Science.gov

Sample records for lytic cycle inducing

  1. Lytic Cycle of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Black, Michael W.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular pathogen within the phylum Apicomplexa. This protozoan parasite is one of the most widespread, with a broad host range including many birds and mammals and a geographic range that is nearly worldwide. While infection of healthy adults is usually relatively mild, serious disease can result in utero or when the host is immunocompromised. This sophisticated eukaryote has many specialized features that make it well suited to its intracellular lifestyle. In this review, we describe the current knowledge of how the asexual tachyzoite stage of Toxoplasma attaches to, invades, replicates in, and exits the host cell. Since this process is closely analogous to the way in which viruses reproduce, we refer to it as the Toxoplasma “lytic cycle.” PMID:10974128

  2. Chlorpyrifos Induces the Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle Activator BZLF-1 via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling; Xie, Fei; Wang, Ting-ting; Liu, Meng-yu; Li, Jia-la; Shang, Lei; Deng, Zi-xuan; Zhao, Peng-xiang; Ma, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for the control of a wide variety of pests, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by OPs may be involved in the toxicity of various pesticides. Previous studies have demonstrated that a reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) could be induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether OPs could reactivate EBV through ROS accumulation. The Raji cells were treated with chlorpyrifos (CPF), one of the most commonly used OPs. Oxidative stress indicators and the expression of the EBV immediate-early gene BZLF-1 were determined after CPF treatment. Our results show that CPF induces oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, accompanied by an increase in ROS production, DNA damage, glutathione (GSH) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity. Moreover, CPF treatment significantly enhances the expression of BZLF-1, and the increased BZLF-1 expression was ameliorated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) incubation. These results suggest that OPs could contribute to the reactivation of the EBV lytic cycle through ROS induction, a process that may play an important role in the development of EBV-associated diseases. PMID:26257840

  3. ARID3B: a Novel Regulator of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer J.; Boyne, James R.; Paulus, Christina; Jackson, Brian R.; Nevels, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of commonly fatal malignancies of immunocompromised individuals, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). A hallmark of all herpesviruses is their biphasic life cycle—viral latency and the productive lytic cycle—and it is well established that reactivation of the KSHV lytic cycle is associated with KS pathogenesis. Therefore, a thorough appreciation of the mechanisms that govern reactivation is required to better understand disease progression. The viral protein replication and transcription activator (RTA) is the KSHV lytic switch protein due to its ability to drive the expression of various lytic genes, leading to reactivation of the entire lytic cycle. While the mechanisms for activating lytic gene expression have received much attention, how RTA impacts cellular function is less well understood. To address this, we developed a cell line with doxycycline-inducible RTA expression and applied stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. Using this methodology, we have identified a novel cellular protein (AT-rich interacting domain containing 3B [ARID3B]) whose expression was enhanced by RTA and that relocalized to replication compartments upon lytic reactivation. We also show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or overexpression of ARID3B led to an enhancement or inhibition of lytic reactivation, respectively. Furthermore, DNA affinity and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that ARID3B specifically interacts with A/T-rich elements in the KSHV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt), and this was dependent on lytic cycle reactivation. Therefore, we have identified a novel cellular protein whose expression is enhanced by KSHV RTA with the ability to inhibit KSHV reactivation. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of fatal malignancies of

  4. The lytic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii: 15 years later

    PubMed Central

    Blader, Ira; Coleman, Bradley; Chen, Chun-Ti; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the clinical and pathological consequence of acute infection with the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Symptoms result from tissue destruction that accompanies lytic parasite growth. This review updates current understanding of the host cell invasion, parasite replication and eventual egress that comprise the lytic cycle, as well as the ways T. gondii manipulates host cells to assure survival. Since the publication of a previous iteration of this review 15 years ago, important advances have been made in our molecular understanding of parasite growth and mechanisms of host cell egress, and knowledge of the parasite’s manipulation of the host has rapidly progressed. Here we cover molecular advances and current conceptual frameworks that include each of these topics, with an eye to what might be known 15 years from now. PMID:26332089

  5. Mitochondrial behaviour throughout the lytic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ovciarikova, Jana; Lemgruber, Leandro; Stilger, Krista L; Sullivan, William J; Sheiner, Lilach

    2017-02-16

    Mitochondria distribution in cells controls cellular physiology in health and disease. Here we describe the mitochondrial morphology and positioning found in the different stages of the lytic cycle of the eukaryotic single-cell parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The lytic cycle, driven by the tachyzoite life stage, is responsible for acute toxoplasmosis. It is known that whilst inside a host cell the tachyzoite maintains its single mitochondrion at its periphery. We found that upon parasite transition from the host cell to the extracellular matrix, mitochondrion morphology radically changes, resulting in a reduction in peripheral proximity. This change is reversible upon return to the host, indicating that an active mechanism maintains the peripheral positioning found in the intracellular stages. Comparison between the two states by electron microscopy identified regions of coupling between the mitochondrion outer membrane and the parasite pellicle, whose features suggest the presence of membrane contact sites, and whose abundance changes during the transition between intra- and extra-cellular states. These novel observations pave the way for future research to identify molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial distribution in Toxoplasma and the consequences of these mitochondrion changes on parasite physiology.

  6. Mitochondrial behaviour throughout the lytic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Ovciarikova, Jana; Lemgruber, Leandro; Stilger, Krista L.; Sullivan, William J.; Sheiner, Lilach

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria distribution in cells controls cellular physiology in health and disease. Here we describe the mitochondrial morphology and positioning found in the different stages of the lytic cycle of the eukaryotic single-cell parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The lytic cycle, driven by the tachyzoite life stage, is responsible for acute toxoplasmosis. It is known that whilst inside a host cell the tachyzoite maintains its single mitochondrion at its periphery. We found that upon parasite transition from the host cell to the extracellular matrix, mitochondrion morphology radically changes, resulting in a reduction in peripheral proximity. This change is reversible upon return to the host, indicating that an active mechanism maintains the peripheral positioning found in the intracellular stages. Comparison between the two states by electron microscopy identified regions of coupling between the mitochondrion outer membrane and the parasite pellicle, whose features suggest the presence of membrane contact sites, and whose abundance changes during the transition between intra- and extra-cellular states. These novel observations pave the way for future research to identify molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial distribution in Toxoplasma and the consequences of these mitochondrion changes on parasite physiology. PMID:28202940

  7. A viral gene that activates lytic cycle expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Yuan, Yan; Zhu, Fanxiu; Miller, George

    1998-01-01

    Herpesviruses exist in two states, latency and a lytic productive cycle. Here we identify an immediate-early gene encoded by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus eight (HHV8) that activates lytic cycle gene expression from the latent viral genome. The gene is a homologue of Rta, a transcriptional activator encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). KSHV/Rta activated KSHV early lytic genes, including virus-encoded interleukin 6 and polyadenylated nuclear RNA, and a late gene, small viral capsid antigen. In cells dually infected with Epstein–Barr virus and KSHV, each Rta activated only autologous lytic cycle genes. Expression of viral cytokines under control of the KSHV/Rta gene is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:9724796

  8. Activation and repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycles by short- and medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Gorres, Kelly L; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan; Miller, George

    2014-07-01

    The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. Importance: Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota. Small

  9. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. Results We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. Conclusions A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds

  10. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    PubMed

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  11. Inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by moronic acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chang, Yung-Fu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle to activate the transcription of viral lytic genes. Our immunoblotting and flow cytometry analyses find that moronic acid, found in galls of Rhus chinensis and Brazilian propolis, at 10microM inhibits the expression of Rta, Zta, and an EBV early protein, EA-D, after lytic induction with sodium butyrate. This study also finds that moronic acids inhibits the capacity of Rta to activate a promoter that contains an Rta-response element, indicating that moronic acid interferes with the function of Rta. On the other hand, moronic acid does not appear to influence with the transactivation function of Zta. Therefore, the lack of expression of Zta and EA-D after moronic acid treatment is attributable to the inhibition of the transactivation functions of Rta. Because the expression of Zta, EA-D and many EBV lytic genes depends on Rta, the treatment of P3HR1 cells with moronic acid substantially reduces the numbers of EBV particles produced by the cells after lytic induction. This study suggests that moronic acid is a new structural lead for anti-EBV drug development.

  12. Modulation of Lactobacillus casei bacteriophage A2 lytic/lysogenic cycles by binding of Gp25 to the early lytic mRNA.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Begoña; Escobedo, Susana; Alonso, Juan C; Suárez, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    The genetic switch of Lactobacillus casei bacteriophage A2 is regulated by the CI protein, which represses the early lytic promoter PR and Cro that abolishes expression from the lysogenic promoter PL . Lysogens contain equivalent cI and cro-gp25 mRNA concentrations, i.e., CI only partially represses P(R), predicting a lytic cycle dominance. However, A2 generates stable lysogens. This may be due to Gp25 binding to the cro-gp25 mRNA between the ribosomal binding site and the cro start codon, which abolishes its translation. Upon lytic cycle induction, CI is partially degraded, cro-gp25 mRNA levels increase, and Cro accumulates, launching viral progeny production. The concomitant concentration increase of Gp25 restricts cro mRNA translation, which, together with the low but detectable levels of CI late during the lytic cycle, promotes reentry of part of the cell population into the lysogenic cycle, thus explaining the low proportion of L. casei lysogens that become lysed (∼ 1%). A2 shares its genetic switch structure with many other Firmicutes phages. The data presented may constitute a model of how these phages make the decision for lysis versus lysogeny.

  13. Stimulus duration and response time independently influence the kinetics of lytic cycle reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Countryman, Jill; Gradoville, Lyndle; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Ye, Jianjiang; Heston, Lee; Himmelfarb, Sarah; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2009-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can be reactivated from latency into the lytic cycle by many stimuli believed to operate by different mechanisms. Cell lines containing EBV differ in their responses to inducing stimuli, yet all stimuli require de novo protein synthesis (44). A crucial step preliminary to identifying these proteins and determining when they are required is to measure the duration of stimulus and response time needed for activation of expression of EBV BRLF1 and BZLF1, the earliest viral indicators of reactivation. Here we show, with four EBV-containing cell lines that respond to different inducing agents, that stimuli that are effective at reactivating EBV can be divided into two main groups. The histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A require a relatively long period of exposure, from 2 to 4 h or longer. Phorbol esters, anti-immunoglobulin G (anti-IgG), and, surprisingly, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine require short exposures of 15 min or less. The cell/virus background influences the response time. Expression of the EBV BZLF1 and BRLF1 genes can be detected before 2 h in Akata cells treated with anti-IgG, but both long- and short-duration stimuli required 4 or more hr to activate BZLF1 and BRLF1 expression in HH514-16, Raji, or B95-8 cells. Thus, stimulus duration and response time are independent variables. Neither stimulus duration nor response time can be predicted by the number of cells activated into the lytic cycle. These experiments shed new light on the earliest events leading to lytic cycle reactivation of EBV.

  14. Induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1: involvement of IL-10 and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Di; Zeng, Yi; Qian, Chao; Huang, Zan; Lv, Zhigang; Cheng, Lin; Yao, Shuihong; Tang, Qiao; Chen, Xiuying; Lu, Chun

    2008-03-01

    Previously, we identified that both human herpesvirus 6 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat were important cofactors that activated lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Here, we further investigated the potential of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to influence KSHV replication. We demonstrated that HSV-1 was a potentially important factor in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, as determined by production of lytic phase mRNA transcripts, viral proteins and infectious viral particles in BCBL-1 cells. These results were further confirmed by an RNA interference experiment using small interfering RNA targeting KSHV ORF50 and a luciferase reporter assay testing ORF50 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Finally, we discovered that production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-4 partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Our data present the first direct evidence that HSV-1 can activate KSHV lytic replication and suggest a role of HSV-1 in KSHV pathogenesis.

  15. Targeted therapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma using low-dose gemcitabine-induced lytic activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hyemi; Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Pil-Gu; Dong, Seung Myung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyunki; Chong, Curtis R; Liu, Jun O; Chen, Jianmeng; Ambinder, Richard F; Hayward, S Diane; Park, Jeon Han; Lee, Jae Myun

    2015-10-13

    The constant presence of the viral genome in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric cancers (EBVaGCs) suggests the applicability of novel EBV-targeted therapies. The antiviral nucleoside drug, ganciclovir (GCV), is effective only in the context of the viral lytic cycle in the presence of EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (TK)/protein kinase (PK) expression. In this study, screening of the Johns Hopkins Drug Library identified gemcitabine as a candidate for combination treatment with GCV. Pharmacological induction of EBV-TK or PK in EBVaGC-originated tumor cells were used to study combination treatment with GCV in vitro and in vivo. Gemcitabine was found to be a lytic inducer via activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)/p53 genotoxic stress pathway in EBVaGC. Using an EBVaGC mouse model and a [125I] fialuridine (FIAU)-based lytic activation imaging system, we evaluated gemcitabine-induced lytic activation in an in vivo system and confirmed the efficacy of gemcitabine-GCV combination treatment. This viral enzyme-targeted anti-tumor strategy may provide a new therapeutic approach for EBVaGCs.

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Open Reading Frame 50/Rta Protein Activates the Entire Viral Lytic Cycle in the HH-B2 Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Line†

    PubMed Central

    Gradoville, Lyndle; Gerlach, Jennifer; Grogan, Elizabeth; Shedd, Duane; Nikiforow, Sarah; Metroka, Craig; Miller, George

    2000-01-01

    Rta, the gene product of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encoded mainly in open reading frame 50 (ORF50), is capable of activating expression of viral lytic cycle genes. What was not demonstrated in previous studies was whether KSHV Rta was competent to initiate the entire viral lytic life cycle including lytic viral DNA replication, late-gene expression with appropriate kinetics, and virus release. In HH-B2, a newly established primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell line, KSHV ORF50 behaved as an immediate-early gene and autostimulated its own expression. Expression of late genes, ORF65, and K8.1 induced by KSHV Rta was eliminated by phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of viral DNA polymerase. Transfection of KSHV Rta increased the production of encapsidated DNase-resistant viral DNA from HH-B2 cells. Thus, introduction of an ORF50 expression plasmid is sufficient to drive the lytic cycle to completion in cultured PEL cells. PMID:10846108

  17. The Cellular Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated Kinase Promotes Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation in Response to Multiple Different Types of Lytic Reactivation-Inducing Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Hagemeier, Stacy R.; Barlow, Elizabeth A.; Meng, Qiao

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-to-lytic switch is mediated by the viral proteins BZLF1 (Z), BRLF1 (R), and BRRF1 (Na). Since we previously showed that DNA-damaging agents (including chemotherapy and irradiation) can induce EBV lytic reactivation and recently demonstrated that wild-type p53 contributes to lytic reactivation, we investigated the role of the ATM kinase during EBV reactivation. ATM phosphorylates and activates p53, as well as numerous other substrates involved in the cellular DNA damage response. Using an ATM inhibitor (KU55933), we found that ATM activity is required for efficient induction of EBV lytic gene expression by a variety of different stimuli, including a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) cytokine, a demethylating agent (5-azacytidine), B cell receptor engagement with anti-IgG antibody, hydrogen peroxide, and the proteosome inhibitor bortezomib. In EBV-infected AGS (gastric) cells, knockdown of ATM, or p53, expression inhibits EBV reactivation. Conversely, treatment of these cells with nutlin-3 (which activates p53 and ATM) robustly induces lytic reactivation in a p53- and ATM-dependent manner. The ability of the EBV R and Na proteins to induce lytic reactivation in EBV-infected AGS cells is ATM dependent. However, overexpression of Z induces lytic gene expression in the presence or absence of ATM activity. Our results suggest that ATM enhances Z promoter activity in the context of the intact EBV genome and that p53 contributes to the ATM effect. Nevertheless, since we found that ATM inhibitors also reduce lytic reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells that have no p53, additional ATM substrates must also contribute to the ATM effect. PMID:23015717

  18. Linking the lytic and lysogenic bacteriophage cycles to environmental conditions, host physiology and their variability in coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Maurice, C F; Bouvier, C; de Wit, R; Bouvier, T

    2013-09-01

    Changes in environmental conditions and prokaryote physiology can strongly affect the dynamics of both the lysogenic and lytic bacteriophage replication cycles in aquatic systems. However, it remains unclear whether it is the nature, amplitude or frequency of these changes that alter the phage replication cycles. We performed an annual survey of three Mediterranean lagoons with contrasting levels of chlorophyll a concentration and salinity to explore how these cues and their variability influence either replication cycle. The lytic cycle was always detected and showed seasonal patterns, whereas the lysogenic cycle was often undetected and highly variable. The lytic cycle was influenced by environmental and prokaryotic physiological cues, increasing with concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, chlorophyll a, and the proportion of respiring cells, and decreasing with the proportion of damaged cells. In contrast, lysogeny was not explained by the magnitude of any environmental or physiological parameter, but increased with the amplitude of change in prokaryote physiology. Our study suggests that both cycles are regulated by distinct factors: the lytic cycle is dependent on environmental parameters and host physiology, while lysogeny is dependent on the variability of prokaryote physiology. This could lead to the contrasting patterns observed between both cycles in aquatic systems.

  19. Zidovudine-based lytic-inducing chemotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Ulas Darda; Diaz, Luis A; Ashlock, Brittany; Toomey, Ngoc; Cabral, Lisa; Bayraktar, Soley; Pereira, Denise; Dittmer, Dirk P; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphomas with lytic-inducing agents is an attractive targeted approach for eliminating virus-infected tumor cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is an excellent substrate for EBV-thymidine kinase: it can induce EBV lytic gene expression and apoptosis in primary EBV+ lymphoma cell lines. We hypothesized that the combination of AZT with lytic-inducing chemotherapy agents would be effective in treating EBV+ lymphomas. We report a retrospective analysis of 19 patients with aggressive EBV+ non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including nine cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma (AIDS-PCNSL) treated with AZT-based chemotherapy. Our results demonstrate that high-dose AZT-methotrexate is efficacious in treating highly aggressive systemic EBV+ lymphomas in the upfront setting. In primary EBV+ lymphoma cell lines, the combination of AZT with hydroxyurea resulted in synergistic EBV lytic induction and cell death. Further, AZT-hydroxyurea treatment resulted in dramatic responses in patients with AIDS-PCNSL. The combination of AZT with chemotherapy, especially lytic-inducing agents, should be explored further in clinical trials for the treatment of EBV-related lymphomas.

  20. Zidovudine-based lytic-inducing chemotherapy for Epstein–Barr virus-related lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas Darda; Diaz, Luis A.; Ashlock, Brittany; Toomey, Ngoc; Cabral, Lisa; Bayraktar, Soley; Pereira, Denise; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphomas with lytic-inducing agents is an attractive targeted approach for eliminating virus-infected tumor cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is an excellent substrate for EBV-thymidine kinase: it can induce EBV lytic gene expression and apoptosis in primary EBV+ lymphoma cell lines. We hypothesized that the combination of AZT with lytic-inducing chemotherapy agents would be effective in treating EBV+ lymphomas. We report a retrospective analysis of 19 patients with aggressive EBV+ non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including nine cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma (AIDSPCNSL) treated with AZT-based chemotherapy. Our results demonstrate that high-dose AZT–methotrexate is efficacious in treating highly aggressive systemic EBV+ lymphomas in the upfront setting. In primary EBV+ lymphoma cell lines, the combination of AZT with hydroxyurea resulted in synergistic EBV lytic induction and cell death. Further, AZT–hydroxyurea treatment resulted in dramatic responses in patients with AIDSPCNSL. The combination of AZT with chemotherapy, especially lytic-inducing agents, should be explored further in clinical trials for the treatment of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:23837493

  1. De novo protein synthesis is required for lytic cycle reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus, but not Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, in response to histone deacetylase inhibitors and protein kinase C agonists.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjiang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Daigle, Derek; Miller, George

    2007-09-01

    The oncogenic human gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), are latent in cultured lymphoma cells. We asked whether reactivation from latency of either virus requires de novo protein synthesis. Using Northern blotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, we measured the kinetics of expression of the lytic cycle activator genes and determined whether abundance of mRNAs encoding these genes from either virus was reduced by treatment with cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis. CHX blocked expression of mRNAs of EBV BZLF1 and BRLF1, the two EBV lytic cycle activator genes, when HH514-16 Burkitt lymphoma cells were treated with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, sodium butyrate or trichostatin A, or a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine. CHX also inhibited EBV lytic cycle activation in B95-8 marmoset lymphoblastoid cells by phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA). EBV lytic cycle induction became resistant to CHX between 4 and 6 h after application of the inducing stimulus. KSHV lytic cycle activation, as assessed by ORF50 mRNA expression, was rapidly induced by the HDAC inhibitors, sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, in HH-B2 primary effusion lymphoma cells. In HH-B2 cells, CHX did not inhibit, but enhanced, expression of the KSHV lytic cycle activator gene, ORF50. In BC-1, a primary effusion lymphoma cell line that is dually infected with EBV and KSHV, CHX blocked EBV BRLF1 lytic gene expression induced by TPA and sodium butyrate; KSHV ORF50 mRNA induced simultaneously in the same cells by the same inducing stimuli was resistant to CHX. The experiments show, for the cell lines and inducing agents studied, that the EBV BZLF1 and BRLF1 genes do not behave with "immediate-early" kinetics upon reactivation from latency. KSHV ORF50 is a true "immediate-early" gene. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors and TPA induce lytic cycle

  2. An Sp1 response element in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 50 promoter mediates lytic cycle induction by butyrate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjiang; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can be driven into the lytic cycle in vitro by phorbol esters and sodium butyrate. This report begins to analyze the process by which butyrate activates the promoter of KSHV open reading frame 50 (ORF50), the key viral regulator of the KSHV latency to lytic cycle switch. A short fragment of the promoter, 134 nucleotides upstream of the translational start of ORF50, retained basal uninduced activity and conferred maximal responsiveness to sodium butyrate. The butyrate response element was mapped to a consensus Sp1-binding site. By means of electrophoretic mobility shift assays, both Sp1 and Sp3 were shown to form complexes in vitro with the ORF50 promoter at the Sp1 site. Butyrate induced the formation of a group of novel complexes, including several Sp3-containing complexes, one Sp1-containing complex, and several other complexes that were not identified with antibodies to Sp1 or Sp3. Formation of all butyrate-induced DNA-protein complexes was mediated by the consensus Sp1 site. In insect and mammalian cell lines, Sp1 significantly activated the ORF50 promoter linked to luciferase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a PEL cell line showed that butyrate induced Sp1, CBP, and p300 binding to the ORF50 promoter in vivo in an on-off manner. The results suggest that induction of the KSHV lytic cycle by butyrate is mediated through interactions at the Sp1/Sp3 site located 103 to 112 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation of ORF50 presumably by enhancing the binding of Sp1 to this site.

  3. Disruption of the p53-p21 pathway inhibits efficiency of the lytic-replication cycle of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Zhu, Meng; Zhang, Hao; Yi, Ting; Klena, John D; Peng, Yihong

    2012-10-01

    Cellular p53 and its downstream mediator p21, the major cellular growth suppression and DNA repair markers, have recently been implicated in viral amplification. Here, we show that herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection of both HCT116 p53(+/+)and NIH3T3 cells resulted in sustained increases of p21. HSV-2 infection did not increase cellular p53 expression, but led to phosphorylation of this protein at Ser20. This phosphorylation was accompanied by the increase of p21 protein levels. Furthermore, specific knockdown of endogenous p21 by siRNAs severely impaired virus production represented by HSV envelope glycoprotein B (gB) expression and progeny virus titers. Disruption of the p53-p21 pathway by either knocking down p53 in HCT116 p53(+/+) and NIH3T3 cells or using p53-deficient HCT116 p53(-/-) cells, led to a significant reduction of HSV-2 production. Together, these results suggest that the p53-p21 pathway is required for efficient HSV-2 lytic replication cycle. Because HSV infection induces the G0/G1 phase arrest at the early step of lytic-replication cycle, we propose that HSV-2 might hijack the cellular p53-p21 pathway to arrest the host cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, blocking cellular DNA synthesis, for its own benefit, i.e., to favor its own viral replication by avoiding competition in generating viral nucleotide pools.

  4. Metabolic Cooperation of Glucose and Glutamine Is Essential for the Lytic Cycle of Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Richard; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite infecting nearly all warm-blooded organisms. Asexual reproduction of the parasite within its host cells is achieved by consecutive lytic cycles, which necessitates biogenesis of significant energy and biomass. Here we show that glucose and glutamine are the two major physiologically important nutrients used for the synthesis of macromolecules (ATP, nucleic acid, proteins, and lipids) in T. gondii, and either of them is sufficient to ensure the parasite survival. The parasite can counteract genetic ablation of its glucose transporter by increasing the flux of glutamine-derived carbon through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and by concurrently activating gluconeogenesis, which guarantee a continued biogenesis of ATP and biomass for host-cell invasion and parasite replication, respectively. In accord, a pharmacological inhibition of glutaminolysis or oxidative phosphorylation arrests the lytic cycle of the glycolysis-deficient mutant, which is primarily a consequence of impaired invasion due to depletion of ATP. Unexpectedly, however, intracellular parasites continue to proliferate, albeit slower, notwithstanding a simultaneous deprivation of glucose and glutamine. A growth defect in the glycolysis-impaired mutant is caused by a compromised synthesis of lipids, which cannot be counterbalanced by glutamine but can be restored by acetate. Consistently, supplementation of parasite cultures with exogenous acetate can amend the lytic cycle of the glucose transport mutant. Such plasticity in the parasite's carbon flux enables a growth-and-survival trade-off in assorted nutrient milieus, which may underlie the promiscuous survival of T. gondii tachyzoites in diverse host cells. Our results also indicate a convergence of parasite metabolism with cancer cells.

  5. Suppression of the LMP2A target gene, EGR-1, protects Hodgkin's lymphoma cells from entry to the EBV lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Vockerodt, Martina; Wei, Wenbin; Nagy, Eszter; Prouzova, Zuzana; Schrader, Alexandra; Kube, Dieter; Rowe, Martin; Woodman, Ciaran B; Murray, Paul G

    2013-08-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is unusual among B cell lymphomas, in so far as the malignant Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells lack a functional B cell receptor (BCR), as well as many of the required downstream signalling components. In Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma, HRS cells express the viral latent membrane proteins (LMP)-1 and -2A. LMP2A is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of Hodgkin's lymphoma by providing a surrogate BCR-like survival signal. However, LMP2A has also been shown to induce the virus-replicative cycle in B cells, an event presumably incompatible with lymphomagenesis. In an attempt to resolve this apparent paradox, we compared the transcriptional changes observed in primary HRS cells with those induced by LMP2A and by BCR activation in primary human germinal centre (GC) B cells, the presumed progenitors of HRS cells. We found a subset of genes that were up-regulated by both LMP2A expression and BCR activation but which were down-regulated in primary HRS cells. These genes included EGR1, an immediate-early gene that is required for BCR-induced entry to the virus-replicative cycle. We present data supporting a model for the pathogenesis of EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma in which LMP2A-expressing HRS cells lacking BCR signalling functions cannot induce EGR1 and are consequently protected from entry to the virus lytic cycle. The primary microarray data are available from GEO (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) under series Accession No 46143.

  6. Glutathione diminishes tributyltin- and dibutyltin-induced loss of lytic function in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeralyn J; Davis, McLisa V; Whalen, Margaret M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether reduced glutathione (GSH) was able to alter the negative effects of tributyltin (TBT) or dibutyltin (DBT) on the lytic function of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). The results indicated that the presence of GSH during the exposure of NK cells to TBT or DBT diminished the negative effect of the butyltin on the lytic function of NK cells. This suggests that the interaction of TBT and DBT with functionally relevant sulfhydryl groups in NK cells may be part of the mechanism by which they decrease NK lytic function.

  7. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24176852

  8. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-10-31

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Two Subclasses of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycle Promoters Distinguished by Open Reading Frame 50 Mutant Proteins That Are Deficient in Binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jκ in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jκ protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jκ cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein. PMID:15994769

  10. Two subclasses of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycle promoters distinguished by open reading frame 50 mutant proteins that are deficient in binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-07-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jkappa in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jkappa protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jkappa cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein.

  11. Lytic bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes. PMID:24228223

  12. Molecular Biology of KSHV Lytic Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Uppal, Timsy; Verma, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) primarily persists as a latent episome in infected cells. During latent infection, only a limited number of viral genes are expressed that help to maintain the viral episome and prevent lytic reactivation. The latent KSHV genome persists as a highly ordered chromatin structure with bivalent chromatin marks at the promoter-regulatory region of the major immediate-early gene promoter. Various stimuli can induce chromatin modifications to an active euchromatic epigenetic mark, leading to the expression of genes required for the transition from the latent to the lytic phase of KSHV life cycle. Enhanced replication and transcription activator (RTA) gene expression triggers a cascade of events, resulting in the modulation of various cellular pathways to support viral DNA synthesis. RTA also binds to the origin of lytic DNA replication to recruit viral, as well as cellular, proteins for the initiation of the lytic DNA replication of KSHV. In this review we will discuss some of the pivotal genetic and epigenetic factors that control KSHV reactivation from the transcriptionally restricted latent program. PMID:25594835

  13. Herpes simplex virus 1 DNA is in unstable nucleosomes throughout the lytic infection cycle, and the instability of the nucleosomes is independent of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jonathan J; Schang, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA is chromatinized during latency and consequently regularly digested by micrococcal nuclease (MCN) to nucleosome-size fragments. In contrast, MCN digests HSV-1 DNA in lytically infected cells to mostly heterogeneous sizes. Yet HSV-1 DNA coimmunoprecipitates with histones during lytic infections. We have shown that at 5 h postinfection, most nuclear HSV-1 DNA is in particularly unstable nucleoprotein complexes and consequently is more accessible to MCN than DNA in cellular chromatin. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered at this time in complexes with the biophysical properties of mono- to polynucleosomes following a modified MCN digestion developed to detect potential unstable intermediates. We proposed that most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes during lytic infections. Physiologically, nucleosome assembly typically associates with DNA replication, although DNA replication transiently disrupts nucleosomes. It therefore remained unclear whether the instability of the HSV-1 nucleoprotein complexes was related to the ongoing viral DNA replication. Here we tested whether HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes before, during, or after the peak of viral DNA replication or when HSV-1 DNA replication is inhibited. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered in complexes fractionating as mono- to polynucleosomes from nuclei harvested at 2, 5, 7, or 9 h after infection, even if viral DNA replication was inhibited. Therefore, most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes throughout the lytic replication cycle, and the instability of these complexes is surprisingly independent of HSV-1 DNA replication. The specific accessibility of nuclear HSV-1 DNA, however, varied at different times after infection.

  14. Ocean acidification and viral replication cycles: Frequency of lytically infected and lysogenic cells during a mesocosm experiment in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiola, Anastasia; Pitta, Paraskevi; Giannakourou, Antonia; Bourdin, Guillaume; Marro, Sophie; Maugendre, Laure; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Gazeau, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    The frequency of lytically infected and lysogenic cells (FLIC and FLC, respectively) was estimated during an in situ mesocosm experiment studying the impact of ocean acidification on the plankton community of a low nutrient low chlorophyll (LNLC) system in the north-western Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche, France) in February/March 2013. No direct effect of elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) on viral replication cycles could be detected. FLC variability was negatively correlated to heterotrophic bacterial and net community production as well as the ambient bacterial abundance, confirming that lysogeny is a prevailing life strategy under unfavourable-for-the-hosts conditions. Further, the phytoplankton community, assessed by chlorophyll a concentration and the release of >0.4 μm transparent exopolymeric particles, was correlated with the occurrence of lysogeny, indicating a possible link between photosynthetic processes and bacterial growth. Higher FLC was found occasionally at the highest pCO2-treated mesocosm in parallel to subtle differences in the phytoplankton community. This observation suggests that elevated pCO2 could lead to short-term alterations in lysogenic dynamics coupled to phytoplankton-derived processes. Correlation of FLIC with any environmental parameter could have been obscured by the sampling time or the synchronization of lysis to microbial processes not assessed in this experiment. Furthermore, alterations in microbial and viral assemblage composition and gene expression could be a confounding factor. Viral-induced modifications in organic matter flow affect bacterial growth and could interact with ocean acidification with unpredictable ecological consequences.

  15. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapson, Andrew C.; Gee, Michelle L.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2016-12-01

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  16. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rapson, Andrew C; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A; Smith, Trevor A

    2016-09-28

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  17. Role of protein kinase C in TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Abraham B; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposure of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminishes their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C(PKC) as well as MAPK activity. TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposure. TBT caused a 2–3-fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM (16–98 ng/ml),indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposure. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells, validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that, in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked, there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT.However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells.

  18. CD8 T cells protect adult naive mice from JEV-induced morbidity via lytic function

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Amanpreet Singh; Agrawal, Tanvi; Biswas, Moanaro; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Rath, Satyajit; George, Anna; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.

    2017-01-01

    Following Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection neutralizing antibodies are shown to provide protection in a significant proportion of cases, but not all, suggesting additional components of immune system might also contribute to elicit protective immune response. Here we have characterized the role of T cells in offering protection in adult mice infected with JEV. Mice lacking α/β–T cells (TCRβ–null) are highly susceptible and die over 10–18 day period as compared to the wild-type (WT) mice which are resistant. This is associated with high viral load, higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and breach in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Infected WT mice do not show a breach in BBB; however, in contrast to TCRβ-null, they show the presence of T cells in the brain. Using adoptive transfer of cells with specific genetic deficiencies we see that neither the presence of CD4 T cells nor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 or interferon-gamma have any significant role in offering protection from primary infection. In contrast, we show that CD8 T cell deficiency is more critical as absence of CD8 T cells alone increases mortality in mice infected with JEV. Further, transfer of T cells from beige mice with defects in granular lytic function into TCRβ-null mice shows poor protection implicating granule-mediated target cell lysis as an essential component for survival. In addition, for the first time we report that γ/δ-T cells also make significant contribution to confer protection from JEV infection. Our data show that effector CD8 T cells play a protective role during primary infection possibly by preventing the breach in BBB and neuronal damage. PMID:28151989

  19. Construction of a lytically replicating Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Budt, Matthias; Hristozova, Tsvetana; Hille, Georg; Berger, Katrin; Brune, Wolfram

    2011-10-01

    Karposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is found predominantly in a latent state in most cell types, impeding investigations of the lytic replication cycle. Here, we engineered the cloned KSHV genome, bacterial artificial chromosome 36 (BAC36), to enforce constitutive expression of the main lytic switch regulator, the replication and transcription activator (RTA) (open reading frame 50 [ORF50]). The resulting virus, KSHV-lyt, activated by default the lytic cycle and replicated to high titers in various cells. Using KSHV-lyt, we showed that ORF33 (encoding a tegument protein) is essential for lytic KSHV replication in cell culture, but ORF73 (encoding the latent nuclear antigen [LANA]) is not. Thus, KSHV-lyt should be highly useful to study viral gene function during lytic replication.

  20. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, B.; Silveira, C. B.; Bailey, B. A.; Barott, K.; Cantu, V. A.; Cobián-Güemes, A. G.; Coutinho, F. H.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Felts, B.; Furby, K. A.; George, E. E.; Green, K. T.; Gregoracci, G. B.; Haas, A. F.; Haggerty, J. M.; Hester, E. R.; Hisakawa, N.; Kelly, L. W.; Lim, Y. W.; Little, M.; Luque, A.; McDole-Somera, T.; McNair, K.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Quistad, S. D.; Robinett, N. L.; Sala, E.; Salamon, P.; Sanchez, S. E.; Sandin, S.; Silva, G. G. Z.; Smith, J.; Sullivan, C.; Thompson, C.; Vermeij, M. J. A.; Youle, M.; Young, C.; Zgliczynski, B.; Brainard, R.; Edwards, R. A.; Nulton, J.; Thompson, F.; Rohwer, F.

    2016-03-01

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator-prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus ‘more microbes, fewer viruses’.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)–specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress–dependent and –independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress. PMID:21849482

  2. HIV-1 Vpr Inhibits Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication by Inducing MicroRNA miR-942-5p and Activating NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qin; Shen, Chenyou; Qin, Jie; Li, Wan; Hu, Minmin; Lu, Hongmei; Qin, Di; Zhu, Jianzhong; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is required for the development of several AIDS-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The high incidence of AIDS-KS has been ascribed to the interaction of KSHV and HIV-1. We have previously shown that HIV-1-secreted proteins Tat and Nef regulate the KSHV life cycle and synergize with KSHV oncogenes to promote angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here, we examined the regulation of KSHV latency by HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr). We found that soluble Vpr inhibits the expression of KSHV lytic transcripts and proteins, as well as viral particle production by activating NF-κB signaling following internalization into PEL cells. By analyzing the expression profiles of microRNAs combined with target search by bioinformatics and luciferase reporter analyses, we identified a Vpr-upregulated cellular microRNA (miRNA), miR-942-5p, that directly targeted IκBα. Suppression of miR-942-5p relieved the expression of IκBα and reduced Vpr inhibition of KSHV lytic replication, while overexpression of miR-942-5p enhanced Vpr inhibition of KSHV lytic replication. Our findings collectively illustrate that, by activating NF-κB signaling through upregulating a cellular miRNA to target IκBα, internalized HIV-1 Vpr inhibits KSHV lytic replication. These results have demonstrated an essential role of Vpr in the life cycle of KSHV. IMPORTANCE Coinfection by HIV-1 promotes the aggressive growth of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). In this study, we have shown that soluble HIV-1 Vpr inhibits KSHV lytic replication by activating NF-κB signaling following internalization into PEL cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that a cellular microRNA upregulated by Vpr, miR-942-5p, directly targeted IκBα. Suppression of miR-942-5p relieved IκBα expression and reduced Vpr inhibition

  3. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus and cellular gene expression during the early phases of Epstein-Barr virus lytic induction.

    PubMed

    Auburn, Helen; Zuckerman, Mark; Smith, Melvyn

    2016-11-01

    In order to develop novel host/pathogen real-time PCR assays for routine diagnostic use, early gene expression patterns from both Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Raji cells were examined after inducing the lytic life cycle using 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol ester and sodium butyrate. Real-time PCR identified several highly induced (>90-fold) EBV lytic genes over a 48 h time course during the lytic induction phase. Latent genes were induced at low levels during this phase. The cellular response to lytic viral replication is poorly understood. Whole human genome microarray analysis identified 113 cellular genes regulated twofold or more by EBV, including 63 upregulated and 46 downregulated genes, over a 24 h time course post-induction. The most upregulated gene was CHI3L1, a chitinase-3-like 1 protein (18.1-fold; P<0.0084), and the most downregulated gene was TYMS, a thymidylate synthetase (-7.6-fold). Gene Ontology enrichment analysis using MetaCore software revealed cell cycle (core), cell cycle (role of anaphase-promoting complex) in cell cycle regulation) and lymphatic diseases as the most significantly represented biological network processes, canonical pathways and disease biomarkers, respectively. Chemotaxis, DNA damage and inflammation (IL-4 signalling) together with lymphoproliferative disorders and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were significantly represented biological processes and disease biomarkers.

  4. Glycolysis, Glutaminolysis and Fatty Acid Synthesis are Required for Distinct Stages of KSHV Lytic Replication.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Erica L; Pulliam, Thomas H; Dimaio, Terri A; Thalhofer, Angel B; Delgado, Tracie; Lagunoff, Michael

    2017-03-08

    Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). KSHV infection induces and requires multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis (FAS) for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. To determine the metabolic requirements for productive KSHV infection, we induced lytic replication in the presence of inhibitors of different metabolic pathways. We found that glycolysis, glutaminolysis and FAS are all required for maximal KSHV virus production and that these pathways appear to participate in virus production at different stages of the viral life cycle. Glycolysis and glutaminolysis, but not FAS, inhibit viral genome replication and interestingly, are required for different early steps of lytic gene expression. Glycolysis is necessary for early gene transcription while glutaminolysis is necessary for early gene translation, but not transcription. Inhibition of FAS resulted in decreased production of extracellular virions, but did not reduce intracellular genome levels or block intracellular virion production. However, in the presence of FAS inhibitors, the intracellular virions are non-infectious indicating that FAS is required for virion assembly or maturation. KS tumors support both latent and lytic KSHV replication. Previous work has shown that multiple cellular metabolic pathways are required for latency, and we now show that these metabolic pathways are required for efficient lytic replication providing novel therapeutic avenues for KS tumors.IMPORTANCE KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma, the most common tumor of AIDS patients. KS spindle cells, the main tumor cells, all contain KSHV, mostly in the latent state where there is limited viral gene expression. However, a percentage of spindle cells support lytic replication and production of virus and these cells are thought to contribute to overall tumor formation. Our previous findings showed that

  5. Fine-Tuning of the Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Life Cycle in Neighboring Cells through the RTA-JAG1-Notch Pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiheng; Liang, Deguang; Sun, Rui; Lan, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic pathogen that displays latent and lytic life cycles. In KS lesions, infiltrated immune cells, secreted viral and/or cellular cytokines, and hypoxia orchestrate a chronic pro-lytic microenvironment that can promote KSHV reactivation. However, only a small subset of viruses spontaneously undergoes lytic replication in this pro-lytic microenvironment while the majority remains in latency. Here, we show that the expression of the Notch ligand JAG1 is induced by KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA) during reactivation. JAG1 up-regulation activates Notch signaling in neighboring cells and prevents viral lytic replication. The suppression of JAG1 and Notch1 with inhibitors or small interfering RNA promotes lytic replication in the presence of RTA induction or under conditions of hypoxia. The underlying mechanism involves the Notch downstream effector hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), which directly binds lytic gene promoters and attenuates viral lytic gene expression. RTA interacts with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1), disrupts LEF1/Groucho/TLE suppressive complexes and releases LEF1 to activate JAG1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that cells with viral lytic replication can inhibit KSHV reactivation in neighboring cells through an RTA-JAG1-Notch pathway. These data provide insight into the mechanism by which the virus maintains the balance between lytic and latent infection in the pro-lytic tumor microenvironment. PMID:27760204

  6. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K1 protein: effects on lytic viral replication.

    PubMed

    Lagunoff, M; Lukac, D M; Ganem, D

    2001-07-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) K1 gene encodes a polypeptide bearing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) that is constitutively active for ITAM-based signal transduction. Although ectopic overexpression of K1 in cultured fibroblasts can lead to growth transformation, in vivo this gene is primarily expressed in lymphoid cells undergoing lytic infection. Here we have examined function of K1 in the setting of lytic replication, through the study of K1 mutants lacking functional ITAMs. Expression of such mutants in BJAB cells cotransfected with wild-type K1 results in dramatic inhibition of K1 signal transduction, as judged by impaired activation of Syk kinase and phospholipase C-gamma2 as well as by diminished expression of a luciferase reporter gene dependent upon K1-induced calcium and Ras signaling. Thus, the mutants behave as dominantly acting inhibitors of K1 function. To assess the role of K1 in lytic replication, we introduced these K1 mutants into BCBL-1 cells, a B-cell lymphoma line latently infected with KSHV, and induced lytic replication by ectopic expression of the KSHV ORF50 transactivator. Expression of lytic cycle genes was diminished up to 80% in the presence of a K1 dominant negative mutant. These inhibitory effects could be overridden by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate treatment, indicating that inhibition was not due to irreversible cell injury and suggesting that other signaling events could bypass the block. We conclude that ITAM-dependent signaling by K1 is not absolutely required for lytic reactivation but functions to modestly augment lytic replication in B cells, the natural reservoir of KSHV.

  7. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    PubMed

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  8. Effects of varying duty cycle and pulse width on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced transcranial thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thilo; Raman, Rema; Fisher, David J; Ahadi, Golnaz; Zadicario, Eyal; Voie, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The goal was to test the effects of various combinations of pulse widths (PW) and duty cycles (DC) on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced sonothrombolysis efficacy using an in vitro flow model. An ExAblate™ 4000 HIFU headsystem (InSightec, Inc., Israel) was used. Artificial blood clots were placed into test tubes inside a human calvarium and exposed to pulsatile flow. Four different duty cycles were tested against four different pulse widths. For all study groups, an increase in thrombolysis efficacy could be seen in association with increasing DC and/or PW (p < 0.0001). Using transcranial HIFU, significant thrombolysis can be achieved within seconds and without the use of lytic drugs in vitro. Longer duty cycles in combination with longer pulse widths seem to have the highest potential to optimize clot lysis efficacy.

  9. Specific proteins synthesized during the viral lytic cycle in vaccinia virus-infected HeLa cells: analysis by high-resolution, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, L.; Bravo, R.

    1986-05-01

    The proteins synthesized in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells have been analyzed at different times after infection by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Vaccinia-infected cells present up to 198 polypeptides (138 acidic, isoelectric focusing; 60 basic, nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) not detected in control cells. Cells infected in the presence of cycloheximide show 81 additional polypeptides after cycloheximide removal, resulting in a total estimate of 279 proteins induced after vaccinia infection. The glycoproteins made at various time postinfection were also analyzed. At least 13 proteins labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine were detected in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells.

  10. Specific proteins synthesized during the viral lytic cycle in vaccinia virus-infected HeLa cells: analysis by high-resolution, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, L; Bravo, R

    1986-01-01

    The proteins synthesized in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells have been analyzed at different times after infection by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Vaccinia-infected cells present up to 198 polypeptides (138 acidic, isoelectric focusing; 60 basic, nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) not detected in control cells. Cells infected in the presence of cycloheximide show 81 additional polypeptides after cycloheximide removal, resulting in a total estimate of 279 proteins induced after vaccinia infection. The glycoproteins made at various times postinfection were also analyzed. At least 13 proteins labeled with [3H]glucosamine were detected in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells. Images PMID:3701923

  11. Chromatin dynamics during herpes simplex virus-1 lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Placek, Brandon J; Berger, Shelley L

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a DNA virus that can establish lytic infections in epithelial cells and latent infections in sensory neurons. Upon entry into the nucleus the genome of HSV-1 rapidly associates with histone proteins. Similar to the genomes of the cellular host, HSV-1 is subject to chromatin-based regulation of transcription and replication. However, unlike the host genome, nucleosomes appear to be underrepresented on the HSV genome. During lytic infection, when the genome is transcribed, the HSV-1 chromatin structure appears to be disorganized, and characterized by histone variant sub-types and post-translational modifications representative of active chromatin. In contrast, during latency, when the majority of the viral genome is transcriptionally silent, the chromatin is compacted into a regularly repeating, compact heterochromatic structure. Here we discuss recent studies that underscore the importance of chromatin regulation during the lytic phase of the HSV-1 life-cycle.

  12. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation Activates B Cells Polyclonally and Induces Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression: A Mechanism Underlying Autoimmunity and Its Contribution to Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Keiko; Kumata, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yuji; Satoh, Yukio; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Hara, Sayuri; Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease that results in and is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, and the reactivation of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B lymphocytes induces the differentiation of host B cells into plasma cells. We previously reported that some EBV-infected B cells had thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs) as surface immunoglobulins (Igs), and EBV reactivation induced these TRAb+EBV+ cells to produce TRAbs. EBV reactivation induces Ig production from host B cells. The purpose of the present study was to examine total Ig productions from B cell culture fluids and to detect activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 in culture B cells during EBV reactivation induction and then we discussed the mechanisms of EBV reactivation-induced Ig production in relation to autoimmunity. We showed that the EBV reactivation induces the production of every isotype of Ig and suggested that the Ig production was catalyzed by AID through LMP1 and NF-κB. The results that the amount of IgM was significantly larger compared with IgG suggested the polyclonal B cell activation due to LMP1. We proposed the pathway of EBV reactivation induced Ig production; B cells newly infected with EBV are activated by polyclonal B cell activation and produce Igs through plasma cell differentiation induced by EBV reactivation. LMP1-induced AID enabled B cells to undergo class-switch recombination to produce every isotype of Ig. According to this mechanism, EBV rescues autoreactive B cells to produce autoantibodies, which contribute to the development and exacerbation of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Restarting Lytic Gene Transcription at the Onset of Herpes Simplex Virus Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Anna R; Wilson, Angus C

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes a latent reservoir in neurons of human peripheral nerves. In this quiescent state, the viral genome persists as a circular, histone-associated episome, and transcription of viral lytic cycle genes is largely suppressed through epigenetic processes. Periodically, latent virus undergoes reactivation whereby lytic genes are activated and viral replication occurs. In this Gem, we review recent evidence that mechanisms governing the initial transcription of lytic genes are distinct from those of de novo infection and directly link reactivation to neuronal stress response pathways. We also discuss evidence that lytic cycle gene expression can be uncoupled from the full reactivation program, arguing for a less sharply bimodal definition of latency.

  15. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Limits Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Activation in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Erik R.; Koganti, Siva; Zhi, Jizu; Megyola, Cynthia; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Tangye, Stuart G.; Farrell, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is central to its life cycle and to most EBV-related diseases. However, not every EBV-infected B cell is susceptible to lytic activation. This lack of uniform susceptibility to lytic activation also directly impacts the success of viral oncolytic therapy for EBV cancers, yet determinants of susceptibility to lytic induction signals are not well understood. To determine if host factors influence susceptibility to EBV lytic activation, we developed a technique to separate lytic from refractory cells and reported that EBV lytic activation occurs preferentially in cells with lower levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Using this tool to detect single cells, we now extend the correlation between STAT3 and lytic versus refractory states to EBV-infected circulating B cells in patients with primary EBV infection, leading us to investigate whether STAT3 controls susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. In loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies in EBV-positive B lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cells, we found that the levels of functional STAT3 regulate susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. This prompted us to identify a pool of candidate cellular genes that might be regulated by STAT3 to limit EBV lytic activation. From this pool, we confirmed increases in transcript levels in refractory cells of a set of genes known to participate in transcription repression. Taken together, our findings place STAT3 at a critical crossroads between EBV latency and lytic activation, processes fundamental to EBV lymphomagenesis. PMID:23966384

  16. Development of a lytic peptide derived from BH3-only proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q; Zhao, H; Jiang, Y; Wu, M; Tian, Y; Wang, D; Lao, Y; Xu, N; Li, Z

    2016-01-01

    Despite great advances in cancer therapy, drug resistance is a difficult hurdle to overcome that requires development of anticancer agents with novel and effective modes of action. In a number of studies, lytic peptides have shown remarkable ability to eliminate cancer cells through a different way from traditional treatments. Lytic peptides are positively charged, amphiphilic, and are efficient at binding and disrupting the negatively charged cell membrane of cancer cells. In this study, we described the anticancer properties of a lytic peptide that was developed on the basis of the alignment of amphiphilic BH3 peptides. Our results demonstrated that the positive charge and conformation constraint were favourable for efficient cancer cell elimination. Artificial BCL-2 homology 3 peptides (ABH3) exhibited effective anticancer effects against a series of cancer cell lines in vitro and in HeLa human cervical tumour xenografts in vivo. ABH3 induced cell death in an apoptosis-independent manner through the lytic properties of the peptide that caused disruption of cell membrane. Our results showed that charge tuning and conformation constraining in a lytic peptide could be applied to optimise the anticancer activity of lytic peptides. These results also suggest that ABH3 may be a promising beginning for the development of additional lytic peptides as anticancer reagents. PMID:27551502

  17. Simian virus 40 late proteins possess lytic properties that render them capable of permeabilizing cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Robert; Rusan, Nasser M; Wilbuer, Anne-Kathrin; Norkin, Leonard C; Wadsworth, Patricia; Hebert, Daniel N

    2006-07-01

    Many nonenveloped viruses have evolved an infectious cycle that culminates in the lysis or permeabilization of the host to enable viral release. How these viruses initiate the lytic event is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the simian virus 40 progeny accumulated at the nuclear envelope prior to the permeabilization of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes at a time which corresponded with the release of the progeny. The permeabilization of these cellular membranes temporally correlated with late protein expression and was not observed upon the inhibition of their synthesis. To address whether one or more of the late proteins possessed an inherent capacity to induce membrane permeabilization, we examined the permeability of Escherichia coli that separately expressed the late proteins. VP2 and VP3, but not VP1, caused the permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, VP3 expression resulted in bacterial cell lysis. These findings demonstrate that VP3 possesses an inherent lytic property that is independent of eukaryotic signaling or cell death pathways.

  18. 5-hydroxymethylation of the EBV genome regulates the latent to lytic switch

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Coral K.; Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Henning, Amanda N.; Ma, Shidong; Oetting, Kayla M.; Lee, Dennis; Lambert, Paul; Johannsen, Eric C.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2015-01-01

    Latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection and cellular hypermethylation are hallmarks of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, EBV infection of normal oral epithelial cells is confined to differentiated cells and is lytic. Here we demonstrate that the EBV genome can become 5-hydroxymethylated and that this DNA modification affects EBV lytic reactivation. We show that global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)-modified DNA accumulates during normal epithelial-cell differentiation, whereas EBV+ NPCs have little if any 5hmC-modified DNA. Furthermore, we find that increasing cellular ten–eleven translocation (TET) activity [which converts methylated cytosine (5mC) to 5hmC] decreases methylation, and increases 5hmC modification, of lytic EBV promoters in EBV-infected cell lines containing highly methylated viral genomes. Conversely, inhibition of endogenous TET activity increases lytic EBV promoter methylation in an EBV-infected telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cell line where lytic viral promoters are largely unmethylated. We demonstrate that these cytosine modifications differentially affect the ability of the two EBV immediate-early proteins, BZLF1 (Z) and BRLF1 (R), to induce the lytic form of viral infection. Although methylation of lytic EBV promoters increases Z-mediated and inhibits R-mediated lytic reactivation, 5hmC modification of lytic EBV promoters has the opposite effect. We also identify a specific CpG-containing Z-binding site on the BRLF1 promoter that must be methylated for Z-mediated viral reactivation and show that TET-mediated 5hmC modification of this site in NOKs prevents Z-mediated viral reactivation. Decreased 5-hydroxymethylation of cellular and viral genes may contribute to NPC formation. PMID:26663912

  19. Enhancement of Lytic Activity by Leptin Is Independent From Lipid Rafts in Murine Primary Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Collin, Aurore; Noacco, Audrey; Talvas, Jérémie; Caldefie-Chézet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Farges, Marie-Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic adipokine, is known as a regulator of food intake, but it is also involved in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, and survival. Leptin receptor is integrated inside cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipid rafts, which, if disrupted or destroyed, could lead to a perturbation of lytic mechanism. Previous studies also reported that leptin could induce membrane remodeling. In this context, we studied the effect of membrane remodeling in lytic activity modulation induced by leptin. Thus, primary mouse splenocytes were incubated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-MCD), a lipid rafts disrupting agent, cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a membrane stabilizer agent for 1 h. These treatments were followed by splenocyte incubation with leptin (absence, 10 and 100 ng/ml). Unlike β-MCD or cholesterol, UDCA was able to block leptin lytic induction. This result suggests that leptin increased the lytic activity of primary spleen cells against syngenic EO771 mammary cancer cells independently from lipid rafts but may involve membrane fluidity. Furthermore, natural killer cells were shown to be involved in the splenocyte lytic activity. To our knowledge it is the first publication in primary culture that provides the link between leptin lytic modulation and membrane remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 101-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  1. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  2. Mechanical Motion Induced by Spatially Distributed Limit-Cycle Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Mukae, Yuuki

    2017-03-01

    Spatially distributed limited-cycle oscillators are seen in various physical and biological systems. In internal organs, mechanical motions are induced by the stimuli of spatially distributed limit-cycle oscillators. We study several mechanical motions by limit-cycle oscillators using simple model equations. One problem is deformation waves of radius oscillation induced by desynchronized limit-cycle oscillators, which is motivated by peristaltic motion of the small intestine. A resonance-like phenomenon is found in the deformation waves, and particles can be transported by the deformation waves. Another is the beating motion of the heart. The expansion and contraction motion is realized by a spatially synchronized limit-cycle oscillation; however, the strong beating disappears by spiral chaos, which is closely related to serious arrhythmia in the heart.

  3. [Treatment of anovulatory cycle induced sterility].

    PubMed

    Botella Llusia, J

    1983-03-01

    Of all the clinical aspects of human sterility, the anovulatory cycle is undoubtedly 1 that has produced the widest range of therapuetic successes. While in other fields progress has been very slow (male sterility or tubal obstruction), ovarian pharmacoendocrinology has shown several advances over recent years. This progress is due partly to new chemicals such as urinary menopausal gonadotropins, LH-RH, and their analogues Clomiphene and Bromocriptine. Contributing further to these good results is a greater knowledge of the etiology of anovulation and a more accurate selection of cases for treatment.

  4. Induced natural convection thermal cycling device

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung Kit

    2002-08-13

    A device for separating gases, especially isotopes, by thermal cycling of a separation column using a pressure vessel mounted vertically and having baffled sources for cold and heat. Coils at the top are cooled with a fluid such as liquid nitrogen. Coils at the bottom are either electrical resistance coils or a tubular heat exchange. The sources are shrouded with an insulated "top hat" and simultaneously opened and closed at the outlets to cool or heat the separation column. Alternatively, the sources for cold and heat are mounted separately outside the vessel and an external loop is provided for each circuit.

  5. Prediction of thermal cycling induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal fatigue has been observed to cause matrix cracking in laminated composite materials. A method is presented to predict transverse matrix cracks in composite laminates subjected to cyclic thermal load. Shear lag stress approximations and a simple energy-based fracture criteria are used to predict crack densities as a function of temperature. Prediction of crack densities as a function of thermal cycling is accomplished by assuming that fatigue degrades the material's inherent resistance to cracking. The method is implemented as a computer program. A simple experiment provides data on progressive cracking of a laminate with decreasing temperature. Existing data on thermal fatigue is also used. Correlations of the analytical predictions to the data are very good. A parametric study using the analytical method is presented which provides insight into material behavior under cyclical thermal loads.

  6. Magnetic field aberration induced by cycle stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Yang; luming, Li; Xing, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Magneto-mechanical effect has been causing people's growing interest because of its relevance to several technology problems. One of them is the variation of surface magnetic field induced by stress concentration under the geomagnetic field. It can be used as an innovative, simple and convenient potential NDE method, called as magnetic memory method. However, whether and how this can be used as a quantitative measurement method, is still a virginal research field where nobody sets foot in. In this paper, circle tensile stress within the elastic region was applied to ferromagnetic sample under geomagnetic field. Experiment results on the relation between surface magnetic field and elastic stress were presented, and a simple model was derived. Simulation of the model was reconciled with the experimental results. This can be of great importance for it provides a brighter future for the promising Magnetic Memory NDE method—the potential possibility of quantitative measurement.

  7. Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases: The Microbial Power Tool for Lignocellulose Degradation.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2016-11-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-enzymes that catalyze oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds. These enzymes are secreted by many microorganisms to initiate infection and degradation processes. In particular, the concept of fungal degradation of lignocellulose has been revised in the light of this recent finding. LPMOs require a source of electrons for activity, and both enzymatic and plant-derived sources have been identified. Importantly, light-induced electron delivery from light-harvesting pigments can efficiently drive LPMO activity. The possible implications of LPMOs in plant-symbiont and -pathogen interactions are discussed in the context of the very powerful oxidative capacity of these enzymes.

  8. Lytic peptides with improved stability and selectivity designed for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Tu, Zhigang; Voloshchuk, Natalya; Liang, Jun F

    2012-04-01

    Lytic peptides are a group of membrane-acting peptides, which have excellent activity to drug-resistant cells. In this study, the stability and tumor selectivity of newly designed pH-activated lytic peptides were studied. We found that despite varied secondary structures, pH-induced structure changes could not be directly linked to the activity and pH sensitivity of peptides. On the contrary, formation of aggregates had great impacts on peptide binding and insertion into the lipid bilayer of cell membrane. It was found that the pH controlled peptide aggregation and dissolution was responsible for the pH-dependent membrane lysis activity of peptides. One peptide (PTP-7c) formed stable amyloid fibrils, which did not completely dissolve under acidic conditions. As a result, PTP-7c had the lowest membrane lysis and cell killing activities among tested lytic peptides. As solid tumors have consistently low extracellular pHs, peptides with acid-activation features showed improved selectivity to cancer cells. In addition, self-assembled lytic peptides were found to become more stable and showed dramatically increased half lives (up to 11 h) in human plasma. These new lytic peptides with good stability and acid-activated cell lysis activity will have wide biomedical applications especially for the treatment of cancers in which drug resistance has developed.

  9. Lytic spondylolisthesis in helicopter pilots.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Froom, J; Van Dyk, D; Caine, Y; Ribak, J; Margaliot, S; Floman, Y

    1984-06-01

    Trauma to the back from the force of chronic stress is thought to be an etiologic factor in isthmic spondylolisthesis (SLL). The relationship of first degree spondylolisthesis to low back pain (LBP) is controversial. We compare the prevalence of SLL in helicopter pilots who are subject to strong vibrational forces, with other airforce personnel. Helicopter pilots had more than a four times higher prevalence of SLL (4.5%) than did cadets (1.0%) and transport pilots (0.9%). Low back pain was more frequent in pilots with SLL than in those without this lesion but in no case was the pain disabling or the defect progressive. We conclude that SLL may be induced by vibrational forces and although SLL is associated with LBP, the pain was little clinical significance.

  10. Modeling and remote sensing of human induced water cycle change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.

    2016-04-01

    The global water cycle has been profoundly affected by human land-water management especially during the last century. Since the changes in water cycle can affect the functioning of a wide range of biophysical and biogeochemical processes of the Earth system, it is essential to account for human land-water management in land surface models (LSMs) which are used for water resources assessment and to simulate the land surface hydrologic processes within Earth system models (ESMs). During the last two decades, noteworthy progress has been made in modeling human impacts on the water cycle but sufficient advancements have not yet been made, especially in representing human factors in large-scale LSMs toward integrating them into ESMs. In this study, an integrated modeling framework of continental-scale water cycle, with explicit representation of climate and human induced forces (e.g., irrigation, groundwater pumping) is developed and used to reconstruct the observed water cycle changes in the past and to attribute the observed changes to climatic and human factors. The new model builds upon two different previously developed models: a global LSM called the Human Impacts and GroundWater in the MATSIRO (HiGW-MAT) and a high-resolution regional groundwater model called the LEAF-Hydro-Flood. The model is used to retro-simulate the hydrologic stores and fluxes in close dialogue with in-situ and GRACE satellite based observations at a wide range of river basin scales around the world, with a particular focus on the changes in groundwater dynamics in northwest India, Pakistan, and the High Plains and Central Valley aquifers in the US.

  11. The role of microRNAs in Epstein-Barr virus latency and lytic reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Eleonora; Luftig, Micah A.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic viruses reprogram host gene expression driving proliferation, ensuring survival, and evading the immune response. The recent appreciation of microRNAs (miRNAs) as small non-coding RNAs that broadly regulate gene expression has provided new insight into this complex scheme of host control. This review highlights the role of viral and cellular miRNAs during the latent and lytic phases of the EBV life cycle. PMID:21835261

  12. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  13. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers.

  14. Increased Lytic Efficiency of Bovine Macrophages Trained with Killed Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Juste, Ramon A.; Alonso-Hearn, Marta; Garrido, Joseba M.; Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A.; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Dominguez, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is evolutionarily conserved in multicellular organisms and was considered to lack memory until very recently. One of its more characteristic mechanisms is phagocytosis, the ability of cells to engulf, process and eventually destroy any injuring agent. We report the results of an ex vivo experiment in bovine macrophages in which improved clearance of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) was induced by pre-exposure to a heat killed M. bovis preparation. The effects were independent of humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses and lasted up to six months. Specifically, our results demonstrate the existence of a training effect in the lytic phase of phagocytosis that can be activated by killed mycobacteria, thus suggesting a new mechanism of vaccine protection. These findings are compatible with the recently proposed concept of trained immunity, which was developed to explain the observation that innate immune responses provide unspecific protection against pathogens including other than those that originally triggered the immune response. PMID:27820836

  15. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  16. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Estes, Kathleen A; Szumowski, Suzannah C; Troemel, Emily R

    2011-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo.

  17. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polmer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1994-01-01

    The work done in the period August 1993 through February 1994 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program is summarized. Most of the work performed in this period, as well as the previous one, is described in detail in the attached Master's thesis, 'Analysis of Thermally Induced Damage in Composite Space Structures,' by Cecelia Hyun Seon Park. Work on a small thermal cycling and aging chamber was concluded in this period. The chamber was extensively tested and calibrated. Temperatures can be controlled very precisely, and are very uniform in the test chamber. Based on results obtained in the previous period of this program, further experimental progressive cracking studies were carried out. The laminates tested were selected to clarify the differences between the behaviors of thick and thin ply layers, and to explore other variables such as stacking sequence and scaling effects. Most specimens tested were made available from existing stock at Langley Research Center. One laminate type had to be constructed from available prepreg material at Langley Research Center. Specimens from this laminate were cut and prepared at MIT. Thermal conditioning was carried out at Langley Research Center, and at the newly constructed MIT facility. Specimens were examined by edge inspection and by crack configuration studies, in which specimens were sanded down in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate was implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Extensive correlations between test results and code predictions were carried out. The computer code was documented and is ready for distribution.

  18. Prostate Cancer With Metastatic Lytic Bone Lesions: Positive Bone Scan Post Docetaxel Chemotherapy in the Setting of Clinically Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Victoria Yvonne; Domino, Paula M.; Sutkowski, Raymond; Stillings, Stephanie A.; Trejo-Lopez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of metastatic bone prostate cancer with Docetaxel chemotherapy per CHAARTED trial is standard of care. Timing of CT and bone scintigraphy for evaluation of successful treatment of lytic lesions is not available in the literature. We present a case of a 70 year old male with PSA of 586 and wide spread metastatic bone lytic lesions, who underwent androgen deprivation therapy and six cycles of Docetaxel chemotherapy. The patient had clinically successful treatment. Contrast enhanced CT scan demonstrated sclerotic bone lesions with PSA 2.5 at this point in treatment; however, 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy remained positive for metastatic lesions. PMID:27169018

  19. Phage lytic proteins: biotechnological applications beyond clinical antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most bacteriophages encode two types of cell wall lytic proteins: Endolysins (lysins) and virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases. Both enzymes have the ability to degrade the peptidoglycan of Gram positive bacteria resulting in cell lysis when they are applied externally. Bacteriophage lytic p...

  20. KSHV Targeted Therapy: An Update on Inhibitors of Viral Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Natacha; Duraffour, Sophie; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Since the discovery of KSHV 20 years ago, there is still no standard treatment and the management of virus-associated malignancies remains toxic and incompletely efficacious. As the majority of tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV, currently marketed antivirals that target the virus lytic cycle have shown inconsistent results in clinic. Nevertheless, lytic replication plays a major role in disease progression and virus dissemination. Case reports and retrospective studies have pointed out the benefit of antiviral therapy in the treatment and prevention of KSHV-associated diseases. As a consequence, potent and selective antivirals are needed. This review focuses on the anti-KSHV activity, mode of action and current status of antiviral drugs targeting KSHV lytic cycle. Among these drugs, different subclasses of viral DNA polymerase inhibitors and compounds that do not target the viral DNA polymerase are being discussed. We also cover molecules that target cellular kinases, as well as the potential of new drug targets and animal models for antiviral testing. PMID:25421895

  1. Lytic and lysogenic infection of diverse Escherichia coli and Shigella strains with a verocytotoxigenic bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    James, C E; Stanley, K N; Allison, H E; Flint, H J; Stewart, C S; Sharp, R J; Saunders, J R; McCarthy, A J

    2001-09-01

    A verocytotoxigenic bacteriophage isolated from a strain of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157, into which a kanamycin resistance gene (aph3) had been inserted to inactivate the verocytotoxin gene (vt2), was used to infect Enterobacteriaceae strains. A number of Shigella and E. coli strains were susceptible to lysogenic infection, and a smooth E. coli isolate (O107) was also susceptible to lytic infection. The lysogenized strains included different smooth E. coli serotypes of both human and animal origin, indicating that this bacteriophage has a substantial capacity to disseminate verocytotoxin genes. A novel indirect plaque assay utilizing an E. coli recA441 mutant in which phage-infected cells can enter only the lytic cycle, enabling detection of all infective phage, was developed.

  2. Interannual Variations of MLS Carbon Monoxide Induced by Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Wu, Dong L.; Ruzmaikin, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    More than eight years (2004-2012) of carbon monoxide (CO) measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are analyzed. The mesospheric CO, largely produced by the carbon dioxide (CO2) photolysis in the lower thermosphere, is sensitive to the solar irradiance variability. The long-term variation of observed mesospheric MLS CO concentrations at high latitudes is likely driven by the solar-cycle modulated UV forcing. Despite of different CO abundances in the southern and northern hemispheric winter, the solar-cycle dependence appears to be similar. This solar signal is further carried down to the lower altitudes by the dynamical descent in the winter polar vortex. Aura MLS CO is compared with the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) total solar irradiance (TSI) and also with the spectral irradiance in the far ultraviolet (FUV) region from the SORCE Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). Significant positive correlation (up to 0.6) is found between CO and FUVTSI in a large part of the upper atmosphere. The distribution of this positive correlation in the mesosphere is consistent with the expectation of CO changes induced by the solar irradiance variations.

  3. Identification of the Essential Role of Viral Bcl-2 for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qiming; Chang, Brian; Lee, Patrick; Brulois, Kevin F.; Ge, Jianning; Shi, Mude; Rodgers, Mary A.; Feng, Pinghui; Oh, Byung-Ha; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) evades host defenses through tight suppression of autophagy by targeting each step of its signal transduction: by viral Bcl-2 (vBcl-2) in vesicle nucleation, by viral FLIP (vFLIP) in vesicle elongation, and by K7 in vesicle maturation. By exploring the roles of KSHV autophagy-modulating genes, we found, surprisingly, that vBcl-2 is essential for KSHV lytic replication, whereas vFLIP and K7 are dispensable. Knocking out vBcl-2 from the KSHV genome resulted in decreased lytic gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels, a lower viral DNA copy number, and, consequently, a dramatic reduction in the amount of progeny infectious viruses, as also described in the accompanying article (A. Gelgor, I. Kalt, S. Bergson, K. F. Brulois, J. U. Jung, and R. Sarid, J Virol 89:5298–5307, 2015). More importantly, the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic functions of vBcl-2 were not required for KSHV lytic replication. Using a comprehensive mutagenesis analysis, we identified that glutamic acid 14 (E14) of vBcl-2 is critical for KSHV lytic replication. Mutating E14 to alanine totally blocked KSHV lytic replication but showed little or no effect on the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic functions of vBcl-2. Our study indicates that vBcl-2 harbors at least three important and genetically separable functions to modulate both cellular signaling and the virus life cycle. IMPORTANCE The present study shows for the first time that vBcl-2 is essential for KSHV lytic replication. Removal of the vBcl-2 gene results in a lower level of KSHV lytic gene expression, impaired viral DNA replication, and consequently, a dramatic reduction in the level of progeny production. More importantly, the role of vBcl-2 in KSHV lytic replication is genetically separated from its antiapoptotic and antiautophagic functions, suggesting that the KSHV Bcl-2 carries a novel function in viral lytic replication. PMID:25740994

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic switch protein stimulates DNA binding of RBP-Jk/CSL to activate the Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Bu, Wei; Palmeri, Diana; Spadavecchia, Sophia; Lynch, Stephen J; Marras, Salvatore A E; Tyagi, Sanjay; Lukac, David M

    2006-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) lytic switch protein, Rta, is a ligand-independent inducer of the Notch signal transduction pathway, and KSHV cannot reactivate from latency in cells null for the Notch target protein RBP-Jk. Here we show that Rta promotes DNA binding of RBP-Jk, a mechanism that is fundamentally different from that established for the RBP-Jk-activating proteins, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Epstein-Barr virus EBNA2. Although constitutively active RBP-Jk and NICD do not transactivate KSHV promoters independently, cotransfection of an Rta mutant lacking its transactivation domain robustly restores transcriptional activation. Cooperation requires intact DNA binding sites for Rta and RBP-Jk and trimeric complex formation between the three molecules in vitro. In infected cells, RBP-Jk is virtually undetectable on a series of viral and cellular promoters during KSHV latency but is significantly enriched following Rta expression during viral reactivation. Accordingly, Rta, but not EBNA2 and NICD, reactivates the complete viral lytic cycle.

  5. Structural diversity of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Forsberg, Zarah; Loose, Jennifer Sm; Bissaro, Bastien; Eijsink, Vincent Gh

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds and represent a promising resource for development of industrial enzyme cocktails for biomass processing. LPMOs show high sequence and modular diversity and are known, so far, to cleave insoluble substrates such as cellulose, chitin and starch, as well as hemicelluloses such as beta-glucan, xyloglucan and xylan. All LPMOs share a catalytic histidine brace motif to bind copper, but differ strongly when it comes to the nature and arrangement of residues on the substrate-binding surface. In recent years, the number of available LPMO structures has increased rapidly, including the first structure of an enzyme-substrate complex. The insights gained from these structures is reviewed below.

  6. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done in the period February 1993 through July 1993 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program. An oral presentation of this work was given to Langley personnel in September of 1993. This document was prepared for archival purposes. Progress studies have been performed on the effects of spatial variations in material strength. Qualitative agreement was found with observed patterns of crack distribution. These results were presented to NASA Langley personnel in November 1992. The analytical methodology developed by Prof. McManus in the summer of 1992 (under an ASEE fellowship) has been generalized. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate has been implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Experimental progressive cracking studies on a variety of laminates were carried out at Langley Research Center. Results were correlated to predictions using the new methods. Results were initially mixed. This motivated an exploration of the configuration of cracks within laminates. A crack configuration study was carried out by cutting and/or sanding specimens in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. These investigations were supplemented by dye-penetrant enhanced X-ray photographs. The behavior of thin plies was found to be different from the behavior of thicker plies (or ply groups) on which existing theories are based. Significant edge effects were also noted, which caused the traditional metric of microcracking (count of cracks on a polished edge) to be very inaccurate in some cases. With edge and configuration taken into account, rough agreement with predictions was achieved. All results to date were reviewed with NASA Langley personnel in September 1993.

  7. DNA-binding-defective mutants of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic switch activator Zta transactivate with altered specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Flemington, E K; Lytle, J P; Cayrol, C; Borras, A M; Speck, S H

    1994-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 and BZLF1 genes are the first viral genes transcribed upon induction of the viral lytic cycle. The protein products of both genes (referred to here as Rta and Zta, respectively) activate expression of other viral genes, thereby initiating the lytic cascade. Among the viral antigens expressed upon induction of the lytic cycle, however, Zta is unique in its ability to disrupt viral latency; expression of the BZLF1 gene is both necessary and sufficient for triggering the viral lytic cascade. We have previously shown that Zta can activate its own promoter (Zp), through binding to two Zta recognition sequences (ZIIIA and ZIIIB). Here we describe mutant Zta proteins that do not bind DNA (referred to as Zta DNA-binding mutants [Zdbm]) but retain the ability to transactivate Zp. Consistent with the inability of these mutants to bind DNA, transactivation of Zp by Zdbm is not dependent on the Zta recognition sequences. Instead, transactivation by Zdbm is dependent upon promoter elements that bind cellular factors. An examination of other viral and cellular promoters identified promoters that are weakly responsive or unresponsive to Zdbm. An analysis of a panel of artificial promoters containing one copy of various promoter elements demonstrated a specificity for Zdbm activation that is distinct from that of Zta. These results suggest that non-DNA-binding forms of some transactivators retain the ability to transactivate specific target promoters without direct binding to DNA. Images PMID:8164660

  8. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus latency type and spontaneous reactivation predict lytic induction levels.

    PubMed

    Phan, An T; Fernandez, Samantha G; Somberg, Jessica J; Keck, Kristin M; Miranda, Jj L

    2016-05-20

    The human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) evades the immune system by entering a transcriptionally latent phase in B cells. EBV in tumor cells expresses distinct patterns of genes referred to as latency types. Viruses in tumor cells also display varying levels of lytic transcription resulting from spontaneous reactivation out of latency. We measured this dynamic range of lytic transcription with RNA deep sequencing and observed no correlation with EBV latency types among genetically different viruses, but type I cell lines reveal more spontaneous reactivation than isogenic type III cultures. We further determined that latency type and spontaneous reactivation levels predict the relative amount of induced reactivation generated by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs. Our work has potential implications for personalizing medicine against EBV-transformed malignancies. Identifying latency type or measuring spontaneous reactivation may provide predictive power in treatment contexts where viral production should be either avoided or coerced.

  10. Tachyzoite-induced life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii in cats.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2002-08-01

    The tachyzoite-induced cycle of Toxoplasma gondii was studied in 46 cats. Tachyzoites of the M-7741 or Me-49 strain of T. gondii were administered orally to cats by pouring into the mouth or by stomach tube, or by intraintestinal inoculation. Ten weaned cats that had been inoculated with tachyzoites directly in the intestine were killed 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 25 days later, and their tissues were studied histologically and bioassayed in mice. Toxoplasma gondii was demonstrable in the blood of 8 cats and in other tissues of all these 10. Four out of five 1- to 8-day-old cats fed tachyzoites by stomach tube became infected with T. gondii, and 1 became ill because of toxoplasmosis. All 19 weaned cats fed tachyzoites (poured into the mouth) became infected, and 6 died of acute toxoplasmosis 9-15 days after being fed T. gondii. Six out of 12 weaned cats fed tachyzoites by stomach tube became infected but were asymptomatic. Overall, 12 out of 26 cats observed for 19 days or more shed oocysts with a prepatent period (pp) of 19 days or more, with the sole exception of 1 cat that shed oocysts with a pp of 5 days. Enteroepithelial stages of T. gondii were not found in any cat before oocysts were shed. Cats shed up to 360 million oocysts in a day, and oocysts were shed for 4-6 days.

  11. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  12. T Cell Receptor-induced Activation and Apoptosis In Cycling Human T Cells Occur throughout the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Michael; Zaks, Tal Z.; JL, Liu; LeRoith, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting associations between susceptibility to activation-induced cell death and the cell cycle in T cells. However, most of the studies used potentially toxic pharmacological agents for cell cycle synchronization. A panel of human melanoma tumor-reactive T cell lines, a CD8+ HER-2/neu-reactive T cell clone, and the leukemic T cell line Jurkat were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Fractions enriched for the G0–G1, S, and G2–M phases of the cell cycle were assayed for T cell receptor-mediated activation as measured by intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytolytic recognition of tumor targets, and induction of Fas ligand mRNA. Susceptibility to apoptosis induced by recombinant Fas ligand and activation-induced cell death were also studied. None of the parameters studied was specific to a certain phase of the cell cycle, leading us to conclude that in nontransformed human T cells, both activation and apoptosis through T cell receptor activation can occur in all phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10588669

  13. Non-Lytic Egression of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) Particles from Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Fernando; Romero, Nicolás; Cubas, Liliana L; Delgui, Laura R; Rodríguez, Dolores; Rodríguez, José F

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a member of the Birnaviridae family, is responsible for a devastating immunosuppressive disease affecting juvenile domestic chickens. IBDV particles are naked icosahedrons enclosing a bipartite double-stranded RNA genome harboring three open reading frames (ORF). One of these ORFs codes for VP5, a non-structural polypeptide dispensable for virus replication in tissue culture but essential for IBDV pathogenesis. Using two previously described recombinant viruses, whose genomes differ in a single nucleotide, expressing or not the VP5 polypeptide, we have analyzed the role of this polypeptide during the IBDV replication process. Here, we show that VP5 is not involved in house-keeping steps of the virus replication cycle; i.e. genome transcription/replication, protein translation and virus assembly. Although infection with the VP5 expressing and non-expressing viruses rendered similar intracellular infective progeny yields, striking differences were detected on the ability of their progenies to exiting infected cells. Experimental data shows that the bulk of the VP5-expressing virus progeny efficiently egresses infected cells during the early phase of the infection, when viral metabolism is peaking and virus-induced cell death rates are as yet minimal, as determined by qPCR, radioactive protein labeling and quantitative real-time cell death analyses. In contrast, the release of the VP5-deficient virus progeny is significantly abridged and associated to cell death. Taken together, data presented in this report show that IBDV uses a previously undescribed VP5-dependent non-lytic egress mechanism significantly enhancing the virus dissemination speed. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that newly assembled IBDV virions associate to a vesicular network apparently facilitating their trafficking from virus assembly factories to the extracellular milieu, and that this association requires the expression of the VP5 polypeptide.

  14. Non-Lytic Egression of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) Particles from Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Fernando; Romero, Nicolás; Cubas, Liliana L.; Delgui, Laura R.; Rodríguez, Dolores

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a member of the Birnaviridae family, is responsible for a devastating immunosuppressive disease affecting juvenile domestic chickens. IBDV particles are naked icosahedrons enclosing a bipartite double-stranded RNA genome harboring three open reading frames (ORF). One of these ORFs codes for VP5, a non-structural polypeptide dispensable for virus replication in tissue culture but essential for IBDV pathogenesis. Using two previously described recombinant viruses, whose genomes differ in a single nucleotide, expressing or not the VP5 polypeptide, we have analyzed the role of this polypeptide during the IBDV replication process. Here, we show that VP5 is not involved in house-keeping steps of the virus replication cycle; i.e. genome transcription/replication, protein translation and virus assembly. Although infection with the VP5 expressing and non-expressing viruses rendered similar intracellular infective progeny yields, striking differences were detected on the ability of their progenies to exiting infected cells. Experimental data shows that the bulk of the VP5-expressing virus progeny efficiently egresses infected cells during the early phase of the infection, when viral metabolism is peaking and virus-induced cell death rates are as yet minimal, as determined by qPCR, radioactive protein labeling and quantitative real-time cell death analyses. In contrast, the release of the VP5-deficient virus progeny is significantly abridged and associated to cell death. Taken together, data presented in this report show that IBDV uses a previously undescribed VP5-dependent non-lytic egress mechanism significantly enhancing the virus dissemination speed. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that newly assembled IBDV virions associate to a vesicular network apparently facilitating their trafficking from virus assembly factories to the extracellular milieu, and that this association requires the expression of the VP5 polypeptide. PMID

  15. Chromatin Dynamics during Lytic Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Kristen L.; Schang, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Latent HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized with silencing marks. Since 2004, however, there has been an apparent inconsistency in the studies of the chromatinization of the HSV-1 genomes in lytically infected cells. Nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that the genomes were not regularly chromatinized, having only low histone occupancy. However, the chromatin modifications associated with transcribed and non-transcribed HSV-1 genes were those associated with active or repressed transcription, respectively. Moreover, the three critical HSV-1 transcriptional activators all had the capability to induce chromatin remodelling, and interacted with critical chromatin modifying enzymes. Depletion or overexpression of some, but not all, chromatin modifying proteins affected HSV-1 transcription, but often in unexpected manners. Since 2010, it has become clear that both cellular and HSV-1 chromatins are highly dynamic in infected cells. These dynamics reconcile the weak interactions between HSV-1 genomes and chromatin proteins, detected by nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation, with the proposed regulation of HSV-1 gene expression by chromatin, supported by the marks in the chromatin in the viral genomes and the abilities of the HSV-1 transcription activators to modulate chromatin. It also explains the sometimes unexpected results of interventions to modulate chromatin remodelling activities in infected cells. PMID:23863878

  16. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  17. Lytic viral infection of bacterioplankton in deep waters of the western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luo, T.; Sun, J.; Cai, L.; Jiao, N.; Zhang, R.

    2013-12-01

    As the most abundant biological entities in the ocean, viruses can influence host mortality and nutrients recycling mainly through lytic infection. Yet ecological characteristics of virioplankton and viral impacts on host mortality and biogeochemical cycling in the deep sea are largely unknown. In present study, viral abundance and lytic infection was investigated throughout the water column in the western Pacific Ocean. Both the prokaryotic and viral abundance and production showed a significantly decreasing trend from epipelagic to meso- and bathypelagic waters. Viral abundance decreased from 0.36-1.05 × 1010 particles L-1 to 0.43-0.80 × 109 particles L-1, while the virus : prokaryote ratio varied from 7.21-16.23 to 2.45-23.40, at surface and 2000 m depth, respectively. The lytic viral production rates in surface and 2000 m waters were, averagely, 1.03 × 1010 L-1 day-1 and 5.74 × 108 L-1 day-1, respectively. Relatively high percentages of prokaryotic cells lysed by virus in 1000 m and 2000 m were observed, suggesting a significant contribution of viruses to prokaryotic mortality in deep ocean. The carbon released by viral lysis in deep western Pacific Ocean waters was from 0.03 to 2.32 μg C L-1 day-1. Our findings demonstrated a highly dynamic and active viral population in the deep western Pacific Ocean and suggested that virioplankton play an important role in the microbial loop and subsequently biogeochemical cycling in deep oceans.

  18. Lytic viral infection of bacterioplankton in deep waters of the western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luo, T.; Sun, J.; Cai, L.; Liang, Y.; Jiao, N.; Zhang, R.

    2014-05-01

    As the most abundant biological entities in the ocean, viruses influence host mortality and nutrient recycling mainly through lytic infection. Yet, the ecological characteristics of virioplankton and viral impacts on host mortality and biogeochemical cycling in the deep sea are largely unknown. In the present study, viral abundance and lytic infection were investigated throughout the water column in the western Pacific Ocean. Both the prokaryotic and viral abundance and production showed a significantly decreasing trend from epipelagic to meso- and bathypelagic waters. Viral abundance decreased from 0.36-1.05 × 1010 particles L-1 to 0.43-0.80 × 109 particles L-1, while the virus : prokaryote ratio varied from 7.21 to 16.23 to 2.45-23.40, at the surface and 2000 m, respectively. Lytic viral production rates in surface and 2000 m waters were, on average, 1.03 × 1010 L-1 day-1 and 5.74 × 108 L-1 day-1. Relatively high percentages of prokaryotic cells lysed by viruses at 1000 and 2000 m were observed, suggesting a significant contribution of viruses to prokaryotic mortality in the deep ocean. The carbon released by viral lysis in deep western Pacific Ocean waters was from 0.03 to 2.32 μg C L-1 day-1. Our findings demonstrated a highly dynamic and active viral population in these deep waters and suggested that virioplankton play an important role in the microbial loop and subsequently biogeochemical cycling in deep oceans.

  19. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine.

  20. Isolation and characterization of lytic vibriophage against Vibrio cholerae O1 from environmental water samples in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Fendi, Ali; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim; Ravichandran, Manickam; Yean, Chan Yean

    2014-10-01

    Water samples from a variety of sources in Kelantan, Malaysia (lakes, ponds, rivers, ditches, fish farms, and sewage) were screened for the presence of bacteriophages infecting Vibrio cholerae. Ten strains of V. cholerae that appeared to be free of inducible prophages were used as the host strains. Eleven bacteriophage isolates were obtained by plaque assay, three of which were lytic and further characterized. The morphologies of the three lytic phages were similar with each having an icosahedral head (ca. 50-60 nm in diameter), a neck, and a sheathed tail (ca. 90-100 nm in length) characteristic of the family Myoviridae. The genomes of the lytic phages were indistinguishable in length (ca. 33.5 kb), nuclease sensitivity (digestible with DNase I, but not RNase A or S1 nuclease), and restriction enzyme sensitivity (identical banding patterns with HindIII, no digestion with seven other enzymes). Testing for infection against 46 strains of V. cholerae and 16 other species of enteric bacteria revealed that all three isolates had a narrow host range and were only capable of infecting V. cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba. The similar morphologies, indistinguishable genome characteristics, and identical host ranges of these lytic isolates suggests that they represent one phage, or several very closely related phages, present in different water sources. These isolates are good candidates for further bio-phage-control studies.

  1. Temperature Cycles Induce Early Maturation in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major impediment in improvement of channel catfish by selective breeding is that a high percent of fish do not spawn until the third year. The conditions that lead to sexual maturation in fish have not been established. Size, nutritional state and number of seasonal cycles have all been suggeste...

  2. Distinct patterns of cleavage and translocation of cell cycle control proteins in CD95-induced and p53-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Weon Seo; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Chung, Doo Hyun; Nam, Woo-Dong; Choi, Won Jin; Bae, Youngmee

    2003-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death induced by p53 occurs at a late G1 cell cycle checkpoint termed the restriction (R) point, and it has been proposed that p53-induced apoptosis causes upregulation of CD95. However, as cells with defective in CD95 signaling pathway are still sensitive to p53-induced apoptosis, CD95 cannot be the sole factor resulting in apoptosis. In addition, unlike p53-induced apoptosis, the relationship between CD95-mediated apoptosis and the cell cycle is not clearly understood. It would therefore be worth investigating whether CD95-mediated cell death is pertinent with p53-induced apoptosis in view of cell cycle related molecules. In this report, biochemical analysis showed that etoposide-induced apoptosis caused the induction and the nuclear translocation of effector molecules involved in G1 cell cycle checkpoint. However, there was no such translocation in the case of CD95-mediated death. Thus, although both types of apoptosis involved caspase activation, the cell cycle related proteins responded differently. This argues against the idea that p53-induced apoptosis occurs through the induction of CD95/CD95L expression. PMID:12923319

  3. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  4. Drought-induced Changes in Dryland Soil Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belnap, J.; Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Duniway, M.; Ferrenberg, S.; Hoover, D. L.; Reed, S.

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 41% of Earth´s terrestrial surface consists of drylands and they are an important biome on all continents. Although dryland biota would be expected to be drought adapted, they can be surprisingly vulnerable to extended dry periods with subsequent consequences for biogeochemical cycles. Biological soil crusts, constituting up to 70% of the living cover in these regions, are important in these cycles. They fix both N and C, providing a significant percentage of regional and global inputs. However, extended drought reduces both types of inputs, as biocrusts are only metabolically active when wet, yet losses continue even when soils are dry. In addition, extended droughts can result in their mortality. The amount of net soil C exchange of biocrusted soils is controversial, but in SE Utah, soil C uptake only occurred when only when soils were wet. As soils are infrequently wet, annual balances were negative during the 2 year study and with future extended droughts or increased temperatures that reduce soil moisture, these losses will become even greater. As with C, N fixation also requires biocrusts be wet and thus inputs decline with extended drought or higher temperatures that both reduce input and result in lichen and cyanobacterial mortality. And similarly, N losses continue even when soils are dry. Loss of biocrust mosses can profoundly alter N cycles. Desert plants are also affected by drought: in plots where experimental drought was imposed, plants had lower photosynthetic rates and higher leaf C:N, which will likely affect productivity and decomposition rates and thus have further impacts on soil biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  6. RAD001 (everolimus) induces dose-dependent changes to cell cycle regulation and modifies the cell cycle response to vincristine.

    PubMed

    Saunders, P O; Weiss, J; Welschinger, R; Baraz, R; Bradstock, K F; Bendall, L J

    2013-10-01

    More than 50% of adults and ~20% of children with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse following treatment. Dismal outcomes for patients with relapsed or refractory disease mandate novel approaches to therapy. We have previously shown that the combination of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 (everolimus) and the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine increases the survival of non-obese diabetic/severe combined immuno-deficient (NOD/SCID) mice bearing human ALL xenografts. We have also shown that 16 μM RAD001 synergized with agents that cause DNA damage or microtubule disruption in pre-B ALL cells in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that RAD001 has dose-dependent effects on the cell cycle in ALL cells, with 1.5 μM RAD001 inhibiting pRb, Ki67 and PCNA expression and increasing G0/1 cell cycle arrest, whereas 16 μM RAD001 increases pRb, cyclin D1, Ki67 and PCNA, with no evidence of an accumulation of cells in G0/1. Transition from G2 into mitosis was promoted by 16 μM RAD001 with reduced phosphorylation of cdc2 in cells with 4 N DNA content. However, 16 μM RAD001 preferentially induced cell death in cells undergoing mitosis. When combined with vincristine, 16 μM RAD001 reduced the vincristine-induced accumulation of cells in mitosis, probably as a result of increased death in this population. Although 16 μM RAD001 weakly activated Chk1 and Chk2, it suppressed strong vincristine-induced activation of these cell cycle checkpoint regulators. We conclude that RAD001 enhances chemosensitivity at least in part through suppression of cell cycle checkpoint regulation in response to vincristine and increased progression from G2 into mitosis.

  7. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  8. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  9. Valley Formation on Early Mars Caused by Carbonate-Silicate Cycle-Induced Climate Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natasha; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Haqq-Misra, Jacob; Kasting, James

    2016-10-01

    For decades, scientists have tried to explain the evidence for fluvial activity on early Mars, but a consensus has yet to emerge regarding the mechanism for producing it. One hypothesis suggests early Mars was warmed by a thick greenhouse atmosphere. Another suggests early Mars was generally cold but was warmed occasionally by impacts or by episodes of enhanced volcanism. These latter hypotheses struggle to produce the amounts of rainfall needed to form the martian valleys, but are consistent with inferred low rates of weathering compared to Earth. We suggest that both schools of thought are partly correct. Mars experienced dramatic climate cycles with extended periods of glaciation punctuated by warm periods lasting up to 10 Myr. Cycles of repeated glaciation and deglaciation occurred because stellar insolation was low, and because CO2 outgassing could not keep pace with CO2 consumption by silicate weathering followed by deposition of carbonates. In order to deglaciate early Mars , substantial outgassing of molecular hydrogen from Mars' reduced crust and mantle was also required. Our hypothesis can be tested by future Mars exploration that better establishes the time scale for valley formation.

  10. The Integrins Involved in Soybean Agglutinin-Induced Cell Cycle Alterations in IPEC-J2

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Zhao, Yuan; Yuan, Zhijie; Farouk, Mohammed Hamdy; Zhang, Shiyao; Bao, Nan; Qin, Guixin

    2017-01-01

    Soybean agglutinin (SBA) is an anti-nutritional factor of soybean, affecting cell proliferation and inducing cytotoxicity. Integrins are transmembrane receptors, mediating a variety of cell biological processes. This research aims to study the effects of SBA on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression of the intestinal epithelial cell line from piglets (IPEC-J2), to identify the integrin subunits especially expressed in IPEC-J2s, and to analyze the functions of these integrins on IPEC-J2 cell cycle progression and SBA-induced IPEC-J2 cell cycle alteration. The results showed that SBA lowered cell proliferation rate as the cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase (P < 0.05) was inhibited. Moreover, SBA lowered mRNA expression of cell cycle-related gene CDK4, Cyclin E and Cyclin D1 (P < 0.05). We successfully identified integrins α2, α3, α6, β1, and β4 in IPEC-J2s. These five subunits were crucial to maintain normal cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in IPEC-J2s. Restrain of either these five subunits by their inhibitors, lowered cell proliferation rate, and arrested the cells at G0/G1 phase of cell cycle (P < 0.05). Further analysis indicated that integrin α2, α6, and β1 were involved in the blocking of G0/G1 phase induced by SBA. In conclusion, these results suggested that SBA lowered the IPEC-J2 cell proliferation rate through the perturbation of cell cycle progression. Furthermore, integrins were important for IPEC-J2 cell cycle progression, and they were involved in the process of SBA-induced cell cycle progression alteration, which provide a basis for further revealing SBA anti-proliferation and anti-nutritional mechanism. PMID:28222496

  11. The menstrual cycle and susceptibility to coriolis-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B; Heskin, R; Hofer, K; Gagnon, M

    2001-01-01

    Survey studies on motion sickness susceptibility suggest that females tend to report greater severity in illness and higher incidence of vomiting than males. Menstruation is said to be a contributing factor. A recent study suggested that females were least susceptible to seasickness during ovulation in a "round the world" yacht race. Sixteen subjects (18-36 years old) were exposed to Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation in the laboratory. They were tested once during permenstruation (Day 1-5), ovulation (Day 12-15) and premenstruation (Day 24-28), based on a normalized 28-day cycle, in a randomised design. Physiological measurements of motion sickness included forearm and calf cutaneous blood flow. Subjective evaluation of sickness symptoms was based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria and Golding's rating method. Our results indicated that under controlled laboratory conditions, different phases of the menstrual cycle appear to have no influence on subjective symptoms of motion sickness or on cutaneous blood flow increase in the forearm and calf. The lack of commonality between the types and levels of hormones that are released during motion sickness and those that are involved in different menstrual phases appears to support our findings.

  12. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Biological Control of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle with Lytic Enzyme-Producing Microorganisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Lytic enzyme-producing microorganisms Biocontrol Mycoherbicides Hydrilla Induced pathogenicity 20. ASTRACT (Coartinue G rev’wm eft if n*..eeam7 mod...However, no natural enemies of hydrilla have yet been imported that are promising biocontrol candidates. Therefore, a less conventional approach was...of microorganisms that function in the decay process. These microorganisms pro- duce enzymes capable of lysing specific plant components such as

  13. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, H; Wachter, F; Grunert, M; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 or G2 using cytotoxic drugs, phase-specific inhibitors or RNA interference against cyclinB and E. Biochemical or molecular arrest at any point of the cell cycle increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, when cell cycle arrest was disabled by addition of caffeine, the antitumor activity of TRAIL was reduced. Most important for clinical translation, tumor cells from three children with B precursor or T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis upon knockdown of either cyclinB or cyclinE, arresting the cell cycle in G2 or G1, respectively. Taken together and in contrast to most conventional cytotoxic drugs, TRAIL exerts enhanced antitumor activity against cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Therefore, TRAIL might represent an interesting drug to treat static-tumor disease, for example, during minimal residual disease. PMID:23744361

  14. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain: strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2015-03-01

    Cycle training is widely performed as a major part of any exercise program seeking to improve aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health. However, the effect of cycle training on muscle size and strength gain still requires further insight, even though it is known that professional cyclists display larger muscle size compared to controls. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of cycle training on muscle size and strength of the lower extremity and the possible mechanisms for increasing muscle size with cycle training. It is plausible that cycle training requires a longer period to significantly increase muscle size compared to typical resistance training due to a much slower hypertrophy rate. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy similarly between young and older age groups, while strength gain seems to favor older adults, which suggests that the probability for improving in muscle quality appears to be higher in older adults compared to young adults. For young adults, higher-intensity intermittent cycling may be required to achieve strength gains. It also appears that muscle hypertrophy induced by cycle training results from the positive changes in muscle protein net balance.

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  16. Triaxial MMG investigation during FES-induced cycle movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelain, M. C.; Nogueira-Neto, G. N.; Nohama, P.; Gewehr, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury is damage to the spinal cord that results in loss of functions, causes muscle, joint and bone deficits, moreover it increases the muscle tone level. FEScycling is an alternative rehabilitation process to conserve the musculoskeletal system affected by the injury in the functional state. The aim of this study is to get the legs bilaterally synchronized by FES and compare MMG signal responses. The preliminary protocol consists of five consecutive contractions. The first and the last contractions were discarded and the three intermediate contractions were analyzed. A ratio between MMG values of muscle responses during propulsion and return of pedalling phases was calculated for each cycle and each leg. The applied FES profile consisted of pulse and burst on time of 250 us and 5 ms and frequencies of 1000 Hz and 20 Hz, respectively. Results showed that greater MMG RMS values tend to occur during the propulsion phase than in the return phase. MMG Z axis of RLL and MMG X axis of LLL were the axes that presented the greatest ratios. The MMG RMS signal showed that greater values tend to occur during the propulsion phase than in the return phase of the same thigh.

  17. NEDDylation is essential for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency and lytic reactivation and represents a novel anti-KSHV target.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David J; Wood, Jennifer J; Jackson, Brian R; Baquero-Pérez, Belinda; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which are aggressive malignancies associated with immunocompromised patients. For many non-viral malignancies, therapeutically targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been successful. Likewise, laboratory studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the UPS might provide a promising avenue for the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. The largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases are the cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) that are activated by an additional ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8. We show that pharmacological inhibition of NEDDylation (using the small molecule inhibitor MLN4924) is cytotoxic to PEL cells by inhibiting NF-κB. We also show that CRL4B is a novel regulator of latency as its inhibition reactivated lytic gene expression. Furthermore, we uncovered a requirement for NEDDylation during the reactivation of the KSHV lytic cycle. Intriguingly, inhibition prevented viral DNA replication but not lytic cycle-associated gene expression, highlighting a novel mechanism that uncouples these two features of KSHV biology. Mechanistically, we show that MLN4924 treatment precluded the recruitment of the viral pre-replication complex to the origin of lytic DNA replication (OriLyt). These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV latency and reactivation. Moreover, they demonstrate that inhibition of NEDDylation represents a novel approach for the treatment of KSHV-associated malignancies.

  18. NEDDylation Is Essential for Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Lytic Reactivation and Represents a Novel Anti-KSHV Target

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David J.; Wood, Jennifer J.; Jackson, Brian R.; Baquero-Pérez, Belinda; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which are aggressive malignancies associated with immunocompromised patients. For many non-viral malignancies, therapeutically targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been successful. Likewise, laboratory studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the UPS might provide a promising avenue for the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. The largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases are the cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) that are activated by an additional ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8. We show that pharmacological inhibition of NEDDylation (using the small molecule inhibitor MLN4924) is cytotoxic to PEL cells by inhibiting NF-κB. We also show that CRL4B is a novel regulator of latency as its inhibition reactivated lytic gene expression. Furthermore, we uncovered a requirement for NEDDylation during the reactivation of the KSHV lytic cycle. Intriguingly, inhibition prevented viral DNA replication but not lytic cycle-associated gene expression, highlighting a novel mechanism that uncouples these two features of KSHV biology. Mechanistically, we show that MLN4924 treatment precluded the recruitment of the viral pre-replication complex to the origin of lytic DNA replication (OriLyt). These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV latency and reactivation. Moreover, they demonstrate that inhibition of NEDDylation represents a novel approach for the treatment of KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:25794275

  19. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Sawtell, Nancy M.; Thompson, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system. PMID:27607440

  20. Control of human cytomegalovirus gene expression by differential histone modifications during lytic and latent infection of a monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ioudinkova, Elena; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Rynditch, Alla; De Conto, Flora; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Pinardi, Federica; Razin, Sergey V; Chezzi, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    Non-differentiated THP-1 cells can be infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Towne strain, which persists in these cells in a non-active (latent) form without undergoing a productive cycle. The same cells become permissive for HCMV lytic infection after induction of cell differentiation by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We used this cellular model to study the possible role of histone modifications in the control of HCMV latency. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against histone H3 acetylated or dimethylated in position K9, we demonstrated that in lytically infected cells the HCMV enhancer was associated with heavy acetylated but not dimethylated H3. In the case of latent infection, the HCMV enhancer was associated with neither acetylated nor dimethylated H3. HCMV genes encoding DNA polymerase (early), pp65 (early-late) and pp150 (late) proteins were associated preferentially with acetylated H3 in lytically infected cells and with dimethylated H3 in latently infected cells. These data strongly suggest that K9 methylation of H3 is involved in HCMV gene repression, while association of the above genes with acetylated histones is likely to be necessary for active transcription. It can be postulated that the same histone modifications are used to mark active and repressed genes in both cellular and viral chromatin.

  1. Cycling-Induced Changes in the Entropy Profiles of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hudak, N. S.; Davis, L. E.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2014-12-09

    Entropy profiles of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) electrodes were measured at various stages in the cycle life to examine performance degradation and cycling-induced changes, or lack thereof, in thermodynamics. LiCoO2 electrodes were cycled at C/2 rate in half-cells (vs. lithium anodes) up to 20 cycles or C/5 rate in full cells (vs. MCMB anodes) up to 500 cycles. The electrodes were then subjected to entropy measurements (∂E/∂T, where E is open-circuit potential and T is temperature) in half-cells at regular intervals over the approximate range 0.5 ≤ x ≤ 1 in LixCoO2. Despite significant losses in capacity upon cycling, neither cycling rate resulted in any change to the overall shape of the entropy profile relative to an uncycled electrode, indicating retention of the basic LiCoO2 structure, lithium insertion mechanism, and thermodynamics. This confirms that cycling-induced performance degradation in LiCoO2 electrodes is primarily caused by kinetic barriers that increase with cycling. In the case of electrodes cycled at C/5, there was a subtle, quantitative, and gradual change in the entropy profile in the narrow potential range of the hexagonal-to-monoclinic phase transition. The observed change is indicative of a decrease in the intralayer lithium ordering that occurs at these potentials, and it demonstrates that a cyclinginduced structural disorder accompanies the kinetic degradation mechanisms.

  2. Cycling-Induced Changes in the Entropy Profiles of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Hudak, N. S.; Davis, L. E.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2014-12-09

    Entropy profiles of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) electrodes were measured at various stages in the cycle life to examine performance degradation and cycling-induced changes, or lack thereof, in thermodynamics. LiCoO2 electrodes were cycled at C/2 rate in half-cells (vs. lithium anodes) up to 20 cycles or C/5 rate in full cells (vs. MCMB anodes) up to 500 cycles. The electrodes were then subjected to entropy measurements (∂E/∂T, where E is open-circuit potential and T is temperature) in half-cells at regular intervals over the approximate range 0.5 ≤ x ≤ 1 in LixCoO2. Despite significant losses in capacity upon cycling, neithermore » cycling rate resulted in any change to the overall shape of the entropy profile relative to an uncycled electrode, indicating retention of the basic LiCoO2 structure, lithium insertion mechanism, and thermodynamics. This confirms that cycling-induced performance degradation in LiCoO2 electrodes is primarily caused by kinetic barriers that increase with cycling. In the case of electrodes cycled at C/5, there was a subtle, quantitative, and gradual change in the entropy profile in the narrow potential range of the hexagonal-to-monoclinic phase transition. The observed change is indicative of a decrease in the intralayer lithium ordering that occurs at these potentials, and it demonstrates that a cyclinginduced structural disorder accompanies the kinetic degradation mechanisms.« less

  3. Chemotherapy Drug Induced Discoordination of Mitochondrial Life Cycle Detected by Cardiolipin Fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yu-Jen; Chan, Jui-Fen; Hsu, Yuan-Hao Howard

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy drugs have been prescribed for the systemic treatment of cancer. We selected three chemotherapy drugs, including methotrexate, mitomycine C and vincristine to inhibit the proliferation of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in S, G2 and M phases of the cell cycle respectively. These chemotherapy drugs showed significant toxicity and growth inhibition to the cancer cells measured by MTT assay. After treated with a 50% inhibitory dosage for 48 hours, these cancer cells showed significant accumulation of cardiolipin (CL), which was a reverse trend of the nutritional deficiency induced arrest at G1 phase. The quantity of each CL species was further semi-quantitated by HPLC-ion trap mass spectrometer. Methotraxate treatment caused unique increases of acyl chain length on CL, which were the opposite of the serum starvation, mitomycine C and vincristine treatments. Although mitomycine C and vincristine have different mechanisms to induce cell cycle arrest, these two drugs displayed similar effects on decreasing chain length of CL. Continuation of CL synthesis during cell cycle arrest indicated the chemotherapy drugs resulting in the discoordination of the mitochondrial life cycle from the cell cycle and thus caused the accumulation of CL. These finding reveals that the pre-remodeling nascent CL accumulates during the methotraxate induced arrest; however, the post-remodeling mature CL accumulates during the mitomycine C and vincristine induced arrest after the synthesis phase. PMID:27627658

  4. Can pharmacologic hyperprolactinemia and breast-suction induce lactation in women with normal menstrual cycles?

    PubMed

    Polatti, F; Brambilla, A; Mandelli, B; Forgione, A

    1984-01-01

    Six women--age range 21/24--with regular ovulatory cycles, voluntarily underwent with L-Sulpiride (100 mg/die) from the 5th to the 19th day of the cycle. On the 13th, 14th and 15th day of therapy breast suction by syringe breast-pump was performed on each woman every 6 hours and for 4' from either breast. Milk secretion was poor and showed no noticeable increase in the three days of breast suction. L-Sulpiride-induced hyperprolactinemia combined with nipple stimulation-induced increased PRL secretion failed to stimulate milk secretion at a level comparable with physiologic lactation in puerperium.

  5. AP4 is required for mitogen- and c-MYC-induced cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Jackstadt, Rene; Hermeking, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    AP4 represents a c-MYC-inducible bHLH-LZ transcription factor, which displays elevated expression in many types of tumors. We found that serum-starved AP4-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were unable to resume proliferation and showed a delayed S-phase entry after restimulation. Furthermore, they accumulated as tetraploid cells due to a cytokinesis defect. In addition, AP4 was required for c-MYC-induced cell cycle re-entry. AP4-deficient MEFs displayed decreased expression of CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2), which we characterized as a conserved and direct AP4 target. Activation of an AP4 estrogen receptor fusion protein (AP4-ER) enhanced proliferation of human diploid fibroblasts in a CDK2-dependent manner. However, in contrast to c-MYC-ER, AP4-ER activation was not sufficient to induce cell cycle re-entry or apoptosis in serum-starved MEFs. AP4-deficiency was accompanied by increased spontaneous and c-MYC-induced DNA damage in MEFs. Furthermore, c-MYC-induced apoptosis was decreased in AP4-deficient MEFs, suggesting that induction of apoptosis by c-MYC is linked to its ability to activate AP4 and thereby cell cycle progression. Taken together, these results indicate that AP4 is a central mediator and coordinator of cell cycle progression in response to mitogenic signals and c-MYC activation. Therefore, inhibition of AP4 function may represent a therapeutic approach to block tumor cell proliferation. PMID:25261373

  6. Computer aided lytic bone metastasis detection using regular CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; O'Connor, Stacy D.; Summers, Ronald

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a computer aided detection system to find lytic bone metastases in the spine. The CAD system is designed to run on routine chest and/or abdominal CT exams (5mm slice thickness) obtained during a patient's evaluation for other indications. The system can therefore serve as a background procedure to detect bone metastases. The spine is first automatically extracted based on adaptive thresholding, morphological operation, and region growing. The spinal cord is then traced from thoracic spine to lumbar spine using a dynamic graph search to set up a local spine coordinate system. A watershed algorithm is then applied to detect potential lytic bone lesions. A set of 26 quantitative features (density, shape and location) are computed for each detection. After a filter on the features, Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used as classifiers to determine if a detection is a true lesion. The SVM was trained using ground truth segmentation manually defined by experts.

  7. Purification and Properties of Clostridium perfringens Spore Lytic Enzymes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    occurred with, for example, urea/mercaptoethanol (UME) treatment of Bacillus megaterium (Vary, 1973). alkaline dithioerythritol/sodium dodecyl sulphate...cetylmuremides of Bacillus subtilis YT 25. Agr. Biol. Chem. 38 2357-65. Accepted 15 June 1979 91 Germination of C perfringns spores Journal qf General Microbiology...spore-lytic enzymes of Bacillus cereus have been isolated and extensively studied by Strange & Dark (1957). Gould et al. (1966), Warth (1972) and Brown et

  8. Using Phage Lytic Enzymes to Destroy Pathogenic and BW Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-14

    B. anthracis than the gamma-phage since it will not recognize the occasional B. cereus strain yielding a false positive reaction. This phage is a...bacteriolytic agent that can rapidly and specifically detect and kill Bacillus anthracis. Nature. 418: 884– 889. Nelson, D., Schuch, R., S. Zhu, D...Djurkovic and V.A. Fischetti. 2003. The phage lytic enzyme Cpl-1 as a novel antimicrobial for pneumococcal bacteremia and sepsis. Infect. Immun.71:6199

  9. Lytic bacteriophages: Potential interventions against enteric bacterial pathogens on produce.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-04-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes.

  10. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  11. Ecdysone signaling induces two phases of cell cycle exit in Drosophila cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongfeng; Flegel, Kerry; Kumar, Jayashree; McKay, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development, cell proliferation and differentiation must be tightly coordinated to ensure proper tissue morphogenesis. Because steroid hormones are central regulators of developmental timing, understanding the links between steroid hormone signaling and cell proliferation is crucial to understanding the molecular basis of morphogenesis. Here we examined the mechanism by which the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates the cell cycle in Drosophila. We find that a cell cycle arrest induced by ecdysone in Drosophila cell culture is analogous to a G2 cell cycle arrest observed in the early pupa wing. We show that in the wing, ecdysone signaling at the larva-to-puparium transition induces Broad which in turn represses the cdc25c phosphatase String. The repression of String generates a temporary G2 arrest that synchronizes the cell cycle in the wing epithelium during early pupa wing elongation and flattening. As ecdysone levels decline after the larva-to-puparium pulse during early metamorphosis, Broad expression plummets, allowing String to become re-activated, which promotes rapid G2/M progression and a subsequent synchronized final cell cycle in the wing. In this manner, pulses of ecdysone can both synchronize the final cell cycle and promote the coordinated acquisition of terminal differentiation characteristics in the wing. PMID:27737823

  12. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  13. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  14. Gravitational effects of process-induced dislocations in silicon. [during thermal cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Matters pertaining to semiconductor device fabrication were studied in terms of the influence of gravity on the production of dislocations in silicon wafers during thermal cycling in a controlled ambient where no impurities are present and oxidation is minimal. Both n-type and p-type silicon wafers having a diameter of 1.25 in to 1.5 in, with fixed orientation and resistivity values, were used. The surface dislocation densities were measured quantitatively by the Sirtl etch technique. The results show two significant features of the plastic flow phenomenon as it is related to gravitational stress: (1) the density of dislocations generated during a given thermal cycle is directly related to the duration of the cycle; and (2) the duration of the thermal cycle required to produce a given dislocation density is inversely related to the equilibrium temperature. Analysis of the results indicates that gravitational stress is instrumental in process-induced defect generation.

  15. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  16. Cordycepin enhances Epstein-Barr virus lytic infection and Epstein-Barr virus-positive tumor treatment efficacy by doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Du, Yinping; Yu, Jieshi; Du, Li; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The consistent latent presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in tumor cells offers potential for virus-targeted therapies. The switch from the latent form of EBV to the lytic form in tumor cells can lead to tumor cell lysis. In this study, we report that a natural small molecule compound, cordycepin, can induce lytic EBV infection in tumor cells. Subsequently, we demonstrate that cordycepin can enhance EBV reactivating capacity and EBV-positive tumor cell killing ability of low dose doxorubicin. The combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin phosphorylates CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) through protein kinase C (PKC)-p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway, and C/EBPβ is required for the activation of lytic EBV infection. Most importantly, an in vivo experiment demonstrates that the combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin is more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in SCID mice than is doxorubicin alone. Our findings establish that cordycepin can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy for treatment of EBV-positive tumors.

  17. Lytic enzyme production optimization using low-cost substrates and its application in the clarification of xanthan gum culture broth

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cíntia Reis; Silva, Marilia Lordelo Cardoso; Kamida, Helio Mitoshi; Goes-Neto, Aristoteles; Koblitz, Maria Gabriela Bello

    2014-01-01

    Lytic enzymes are widely used in industrial biotechnology as they are able to hydrolyze the bacterial cell wall. One application of these enzymes is the clarification of the culture broth for the production of xanthan gum, because of its viability in viscous media and high specificity. The screening process for filamentous fungi producing lytic enzymes, the optimization of production of these enzymes by the selected microorganism, and the optimization of the application of the enzymes produced in the clarification of culture broth are presented in this article. Eleven fungal isolates were tested for their ability to produce enzymes able to increase the transmittance of the culture broth containing cells of Xanthomonas campestris. To optimize the secretion of lytic enzymes by the selected microorganism the following variables were tested: solid substrate, initial pH, incubation temperature, and addition of inducer (gelatin). Thereafter, secretion of the enzymes over time of incubation was assessed. To optimize the clarification process a central composite rotational design was applied in which the pH of the reaction medium, the dilution of the broth, and the reaction temperature were evaluated. The isolate identified as Aspergillus tamarii was selected for increasing the transmittance of the broth from 2.1% to 54.8%. The best conditions for cultivation of this microorganism were: use of coconut husk as solid substrate, with 90% moisture, at 30°C for 20 days. The lytic enzymes produced thereby were able to increase the transmittance of the culture broth from 2.1% to 70.6% at 65°C, without dilution and without pH adjustment. PMID:25473487

  18. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  19. Specific lytic activity against mycobacterial antigens is inversely correlated with the severity of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    DE LA BARRERA, S S; FINIASZ, M; FRIAS, A; ALEMÁN, M; BARRIONUEVO, P; FINK, S; FRANCO, M C; ABBATE, E; SASIAIN, M Del C

    2003-01-01

    The ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with active tuberculosis to display cytotoxic responses against autologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-pulsed macrophages was evaluated. Non-MHC restricted cell-dependent lytic activity was observed in ex vivo effector cells from tuberculosis patients and was mediated mainly by CD3+γδ TCR+ T (γδ T) cells bearing CD56 and/or CD16 molecules. MHC-restricted and non-MHC restricted cytotoxic T cells (CTL) were differentially expanded upon stimulation with Mtb in tuberculosis patients and normal controls (N). Class-I restricted CD8+ CTL and class-II restricted CD4+ CTL were generated in PPD+N and to a lesser extent in PPD–N. Mtb-stimulated effector cells from tuberculosis patients became progressively non-MHC restricted CD4–CD8–γδ T cells, while lytic activity of CD4+ and CD8+CTL decreased gradually as the disease became more severe. On the other hand, target cells were lysed by ex vivo cells from tuberculosis patients through the Fas-FasL and perforin pathways. Mtb-induced CD4+ CTL from tuberculosis patients and N controls preferentially employed the Fas-FasL mechanism. Mtb-induced CD8+ CTL effector cells from patients used the perforin-based mechanism while cells from N controls also used the Fas-FasL pathway. While Mtb-induced γδ CTL from patients and PPD–N employed the latter mechanism cells from PPD+N individuals also used the perforin pathway. It can be concluded that shifts in the CTL response and the cytolytic mechanisms take place as the pulmonary involvement becomes more severe. PMID:12780692

  20. The mysterious human epidermal cell cycle, or an oncogene-induced differentiation checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Gandarillas, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, we reported that proto-oncogene MYC promoted differentiation of human epidermal stem cells, a finding that was surprising to the MYC and the skin research communities. MYC was one of the first human oncogenes identified, and it had been strongly associated with proliferation. However, it was later shown that MYC could induce apoptosis under low survival conditions. Currently, the notion that MYC promotes epidermal differentiation is widely accepted, but the cell cycle mechanisms that elicit this function remain unresolved. We have recently reported that keratinocytes respond to cell cycle deregulation and DNA damage by triggering terminal differentiation. This mechanism might constitute a homeostatic protection face to cell cycle insults. Here, I discuss recent and not-so-recent evidence suggesting the existence of a largely unexplored oncogene-induced differentiation response (OID) analogous to oncogene-induced apoptosis (OIA) or senescence (OIS). In addition, I propose a model for the role of the cell cycle in skin homeostasis maintenance and for the dual role of MYC in differentiation. PMID:23114621

  1. Ibuprofen and apigenin induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Elsisi, Nahed S; Darling-Reed, Selina; Lee, Eunsook Y; Oriaku, Ebenezer T; Soliman, Karam F

    2005-02-28

    In case of injury or disease, microglia are recruited to the site of the pathology and become activated as evidenced by morphological changes and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Evidence suggests that microglia proliferate by cell division to create gliosis at the site of pathological conditions such as the amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease and the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. The hyperactivation of microglia contributes to neurotoxicity. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory compounds modulate the progression of cell cycle and induce apoptosis of the activated cells. We investigated the effects of ibuprofen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) and apigenin (a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties) on the cell cycle of the murine microglial cell line BV-2. The findings indicate that apigenin-induced cell cycle arrest preferentially in the G2/M phase and ibuprofen caused S phase arrest. The binding of annexin V-FITC to the membranes of cells which indicates the apoptotic process were examined, whereas the DNA was stained with propidium iodide. Both apigenin and ibuprofen induced apoptosis significantly in early and late stages. The induction of apoptosis by ibuprofen and apigenin was confirmed using TUNEL assay, revealing that 25 microM apigenin and 250 microM ibuprofen significantly increased apoptosis in BV-2 cells. The results from the present study suggest that anti-inflammatory compounds might inhibit microglial proliferation by modulating the cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

  2. Recent climate-induced variations in terrestrial carbon cycle over tropics: A model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichii, K.; Nemani, R. R.; Hashimoto, H.

    2003-12-01

    Tropical forests accounts for about 20 percent of the world terrestrial carbon and one-third of global terrestrial NPP. Atmospheric inversion studies show that additional factors such as CO2 fertilization and climate changes, should work as a carbon sink despite of CO2 emission due to deforestation in tropical regions. However, responses of tropical ecosystems to environmental changes and current carbon sink mechanisms are still unknown. The goal of this study is (1) to characterize the climate influences on tropical carbon cycle such as GPP, NPP and NEP, and (2) to analyze recent interannual variations in terrestrial carbon cycle over tropics. We investigated the relationship between climate factors (temperature, precipitation, radiation, and VPD) and several carbon cycle components, and analyzed recent carbon cycle variations over tropics using Biome BGC with NCEP reanalysis climate data from 1982 to 1999. In tropical ecosystems, interannual variations in GPP are mainly explained by radiation variations, and temperature and precipitation variation are secondary important. NPP and NEP interannual variations are primarily determined by temperature variation, and radiation came as a secondary important factors. Precipitation, which was considered as an important climate factor that control interannual variations in carbon cycle in tropics, has little effects on interannual variation in tropical carbon cycle possibly because of abundant rainfall. Then, recent interannual variations in terrestrial carbon cycle over tropics were analyzed from 1982-1999. Tropics show gradual increases in GPP, NPP, and NEP at a rate of several percent per recent 18 years with large drop in 1998. Both climate change and CO2 fertilization have impact on recent enhancement of terrestrial carbon uptake. Of all climate factors, radiation-induced enhancement shows important role in enhancing CO2 uptake over Amazon. On the other hand, variations in precipitation and vapor pressure did not make

  3. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II HLA-DRα Is Downregulated by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Lytic Transactivator RTA and MARCH8

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Pei, Yong-gang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains two modes of life cycle, the latent and lytic phases. To evade the attack of the cell host's immune system, KSHV switches from the lytic to the latent phase, a phase in which only a few of viral proteins are expressed. The mechanism by which KSHV evades the attack of the immune system and establishes latency has not been fully understood. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are key components of the immune system defense mechanism against viral infections. Here we report that HLA-DRα, a member of the MHC-II molecules, was downregulated by the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein encoded by KSHV ORF50, an important regulator of the viral life cycle. RTA not only downregulated HLA-DRα at the protein level through direct binding and degradation through the proteasome pathway but also indirectly downregulated the protein level of HLA-DRα by enhancing the expression of MARCH8, a member of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) proteins. Our findings indicate that KSHV RTA facilitates evasion of the virus from the immune system through manipulation of HLA-DRα. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causal role in a number of human cancers, and its persistence in infected cells is controlled by the host's immune system. The mechanism by which KSHV evades an attack by the immune system has not been well understood. This work represents studies which identify a novel mechanism by which the virus can facilitate evasion of an immune system. We now show that RTA, the replication and transcription activator encoded by KSHV (ORF50), can function as an E3 ligase to degrade HLA-DRα. It can directly bind and induce degradation of HLA-DRα through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In addition to the direct regulation of HLA-DRα, RTA can also indirectly downregulate the level of HLA-DRα protein by upregulating transcription of MARCH8

  4. A global response induced in Escherichia coli by redox-cycling agents overlaps with that induced by peroxide stress.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, J T; Demple, B

    1989-01-01

    Escherichia coli treated with nontoxic levels of the superoxide-generating redox-cycling agents menadione and paraquat showed dramatic changes in protein composition as monitored by two-dimensional gel analysis. The distribution of proteins synthesized after treatment with these agents overlapped significantly with that seen after hydrogen peroxide treatment, and it included all the proteins in the oxyR regulon. The redox-cycling agents also elicited the synthesis of at least 33 other proteins that were not seen with hydrogen peroxide, including three heat shock proteins, the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase, the DNA repair protein endonuclease IV, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. At least some of these redox-inducible proteins appear to be part of a specific response to intracellular superoxide. E. coli is thus equipped with a network of inducible responses against oxidative damage, controlled in multiple regulatory pathways. Images PMID:2472381

  5. A global response induced in Escherichia coli by redox-cycling agents overlaps with that induced by peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J T; Demple, B

    1989-07-01

    Escherichia coli treated with nontoxic levels of the superoxide-generating redox-cycling agents menadione and paraquat showed dramatic changes in protein composition as monitored by two-dimensional gel analysis. The distribution of proteins synthesized after treatment with these agents overlapped significantly with that seen after hydrogen peroxide treatment, and it included all the proteins in the oxyR regulon. The redox-cycling agents also elicited the synthesis of at least 33 other proteins that were not seen with hydrogen peroxide, including three heat shock proteins, the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase, the DNA repair protein endonuclease IV, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. At least some of these redox-inducible proteins appear to be part of a specific response to intracellular superoxide. E. coli is thus equipped with a network of inducible responses against oxidative damage, controlled in multiple regulatory pathways.

  6. Positive Feedback Cycle of TNFα Promotes Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced THP-1 Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Shang, Weilong; Yuan, Jizhen; Hu, Zhen; Peng, Huagang; Zhu, Junmin; Hu, Qiwen; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hui; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Yinan; Li, Shu; Hu, Xiaomei; Rao, Xiancai

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) has been demonstrated to be of importance in Staphylococcus aureus related diseases, such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Dysregulated apoptosis in AD is remarkable, and SEB can induce apoptosis of various cell types. However, the mechanisms by which SEB induces apoptosis and influences disease processes remain unclear. In this study, the recombinant SEB-induced THP-1 monocyte apoptosis was demonstrated in the absence of preliminary cell activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. SEB could up-regulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in THP-1 cells and induce apoptosis via an extrinsic pathway. TNFα could in turn increase the expression of HLA-DRa, the SEB receptor on the cell surface. As a result, a positive feedback cycle of TNFα was established. TNFα expression and SEB-induced apoptosis were decreased by knocking down the expression of either HLA-DRa or TNFR1. Therefore, the feedback cycle of TNFα is crucial for SEB functions. This work provides insights into the mechanisms of SEB-induced monocyte apoptosis and emphasizes the major role of TNFα in future related studies. PMID:27709104

  7. Raman spectrum reveals the cell cycle arrest of Triptolide-induced leukemic T-lymphocytes apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daosen; Feng, Yanyan; Zhang, Qinnan; Su, Xin; Lu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Shengde; Zhong, Liyun

    2015-04-01

    Triptolide (TPL), a traditional Chinese medicine extract, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties. Though some research results have implicated that Triptolide (TPL) can be utilized in the treatment of leukemia, it remains controversial about the mechanism of TPL-induced leukemic T-lymphocytes apoptosis. In this study, combining Raman spectroscopic data, principal component analysis (PCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, both the biochemical changes and morphological changes during TPL-induced cell apoptosis were presented. In contrast, the corresponding data during Daunorubicin (DNR)-induced cell apoptosis was also exhibited. The obtained results showed that Raman spectral changes during TPL-induced cell apoptosis were greatly different from DNR-induced cell apoptosis in the early stage of apoptosis but revealed the high similarity in the late stage of apoptosis. Moreover, above Raman spectral changes were respectively consistent with the morphological changes of different stages during TPL-induced apoptosis or DNR-induced apoptosis, including membrane shrinkage and blebbing, chromatin condensation and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Importantly, it was found that Raman spectral changes with TPL-induced apoptosis or DNR-induced apoptosis were respectively related with the cell cycle G1 phase arrest or G1 and S phase arrest.

  8. The molecular basis of polysaccharide cleavage by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Simmons, Thomas J.; Dupree, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Ciano, Luisa; Johnston, Esther M.; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S.; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Marmuse, Laurence; Fort, Sébastien; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Henrissat, Bernard; Lenfant, Nicolas; Tuna, Floriana; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Davies, Gideon J.; Leggio, Leila Lo; Walton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-containing enzymes which oxidatively break down recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin. Since their discovery LPMOs have become integral factors in the industrial utilization of biomass, especially in the sustainable generation of cellulosic bioethanol. We report here the first structural determination of an LPMO–oligosaccharide complex, yielding detailed insights into the mechanism of action of these enzymes. Using a combination of structure and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we reveal the means by which LPMOs interact with saccharide substrates. We further uncover electronic and structural features of the enzyme active site, showing how LPMOs orchestrate the reaction of oxygen with polysaccharide chains. PMID:26928935

  9. Structure of the Bacteriophage [phi]KZ Lytic Transglycosylase gp144

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-04-02

    Lytic transglycosylases are enzymes that act on the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. They cleave the glycosidic linkage between N-acetylmuramoyl and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues with the concomitant formation of a 1,6-anhydromuramoyl product. The x-ray structure of the lytic transglycosylase gp144 from the Pseudomonas bacteriophage {phi}KZ has been determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution. This protein is probably employed by the bacteriophage in the late stage of the virus reproduction cycle to destroy the bacterial cell wall to release the phage progeny. {phi}KZ gp144 is a 260-residue {alpha}-helical protein composed of a 70-residue N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The fold of the N-terminal domain is similar to the peptidoglycan-binding domain from Streptomyces albus G d-Ala-d-Ala carboxypeptidase and to the N-terminal prodomain of human metalloproteinases that act on extracellular matrices. The C-terminal catalytic domain of gp144 has a structural similarity to the catalytic domain of the transglycosylase Slt70 from Escherichia coli and to lysozymes. The gp144 catalytic domain has an elongated groove that can bind at least five sugar residues at sites A-E. As in other lysozymes, the peptidoglycan cleavage (catalyzed by Glu{sup 115} in gp144) occurs between sugar-binding subsites D and E. The x-ray structure of the {phi}KZ transglycosylase complexed with the chitotetraose (N-acetylglucosamine){sub 4} has been determined to 2.6-{angstrom} resolution. The N-acetylglucosamine residues of the chitotetraose bind in sites A-D.

  10. A power-cycling-induced failure mechanism in IGBT multichip modules

    SciTech Connect

    Malberti, P.; Ciappa, M.; Cattomio, R.

    1995-12-31

    Catastrophic burn-out occurring during power-cycling of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) multichip modules have been observed to arise as a secondary failure mechanism caused by the lifting of the emitter aluminum bonding wires. In effect, the successive lift-off of the aluminum wires results in a current crowding through few IGBT cells with consequent triggering of the internal parasitic thyristor-structure. Basing on failure analysis data, this paper presents a simple qualitative model for the time dependent lift-off of aluminum bondwires in IGBT modules occurring during either field operation, or accelerated tests. This power-cycling induced failure mechanism is described in terms of the reconstruction of the aluminum interconnection as consequence of plastic deformation. Some practical conclusions are finally drawn for power cycle testing and for optimal thermal design.

  11. CTCF and Rad21 act as host cell restriction factors for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) lytic replication by modulating viral gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Mosbruger, Tim; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesvirus genomes. CTCF and cohesin regulate KSHV gene expression during latency and may also control lytic reactivation, although their role in lytic gene expression remains incompletely characterized. Here, we analyze the dynamic changes in CTCF and cohesin binding that occur during the process of KSHV viral reactivation and virion production by high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and show that both proteins dissociate from viral genomes in kinetically and spatially distinct patterns. By utilizing siRNAs to specifically deplete CTCF and Rad21, a cohesin component, we demonstrate that both proteins are potent restriction factors for KSHV replication, with cohesin knockdown leading to hundred-fold increases in viral yield. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to characterize the transcriptional effects of CTCF and cohesin depletion, and demonstrated that both proteins have complex and global effects on KSHV lytic transcription. Specifically, both proteins act as positive factors for viral transcription initially but subsequently inhibit KSHV lytic transcription, such that their net effect is to limit KSHV RNA accumulation. Cohesin is a more potent inhibitor of KSHV transcription than CTCF but both proteins are also required for efficient transcription of a subset of KSHV genes. These data reveal novel effects of CTCF and cohesin on transcription from a relatively small genome that resemble their effects on the cellular genome by acting as

  12. Naphthazarin enhances ionizing radiation-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Young; Park, Seong-Joon; Shim, Jae Woong; Yang, Kwangmo; Kang, Ho Sung; Heo, Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Naphthazarin (Naph, DHNQ, 5,8-dihydroxy-l,4-naphthoquinone) is one of the naturally available 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives that are well-known for their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial and antitumor cytotoxic effects in cancer cells. Herein, we investigated whether Naph has effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Naph reduced the MCF-7 cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that Naph and/or IR increased the p53-dependent p21 (CIP/WAF1) promoter activity. Noteworthy, our ChIP assay results showed that Naph and IR combined treatment activated the p21 promoter via inhibition of binding of multi-domain proteins, DNMT1, UHRF1 and HDAC1. Apoptosis and cell cycle analyses demonstrated that Naph and IR combined treatment induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Herein, we showed that Naph treatment enhances IR-induced cell cycle arrest and death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through the p53-dependent p21 activation mechanism. These results suggest that Naph might sensitize breast cancer cells to radiotherapy by enhancing the p53-p21 mechanism activity.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes induces host DNA damage and delays the host cell cycle to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Elsa; Costa, Ana Catarina; Brito, Cláudia; Costa, Lionel; Pombinho, Rita; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a human intracellular pathogen widely used to uncover the mechanisms evolved by pathogens to establish infection. However, its capacity to perturb the host cell cycle was never reported. We show that Lm infection affects the host cell cycle progression, increasing its overall duration but allowing consecutive rounds of division. A complete Lm infectious cycle induces a S-phase delay accompanied by a slower rate of DNA synthesis and increased levels of host DNA strand breaks. Additionally, DNA damage/replication checkpoint responses are triggered in an Lm dose-dependent manner through the phosphorylation of DNA-PK, H2A.X, and CDC25A and independently from ATM/ATR. While host DNA damage induced exogenously favors Lm dissemination, the override of checkpoint pathways limits infection. We propose that host DNA replication disturbed by Lm infection culminates in DNA strand breaks, triggering DNA damage/replication responses, and ensuring a cell cycle delay that favors Lm propagation. PMID:24552813

  14. Suppression of the antiferroelectric phase during polarization cycling of an induced ferroelectric phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoming; Tan, Xiaoli

    2015-08-17

    The ceramic Pb{sub 0.99}Nb{sub 0.02}[(Zr{sub 0.57}Sn{sub 0.43}){sub 0.92}Ti{sub 0.08}]{sub 0.98}O{sub 3} can exist in either an antiferroelectric or a ferroelectric phase at room temperature, depending on the thermal and electrical history. The antiferroelectric phase can be partially recovered from the induced ferroelectric phase when the applied field reverses polarity. Therefore, polarization cycling of the ferroelectric phase in the ceramic under bipolar fields at room temperature is accompanied with repeated phase transitions. In this letter, the stability of the recovered antiferroelectric phase upon electrical cycling of the ceramic is investigated. Ex-situ X-ray diffraction reveals that bipolar cycling suppresses the antiferroelectric phase; this is indirectly supported by piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} measurements. It is speculated that the accumulated charged point defects during polarization cycling stabilize the polar ferroelectric phase. The findings presented are important to the fundamental studies of electric fatigue and field-induced phase transitions in ferroelectrics.

  15. Heat-induced darkening and spectral broadening in photodarkened ytterbium-doped fiber under thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Mikko J; Montiel i Ponsoda, Joan J; Koplow, Jeffrey P; Honkanen, Seppo

    2009-06-08

    We study thermal bleaching of photodarkening-induced loss in a 20-microm core diameter, large-mode-area ytterbium-doped silica fiber. Pristine and photodarkened samples are subjected to thermal cycling pulses. Recovery of the photodarkened fiber absorption coefficient initiates at approximately 350 degrees C and complete recovery is reached at approximately 625 degrees C. However, prior to recovery, the photodarkened fiber exhibits further heat-induced increase of absorption loss. This increase of loss is attributed to both a permanent increase of loss-inducing color centers and a temperature-dependent broadening of the absorption spectrum. Post-irradiation heat-induced formation of color centers suggests the presence of an intermediate energy state in the near-infrared photochemical mechanism for photodarkening.

  16. Duty cycle dependence of ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis in a human clot model.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Jason M; Holland, Christy K; Lindsell, Christopher J; Shaw, George J

    2007-04-01

    Combined ultrasound and tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) therapy, or ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis (UET), has been shown to improve recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We measured the effect of ultrasound duty cycle on the lytic efficacy of 120 kHz UET in an in vitro human clot model. The hypothesis was that an increase in duty cycle increases rt-PA lytic efficacy. Human whole blood clots were exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound and rt-PA for 30 min in human plasma. The duty cycle ranged from 0% to 80%, where 0% represents sham exposure. Clot lytic rate was measured by recording the clot width over time. The clot width after 30 min exposure to rt-PA and ultrasound decreases with increasing duty cycle. The initial lytic rate increased linearly with duty cycle.

  17. Model for Estimating Life-Cycle Costs Associated with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-10

    decisions. Currently, the cash outlays by the government for noise-induced hearing loss ( NIHL ) caused to service personnel by loud systems and spaces are...un-accounted for in estimates of life-cycle costs. A companion report demonstrated that a NIHL prediction algorithm from the American National...compensation costs of the predicted NIHL in this population. A numerical example of the algorithm operation was included. Using cost values applicable to

  18. Behavior and Properties of Mature Lytic Granules at the Immunological Synapse of Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Min; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Stevens, David R.; Rettig, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Killing of virally infected cells or tumor cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires targeting of lytic granules to the junction between the CTL and its target. We used whole-cell patch clamp to measure the cell capacitance at fixed intracellular [Ca2+] to study fusion of lytic granules in human CTLs. Expression of a fluorescently labeled human granzyme B construct allowed identification of lytic granule fusion using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this way capacitance steps due to lytic granule fusion were identified. Our goal was to determine the size of fusing lytic granules and to describe their behavior at the plasma membrane. On average, 5.02 ± 3.09 (mean ± s.d.) lytic granules were released per CTL. The amplitude of lytic granule fusion events was ~ 3.3 fF consistent with a diameter of about 325 nm. Fusion latency was biphasic with time constants of 15.9 and 106 seconds. The dwell time of fusing lytic granules was exponentially distributed with a mean dwell time of 28.5 seconds. Fusion ended in spite of the continued presence of granules at the immune synapse. The mobility of fusing granules at the membrane was indistinguishable from that of lytic granules which failed to fuse. While dwelling at the plasma membrane lytic granules exhibit mobility consistent with docking interspersed with short periods of greater mobility. The failure of lytic granules to fuse when visible in TIRF at the membrane may indicate that a membrane-confined reaction is rate limiting. PMID:26296096

  19. Myricetin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianfang; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Sun, Qianqian; Zang, Wenqiao; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2015-10-01

    Myricetin is a flavonoid that is abundant in fruits and vegetables and has protective effects against cancer and diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of myricetin against gastric cancer (GC) is not fully understood. We researched myricetin on the proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle in GC HGC-27 and SGC7901 cells, to explore the underlying mechanism of action. Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, Western blotting, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis assay were used to evaluate the effects of myricetin on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the cell cycle. To analyze the binding properties of ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) with myricetin, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis was performed. CCK8 assay showed that myricetin inhibited GC cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that myricetin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in GC cells. Western blotting indicated that myricetin influenced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of GC cells by regulating related proteins. SPR analysis showed strong binding affinity of RSK2 and myricetin. Myricetin bound to RSK2, leading to increased expression of Mad1, and contributed to inhibition of HGC-27 and SGC7901 cell proliferation. Our results suggest the therapeutic potential of myricetin in GC.

  20. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains

    PubMed Central

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. Material and Methods The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. Conclusions The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed

  2. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K3 and K5 Ubiquitin E3 Ligases Have Stage-Specific Immune Evasion Roles during Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Brulois, Kevin; Toth, Zsolt; Wong, Lai-Yee; Feng, Pinghui; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Ensser, Armin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The downregulation of immune synapse components such as major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and ICAM-1 is a common viral immune evasion strategy that protects infected cells from targeted elimination by cytolytic effector functions of the immune system. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two membrane-bound ubiquitin E3 ligases, called K3 and K5, which share the ability to induce internalization and degradation of MHC-I molecules. Although individual functions of K3 and K5 outside the viral genome are well characterized, their roles during the KSHV life cycle are still unclear. In this study, we individually introduced the amino acid-coding sequences of K3 or K5 into a ΔK3 ΔK5 recombinant virus, at either original or interchanged genomic positions. Recombinants harboring coding sequences within the K5 locus showed higher K3 and K5 protein expression levels and more rapid surface receptor downregulation than cognate recombinants in which coding sequences were introduced into the K3 locus. To identify infected cells undergoing K3-mediated downregulation of MHC-I, we employed a novel reporter virus, called red-green-blue-BAC16 (RGB-BAC16), which was engineered to harbor three fluorescent protein expression cassettes: EF1α-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1), polyadenylated nuclear RNA promoter (pPAN)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and pK8.1-monomeric blue fluorescent protein (tagBFP), marking latent, immediate early, and late viral gene expression, respectively. Analysis of RGB-derived K3 and K5 deletion mutants showed that while the K5-mediated downregulation of MHC-I was concomitant with pPAN induction, the reduction of MHC-I surface expression by K3 was evident in cells that were enriched for pPAN-driven EGFPhigh and pK8.1-driven blue fluorescent protein-positive (BFP+) populations. These data support the notion that immunoreceptor downregulation occurs by a sequential process wherein K5 is critical

  3. Molecular Basis for Lytic Bacteriophage Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Duerkop, Breck A.; Huo, Wenwen; Bhardwaj, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human intestine harbors diverse communities of bacteria and bacteriophages. Given the specificity of phages for their bacterial hosts, there is growing interest in using phage therapies to combat the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. A significant barrier to such therapies is the rapid development of phage-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need to understand how bacteria acquire phage resistance in vivo. Here we identify novel lytic phages in municipal raw sewage that kill Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that resides in the human intestine. We show that phage infection of E. faecalis requires a predicted integral membrane protein that we have named PIPEF (for phage infection protein from E. faecalis). We find that PIPEF is conserved in E. faecalis and harbors a 160-amino-acid hypervariable region that determines phage tropism for distinct enterococcal strains. Finally, we use a gnotobiotic mouse model of in vivo phage predation to show that the sewage phages temporarily reduce E. faecalis colonization of the intestine but that E. faecalis acquires phage resistance through mutations in PIPEF. Our findings define the molecular basis for an evolutionary arms race between E. faecalis and the lytic phages that prey on them. They also suggest approaches for engineering E. faecalis phages that have altered host specificity and that can subvert phage resistance in the host bacteria. PMID:27578757

  4. Pfaffosidic Fraction from Hebanthe paniculata Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Caspase-3-Induced Apoptosis in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Cogliati, Bruno; Latorre, Andréia Oliveira; Akisue, Gokithi; Nagamine, Márcia Kazumi; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Hansen, Daiane; Sanches, Daniel Soares; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan

    2015-01-01

    Hebanthe paniculata roots (formerly Pfaffia paniculata and popularly known as Brazilian ginseng) show antineoplastic, chemopreventive, and antiproliferative properties. Functional properties of these roots and their extracts are usually attributed to the pfaffosidic fraction, which is composed mainly by pfaffosides A–F. However, the therapeutic potential of this fraction in cancer cells is not yet entirely understood. This study aimed to analyze the antitumoral effects of the purified pfaffosidic fraction or saponinic fraction on the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Cellular viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were evaluated, respectively, by MTT assay, BrdU incorporation, activated caspase-3 immunocytochemistry, and DNA fragmentation assay. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry and the cell cycle-related proteins were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blot. The cells exposed to pfaffosidic fraction had reduced viability and cellular growth, induced G2/M at 48 h or S at 72 h arrest, and increased sub-G1 cell population via cyclin E downregulation, p27KIP1 overexpression, and caspase-3-induced apoptosis, without affecting the DNA integrity. Antitumoral effects of pfaffosidic fraction from H. paniculata in HepG2 cells originated by multimechanisms of action might be associated with cell cycle arrest in the S phase, by CDK2 and cyclin E downregulation and p27KIP1 overexpression, besides induction of apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. PMID:26075002

  5. A Stress-Induced Small RNA Modulates Alpha-Rhizobial Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Marta; Frage, Benjamin; Wright, Patrick R.; Becker, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms adjusting replication initiation and cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions are crucial for microbial survival. Functional characterization of the trans-encoded small non-coding RNA (trans-sRNA) EcpR1 in the plant-symbiotic alpha-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed a role of this class of riboregulators in modulation of cell cycle regulation. EcpR1 is broadly conserved in at least five families of the Rhizobiales and is predicted to form a stable structure with two defined stem-loop domains. In S. meliloti, this trans-sRNA is encoded downstream of the divK-pleD operon. ecpR1 belongs to the stringent response regulon, and its expression was induced by various stress factors and in stationary phase. Induced EcpR1 overproduction led to cell elongation and increased DNA content, while deletion of ecpR1 resulted in reduced competitiveness. Computationally predicted EcpR1 targets were enriched with cell cycle-related mRNAs. Post-transcriptional repression of the cell cycle key regulatory genes gcrA and dnaA mediated by mRNA base-pairing with the strongly conserved loop 1 of EcpR1 was experimentally confirmed by two-plasmid differential gene expression assays and compensatory changes in sRNA and mRNA. Evidence is presented for EcpR1 promoting RNase E-dependent degradation of the dnaA mRNA. We propose that EcpR1 contributes to modulation of cell cycle regulation under detrimental conditions. PMID:25923724

  6. Mutation of a single lytic transglycosylase causes aberrant septation and inhibits cell separation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Cloud, Karen A; Dillard, Joseph P

    2004-11-01

    The function of lytic peptidoglycan transglycosylases is poorly understood. Single lytic transglycosylase mutants of Escherichia coli have no growth phenotype. By contrast, mutation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ltgC inhibited cell separation without affecting peptidoglycan monomer production. Thus, LtgC has a dedicated function in gonococcal cell division.

  7. Middle infrared radiation induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Shih, Meng-Her; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2013-01-01

    There were studies investigating the effects of broadband infrared radiation (IR) on cancer cell, while the influences of middle-infrared radiation (MIR) are still unknown. In this study, a MIR emitter with emission wavelength band in the 3-5 µm region was developed to irradiate A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. It was found that MIR exposure inhibited cell proliferation and induced morphological changes by altering the cellular distribution of cytoskeletal components. Using quantitative PCR, we found that MIR promoted the expression levels of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related and Rad3-related), TP53 (tumor protein p53), p21 (CDKN1A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A) and GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible), but decreased the expression levels of cyclin B coding genes, CCNB1 and CCNB2, as well as CDK1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1). The reduction of protein expression levels of CDC25C, cyclin B1 and the phosphorylation of CDK1 at Thr-161 altogether suggest G(2)/M arrest occurred in A549 cells by MIR. DNA repair foci formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) marker γ-H2AX and sensor 53BP1 was induced by MIR treatment, it implies the MIR induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted from DSB. This study illustrates a potential role for the use of MIR in lung cancer therapy by initiating DSB and blocking cell cycle progression.

  8. Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 Initiates Oxidation-stimulated Osmotic Lysis of Trypanosoma brucei brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Amy Styer; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Human innate immunity against the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei is conferred by trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs), against which human-infective T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense have evolved resistance. TLF-1 is a subclass of high density lipoprotein particles defined by two primate-specific apolipoproteins: the ion channel-forming toxin ApoL1 (apolipoprotein L1) and the hemoglobin (Hb) scavenger Hpr (haptoglobin-related protein). The role of oxidative stress in the TLF-1 lytic mechanism has been controversial. Here we show that oxidative processes are involved in TLF-1 killing of T. brucei brucei. The lipophilic antioxidant N,N′-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine protected TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei from lysis. Conversely, lysis of TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei was increased by the addition of peroxides or thiol-conjugating agents. Previously, the Hpr-Hb complex was postulated to be a source of free radicals during TLF-1 lysis. However, we found that the iron-containing heme of the Hpr-Hb complex was not involved in TLF-1 lysis. Furthermore, neither high concentrations of transferrin nor knock-out of cytosolic lipid peroxidases prevented TLF-1 lysis. Instead, purified ApoL1 was sufficient to induce lysis, and ApoL1 lysis was inhibited by the antioxidant DPPD. Swelling of TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei was reminiscent of swelling under hypotonic stress. Moreover, TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei became rapidly susceptible to hypotonic lysis. T. brucei brucei cells exposed to peroxides or thiol-binding agents were also sensitized to hypotonic lysis in the absence of TLF-1. We postulate that ApoL1 initiates osmotic stress at the plasma membrane, which sensitizes T. brucei brucei to oxidation-stimulated osmotic lysis. PMID:26645690

  9. Protein PSMD8 may mediate microgravity-induced cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan; Wu, Di; Chen, Xiaoning

    Microgravity environment of space can induce a serial of changes in cells, such as morphology alterations, cytoskeleton disorder and cell cycle disturbance. Our previous study of simulated-microgravity on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos demonstrated 26s proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 8 (PSMD8) might be a microgravity sensitive gene. However, functional study on PSMD8 is very limited and it has not been cloned in zebrafish till now. In this study, we tried to clone PSMD8 gene in zebrafish, quantify its protein expression level in zebrafish embryos after simulated microgravity and identify its possible function in cell cycle regulation. A rotary cell culture system (RCCS) designed by national aeronautics and apace administration (NASA) of America was used to simulate microgravity. The full-length of psmd8 gene in zebrafish was cloned. Preliminary analysis on its sequence and phylogenetic tree construction were carried out subsequently. Quantitative analysis by western blot showed that PSMD8 protein expression levels were significantly increased 1.18 and 1.22 times after 24-48hpf and 24-72hpf simulated microgravity, respectively. Moreover, a significant delay on zebrafish embryo development was found in simulated-microgravity exposed group. Inhibition of PSMD8 protein in zebrafish embryonic cell lines ZF4 could block cell cycle in G1 phase, which indicated that PSMD8 may play a role in cell cycle regulation. Interestingly, simulated-microgravity could also block ZF4 cell in G1 phase. Whether it is PSMD8 mediated cell cycle regulation result in the zebrafish embryo development delay after simulated microgravity exposure still needs further study. Key Words: PSMD8; Simulated-microgravity; Cell cycle; ZF4 cell line

  10. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  11. Commitment to Lysogeny Is Preceded by a Prolonged Period of Sensitivity to the Late Lytic Regulator Q in Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2014-01-01

    A key event in development is the irreversible commitment to a particular cell fate, which may be concurrent with or delayed with respect to the initial cell fate decision. In this work, we use the paradigmatic bacteriophage λ lysis-lysogeny decision circuit to study the timing of commitment. The lysis-lysogeny decision is made based on the expression trajectory of CII. The chosen developmental strategy is manifested by repression of the pR and pL promoters by CI (lysogeny) or by antitermination of late gene expression by Q (lysis). We found that expression of Q in trans from a plasmid at the time of infection resulted in a uniform lytic decision. Furthermore, expression of Q up to 50 min after infection results in lysis of the majority of cells which initially chose lysogenic development. In contrast, expression of Q in cells containing a single chromosomal prophage had no effect on cell growth, indicating commitment to lysogeny. Notably, if the prophage was present in 10 plasmid-borne copies, Q expression resulted in lytic development, suggesting that the cellular phage chromosome number is the critical determinant of the timing of lysogenic commitment. Based on our results, we conclude that (i) the lysogenic decision made by the CI-Cro switch soon after infection can be overruled by ectopic Q expression at least for a time equivalent to one phage life cycle, (ii) the presence of multiple λ chromosomes is a prerequisite for a successful Q-mediated switch from lysogenic to lytic development, and (iii) phage chromosomes within the same cell can reach different decisions. PMID:25092034

  12. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-08-03

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages.

  13. Combined Inhibition of the BMP pathway and the RANK-RANKL axis in a Mixed Lytic/blastic Prostate Cancer Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Mandeep S.; Alaee, Farhang; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Sugiyama, Osamu; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Stout, David; Dougall, William C.; Lieberman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of combined inhibition of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity in a mixed lytic/blastic prostate cancer lesion in bone. Human prostate cancer cells (C4 2b) were injected into immunocompromised mice using an intratibial injection model to create mixed lytic/blastic lesions. RANK-Fc, a recombinant RANKL antagonist, was injected subcutaneously three times a week (10mg/kg) to inhibit RANKL and subsequent formation, function and survival of osteoclasts. Inhibition of BMP activity was achieved by transducing prostate cancer cells ex vivo with a retroviral vector expressing noggin (retronoggin; RN). There were three treatment groups (RANK-Fc treatment, RN treatment and combined RN and RANK-Fc treatment) and two control groups (untreated control and empty vector control for the RN treatment group). The progression of bone lesion and tumor growth was evaluated using plain radiographs, hind limb tumor size, 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-fluoride micro PET-CT, histology and histomorphometry. Treatment with RANK-Fc alone inhibited osteolysis and transformed a mixed lytic/blastic lesion into an osteoblastic phenotype. Treatment with RN alone inhibited the osteoblastic component in a mixed lytic/blastic lesion and resulted in formation of smaller osteolytic bone lesion with smaller soft tissue size. The animals treated with both RN and RANK-Fc demonstrated delayed development of bone lesions, inhibition of osteolysis, small soft tissue tumors and preservation of bone architecture with less tumor induced new bone formation. This study suggests that combined inhibition of the RANKL and the BMP pathway may be an effective biologic therapy to inhibit the progression of established mixed lytic/blastic prostate cancer lesions in bone. PMID:21073986

  14. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  15. Simvastatin induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation of bladder cancer cells via PPARγ signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yongzhi; Qian, Guofeng; Dan, Han C.; Jiang, Wei; Ju, Lingao; Wu, Min; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Xinghuan

    2016-01-01

    Simvastatin is currently one of the most common drugs for old patients with hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerotic diseases by reducing cholesterol level and anti-lipid properties. Importantly, simvastatin has also been reported to have anti-tumor effect, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. We collected several human bladder samples and performed microarray. Data analysis suggested bladder cancer (BCa) was significantly associated with fatty acid/lipid metabolism via PPAR signalling pathway. We observed simvastatin did not trigger BCa cell apoptosis, but reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by PPARγ-activation. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis indicated that simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, suggested by downregulation of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, simvastatin suppressed BCa cell metastasis by inhibiting EMT and affecting AKT/GSK3β. More importantly, we found that the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and the alterations of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1 triggered by simvastatin could be recovered by PPARγ-antagonist (GW9662), whereas the treatment of PPARα-antagonist (GW6471) shown no significant effects on the BCa cells. Taken together, our study for the first time revealed that simvastatin inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase via PPARγ signalling pathway. PMID:27779188

  16. [Cell cycle arrest at M phase induced by vinblastine in MOLT-4 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi-Sheng; Pan, Chang-Chuan; Jin, Chang-Nan; Li, Jian-Jun; Xiong, Gong-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Xi; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2009-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the biological effect of vinblastine (VLS), usually known as inductor of mitotic arrest, on MOLT-4 of ALL cells and to evaluate its significance. The cell arrest in M phase and/or cell apoptosis were induced by treatment of MOLT-4 cells with 0.05 microg/ml VLS for 0 - 12 hours; the DNA histogram was detected by flow cytometry; the morphological changes of cells were observed by confocal microscopy; the cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis and morphological changes of cells before and after arrest were analyzed by using arrest increasing rate (AIR), arrest efficiency (AE), apoptosis rate (AR) and morphologic parameters respectively. The results indicated that the cell arrest did not accompanied by significant increase of apoptosis rate; the DNA histogram of cell arrest showed dynamic change of cell cycle in time-dependent manner; the arrest efficiency could be quantified. The cell arrest at M phase was accompanied by cell stack in S phase, the cell proliferation rate dropped after cell arrest occurred. The cells arrested at M phase possessed of characteristic morphologic features in cell mitosis. It is concluded that the vinblastine can solely induce arrest of MOLT-4 cells at M phase. This study provides experimental basis for further investigating the relation of cell cycle arrest to apoptosis, mechanism of checkpoint and development of new anticancer drugs.

  17. Solar Cycle Variability in Mean Thermospheric Composition and Temperature Induced by Atmospheric Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M., Jr.; Forbes, J. M.; Hagan, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Vertically-propagating atmospheric thermal tides whose origins lie in Earth's lower atmosphere are now widely recognized as one of the dominant "meteorological" drivers of space weather. Many prior research efforts have focused on documenting and understanding the role that dissipating tides play in determining the longitudinal and seasonal variability associated with lower thermospheric winds, temperature, and constituent densities. However, considerably less attention has focused on understanding the potential solar cycle variability in the mean thermospheric state induced by the tides. In this paper we utilize the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM), forced with observationally-based tides at the model lower boundary from the Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT, from Oberheide et al. [2011]), to elucidate how the dissipating tides induce variations of up to 30 K in the zonal-mean thermosphere temperature between solar minimum and maximum. Numerical experiments are performed for the month of September and for solar minimum, medium, and maximum conditions in order to quantify the solar cycle variability associated with the different terms in the thermodynamic energy, major and minor neutral constituent continuity equations. Our analysis indicates that solar cycle variability in neutral temperatures results from a combination of net eddy heat transport effects and tidal modulation of net nitric oxide (NO) cooling. The chemical and dynamical pathways through which dissipating tides affect mean NO cooling differently at solar minimum and maximum are diagnosed.

  18. Tangeretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through upregulation of PTEN expression in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Yu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Yan-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tangeretin (TANG), present in peel of citrus fruits, has been shown to various medicinal properties such as chemopreventive and neuroprotective. However, the chemopreventive effect of TANG on glioblastoma cells has not been examined. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer potential of TANG in glioblastoma cells and to investigate the related mechanism. Human glioblastoma U-87MG and LN-18 cells were treated with 45μM concentration of TANG and cell growth was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell death were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The cells treated with TANG were significantly increased cell growth suppression and cell death effects than vehicle treated cells. Further, TANG treatment increases G2/M arrest and apoptosis by modulating PTEN and cell-cycle regulated genes such as cyclin-D and cdc-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, the ability of TANG to decrease cell growth and to induce cell death was compromised when PTEN was knockdown by siRNA. Taken together, the chemopreventive effect of TANG is associated with regulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in glioblastoma, thereby attenuating glioblastoma cell growth. Hence, the present findings suggest that TANG may be a therapeutic agent for glioblastoma treatment.

  19. Photodynamically induced cell cycle and gene expression changes: precursors of apoptosis introduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Barbara E.; Verwanger, Thomas; Schnitzhofer, Gerlinde

    1997-12-01

    Photodynamic tumor therapy is able to induce apoptosis with many photosensitizers. Apoptosis is based on changes in gene expression and correlated to cell cycle activities. In this study, therefore, quantitative determination of the expression of the (proto)oncoges c-myc and bcl-2 in normal and transformed fibroblasts following PDT with ALA and low dose irradiation was connected with cell cycle analysis in order to investigate, if a risk for occurrence of secondary tumors by irreversibly increased oncogene expression can be found, if phases of the cell cycle show selective sensitivity to the therapy, and if changes in one of the two or both parameters may either precede or prepare an introduction of apoptosis. The results show (1) no mutagenic risk by timely limited overexpression of c-myc and bcl-2, (2) no selective cell cycle sensitivity to the therapy; but, in contrary, sustained increase of the proliferative activity of the transformed cells by the interaction of bcl-2 and c-myc, indicating a risk of promotion of tumor regrowth in sublethally damaged areas, (3) the introduction of apoptotic processes by low dose PDT in the cytoplasm/mitochondria and less in the nucleus. Transformed cells show higher constitutive gene expression and proliferative activities than normal cells.

  20. Glucocorticoids activate Epstein Barr Virus lytic replication through the upregulation of immediate early BZLF1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eric V.; Webster Marketon, Jeanette I.; Chen, Min; Lo, Kwok Wai; Kim, Seung-jae; Glaser, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Psychological stress-associated immune dysregulation has been shown to disrupt the steady state expression and reactivate latent herpes viruses. One such virus is the Epstein Barr virus (EBV), which is associated with several human malignancies. EBV infects >90% of people living in North America and persists for life in latently infected cells. Although several studies have shown that glucocorticoids (GCs) can directly induce reactivation of the latent virus, the mechanism of stress hormone involvement in the control of EBV gene expression is not well understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that GCs can induce the latent EBV genome to lytically replicate through the induction of the EBV immediate early gene BZLF1 which encodes the lytic transactivator protein ZEBRA. We show a dose-dependent upregulation of BZLF1 mRNA expression by hydrocortisone (HC) and dexamethasone (Dex) in Daudi cells, an EBV genome positive Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line, and Dex-induction of the early gene products BLLF3 (encoding for the EBV dUTPase) and BALF5 (encoding for the EBV DNA polymerase). We show that Daudi cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GR) that mediate Dex-dependent upregulation of BZLF1 mRNA levels. This effect was inhibited by both the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 and by cycloheximide. The results suggest that GCs, in addition to inducing stress-related immune dysregulation, can mediate latent EBV reactivation through the induction of the BZLF1 gene. PMID:20466055

  1. Permanence induced by life-cycle resonances: the periodical cicada problem.

    PubMed

    Kon, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    Periodical cicadas are known for their unusually long life cycle for insects and their prime periodicity of either 13 or 17 years. One of the explanations for the prime periodicity is that the prime periods are selected to prevent cicadas from resonating with predators with submultiple periods. This paper considers this hypothesis by investigating a population model for periodical predator and prey. The study shows that if the periods of the two periodical species are not coprime, then the predator cannot resist the invasion of the prey. On the other hand, if the periods are coprime, then the predator can resist the invasion of the prey. It is also shown that if the periods are not coprime, then the life-cycle resonance can induce a permanent system, in which no cohorts are missing in both populations. On the other hand, if the periods are coprime, then the system cannot be permanent.

  2. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Ho; Park, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin). Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:27478478

  3. Prion-induced neurotoxicity: Possible role for cell cycle activity and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bujdoso, Raymond; Landgraf, Matthias; Jackson, Walker S; Thackray, Alana M

    2015-08-12

    Protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases arise through neurotoxicity induced by aggregation of host proteins. These conditions include Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease, tauopathies and prion diseases. Collectively, these conditions are a challenge to society because of the increasing aged population and through the real threat to human food security by animal prion diseases. It is therefore important to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie protein misfolding-induced neurotoxicity as this will form the basis for designing strategies to alleviate their burden. Prion diseases are an important paradigm for neurodegenerative conditions in general since several of these maladies have now been shown to display prion-like phenomena. Increasingly, cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response are recognised as cellular events that participate in the neurotoxic process of various neurodegenerative diseases, and their associated animal models, which suggests they are truly involved in the pathogenic process and are not merely epiphenomena. Here we review the role of cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response in neurodegeneration associated with protein misfolding diseases, and suggest that these events contribute towards prion-induced neurotoxicity. In doing so, we highlight PrP transgenic Drosophila as a tractable model for the genetic analysis of transmissible mammalian prion disease.

  4. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  5. Tumor cell cycle arrest induced by shear stress: Roles of integrins and Smad

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Chang, Cheng Allen; Lee, Ding-Yu; Lee, Pei-Ling; Yeh, Yu-Ming; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial flow in and around tumor tissue affects the mechanical microenvironment to modulate tumor cell growth and metastasis. We investigated the roles of flow-induced shear stress in modulating cell cycle distribution in four tumor cell lines and the underlying mechanisms. In all four cell lines, incubation under static conditions for 24 or 48 h led to G0/G1 arrest; in contrast, shear stress (12 dynes/cm2) induced G2/M arrest. The molecular basis of the shear effect was analyzed, and the presentation on molecular mechanism is focused on human MG63 osteosarcoma cells. Shear stress induced increased expressions of cyclin B1 and p21CIP1 and decreased expressions of cyclins A, D1, and E, cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdk)-1, -2, -4, and -6, and p27KIP1 as well as a decrease in Cdk1 activity. Using specific antibodies and small interfering RNA, we found that the shear-induced G2/M arrest and corresponding changes in G2/M regulatory protein expression and activity were mediated by αvβ3 and β1 integrins through bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IA-specific Smad1 and Smad5. Shear stress also down-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) binding activity and osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase expressions in MG63 cells; these responses were mediated by αvβ3 and β1 integrins through Smad5. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which shear stress induces G2/M arrest in tumor cells and inhibits cell differentiation and demonstrate the importance of mechanical microenvironment in modulating molecular signaling, gene expression, cell cycle, and functions in tumor cells. PMID:18310319

  6. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun-Mi; Nguyen, Long Duy; Shim, Jaekyung; Song, Young-Han

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  7. Interplay between cell cycle and autophagy induced by boswellic acid analog

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Anup S.; Guru, Santosh K.; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Ashok; Ahmad, Masroor; Bhushan, Shashi; Sharma, Parduman R.; Mahajan, Priya; Shah, Bhahwal A.; Sharma, Simmi; Nargotra, Amit; Vishwakarma, Ram; Korkaya, Hasan; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of autophagy induced by boswellic acid analog BA145 on cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells. BA145 induced robust autophagy in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and exhibited cell proliferation inhibition by inducing cells to undergo G2/M arrest. Inhibition of G2/M progression was associated with decreased expression of cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin E, cdc2, cdc25c and CDK-1. Pre-treatment of cells with autophagy inhibitors or silencing the expression of key autophagy genes abrogated BA145 induced G2/M arrest and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. It was further observed that BA145 induced autophagy by targeting mTOR kinase (IC50 1 μM), leading to reduced expression of p-mTOR, p-p70S6K (T389), p-4EBP (T37/46) and p-S6 (S240/244). Notably, inhibition of mTOR signalling by BA145 was followed by attendant activation of AKT and its membrane translocation. Inhibition of Akt through pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs enhanced BA145 mediated autophagy, G2/M arrest and reduced expression of G2/M regulators. Further studies revealed that BA145 arbitrated inhibition of mTOR led to the activation of Akt through IGFR/PI3k/Akt feedback loop. Intervention in IGFR/PI3k/Akt loop further depreciated Akt phosphorylation and its membrane translocation that culminates in augmented autophagy with concomitant G2/M arrest and cell death. PMID:27680387

  8. Genomic analysis of Bacillus subtilis lytic bacteriophage ϕNIT1 capable of obstructing natto fermentation carrying genes for the capsule-lytic soluble enzymes poly-γ-glutamate hydrolase and levanase.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Tatsuro; Abe, Naoki; Kimura, Keitarou; Suzuki, Atsuto; Kaneko, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains including the fermented soybean (natto) starter produce capsular polymers consisting of poly-γ-glutamate and levan. Capsular polymers may protect the cells from phage infection. However, bacteriophage ϕNIT1 carries a γ-PGA hydrolase gene (pghP) that help it to counteract the host cell's protection strategy. ϕNIT had a linear double stranded DNA genome of 155,631-bp with a terminal redundancy of 5,103-bp, containing a gene encoding an active levan hydrolase. These capsule-lytic enzyme genes were located in the possible foreign gene cluster regions between central core and terminal redundant regions, and were expressed at the late phase of the phage lytic cycle. All tested natto origin Spounavirinae phages carried both genes for capsule degrading enzymes similar to ϕNIT1. A comparative genomic analysis revealed the diversity among ϕNIT1 and Bacillus phages carrying pghP-like and levan-hydrolase genes, and provides novel understanding on the acquisition mechanism of these enzymatic genes.

  9. CDK4/6 inhibition induces epithelial cell cycle arrest and ameliorates acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    DiRocco, Derek P.; Bisi, John; Roberts, Patrick; Strum, Jay; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sharpless, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and urgently requires new preventative therapies. Expression of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor transgene protects against AKI, suggesting that manipulating the tubular epithelial cell cycle may be a viable therapeutic strategy. Broad spectrum small molecule CDK inhibitors are protective in some kidney injury models, but these have toxicities and epithelial proliferation is eventually required for renal repair. Here, we tested a well-tolerated, novel and specific small molecule inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, PD 0332991, to investigate the effects of transient cell cycle inhibition on epithelial survival in vitro and kidney injury in vivo. We report that CDK4/6 inhibition induced G0/G1 cycle arrest in cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTC) at baseline and after injury. Induction of transient G0/G1 cycle arrest through CDK4/6 inhibition protected hRPTC from DNA damage and caspase 3/7 activation following exposure to the nephrotoxins cisplatin, etoposide, and antimycin A. In vivo, mice treated with PD 0332991 before ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) exhibited dramatically reduced epithelial progression through S phase 24 h after IRI. Despite reduced epithelial proliferation, PD 0332991 ameliorated kidney injury as reflected by improved serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels 24 h after injury. Inflammatory markers and macrophage infiltration were significantly decreased in injured kidneys 3 days following IRI. These results indicate that induction of proximal tubule cell cycle arrest with specific CDK4/6 inhibitors, or “pharmacological quiescence,” represents a novel strategy to prevent AKI. PMID:24338822

  10. Berberine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma SNU-5 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-Pin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lee, Jau-Hong; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the inhibited growth (cytotoxic activity) of berberine and apoptotic pathway with its molecular mechanism of action. METHODS: The in vitro cytotoxic techniques were complemented by cell cycle analysis and determination of sub-G1 for apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma SNU-5 cells. Percentage of viable cells, cell cycle, and sub-G1 group (apoptosis) were examined and determined by the flow cytometric methods. The associated proteins for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were examined by Western blotting. RESULTS: For SNU-5 cell line, the IC (50) was found to be 48 μmol/L of berberine. In SNU-5 cells treated with 25-200 μmol/L berberine, G2/M cell cycle arrest was observed which was associated with a marked increment of the expression of p53, Wee1 and CDk1 proteins and decreased cyclin B. A concentration-dependent decrease of cells in G0/G1 phase and an increase in G2/M phase were detected. In addition, apoptosis detected as sub-G0 cell population in cell cycle measurement was proved in 25-200 μmol/L berberine-treated cells by monitoring the apoptotic pathway. Apoptosis was identified by sub-G0 cell population, and upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, release of Ca2+, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and then led to the release of mitochondrial cytochrome C into the cytoplasm and caused the activation of caspase-3, and finally led to the occurrence of apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Berberine induces p53 expression and leads to the decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, Cytochrome C release and activation of caspase-3 for the induction of apoptosis. PMID:16440412

  11. The adverse effects of high fat induced obesity on female reproductive cycle and hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donthireddy, Laxminarasimha Reddy

    The prevalence of obesity, an established risk and progression factor for abnormal reproductive cycle and tissue damage in female mice. It leads to earlier puberty, menarche in young females and infertility. There are extensive range of consequences of obesity which includes type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Obesity is the interaction between dietary intake, genes, life style and environment. The interplay of hormones estrogen, insulin, and leptin is well known on energy homeostasis and reproduction. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of high fat induced obesity on reproductive cycles and its hormonal abnormalities on mice model. Two week, 3 month and 8 month long normal (WT) and very high fat diet (VHFD) diet course is followed. When mice are fed with very high fat diet, there is a drastic increase in weight within the first week later. There was a significant (p<0.001) increase in leptin levels in 6 month VHFD treated animals. 2 week, 3 month and 6 month time interval pap smear test results showed number of cells, length of estrous cycle and phases of the estrous cycle changes with VHFD mice(n=30) compared to normal diet mice(n=10). These results also indicate that the changes in the reproductive cycles in VHFD treated female mice could be due to the changes in hormones. Histo-pathological analyses of kidney, ovary, liver, pancreas, heart and lungs showed remarkable changes in some tissue on exposure to very high fat. Highly deposited fat packets observed surrounding the hepatocytes and nerve cells.

  12. Purified Lesser weever fish venom (Trachinus vipera) induces eryptosis, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Fezai, Myriam; Slaymi, Chaker; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Lang, Florian; Jemaà, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Accidents caused by the sting of Trachinus vipera (known as Lesser weever fish) are relatively common in shallow waters of the Mediterranean. Symptoms after the sting vary from severe pain to edema or even tissue necrosis in some cases. Here we show that purified Lesser weever fish venom induces eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death, and apoptosis of human colon carcinoma cells. The venom leads to erythrocyte shrinkage, phosphatidylserine translocation and increased intracellular Ca2+, events typical for eryptosis. According to mitochondrial staining cancer cells dyed after the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Trachinus vipera venom further causes cell cycle arrest. PMID:27995979

  13. Few-cycle pulse laser-induced damage of thin films in air and vacuum ambience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.; Talisa, Noah; Tempea, Gabriel; Austin, Drake R.; Neacsu, Catalin; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced damage mechanisms were investigated for an ultra-broadband chirped mirror, as part of a systematic study of few-cycle pulse laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of widely-used ultra-broadband optics, in vacuum and in air, for single and multi-pulse regimes (S-on-1). Microscopic analysis of damage morphology suggests that three different damage mechanisms occur across the fluence range 0.15-0.4J/cm2, while no ablation was yet observed. The three regimes resulted in shallow swelling (< 10 nm tall), tall blistering ( 150 nm tall), and annular blistering (damage suppressed at highest intensity, forming a ring shape). Descriptions of the potential mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Biophysical studies of the interactions between the phage varphiKZ gp144 lytic transglycosylase and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Isabelle; Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Giroux, Anne-Marie; Pigeon, Xavier; Arseneault, Marjolaine; Levesque, Roger C; Auger, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    The use of naturally occurring lytic bacteriophage proteins as specific antibacterial agents is a promising way to treat bacterial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The opportunity to develop bacterial resistance to these agents is minimized by their broad mechanism of action on bacterial membranes and peptidoglycan integrity. In the present study, we have investigated lipid interactions of the gp144 lytic transglycosylase from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage varphiKZ. Interactions with zwitterionic lipids characteristic of eukaryotic cells and with anionic lipids characteristic of bacterial cells were studied using fluorescence, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, circular dichroism, Langmuir monolayers, and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). Gp144 interacted preferentially with anionic lipids, and the presence of gp144 in anionic model systems induced membrane disruption and lysis. Lipid domain formation in anionic membranes was observed by BAM. Gp144 did not induce disruption of zwitterionic membranes but caused an increase in rigidity of the lipid polar head group. However, gp144 interacted with zwitterionic and anionic lipids in a model membrane system containing both lipids. Finally, the gp144 secondary structure was not significantly modified upon lipid binding.

  15. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B. . E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2007-06-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells.

  16. Propionibacterium acnes inhibits FOXM1 and induces cell cycle alterations in human primary prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Sayanjali, Behnam; Christensen, Gitte J M; Al-Zeer, Munir A; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been detected in diseased human prostate tissue, and cell culture experiments suggest that the bacterium can establish a low-grade inflammation. Here, we investigated its impact on human primary prostate epithelial cells. Microarray analysis confirmed the inflammation-inducing capability of P. acnes but also showed deregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. qPCR experiments showed that viable P. acnes downregulates a master regulator of cell cycle progression, FOXM1. Flow cytometry experiments revealed that P. acnes increases the number of cells in S-phase. We tested the hypothesis that a P. acnes-produced berninamycin-like thiopeptide is responsible for this effect, since it is related to the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin. The thiopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster was strongly expressed; it is present in subtype IB of P. acnes, but absent from type IA, which is most abundant on human skin. A knock-out mutant lacking the gene encoding the berninamycin-like peptide precursor was unable to downregulate FOXM1 and to halt the cell cycle. Our study reveals a novel host cell-interacting activity of P. acnes.

  17. Methamphetamine Alters the Normal Progression by Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Austin R.; Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a potent psychostimulant with a high addictive capacity, which induces many deleterious effects on the brain. Chronic MA abuse leads to cognitive dysfunction and motor impairment. MA affects many cells in the brain, but the effects on astrocytes of repeated MA exposure is not well understood. In this report, we used Gene chip array to analyze the changes in the gene expression profile of primary human astrocytes treated with MA for 3 days. Range of genes were found to be differentially regulated, with a large number of genes significantly downregulated, including NEK2, TTK, TOP2A, and CCNE2. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed a highly significant clustering of genes involved in cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Further pathway analysis showed that the genes downregulated by multiple MA treatment were critical for G2/M phase progression and G1/S transition. Cell cycle analysis of SVG astrocytes showed a significant reduction in the percentage of cell in the G2/M phase with a concomitant increase in G1 percentage. This was consistent with the gene array and validation data, which showed that repeated MA treatment downregulated the genes associated with cell cycle regulation. This is a novel finding, which explains the effect of MA treatment on astrocytes and has clear implication in neuroinflammation among the drug abusers. PMID:25290377

  18. Variation of Mars' Induced Magnetospheric Boundaries over the Last Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. E. S.; Sanchez-Cano, B.; Andrews, D. J.; Lester, M.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Nichols, J. D.; Fraenz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since Mars lacks an intrinsic global magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian ionosphere and upper atmosphere. This interaction gives rise to an induced magnetosphere around the planet with distinct boundaries encapsulating, and separating plasma populations of differing origin. The European Space Agency Mars Express (MEX) mission has been in operation for a full solar cycle, affording us an extensive and unique dataset to study the response of the main Martian plasma boundaries to external and internal factors. From analysis of the electron flux measured by the Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms Electron Spectrometer (ASPERA-3 ELS) instrument on-board MEX, we present the initial results of identification of the bow shock and induced magnetospheric boundaries along with their variation in position over the last solar cycle. Compared to other bodies in the solar system that lack an intrinsic global magnetic field, the presence of crustal magnetic fields distributed across the Southern hemisphere of Mars further complicates and differentiates the Martian plasma system. The impact of the presence of these crustal magnetic fields on the location of boundaries is also studied.

  19. Notch signaling in response to excitotoxicity induces neurodegeneration via erroneous cell cycle reentry

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, S; Liu, S; Brai, E; Kaczarowski, M; Alberi, L

    2015-01-01

    Neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke and epilepsy are currently marred by the lack of effective treatments to prevent neuronal death. Erroneous cell cycle reentry (CCR) is hypothesized to have a causative role in neurodegeneration. We show that forcing S-phase reentry in cultured hippocampal neurons is sufficient to induce neurodegeneration. We found that kainic-acid treatment in vivo induces erroneous CCR and neuronal death through a Notch-dependent mechanism. Ablating Notch signaling in neurons provides neuroprotection against kainic acid-induced neuronal death. We further show that kainic-acid treatment activates Notch signaling, which increases the bioavailability of CyclinD1 through Akt/GSK3β pathway, leading to aberrant CCR via activation of CyclinD1-Rb-E2F1 axis. In addition, pharmacological blockade of this pathway at critical steps is sufficient to confer resistance to kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity in mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that excitotoxicity leads to neuronal death in a Notch-dependent manner through erroneous CCR. PMID:25822340

  20. A Topical Mitochondria-Targeted Redox-Cycling Nitroxide Mitigates Oxidative Stress-Induced Skin Damage.

    PubMed

    Brand, Rhonda M; Epperly, Michael W; Stottlemyer, J Mark; Skoda, Erin M; Gao, Xiang; Li, Song; Huq, Saiful; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E; Greenberger, Joel S; Falo, Louis D

    2017-03-01

    Skin is the largest human organ, and it provides a first line of defense that includes physical, chemical, and immune mechanisms to combat environmental stress. Radiation is a prevalent environmental stressor. Radiation-induced skin damage ranges from photoaging and cutaneous carcinogenesis caused by UV exposure, to treatment-limiting radiation dermatitis associated with radiotherapy, to cutaneous radiation syndrome, a frequently fatal consequence of exposures from nuclear accidents. The major mechanism of skin injury common to these exposures is radiation-induced oxidative stress. Efforts to prevent or mitigate radiation damage have included development of antioxidants capable of reducing reactive oxygen species. Mitochondria are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis plays a major role in radiation-induced tissue damage. We reasoned that targeting a redox cycling nitroxide to mitochondria could prevent reactive oxygen species accumulation, limiting downstream oxidative damage and preserving mitochondrial function. Here we show that in both mouse and human skin, topical application of a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant prevents and mitigates radiation-induced skin damage characterized by clinical dermatitis, loss of barrier function, inflammation, and fibrosis. Further, damage mitigation is associated with reduced apoptosis, preservation of the skin's antioxidant capacity, and reduction of irreversible DNA and protein oxidation associated with oxidative stress.

  1. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  2. The small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) are involved in regulating the latent-to-lytic switch in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Beatrix; Strehle, Martin; Sattler, Christine; Bund, Dagmar; Flach, Britta; Stoeger, Tobias; Haas, Jürgen G.; Adler, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The human gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), which are associated with a variety of diseases including tumors, produce various small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). Like all herpesviruses, they show two stages in their life cycle: lytic replication and latency. During latency, hardly any viral proteins are expressed to avoid recognition by the immune system. Thus, sncRNAs might be exploited since they are less likely to be recognized. Specifically, it has been proposed that sncRNAs might contribute to the maintenance of latency. This has already been shown in vitro, but the respective evidence in vivo is very limited. A natural model system to explore this question in vivo is infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). We used this model to analyze a MHV-68 mutant lacking the expression of all miRNAs. In the absence of the miRNAs, we observed a higher viral genomic load during late latency in the spleens of mice. We propose that this is due to a disturbed regulation of the latent-to-lytic switch, altering the balance between latent and lytic infection. Hence, we provide for the first time evidence that gammaherpesvirus sncRNAs contribute to the maintenance of latency in vivo. PMID:27561205

  3. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-26

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer.

  4. GnRH-agonist induced depressive and anxiety symptoms during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Azem, Foad; Aharonov, Inbar; Ben Avi, Irit; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul; Amit, Ami; Weizman, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a GnRH agonist inducing a hypogonadic state during IVF-ET cycles induces negative mood symptoms, we conducted a prospective randomized study in 108 women comparing two different controlled ovarian stimulation protocols. A significant phase effect was observed for depression and anxiety symptoms during IVF-ET cycles reflecting an increase in symptoms between the hypogonadal phase and the peak in gonadotropin stimulation; however, the hypogonadal phase induced by the GnRH agonist was not associated with a significant increase in any of the studied mood parameters.

  5. Arecoline induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shuei-Kuen; Chang, Mei-Chi; Su, Cheng-Yao; Chi, Lin-Yang; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Ching; Tseng, Wan-Yu; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Hsu, Ming-Lun; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2012-08-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing is a common oral habit in South Asia and Taiwan. BQ consumption may increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), and periodontitis as well as systemic diseases (atherosclerosis, hypertension, etc.). However, little is known about the toxic effect of BQ components on endothelial cells that play important roles for angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, tissue fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases. EAhy 926 (EAHY) endothelial cells were exposed to arecoline, a major BQ alkaloid, for various time periods. Cytotoxicity was estimated by 3-(4, 5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The cell cycle distribution of EAHY cells residing in sub-G0/G1, G0/G1, S-, and G2/M phases was analyzed by propidium iodide staining of cellular DNA content and flow cytometry. Some EAHY cells retracted, became round-shaped in appearance, and even detached from the culture plate after exposure to higher concentrations of arecoline (> 0.4 mM). At concentrations of 0.4 and 0.8 mM, arecoline induced significant cytotoxicity to EAHY cells. At similar concentrations, arecoline induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased sub-G0/G1 population, a hallmark of apoptosis. Interestingly, prolonged exposure to arecoline (0.1 mM) for 12 and 21 days significantly suppressed the proliferation of EAHY cells, whereas EAHY cells showed adaptation and survived when exposed to 0.05 mM arecoline. These results suggest that BQ components may contribute to the pathogenesis of OSF and BQ chewing-related cardiovascular diseases via toxicity to oral or systemic endothelial cells, leading to impairment of vascular function. During BQ chewing, endothelial damage may be induced by areca nut components and associate with the pathogenesis of OSF, periodontitis, and cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Centchroman induces redox-dependent apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shyam, Hari; Singh, Neetu; Kaushik, Shweta; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Centchroman (CC) or Ormeloxifene has been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in various types of cancer cells. This has, however, not been addressed for endometrial cancer cells where its (CC) mechanism of action remains unclear. This study focuses on the basis of antineoplasticity of CC by blocking the targets involved in the cell cycle, survival and apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Ishikawa Human Endometrial Cancer Cells were cultured under estrogen deprived medium, exposed to CC and analyzed for proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we also analyzed oxidative stress induced by CC. Cell viability studies confirmed the IC50 of CC in Ishikawa cells to be 20 µM after 48 h treatment. CC arrests the cells in G0/G1 phase through cyclin D1 and cyclin E mediated pathways. Phosphatidylserine externalization, nuclear morphology changes, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and alteration of Bcl-2 family protein expression clearly suggest ongoing apoptosis in the CC treated cells. Activation of caspase 3 & 9, up-regulation of AIF and inhibition of apoptosis by z-VAD-fmk clearly explains the participation of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. Further, the increase of ROS, loss of MMP, inhibition of antioxidant (MnSOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and GST) and inhibition of apoptosis with L-NAC suggests CC induced oxidative stress leading to apoptosis via mitochondria mediated pathway. Therefore, CC could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of Endometrial Cancer adjunct to its utility as a contraceptive and an anti-breast cancer agent.

  7. Characterization and quenching of friction-induced limit cycles of electro-hydraulic servovalve control systems with transport delay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Jay

    2010-10-01

    This paper develops a systematic and straightforward methodology to characterize and quench the friction-induced limit cycle conditions in electro-hydraulic servovalve control systems with transport delay in the transmission line. The nonlinear friction characteristic is linearized by using its corresponding describing function. The delay time in the transmission line, which could accelerate the generation of limit cycles is particularly considered. The stability equation method together with parameter plane method provides a useful tool for the establishment of necessary conditions to sustain a limit cycle directly in the constructed controller coefficient plane. Also, the stable region, the unstable region, and the limit cycle region are identified in the parameter plane. The parameter plane characterizes a clear relationship between limit cycle amplitude, frequency, transport delay, and the controller coefficients to be designed. The stability of the predicted limit cycle is checked by plotting stability curves. The stability of the system is examined when the viscous gain changes with respect to the temperature of the working fluid. A feasible stable region is characterized in the parameter plane to allow a flexible choice of controller gains. The robust prevention of limit cycle is achieved by selecting controller gains from the asymptotic stability region. The predicted results are verified by simulations. It is seen that the friction-induced limit cycles can be effectively predicted, removed, and quenched via the design of the compensator even in the case of viscous gain and delay time variations unconditionally.

  8. 2'-Nitroflavone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Mariano G; Blank, Viviana C; Marder, Mariel; Roguin, Leonor P

    2008-09-08

    The mechanism of antitumor action of a synthetic nitroflavone derivative, 2'-nitroflavone, was evaluated in vitro in HeLa human cervix adenocarcinoma cells. We showed that the nitroflavone derivative slowed down the cell cycle at the S phase and increase the population of cells at the G2/M phase after 24h of incubation. The treatment with 2'-nitroflavone also induced an apoptotic response, characterized by an increase of the sub-G1 fraction of cells, by cells with chromatin condensation and membrane blebbing, by a typical ladder of DNA fragmentation and by detection of apoptotic cells stained with Annexin V. The observed apoptosis was regulated by caspase-8 and -9, both contributing to the activation of the effector caspase-3. In addition, inhibitors of caspase-8 or -9 partially protected HeLa cells from 2'-nitroflavone-induced cell death. We also found that 2'-nitroflavone did not affect the total amount of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins, although a translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria was evident after 6h of exposure. Furthermore, 2'-nitroflavone decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein, induced the release of cytochrome C to cytosol and increased the levels of Fas and Fas-L. Our results indicated that both death receptor and mitochondria-dependent pathways are involved in the apoptotic cell death triggered by 2'-nitroflavone and suggest that this derivative could be a potentially useful agent for the treatment of certain malignancies.

  9. Fixation probability for lytic viruses: the attachment-lysis model.

    PubMed

    Patwa, Z; Wahl, L M

    2008-09-01

    The fixation probability of a beneficial mutation is extremely sensitive to assumptions regarding the organism's life history. In this article we compute the fixation probability using a life-history model for lytic viruses, a key model organism in experimental studies of adaptation. The model assumes that attachment times are exponentially distributed, but that the lysis time, the time between attachment and host cell lysis, is constant. We assume that the growth of the wild-type viral population is controlled by periodic sampling (population bottlenecks) and also include the possibility that clearance may occur at a constant rate, for example, through washout in a chemostat. We then compute the fixation probability for mutations that increase the attachment rate, decrease the lysis time, increase the burst size, or reduce the probability of clearance. The fixation probability of these four types of beneficial mutations can be vastly different and depends critically on the time between population bottlenecks. We also explore mutations that affect lysis time, assuming that the burst size is constrained by the lysis time, for experimental protocols that sample either free phage or free phage and artificially lysed infected cells. In all cases we predict that the fixation probability of beneficial alleles is remarkably sensitive to the time between population bottlenecks.

  10. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  11. Magnetization changes in 2% Mn pipeline steel induced by uniaxial tensile stress cycles of increasing amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Atherton, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    The application of cyclic stress to a ferromagnetic normally gives irreversible magnetization shifts towards the anhysteretic magnetization. Here experimental measurements are presented that show the irreversible magnetization changes induced by cyclic uniaxial isofield stress applied after magnetization at particular points on minor hysteresis loops. Selecting the (M,H) point and magnetization history, then applying stress cycles of increasing amplitude enables irreversible changes, initially away from and later toward the anhysteretic curve, to be obtained. Examples of a second inversion (i.e., irreversible shifts initially toward, then away and subsequently, toward the anhysteretic magnetization) with increasing amplitude cyclic uniaxial stress are also given. Preisach diagrams are used to interpret these results qualitatively in terms of local, more extensive and global anhysteretic states.

  12. Long-Term Plasticity in Reflex Excitability Induced by Five Weeks of Arm and Leg Cycling Training after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Klarner, Taryn; Barss, Trevor S.; Sun, Yao; Kaupp, Chelsea; Loadman, Pamela M.; Zehr, E. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Neural connections remain partially viable after stroke, and access to these residual connections provides a substrate for training-induced plasticity. The objective of this project was to test if reflex excitability could be modified with arm and leg (A & L) cycling training. Nineteen individuals with chronic stroke (more than six months postlesion) performed 30 min of A & L cycling training three times a week for five weeks. Changes in reflex excitability were inferred from modulation of cutaneous and stretch reflexes. A multiple baseline (three pretests) within-subject control design was used. Plasticity in reflex excitability was determined as an increase in the conditioning effect of arm cycling on soleus stretch reflex amplitude on the more affected side, by the index of modulation, and by the modulation ratio between sides for cutaneous reflexes. In general, A & L cycling training induces plasticity and modifies reflex excitability after stroke. PMID:27827888

  13. Irradiation-induced protein inactivation reveals Golgi enzyme cycling to cell periphery

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2012-01-01

    Acute inhibition is a powerful technique to test proteins for direct roles and order their activities in a pathway, but as a general gene-based strategy, it is mostly unavailable in mammalian systems. As a consequence, the precise roles of proteins in membrane trafficking have been difficult to assess in vivo. Here we used a strategy based on a genetically encoded fluorescent protein that generates highly localized and damaging reactive oxygen species to rapidly inactivate exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during live-cell imaging and address the long-standing question of whether the integrity of the Golgi complex depends on constant input from the ER. Light-induced blockade of ER exit immediately perturbed Golgi membranes, and surprisingly, revealed that cis-Golgi-resident proteins continuously cycle to peripheral ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and depend on ER exit for their return to the Golgi. These experiments demonstrate that ER exit and extensive cycling of cis-Golgi components to the cell periphery sustain the mammalian Golgi complex. PMID:22421362

  14. Radiation-induced cardiomyopathy as a function of radiation beam gating to the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, David J.; Flanagan, Michael F.; Southworth, Jean B.; Hadley, Vaughn; Thibualt, Melissa Wei; Hug, Eugen B.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2004-04-01

    Portions of the heart are often unavoidably included in the primary treatment volume during thoracic radiotherapy, and radiation-induced heart disease has been observed as a treatment-related complication. Such complications have been observed in humans following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease and treatment of the left breast for carcinoma. Recent attempts have been made to prevent re-stenosis following angioplasty procedures using external beam irradiation. These attempts were not successful, however, due to the large volume of heart included in the treatment field and subsequent cardiac morbidity. We suggest a mechanism for sparing the heart from radiation damage by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle and delivering radiation only when the heart is in a relatively hypoxic state. We present data from a rat model testing this hypothesis and show that radiation damage to the heart can be altered by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle. This technique may be useful in reducing radiation damage to the heart secondary to treatment for diseases such as Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer.

  15. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induces ferroptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in head and neck carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Renyu; Zhang, Ziheng; Chen, Lingfeng; Zhou, Yunfang; Zou, Peng; Feng, Chen; Wang, Li; Liang, Guang

    2016-10-10

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, exhibits a wide range of biological roles including a highly efficient and specific anti-tumor activity. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of DHA on head and neck carcinoma cells and elucidate the potential mechanisms. We used five head and neck carcinoma cell lines and two non-tumorigenic normal epithelial cell lines to achieve our goals. Cells were exposed to DHA and subjected to cellular activity assays including viability, cell cycle analysis, cell death, and angiogenic phenotype. Our results show that DHA causes cell cycle arrest which is mediated through Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1). We also demonstrate that DHA induces ferroptosis and apoptosis in head and neck carcinoma cells. Lastly, our results show that DHA alters the angiogenic phenotype of cancer cells by reducing the expression of angiogenic factors and the ability of cancer cells to support endothelial cell tubule formation. Our study suggests that DHA specifically causes head and neck cancer cell death through contribution from both ferroptosis and apoptosis. DHA may represent an effective strategy in head and neck cancer treatment.

  16. Quantitative stratigraphic models of rifts based on orbitally induced lake cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.E.; Schlische, R.W.

    1988-02-01

    Orbitally induced lacustrine cycles in the rift sequences of the Newark Supergroup provide a direct measure of sedimentation rates (S) averaged at the 20 thousand year level. For the Triassic, the basins followed a pattern exemplified by the Newark basin: early fluvial fill, followed by lacustrine deposition where S slowly and exponentially decreased. Once lacustrine deposition began, lakes fluctuated with orbital cycles; however, maximum lake depth (MLD) began shallow, rapidly deepened, then slowly and exponentially shallowed toward the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. These observations suggest a model based on the filling of a trough, the simplest of which is a graben where the volumetric sedimentation rate (V) is constant and extension is uniform. First, S equals subsidence until hydrographic closure. Afterward, S = BV/L(B/sup 2/D/sup 2/ + (2BVt(A-D))/L)/sup minus/1/2 (t = time after closure and A, D, B, and L are the final widths, depth, and length of the graben). The observed changes in MLD conform to the predictions of this filing model. Half-graben are more complex, but similar patterns result. Major deviations reflect tectonic events. One dramatic deviation occurred at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, where S and MLD greatly increased. This coincided with massive tholeitic magmatism, probably reflecting increased extension rates and a marked basin asymmetry. This model explains why Newark hydrocarbon targets are in strata of either the early Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, because those intervals were deposited by the deepest lakes.

  17. Quantitative stratigraphic models of rifts based on orbitally induced lake cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.E.; Schlische, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Orbitally induced lacustrine cycles in the rift sequences of the Newark Supergroup provide a direct measure of sedimentation rates (S) averaged at the 20 thousand year level. For the Triassic, the basins followed a pattern exemplified by the Newark basin: early fluvial fill, followed by lacustrine deposition where S slowly and exponentially decreased. Once lacustrine deposition began, lakes fluctuated with orbital cycles; however, maximum lake depth (MLD) began shallow, rapidly deepened, then slowly and exponentially shallowed toward the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. These observations suggest a model based on the filling of a trough, the simplest of which is a graben where the volumetric sedimentation rate (V) is constant and extension in uniform. The observed changes in MLD conform to the predictions of this filling model. Half-graben are more complex, but similar patterns result. Major deviations reflect tectonic events. One dramatic deviation occurred at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, where subsidence and MLD greatly increased. This coincided with massive tholeiitic magmatism, probably reflecting increased extension rates and a marked basin asymmetry. This model explains why Newark hydrocarbon targets are in strata of either the early Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, because those intervals were deposited by the deepest lakes.

  18. Regulation of the viral life cycle by murine gammaherpesvirus 68 microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soowon; Jeon, Chanoh; Im, Kyungtaek; Song, Moon Jung; Min, Hyeyoung

    2017-03-01

    γ-Herpesviruses (γHV) such as Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus are important human pathogens involved in lymphoproliferation and tumorigenesis. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68, γHV-68) is an effective model for the study of γHV pathogenesis and host-virus interaction because it is closely related to human γHV. Similarly to human γHV, MHV-68 encodes 15 microRNAs (miRNAs). Although their functions remain unknown, they are thought to regulate the viral life cycle or host-virus interactions, similarly to other human γHV. Herein, we established stable cell lines expressing MHV-68 miRNAs and investigated the role of MHV-68 miRNAs in the regulation of viral life cycle. We found that mghv-miR-M1-1, -3, -5, -7, -8, -9, -10, -11, -13, and -15 repressed MHV-68 lytic replication by down-regulating expression of the replication and transcription activator (RTA) gene, whereas mghv-miR-M1-2, -4, -6, and -12 induced lytic replication by up-regulating RTA. We confirmed that the decrease in viral replication caused by mghv-miR-M1-1 was abolished by inhibition of miRNA expression via miRNA inhibitor treatment. In addition, we observed that mghv-miR-M1-1 down-regulated c-Jun indirectly and decreased cytokine production, suggesting that mghv-miR-M1-1 may inhibit MHV-68 lytic replication by inhibiting the activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling pathway.

  19. Tumor cycling hypoxia induces chemoresistance in glioblastoma multiforme by upregulating the expression and function of ABCB1

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chii-Wen; Wang, Chi-Chung; Wu, Chung-Pu; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lee, Yu-Chun; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Hsieh, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cycling hypoxia is now a well-recognized phenomenon in animal and human solid tumors. However, how tumor cycling hypoxia impacts chemotherapy is unclear. In the present study, we explored the impact and the mechanism of cycling hypoxia on tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance. Hoechst 33342 staining and hypoxia-inducible factor–1 (HIF-1) activation labeling together with immunofluorescence imaging and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to isolate hypoxic tumor subpopulations from human glioblastoma xenografts. ABCB1 expression, P-glycoprotein function, and chemosensitivity in tumor cells derived from human glioblastoma xenografts or in vitro cycling hypoxic stress-treated glioblastoma cells were determined using Western blot analysis, drug accumulation and efflux assays, and MTT assay, respectively. ABCB1 expression and P-glycoprotein function were upregulated under cycling hypoxia in glioblastoma cells concomitant with decreased responses to doxorubicin and BCNU. However, ABCB1 knockdown inhibited these effects. Moreover, immunofluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis for ABCB1, HIF-1 activation, and Hoechst 3342 in glioblastoma revealed highly localized ABCB1 expression predominantly in potentially cycling hypoxic areas with HIF-1 activation and blood perfusion in the solid tumor microenvironment. The cycling hypoxic tumor cells derived from glioblastoma xenografts exhibited higher ABCB1 expression, P-glycoprotein function, and chemoresistance, compared with chronic hypoxic and normoxic cells. Tumor-bearing mice that received YC-1, an HIF-1α inhibitor, exhibited suppressed tumor microenvironment-induced ABCB1 induction and enhanced survival rate in BCNU chemotherapy. Cycling hypoxia plays a vital role in tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance through the HIF-1–dependent induction of ABCB1. HIF-1 blockade before and concurrent with chemotherapy could suppress cycling hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. PMID:22946104

  20. Xanthones from the Leaves of Garcinia cowa Induce Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Autophagy in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengxiang; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Danqing; Lao, Yuanzhi; Fu, Wenwei; Tan, Hongsheng; Cao, Peng; Yang, Ling; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-06-19

    Two new xanthones, cowaxanthones G (1) and H (2), and 23 known analogues were isolated from an acetone extract of the leaves of Garcinia cowa. The isolated compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines and immortalized HL7702 normal liver cells, whereby compounds 1, 5, 8, and 15-17 exhibited significant cytotoxicity. Cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry showed that 5 induced cell cycle arrest at the S phase in a dose-dependent manner, 1 and 16 at the G2/M phase, and 17 at the G1 phase, while 16 and 17 induced apoptosis. Moreover, autophagy analysis by GFP-LC3 puncta formation and western blotting suggested that 17 induced autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that these xanthones possess anticancer activities targeting cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy signaling pathways.

  1. Activation of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Major Latency Locus by the Lytic Switch Protein RTA (ORF50)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Satoko; Fujita, Yuriko; Gomez, Evan; Tanese, Naoko; Wilson, Angus C.

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains a latent infection in primary effusion lymphoma cells but can be induced to enter full lytic replication by exposure to a variety of chemical inducing agents or by expression of the KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein. During latency, only a few viral genes are expressed, and these include the three genes of the so-called latency transcript (LT) cluster: v-FLIP (open reading frame 71 [ORF71]), v-cyclin (ORF72), and latency-associated nuclear antigen (ORF73). During latency, all three open reading frames are transcribed from a common promoter as part of a multicistronic mRNA. Subsequent alternative mRNA splicing and internal ribosome entry allows for the expression of each protein. Here, we show that transcription of LT cassette mRNA can be induced by RTA through the activation of a second promoter (LTi) immediately downstream of the constitutively active promoter (LTc). We identified a minimal cis-regulatory region, which overlaps with the promoter for the bicistronic K14/v-GPCR delayed early gene that is transcribed in the opposite direction. In addition to a TATA box at −30 relative to the LTi mRNA start sites, we identified three separate RTA response elements that are also utilized by the K14/v-GPCR promoter. Interestingly, LTi is unresponsive to sodium butyrate, a potent inducer of lytic replication. This suggests there is a previously unrecognized class of RTA-responsive promoters that respond to direct, but not indirect, induction of RTA. These studies highlight the fact that induction method can influence the precise program of viral gene expression during early events in reactivation and also suggest a mechanism by which RTA contributes to establishment of latency during de novo infections. PMID:15956592

  2. The Hydroclimate of East Africa: Seasonal cycle, Decadal Variability, and Human-induced Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchang

    land areas and a bimodal annual cycle with the major rainy season during MAM (often called the ``long rains'' by local people) and the second during OND (the "short rains"). To explore these distinctive features, we use the ERA-Interim Re-Analysis data to analyze the associated annual cycles of atmospheric convective stability, circulation and moisture budget. The atmosphere over East Africa is found to be convectively stable, in general, year-round but with an annual cycle dominated by the surface moist static energy (MSE), which is in phase with the precipitation annual cycle. Throughout the year, the atmospheric circulation is dominated by a pattern of convergence near the surface, divergence in the lower troposphere and convergence again at upper levels. Consistently, the convergence of the vertically integrated moisture flux is mostly negative across the year, but becomes weakly positive in the two rainy seasons. It is suggested the semi-arid/arid climate in East Africa and its bimodal rainfall annual cycle can be explained by the ventilation mechanism, in which the atmospheric convective stability over East Africa is controlled by the import of low MSE air from the relatively cool Indian Ocean off the coast and the cold winter hemisphere. During the rainy seasons, however, the off-coast SST increases (and is warmest during the long rains season) and the northerly or southerly weakens, and consequently the air imported into East Africa becomes less stable. The MSE framework is then applied to study the coupling-induced bias of the East African rainfall annual cycle often found in CMIP3/5 coupled models that overestimates the OND rainfall and underestimates the MAM rainfall, by comparing the historical (coupled) and the AMIP runs (SST-forced) for each model. It is found that a warm north and cold south SST bias over the Indian Ocean induced in coupled models is responsible for the dry MAM rainfall bias over East Africa while the ocean dynamics induced warm west and

  3. Parkin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Jung, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kang, Yeo Wool; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2015-08-14

    Parkin is a known tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which parkin acts as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, we reported that parkin expression induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. However, at that time, we did not consider the involvement of parkin in cell cycle control. In the current study, we investigated whether parkin is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppression of cancer cell growth. In our cell cycle analyses, parkin expression induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which parkin induces this G2/M arrest, we analyzed cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M transition. Parkin expression induced CDC2 phosphorylation which is known to inhibit CDC2 activity and cause G2/M arrest. Cyclin B1, which is degraded during the mitotic transition, accumulated in response to parkin expression, thereby indicating parkin-induced G2/M arrest. Next, we established that Myt1, which is known to phosphorylate and inhibit CDC2, increased following parkin expression. In addition, we found that parkin also induces increased Myt1 expression, G2/M arrest, and reduced cell viability in TNF-α-treated HCT15 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of parkin expression by parkin-specific siRNA decreased Myt1 expression and phosphorylation of CDC2 and resulted in recovered cell viability. These results suggest that parkin acts as a crucial molecule causing cell cycle arrest in G2/M, thereby suppressing tumor cell growth.

  4. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Miaoxian; Chung, Hau Yin; Li, Yaolan

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  5. Production of Lytic Enzymes by Trichoderma Isolates during in vitro Antagonism with Aspergillus Niger, The Causal Agent of Collar ROT of Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Gajera, H. P.; Vakharia, D. N.

    2012-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma (six of T. harzianum, five of T. viride, one of T. virens), which reduced variably the incidence of collar rot disease caused in peanut by Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem, were evaluated for their potential to produce lytic enzymes during in vitro antagonism. T. viride 60 inhibited highest (86.2%) growth of test fungus followed by T. harzianum 2J (80.4%) at 6 days after inoculation (DAI) on PDA media. The specific activities of chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase and protease were 11, 3.46 and 9 folds higher in T6 antagonist (T. viride 60 and A. niger interactions) followed by 8.72, 2.85 and 9 folds in T8antagonist (T. harzianum 2J and A. niger interactions), respectively, compared to the activity produced by control petri plate T13 (A. niger alone) at 6 DAI. Activity of these lytic enzymes induced in antagonists’ plates comprises the growth of Trichoderma isolates. However, cellulase and poly galacturonase were found least amount in these antagonists treatment. A significant positive correlation (p=0.01) between percentage growth inhibition of test fungus and lytic enzymes – (chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase and protease) in the culture medium of antagonist treatment established a relationship to inhibit growth of fungal pathogen by increasing the levels of these enzymes. Among the Trichoderma isolates, T. viride 60 was found best strain to be used in biological control of plant pathogen A. niger. PMID:24031802

  6. Expression and lytic efficacy assessment of the Staphylococcus aureus phage SA4 lysin gene

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Mayank; Viswas, Konasagara Nagaleekar; Abhishek; Kumar, Sujeet; Reddy, Manjunatha

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is becoming very difficult due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains. Hence, the search for novel therapeutic alternatives has become of great importance. Consequently, bacteriophages and their endolysins have been identified as potential therapeutic alternatives to antibiotic therapy against S. aureus. In the present study, the gene encoding lysin (LysSA4) in S. aureus phage SA4 was cloned and the nucleotide sequence was determined. Sequence analysis of the recombinant clone revealed a single 802-bp open reading frame encoding a partial protein with a calculated mass of 30 kDa. Results of this analysis also indicated that the LysSA4 sequence shared a high homology with endolysin of the GH15 phage and other reported phages. The LysSA4 gene of the SA4 phage was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant LysSA4 induced the lysis of host bacteria in a spot inoculation test, indicating that the protein was expressed and functionally active. Furthermore, recombinant lysin was found to have lytic activity, albeit a low level, against mastitogenic Staphylococcus isolates of bovine origin. Data from the current study can be used to develop therapeutic tools for treating diseases caused by drug-resistant S. aureus strains. PMID:23388442

  7. Activated Nrf2 Interacts with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Protein LANA-1 and Host Protein KAP1 To Mediate Global Lytic Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Gjyshi, Olsi; Roy, Arunava; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We have previously shown that KSHV utilizes the host transcription factor Nrf2 to aid in infection of endothelial cells and oncogenesis. Here, we investigate the role of Nrf2 in PEL and PEL-derived cell lines and show that KSHV latency induces Nrf2 protein levels and transcriptional activity through the COX-2/PGE2/EP4/PKCζ axis. Next-generation sequencing of KSHV transcripts in the PEL-derived BCBL-1 cell line revealed that knockdown of this activated Nrf2 results in global elevation of lytic genes. Nrf2 inhibition by the chemical brusatol also induces lytic gene expression. Both Nrf2 knockdown and brusatol-mediated inhibition induced KSHV lytic reactivation in BCBL-1 cells. In a series of follow-up experiments, we characterized the mechanism of Nrf2-mediated regulation of KSHV lytic repression during latency. Biochemical assays showed that Nrf2 interacted with KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1) and the host transcriptional repressor KAP1, which together have been shown to repress lytic gene expression. Promoter studies showed that although Nrf2 alone induces the open reading frame 50 (ORF50) promoter, its association with LANA-1 and KAP1 abrogates this effect. Interestingly, LANA-1 is crucial for efficient KAP1/Nrf2 association, while Nrf2 is essential for LANA-1 and KAP1 recruitment to the ORF50 promoter and its repression. Overall, these results suggest that activated Nrf2, LANA-1, and KAP1 assemble on the ORF50 promoter in a temporal fashion. Initially, Nrf2 binds to and activates the ORF50 promoter during early de novo infection, an effect that is exploited during latency by LANA-1-mediated recruitment of the host transcriptional repressor KAP1 on Nrf2. Cell death assays further showed that Nrf2 and KAP1 knockdown induce significant cell death in PEL cell lines

  8. Few-cycle pulse laser induced damage threshold determination of ultra-broadband optics.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Kyle R P; Talisa, Noah; Tempea, Gabriel; Austin, Drake R; Neacsu, Catalin; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2016-12-12

    A systematic study of few-cycle pulse laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) determination was performed for commercially-available ultra-broadband optics, (i.e. chirped mirrors, silver mirrors, beamsplitters, etc.) in vacuum and in air, for single and multi-pulse regime (S-on-1). Multi-pulse damage morphology at fluences below the single-pulse LIDT was studied in order to investigate the mechanisms leading to the onset of damage. Stark morphological contrast was observed between multi-pulse damage sites formed in air versus those in vacuum. One effect of vacuum testing compared to air included suppression of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation, possibly influenced by a reduced presence of damage debris. Another effect of vacuum was occasional lowering of LIDT, which appears to be due to the stress-strain performance of the coating design during laser irradiation and under the external stress of vacuum ambience. A fused silica substrate is also examined, and a non-LIPSS nanostructuring is observed on the surface. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  9. DNA replication stress induces deregulation of the cell cycle events in root meristems of Allium cepa

    PubMed Central

    Żabka, Aneta; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Prolonged treatment of Allium cepa root meristems with changing concentrations of hydroxyurea (HU) results in either premature chromosome condensation or cell nuclei with an uncommon form of biphasic chromatin organization. The aim of the current study was to assess conditions that compromise cell cycle checkpoints and convert DNA replication stress into an abnormal course of mitosis. Methods Interphase-mitotic (IM) cells showing gradual changes of chromatin condensation were obtained following continuous 72 h treatment of seedlings with 0·75 mm HU (without renewal of the medium). HU-treated root meristems were analysed using histochemical stainings (DNA-DAPI/Feulgen; starch-iodide and DAB staining for H2O2 production), Western blotting [cyclin B-like (CBL) proteins] and immunochemistry (BrdU incorporation, detection of γ-H2AX and H3S10 phosphorylation). Key Results Continuous treatment of onion seedlings with a low concentration of HU results in shorter root meristems, enhanced production of H2O2, γ-phosphorylation of H2AX histones and accumulation of CBL proteins. HU-induced replication stress gives rise to axially elongated cells with half interphase/half mitotic structures (IM-cells) having both decondensed and condensed domains of chromatin. Long-term HU treatment results in cell nuclei resuming S phase with gradients of BrdU labelling. This suggests a polarized distribution of factors needed to re-initiate stalled replication forks. Furthermore, prolonged HU treatment extends both the relative time span and the spatial scale of H3S10 phosphorylation known in plants. Conclusions The minimum cell length and a threshold level of accumulated CBL proteins are both determining factors by which the nucleus attains commitment to induce an asynchronous course of chromosome condensation. Replication stress-induced alterations in an orderly route of the cell cycle events probably reflect a considerable reprogramming of metabolic functions of

  10. Staphylococcal phage 2638a endolysin is lytic for Staphylococcus aureus and harbors an inter-lytic-domain cryptic translational start site.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious pathogen with a propensity for developing resistance to virtually all antibiotics. Staphylococcal phage 2638A endolysin is a peptidoglycan hydrolase that is lytic for Staphylococcus aureus when exposed externally, making it a new candidate antimicrobial. It sha...

  11. Capillarisin Exhibits Anticancer Effects by Inducing Apoptosis, Cell Cycle Arrest and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Loss in Osteosarcoma Cancer Cells (HOS).

    PubMed

    Chen, N-J; Hao, F-Y; Liu, H; Zhao, H; Li, J-M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the anticancer activity of capillarisin against human osteosarcoma (HOS) cancer cells in vitro. Cell viability after capillarisin drug treatment and evaluated by MTT assay. The extent of cell death induced by capillarisin was estimated by using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The effect of capillarisin on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) was demonstrated via flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) DNA-binding fluorescent dyes respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to examine the morphological changes in osteosarcoma cancer cells and presence of apoptotic bodies following capillarisin treatment. The results of this study revealed that capillarisin induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of these cancer cells after 12-h of incubation. Further, capillarisin induced significant release of LDH from these cell cultures and this LDH release was much more noticeable at higher concentrations of capillarisin. Hoechst 33258 staining revealed characteristic morphological features of apoptosis triggered by capillarisin treatment. Cell cycle analysis revealed that capillarisin induced dose-dependent G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Capillarisin also trigerred a progressive and dose-dependent reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, capillarisin inhibits cancer cell growth of osteosarcoma cells by inducing apoptosis accompanied with G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and loss in mitochondrial membrane potential.

  12. Mechanism of T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in Mia-PaCa pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Andrew M; Sarkar, Sibaji; Faller, Douglas V

    2012-06-01

    DNA oligonucleotides with sequence homology to human telomeric DNA (T-oligo) induce cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis, senescence, or autophagy in a human cancer cell type-specific manner. T-oligo has potential as a new therapeutic strategy in oncology because of its ability to target certain types of tumor cells while sparing normal ones. In the present study, we demonstrate the T-oligo-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. To further contribute to the mechanistic understanding of T-oligo, we also identify cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) as a functional mediator in the T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active cdk2 mutant abrogates T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in these tumor cells while knockdown of cdk2 expression alone recapitulates the T-oligo effect. Finally, we demonstrate the dispensability of T-oligo-induced ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response-signaling pathways, which have long been considered functional in the T-oligo signaling mechanism.

  13. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  14. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-C.; Kao, Y.-C.; Chang, T-J.; Wong, M.-L. . E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

  15. Disrupted light-dark cycle abolishes circadian expression of peripheral clock genes without inducing behavioral arrhythmicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Higo-Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Yasumoto, Yuki

    2015-03-06

    The environmental light-dark (LD) cycle entrains the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of mammals. The present study examined the effects of disrupted LD cycles on peripheral clocks in mice housed under a normal 12 h light-12 h dark cycle (LD 12:12) or an ultradian LD 3:3 cycle. Drinking behavior seemed to be free-running with a long period (26.03 h) under ultradian LD 3:3 cycles, in addition to light-induced direct suppression (masking effect). Core body temperature completely lost robust circadian rhythm and acquired a 6-h rhythm with a low amplitude under LD 3:3. Robust circadian expression of Per1, Per2, Clock and Bmal1 mRNAs was similarly flattened to intermediate levels in the liver, heart and white adipose tissue under LD 3:3. Robust circadian expression of Rev-erbα mRNA was completely damped in these tissues. Circadian expression of Dbp, a clock-controlled gene, was also disrupted in these tissues from mice housed under LD 3:3. The aberrant LD cycle seemed to induce the loss of circadian gene expression at the level of transcription, because rhythmic pre-mRNA expression of these genes was also abolished under LD 3:3. In addition to the direct effect of the aberrant LD cycle, abolished systemic time cues such as those of plasma corticosterone and body temperature might be involved in the disrupted expression of these circadian genes under LD 3:3. Our findings suggest that disrupted environmental LD cycles abolish the normal oscillation of peripheral clocks and induce internal desynchrony in mammals.

  16. RTA Occupancy of the Origin of Lytic Replication during Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cell Latency.

    PubMed

    Santana, Alexis L; Oldenburg, Darby G; Kirillov, Varvara; Malik, Laraib; Dong, Qiwen; Sinayev, Roman; Marcu, Kenneth B; White, Douglas W; Krug, Laurie T

    2017-02-16

    RTA, the viral Replication and Transcription Activator, is essential for rhadinovirus lytic gene expression upon de novo infection and reactivation from latency. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor (TLR)4 engagement enhances rhadinovirus reactivation. We developed two new systems to examine the interaction of RTA with host NF-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection: a latent B cell line (HE-RIT) inducible for RTA-Flag expression and virus reactivation; and a recombinant virus (MHV68-RTA-Bio) that enabled in vivo biotinylation of RTA in BirA transgenic mice. LPS acted as a second stimulus to drive virus reactivation from latency in the context of induced expression of RTA-Flag. ORF6, the gene encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein, was one of many viral genes that were directly responsive to RTA induction; expression was further increased upon treatment with LPS. However, NF-κB sites in the promoter of ORF6 did not influence RTA transactivation in response to LPS in HE-RIT cells. We found no evidence for RTA occupancy of the minimal RTA-responsive region of the ORF6 promoter, yet RTA was found to complex with a portion of the right origin of lytic replication (oriLyt-R) that contains predicted RTA recognition elements. RTA occupancy of select regions of the MHV-68 genome was also evaluated in our novel in vivo RTA biotinylation system. Streptavidin isolation of RTA-Bio confirmed complex formation with oriLyt-R in LPS-treated primary splenocytes from BirA mice infected with MHV68 RTA-Bio. We demonstrate the utility of reactivation-inducible B cells coupled with in vivo RTA biotinylation for mechanistic investigations of the interplay of host signaling with RTA.

  17. RTA Occupancy of the Origin of Lytic Replication during Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cell Latency

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Alexis L.; Oldenburg, Darby G.; Kirillov, Varvara; Malik, Laraib; Dong, Qiwen; Sinayev, Roman; Marcu, Kenneth B.; White, Douglas W.; Krug, Laurie T.

    2017-01-01

    RTA, the viral Replication and Transcription Activator, is essential for rhadinovirus lytic gene expression upon de novo infection and reactivation from latency. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor (TLR)4 engagement enhances rhadinovirus reactivation. We developed two new systems to examine the interaction of RTA with host NF-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection: a latent B cell line (HE-RIT) inducible for RTA-Flag expression and virus reactivation; and a recombinant virus (MHV68-RTA-Bio) that enabled in vivo biotinylation of RTA in BirA transgenic mice. LPS acted as a second stimulus to drive virus reactivation from latency in the context of induced expression of RTA-Flag. ORF6, the gene encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein, was one of many viral genes that were directly responsive to RTA induction; expression was further increased upon treatment with LPS. However, NF-κB sites in the promoter of ORF6 did not influence RTA transactivation in response to LPS in HE-RIT cells. We found no evidence for RTA occupancy of the minimal RTA-responsive region of the ORF6 promoter, yet RTA was found to complex with a portion of the right origin of lytic replication (oriLyt-R) that contains predicted RTA recognition elements. RTA occupancy of select regions of the MHV-68 genome was also evaluated in our novel in vivo RTA biotinylation system. Streptavidin isolation of RTA-Bio confirmed complex formation with oriLyt-R in LPS-treated primary splenocytes from BirA mice infected with MHV68 RTA-Bio. We demonstrate the utility of reactivation-inducible B cells coupled with in vivo RTA biotinylation for mechanistic investigations of the interplay of host signaling with RTA. PMID:28212352

  18. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  19. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  20. Silymarin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ma, Yalin; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Dongping; Huang, Guangrong

    2014-11-15

    The polyphenolic flavonoid silymarin that is the milk thistle extract has been found to possess an anti-cancer effect against various human epithelial cancers. In this study, to explore the regulative effect of silymarin on human ovarian cancer line A2780s and PA-1 cells, 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry were respectively used to determine the inhibitory effect of silymarin on the both cell lines, and to measure their cell cycle progression. Apoptosis induction and mitochondrial membrane potential damage were separately detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling assay and 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide staining. Additionally, western blotting was applied to determine cytochrome C release and expression levels of p53, p21, p27, p16, CDK2, Bax, Bcl-2, procaspase-9, procaspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 proteins. The activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3 was measured using Caspase-Glo-9 and Caspase-Glo-3 assay. The results indicated that silymarin effectively suppressed cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and arrested cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in A2780s and PA-1 cells via up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27 protein expression, and down-regulation of CDK2 protein expression. Additionally, silymarin treatment for 24h at 50 and 100µg/ml resulted in a reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome C release, and significantly induced apoptosis in A2780s and PA-1 cells by increasing Bax and decreasing Bcl-2 protein expression, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Therefore, silymarin is a possible potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer.

  1. Linking global-change induced shifts in soil nitrogen cycling with the abundance of key microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, C.; Eviner, V.; Beman, M.; Hart, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    understanding of the regulatory role of the soil microbial community in terrestrial N cycling and also help to improve our understanding of the controls on global change-induced shifts in ecosystem functioning.

  2. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity. PMID:26703569

  3. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, KM; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Steefel, Carl I; Sharon, I; Williams, Ken; Miller, CS; Frischkorn, Kyle C; Chourey, Karuna; Thomas, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Long, Phil; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used community proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer. Genomic sequences from the community recovered during microbial sulfate reduction were used to econstruct, de novo, near-complete genomes for Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria) and relatives of Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas (Epsilonproteobacteria), and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen-fixation (Nif) and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results suggest less abundant Desulfuromonadales and Bacteroidetes also actively contributed to CO2 production via the TCA cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. Modeling shows that this reaction was thermodynamically possible, and kinetically favorable relative to acetate-dependent denitrification. We conclude that high-levels of carbon amendment aimed to stimulate anaerobic heterotrophy led to carbon fixation in co-dependent chemoautotrophs. These results have implications for understanding complex ecosystem behavior, and show that high levels of organic carbon supplementation can expand the range of microbial functionalities accessible for ecosystem manipulation.

  4. Oxidation of carbon sources via the tricarboxylic acid cycle during calcium-induced conidiation of Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed

    Pitt, D; Mosley, M J

    1986-01-01

    The TCA cycle was examined during Ca2+-induced conidiation in Penicillium notatum over the 12-h period after addition of Ca2+ to vegetative cultures. Conidiation was independent of Ca2+ when certain intermediates and derivatives of the TCA cycle served as sole carbon sources. Arsenite and malonate augmented the effect of Ca2+ on conidiation but did not substitute for it. Mitochondria from vegetative cells had low rates of oxidation of TCA cycle intermediates and, with the exception of pyruvate, aconitate and glutamate, these were poorly linked to phosphorylation processes. Calcium ions affected mitochondrial function causing reduced oxidation of oxoglutarate, elimination of pyruvate oxidation and a decline in respiratory control of these substrates with increased oxidation of NADH and NADPH. Radiorespirometric studies and enzyme searches revealed a complete but weakly oxidative TCA cycle in vegetative cells. In Ca2+-induced cells oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was deleted within 6.5 h of Ca2+ addition and this was accompanied by establishment of an 'incomplete Krebs cycle'. Calcium-induced conidiation was associated with increased capacity for acetate and glutamate metabolism involving an activated glyoxylate shunt which may be related to enhanced biosynthetic demand. The metabolic basis of the Ca2+ effect on conidiation is discussed in connection with previous findings.

  5. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  6. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  7. The molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Heng; Jiang, Min; Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; He, Min; Zuo, Zhicai; Ouyang, Ping; Fan, Junde; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has potent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and other adverse effects in human and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum of broilers. Broilers, as experimental animals, were fed 0.6 mg/kg AFB1 diet for 3 weeks. Our results showed that AFB1 reduced the jejunal villus height, villus height/crypt ratio and caused G2/M cell cycle arrest. The G2/M cell cycle was accompanied by the increase of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Chk2, p21 protein and mRNA expression, and the decrease of Mdm2, cdc25C, cdc2, cyclin B and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and mRNA expression. In conclusion, AFB1 blocked G2/M cell cycle by ATM pathway in the jejunum of broilers. PMID:27232757

  8. Two modes of lytic granule fusion during degranulation by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongfang; Martina, Jose A; Wu, Xufeng S; Hammer, John A; Long, Eric O

    2011-08-01

    Lytic granules in cytotoxic lymphocytes, which include T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, are secretory lysosomes that release their content upon fusion with the plasma membrane (PM), a process known as degranulation. Although vesicle exocytosis has been extensively studied in endocrine and neuronal cells, much less is known about the fusion of lytic granules in cytotoxic lymphocytes. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to examine lytic granules labeled with fluorescently tagged Fas ligand (FasL) in the NK cell line NKL stimulated with phorbol ester and ionomycin and in primary NK cells activated by physiological receptor-ligand interactions. Two fusion modes were observed: complete fusion, characterized by loss of granule content and rapid diffusion of FasL at the PM; and incomplete fusion, characterized by transient fusion pore opening and retention of FasL at the fusion site. The pH-sensitive green fluorescence protein (pHluorin) fused to the lumenal domain of FasL was used to visualize fusion pore opening with a time resolution of 30 ms. Upon incomplete fusion, pHluorin emission lasted several seconds in the absence of noticeable diffusion. Thus, we conclude that lytic granules in NK cells undergo both complete and incomplete fusion with the PM, and propose that incomplete fusion may promote efficient recycling of lytic granule membrane after the release of cytotoxic effector molecules.

  9. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV), for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections. PMID:27190217

  10. Characterization of the Xanthophyll Cycle and Other Photosynthetic Pigment Changes Induced by Iron Deficiency in Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Morales, F; Abadía, A; Abadía, J

    1990-10-01

    In this work we characterize the changes induced by iron deficiency in the pigment composition of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves. When sugar beet plants were grown hydroponically under limited iron supply, neoxanthin and beta-carotene decreased concomitantly with chlorophyll a, whereas lutein and the carotenoids within the xanthophyll cycle were less affected. Iron deficiency caused major increases in the lutein/chlorophyll a and xanthophyll cycle pigments/chlorophyll a molar ratios. Xanthophyll cycle carotenoids in Fe-deficient plants underwent epoxidations and de-epoxidations in response to ambient light conditions. In dark adapted Fe-deficient plants most of the xanthophyll cycle pigment pool was in the epoxidated form violaxanthin. We show, both by HPLC and by in vivo 505 nanometers absorbance changes, that in Fe deficient plants and in response to light, the de-epoxidated forms antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin were rapidly formed at the expense of violaxanthin. Several hours after returning to dark, the xanthophyll cycle was shifted again toward violaxanthin. The ratio of variable to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence from intact leaves was decreased by iron deficiency. However, in iron deficient leaves this ratio was little affected by light conditions which displace the xanthophyll cycle toward epoxidation or de-epoxidation. This suggests that the functioning of the xanthophyll cycle is not necessarily linked to protection against excess light input.

  11. Benzylidenetetralones, cyclic chalcone analogues, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Drutovic, David; Chripkova, Martina; Pilatova, Martina; Kruzliak, Peter; Perjesi, Pal; Sarissky, Marek; Lupi, Monica; Damia, Giovanna; Broggini, Massimo; Mojzis, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, with 1.2 million new cancer cases annually. Chalcones are secondary metabolite precursors of flavonoids that exhibit diverse biological activities, including antioxidant and antitumor activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of new synthetic chalcone derivatives on HCT116 cells. (E)-2-(2',4'-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-tetralone (Q705) was found to be the most active (IC50 = 3.44 ± 0.25 μM). Based on these results, this compound was chosen for further analysis of its biochemical and molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that Q705 inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of HCT116 cells. The results of a flow cytometric analyses suggested that this compound caused a significant cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased the proportion of cells in the subG0/G1 phase, marker of apoptosis. Q705-induced apoptosis was confirmed by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Treatment of HCT116 cells with this chalcone significantly increased the caspase-3,-7 activity and resulted in cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Changes in the nuclear morphology such as chromatin condensation were also observed. These effects were associated with a decreased expression of bcl-xL and increased overall ratio of bax/bcl-xL mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that Q705 induced H2AX histone modifications characteristic of DNA damage, disruption of microtubule organization and downregulation of tubulins. In summary, these results suggest that the cyclic chalcone analogue Q705 has potential as a new compound for colorectal cancer therapy.

  12. Knockdown of USP39 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Bo; Lei, Yu; Sun, Jingying; Zhang, Yaohua; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-10-01

    The spliceosome machinery composed of multimeric protein complexes guides precursor messenger RNAs (mRNAs) (pre-mRNAs) splicing in eukaryotic cells. Spliceosome components have been shown to be downregulated in cancer and could be a promising molecular target for anticancer therapy. The ubiquitin-specific protease 39 (USP39) is essential for pre-mRNA splicing, and upregulated USP39 expression is noted in a variety of cancers. However, the role of USP39 in the development and progression of melanoma remains unclear. In the present study, USP39 expression was found to be increased in melanoma tissues compared with that in nevus tissues. USP39 silencing via lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly suppressed melanoma cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 cell cycle phase arrest, and increased apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, USP39 knockdown suppressed melanoma tumor growth in a xenograft model. In addition, USP39 silencing was associated with the increased expressions of p21, p27, and Bax. Furthermore, the inhibition of USP39 expression decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, indicating that ERK signaling pathways might be involved in the regulation of melanoma cell proliferation by USP39. Our findings suggest that USP39 may play crucial roles in the development and pathogenesis of melanoma, and it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma.

  13. Bracken-fern extracts induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Motahhareh Tourchi; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Dehghani, Hesam

    2012-01-01

    Bracken fern [Pteridium aquilinem (L.) kuhn (Dennstaedtiaceae)] is one of the most common species on the planet. It has been consumed by humans and animals for centuries. Use by some human groups is because they believe bracken fern is good for health as plant medicine. However, it is also one of the few known plants that can cause tumors in farm animals. Many interested groups have focused their attention on bracken fern because of these interesting features. In order to evaluate the biological effects of exposure to this plant in cellular level, human cancer cell lines were treated with the fern dichloromethane extracts and the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were studied. Anti-proliferative/cytotoxic effects were evaluated by cell count, MTT assay and flow cytometry methods with three different cancer cell lines, TCC, NTERA2, and MCF-7, and two normal cells, HDF1 and HFF3. Pro-apoptotic effects of the extracts were determined by DAPI staining and comet assay, on TCC cancer cells compared to the normal control cell lines. Cellular morphology was examined by light microscopy. Our present study showed that the extract caused DNA damage and apoptosis at high concentrations (200 μg/mL) and also it may induce cell cycle arrest (G2/M phase) at mild concentrations (50 and 30 μg/mL) depending on the cell type and tumor origin. These results indicate that bracken fern extract is a potent source of anticancer compounds that could be utilized pharmaceutically.

  14. Testosterone induces cell proliferation and cell cycle gene overexpression in human visceral preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael; Selva, David M

    2013-08-01

    Evidence from the literature suggests that testosterone plays an important role in visceral fat accumulation since both men and women with hyperandrogenism accumulate more adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity than healthy women. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. To shed light on this issue, we have used an in vitro approach to examine the effect of testosterone on human visceral preadipocyte proliferation. Our results showed that testosterone treatment significantly increased proliferation of human visceral preadipocytes in proliferation assays using flow cytometric analysis. We next performed a microarray gene expression analysis of human visceral preadipocytes treated with testosterone or vehicle to identify which genes were involved in the testosterone-induced increase in preadipocyte proliferation. The results showed a total of 140 genes differentially expressed between testosterone vs. vehicle. Among the top 10 upregulated genes, 5 were involved in cellular cycle and proliferation, and 3 (APOBEC3b, CCNA2, and PRC1) were significantly overexpressed by testosterone treatment when analyzed by real-time PCR. We conclude that testosterone exerts a proliferative effect on preadipocytes that may participate in the sex differences in fat distribution and that it may explain visceral fat accumulation in women with hyperandrogenism.

  15. The role of shock induced trailing-edge separation in limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Atlee M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The potential role of shock induced trailing edge separation (SITES) in limit cycle oscillations (LCO) was established. It was shown that the flip-flop characteristics of transition to and from SITES as well as its hysteresis could couple with wing modes with torsional motion and low damping. This connection led to the formulation of a very simple nonlinear math model using the linear equations of motion with a nonlinear step forcing function with hysteresis. A finite difference solution with time was developed and calculations were made for the F-111 TACT were used to determine the step forcing function due to SITES transition. Since no data were available for the hysteresis, a parameter study was conducted allowing the hysteresis effect to vary. Very small hysteresis effects, which were within expected bounds, were required to obtain reasonable response levels that essentially agreed with flight test results. Also in agreement with wind tunnel tests, LCO calculations for the 1/6 scale F-111 model showed that the model should have not experienced LCO.

  16. Besnoitia besnoti lytic cycle in vitro and differences in invasion and intracellular proliferation among isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Bovine besnoitiosis, caused by the protozoan Besnoitia besnoiti, reduces productivity and fertility of affected herds. Besnoitiosis continues to expand in Europe and no effective control tools are currently available. Experimental models are urgently needed. Herein, we describe for the f...

  17. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway. PMID:27322250

  18. Levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in lymphoblastoid cell lines are correlated with frequencies of spontaneous lytic growth but not with levels of expression of EBNA-1, EBNA-2, or latent membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Metzenberg, S

    1990-01-01

    The process of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced transformation of human B lymphocytes results in a cell line that is a mixture of latently and lytically infected cells, with the lytic cells composing roughly 5% to less than 0.0001% of the overall population. A set of nine normal lymphoblastoid cell lines that span a 100- to 200-fold range in average EBV DNA content were studied, and the frequency with which these cells entered a lytic phase of viral growth correlated with their EBV DNA copy number (as a population average). However, neither factor correlated with the levels of expression of transcript for the viral genes EBNA-1, EBNA-2, and latent membrane protein, nor did they correlate with the levels of EBNA-2 protein and latent membrane protein. The rate at which a cell line enters into lytic growth spontaneously is therefore not dependent on the overall steady-state levels of expression of these latent-phase genes. Images PMID:2152830

  19. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of kainate-induced inward currents in microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Jun; Sawada, Makoto; Nakanishi, Hiroshi . E-mail: nakan@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-10-27

    Microglia are reported to have {alpha}-amino-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate/kainate (KA) types. However, only small population of primary cultured rat microglia (approximately 20%) responded to KA. In the present study, we have attempted to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of responsiveness to KA in GMIR1 rat microglial cell line. When the GMIR1 cells were plated at a low density in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, the proliferation rate increased and reached the peak after 2 days in culture and then gradually decreased because of density-dependent inhibition. At cell proliferation stage, approximately 80% of the GMIR1 cells exhibited glutamate (Glu)- and KA-induced inward currents at cell proliferation stage, whereas only 22.5% of the cells showed responsiveness to Glu and KA at cell quiescent stage. Furthermore, the mean amplitudes of inward currents induced by Glu and KA at cell proliferation stage (13.8 {+-} 3.0 and 8.4 {+-} 0.6 pA) were significantly larger than those obtained at cell quiescent stage (4.7 {+-} 0.8 and 6.2 {+-} 1.2 pA). In the GMIR1 cells, KA-induced inward currents were markedly inhibited by (RS)-3-(2-carboxybenzyl) willardiine (UBP296), a selective antagonist for KA receptors. The KA-responsive cells also responded to (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective agonist for GluR5, in both GMIR1 cells and primary cultured rat microglia. Furthermore, mRNA levels of the KA receptor subunits, GluR5 and GluR6, at the cell proliferation stage were significantly higher than those at the cell quiescent stage. Furthermore, the immunoreactivity for GluR6/7 was found to increase in activated microglia in the post-ischemic hippocampus. These results strongly suggest that microglia have functional KA receptors mainly consisting of GluR5 and GluR6, and the expression levels of these subunits are closely regulated by the cell cycle mechanism.

  20. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage–induced cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A.; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase–regulated nuclear–cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage–induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β–dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP–regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  1. Comparison of the pedalling performance induced by magnetic and electrical stimulation cycle ergometry in able-bodied subjects.

    PubMed

    Szecsi, J; Straube, A; Fornusek, C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the mechanical power and work generated by able-bodied subjects during functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) vs. functional electrical stimulation (FES) induced ergometer training conditions. Both stimulation methods were applied at a 30 Hz frequency to the quadriceps muscles of 22 healthy able-bodied subjects to induce cycling for 4× four minutes or until exhaustion. FMS was performed via large surface, cooled coils, while FES was applied with a typical stimulation setup used for cycling. Significantly more (p<10(-3)) muscular power was generated by FMS (23.8 ± 9.1W [mean ± SD]) than by FES (11.3 ± 11.3 W). Additionally, significantly more (p<10(-6)) work was produced by FMS than by FES (4.413 ± 2.209 kJ vs. 0.974 ± 1.269 kJ). The increase in the work was paralleled by a significant prolongation of time to cycling failure (181.8 ± 33.4s vs. 87.0 ± 54.0 s, respectively, p<10(-5)). Compared to FES, FMS can produce more intense and longer cycling exercise in able-bodied subjects. The differing dynamic behaviour of FMS and FES in the presented measurement setup might be related to stimulation induced pain and fatigue mechanisms of the neuromuscular system.

  2. Jungermannenone A and B induce ROS- and cell cycle-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-xia; Lin, Zhao-min; Wang, Mei-juan; Dong, Yi-wen; Niu, Huan-min; Young, Charles YF; Lou, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Hui-qing

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Jungermannenone A and B (JA, JB) are new ent-kaurane diterpenoids isolated from Chinese liverwort Jungermannia fauriana, which show anti-proliferation activities in cancer cells. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the anticancer action of JA and JB in PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Methods: A panel of 9 human cancer cell lines was tested. Cell proliferation was assessed with a real-time cell analyzer and MTT assay. Cell apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and ROS levels were measured using cytometry. Mitochondrial damage was examined by transmission electron microscopy. DNA damage was detected with comet assay. Apoptotic, DNA damage- and cell cycle-related proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. The expression of DNA repair genes was measured with qRT-PCR. Results: Both JA and JB exerted potent anti-proliferative action against the 9 cancer cell lines, and PC3 cells were more sensitive with IC50 values of 1.34±0.09 and 4.93±0.20 μmol/L, respectively. JA (1.5 μmol/L) and JB (5 μmol/L) induced PC3 cell apoptosis, which was attenuated by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD. Furthermore, both JA and JB caused mitochondrial damage and ROS accumulation in PC3 cells, whereas vitamin C blocked the ROS accumulation and attenuated the cytotoxicity of JA and JB. Moreover, both JA and JB induced DNA damage, accompanied by downregulated DNA repair proteins Ku70/Ku80 and RDA51. JA induced marked cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, which was related to c-Myc suppression, whereas JB enforced the cell cycle blockade in the G2/M phase, which associated with activation of the JNK signaling. Conclusion: Both JA and JB induce prostate cancer apoptosis via ROS accumulation and induction of cell cycle arrest. PMID:27133304

  3. Combination of ascorbate/epigallocatechin-3-gallate/gemcitabine synergistically induces cell cycle deregulation and apoptosis in mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Martinotti, Simona; Ranzato, Elia; Parodi, Monica; Vitale, Massimo; Burlando, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MMe) is a poor-prognosis tumor in need of innovative therapies. In a previous in vivo study, we showed synergistic anti-MMe properties of the ascorbate/epigallocatechin-3-gallate/gemcitabine combination. We have now focused on the mechanism of action, showing the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through measurements of caspase 3, intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, annexin V, and DNA content. StellArray™ PCR technology and Western immunoblotting revealed DAPK2-dependent apoptosis, upregulation of cell cycle promoters, downregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and repression of NFκB expression. The complex of data indicates that the mixture is synergistic in inducing cell cycle deregulation and non-inflammatory apoptosis, suggesting its possible use in MMe treatment. - Highlights: • Ascorbate/epigallocathechin-gallate/gemcitabine has been tested on mesothelioma cells • A synergistic mechanism has been shown for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis • PCR-array analysis has revealed the de-regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle genes • Maximum upregulation has been found for the Death-Associated Protein Kinase-2 gene • Data suggest that the mixture could be used as a clinical treatment.

  4. Cell cycle-dependent DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 involves ATM, ATR, CHK2, and BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Iha; Avraham, Hava Karsenty . E-mail: havraham@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-07-01

    Topoisomerase II is essential for cell proliferation and survival and has been a target of various anticancer drugs. ICRF-193 has long been used as a catalytic inhibitor to study the function of topoisomerase II. Here, we show that ICRF-193 treatment induces DNA damage signaling. Treatment with ICRF-193 induced G2 arrest and DNA damage signaling involving {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and CHK2 phosphorylation. DNA damage by ICRF-193 was further demonstrated by formation of the nuclear foci of 53BP1, NBS1, BRCA1, MDC1, and FANCD2 and increased comet tail moment. The DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 was mediated by ATM and ATR and was restricted to cells in specific cell cycle stages such as S, G2, and mitosis including late and early G1 phases. Downstream signaling of ATM and ATR involved the phosphorylation of CHK2 and BRCA1. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ICRF-193 induces DNA damage signaling in a cell cycle-dependent manner and suggest that topoisomerase II might be essential for the progression of the cell cycle at several stages including DNA decondensation.

  5. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system.

  6. DNA‐damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life‐long by their unique abilities of self‐renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA‐damage‐inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA‐damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time‐lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A‐expressing HSCs failed to long‐term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ‐irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen‐activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic‐erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress‐induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699–710 PMID:26731607

  7. Arctic sea-ice melting: Effects on hydroclimatic variability and on UV-induced carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    change on biogeochemical cycling: interactions and feedbacks, Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, 14(1), 127-148. Francis, J. A., S. J. Vavrus (2012), Evidence linking Arctic amplification to extreme weather in mid-latitudes, Geophysical Research Letters, 39, doi: 10.1029/2012GL051000. Haaland, S., D. Hongve, H. Laudon, G. Riise, R. D. Vogt (2010), Quantifying the drivers of the increasing colored organic matter in boreal surface waters, Environmental Science & Technology, 44(8), 2975-2980. IPCC Climate Change 2013 - The Physical Science Bases (2013). Schubert, S., H. Wang, M. Suarez (2011), Warm season subseasonal variability and climate extremes in the Northern Hemisphere: The role of stationary Rossby waves, Journal of Climate, 24(18), 4773-4792. Screen, J. A. (2013), Influence of Arctic sea ice on European summer precipitation, Environmental Research Letters, 8(4), doi: 10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/044015. Sulzberger, B., E. Durisch-Kaiser (2009), Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): A prerequisite for understanding UV-induced changes of DOM absorption properties and bioavailability, Aquatic Sciences, 71(2), 104-126.

  8. Undetectable bacterial resistance to phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of three phage lytic proteins constructs. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes w...

  9. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Is Expressed in Germ Cells throughout the Murine Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Natsumi; Davy, Philip M C; Gardner, Lauren H; Mathews, Juanita; Yamazaki, Yuki; Allsopp, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells of the early embryo, and germ line cells, are essential to ensure uncompromised development to adulthood as well as species propagation, respectively. Recently, the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) has been shown to have important roles in embryonic stem cells; in particular, regulation of conversion to glycolytic metabolism and, as we have shown, maintenance of functional levels of telomerase. In the present study, we sought to assess whether Hif1α was also expressed in the primitive cells of the murine embryo. We observed expression of Hif1α in pre-implantation embryos, specifically the 2-cell stage, morula, and blastocyst. Robust Hif1α expression was also observed in male and female primordial germ cells. We subsequently assessed whether Hif1α was expressed in adult male and female germ cells. In the testis, Hif1α was robustly expressed in spermatogonial cells, in both juvenile (6-week old) and adult (3-month old) males. In the ovaries, Hif1α was expressed in mature oocytes from adult females, as assessed both in situ and in individual oocytes flushed from super-ovulated females. Analysis of Hif1α transcript levels indicates a mechanism of regulation during early development that involves stockpiling of Hif1α protein in mature oocytes, presumably to provide protection from hypoxic stress until the gene is re-activated at the blastocyst stage. Together, these observations show that Hif1α is expressed throughout the life-cycle, including both the male and female germ line, and point to an important role for Hif1α in early progenitor cells.

  10. Cytokinin delays dark-induced senescence in rice by maintaining the chlorophyll cycle and photosynthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Talla, Sai Krishna; Panigrahy, Madhusmita; Kappara, Saivishnupriya; Nirosha, P; Neelamraju, Sarla; Ramanan, Rajeshwari

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin (CK) is known to delay senescence in plants. We studied the effect of a CK analog, 6-benzyl adenine (BA), on rice leaves to understand the possible mechanism by which CK delays senescence in a drought- and heat-tolerant rice cultivar Nagina22 (N22) using dark-induced senescence (DIS) as a surrogate for natural senescence of leaves. Leaves of N22-H-dgl162, a stay-green mutant of N22, and BA-treated N22 showed retention of chlorophyll (Chl) pigments, maintenance of the Chl a/b ratio, and delay in reduction of both photochemical efficiency and rate of oxygen evolution during DIS. HPLC analysis showed accumulation of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll (HmChl) during DIS, and the kinetics of its accumulation correlated with progression of senescence. Transcriptome analysis revealed that several plastid-localized genes, specifically those associated with photosystem II (PSII), showed higher transcript levels in BA-treated N22 and the stay-green mutant leaves compared with naturally senescing N22 leaves. Real-time PCR analyses showed that genes coding for enzymes associated with Chl a/b interconversion and proteins associated with light-harvesting complexes maintained higher transcript levels up to 72h of DIS following BA treatment. The pigment-protein complexes analyzed by green gel remained intact in both N22-H-dgl162 and BA-treated N22 leaves even after 96h of DIS. Thus, CK delays senescence by accumulation of HmChl and up-regulating genes in the Chl cycle, thereby maintaining the Chl a/b ratio. Also, CK treatment retains higher transcript levels of PSII-related genes, resulting in the stability of photosynthetic pigment complexes and functional stay-greenness in rice.

  11. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Is Expressed in Germ Cells throughout the Murine Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lauren H.; Mathews, Juanita; Yamazaki, Yuki; Allsopp, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells of the early embryo, and germ line cells, are essential to ensure uncompromised development to adulthood as well as species propagation, respectively. Recently, the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) has been shown to have important roles in embryonic stem cells; in particular, regulation of conversion to glycolytic metabolism and, as we have shown, maintenance of functional levels of telomerase. In the present study, we sought to assess whether Hif1α was also expressed in the primitive cells of the murine embryo. We observed expression of Hif1α in pre-implantation embryos, specifically the 2-cell stage, morula, and blastocyst. Robust Hif1α expression was also observed in male and female primordial germ cells. We subsequently assessed whether Hif1α was expressed in adult male and female germ cells. In the testis, Hif1α was robustly expressed in spermatogonial cells, in both juvenile (6-week old) and adult (3-month old) males. In the ovaries, Hif1α was expressed in mature oocytes from adult females, as assessed both in situ and in individual oocytes flushed from super-ovulated females. Analysis of Hif1α transcript levels indicates a mechanism of regulation during early development that involves stockpiling of Hif1α protein in mature oocytes, presumably to provide protection from hypoxic stress until the gene is re-activated at the blastocyst stage. Together, these observations show that Hif1α is expressed throughout the life-cycle, including both the male and female germ line, and point to an important role for Hif1α in early progenitor cells. PMID:27148974

  12. Mutations in ampG and Lytic Transglycosylase Genes Affect the Net Release of Peptidoglycan Monomers from Vibrio fischeri▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adin, Dawn M.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Goldman, William E.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2009-01-01

    The light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri releases N-acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramylalanyl-γ-glutamyldiaminopimelylalanine, a disaccharide-tetrapeptide component of peptidoglycan that is referred to here as “PG monomer.” In contrast, most gram-negative bacteria recycle PG monomer efficiently, and it does not accumulate extracellularly. PG monomer can stimulate normal light-organ morphogenesis in the host squid Euprymna scolopes, resulting in regression of ciliated appendages similar to that triggered by infection with V. fischeri. We examined whether the net release of PG monomers by V. fischeri resulted from lytic transglycosylase activity or from defects in AmpG, the permease through which PG monomers enter the cytoplasm for recycling. An ampG mutant displayed a 100-fold increase in net PG monomer release, indicating that AmpG is functional. The ampG mutation also conferred the uncharacteristic ability to induce light-organ morphogenesis even when placed in a nonmotile flaJ mutant that cannot infect the light-organ crypts. We targeted five potential lytic transglycosylase genes singly and in specific combinations to assess their role in PG monomer release. Combinations of mutations in ltgA, ltgD, and ltgY decreased net PG monomer release, and a triple mutant lacking all three of these genes had little to no accumulation of PG monomers in culture supernatants. This mutant colonized the host as well as the wild type did; however, the mutant-infected squid were more prone to later superinfection by a second V. fischeri strain. We propose that the lack of PG monomer release by this mutant results in less regression of the infection-promoting ciliated appendages, leading to this propensity for superinfection. PMID:19074387

  13. Synthesis of globin mRNA in relation to the cell cycle during induced murine erythroleukemia differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Gambari, R; Terada, M; Bank, A; Rifkind, R A; Marks, P A

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the synthesis of globin mRNA and the phase of cell cycle was examined in synchronized murine erythroleukemia cells. Cells were synchronized with respect to the cell division cycle either by culture with 2 mM thymidine or 2 mM thymidine followed by 0.5 mM hydroxyurea, which caused cells to accumulate in late G1 or early S (referred to as G1/S boundary). Cells were induced to erythroid differentiation by culture with 280 mM dimethyl sulfoxide or 4 mM hexamethylene bisacetamide. These inducers do not alter the progression of cells from the G1/S boundary through S, G2, and M, but do cause prolongation of the subsequent G1 phase. Accumulation of newly synthesized globin mRNA is first detected when cells are in this G1 phase. PMID:278991

  14. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells.

  15. Calotropin from Asclepias curasavica induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, En-Pan; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Tan, Qiu-Tong; Liu, Fang-Lan; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-09-16

    Calotropin (M11), an active compound isolated from Asclepias curasavica L., was found to exert strong inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activity specifically against cisplatin-induced resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549/CDDP). Molecular mechanism study revealed that M11 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through down-regulating cyclins, CDK1, CDK2 and up-regulating p53 and p21. Furthermore, M11 accelerated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was accompanied by increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in reactive oxygen species production, activations of caspases 3 and 9 as well as cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The activation and phosphorylation of JNK was also found to be involved in M11-induced apoptosis, and SP610025 (specific JNK inhibitor) partially prevented apoptosis induced by M11. In contrast, all of the effects that M11 induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/CDDP cells were not significant in A549 cells. Drugs with higher sensitivity against resistant tumor cells than the parent cells are rather rare. Results of this study supported the potential application of M11 on the non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) with cisplatin resistance.

  16. Involvement of p53 in cell death following cell cycle arrest and mitotic catastrophe induced by rotenone.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, António Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Lima, Jorge; Singh, Keshav K; Soares, Paula; Videira, Arnaldo

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the cell death-inducing effects of rotenone, a plant extract commonly used as a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, we studied cancer cell lines with different genetic backgrounds. Rotenone inhibits cell growth through the induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest, associated with the development of mitotic catastrophe. The cell death inducer staurosporine potentiates the inhibition of cell growth by rotenone in a dose-dependent synergistic manner. The tumor suppressor p53 is involved in rotenone-induced cell death, since the drug treatment results in increased expression, phosphorylation and nuclear localization of the protein. The evaluation of the effects of rotenone on a p53-deficient cell line revealed that although not required for the promotion of mitotic catastrophe, functional p53 appears to be essential for the extensive cell death that occurs afterwards. Our results suggest that mitotic slippage also occurs subsequently to the rotenone-induced mitotic arrest and cells treated with the drug for a longer period become senescent. Treatment of mtDNA-depleted cells with rotenone induces cell death and cell cycle arrest as in cells containing wild-type mtDNA, but not formation of reactive oxygen species. This suggests that the effects of rotenone are not dependent from the production of reactive oxygen species. This work highlights the multiple effects of rotenone in cancer cells related to its action as an anti-mitotic drug.

  17. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Yang, Yongbo

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  18. The p75{sup NTR} tumor suppressor induces cell cycle arrest facilitating caspase mediated apoptosis in prostate tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khwaja, Fatima; Tabassum, Arshia; Allen, Jeff; Djakiew, Daniel . E-mail: djakiewd@georgetown.edu

    2006-03-24

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}) is a death receptor which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family of membrane proteins. This study shows that p75{sup NTR} retarded cell cycle progression by induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 and a reduction in the S phase of the cell cycle. The rescue of tumor cells from cell cycle progression by a death domain deleted ({delta}DD) dominant-negative antagonist of p75{sup NTR} showed that the death domain transduced anti-proliferative activity in a ligand-independent manner. Conversely, addition of NGF ligand rescued retardation of cell cycle progression with commensurate changes in components of the cyclin/cdk holoenzyme complex. In the absence of ligand, p75{sup NTR}-dependent cell cycle arrest facilitated an increase in apoptotic nuclear fragmentation of the prostate cancer cells. Apoptosis of p75{sup NTR} expressing cells occurred via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway leading to a sequential caspase-9 and -7 cascade. Since the death domain deleted dominant-negative antagonist of p75{sup NTR} rescued intrinsic caspase associated apoptosis in PC-3 cells, this shows p75{sup NTR} was integral to ligand independent induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the ability of ligand to ameliorate the p75{sup NTR}-dependent intrinsic apoptotic cascade indicates that NGF functioned as a survival factor for p75{sup NTR} expressing prostate cancer cells.

  19. K562 cells display different vulnerability to H₂O₂ induced oxidative stress in differing cell cycle phases.

    PubMed

    Akcakaya, Handan; Dal, Fulya; Tok, Sabiha; Cinar, Suzan-Adin; Nurten, Rustem

    2015-02-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the increase of oxidizing agents like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or the imbalance between the antioxidative defense mechanism and oxidants. Cell cycle checkpoint response can be defined as the arrest of the cell cycle functioning after damaging chemical exposure. This temporary arrest may be a period of time given to the cells to repair the DNA damage before entering the cycle again and completing mitosis. In order to determine the effects of oxidative stress on several cell cycle phases, human erytroleukemia cell line (K562) was synchronized with mimosine and genistein, and cell cycle analysis carried out. Synchronized cells were exposed to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at several concentrations and different times. Changes on mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) of K562 cells were analyzed in G1, S, and G2 /M using Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123). To determine apoptosis and necrosis, stressed cells were stained with Annexin V (AnnV) and propidium iodide (PI) for flow cytometry. Changes were observed in the ΔΨm of synchronized and asynchronized cells that were exposed to oxidative stress. Synchronized cells in S phase proved resistant to the effects of oxidative stress and synchronized cells at G2 /M phase were sensitive to the effects of H2O2 -induced oxidative stress at 500 μM and above.

  20. Ethanol extract of Innotus obliquus (Chaga mushroom) induces G1 cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus, Chaga mushroom) has long been used as a folk medicine to treat cancer. In the present study, we examined whether or not ethanol extract of I. obliquus (EEIO) inhibits cell cycle progression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells, in addition to its mechanism of action. MATERIALS/METHODS To examine the effects of Inonotus obliquus on the cell cycle progression and the molecular mechanism in colon cancer cells, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were cultured in the presence of 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO, and analyzed the cell cycle arrest by flow cytometry and the cell cycle controlling protein expression by Western blotting. RESULTS Treatment cells with 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO reduced viable HT-29 cell numbers and DNA synthesis, increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, decreased protein expression of CDK2, CDK4, and cyclin D1, increased expression of p21, p27, and p53, and inhibited phosphorylation of Rb and E2F1 expression. Among I. obliquus fractions, fraction 2 (fractionated by dichloromethane from EEIO) showed the same effect as EEIO treatment on cell proliferation and cell cycle-related protein levels. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that fraction 2 is the major fraction that induces G1 arrest and inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting I. obliquus could be used as a natural anti-cancer ingredient in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25861415

  1. Honokiol, a chemopreventive agent against skin cancer, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Guillermo, Ruth; Kaushik, Radhey S; Young, Alan; Chandrasekher, Gudiseva; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2011-11-01

    Honokiol is a plant lignan isolated from bark and seed cones of Magnolia officinalis. Recent studies from our laboratory indicated that honokiol pretreatment decreased ultraviolet B-induced skin cancer development in SKH-1 mice. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effects of honokiol on human epidermoid squamous carcinoma A431 cells and to elucidate possible mechanisms involved in preventing skin cancer. A431 cells were pretreated with different concentrations of honokiol for a specific time period and investigated for effects on apoptosis and cell cycle analysis. Treatment with honokiol significantly decreased cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Honokiol pretreatment at 50 μmol/L concentration induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest significantly (P < 0.05) and decreased the percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phase. Honokiol down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 proteins and up-regulated the expression of Cdk's inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. Pretreatment of A431 cells with honokiol leads to induction of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. These findings indicate that honokiol provides its effects in squamous carcinoma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis.

  2. Effectiveness of lytic bacteriophages in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations introduced through cross-contamination on fresh cut lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research has shown that lytic bacteriophages (phages) can kill E. coli O157:H7 on produce surfaces. The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 10^8 PFU/m...

  3. How Cancer Cells Become Resistant to Cationic Lytic Peptides: It's the Sugar!

    PubMed

    Pierce, Joshua G

    2017-02-16

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Ishikawa et al. (2017) demonstrate that the loss of cell-surface anionic saccharides can impart resistance toward anticancer peptides. This study provides the first insight into potential resistance mechanisms toward cationic lytic peptides and highlights the important, yet previously unappreciated, role cell-surface glycans can play in cellular resistance mechanisms.

  4. Sheep (Ovis aries) airway epithelial cells support ovine herpesvirus 2 lytic replication in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we describe the development of a monospecific, polyclonal rabbit antiserum directed against the ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) major capsid protein and its use to detect lytically infected cells in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). Immunofluorescent labeling using monoclonal antibodies direc...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Lytic Bacteriophage LZ35 Infecting Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhonghe; Huang, Honglan; Wu, Xiaolin; Hao, Yuchong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteriophages infecting A. baumannii can be used as effective agents to control these infections. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the lytic bacteriophage LZ35 infecting A. baumannii isolates. PMID:27856573

  6. Impact of brine-induced stratification on the glacial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttes, N.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    During the cold period of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, about 21 000 years ago) atmospheric CO2 was around 190 ppm (Monnin et al., 2001), much lower than the pre-industrial concentration of 280 ppm. The causes of this substantial drop remain partially unresolved, despite intense research. Understanding the origin of reduced atmospheric CO2 during glacial times is crucial to comprehend the evolution of the different carbon reservoirs within the Earth system (atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere and ocean). In this context, the ocean is believed to play a major role as it can store large amounts of carbon (Sigman and Boyle, 2000), especially in the abyss, which is a carbon reservoir that is thought to have expanded during glacial times. To create this larger reservoir, one possible mechanism is to produce very dense glacial waters, thereby stratifying the deep ocean and reducing the carbon exchange between the deep and surface ocean (Paillard and Parrenin, 2004). The existence of such very dense waters has been inferred in the LGM deep Atlantic from sediment pore water salinity (Adkins et al., 2002). Based on these observations, we study the impact of a brine mechanism on the glacial carbon cycle. This mechanism relies on the formation and rapid sinking of brines, very salty water released during sea ice formation, which brings salty dense water down to the bottom of the ocean. It provides two major features: a direct link from the surface to the deep ocean along with an efficient way of setting a strong stratification. We show with the CLIMBER-2 coupled carbon-climate model (Petoukhov et al., 2000) that such a brine mechanism can account for a significant decrease in atmospheric CO2 and contribute to the glacial-interglacial change. This mechanism can be amplified by low vertical diffusion resulting from the brine-induced stratification. The results obtained substantially improve the modeled glacial distribution of oceanic δ13C as well as the deep ocean salinity in

  7. Cell cycle arrest induced by MPPa-PDT in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liming; Bi, Wenxiang; Tian, Yuanyuan

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical treatment using a photosensitizing agent and light source to treat cancers. Pyropheophorbidea methyl ester (MPPa), a derivative of chlorophyll, is a novel potent photosensitizer. To learn more about this photosensitizer, we examined the cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometer. Checkpoints of the cell cycle were measured by western blot. In this study, we found that the expression of Cyclin D1 was obviously decreased, while the expression of Chk2 and P21 was increased after PDT treatment. This study showed that MPPa-PDT affected the checkpoints of the cell cycle and led the cells to apoptosis.

  8. The oxygen-rich postnatal environment induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Puente, Bao N; Kimura, Wataru; Muralidhar, Shalini A; Moon, Jesung; Amatruda, James F; Phelps, Kate L; Grinsfelder, David; Rothermel, Beverly A; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A; Santos, Celio X; Thet, SuWannee; Mori, Eiichiro; Kinter, Michael T; Rindler, Paul M; Zacchigna, Serena; Mukherjee, Shibani; Chen, David J; Mahmoud, Ahmed I; Giacca, Mauro; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Shah, Ajay M; Szweda, Luke I; Sadek, Hesham A

    2014-04-24

    The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary postnatal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen-rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell-cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and DNA damage response (DDR) markers significantly increase in the heart during the first postnatal week. Intriguingly, postnatal hypoxemia, ROS scavenging, or inhibition of DDR all prolong the postnatal proliferative window of cardiomyocytes, whereas hyperoxemia and ROS generators shorten it. These findings uncover a protective mechanism that mediates cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest in exchange for utilization of oxygen-dependent aerobic metabolism. Reduction of mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress should be an important component of cardiomyocyte proliferation-based therapeutic approaches.

  9. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection activates the Epstein-Barr virus replicative cycle via a CREB-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongling; Li, Ting; Zeng, Musheng; Peng, Tao

    2012-04-01

    The reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to lytic replication is important in pathogenesis and requires virus-host cellular interactions. However, the mechanism underlying the reactivation of EBV is not yet fully understood. In the present study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown to induce the reactivation of latent EBV by triggering BZLF1 expression. The BZLF1 promoter (Zp) was not activated by HSV-1 essential glycoprotein-induced membrane fusion. Nevertheless, Zp was activated within 6 h post HSV-1 infection in virus entry-dependent and replication-independent manners. Using a panel of Zp deletion mutants, HSV-1 was shown to promote Zp through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element (CRE) located in ZII. The phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding (phos-CREB) protein, the cellular transactivator that binds to CRE, also increased after HSV-1 infection. By transient transfection, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and HSV-1 US3 protein were found to be capable of activating Zp in CREB- and CRE-dependent manners. The relationship between EBV activation and HSV-1 infection revealed a possible common mechanism that stimulated latent EBV into lytic cycles in vivo.

  10. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  11. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  12. Autoregulatory lentiviral vectors allow multiple cycles of doxycycline-inducible gene expression in human hematopoietic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Centlivre, M; Zhou, X; Pouw, S M; Weijer, K; Kleibeuker, W; Das, A T; Blom, B; Seppen, J; Berkhout, B; Legrand, N

    2010-01-01

    The efficient control of gene expression in vivo from lentiviral vectors remains technically challenging. To analyze inducible gene expression in a human setting, we generated 'human immune system' (HIS) mice by transplanting newborn BALB/c Rag2(-/-)IL-2Rgamma(c)(-/-) immunodeficient mice with human hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vector. We compared several methods of doxycycline delivery to mice, and could accurately measure doxycycline in vivo using a new sensitive detection assay. Two different lentiviral vector designs with constitutive (TRECMV-V14) or autoregulatory (TREAuto-V14) expression of an optimized reverse tetracycline transactivator were used to transduce human hematopoietic stem cells. After transplantation into immunodeficient mice, we analyzed the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in the human hematopoiesis-derived cells that develop and accumulate in the generated HIS mice. We show efficient inducible GFP expression in adult HIS mice containing TREAuto-V14-transduced human cells, whereas GFP expression is poor with the TRECMV-V14 vector. Multiple cycles of doxycycline exposure in the TREAuto-V14 group result in repeated cycles of GFP expression with no loss of intensity. These findings are of major interest for gene therapy and basic research settings that require inducible gene expression.

  13. Selective killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytically infected cells with a recombinant immunotoxin targeting the viral gpK8.1A envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Deboeeta; Chandran, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) is etiologically associated with three neoplastic syndromes: Kaposi sarcoma and the uncommon HIV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease. The incidence of the latter B-cell pathology has been increasing in spite of antiretroviral therapy; its association with lytic virus replication has prompted interest in therapeutic strategies aimed at this phase of the virus life cycle. We designed and expressed a recombinant immunotoxin (2014-PE38) targeting the gpK8.1A viral glycoprotein expressed on the surface of the virion and infected cells. We show that this immunotoxin selectively kills KSHV-infected cells in dose-dependent fashion, resulting in major reductions of infectious virus release. The immunotoxin and ganciclovir, an inhibitor of viral DNA replication, showed marked reciprocal potentiation of antiviral activities. These results suggest that the immunotoxin, alone or in combination, may represent a new approach to treat diseases associated with KSHV lytic replication. PMID:22377676

  14. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation

    PubMed Central

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc−/−) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc−/− newborns but rescued in G3 Terc−/−/p21−/− mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  15. Glucose restriction induces transient G2 cell cycle arrest extending cellular chronological lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Fumie; Ishii, Mahiro; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Kojiro; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    While glucose is the fundamental source of energy in most eukaryotes, it is not always abundantly available in natural environments, including within the human body. Eukaryotic cells are therefore thought to possess adaptive mechanisms to survive glucose-limited conditions, which remain unclear. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating cell cycle progression in response to abrupt changes in extracellular glucose concentration. Upon reduction of glucose in the medium, wild-type fission yeast cells undergo transient arrest specifically at G2 phase. This cell cycle arrest is dependent on the Wee1 tyrosine kinase inhibiting the key cell cycle regulator, CDK1/Cdc2. Mutant cells lacking Wee1 are not arrested at G2 upon glucose limitation and lose viability faster than the wild-type cells under glucose-depleted quiescent conditions, suggesting that this cell cycle arrest is required for extension of chronological lifespan. Our findings indicate the presence of a novel cell cycle checkpoint monitoring glucose availability, which may be a good molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26804466

  16. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression, induces apoptosis and alters the proteome in human cervical cancer cell Line CaSki.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqin; Ran, Li; Fang, Wen; Wang, Donghong

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecologic tumors. There is an upward trend in the incidence. The objective of this research was to explore the effect of lobaplatin on cervical cancer CaSki cells proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis and analysis of the differential expressed proteins of CaSki cells after exposed to lobaplatin. Our findings have shown that lobaplatin inhibits cell proliferations in human cervical cancer CaSki cells in dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry assay confirmed that lobaplatin affected cervical cancer cell survival by blocking cell cycle progression in S phase and G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent manner. Lobaplatin treatment reduced polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 2, ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, hypothetical protein, terminal uridylyltransferase 7, ubiquitin specific protease 16 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 expression and increase zinc finger protein 91, zinc finger protein, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 precursor, stromal cell protein and laminin subunit alpha-4 expression. Some of the differentially expressed proteins may be associated with antitumor effect of lobaplatin. Lobaplatin showed a good antitumour activity in in vitro models of human cervical cancer cells. These results indicate that lobaplatin could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent in human cervical cancer treatment by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and changing many kinds of protein molecule expression level.

  17. Toona Sinensis and Moschus Decoction Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Hong; Zhang, Yifei; Fang, Zhijia; Huang, Zhiwei; Shi, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Toona sinensis and Moschus are two herb materials used in traditional Chinese medicine, most commonly for their various biological activities. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of three decoctions from Toona sinensis, Moschus, and Toona sinensis and Moschus in combination on cell growth in several normal and cancer cell lines by cell viability assay. The results showed that the combined decoction exhibited the strongest anticancer effects, compared to two single decoctions. The observations indicated that the combined decoction did not induce cell apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells by fluorescence microscopy. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the combined decoction arrested HeLa cell cycle progression in S-phase. After the decoction incubation, among 41 cell cycle related genes, eight were reduced, while five were increased in mRNA levels by real-time PCR assay. Western blotting showed that there were no apparent changes of protein levels of Cyclin E1, while P27 expression significantly declined and the levels of CDC7 and CDK7 obviously increased. The data suggest that the RB pathway is partially responsible for the decoction-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. Therefore, the combined decoction may have therapeutic potential as an anticancer formula for certain cancers. PMID:24511319

  18. Amino Acids in the Basic Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus ZEBRA Protein Play Distinct Roles in DNA Binding, Activation of Early Lytic Gene Expression, and Promotion of Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Heston, Lee; El-Guindy, Ayman; Countryman, Jill; Dela Cruz, Charles; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2006-01-01

    The ZEBRA protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) drives the viral lytic cycle cascade. The capacity of ZEBRA to recognize specific DNA sequences resides in amino acids 178 to 194, a region in which 9 of 17 residues are either lysine or arginine. To define the basic domain residues essential for activity, a series of 46 single-amino-acid-substitution mutants were examined for their ability to bind ZIIIB DNA, a high-affinity ZEBRA binding site, and for their capacity to activate early and late EBV lytic cycle gene expression. DNA binding was obligatory for the protein to activate the lytic cascade. Nineteen mutants that failed to bind DNA were unable to disrupt latency. A single acidic replacement of a basic amino acid destroyed DNA binding and the biologic activity of the protein. Four mutants that bound weakly to DNA were defective at stimulating the expression of Rta, the essential first target of ZEBRA in lytic cycle activation. Four amino acids, R183, A185, C189, and R190, are likely to contact ZIIIB DNA specifically, since alanine or valine substitutions at these positions drastically weakened or eliminated DNA binding. Twenty-three mutants were proficient in binding to ZIIIB DNA. Some DNA binding-proficient mutants were refractory to supershift by BZ-1 monoclonal antibody (epitope amino acids 214 to 230), likely as the result of the increased solubility of the mutants. Mutants competent to bind DNA could be separated into four functional groups: the wild-type group (eight mutants), a group defective at activating Rta (five mutants, all with mutations at the S186 site), a group defective at activating EA-D (three mutants with the R179A, S186T, and K192A mutations), and a group specifically defective at activating late gene expression (seven mutants). Three late mutants, with a Y180A, Y180E, or K188A mutation, were defective at stimulating EBV DNA replication. This catalogue of point mutants reveals that basic domain amino acids play distinct functions in binding

  19. Some effects of thermal-cycle-induced deformation in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Price, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deformation process observed in the hot gas side wall of rocket combustion chambers was investigaged for three different liner materials. Five thrust chambers were cycled to failure by using hydrogen and oxygen as propellants at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/cu m. The deformation was observed nondestructively at midlife points and destructively after failure occurred. The cyclic life results are presented with an accompanying discussion about the problems of life prediction associated with the types of failures encountered in the present work. Data indicating the deformation of the thrust chamber liner as cycles are accumulated are presented for each of the test thrust chambers. From these deformation data and observation of the failure sites it is evident that modeling the failure process as classic low cycle thermal fatigue is inadequate as a life prediction method.

  20. MYC-repressed long noncoding RNAs antagonize MYC-induced cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Jun; Fadda, Paolo; Alder, Hansjuerg; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC is a proto-oncogene regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metabolism. The recent identification of MYC-regulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) expands our knowledge of the role of lncRNAs in MYC functions. Here, we identify MYC-repressed lncRNAs named MYCLo-4, -5 and -6 by comparing 3 categories of lncRNAs (downregulated in highly MYC-expressing colorectal cancer, up-regulated by MYC knockdown in HCT116, upregulated by MYC knockdown in RKO). The MYC-repressed MYCLos are implicated in MYC-modulated cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation. By screening cell cycle-related genes regulated by MYC and the MYC-repressed MYCLos, we identified the MYC-repressed gene GADD45A as a target gene of the MYC-repressed MYCLos such as MYCLo-4 and MYCLo-6. PMID:26003165

  1. Lithium increases proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells and rescues irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Giulia; Di Martino, Elena; Omelyanenko, Anna; Andäng, Michael; Delle, Ulla; Elmroth, Kecke; Blomgren, Klas

    2015-11-10

    Radiotherapy in children causes debilitating cognitive decline, partly linked to impaired neurogenesis. Irradiation targets primarily cancer cells but also endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) leading to cell death or cell cycle arrest. Here we evaluated the effects of lithium on proliferation, cell cycle and DNA damage after irradiation of young NSPCs in vitro.NSPCs were treated with 1 or 3 mM LiCl and we investigated proliferation capacity (neurosphere volume and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation). Using flow cytometry, we analysed apoptosis (annexin V), cell cycle (propidium iodide) and DNA damage (γH2AX) after irradiation (3.5 Gy) of lithium-treated NSPCs.Lithium increased BrdU incorporation and, dose-dependently, the number of cells in replicative phase as well as neurosphere growth. Irradiation induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M phases. Treatment with 3 mM LiCl was sufficient to increase NSPCs in S phase, boost neurosphere growth and reduce DNA damage. Lithium did not affect the levels of apoptosis, suggesting that it does not rescue NSPCs committed to apoptosis due to accumulated DNA damage.Lithium is a very promising candidate for protection of the juvenile brain from radiotherapy and for its potential to thereby improve the quality of life for those children who survive their cancer.

  2. Rhizoma Paridis Saponins Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jue; Yang, Yixi; Lei, Lei; Tian, Mengliang

    2015-01-01

    Background As a traditional Chinese medicine herb, Chonglou (Paris polyphylla var. chinensis) has been used as anticancer medicine in China in recent decades, as it can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in numerous cancer cells. The saponins extract from the rhizoma of Chonglou [Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS)] is known as the main active component for anticancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanism of the anticancer effect of RPS is unknown. Material/Methods The present study evaluated the effect of RPS in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry. Subsequently, the expression of several genes associated with cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Results RPS was revealed to inhibit cell growth, causing a number of cells to accumulate in the G 1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to apoptosis. In addition, the effect was dose-dependent. Moreover, the results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that p53 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) were significantly downregulated, and that BCL2, BAX, and p21 were upregulated, by RPS treatment. Conclusions We speculated that the RPS could act on a pathway, including p53, p21, BCL2, BAX, and CDK2, and results in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. PMID:26311066

  3. Apoptosis and cell cycle disturbances induced by coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin on human lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Molina-Guarneros, Juan A; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge; Mandoki, Juan Jose

    2004-03-01

    Coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin have anti-tumour actions in vitro and in vivo. There are no previous reports on the cytostatic and apoptotic actions of coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines. Here we report on: (1) the inhibition of cell proliferation, (2) the phase in which cell cycle arrest occurs, and (3) the induction of apoptosis. Inhibition of cell proliferation was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The effects on cell cycle phases were determined at 100 microg/ml of coumarin or 7-hydroxycoumarin using propidium iodide and flow cytometry. Higher concentrations were used to study apoptosis, detected by: (1) morphological cell changes, (2) subG1 peak detection and (3) Annexin-V assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin were used as controls. The actions of these compounds depended on drug concentrations and on histological cell type. Coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin inhibited cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in all the lung carcinoma cell lines. Apoptosis required large concentrations of the coumarin compounds and was observed in adenocarcinomas. Apoptosis was not associated with intra-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Apoptosis was not observed in squamous lung carcinoma cell lines, but an increase in G1 cell cycle arrest was detected. In PBMC, only large concentrations of the coumarin compounds elicited a cystostatic action. Coumarins in combination with other anti-neoplastic drugs might increase the effectiveness of NSCLC treatments.

  4. Demethylation and alterations in the expression level of the cell cycle-related genes as possible mechanisms in arsenic trioxide-induced cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moghaddaskho, Farima; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Ghadami, Mohsen; Tavakkoly-Bazzaz, Javad; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been used clinically as an anti-tumor agent. Its mechanisms are mostly considered to be the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of its anti-cancer action through cell cycle arrest are poorly known. Furthermore, As2O3 has been shown to be a potential DNA methylation inhibitor, inducing DNA hypomethylation. We hypothesize that As2O3 may affect the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes by interfering with DNA methylation patterns. To explore this, we examined promoter methylation status of 24 cell cycle genes in breast cancer cell lines and in a normal breast tissue sample by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction enzyme-based methods. Gene expression level and cell cycle distribution were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometric analyses, respectively. Our methylation analysis indicates that only promoters of RBL1 (p107), RASSF1A, and cyclin D2 were aberrantly methylated in studied breast cancer cell lines. As2O3 induced CpG island demethylation in promoter regions of these genes and restores their expression correlated with DNA methyltransferase inhibition. As2O3 also induced alterations in messenger RNA expression of several cell cycle-related genes independent of demethylation. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the cell cycle arrest induced by As2O3 varied depending on cell lines, MCF-7 at G1 phase and both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells at G2/M phase. These changes at transcriptional level of the cell cycle genes by the molecular mechanisms dependent and independent of demethylation are likely to represent the mechanisms of cell cycle redistribution in breast cancer cells, in response to As2O3 treatment.

  5. On periodic solutions of Goodwin's business cycle model with only floor in induced investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2013-10-01

    We present here an analytical solution of Goodwin's business cycle model in the form of delay differential equation with fixed delay θ and piecewise linear accelerator with only the floor (or the ceiling). We conclude that in this model the time behavior of the solution similar to Goodwin's limit cycle is not possible. These solution looks similar to the oscillation with a period θ, the amplitude of the oscillation growing exponentially to infinity as t →∞. The conditions for existence of the periodic solution in Goodwin's model with fixed delay for the nonlinear accelerator are also discussed.

  6. A sex-inducing pheromone triggers cell cycle arrest and mate attraction in the diatom Seminavis robusta

    PubMed Central

    Moeys, Sara; Frenkel, Johannes; Lembke, Christine; Gillard, Jeroen T. F.; Devos, Valerie; Van den Berge, Koen; Bouillon, Barbara; Huysman, Marie J. J.; De Decker, Sam; Scharf, Julia; Bones, Atle; Brembu, Tore; Winge, Per; Sabbe, Koen; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Clement, Lieven; De Veylder, Lieven; Pohnert, Georg; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although sexual reproduction is believed to play a major role in the high diversification rates and species richness of diatoms, a mechanistic understanding of diatom life cycle control is virtually lacking. Diatom sexual signalling is controlled by a complex, yet largely unknown, pheromone system. Here, a sex-inducing pheromone (SIP+) of the benthic pennate diatom Seminavis robusta was identified by comparative metabolomics, subsequently purified, and physicochemically characterized. Transcriptome analysis revealed that SIP+ triggers the switch from mitosis-to-meiosis in the opposing mating type, coupled with the transcriptional induction of proline biosynthesis genes, and the release of the proline-derived attraction pheromone. The induction of cell cycle arrest by a pheromone, chemically distinct from the one used to attract the opposite mating type, highlights the existence of a sophisticated mechanism to increase chances of mate finding, while keeping the metabolic losses associated with the release of an attraction pheromone to a minimum. PMID:26786712

  7. Dissecting host-virus interaction in lytic replication of a model herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Feng, Pinghui

    2011-10-07

    In response to viral infection, a host develops various defensive responses, such as activating innate immune signaling pathways that lead to antiviral cytokine production. In order to colonize the host, viruses are obligate to evade host antiviral responses and manipulate signaling pathways. Unraveling the host-virus interaction will shed light on the development of novel therapeutic strategies against viral infection. Murine γHV68 is closely related to human oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epsten-Barr virus. γHV68 infection in laboratory mice provides a tractable small animal model to examine the entire course of host responses and viral infection in vivo, which are not available for human herpesviruses. In this protocol, we present a panel of methods for phenotypic characterization and molecular dissection of host signaling components in γHV68 lytic replication both in vivo and ex vivo. The availability of genetically modified mouse strains permits the interrogation of the roles of host signaling pathways during γHV68 acute infection in vivo. Additionally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these deficient mouse strains can be used to further dissect roles of these molecules during γHV68 lytic replication ex vivo. Using virological and molecular biology assays, we can pinpoint the molecular mechanism of host-virus interactions and identify host and viral genes essential for viral lytic replication. Finally, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system facilitates the introduction of mutations into the viral factor(s) that specifically interrupt the host-virus interaction. Recombinant γHV68 carrying these mutations can be used to recapitulate the phenotypes of γHV68 lytic replication in MEFs deficient in key host signaling components. This protocol offers an excellent strategy to interrogate host-pathogen interaction at multiple levels of intervention in vivo and ex vivo. Recently, we have discovered that γHV68 usurps

  8. Chemosensitization of Cancer Cells via Gold Nanoparticle-Induced Cell Cycle Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Megan A.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that plasmonic nanoparticles conjugated with nuclear-targeting and cytoplasm-targeting peptides (NLS and RGD, respectively) are capable of altering the cell cycle of human oral squamous carcinoma cells (HSC-3). In the present work, we show that this regulation of the cell cycle can be exploited to enhance the efficacy of a common chemotherapeutic agent, 5-Fluorouracil, by pre-treating cells with gold nanoparticles. Utilizing flow cytometry cell cycle analysis, we were able to quantify the 5-Fluorouracil efficacy as an accumulation of cells in the S phase with a depletion of cells in the G2/M phase. Two gold nanoparticle sizes were tested in this work; 30 nm with a surface plasmon resonance at 530 nm and 15 nm with a surface plasmon resonance at 520 nm. The 30 nm nuclear-targeted gold nanoparticles (NLS-AuNPs) showed the greatest 5-Fluorouracil efficacy enhancement when 5-Fluorouracil treatment (500 μM, 48 h) is preceded by a 24 h treatment with nanoparticles. In conclusion, we show that nuclear-targeted 30 nm gold nanoparticles enhance 5-Fluorouracil drug efficacy in HSC-3 cells via regulation of the cell cycle, a chemosensitization technique that could potentially be expanded to different cell lines and different chemotherapies. PMID:24329577

  9. Effects of Caffeine on Radiation-Induced Phenomena Associated with Cell-Cycle Traverse of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Ronald A.; Gurley, Lawrence R.; Tobey, Robert A.

    1974-01-01

    Caffeine induced a state of G1 arrest when added to an exponentially growing culture of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO). In addition to its effect on cell-cycle traverse, caffeine ameliorated a number of the responses of cells to ionizing radiation. The duration of the division delay period following X-irradiation of caffeine-treated cells was reduced, and the magnitude of reduction was dependent on caffeine concentration. Cells irradiated during the DNA synthetic phase in the presence of caffeine were delayed less in their exit from S, measured autoradiographically, and the radiation-induced reduction of radioactive thymidine incorporation into DNA was lessened. Cells synchronized by isoleucine deprivation, while being generally less sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation than mitotically synchronized cells, were equally responsive to the effects of caffeine. The X-ray-induced reduction of phosphorylation of lysine-rich histone F1 was less in caffeine-treated cells than in untreated cells. Finally, survival after irradiation was only slightly reduced in caffeine-treated cells. A possible role of cyclic AMP in cell-cycle traverse of irradiated cells is discussed. PMID:4360269

  10. Alisertib Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, Autophagy and Suppresses EMT in HT29 and Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bao-Jun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Da-Jian; Ju, Yong-Le; Wu, Jin-Hao; Ouyang, Man-Zhao; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with substantial mortality and morbidity. Alisertib (ALS) is a selective Aurora kinase A (AURKA) inhibitor with unclear effect and molecular interactome on CRC. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular interactome and anticancer effect of ALS and explore the underlying mechanisms in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. ALS markedly arrested cells in G2/M phase in both cell lines, accompanied by remarkable alterations in the expression level of key cell cycle regulators. ALS induced apoptosis in HT29 and Caco-2 cells through mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. ALS also induced autophagy in HT29 and Caco-2 cells, with the suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), but activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways. There was a differential modulating effect of ALS on p38 MAPK signaling pathway in both cell lines. Moreover, induction or inhibition of autophagy modulated basal and ALS-induced apoptosis in both cell lines. ALS potently suppressed epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. Collectively, it suggests that induction of cell cycle arrest, promotion of apoptosis and autophagy, and suppression of EMT involving mitochondrial, death receptor, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, and AMPK signaling pathways contribute to the cancer cell killing effect of ALS on CRC cells. PMID:26729093

  11. Aloe-emodin induced in vitro G2/M arrest of cell cycle in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Hsieh, W T; Chang, W C; Chung, J G

    2004-08-01

    In this study, we have evaluated the chemopreventive role of aloe-emodin in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro by studying the regulation of proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis. Aloe-emodin inhibited cell proliferation and induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Investigation of the levels of cyclins B1, E and A by immunoblot analysis showed that cyclin E level was unaffected, whereas cyclin B1 and A levels increased with aloe-emodin in HL-60 cells. Investigation of the levels of cyclin-dependent kinases, Cdk1 and 2, showed increased levels of Cdk1 but the levels of Cdk2 were not effected with aloe-emodin in HL-60 cells. The levels of p27 were increased after HL-60 cells were cotreated with various concentrations of aloe-emodin. The increase of the levels of p27 may be the major factor for aloe-emodin to cause G2/M arrest in these examined cells. Flow cytometric assays and DNA fragmentation gel electrophoresis also confirmed aloe-emodin induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. The levels of caspase-3 were increased after HL-60 cells were cotreated with 10 microM aloe-emodin for 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Taken together, aloe-emodin therefore appears to exert its anticarcinogenesis properties by inhibiting proliferation and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis underwent activation of caspase-3 in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

  12. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  13. Light-mediated DNA Repair Prevents UVB-induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Embryos of the Crustacean Macrobrachium olfersi.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Eliane Cristina; Ammar, Dib; Leal, Mayana Lacerda; da Silva, Heloisa Schramm; Allodi, Silvana; Müller, Yara Maria Rauh; Nazari, Evelise Maria

    2015-01-01

    High levels of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation can negatively affect aquatic animals. Macrobrachium olfersi is a prawn that lives in clear freshwaters and during the breeding season, females carry eggs in an external brood pouch. Therefore, we hypothesize that eggs are also exposed to environmental UVB radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether UVB radiation induces DNA damage and compromises cell cycle in embryos of M. olfersi. In laboratory, UVB irradiance (310 mW. cm(-2) ) that embryos receive in the natural environment was simulated. After irradiation, embryos were kept under different light conditions in order to recognize the presence of cell repair. UVB radiation induces DNA damage, specifically thymine dimers. After 48 h of UVB exposure, a significant decrease in the level of these dimers was observed in embryos kept under visible light while it remained constant in the dark. Moreover, under visible light and darkness, a decrease in proliferation was observed after 48 h of irradiation. An increase in PCNA expression and decrease in p53 expression were observed after, respectively, 1 and 48 h of exposure. Our results showed that UVB radiation disturbs the cell cycle and induces DNA damage in M. olfersi embryos. However, under visible light these embryos showed successful DNA repair.

  14. Effect of Crocin on Cell Cycle Regulators in N-Nitroso-N-Methylurea-Induced Breast Cancer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mahboobeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Abroun, Saeid; Azizian, Mahshid

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed the anticancer effect of crocin, a saffron carotenoid, in both breast and gastric cancers in animal models, but its mechanism of action is not clearly known, yet. In this study, the effect of crocin on cell cycle regulators is investigated. Female Wistar Albino rats were divided into two groups, with or without N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) injection. After tumor formation, each group of rats was divided into two subgroups, receiving crocin or vehicle only. After 5 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the tumors were retained for pathologic investigation and determination of the parameters. Before crocin treatment, the tumor volumes were 13.27±3.77 and 12.37±1.88, but at the end of the experiment, they were 23.66±8.82 and 11.91±2.27 in the control and crocin-treated groups, respectively. Pathologic investigation indicated the adenocarcinoma induction by NMU. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed overexpression of cyclin D1 and p21(Cip1) in the NMU-induced breast tumors; however, the expression of both of them suppressed by crocin treatment. The previous studies indicated that crocin induces apoptosis in tumor tissue. In this study, we show that it also suppresses tumor growth and induces cell cycle arrest by downregulation of cyclin D1. In addition, crocin suppressed p21(Cip1) in a p53-dependent manner.

  15. CIL-102-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells via Upregulation of p21 and GADD45

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Shih; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Hsieh, Meng-Chiao; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Lee, Ko-Chao; Lee, Kam-Fai; Shen, Chien-Heng; Tung, Shui-Yi; Teng, Chih-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is a well-known, major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata with valuable biological properties, including anti-tumorigenic activity. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 mediated the induction of cell death, and we performed cell cycle G2/M arrest to clarify molecular changes in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). Treatment of DLD-1 cells with CIL-102 resulted in triggering the extrinsic apoptosis pathway through the activation of Fas-L, caspase-8 and the induction of Bid cleavage and cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. In addition, CIL-102 mediated apoptosis and G2/M arrest by phosphorylation of the Jun N-terminus kinase (JNK1/2) signaling pathway. This resulted in the expression of NFκB p50, p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) levels, and in the induction of p21 and GADD45 as well as the decreased association of cdc2/cyclin B. Furthermore, treatment with the JNK1/2 (SP600125), NFκB (PDTI) or the p300/CBP (C646) inhibitors abolished CIL-102-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest and reversed the association of cdc2 with cyclin B. Therefore, we demonstrated that there was an increase in the cellular levels of p21 and GADD45 by CIL-102 reduction in cell viability and cell cycle arrest via the activation of the JNK1/2, NFκB p50, p300 and CBP signaling modules. Collectively, our results demonstrated that CIL-102 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of colon cancer cells by upregulating p21 and GADD45 expression and by activating JNK1/2, NFκB p50 and p300 to provide a new mechanism for CIL-102 treatment. PMID:28068431

  16. Scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) venom exhibits cytotoxicity and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in breast and colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K.; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Abbasmanthiri, Rajamohamed; Arshaduddin, Mohammed; Al-Harthi, Fahad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The defective apoptosis is believed to play a major role in the survival and proliferation of neoplastic cells. Hence, the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells is one of the targets for cancer treatment. Researchers are considering scorpion venom as a potent natural source for cancer treatment because it contains many bioactive compounds. The main objective of the current study is to evaluate the anticancer property of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Scorpions were milked by electrical stimulation of telsons and lyophilized. The breast (MDA-MB-231) and colorectal (HCT-8) cancer cells were maintained in appropriate condition. The venom cytotoxicity was assessed by 3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay, and the cellular and nuclear changes were studied with propidium iodide and 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole stain, respectively. The cell cycle arrest was examined using muse cell analyzer. Results: The A. bicolor venom exerted cytotoxic effects on MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cells in a dose- and duration-dependent manner and induced apoptotic cell death. The treatment with this venom arrests the cancer cells in G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Conclusions: The venom selectively induces the rate of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cells as reflected by morphological and cell cycle studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first scientific evidence demonstrating the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by A. bicolor scorpion venom. PMID:27721540

  17. Acquisition of intact polar lipids from the Prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis globosa by its lytic virus PgV-07T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maat, D. S.; Bale, N. J.; Hopmans, E. C.; Baudoux, A.-C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.; Brussaard, C. P. D.

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies showed changes in phytoplankton lipid composition during viral infection and have indicated roles for specific lipids in the mechanisms of algal virus-host interaction. To investigate the generality of these findings and obtain a better understanding of the allocation of specific lipids to viruses, we studied the intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of virally infected and non-infected cultures of the Prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis globosa G(A) and its lytic virus PgV-07T. The P. globosa IPL composition was relatively stable over a diel cycle and not strongly affected by viral infection. Glycolipids, phospholipids and betaine lipids were present in both the host and virus, although specific groups such as the diacylglyceryl-hydroxymethyltrimethyl-β-alanines and the sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols, were present in a lower proportion or were not detected in the virus. Viral glycosphingolipids (vGSLs), which have been shown to play a role in the infection strategy of the virus EhV-86, infecting the Prymnesiophyte Emiliania huxleyi CCMP374, were not encountered. Our results show that the involvement of lipids in virus-algal host interactions can be very different amongst virus-algal host systems.

  18. Acquisition of intact polar lipids from the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis globosa by its lytic virus PgV-07T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maat, D. S.; Bale, N. J.; Hopmans, E. C.; Baudoux, A.-C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.; Brussaard, C. P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed changes in phytoplankton lipid composition during viral infection and have indicated roles for specific lipids in the mechanisms of algal virus-host interaction. To investigate the generality of these findings and obtain a better understanding of the allocation of specific lipids to viruses, we studied the intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of virally infected and non-infected cultures of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis globosa G(A) and its lytic virus PgV-07T. The P. globosa IPL composition was relatively stable over a diel cycle and not strongly affected by viral infection. Glycolipids, phospholipids and betaine lipids were present in both the host and virus, although specific groups such as the diacylglyceryl-hydroxymethyltrimethyl-β-alanines and the sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols, were present in a lower proportion or were not detected in the virus. Viral glycosphingolipids (vGSLs), which have been shown to play a role in the infection strategy of the virus EhV-86, infecting the prymnesiophyte Emiliania huxleyi CCMP374, were not encountered. Our results show that the involvement of lipids in virus-algal host interactions can be very different amongst virus-algal host systems.

  19. Cytotoxicity of atropine to human corneal epithelial cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng-Lei; Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Atropine is an anticholinergic drug for mydriasis in eye clinic, and its abuse might be cytotoxic to the cornea and result in blurred vision. However, the cytotoxicity of atropine to the cornea and its cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of atropine to corneal epithelium and its underlying mechanisms using an in vitro model of non-transfected human corneal epithelial (HCEP) cells. Our results showed that atropine, above the concentration of 0.3125 g/l (1/32 of its therapeutic dosage in eye clinic), had a dose- and time-dependent toxicity to HCEP cells by inducing morphological abnormality, cytopathic effect, viability decline, and proliferation retardation. Moreover, the proliferation-retarding effect of atropine on the cells was achieved by inducing G1/S phase arrest and downregulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Besides, atropine also had an apoptosis-inducing effect on the cells by inducing phosphatidylserine externalization, plasma membrane permeability elevation, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic body formation. Furthermore, atropine could also induce activations of caspase-2, -3 and -9, disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, upregulation of Bax and Bad, and upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor, implying a death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent pathway is most probably involved in the apoptosis of HCEP cells induced by atropine. Taken together, our results suggest that atropine has remarkable cytotoxicity to HCEP cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

  20. Importance of crack-propagation-induced ε-martensite in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue of high-Mn austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huichao; Koyama, Motomichi; Sawaguchi, Takahiro; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of deformation-induced ε-martensitic transformation on strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) through crack-propagation analysis involving a notching technique that used a focused ion beam (FIB) setup on Fe-30Mn-4Si-2Al austenitic steel. Using the FIB notch, we separated the microstructure evolution into macroscopic cyclic deformation-induced and crack-propagation-induced microstructures. Following this, we clarified the fatigue crack-propagation-induced ε-martensitic transformation to decelerate crack propagation at a total strain range of 2%, obtaining an extraordinary LCF life of 1.1 × 104 cycles.

  1. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression. In this study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequency of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine efficiency of cytogenetic repair, especially DSB repair. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR-induced biological consequences. Furthermore, eight non-DBS repair genes showed involvement in regulating DSB repair, indicating that

  2. Ceramides promote apoptosis for virus-infected lymphoma cells through induction of ceramide synthases and viral lytic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Bai, Aiping; Chen, Yihan; Bielawski, Jacek; Del Valle, Luis; Smith, Charles D.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent for several human cancers including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a rapidly progressive malignancy arising preferentially in immunocompromised patients. With conventional chemotherapy, PEL continues to portend high mortality, dictating the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2) represents a key gatekeeper for sphingolipid metabolism, responsible for conversion of ceramides to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). We have previously demonstrated that targeting SphK2 using a novel selective inhibitor, ABC294640, leads to intracellular accumulation of ceramides and induces apoptosis for KSHV-infected PEL cells, while suppressing tumor progression in vivo. In the current study, we sought to determine whether specific ceramide/dh-ceramide species and related ceramide synthases (CerS) impact viability for KSHV-infected PEL cells during targeting of SphK2. We found that several specific ceramide and dihydro(dh)-ceramide species and their associated CerS reduce PEL survival and tumor expansion in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that dhC16-Cer induces PEL apoptosis in part through activation of KSHV lytic gene expression. These data further implicate bioactive sphingolipids in regulation of PEL survival, and provide justification for future studies evaluating clinically relevant ceramide analogs or mimetics for their potential as therapeutic agents for PEL. PMID:26327294

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyl induced ROS signaling delays the entry of quiescent human breast epithelial cells into the proliferative cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Leena; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Aykin-Burns, Nùkhet; Spitz, Douglas R.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2010-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental chemical contaminants that can produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) by autoxidation of dihydroxy-PCBs and redox-cycling. We investigate the hypothesis that PCB induced perturbations in ROS signaling regulate the entry of quiescent cells into the proliferative cycle. Quiescent MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells were incubated with 0–3 micromolar of 2-(4-chlorophenyl)benzo-1,4-quinone (4-Cl-BQ), 2, 2′, 4, 4′, 5, 5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and Aroclor 1254 for 4 days. Cells were replated at a lower density and analyzed for cell cycle phase distributions, ROS levels, MnSOD expression, and cyclin D1 protein levels. Quiescent cells incubated with 4-Cl-BQ showed the maximal delay in entering S phase. This delay was associated with a decrease in MnSOD activity, protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in cellular ROS levels. Results from the mRNA turnover assay showed that the 4-Cl-BQ treatment selectively enhanced the degradation of the 4.2 kb MnSOD transcript, while the half-life of the 1.5 kb transcript did not change. Accumulation of cyclin D1 protein levels in replated cells was suppressed in cells treated with 4-Cl-BQ. Pretreatment of quiescent cells with polyethylene glycol-conjugated superoxide dismutase and catalase suppressed 4-Cl-BQ induced increase in ROS levels, which was consistent with an increase in cyclin D1 accumulation, and entry into S phase. These results showed 4-Cl-BQ induced perturbations in ROS signaling inhibit the entry of quiescent cells into S phase. PMID:20307652

  4. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Wen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Hu, Yu-Chen; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Chang, Kee-Lung

    2012-01-15

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis.

  5. Geomagnetically Induced Currents, a space weather hazard. Case study - Europe under intense geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrica, V.; Demetrescu, Cr.; Stefan, C.; Greculeasa, R.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field with the magnetosphere and ionosphere results in variations of the geomagnetic field that induce hazardous electric currents in grounded technological systems (electric power and hydrocarbon transportation networks), the so-called geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). In order to evaluate the hazard induced on the European continent, we present a study of the surface electric field induced by 16 intense (Dst < -150 nT) geomagnetic storms, based on the analysis of the geomagnetic records from the European network of observatories, study that tend to solve the geophysical part of the problem. The evolution during storm development and the sources of the disturbance field are explored in case of the largest geomagnetic storm in the cycle 23 (Dst = -422 nT, November 20-21, 2003), and the geographical distribution of the maximum induced surface geoelectric field over Europe by the 16 storms considered in the study is presented. As source proxies, the Dst geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the magnetospheric ring current at the geomagnetic equator, the AL geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the ionospheric electrojet at auroral latitude, and the PC geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the polar cap current, were examined.

  6. The Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus orf35 gene product is required for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Shir; Itzhak, Inbal; Wasserman, Talya; Gelgor, Anastasia; Kalt, Inna; Sarid, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is implicated in the etiology of several human malignancies. KSHV open reading frame (orf) 35 encodes a conserved gammaherpesvirus protein with an, as yet, unknown function. Employing the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated a recombinant viral clone that fails to express ORF35 (BAC16-ORF35-stop) but preserves intact adjacent and overlapping reading frames. Using this construct, we studied the role of this previously uncharacterized gene product during lytic reactivation of KSHV. Upon lytic reactivation, the ORF35-stop recombinant virus displayed significantly reduced lytic viral gene expression, viral DNA replication, and progeny virus production as compared to control wild-type virus. Exogenous expression of ORF35-Flag reversed the effects of ORF35 deficiency. These results demonstrate that ORF35 is important for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

  7. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  9. Human natural killer cells prevent infectious mononucleosis features by targeting lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chijioke, Obinna; Müller, Anne; Feederle, Regina; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Krieg, Carsten; Emmel, Vanessa; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Leung, Carol S; Antsiferova, Olga; Landtwing, Vanessa; Bossart, Walter; Moretta, Alessandro; Hassan, Rocio; Boyman, Onur; Niedobitek, Gerald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2013-12-26

    Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM), a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK) cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies.

  10. Glucose capped silver nanoparticles induce cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Elisa; Mariano, Stefania; Vergallo, Cristian; Carata, Elisabetta; Fimia, Gian Maria; Mura, Francesco; Rossi, Marco; Vergaro, Viviana; Ciccarella, Giuseppe; Corazzari, Marco; Dini, Luciana

    2017-02-20

    This study aims to determine the interaction (uptake and biological effects on cell viability and cell cycle progression) of glucose capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs-G) on human epithelioid cervix carcinoma (HeLa) cells, in relation to amount, 2×10(3) or 2×10(4) NPs/cell, and exposure time, up to 48h. The spherical and well dispersed AgNPs (30±5nm) were obtained by using glucose as reducing agent in a green synthesis method that ensures to stabilize AgNPs avoiding cytotoxic soluble silver ions Ag(+) release. HeLa cells take up abundantly and rapidly AgNPs-G resulting toxic to cells in amount and incubation time dependent manner. HeLa cells were arrested at S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and subG1 population increased when incubated with 2×10(4) AgNPs-G/cell. Mitotic index decreased accordingly. The dissolution experiments demonstrated that the observed effects were due only to AgNPs-G since glucose capping prevents Ag(+) release. The AgNPs-G influence on HeLa cells viability and cell cycle progression suggest that AgNPs-G, alone or in combination with chemotherapeutics, may be exploited for the development of novel antiproliferative treatment in cancer therapy. However, the possible influence of the cell cycle on cellular uptake of AgNPs-G and the mechanism of AgNPs entry in cells need further investigation.

  11. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair.

  12. Lytic Effects of Serum and Mononuclear Leukocytes on Oral Epithelial Cells in Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-07

    Publiqation 3-32to4-84 RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) PAUL R. BURNETT AND DAVID...vitro cytolytic reactions correlating with recur- rent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). The cytolytic effects of sera and mononuclear leukocytes from...the attached manuscript entitled "Lytic Effects of Serum and Mononuclear Leukocytes on Oral Epithelial Cells in Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis ." 2. If

  13. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori lytic transglycosylases Slt and MltD.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Catherine; Labigne, Agnès; Boneca, Ivo G

    2007-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is a cell wall heteropolymer that is essential for cell integrity. PG hydrolases participate in correct assembly of the PG layer and have been shown to be required for cell division, cell daughter separation, and maintenance of bacterial morphology. In silico analysis of the Helicobacter pylori genome resulted in identification of three potential hydrolases, Slt, MltD, and AmiA. This study was aimed at determining the roles of the putative lytic transglycosylases, Slt and MltD, in H. pylori morphology, growth, and PG metabolism. Strain 26695 single mutants were constructed using a nonpolar kanamycin cassette. The slt and mltD mutants formed normal bacillary and coccoid bacteria in the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. The slt and mltD mutants had growth rates comparable to the growth rate of the parental strain. However, the mltD mutant exhibited enhanced survival in the stationary phase compared to the wild type or the slt mutant. PG was purified from exponentially growing bacteria and from bacteria in the stationary phase, and its muropeptide composition was analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. This analysis revealed changes in the muropeptide composition indicating that MltD and Slt have lytic transglycosylase activities. Glycan strand analysis suggested that Slt and MltD have exo and endo types of lytic transglycosylase activity, indicating that Slt is involved mainly in PG turnover and MltD is involved mainly in rearrangement of the PG layer. In this study, we determined the distinct roles of the lytic transglycosylases Slt and MltD in PG metabolism.

  14. Differential cell cycle-specificity for chromosomal damage induced by merbarone and etoposide in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Roy, Shambhu K; Eastmond, David A

    2007-03-01

    Merbarone, a topoisomerase II (topo II) inhibitor which, in contrast to etoposide, does not stabilize topo II-DNA cleavable complexes, was previously shown to be a potent clastogen in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the possible mechanisms, we compared the cell cycle-specificity of the clastogenic effects of merbarone and etoposide in V79 cells. Using flow cytometry and BrdU labeling techniques, etoposide was shown to cause a rapid and persistent G2 delay while merbarone was shown to cause a prolonged S-phase followed by a G2 delay. To identify the stages which are susceptible to DNA damage, we performed the micronucleus (MN) assay with synchronized cells or utilized a combination of BrdU pulse labeling and the cytokinesis-blocked MN assay with non-synchronized cells. Treatment of M phase cells with either agent did not result in increased MN formation. Etoposide but not merbarone caused a significant increase in MN when cells were treated during G2 phase. When treated during S-phase, both chemicals induced highly significant increases in MN. However, the relative proportion of MN induced by merbarone was substantially higher than that induced by etoposide. Both chemicals also caused significant increases in MN in cells that were treated during G1 phase. To confirm the observations in the MN assay, first division metaphases were evaluated in the chromosome aberration assay. The chromosomes of cells treated with merbarone and etoposide showed increased frequencies of both chromatid- and chromosome-type of aberrations. Our findings indicate that while etoposide causes DNA damage more evenly throughout the G1, S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, an outcome which may be closely associated with topo II-mediated DNA strand cleavage, merbarone induces DNA breakage primarily during S-phase, an effect which is likely due to the stalling of replication forks by inhibition of topo II activity.

  15. p53 dependent apoptosis and cell cycle delay induced by heteroleptic complexes in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gunjan; Rana, Nishant Kumar; Singh, Priya; Dubey, Pradeep; Pandey, Daya Shankar; Koch, Biplob

    2017-04-01

    We previously reported synthesis of novel arene ruthenium (Ru) complexes and evaluated their antitumor activity in murine lymphoma (DL) cells. In this present study we further investigated the mechanism of action of two ruthenium complexes [complex 1 (η6-arene)RuCl(2-pcdpm)] and complex 2 (η6-arene)RuCl(4-mtdpm)] in cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Our studies demonstrate that anticancer property of these two complexes was due to induction of apoptosis through p53 mediated pathway as well as arrest of cells in G2/M phase of cell cycle. It is worth to note that the complexes did not cause any substantial cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Further in comprehensive studies, apoptosis inducing property of both complexes were established in accordance with array of morphological changes ranging from membrane blebbing to formation of apoptotic bodies and followed by DNA fragmentation assay. Furthermore, Flow cytometry by Annexin V/PI staining delineate that complex 1 and 2 have strident impact to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. The complex 1 and 2 treated cells show increased level of intracellular ROS generation which was preceded by p53 activation. Apoptosis induced by 1 and 2 was preceded by mitochondrial aggregations which were monitored by mitotracker. In addition flow cytometry analysis showed that both complexes also effectively arrest cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. Western blot, RT-PCR as well as Real Time analysis were used to further confirm that the complexes induced apoptosis in p53 dependent pathway. Thus, our promising results can contribute to the rational design of novel potential anticancer agents.

  16. HDAC6 regulates the dynamics of lytic granules in cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Andrade, Norman; Iborra, Salvador; Trullo, Antonio; Moreno-Gonzalo, Olga; Calvo, Enrique; Catalán, Elena; Menasche, Gaël; Sancho, David; Vázquez, Jesús; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2016-01-01

    HDAC6 is a tubulin deacetylase involved in many cellular functions related to cytoskeleton dynamics including cell migration and autophagy. In addition, HDAC6 affects antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell activation. In this study, we show that HDAC6 contributes to the cytotoxic function of CD8+ T cells. Immunization studies revealed defective cytotoxic activity in vivo in the absence of HDAC6. Adoptive transfer of wild-type or Hdac6-/- CD8+ T cells to Rag1-/- mice demonstrated specific impairment in CD8+ T cell responses against vaccinia infection. Mechanistically, HDAC6-deficient cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) showed defective in vitro cytolytic activity related to altered dynamics of lytic granules, inhibited kinesin 1 – dynactin mediated terminal transport of lytic granules to the immune synapse and deficient exocytosis, but not to target cell recognition, T cell receptor (TCR) activation or interferon (IFNγ) production. Our results establish HDAC6 as an effector of the immune cytotoxic response that acts by affecting the dynamics, transport and secretion of lytic granules by CTLs. PMID:26869226

  17. KSHV Reactivation and Novel Implications of Protein Isomerization on Lytic Switch Control

    PubMed Central

    Guito, Jonathan; Lukac, David M.

    2015-01-01

    In Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) oncogenesis, both latency and reactivation are hypothesized to potentiate tumor growth. The KSHV Rta protein is the lytic switch for reactivation. Rta transactivates essential genes via interactions with cofactors such as the cellular RBP-Jk and Oct-1 proteins, and the viral Mta protein. Given that robust viral reactivation would facilitate antiviral responses and culminate in host cell lysis, regulation of Rta’s expression and function is a major determinant of the latent-lytic balance and the fate of infected cells. Our lab recently showed that Rta transactivation requires the cellular peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1. Our data suggest that proline‑directed phosphorylation regulates Rta by licensing binding to Pin1. Despite Pin1’s ability to stimulate Rta transactivation, unchecked Pin1 activity inhibited virus production. Dysregulation of Pin1 is implicated in human cancers, and KSHV is the latest virus known to co-opt Pin1 function. We propose that Pin1 is a molecular timer that can regulate the balance between viral lytic gene expression and host cell lysis. Intriguing scenarios for Pin1’s underlying activities, and the potential broader significance for isomerization of Rta and reactivation, are highlighted. PMID:25588053

  18. Extracts of centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A375 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weina; Liu, Rui; Qi, Junpeng; Zhang, Yanmin

    2014-07-01

    Extracts from the centipede Scolopendra genus, have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases and have been found to exhibit anticancer activity in tumor cells. To investigate the potential and associated antitumor mechanism of alcohol extracts of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans (AECS), cell viability, cell cycle and cell apoptosis were studied and the results revealed that AECS inhibits A375 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, AECS was found to arrest the cell cycle of A375 cells at the S phase, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin E and a decrease in the protein levels of cyclin D1. In a cell culture system, AECS markedly induced the apoptosis of A375 cells, which was closely associated with the effects on the Bcl-2 family, whereby decreased Bcl-2 and increased Bak, Bax and Bad expression levels were observed. The underlying mechanism of AECS inhibiting A375 cell proliferation was associated with the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, indicating that AECS may present as a potential therapeutic agent for administration in human melanoma cancer intervention.

  19. Kaempferol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma through EGFR/p38 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenbin; Dang, Qiang; Xu, Defeng; Chen, Yule; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Long, Qingzhi; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in several tumors, but not in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, we investigated the effects of kaempferol and the underlying mechanism(s) on the cell growth of RCC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay were used to study cell growth, and flow cytometry was used to study apoptosis and cell cycles in different RCC cells treated with various doses of kaempferol. A significant inhibition on cell growth, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were observed in 786-O and 769-P cells after kaempferol treatment compared with the control group. Moreover, the results clearly showed that kaempferol causes a strong inhibition of the activation of the EGFR/p38 signaling pathways, upregulation of p21 expression and downregulation of cyclin B1 expression in human RCC cells, together with activation of PARP cleavages, induction of apoptotic death and inhibition of cell growth. Collectively, our results suggest that kaempferol may serve as a candidate for chemo-preventive or chemotherapeutic agents for RCC.

  20. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  1. Trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 by Set1 in the lytic infection of human herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Kent, Jennifer R; Placek, Brandon; Whelan, Kelly A; Hollow, Charles M; Zeng, Ping-Yao; Fraser, Nigel W; Berger, Shelley L

    2006-06-01

    Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes facial, ocular, and encephalitic disease in humans. Previous work showed that the genome of HSV-1 is associated with acetylated and methylated histones during lytic infection. However, the physiological role of histone modifications in lytic infection of HSV-1 is unclear. We examined the role of protein methylation in lytic infection of HSV-1 using a protein methylation inhibitor, 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). We found that MTA strongly reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1. Moreover, MTA treatment decreases the level of trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3) on the HSV-1 genome. These results suggest that protein methylation, and in particular, histone methylation, is involved in the lytic infection of HSV-1. To delineate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and Set7/9, in the lytic infection of HSV-1. Using small interference RNA, we found that the reduction of Set1, but not Set7/9, reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1 and specifically decreases H3K4me3 on the virus genome. These results indicate that H3K4me3 mediated by Set1 is required for optimal gene expression and replication of HSV-1 during lytic infection and suggest that this pathway could be a potential point of pharmacological intervention during HSV-1 infection.

  2. Rosiglitazone inhibits cell proliferation by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawei; Dai, Bing; Fu, Lili; Jia, Jieshuang; Mei, Changlin

    2010-06-01

    Abnormal proliferation is an important pathological feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Many drugs inhibiting cell proliferation have been proved to be effective in slowing the disease progression in ADPKD. Recent evidence has suggested that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have anti-neoplasm effects through inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis in various cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of PPARgamma in human ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line, and found that the expression of PPARgamma was greater in ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line than in normal kidney tissues and human kidney cortex (HKC) cell line. Rosiglitazone inhibited significantly proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These effects were diminished by GW9662, a specific PPARgamma antagonist. Cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest in human ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells with rosiglitazone treatment. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins revealed that rosiglitazone decreased the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, pRb, cyclin D1, cyclin D2 and Cdk4 but increased the levels of p21 and p27 in a dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone also induced apoptosis in cyst-lining epithelial cells, which was correlated with increased bax expression and decreased bcl-2 expression. These results suggest PPARgamma agonist might serve as a promising drug for the treatment of ADPKD.

  3. Up-regulated A20 promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and induces chemotherapy resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Li, Shouyun; Yu, Jing; Li, Huan; Liu, Shuang; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2015-09-01

    A20, also known as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), has been identified as a key regulator of cell survival in many solid tumors. However, little is known about the protein expression level and function of A20 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we found that A20 is up-regulated in ALL patients and several cell lines. Knockdown of A20 in Jurkat, Nalm-6, and Reh cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation, which was associated with cell cycle arrest. Phospho-ERK (p-ERK) was also down-regulated, while p53 and p21 were up-regulated in A20 knockdown cells. In addition, A20 knockdown induced apoptosis in Jurkat and Reh cells and enhanced the sensitivity of these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. These results indicate that A20 may stimulate cell proliferation by regulating cell cycle progression. A20 inhibited apoptosis in some types of ALL cells, thereby enhancing their resistance to chemotherapy. This effect was abolished through A20 silencing. These findings suggest that A20 may contribute to the pathogenesis of ALL and that it may be used as a new therapeutic target for ALL treatment.

  4. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wai Kuan; Ho, Yen Fong; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthohumol, a major prenylated chalcone found in female hop plant, Humulus lupulus, was reported to have various chemopreventive and anti-cancer properties. However, its apoptotic effect on human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was unknown. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the effects of xanthohumol on apoptosis in A549 human NSCLC cells. Materials and Methods: A549 cell proliferation was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Morphological changes of the cells were studied via phase contrast and fluorescent microscopy. Induction of apoptosis was assessed by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (Annexin V-FITC/PI) staining, DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay mitochondrial membrane potential assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity studies. Results: Xanthohumol was found to decrease cell proliferation in A549 cells but had relatively low cytotoxicity on normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Typical cellular and nuclear apoptotic features were also observed in A549 cells treated with xanthohumol. Onset of apoptosis in A549 cells was further confirmed by externalization of phosphatidylserine, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA fragmentation in the cells after treatment. Xanthohumol induced accumulation of cells in sub G1 and S phase based on cell cycle analysis and also increased the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9. Conclusion: This work suggests that xanthohumol as an apoptosis inducer, may be a potent therapeutic compound for NSCLC. PMID:26664015

  5. Recovery of the Cell Cycle Inhibition in CCl4-Induced Cirrhosis by the Adenosine Derivative IFC-305

    PubMed Central

    Chagoya de Sánchez, Victoria; Martínez-Pérez, Lidia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cirrhosis is a chronic degenerative illness characterized by changes in normal liver architecture, failure of hepatic function, and impairment of proliferative activity. The aim of this study is to know how IFC-305 compound induces proliferation of the liver during reversion of cirrhosis. Methods. Once cirrhosis has been installed by CCl4 treatment for 10 weeks in male Wistar rats, they were divided into four groups: two received saline and two received the compound; all were euthanized at 5 and 10 weeks of treatment. Liver homogenate, mitochondria, and nucleus were used to measure cyclins, CDKs, and cell cycle regulatory proteins PCNA, pRb, p53, E2F, p21, p27, HGF, liver ATP, and mitochondrial function. Results. Diminution and small changes were observed in the studied proteins in the cirrhotic animals without treatment. The IFC-305-treated rats showed a clear increase in most of the proteins studied mainly in PCNA and CDK6, and a marked increased in ATP and mitochondrial function. Discussion/Conclusion. IFC-305 induces a recovery of the cell cycle inhibition promoting recovery of DNA damage through the action of PCNA and p53. The increase in energy and preservation of mitochondrial function contribute to recovering the proliferative function. PMID:23056951

  6. AP-2γ Induces p21 Expression, Arrests Cell Cycle, and Inhibits the Tumor Growth of Human Carcinoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hualei; Goswami, Prabhat C; Domann, Frederick E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Activating enhancer-binding protein 2γ (AP-2γ) is a member of the developmentally regulated AP-2 transcription factor family that regulates the expression of many downstream genes. Whereas the effects of AP-2α overexpression on cell growth are fairly well established, the cellular effects of AP-2γ overexpression are less well studied. Our new findings show that AP-2γ significantly upregulates p21 mRNA and proteins, inhibits cell growth, and decreases clonogenic survival. Cell cycle analysis revealed that forced AP-2γ expression induced G1-phase arrest, decreased DNA synthesis, and decreased the fraction of cells in S phase. AP-2γ expression also led to cyclin D1 repression, decreased Rb phosphorylation, and decreased E2F activity in breast carcinoma cells. AP-2γ binding to the p21 promoter was observed in vivo, and the absence of growth inhibition in response to AP-2γ expression in p21 (-/-) cells demonstrated that p21 caused, at least in part, AP-2-induced cell cycle arrest. Finally, the tumor growth of human breast carcinoma cells in vivo was inhibited by the expression of AP-2γ relative to empty vector-infected cells, suggesting that AP-2γ acts as a tumor suppressor. In summary, expression of either AP-2γ or AP-2α inhibited breast carcinoma cell growth; thus, these genes may be therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:16867219

  7. Protective T-Cell-Based Immunity Induced in Neonatal Mice by a Single Replicative Cycle of Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Marco; Abril, Carlos; Schwerdel, Cornelia; Ruedl, Christiane; Ackermann, Mathias; Suter, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Newborns are very susceptible to infections because their immune systems are not fully developed and react to antigen exposure preferentially with unresponsiveness. UV-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) represents such an antigen and does not induce an immune response in neonates. In contrast, protective T cells were primed in newborn mice by a single replicative cycle of DISC HSV-1 given once within 24 h of birth. Each of the HSV-1-primed CD4+ or CD8+ T cells induced in wild-type or interferon-deficient mice conferred resistance to naive animals exposed to a lethal virus challenge. Inactivated HSV-1, injected at variable doses up to 104 times that of DISC HSV-1, was ineffective in inducing any detectable immune responses in neonates. Thus, the capacity of HSV-1 to replicate once, but not the number of virus particles per se, was decisive in inducing protective T-cell-associated immunity in newborn mice. PMID:11119576

  8. Resveratrol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Malignant NK Cells via JAK2/STAT3 Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Quoc Trung, Ly; Espinoza, J. Luis; Takami, Akiyoshi; Nakao, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell malignancies, particularly aggressive NK cell leukaemias and lymphomas, have poor prognoses. Although recent regimens with L-asparaginase substantially improved outcomes, novel therapeutic approaches are still needed to enhance clinical response. Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, has been extensively studied for its anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and anti-cancer activities. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-tumour activities of resveratrol against the NK cell lines KHYG-1, NKL, NK-92 and NK-YS. Resveratrol induced robust G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, significantly suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner for all four cell lines. In addition, resveratrol suppressed constitutively active STAT3 in all the cell lines and inhibited JAK2 phosphorylation but had no effect on other upstream mediators of STAT3 activation, such as PTEN, TYK2, and JAK1. Resveratrol also induced downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins MCL1 and survivin, two downstream effectors of the STAT3 pathway. Finally, resveratrol induced synergistic effect on the apoptotic and antiproliferative activities of L-asparaginase against KHYG-1, NKL and NK-92 cells. These results suggest that resveratrol may have therapeutic potential against NK cell malignancies. Furthermore, our finding that resveratrol is a bonafide JAK2 inhibitor extends its potential benefits to other diseases with dysregulated JAK2 signaling. PMID:23372833

  9. Estrogens decrease {gamma}-ray-induced senescence and maintain cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells independently of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Toillon, Robert-Alain . E-mail: robert.toillon@univ-lille1.fr; Magne, Nicolas; Laios, Ioanna; Castadot, Pierre; Kinnaert, Eric; Van Houtte, Paul; Desmedt, Christine B.Sc.; Leclercq, Guy; Lacroix, Marc

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Sequential administration of radiotherapy and endocrine therapy is considered to be a standard adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Recent clinical reports suggest that radiotherapy could be more efficient in association with endocrine therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the estrogen effects on irradiated breast cancer cells (IR-cells). Methods and Materials: Using functional genomic analysis, we examined the effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen) on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Results: Our results showed that E{sub 2} sustained the growth of IR-cells. Specifically, estrogens prevented cell cycle blockade induced by {gamma}-rays, and no modification of apoptotic rate was detected. In IR-cells we observed the induction of genes involved in premature senescence and cell cycle progression and investigated the effects of E{sub 2} on the p53/p21{sup waf1/cip1}/Rb pathways. We found that E{sub 2} did not affect p53 activation but it decreased cyclin E binding to p21{sup waf1/cip1} and sustained downstream Rb hyperphosphorylation by functional inactivation of p21{sup waf1/cip1}. We suggest that Rb inactivation could decrease senescence and allow cell cycle progression in IR-cells. Conclusion: These results may help to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the maintenance of breast cancer cell growth by E{sub 2} after irradiation-induced damage. They also offer clinicians a rational basis for the sequential administration of ionizing radiation and endocrine therapies.

  10. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Paulo C.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J.; Yunes, Rosendo A.; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N’-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002. PMID:26302043

  11. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.

    1985-09-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G/sub 2/. The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G/sub 2/ arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G/sub 2/. This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G/sub 2/ arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G/sub 2/ arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest, while inhibiting repair of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G/sub 2/ arrest was expressed. The duration of G/sub 2/ arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G/sub 2/ arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G/sub 2/ arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G/sub 2/ arrest.

  12. Expression pattern and intensity of protoporphyrin IX induced by liposomal 5-aminolevulinic acid in rat pilosebaceous unit throughout hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Han, Insook; Jun, Mee Sook; Kim, Soo-Kyun; Kim, Moonkyu; Kim, Jung Chul

    2005-11-01

    We have developed liposomal formulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance topical delivery and examined ALA-induced protoporpyrin (PpIX) expression in rat pilosebaceous unit throughout hair cycle. Two types of liposomes--glycerol dilaulate (GDL) and phosphatidylcholine (PC)--were formulated and both liposomal ALA increased PpIX expression in rat dorsal skin and pilosebaceous units when compared with free ALA. However, iontophoresis combined with liposomal ALA reduced the expression intensity of PpIX in hair bulbs although it achieved deeper and wider expression of PpIX through transfollicular pathway. After topical application in intact or depilated rat skin, liposomal ALA produced excellent PpIX expression in pilosebaceous units. The expression pattern and intensity of PpIX changed in hair cycle-dependent manner: specific expression only in sebaceous glands was observed at telogen; strong expression in whole pilosebaceous units was shown at anagen with intense expressions in hair bulbs and sebaceous glands; and a pattern similar to anagen but reduced intensity in the hair bulbs was seen at catagen. Throughout hair cycle, the expression pattern and intensity were dramatically changed in hair follicular epithelial cells depending on the cell density and proliferation activity of those cells, whereas those were consistent in sebaceous glands regardless of hair cycle. Little expression was shown in dermis. Photoactivation effect of 20% liposomal ALA-PDT using a red filtered-halogen lamp damaged sebaceous glands, hair follicles and epidermal layers. Formation of a thicker epidermal layer was observed, and hair induction after depilation was inhibited along with damage in sebaceous glands.

  13. Taxol induces concentration-dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and cell cycle arrest in ASTC-a-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Taxol (Paclitaxel) is an important natural product for the treatment of solid tumors. Different concentrations of taxol can trigger distinct effects on both the cellular microtubule network and biochemical pathways. Apoptosis induced by low concentrations (5-30 nM) of taxol was associated with mitotic arrest, alteration of microtubule dynamics and/or G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas high concentrations of this drug (0.2-30 μM) caused significant microtubule damage, and was found recently to induce cytoplasm vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. In present study, cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay, confocal microscope, and flow cytometry analysis were used to analyze the cell death form induced by 35 nM and 70 μM of taxol respectively in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. After treatment of 35 nM taxol for 48 h, the OD450 value was 0.80, and 35 nM taxol was found to induce dominantly cell death in apoptotic pathway such as phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, G2/M phase arrest after treatment for 24 h, and nuclear fragmentation after treatment for 48 h. After 70 μM taxol treated the cell for 24 h, the OD450 value was 1.01, and 70 μM taxol induced cytoplasm vacuolization programmed cell death (PCD) and G2/M phase as well as the polyploidy phase arrest in paraptotic-like cell death. These findings imply that the regulated signaling pathway of cell death induced by taxol is dependent on taxol concentration in ASTC-a-1 cells.

  14. Wave-driven Equatorial Annual Oscillation Induced and Modulated by the Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.; Wolff, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Our model for the solar cycle (SC) modulation of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) produces a hemispherically symmetric 12-month Annual Oscillation (AO) in the zonal winds, which is confined to low latitudes. This Equatorial Annual Oscillation (EAO) is produced by interaction between the anti-symmetric component of SC forcing and the dominant anti-symmetric AO. The EA0 is amplified by the upward propagating small- scale gravity waves (GW), and the oscillation propagates down through the stratosphere like the QBO. The amplitude of the EA0 is relatively small, but its SC modulation contributes significantly to extend the effect to lower altitudes. Although the energy of the EA0 is concentrated at low latitudes, prominent signatures appear in the Polar Regions where the SC produces measurable temperature variations. At lower altitudes, the SC effects are significantly different in the two hemispheres because of the EAO, and due to its GW driven downward propagation the phase of the annual cycle is delayed.

  15. A rapid survival assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell cycle effects.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Chandni; McFaline, Jose L; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-02

    We describe a rapid method to accurately measure the cytotoxicity of mammalian cells upon exposure to various drugs. Using this assay, we obtain survival data in a fraction of the time required to perform the traditional clonogenic survival assay, considered the gold standard. The dynamic range of the assay allows sensitivity measurements on a multi-log scale allowing better resolution of comparative sensitivities. Moreover, the results obtained contain additional information on cell cycle effects of the drug treatment. Cell survival is obtained from a quantitative comparison of proliferation between drug-treated and untreated cells. During the assay, cells are treated with a drug and, following a recovery period, allowed to proliferate in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells that synthesize DNA in the presence of BrdU exhibit quenched Hoechst fluorescence, easily detected by flow cytometry; quenching is used to determine relative proliferation in treated vs. untreated cells. Finally, this assay can be used in high-throughput format to simultaneously screen multiple cell lines and drugs for accurate measurements of cell survival and cell cycle effects after drug treatment.

  16. Growth hormone induces multiplication of the slowly cycling germinal cells of the rat tibial growth plate.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, C; Nilsson, A; Isaksson, O; Lindahl, A

    1992-10-15

    To study the effect of locally infused growth hormone (GH) or insulin-like growth factor I(IGF-I) on slowly cycling cells in the germinal cell layer of the tibial growth plate, osmotic minipumps delivering 14.3 microCi of [3H]thymidine per day were implanted s.c. into hypophysectomized rats, and GH (1 microgram) or IGF-I (10 micrograms) was injected daily through a cannula implanted in the proximal tibia. The opposite leg served as a control. After 12 days of treatment, the osmotic minipumps were removed, and three rats in each group were given GH (20 micrograms/day, s.c.) for an additional 14 days to chase the labeled cells out of the proliferative layers. Labeled cells remained in the germinal layer, in the perichondrial ring, and on the surface of the articular cartilage close to the epiphyseal plate. GH administered together with labeled thymidine significantly increased the number of labeled cells in the germinal cell layer compared to that in the control leg (ratio = 1.95 +/- 0.13), whereas IGF-I showed no stimulatory effect (ratio = 0.96 +/- 0.04). Therefore GH but not IGF-I stimulates the multiplication of the slowly cycling (label-retaining) cells in the germinal layer of the epiphyseal plate. IGF-I acts only on the proliferation of the resulting chondrocytes.

  17. Cordycepin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by inducing DNA damage and up-regulation of p53 in Leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yuanhong; Ling, Jianya; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Fengjun; Tao, Shengce; Han, Zeguang; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; Le, Huangying

    2015-01-01

    Cordycepin, an adenosine analog derived from Cordyceps militaris has been shown to exert anti-tumor activity in many ways. However, the mechanisms by which cordycepin contributes to the anti-tumor still obscure. Here our present work showed that cordycepin inhibits cell growth in NB-4 and U937 cells by inducing apoptosis. Further study showed that cordycepin increases the expression of p53 which promotes the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. The released cytochrome c can then activate caspase-9 and trigger intrinsic apoptosis. Cordycepin also blocks MAPK pathway by inhibiting the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and thus sensitizes the apoptosis. In addition, our results showed that cordycepin inhibits the expression of cyclin A2, cyclin E, and CDK2, which leads to the accumulation of cells in S-phase. Moreover, our study showed that cordycepin induces DNA damage and causes degradation of Cdc25A, suggesting that cordycepin-induced S-phase arrest involves activation of Chk2-Cdc25A pathway. In conclusion, cordycepin-induced DNA damage initiates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which leads to the growth inhibition of NB-4 and U937 cells. PMID:25590866

  18. Rapamycin and the transcription factor C/EBPbeta as a switch in osteoclast differentiation: implications for lytic bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Smink, Jeske J; Leutz, Achim

    2010-03-01

    Lytic bone diseases and in particular osteoporosis are common age-related diseases characterized by enhanced bone fragility due to loss of bone density. Increasingly, osteoporosis poses a major global health-care problem due to the growth of the elderly population. Recently, it was found that the gene regulatory transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) is involved in bone metabolism. C/EBPbeta occurs as different protein isoforms of variable amino terminal length, and regulation of the C/EBPbeta isoform ratio balance was found to represent an important factor in osteoclast differentiation and bone homeostasis. Interestingly, adjustment of the C/EBPbeta isoform ratio by the process of translational control is downstream of the mammalian target of rapamycin kinase (mTOR), a sensor of the nutritional status and a target of immunosuppressive and anticancer drugs. The findings imply that modulating the process of translational control of C/EBPbeta isoform expression could represent a novel therapeutic approach in osteolytic bone diseases, including cancer and infection-induced bone loss.

  19. Phenylhydroquinone induces loss of thymocytes through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis elevation in p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yuichiro; Nishi, Kosuke; Nishimoto, Sogo; Sugahara, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    ortho-Phenylphenol has been employed in post-harvest treatment of citrus fruits. Although o-phenylphenol has been reported to cause carcinomas in the urinary tract in rats, toxicity to the immune organs is still unknown. Herein, we report that administration of o-phenylphenol induces thymic atrophy and loss of thymocytes in female BALB/c mice. The influence seems to result from inhibition of the thymocyte development, because increased and decreased populations of the CD4⁻ CD8⁻ double-negative and CD4⁺ CD8⁺ double-positive thymocytes were observed in the o-phenylphenol-administered mice, respectively. ortho-Phenylphenol is metabolized to phenylhydroquinone by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. Phenylhydroquinone made cell cycle of thymocytes to be arrested through reduced expression of the genes associated with G₂/M phase and through phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15. Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 was upregulated by activation of not only ATR but also Erk1/2 and p38, leading to increase of apoptosis. Gene expression of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) was promoted in thymocytes from the o-phenylphenol-administered mice. Overall, our results suggest that o-phenylphenol induces CYP1A1 expression and is metabolized into phenylhydroquinone by the expressed CYP1A1 in thymocytes. The produced phenylhydroquinone in turn induces inhibition of thymocyte development through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the p53-dependent pathway.

  20. High density lipoproteins induce cell cycle entry in vascular smooth muscle cells via mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Nofer, J R; Junker, R; Pulawski, E; Fobker, M; Levkau, B; von Eckardstein, A; Seedorf, U; Assmann, G; Walter, M

    2001-04-01

    In this study we found that HDL acts as a potent and specific mitogen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) by stimulating entry into S-phase and DNA synthesis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, induction of cyclins D1, E, and A, as well as activation of cyclin D-dependent kinases as inferred from phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). Moreover, HDL induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway including Raf-, MEK-1, and ERK1/2, as well as the expression of proto-oncogen c-fos, which is controlled by ERK1/2. PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK-1 blocked the mitogenic activity of HDL and cyclin D1 expression. HDL-induced VSMC proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 expression, and activation of the Raf-1/MEK-1/ERK1/2 cascade were blocked by preincubation of cells with pertussis toxin indicating involvement of trimeric G-protein. By contrast, none of these responses was inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor, GF109203X. The mitogenic effects of native HDL were not mimicked by apo A-I, reconstituted HDL containing apo A-I, or cholesterol-containing liposomes. In conclusion, HDL possesses an intrinsic property to induce G-protein- and MAP-kinase-dependent proliferation and cell cycle progression in VSMC. The strong and specific mitogenic effect of HDL should be taken into account, when therapeutic strategies to elevate the plasma level of these lipoproteins are developed.

  1. Acclimation Training Improves Endurance Cycling Performance in the Heat without Inducing Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Joshua H.; Pyne, David B.; Deakin, Glen B.; Miller, Catherine M.; Edwards, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: While the intention of endurance athletes undertaking short term heat training protocols is to rapidly gain meaningful physical adaption prior to competition in the heat, it is currently unclear whether or not this process also presents an overt, acute challenge to the immune system. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the effects of heat training on both endurance performance and biomarkers associated with inflammatory and immune system responses. Methods: Moderately-actively males (n = 24) were allocated randomly to either HOT (n = 8, 35°C, and 70% RH; NEUTRAL (n = 8, 20°C, and 45% RH); or a non-exercising control group, (CON, n = 8). Over the 18 day study HOT and NEUTRAL performed seven training sessions (40 min cycling at 55 of VO2 max) and all participants completed three heat stress tests (HST) at 35°C and 70% RH. The HST protocol comprised three × sub-maximal intervals followed by a 5 km time trial on a cycle ergometer. Serum samples were collected before and after each HST and analyzed for interleukin-6, immunoglobulin M and lipopolysaccharide. Results: Both HOT and NEUTRAL groups experienced substantial improvement to 5 km time trial performance (HOT −33 ± 20 s, p = 0.02, NEUTRAL −39 ± 18 s, p = 0.01) but only HOT were faster (−45 ± 25 s, and −12 s ± 7 s, p = 0.01) in HST3 compared to baseline and HST2. Interleukin-6 was elevated after exercise for all groups however there were no significant changes for immunoglobulin M or lipopolysaccharide. Conclusions: Short-term heat training enhances 5 km cycling time trial performance in moderately-fit subjects by ~6%, similar in magnitude to exercise training in neutral conditions.Three top-up training sessions yielded a further 3% improvement in performance for the HOT group. Furthermore, the heat training did not pose a substantial challenge to the immune system. PMID:27524970

  2. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Alex C.; Duboué, Erik R.; McDonald, Daniel M.; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S.B.; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly inter-connected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, while starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms because starved period mutants sleep like wild type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food. PMID:20541409

  3. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Keene, Alex C; Duboué, Erik R; McDonald, Daniel M; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S B; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-07-13

    Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly interconnected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, whereas starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep, suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep-suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms as shown by the fact that starved period mutants sleep like wild-type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons, we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food.

  4. Bark Beetle-Induced Mortality Impacts on Forest Biogeochemical Cycles are Less than Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewers, B. E.; Pendall, E.; Norton, U.; Millar, D.; Mackay, D. S.; Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Hyde, K.

    2015-12-01

    Bark beetles increased conifer tree mortality across western North America due to past land use interacting with climate change. For both mountain pine and spruce beetles, the mechanism of mortality is hydraulic failure due to xylem occlusion by beetle-carried blue stain fungi, which causes the trees to die from symptoms that are the same as extreme drought. As the mortality event peaked in the last decade, the hypothesized effects on forest biogeochemical processes were 1) lower forest water use from xylem occlusion, 2) less carbon uptake from limited canopy gas exchange, 3) increased nitrogen cycling from increased litterfall and soil moisture and 4) increased streamflow and organic N and C loading at the watershed scale from the first three consequences. The stand-scale effects during mortality were as predicted with transpiration falling by 10-35% in proportion to the occluded xylem, carbon uptake declining by > 50% due to lack of canopy gas exchange and nitrogen cycling increasing from elevated litter inputs and stimulated organic matter decomposition. Some stands, especially mid-elevation lodgepole pine, did not follow these trends because of residual vegetation taking advantage of the increased resources from the dead trees and rapid succession within 5 years of new grasses, shrubs and tree seedlings as well as increased resource use by surviving canopy trees. In a high elevation spruce stand, the lower water use lasted for only three years while summer carbon uptake was only significantly reduced for a year. At the scale of small to medium-sized watersheds, the impact of mortality was not detectable in stream flow due to the spatial and temporal scale muting of the mortality signal as temporal and spatial scales increase. Current ecosystem and watershed models miss these compensating mechanisms with increasing scale and thus over predict the impact of bark beetle mortality.

  5. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  6. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  7. Oestrous cycle-dependent equine uterine immune response to induced infectious endometritis.

    PubMed

    Marth, Christina D; Firestone, Simon M; Glenton, Lisa Y; Browning, Glenn F; Young, Neil D; Krekeler, Natali

    2016-11-08

    Infectious endometritis is a major cause of reduced pregnancy rates in horses. The objectives of this study were to establish a timeline of the innate immune response in the uterus of healthy horses and to investigate the oestrous cycle effect on this. Endometrial biopsies were collected from five horses before and at 3, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation of Escherichia coli, once in oestrus and once in dioestrus. They were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR, microbiology and histology. Neutrophil numbers increased from very low levels in the absence of inflammation to severe neutrophilia 3 h after inoculation. The concentrations of mRNAs for Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, NOD-like receptor NLRC5, tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidases 1 (TIMP1) and chemokines CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were all increased 3 h after inoculation of E. coli compared to levels detected prior to inoculation. Chemokine mRNA levels remained elevated for 48 h. Concentrations of mRNAs for the antimicrobial peptides equine β-defensin 1 (EBD1), lysozyme, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), lipocalin 2 (LCN2), lactoferrin and uteroferrin were increased between 3 and 12 h post inoculation. The gene for secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) was expressed constitutively. P19 uterocalin mRNA levels were higher in dioestrus than in oestrus over the first 24 h of inflammation. Neutrophils and many innate immune genes responded rapidly to the introduction of E. coli into the uterus, while the oestrous cycle stage had only a relatively minor effect on the response to E. coli. This study has delineated a useful model of innate immunity in infectious endometritis of healthy animals.

  8. Solar cycle dynamic of the Martian induced magnetosphere. Planetary ions acceleration zones and escape.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Andrey; Modolo, Ronan; Jarvinen, Riku; Barabash, Stas

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a massive statistical analysis of the ion flows in the Martian induced magnetosphere. We performed this analysis using Mars Express ion mass spectrometer data taken during 2008 - 2013 time interval. This data allows to make an enhanced study of the induced magnetosphere variations as a response of the solar activity level. Since Mars Express has no onboard magnetometer, we used the hybrid models of the Martian plasma environment to get a proper frame to make an adequate statistics of the magnetospheric response. In this paper we present a spatial distribution of the planetary plasma properties in the planetary wake as well as the ionosospheric escape as a function of the solar activity.

  9. Hypoxia induces p53 accumulation in the S-phase and accumulation of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein in all cell cycle phases of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, T.; Hvidsten, M.; Stokke, T.; Solberg, K.; Rofstad, E. K.

    1998-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to induce accumulation of p53 and of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in tumour cells. In this study, the cell cycle dependence of p53 accumulation and pRb hypophosphorylation in four human melanoma cell lines that are wild type for p53 was investigated using two-parameter flow cytometry measurements of p53 or pRb protein content and DNA content. The hypoxia-induced increase in p53 protein was higher in S-phase than in G1 and G2 phases in all cell lines. The accumulation of p53 in S-phase during hypoxia was not related to hypoxia-induced apoptosis or substantial cell cycle specific cell inactivation during the first 24 h of reoxygenation. pRb was hypophosphorylated in all cell cycle phases by hypoxia treatment. The results did not support a direct link between p53 and pRb during hypoxia because p53 was induced in a cell cycle-specific manner, whereas no cell cycle-dependent differences in pRb hypophosphorylation were detected. Only a fraction of the cell populations (0.60+/-0.10) showed hypophosphorylated pRb. Thus, pRb is probably not the only mediator of the hypoxia-induced cell cycle block seen in all cells and all cell cycle phases. Moreover, the cell cycle-dependent induction of p53 by hypoxia suggests that the primary function of p53 accumulation during hypoxia is other than to arrest the cells. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9862563

  10. Securinine from Phyllanthus glaucus Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława; Ochocka, J. Renata

    2016-01-01

    Background The Securinega-type alkaloids occur in plants belonging to Euphorbiaceae family. One of the most widely distributed alkaloid of this group is securinine, which was identified next to allosecurinine in Phyllanthus glaucus (leafflower). Recently, some Securinega-type alkaloids have paid attention to its antiproliferative potency towards different cancer cells. However, the cytotoxic properties of allosecurinine have not yet been evaluated. Methods The cytotoxicity of the extract, alkaloid fraction obtained from P. glaucus, isolated securinine and allosecurinine against HeLa cells was evaluated by real-time xCELLigence system and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V and 7-amino-actinomycin (7-AAD) staining and confirmed with fluorescent Hoechst 33342 dye. The assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the level of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), caspase-3/7 activity and cell cycle analysis were measured by flow cytometry. The enzymatic activity of caspase-9 was assessed by a luminometric assay. The expression of apoptosis associated genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Results The experimental data revealed that securinine and the alkaloid fraction were significantly potent on HeLa cells growth inhibition with IC50 values of 7.02 ± 0.52 μg/ml (32.3 μM) and 25.46 ± 1.79 μg/ml, respectively. The activity of allosecurinine and Phyllanthus extract were much lower. Furthermore, our study showed that the most active securinine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in the tested cells, increased the percentage of ROS positive cells and depolarized cells as well as stimulated the activity of ERK1/2, caspase-9 and -3/7. Securinine also induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. Real-time PCR analysis showed high expression of TNFRSF genes in the cells stimulated with securinine. Conclusions Securinine

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in A549 human lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, WEI; DENG, JIAGANG; TONG, RONGSHENG; YANG, YONG; HE, XIA; LV, JIANZHEN; WANG, HAILIAN; DENG, SHAOPING; QI, PING; ZHANG, DINGDING; WANG, YI

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin, which is a C-glucosylxanthone (1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone-C2-β-D-glucoside) purified from plant sources, has recently gained attention due to its various biological activities. The present study aimed to determine the apoptotic effects of mangiferin on A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that mangiferin exerted growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects against A549 cells. In addition, mangiferin exhibited anti-tumor properties in A549 xenograft mice in vivo. Mangiferin triggered G2/M phase cell cycle arrest via down-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase 1-cyclin B1 signaling pathway, and induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting the protein kinase C-nuclear factor-κB pathway. In addition, mangiferin was able to enhance the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin on A549 cells, thus indicating the potential for a combined therapy. Notably, mangiferin exerted anticancer effects in vivo, where it was able to markedly decrease the volume and weight of subcutaneous tumor mass, and expand the lifespan of xenograft mice. The present study clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced antitumor activities, and suggested that mangiferin may be considered a potential antineoplastic drug for the future treatment of cancer. PMID:26935347

  12. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment. PMID:26309132

  13. Hispolon from Phellinus linteus induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in NB4 human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Heng-Yuan; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Chen, Jian-Jung; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lin, I-Hsin; Kuo, Wan-Lin; Chao, Wei; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2013-01-01

    Hispolon (a phenolic compound isolated from Phellinus linteus) has been shown to possess strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antidiabetic properties. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of hispolon on human hepatocellular carcinoma NB4 cells using the MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, DAPI (4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining, and flow cytometric analysis. Hispolon inhibited the cellular growth of NB4 cells in a dose-dependent manner through the induction of cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase measured using flow cytometric analysis and apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by DNA laddering. Exposure of NB4 cells to hispolon-induced apoptosis-related protein expressions, such as the cleavage form of caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, and the proapoptotic Bax protein. Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of extrinsic apoptotic proteins (Fas and FasL), intrinsic related proteins (cytochrome c), and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were increased in NB4 cells after hispolon treatment. Hispolon-induced G0/G1-phase arrest was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of p53, cyclins D1, and cyclins E, and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 2, and 4, with concomitant induction of p21waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1. We conclude that hispolon induces both of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in NB4 human leukemia cells in vitro.

  14. Benfluron Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Activation of p53 Pathway in MOLT-4 Leukemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Seifrtová, M; Cochlarová, T; Havelek, R; Řezáčová, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the effect of potential anti-tumour agent benfluron on human leukemic cells MOLT-4 and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of response of tumour cells to this chemotherapeutic agent. It has been shown that the mechanisms of action of benfluron are complex, but the molecular pathways of the cytostatic effect have remained unknown and the present study contributes to their elucidation. In this work, benfluron reduced viability of the treated cells and induced caspase-mediated apoptosis. The programmed cell death was associated with activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3/7. Moreover, exposure of cells to benfluron resulted in accumulation of the cells primarily in late S and G2/M phases. The changes in the levels of key proteins show that benfluron provoked activation of p53 and induced phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 and serine 392. The application of benfluron led to phosphorylation of Chk1 on serine 345 and phosphorylation of Chk2 on threonine 68 in the treated cells. Higher doses of benfluron caused phosphorylation of ERK1/2 on threonine 202 and tyrosine 204, whereas JNK and p38 kinases were not activated. In conclusion, benfluron induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest in late S and G2/M phases, and activates various signalling pathways of the DNA damage response.

  15. IL-1β is a key cytokine that induces trypsin upregulation in the influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin cycle.

    PubMed

    Indalao, I L; Sawabuchi, T; Takahashi, E; Kido, H

    2017-01-01

    Severe influenza is characterized by a cytokine storm, and the influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin cycle is one of the important mechanisms of viral multiplication and multiple organ failure. The aim of this study was to define the key cytokine(s) responsible for trypsin upregulation. Mice were infected with influenza virus strain A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) or treated individually or with a combination of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor α. The levels of these cytokines and trypsin in the lungs were monitored. The neutralizing effects of anti-IL-1β antibodies on cytokine and trypsin expression in human A549 cells and lung inflammation in the infected mice were examined. Infection induced interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and ectopic trypsin in mouse lungs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal administration of interleukin-1β combined with other cytokines tended to upregulate trypsin and cytokine expression in the lungs, but the combination without interleukin-1β did not induce trypsin. In contrast, incubation of A549 cells with interleukin-1β alone induced both cytokines and trypsin, and anti-interleukin-1β antibody treatment abrogated these effects. Administration of the antibody in the infected mice reduced lung inflammation area. These findings suggest that IL-1β plays a key role in trypsin upregulation and has a pathological role in multiple organ failure.

  16. IL-10 down-regulates costimulatory molecules on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-pulsed macrophages and impairs the lytic activity of CD4 and CD8 CTL in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    de la Barrera, S; Aleman, M; Musella, R; Schierloh, P; Pasquinelli, V; Garcia, V; Abbate, E; Sasiain, M del C

    2004-10-01

    Activation of T cells requires both TCR-specific ligation and costimulation through accessory molecules during T cell priming. IFNgamma is a key cytokine responsible for macrophage activation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection while IL-10 is associated with suppression of cell mediated immunity in intracellular infection. In this paper we evaluated the role of IFNgamma and IL-10 on the function of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and on the modulation of costimulatory molecules in healthy controls and patients with active tuberculosis (TB). gamma-irradiated-Mtb (i-Mtb) induced IL-10 production from CD14(+) cells from TB patients. Moreover, CD3(+) T cells of patients with advanced disease also produced IL-10 after i-Mtb stimulation. In healthy donors, IL-10 decreased the lytic activity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells whereas it increased gammadelta-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we found that the presence of IL-10 induced a loss of the alternative processing pathways of antigen presentation along with a down-regulation of the expression of costimulatory molecule expression on monocytes and macrophages from healthy individuals. Conversely, neutralization of endogenous IL-10 or addition of IFNgamma to either effector or target cells from TB patients induced a strong lytic activity mediated by CD8(+) CTL together with an up-regulation of CD54 and CD86 expression on target cells. Moreover, we observed that macrophages from TB patients could use alternative pathways for i-Mtb presentation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the presence of IL-10 during Mtb infection might contribute to mycobacteria persistence inside host macrophages through a mechanism that involved inhibition of MHC-restricted cytotoxicity against infected macrophages.

  17. Identification of RISC-Associated Adenoviral MicroRNAs, a Subset of Their Direct Targets, and Global Changes in the Targetome upon Lytic Adenovirus 5 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bellutti, Florian; Kauer, Maximilian; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviruses encode a set of highly abundant microRNAs (mivaRNAs), which are generated by Dicer-mediated cleavage of the larger noncoding virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) I and II. We performed deep RNA sequencing to thoroughly investigate the relative abundance of individual single strands of mivaRNA isoforms in human A549 cells lytically infected with human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) at physiologically relevant multiplicities of infection (MOIs). In addition, we investigated their relative abundance in the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). The occupation of endogenous RISCs by mivaRNAs turned out to be pronounced but not as dominant as previously inferred from experiments with AGO2-overexpressing cells infected at high MOIs. In parallel, levels of RISC-incorporated mRNAs were investigated as well. Analysis of mRNAs enriched in RISCs in Ad5-infected cells revealed that only mRNAs with complementarity to the seed sequences of mivaRNAs derived from VA RNAI but not VA RNAII were overrepresented among them, indicating that only mivaRNAs derived from VA RNAI are likely to contribute substantially to the posttranscriptional downregulation of host gene expression. Furthermore, to generate a comprehensive picture of the entire transcriptome/targetome in lytically infected cells, we determined changes in cellular miRNA levels in both total RNA and RISC RNA as well, and bioinformatical analysis of mRNAs of total RNA/RISC fractions revealed a general, genome-wide trend toward detargeting of cellular mRNAs upon infection. Lastly, we identified the direct targets of both single strands of a VA RNAI-derived mivaRNA that constituted one of the two most abundant isoforms in RISCs of lytically infected A549 cells. IMPORTANCE Viral and cellular miRNAs have been recognized as important players in virus-host interactions. This work provides the currently most comprehensive picture of the entire mRNA/miRNA transcriptome and of the complete RISC targetome during lytic

  18. Life cycle stage and water depth affect flooding-induced adventitious root formation in the terrestrial species Solanum dulcamara

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Visser, Eric J. W.; de Kroon, Hans; Huber, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Flooding can occur at any stage of the life cycle of a plant, but often adaptive responses of plants are only studied at a single developmental stage. It may be anticipated that juvenile plants may respond differently from mature plants, as the amount of stored resources may differ and morphological changes can be constrained. Moreover, different water depths may require different strategies to cope with the flooding stress, the expression of which may also depend on developmental stage. This study investigated whether flooding-induced adventitious root formation and plant growth were affected by flooding depth in Solanum dulcamara plants at different developmental stages. Methods Juvenile plants without pre-formed adventitious root primordia and mature plants with primordia were subjected to shallow flooding or deep flooding for 5 weeks. Plant growth and the timing of adventitious root formation were monitored during the flooding treatments. Key Results Adventitious root formation in response to shallow flooding was significantly constrained in juvenile S. dulcamara plants compared with mature plants, and was delayed by deep flooding compared with shallow flooding. Complete submergence suppressed adventitious root formation until up to 2 weeks after shoots restored contact with the atmosphere. Independent of developmental stage, a strong positive correlation was found between adventitious root formation and total biomass accumulation during shallow flooding. Conclusions The potential to deploy an escape strategy (i.e. adventitious root formation) may change throughout a plant’s life cycle, and is largely dependent on flooding depth. Adaptive responses at a given stage of the life cycle thus do not necessarily predict how the plant responds to flooding in another growth stage. As variation in adventitious root formation also correlates with finally attained biomass, this variation may form the basis for variation in resistance to shallow

  19. Hydrogen induced surface cracking in an 8090 Al-Li alloy during high cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Laffin, C.; Raghunath, C.R.; Lopez, H.F. . Materials Dept.)

    1993-10-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in understanding the effects of aggressive or moist environments on the properties of Al-Li alloys. However, most of the existing work has been focused on their stress corrosion cracking resistance. Consequently, only a few reports are available on the environmental fatigue strength of these alloys. Upon exposure to aggressive environments, the fatigue crack propagation resistance can be detrimentally affected. R. Piascik and R. Gangloff found enhanced cyclic crack growth rates in an Al-Li-Cu alloy when a critical water vapor pressure was exceeded. Thermodynamically, at atmospheric pressures, strong interactions between hydrogen and lithium are expected to give rise to stable lithium hydrides. Evidence for the development of hydride phases in Al-Li alloys exposed to hydrogen environments has been reported by various workers. Thus, it is likely that HE via hydride formation can be the relevant mechanisms in Al-Li alloys that have been in contact with hydrogen. Since lithium hydrides are stable up to temperatures of 773 K, previous hydrogen exposure can lead to an irreversible mode of embrittlement. Thus, it was the objective of the present work to investigate the effects of hydrogen during aging on the ensuing high cycle fatigue (HCF) performance of an 8090 Al-Li alloy.

  20. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  1. Imaging Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Experimental Gliomas12

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Anke; Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Vukicevic, Slobodan; Kaijzel, Eric L; Winkeler, Alexandra; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) belongs to the superfamily of transforming growth factor β-like cytokines, which can act either as tumor suppressors or as tumor promoters depending on cell type and differentiation. Our investigations focused on analyzing the effects of BMP-7 during glioma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. BMP-7 treatment decreased the proliferation of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG glioma cells up to 50%through a cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase but not by induction of apoptosis. This effect was mediated by the modulation of the expression and phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and downstream retinoblastoma protein. Furthermore, in vivo optical imaging of luciferase activity of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG cells implanted intracranially into nude mice in the presence or absence of BMP-7 treatment corroborated the antiproliferative effects of this cytokine. This report clearly underlines the tumor-suppressive role of BMP-7 in glioma-derived cells. Taken together, our results indicate that manipulating the BMP/transforming growth factor β signaling cascade may serve as a new strategy for imaging-guided molecular-targeted therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:21390190

  2. Oxygen-induced plasticity in tracheal morphology and discontinuous gas exchange cycles in cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea.

    PubMed

    Bartrim, Hamish; Matthews, Philip G D; Lemon, Sussan; White, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    The function and mechanism underlying discontinuous gas exchange in terrestrial arthropods continues to be debated. Three adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolutionary origin or maintenance of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs), which may have evolved to reduce respiratory water loss, facilitate gas exchange in high CO2 and low O2 micro-environments, or to ameliorate potential damage as a result of oversupply of O2. None of these hypotheses have unequivocal support, and several non-adaptive hypotheses have also been proposed. In the present study, we reared cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea in selected levels of O2 throughout development, and examined how this affected growth rate, tracheal morphology and patterns of gas exchange. O2 level in the rearing environment caused significant changes in tracheal morphology and the exhibition of DGCs, but the direction of these effects was inconsistent with all three adaptive hypotheses: water loss was not associated with DGC length, cockroaches grew fastest in hyperoxia, and DGCs exhibited by cockroaches reared in normoxia were shorter than those exhibited by cockroaches reared in hypoxia or hyperoxia.

  3. Pterostilbene induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Gege; Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Guang; Li, Bo; Wu, Xiaosong; Xiao, Wenqin; Xie, Bingqian; Hu, Liangning; Sun, Xi; Chang, Gaomei; Gao, Minjie; Gao, Lu; Dai, Bojie; Tao, Yi; Zhu, Weiliang; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Pterostilbene, a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, has been shown to possess diverse pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no study of the effects of pterostilbene upon hematological malignancies. Herein, we report the antitumor activity and mechanism of pterostilbene against DLBCL cells both in vitro and in vivo. We found that pterostilbene treatment resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability. In addition, pterostilbene exhibited a strong cytotoxic effect, as evidenced not only by reductions of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but also by increases in cellular apoptotic index and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, leading to arrest in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, pterostilbene treatment directly up-regulated p-p38MAPK and down-regulated p-ERK1/2. In vivo, intravenous administration of pterostilbene inhibited tumor development in xenograft mouse models. Overall, the results suggested that pterostilbene is a potential anti-cancer pharmaceutical against human DLBCL by a mechanism involving the suppression of ERK1/2 and activation of p38MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27869173

  4. Retrieval of target structure information from laser-induced photoelectrons by few-cycle bicircular laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang; Lin, C. D.; Le, Anh-Thu

    2017-03-01

    By analyzing theoretical results from a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for atoms in few-cycle bicircular laser pulses, we show that high-energy photoelectron momentum spectra can be used to extract accurate elastic scattering differential cross sections of the target ion with free electrons. We find that the retrieval range for a scattering angle with bicircular pulses is wider than with linearly polarized pulses, although the retrieval method has to be modified to account for different returning directions of the electron in the continuum. This result can be used to extend the range of applicability of ultrafast imaging techniques such as laser-induced electron diffraction and for the accurate characterization of laser pulses.

  5. Impact of the array background pattern on cycling-induced threshold-voltage instabilities in nanoscale NAND Flash memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, G. M.; Bertuccio, M.; Monzio Compagnoni, C.; Beltrami, S.; Spinelli, A. S.; Lacaita, A. L.; Visconti, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper highlights that cycling-induced threshold-voltage instabilities in nanoscale NAND Flash technologies display a non-negligible dependence on the background pattern of the memory array during idle/bake periods. Experimental results clearly reveal, in fact, that instabilities in a (victim) cell do not depend only on its memory state, but also on the memory state of its first neighboring (aggressor) cells. The magnitude of this new cell-to-cell interference effect, moreover, appears to depend on the memory state of the victim cell, decreasing with the increase of its threshold-voltage level. From all of the gathered experimental evidence a physical picture explaining the phenomenon is provided, which is, finally, confirmed with the help of numerical simulations.

  6. Targeting HGF/c-MET induces cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis for primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Cao, Yueyu; Bonstaff, Karlie; Doyle, Lisa; Del Valle, Luis; Whitby, Denise; Parsons, Chris; Reiss, Krzysztof; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-24

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a principal causative agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) with a poor prognosis in immunocompromised patients. However, it still lacks effective treatment which urgently requires the identification of novel therapeutic targets for PEL. Here, we report that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET pathway is highly activated by KSHV in vitro and in vivo. The selective c-MET inhibitor, PF-2341066, can induce PEL apoptosis through cell cycle arrest and DNA damage, and suppress tumor progression in a xenograft murine model. By using microarray analysis, we identify many novel genes that are potentially controlled by HGF/c-MET within PEL cells. One of the downstream candidates, ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase subunit M2 (RRM2), also displays the promising therapeutic value for PEL treatment. Our findings provide the framework for development of HGF/c-MET-focused therapy and implementation of clinical trials for PEL patients.

  7. Targeting HGF/c-MET induces cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis for primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Cao, Yueyu; Bonstaff, Karlie; Doyle, Lisa; Del Valle, Luis; Whitby, Denise; Parsons, Chris; Reiss, Krzysztof; Zabaleta, Jovanny

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a principal causative agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) with a poor prognosis in immunocompromised patients. However, it still lacks effective treatment which urgently requires the identification of novel therapeutic targets for PEL. Here, we report that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET pathway is highly activated by KSHV in vitro and in vivo. The selective c-MET inhibitor, PF-2341066, can induce PEL apoptosis through cell cycle arrest and DNA damage, and suppress tumor progression in a xenograft murine model. By using microarray analysis, we identify many novel genes that are potentially controlled by HGF/c-MET within PEL cells. One of the downstream candidates, ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase subunit M2 (RRM2), also displays the promising therapeutic value for PEL treatment. Our findings provide the framework for development of HGF/c-MET–focused therapy and implementation of clinical trials for PEL patients. PMID:26531163

  8. The marine-derived fungal metabolite, terrein, inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fei; Wang, Shu-Ying; Shen, Hong; Yao, Xiao-Fen; Zhang, Feng-Li; Lai, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    The difficulties faced in the effective treatment of ovarian cancer are multifactorial, but are mainly associated with relapse and drug resistance. Cancer stem-like cells have been reported to be an important contributor to these hindering factors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer activities of a bioactive fungal metabolite, namely terrein, against the human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3, primary human ovarian cancer cells and ovarian cancer stem-like cells. Terrein was separated and purified from the fermentation metabolites of the marine sponge-derived fungus, Aspergillus terreus strain PF26. Its anticancer activities against ovarian cancer cells were investigated by cell proliferation assay, cell migration assay, cell apoptosis and cell cycle assays. The ovarian cancer stem-like cells were enriched and cultured in a serum-free in vitro suspension system. Terrein inhibited the proliferation of the ovarian cancer cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. The underlying mechanisms involved the suppression of the expression of LIN28, an important marker gene of stemness in ovarian cancer stem cells. Of note, our study also demonstrated the ability of terrein to inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer stem-like cells, in which the expression of LIN28 was also downregulated. Our findings reveal that terrein (produced by fermention) may prove to be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer by inhibiting the proliferation of cancer stem-like cells.

  9. GCS-100, a novel galectin-3 antagonist, modulates MCL-1, NOXA, and cell cycle to induce myeloma cell death

    PubMed Central

    Streetly, Matthew J.; Maharaj, Lenushka; Joel, Simon; Schey, Steve A.; Gribben, John G.

    2010-01-01

    GCS-100 is a galectin-3 antagonist with an acceptable human safety profile that has been demonstrated to have an antimyeloma effect in the context of bortezomib resistance. In the present study, the mechanisms of action of GCS-100 are elucidated in myeloma cell lines and primary tumor cells. GCS-100 induced inhibition of proliferation, accumulation of cells in sub-G1 and G1 phases, and apoptosis with activation of both caspase-8 and -9 pathways. Dose- and time-dependent decreases in MCL-1 and BCL-XL levels also occurred, accompanied by a rapid induction of NOXA protein, whereas BCL-2, BAX, BAK, BIM, BAD, BID, and PUMA remained unchanged. The cell-cycle inhibitor p21Cip1 was up-regulated by GCS-100, whereas the procycling proteins CYCLIN E2, CYCLIN D2, and CDK6 were all reduced. Reduction in signal transduction was associated with lower levels of activated IκBα, IκB kinase, and AKT as well as lack of IκBα and AKT activation after appropriate cytokine stimulation (insulin-like growth factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α). Primary myeloma cells showed a direct reduction in proliferation and viability. These data demonstrate that the novel therapeutic molecule, GCS-100, is a potent modifier of myeloma cell biology targeting apoptosis, cell cycle, and intracellular signaling and has potential for myeloma therapy. PMID:20190189

  10. Schisandrin B inhibits the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by inducing cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xue-Jiao; Zhao, Li-Jing; Hao, Yu-Qiu; Su, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Jun-Yao; Du, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Schizandrin B (Sch B) is one of the main dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans present in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis (Schisandraceae). Sch B has multiple functions against cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Sch B on the proliferation, cell cycling, apoptosis and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by MTT, flow cytometry, wound healing and transwell invasion assays. Treatment with Sch B inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Sch B induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase by down-regulating the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4, and CDK6, but up-regulating p53 and p21 expression in A549 cells. Furthermore, Sch B triggered A549 cell apoptosis by increasing Bax, cleaved caspase-3, 9, Cyto C, but decreasing Bcl-2 and PCNA expression. In addition, Sch B inhibited the invasion and migration of A549 cells by down-regulating the expressions of HIF-1, VEGF, MMP-9 and MMP-2. Therefore, Sch B has potent anti-tumor activity and may be a promising traditional Chinese medicine for human lung carcinoma. PMID:26221229

  11. Inhibition of cullin RING ligases by cycle inhibiting factor: evidence for interference with Nedd8-induced conformational control.

    PubMed

    Boh, Boon Kim; Ng, Mei Ying; Leck, Yee Chin; Shaw, Barry; Long, Jed; Sun, Guang Wen; Gan, Yunn Hwen; Searle, Mark S; Layfield, Robert; Hagen, Thilo

    2011-10-21

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is produced by pathogenic intracellular bacteria and injected into the host cells via a type III secretion system. Cif is known to interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle by inhibiting the function of cullin RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). Cullin proteins form the scaffold protein of CRLs and are modified with the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8, which exerts important conformational control required for CRL activity. Cif has recently been shown to catalyze the deamidation of Gln40 in Nedd8 to Glu. Here, we addressed how Nedd8 deamidation inhibits CRL activity. Our results indicate that Burkholderia pseudomallei Cif (also known as CHBP) inhibits the deconjugation of Nedd8 in vivo by inhibiting binding of the deneddylating COP9 signalosome (CSN) complex. We provide evidence that the reduced binding of CSN and the inhibition of CRL activity by Cif are due to interference with Nedd8-induced conformational control, which is dependent on the interaction between the Nedd8 hydrophobic patch and the cullin winged-helix B subdomain. Of note, mutation of Gln40 to Glu in ubiquitin, an additional target of Cif, inhibits the interaction between the hydrophobic surface of ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-binding protein p62/SQSTM1, showing conceptually that Cif activity can impair ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like protein non-covalent interactions. Our results also suggest that Cif may exert additional cellular effects by interfering with the association between ubiquitin and ubiquitin-binding proteins.

  12. A Flavone Constituent from Myoporum bontioides Induces M-Phase Cell Cycle Arrest of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ru; Bai, Li-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chen, Yu-Chang; Chao, Shi-Wei; Feng, Chia-Hsien

    2017-03-15

    Myoporum bontioides is a traditional medicinal plant in Asia with various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial characteristics. To identify the bioactive constituents from M. bontioides, a newly-identified flavone, 3,4'-dimethoxy-3',5,7-trihydroxyflavone (compound 1), along with eight known compounds, were investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer, SCC4 oral cancer, and THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells. Among these compounds, compound 1 exhibited the strongest antiproliferative activity with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 3.3 μM (MCF-7) to 8.6 μM (SCC4). Flow cytometric analysis indicated that compound 1 induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells. Mechanistic evidence suggests that the G2/M arrest could be attributable to compound 1's modulatory effects on the phosphorylation and expression of numerous key signaling effectors, including cell division cycle 2 (CDC2), CDC25C, and p53. Notably, compound 1 downregulated the expression of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and HDAC4, leading to increased histone H3 acetylation and p21 upregulation. Together, these findings suggest the translational potential of compound 1 as a breast cancer treatment.

  13. Inhibition of PPARα induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and synergizes with glycolysis inhibition in kidney cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Wettersten, Hiromi I; Weiss, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the US. While RCC is highly metastatic, there are few therapeutics options available for patients with metastatic RCC, and progression-free survival of patients even with the newest targeted therapeutics is only up to two years. Thus, novel therapeutic targets for this disease are desperately needed. Based on our previous metabolomics studies showing alteration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) related events in both RCC patient and xenograft mice materials, this pathway was further examined in the current study in the setting of RCC. PPARα is a nuclear receptor protein that functions as a transcription factor for genes including those encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism; while PPARα has been reported to regulate tumor growth in several cancers, it has not been evaluated in RCC. A specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in VHL(+) and VHL(-) RCC cell lines (786-O and Caki-1) associated with attenuation of the cell cycle regulatory proteins c-Myc, Cyclin D1, and CDK4; this data was confirmed as specific to PPARα antagonism by siRNA methods. Interestingly, when glycolysis was blocked by several methods, the cytotoxicity of GW6471 was synergistically increased, suggesting a switch to fatty acid oxidation from glycolysis and providing an entirely novel therapeutic approach for RCC.

  14. Laser-induced Magnesium Production from Magnesium Oxide for Renewable Magnesium Energy Cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shi-Hua; Yabe, Takashi; Baasandash, Choijil; Sato, Yuji; Ichikawa, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Masashi; Fukushima, Chika; Uchida, Shigeaki; Ohkubo, Tomomasa

    2010-10-01

    We succeeded in reducing magnesium [Mg] from magnesium oxide [MgO] by laser irradiation. The laser-induced vapor temperature was measured to be approximately 5000 K on the irradiating spot, where MgO separated into Mg and oxygen [O] atoms through thermal dissociation. The Mg vapor was intercepted a cooper plate, forming solid deposits on it. However, the presence of oxygen, resulting from MgO dissociation, leads to Mg oxidization in the course of vapor cooling. The deoxidization process results in lower Mg fraction in the deposits and degrades energy recovery efficiency from laser irradiation. To quench this recombination, we also employed silicon as reducing agents to capture oxygen in favor of Mg extraction. In these experiments, the molar ratio effect (MgO:Si = 1:0-1) on the magnesium fractions and energy efficiencies were measured by means of a chemical reaction. The maximal energy efficiency, %, was obtained at the ratio of MgO:Si = 1:0.5. This ratio is lower than that of the Pidgeon process with Mg:Si = 1:1 resulting in a lower energy efficiency of %. This implies laser-induced Mg production is a economical process of using reducing agents with large throughput. The usage of laser radiation generated from solar energy for Mg metallurgy will significantly reduce CO2 emission.

  15. MLN4924 suppresses neddylation and induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Shi, Cheng-Cheng; Zhang, Hua-Peng; Li, Gong-Quan; Li, Shan-Shan

    2016-07-19

    Neddylation is a post-translational protein modification process associated with carcinogenesis and cancer development. MLN4924, a pharmaceutical neddylation inhibitor, induces potent anti-cancer effects in multiple types of cancers. In this study, we investigated the effects of MLN4924 on human osteosarcoma (OS). Levels of both NEDD8 activating enzyme E1 (NAE1) and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2M (Ube2M), two critical components of the neddylation pathway, were much higher in OS tissues and cells than in normal osseous tissues and cells. MLN4924 treatment led to DNA damage, reduced cell viability, senescence and apoptosis in OS cells. Moreover, MLN4924 inhibited OS xenograft tumor growth in mice. Mechanistically, MLN4924 blocked the neddylation of cullins and induced accumulation of several tumor-suppressive substrates of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs), including CDT1, Wee1, p21, p27, Noxa, and p16. These results suggest clinical studies investigating the utility of MLN4924 for the treatment of OS are warranted.

  16. AM251 induces apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in A375 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Romanini, Antonella; Pellegrino, Mario; Adinolfi, Barbara; Podestà, Adriano; Costa, Barbara; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Martini, Claudia; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Nieri, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Human cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive and chemotherapy-resistant type of cancer. AM251 is a cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist with off-target antitumor activity against pancreatic and colon cancer cells. The current study aimed to characterize the in-vitro antimelanoma activity of AM251. The BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cell line, A375, was used as an in-vitro model system. Characterization tools included a cell viability assay, nuclear morphology assessment, gene expression, western blot, flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/7-AAD double staining, cell cycle analyses, and measurements of changes in intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations. AM251 exerted a marked cytotoxic effect against A375 human melanoma cells with potency comparable with that observed for cisplatin without significant changes in the human dermal fibroblasts viability. AM251, at a concentration that approximates the IC50, downregulated genes encoding antiapoptotic proteins (BCL2 and survivin) and increased transcription levels of proapoptotic BAX, induced alteration of Annexin V reactivity, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation in the cell nuclei, and G2/M phase arrest.AM251 also induced a 40% increase in the basal cAMP levels, but it did not affect intracellular calcium concentrations. The involvement of GPR55, TRPA1, and COX-2 in the AM251 mechanism of action was excluded. The combination of AM251 with celecoxib produced a synergistic antitumor activity, although the mechanism underlying this effect remains to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence of a proapoptotic effect and G2/M cell cycle arrest of AM251 on A375 cells. This compound may be a potential prototype for the development of promising diarylpyrazole derivatives to be evaluated in human cutaneous melanoma.

  17. TiO2 nanoparticles induce DNA double strand breaks and cell cycle arrest in human alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Kansara, Krupa; Patel, Pal; Shah, Darshini; Shukla, Ritesh K; Singh, Sanjay; Kumar, Ashutosh; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-03-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) have the second highest global annual production (∼3000 tons) among the metal-containing NPs. These NPs are used as photocatalysts for bacterial disinfection, and in various other consumer products including sunscreen, food packaging, therapeutics, biosensors, surface cleaning agents, and others. Humans are exposed to these NPs during synthesis (laboratory), manufacture (industry), and use (consumer products, devices, medicines, etc.), as well as through environmental exposures (disposal). Hence, there is great concern regarding the health effects caused by exposure to NPs and, in particular, to TiO2 NPs. In the present study, the genotoxic potential of TiO2 NPs in A549 cells was examined, focusing on their potential to induce ROS, different types of DNA damage, and cell cycle arrest. We show that TiO2 NPs can induce DNA damage and a corresponding increase in micronucleus frequency, as evident from the comet and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assays. We demonstrate that DNA damage may be attributed to increased oxidative stress and ROS generation. Furthermore, genomic and proteomic analyses showed increased expression of ATM, P53, and CdC-2 and decreased expression of ATR, H2AX, and Cyclin B1 in A549 cells, suggesting induction of DNA double strand breaks. The occurrence of double strand breaks was correlated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Overall, the results indicate the potential for genotoxicity following exposure to these TiO2 NPs, suggesting that use should be carefully monitored.

  18. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60–75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that arctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas. PMID:28356992

  19. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60-75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that arctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas.

  20. Changes in snow cover and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau induced by absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Kim, M.; Kim, K.; Lee, W.

    2009-12-01

    The warming of the land surface and retreating glacier and snowpack in Hindu-Kush-Himalayas-Tibet (HKHT) are well known observations often attributed to effect of greenhouse warming. In this study, based on numerical experiments with the NASA fvGCM, we find that the elevated -heat-pump (EHP) effect by absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and Himalayas foothills can lead to substantial warming of the atmosphere and land surface, and reduction in snow cover over the HKHT region . Atmosphere and surface energy analyses show that beginning in April, the middle atmosphere, near the high-altitude surface over the Tibetan Plateau, heats up due to absorption of solar radiation by black carbon and dust. The near surface heating increases convection, which spreads the warming to the upper troposphere over the Plateau. As the monsoon season approaches in May, the increased convection draws in warmer and moister monsoon air into the HKHT, which further enhances the convection, cloudiness and precipitation over the region in late May and early June. The moister and warmer atmosphere over the HKHT region suppresses evaporation and sensible heat fluxes from the surface during April-May. The excess heat received by the surface goes into melting of the snowpack, exposing more of the bare land. The exposed land surface leads to further increase in land surface temperature over the HKHT. Results show that most of the snow melt occurs in the western region (west of 90E) in April and May, when black carbon aerosol loading in the atmosphere is highest, and dust loading is on the rise. The equivalent surface albedo change due to snow melt is reduced by about 8-10%, and 4-6% over the western and eastern TP respectively. The proposed mechanism appear to be relevant on interannnual time scales and beyond. The consequence of these changes in HKHT on the water cycle of Asia will be discussed.

  1. Repeated supra-maximal sprint cycling with and without sodium bicarbonate supplementation induces endothelial microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Richard J; Peart, Daniel J; Madden, Leigh A; Vince, Rebecca V

    2014-01-01

    Under normal homeostatic conditions, the endothelium releases microparticles (MPs), which are known to increase under stressful conditions and in disease states. CD105 (endoglin) and CD106 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) are expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and increased expression in response to stress may be observed. A randomised-controlled double-blinded study aimed to examine the use of endothelial MPs as a marker for the state of one's endothelium, as well as whether maintaining acid-base homeostasis affects the release of these MPs. This study tested seven healthy male volunteers, who completed a strenuous cycling protocol, with venous blood analysed for CD105+ and CD106+ MPs by flow cytometry at regular intervals. Prior to each trial participants consumed either 0.3 g·kg(-1) body mass of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), or 0.045 g·kg(-1) body mass of sodium chloride (NaCl). A significant rise in endothelial CD105+ MPs and CD106+ MPs (p<0.05) was observed at 90 min post-exercise. A significant trend was shown for these MPs to return to resting levels 180 min post-exercise in both groups. No significance was found between experimental groups, suggesting that maintaining acid-base variables closer to basal levels has little effect upon the endothelial stress response for this particular exercise mode. In conclusion, strenuous exercise is accompanied by MP release and the endothelium is able to rapidly recover in healthy individuals, whilst maintaining acid-base homeostasis does not attenuate the MP release from the endothelium after exercise.

  2. R-Phycoerythrin Induces SGC-7901 Apoptosis by Arresting Cell Cycle at S Phase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huixin; Gao, Shiyong; Zhuang, Yan; Dong, Yanhong; Guan, Wenhui; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Jian; Cui, Jingru

    2016-09-12

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), one of the chemical constituents of red algae, could produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and possibly be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Documents reported that R-PE could inhibit cell proliferation in HepG2 and A549 cells, which was significative for cancer therapy. This is due to the fact that R-PE could kill cancer cells directly as well as by PDT. However, little is known about the cytotoxicity of R-PE to the SGC-7901 cell. In this study, it has been found that R-PE could inhibit SGC-7901 proliferation and induce cell apoptosis, which was achieved by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase. CyclinA, CDK2 and CDC25A are proteins associated with the S phase, and it was found that R-PE could increase the expression of cyclin A protein and decrease the expression of CDK2 and CDC25A proteins. Thus, it was concluded that R-PE reduced the CDK2 protein activated through decreasing the CDC25A factor, which reduced the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. The reduction of Cyclin-CDK complex made the SGC-7901 cells arrest at the S phase. Therefore, R-PE induced apoptosis by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase was successful, which was achieved by the expression of the CDC25A protein, which reduced the CDK2 protein actived and the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex.

  3. R-Phycoerythrin Induces SGC-7901 Apoptosis by Arresting Cell Cycle at S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huixin; Gao, Shiyong; Zhuang, Yan; Dong, Yanhong; Guan, Wenhui; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Jian; Cui, Jingru

    2016-01-01

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), one of the chemical constituents of red algae, could produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and possibly be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Documents reported that R-PE could inhibit cell proliferation in HepG2 and A549 cells, which was significative for cancer therapy. This is due to the fact that R-PE could kill cancer cells directly as well as by PDT. However, little is known about the cytotoxicity of R-PE to the SGC-7901 cell. In this study, it has been found that R-PE could inhibit SGC-7901 proliferation and induce cell apoptosis, which was achieved by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase. CyclinA, CDK2 and CDC25A are proteins associated with the S phase, and it was found that R-PE could increase the expression of cyclin A protein and decrease the expression of CDK2 and CDC25A proteins. Thus, it was concluded that R-PE reduced the CDK2 protein activated through decreasing the CDC25A factor, which reduced the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. The reduction of Cyclin-CDK complex made the SGC-7901 cells arrest at the S phase. Therefore, R-PE induced apoptosis by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase was successful, which was achieved by the expression of the CDC25A protein, which reduced the CDK2 protein actived and the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. PMID:27626431

  4. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  5. Combined treatment of gamma-tocotrienol with statins induce mammary tumor cell cycle arrest in G1.

    PubMed

    Wali, Vikram B; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Sylvester, Paul W

    2009-06-01

    Statins and gamma-tocotrienol (a rare isoform of vitamin E) both inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase activity and display anticancer activity. However, clinical application of statins has been limited by high dose toxicity. Previous studies showed that combined statin and gamma-tocotrienol treatment synergistically inhibits growth of highly malignant +SA mammary epithelial cells in culture. To investigate the mechanism mediating this growth inhibition, studies were conducted to determine the effect of combination low dose gamma-tocotrienol and statin treatment on +SA mammary tumor cell cycle progression. Treatment with 0.25 microM simvastatin, lovastatin, mevastatin, 10 microM pravastatin or 2.0 microM gamma-tocotrienol alone had no effect, while combined treatment of individual statins with gamma-tocotrienol significantly inhibited +SA cell proliferation during the 4-day culture period. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that combined treatment induced cell cycle arrest in G1. Additional studies showed that treatment with 0.25 microM simvastatin or 2 microM gamma-tocotrienol alone had no effect on the relative intracellular levels of cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6, but combined treatment caused a large reduction in cyclin D1 and CDK2 levels. Combined treatments also caused a relatively large increase in p27, but had no effect on p21 and p15 levels, and resulted in a large reduction in retinoblastoma (Rb) protein phosphorylation at ser780 and ser807/811. Similar effects were observed following combined treatment of gamma-tocotrienol with low doses of lovastatin, mevastatin and pravastatin. These findings demonstrate that combination low dose statin and gamma-tocotrienol treatment induced mammary tumor cell cycle arrest at G1, resulting from an increase in p27 expression, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, and hypophosphorylation of Rb protein. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with gamma

  6. Silencing of MAP4K4 by short hairpin RNA suppresses proliferation, induces G1 cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-FEI; QU, GUO-QIANG; LU, YUN-MIN; KONG, WU-MING; LIU, YUAN; CHEN, WEI-XIONG; LIAO, XIAO-HONG

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the second most common cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Previous studies suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase isoform 4 (MAP4K4) is involved in cancer cell growth, apoptosis and migration. In the present study, bioinformatics analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed to determine if MAP4K4 was overexpressed in GC. The knockdown of MAP4K4 by RNA interference in GC cells markedly inhibited cell proliferation, which may be mediated by cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. The silencing of MAP4K4 also induced cell apoptosis by increasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. In addition, Notch signaling was markedly reduced by MAP4K4 silencing. The results of the present study suggested that inhibition of MAP4K4 may be a therapeutic strategy for GC. PMID:26549737

  7. Construction of a chimeric lysin Ply187N-V12C with extended lytic activity against staphylococci and streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiuhua; Wang, Jing; Yang, Hang; Wei, Cuihua; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Huang, Yanling; Zhang, Xian-En; Wei, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    Developing chimeric lysins with a wide lytic spectrum would be important for treating some infections caused by multiple pathogenic bacteria. In the present work, a novel chimeric lysin (Ply187N-V12C) was constructed by fusing the catalytic domain (Ply187N) of the bacteriophage lysin Ply187 with the cell binding domain (146-314aa, V12C) of the lysin PlyV12. The results showed that the chimeric lysin Ply187N-V12C had not only lytic activity similar to Ply187N against staphylococcal strains but also extended its lytic activity to streptococci and enterococci, such as Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, which Ply187N could not lyse. Our work demonstrated that generating novel chimeric lysins with an extended lytic spectrum was feasible through fusing a catalytic domain with a cell-binding domain from lysins with lytic spectra across multiple genera. PMID:25219798

  8. Semi-purified extracts of Commelina benghalensis (Commelinaceae) induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in Jurkat-T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Commelina benghalensis (CB) is a small plant whose fleshy stems are used in South Africa to treat skin conditions (e.g., cancerous skin outgrowths). This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of sub-fractions of acetone extracts of CB stems on growth-associated molecular events of apoptosis and cell division cycle of Jurkat-T (JT) cells. Methods Acetone extract of CB stems were subfractioned into n-hexane (F1) and dichloromethane (F2) fractions. After treatment of JT cells with these subfractions, cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis were determined using a haemocytometer, the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and Hoechst 33258 staining, respectively. Cell division cycle distribution profiles were analysed using an Epics Alba Flow Cytometer and the expression of cell division cycle regulatory genes was analysed using RT-PCR, while immunoreactive proteins were detected on western blots. Results The F1 and F2 fractions inhibited the proliferation and viability of JT cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 32.5 μg/mℓ and 56 μg/mℓ, respectively. The observed cytotoxicity was established to be a consequence of apoptosis. as verified using Hoechst staining method. Both fractions induced a G1/S interphase arrest of the cell division cycle of JT cells. RT-PCR analyses showed an up-regulatory effect by the F1 fraction in the expression of cyclin B1, cdc2 and bax, with a down-regulatory effect in the expression levels of bcl-2. Fraction F1 also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and its downstream regulators, p21 and Cdc2. However, protein Bax and p21 and p53 transcripts were undetectable under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, fraction F2 increased the mRNA expression levels of bax, bcl-2, cyclin B1 and cdc2. Concomitantly, fraction F2 showed an up-regulation in the protein expression levels of Cdc2, Bcl-2, Cyclin B1 and p21. Despite the up-regulation in protein expression levels by

  9. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-22

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes.

  10. Stress-induced prophage DNA replication in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Russell, Nathalie; Elrod, Brandon; Dominguez, Katrina

    2009-09-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium, a foodborne pathogen, is the cause of new outbreaks every year. The virulence of new pathogens is determined by their virulence genes, many of them carried on transferable elements, such as prophages. In bacteria harboring multiple prophages such as Salmonella, the reassortment of these genes plays a major role in the emergence of new pathogens and consequently new epidemics. This gene transfer depends on prophage induction and the initiation of the phage lytic cycle. In the present study we have tested the effects of bacterial extracytoplasmic stress on prophage induction. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR assay to quantify variations in phage genes copy number, representative of phage DNA replication associated with the initiation of the lytic cycle. The induction of the four Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 prophages (Fels-1, Fels-2, Gifsy-1 and Gifsy-2) was measured during exponential growth, stationary phase, starvation, as well as after treatment with Mitomycin C, Ampicillin or heat. Our results show that the four prophages respond differently to each treatment. Gifsy-2 showed constant low level of induction independently of the extracytoplasmic stress, Fels-1 was strongly induced after DNA damage, Fels-2 showed spontaneous induction only during optimal bacterial growth, and Gifsy-1 was repressed in all conditions. These findings show that the transfer of virulence genes can respond to and depend on variations of the bacterial surrounding conditions, and help to explain the appearance of new Salmonella outbreaks.

  11. Dynamic evaluation of a regional air quality model: Assessing the emissions-induced weekly ozone cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Thomas; Hogrefe, Christian; Trivikrama Rao, S.; Porter, P. Steven; Ku, Jia-Yeong

    2010-09-01

    Air quality models are used to predict changes in pollutant concentrations resulting from envisioned emission control policies. Recognizing the need to assess the credibility of air quality models in a policy-relevant context, we perform a dynamic evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system for the "weekend ozone effect" to determine if observed changes in ozone due to weekday-to-weekend (WDWE) reductions in precursor emissions can be accurately simulated. The weekend ozone effect offers a unique opportunity for dynamic evaluation, as it is a widely documented phenomenon that has persisted since the 1970s. In many urban areas of the Unites States, higher ozone has been observed on weekends than weekdays, despite dramatically reduced emissions of ozone precursors (nitrogen oxides [NO x] and volatile organic compounds [VOCs]) on weekends. More recent measurements, however, suggest shifts in the spatial extent or reductions in WDWE ozone differences. Using 18 years (1988-2005) of observed and modeled ozone and temperature data across the northeastern United States, we re-examine the long-term trends in the weekend effect and confounding factors that may be complicating the interpretation of this trend and explore whether CMAQ can replicate the temporal features of the observed weekend effect. The amplitudes of the weekly ozone cycle have decreased during the 18-year period in our study domain, but the year-to-year variability in weekend minus weekday (WEWD) ozone amplitudes is quite large. Inter-annual variability in meteorology appears to influence WEWD differences in ozone, as well as WEWD differences in VOC and NO x emissions. Because of the large inter-annual variability, modeling strategies using a single episode lasting a few days or a few episodes in a given year may not capture the WEWD signal that exists over longer time periods. The CMAQ model showed skill in predicting the absolute values of ozone concentrations during the

  12. Studies on the mechanism of natural killer cytotoxicity. III. Activation of NK cells by interferon augments the lytic activity of released natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF).

    PubMed

    Wright, S C; Bonavida, B

    1983-06-01

    The mechanism by which interferon (IFN) pretreatment of effector cells augments natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) was examined by determining whether IFN has any effect on the production of natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF). NKCF are released into the supernatant of co-cultures of murine spleen cells and YAC-1 stimulator cells, and their lytic activity is measured against YAC-1 target cells. It was demonstrated that pretreatment of effector cells with murine fibroblast IFN or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (pIC) resulted in the release of NKCF with augmented lytic activity. Evidence indicated that the IFN-induced augmentation of NKCF activity required protein synthesis during the IFN pretreatment period, because concurrent pretreatment with both IFN and cycloheximide abrogated the IFN effect. Protein synthesis, however, is not required for the production of base levels of NKCF because emetine pretreatment of normal spleen cells did not result in a decrease in NKCF production. Furthermore, substantial levels of NKCF activity could be detected in freeze-thaw lysates of freshly isolated spleen cells. Cell populations enriched for NK effector cells, such as nylon wool-nonadherent nude mouse spleen cells, produced lysates with high levels of NKCF activity, whereas lysates of CBA thymocytes were devoid of NKCF activity. Pretreatment of spleen cells with either IFN or pIC resulted in an augmentation of the NKCF activity present in their cell lysates. Taken altogether, these findings suggest that freshly isolated NK cells contain preformed pools of NKCF. Pretreatment of these cells with IFN causes de novo synthesis of additional NKCF and/or activation of preexisting NKCF. According to our model for the mechanism of NK CMC, target cell lysis is ultimately the result of transfer of NKCF from the effector cell to the target cell. The evidence presented here suggests that the IFN-induced augmentation of NK activity could be accounted for by an

  13. CRM1 inhibitor S109 suppresses cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Chong, Yulong; Liu, Huize; Han, Yan; Niu, Mingshan

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal localization of tumor suppressor proteins is a common feature of renal cancer. Nuclear export of these tumor suppressor proteins is mediated by chromosome region maintenance-1 (CRM1). Here, we investigated the antitumor eff ects of a novel reversible inhibitor of CRM1 on renal cancer cells. We found that S109 inhibits the CRM1-mediated nuclear export of RanBP1 and reduces protein levels of CRM1. Furthermore, the inhibitory eff ect of S109 on CRM1 is reversible. Our data demonstrated that S109 signifi cantly inhibits proliferation and colony formation of renal cancer cells. Cell cycle assay showed that S109 induced G1-phase arrest, followed by the reduction of Cyclin D1 and increased expression of p53 and p21. We also found that S109 induces nuclear accumulation of tumor suppressor proteins, Foxo1 and p27. Most importantly, mutation of CRM1 at Cys528 position abolished the eff ects of S109. Taken together, our results indicate that CRM1 is a therapeutic target in renal cancer and the novel reversible CRM1 inhibitor S109 can act as a promising candidate for renal cancer therapy.

  14. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  15. Jatamanvaltrate P induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy in human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhu, Rui; Tian, Shasha; Wang, Yiqi; Lou, Siyue; Zhao, Huajun

    2017-03-10

    Jatamanvaltrate P is a novel iridoid ester isolated from Valeriana jatamansi Jones, a traditional medicine used to treat nervous disorders. In this study, we found that Jatamanvaltrate P possessed notable antitumor properties and therefore evaluated its anticancer effects against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Jatamanvaltrate P inhibited the growth and proliferation of MCF-7 and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453 and MDA-MB-468) in a concentration-dependent manner, while displayed relatively low cytotoxicity to human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). Treatment with Jatamanvaltrate P induced G2/M-phase arrest in TNBC and G0/G1-phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. Further study of the molecular mechanisms of this cytotoxic compound demonstrated that Jatamanvaltrate P enhanced cleavage of PARP and caspases, while decreased the expression levels of cell cycle-related Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1 and Cdc-2. It also activated autophagy, as indicated by the triggered autophagosome formation and increased LC3-II levels. Autophagy inhibition by 3-MA co-treatment undermined Jatamanvaltrate P-induced cell death. Finally, Jatamanvaltrate P exhibited a potential antitumor effect in MDA-MB-231 xenografts without apparent toxicity. These results suggest that Jatamanvaltrate P is a potential therapeutic agent for breast cancer, providing a basis for development of the compound as a novel chemotherapeutic agent.

  16. Tetramethoxychalcone, a Chalcone Derivative, Suppresses Proliferation, Blocks Cell Cycle Progression, and Induces Apoptosis of Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Meiqin; Yang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor functions of a synthetic chalcone derivative 4,3′,4′,5′- tetramethoxychalcone (TMOC) in ovarian cancer cells. We found that TMOC inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of cisplatin sensitive cell line A2780 and resistant cell line A2780/CDDP, as well as ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of A2780 cells with TMOC resulted in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and the up-regulation of p16, p21 and p27 proteins. We demonstrated that TMOC might induce cell apoptosis through suppressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but enhancing the expression of Bax and the cleavage of PARP-1. Treatment of TMOC also reduced the invasion and migration of A2780 cells. Finally, we found that TMOC inhibited the constitutive activation of STAT3 signaling pathway and induced the expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN regardless of the p53 status in cell lines. These data suggest that TMOC may be developed as a potential chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including ovarian cancer. PMID:25180593

  17. Cell cycle regulation of breast cancer cells through estrogen-induced activities of ERK and Akt protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, Nancy; Guédin, Aurore; Dacquet, Catherine; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2005-06-15

    The proliferative effect of estrogens on breast cancer cell (BCC) is mainly mediated through estrogen receptors (ER). Non-transcriptional effects of estrogens, exerted through activation of several protein kinases, may also contribute to BCC proliferation. However, the relative contribution of these two responses to BCC proliferation is not known. We characterized a novel estrogenic receptor ligand which possess Akt and ERK activating properties distinct from that of 17beta-estradiol. Early and delayed waves of activation of these kinases were detected upon estrogenic challenge of BCC, but only molecules able to promote a significant, delayed activation of ERK-induced BCC proliferation. Estrogen-induced cell cycle progression was not sensitive to the inhibition of ERK-regulating kinases MEK1 and 2. ERalpha was found to be necessary, but not sufficient for kinases activation. Thus, estrogens elicit a distinct pattern of early and delayed activation of ERK and Akt, and early protein kinase activation is probably not involved in BCC proliferation. Structural variations in the estrogen molecule may confer novel biological properties unrelated to estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation.

  18. Downregulation of FOXP1 Inhibits Cell Proliferation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inducing G1/S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Ji; Cui, Meiling; Zhao, Fangyu; Ge, Chao; Chen, Taoyang; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) belongs to a family of winged-helix transcription factors that are involved in the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and longevity. FOXP1 can affect cell proliferation and migratory ability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanism of FOXP1 in the proliferation of HCC cells. This study aimed to further explore the function of FOXP1 on the proliferation of HCC cells as well as the relevant mechanism involved. Western blot analysis, tumor xenograft models, and flow cytometry analysis were performed to elucidate the function of FOXP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in human HCC. We observed that silencing FOXP1 significantly suppressed the growth ability of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, knockdown of FOXP1 induced G1/S phase arrest, and the expression of total and phosphorylated Rb (active type) as well as the levels of E2F1 were markedly decreased at 24 h; however, other proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and cyclin D1 did not show noticeable changes. In conclusion, downregulation of FOXP1 inhibits cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing G1/S phase cell cycle arrest, and the decrease in phosphorylated Rb is the main contributor to this G1/S phase arrest. PMID:27618020

  19. DNA-damage, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis induced in BEAS-2B cells by 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA).

    PubMed

    Ansteinsson, V; Solhaug, A; Samuelsen, J T; Holme, J A; Dahl, J E

    2011-08-16

    The methacrylate monomer 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is commonly used in resin-based dental restorative materials. These materials are cured in situ and HEMA and other monomers have been identified in ambient air during dental surgery. In vitro studies have demonstrated a toxic potential of methacrylates, and concerns have been raised regarding possible health effects due to inhalation. In this study we have investigated the mechanisms of HEMA-induced toxicity in the human lung epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Depletion of cellular glutathione (GSH) and an increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were seen after 2h of exposure, but the levels were restored to control levels after 12h. After 24h, inhibited cell proliferation and apoptotic cell death were found. The results of the Comet assay and the observed phosphorylation of DNA-damage-associated signalling proteins including Chk2, H2AX, and p53 suggest that the toxicity of HEMA is mediated by DNA damage. Further, the antioxidant trolox did not counteract the HEMA-induced cell-cycle arrest, which indicates that the DNA damage is of non-oxidative origin.

  20. Ethyl acetate extract of Peperomia tetraphylla induces cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dayong; Yang, Xiuxiu; Lu, Xuan; Shi, Liying; Feng, Baomin

    2016-12-01

    The current study evaluated the cytotoxicity and the mechanism of apoptotic induction by Peperomia tetraphylla in U937 lymphoma cells. The results showed that P. tetraphylla ethyl acetate extract (EAEPT) inhibited the cell growth in U937 cells by MTT assay. After the U937 cells were treated with EAEPT, the cells exhibited marked morphological features of apoptosis (Hoechst 33342 staining) and the number of apoptotic cell (Annexin V-FITC/PI staining) increased. The treatment of EAEPT could induce loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increase the ROS level. Moreover, EAEPT treatment resulted in the accumulation of cells at S phase. We found that EAEPT could induce the cleavage of the caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9 and Bid. And the treatment of EAEPT could increase expression of Bax and down-regulate the expression of CCNB1, CCND1 and CDK1. The sub-fraction of EAEPT, namely EASub1 demonstrated the highest cytotoxicity activity on U937 cells. It was confirmed that EAEPT could inhibit the growth of U937 cells by blocking the cell cycle and prompted apoptosis via the ROS-medicated mitochondria pathway in vitro.

  1. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Andrew W.; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low–voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, ηp2 = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, ηp2 = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, ηp2 = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m (ηp2 = 0.10) and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m (ηp2 = 0.16), 500-m (ηp2 = 0.15), and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to improve 5-km TT performance. PMID:28223939

  2. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Andrew W; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Polman, Remco C J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low-voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, [Formula: see text] = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, [Formula: see text] = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, [Formula: see text] = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.10) and 750-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.16), 500-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.15), and 750-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to

  3. Hyperosmotic stress induces cell cycle arrest in retinal pigmented epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, T; Vujovic, A; Libert, F; Op de Beeck, A; Hébrant, A; Janssens, S; Grégoire, F; Lefort, A; Bolaky, N; Perret, J; Caspers, L; Willermain, F; Delporte, C

    2013-01-01

    Osmotic changes occur in many tissues and profoundly influence cell function. Herein, we investigated the effect of hyperosmotic stress on retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells using a microarray approach. Upon 4-h exposure to 100 mM NaCl or 200 mM sucrose, 79 genes were downregulated and 72 upregulated. Three gene ontology categories were significantly modulated: cell proliferation, transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter and response to abiotic stimulus. Fluorescent-activated cell sorting analysis further demonstrated that owing to hyperosmotic stimulation for 24 h, cell count and cell proliferation, as well as the percentage of cells in G0/G1 and S phases were significantly decreased, whereas the percentage of cells in G2/M phases increased, and apoptosis and necrosis remained unaffected. Accordingly, hyperosmotic conditions induced a decrease of cyclin B1 and D1 expression, and an activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that hypertonic conditions profoundly affect RPE cell gene transcription regulating cell proliferation by downregulation cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 protein expression. PMID:23744362

  4. Aquifer Arsenic Cycling Induced by Seasonal Hydrologic Changes within the Yangtze River Basin.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael V; Ying, Samantha C; Benner, Shawn G; Duan, Yanhua; Wang, Yanxin; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-04-05

    Consumption of groundwater containing >10 μg L(-1) arsenic (As) adversely impacts more than 100 million people worldwide. Multiyear trends in aquifer As concentrations have been documented, but strong seasonal variations are not commonly observed. Here we report dramatic seasonal changes in As concentrations and aquifer chemistry within the Jianghan Plain of the Yangtze River, China. At some wells, concentrations fluctuate by more than an order of magnitude within a single year (100-1200 μg L(-1)). Groundwater extraction and sustained water levels of surface channels during the dry season induces a strong downward hydraulic gradient, seasonally supplying oxidizing (oxygen, nitrate) water to the otherwise anoxic aquifer. Oxygen and/or nitrate addition promotes a transient drop in As concentrations for 1-3 months. When recharge ceases, reducing, low-arsenic conditions are reestablished by reactive, endogenous organic carbon. Temporal variability in As concentrations is especially problematic because it increases the probability of false-negative well testing during low-arsenic seasons. However, periods of low As may also provide a source of less toxic water for irrigation or other uses. Our results highlight the vulnerability and variability of groundwater resources in the Jianghan Plain and other inland basins within Asia to changing geochemical conditions, both natural and anthropogenic, and reinforce that continued monitoring of wells in high-risk regions is essential.

  5. MSM ameliorates HIV-1 Tat induced neuronal oxidative stress via rebalance of the glutathione cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seol-hee; Smith, Adam J; Tan, Jun; Shytle, R Douglas; Giunta, Brian

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat protein is a key neuropathological element in HIV associated neurogcognitive disorders (HAND); a type of cognitive syndrome thought to be at least partially mediated by increased levels of brain reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound known to reduce oxidative stress. This study was conducted to determine whether administration of MSM attenuates HIV-1 Tat induced oxidative stress in mouse neuronal cells. MSM treatment significantly decreased neuronal cell NO and ROS secretion. Further, MSM significantly reversed HIV-1 Tat mediated reductions in reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as HIV-1 Tat mediated increases in oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In addition, Tat reduced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key nuclear promoter of antioxidant activity, while MSM increased its translocation to the nucleus in the presence of Tat. These results suggest that HIV-1 Tat reduces the resiliency of neuron cells to oxidative stress which can be reversed by MSM. Given the clinical safety of MSM, future preclinical in vivo studies will be required to further confirm these results in effort to validate MSM as a neuroprotectant in patients at risk of, or who are already diagnosed with, HAND. PMID:25893035

  6. Local RhoA activation induces cytokinetic furrows independent of spindle position and cell cycle stage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The GTPase RhoA promotes contractile ring assembly and furrow ingression during cytokinesis. Although many factors that regulate RhoA during cytokinesis have been characterized, the spatiotemporal regulatory logic remains undefined. We have developed an optogenetic probe to gain tight spatial and temporal control of RhoA activity in mammalian cells and demonstrate that cytokinetic furrowing is primarily regulated at the level of RhoA activation. Light-mediated recruitment of a RhoGEF domain to the plasma membrane leads to rapid induction of RhoA activity, leading to assembly of cytokinetic furrows that partially ingress. Furthermore, furrow formation in response to RhoA activation is not temporally or spatially restricted. RhoA activation is sufficient to generate furrows at both the cell equator and cell poles, in both metaphase and anaphase. Remarkably, furrow formation can be initiated in rounded interphase cells, but not adherent cells. These results indicate that RhoA activation is sufficient to induce assembly of functional contractile rings and that cell rounding facilitates furrow formation. PMID:27298323

  7. Polydatin, a natural precursor of resveratrol, induces cell cycle arrest and differentiation of human colorectal Caco-2 cell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human colon adenocarcinoma cells are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracyclines, that induce death by increasing the reactive oxygen species. A number of studies have been focused on chemo-preventive use of resveratrol as antioxidant against cardiovascular diseases, aging and cancer. While resveratrol cytotoxic action was due to its pro-oxidant properties. In this study, we investigate whether the Resveratrol (trans-3,5,49-trihydroxystilbene) and its natural precursor Polydatin (resveratrol-3-O-b-mono- D-glucoside, the glycoside form of resveratrol) combination, might have a cooperative antitumor effect on either growing or differentiated human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells. Methods The polydatin and resveratrol pharmacological interaction was evaluated in vitro on growing and differentiated Caco-2 cell lines by median drug effect analysis calculating a combination index with CalcuSyn software. We have selected a synergistic combination and we have evaluated its effect on the biological and molecular mechanisms of cell death. Results Simultaneous exposure to polydatin and resveratrol produced synergistic antiproliferative effects compared with single compound treatment. We demonstrated that polydatin alone or in combination with resveratrol at 3:1 molar ratio synergistically modulated oxidative stress, cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. Worthy of note treatment with polydatin induced a nuclear localization and decreased expression of heat shock protein 27, and vimentin redistributed within the cell. Conclusions From morphological, and biochemical outcome we obtained evidences that polydatin induced a transition from a proliferative morphology to cell-specific differentiated structures and caused human CaCo-2 cell death by induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest the potential use of polydatin in combination chemotherapy for human colon cancer. PMID:24138806

  8. Manganese ions enhance mitochondrial H2O2 emission from Krebs cycle oxidoreductases by inducing permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Bonke, Erik; Siebels, Ilka; Zwicker, Klaus; Dröse, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Manganese-induced toxicity has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We could recently show in mechanistic studies that Mn(2+) ions induce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production from the ubiquinone binding site of mitochondrial complex II (IIQ) and generally enhance H2O2 formation by accelerating the rate of superoxide dismutation. The present study with intact mitochondria reveals that manganese additionally enhances H2O2 emission by inducing mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). In mitochondria fed by NADH-generating substrates, the combination of Mn(2+) and different respiratory chain inhibitors led to a dynamically increasing H2O2emission which was sensitive to the mPT inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) as well as Ru-360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Under these conditions, flavin-containing enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix, e.g. the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase (OGDH), were major sources of ROS. With succinate as substrate, Mn(2+) stimulated ROS production mainly at complex II, whereby the applied succinate concentration had a marked effect on the tendency for mPT. Also Ca(2+) increased the rate of H2O2 emission by mPT, while no direct effect on ROS-production of complex II was observed. The present study reveals a complex scenario through which manganese affects mitochondrial H2O2 emission: stimulating its production from distinct sites (e.g. site IIQ), accelerating superoxide dismutation and enhancing the emission via mPT which also leads to the loss of soluble components of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems and favors the ROS production from flavin-containing oxidoreductases of the Krebs cycle.

  9. Mitochondria-derived ROS bursts disturb Ca2+ cycling and induce abnormal automaticity in guinea pig cardiomyocytes: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qince; Su, Di; O'Rourke, Brian; Pogwizd, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are in close proximity to the redox-sensitive sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release [ryanodine receptors (RyRs)] and uptake [Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)] channels. Thus mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (mdROS) could play a crucial role in modulating Ca2+ cycling in the cardiomyocytes. However, whether mdROS-mediated Ca2+ dysregulation translates to abnormal electrical activities under pathological conditions, and if yes what are the underlying ionic mechanisms, have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that pathological mdROS induce Ca2+ elevation by modulating SR Ca2+ handling, which activates other Ca2+ channels and further exacerbates Ca2+ dysregulation, leading to abnormal action potential (AP). We also propose that the morphologies of elicited AP abnormality rely on the time of mdROS induction, interaction between mitochondria and SR, and intensity of mitochondrial oxidative stress. To test the hypotheses, we developed a multiscale guinea pig cardiomyocyte model that incorporates excitation-contraction coupling, local Ca2+ control, mitochondrial energetics, and ROS-induced ROS release. This model, for the first time, includes mitochondria-SR microdomain and modulations of mdROS on RyR and SERCA activities. Simulations show that mdROS bursts increase cytosolic Ca2+ by stimulating RyRs and inhibiting SERCA, which activates the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, Ca2+-sensitive nonspecific cationic channels, and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, eliciting abnormal AP. The morphologies of AP abnormality are largely influenced by the time interval among mdROS burst induction and AP firing, dosage and diffusion of mdROS, and SR-mitochondria distance. This study defines the role of mdROS in Ca2+ overload-mediated cardiac arrhythmogenesis and underscores the importance of considering mitochondrial targets in designing new antiarrhythmic therapies. PMID:25539710

  10. Dopaminergic Neurons Respond to Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress by Modulating Lipid Acylation and Deacylation Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Campos, Sofía; Rodríguez Diez, Guadalupe; Oresti, Gerardo Martín; Salvador, Gabriela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Metal-imbalance has been reported as a contributor factor for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson Disease (PD). Specifically, iron (Fe)-overload and copper (Cu) mis-compartmentalization have been reported to be involved in the injury of dopaminergic neurons in this pathology. The aim of this work was to characterize the mechanisms of membrane repair by studying lipid acylation and deacylation reactions and their role in oxidative injury in N27 dopaminergic neurons exposed to Fe-overload and Cu-supplementation. N27 dopaminergic neurons incubated with Fe (1mM) for 24 hs displayed increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and elevated plasma membrane permeability. Cu-supplemented neurons (10, 50 μM) showed no evidence of oxidative stress markers. A different lipid acylation profile was observed in N27 neurons pre-labeled with [3H] arachidonic acid (AA) or [3H] oleic acid (OA). In Fe-exposed neurons, AA uptake was increased in triacylglycerols (TAG) whereas its incorporation into the phospholipid (PL) fraction was diminished. TAG content was 40% higher in Fe-exposed neurons than in controls. This increase was accompanied by the appearance of Nile red positive lipid bodies. Contrariwise, OA incorporation increased in the PL fractions and showed no changes in TAG. Lipid acylation profile in Cu-supplemented neurons showed AA accumulation into phosphatidylserine and no changes in TAG. The inhibition of deacylation/acylation reactions prompted an increase in oxidative stress markers and mitochondrial dysfunction in Fe-overloaded neurons. These findings provide evidence about the participation of lipid acylation mechanisms against Fe-induced oxidative injury and postulate that dopaminergic neurons cleverly preserve AA in TAG in response to oxidative stress. PMID:26076361

  11. Protozoacidal Trojan-Horse: use of a ligand-lytic peptide for selective destruction of symbiotic protozoa within termite guts.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; Delatte, Jennifer; Foil, Lane; Husseneder, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    For novel biotechnology-based termite control, we developed a cellulose bait containing freeze-dried genetically engineered yeast which expresses a protozoacidal lytic peptide attached to a protozoa-recognizing ligand. The yeast acts as a 'Trojan-Horse' that kills the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, which leads to the death of termites, presumably due to inefficient cellulose digestion. The ligand targets the lytic peptide specifically to protozoa, thereby increasing its protozoacidal efficiency while protecting non-target organisms. After ingestion of the bait, the yeast propagates in the termite's gut and is spread throughout the termite colony via social interactions. This novel paratransgenesis-based strategy could be a good supplement for current termite control using fortified biological control agents in addition to chemical insecticides. Moreover, this ligand-lytic peptide system could be used for drug development to selectively target disease-causing protozoa in humans or other vertebrates.

  12. A new bacteriophage typing scheme for Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains. 3. Analysis of lytic properties.

    PubMed

    Sekaninová, G; Rychlík, I; Kolárová, M; Pillich, J; Seménka, J; Zajícová, V

    1998-01-01

    The lytic properties of 21 bacteriophages constituting a new typing set for Proteus were examined in 507 Proteus mirabilis and 29 P. vulgaris strains isolated from patients and healthy subjects. Comparison of their morphological, serological, genetic and lytic properties showed that, in the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families, some phages were so closely related that the presence of all of them in the set was redundant. Analysis of the lytic properties revealed that some of the bacteriophages were not active enough to facilitate the differentiation of Proteus strains. The size of the final typing set was reduced from 21 to 12 phages but it was suggested that, in order to improve the differentiation capacity of the set, new phages should be included.

  13. Protozoacidal Trojan-Horse: Use of a Ligand-Lytic Peptide for Selective Destruction of Symbiotic Protozoa within Termite Guts

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amit; Delatte, Jennifer; Foil, Lane; Husseneder, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    For novel biotechnology-based termite control, we developed a cellulose bait containing freeze-dried genetically engineered yeast which expresses a protozoacidal lytic peptide attached to a protozoa-recognizing ligand. The yeast acts as a ‘Trojan-Horse’ that kills the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, which leads to the death of termites, presumably due to inefficient cellulose digestion. The ligand targets the lytic peptide specifically to protozoa, thereby increasing its protozoacidal efficiency while protecting non-target organisms. After ingestion of the bait, the yeast propagates in the termite's gut and is spread throughout the termite colony via social interactions. This novel paratransgenesis-based strategy could be a good supplement for current termite control using fortified biological control agents in addition to chemical insecticides. Moreover, this ligand-lytic peptide system could be used for drug development to selectively target disease-causing protozoa in humans or other vertebrates. PMID:25198727

  14. HCdc14A is involved in cell cycle regulation of human brain vascular endothelial cells following injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Zhou, Houguang; Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Hu, Renming; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle processes play a vital role in vascular endothelial proliferation and dysfunction. Cell division cycle protein 14 (Cdc14) is an important cell cycle regulatory phosphatase. Previous studies in budding yeast demonstrated that Cdc14 could trigger the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), which are required for mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, the exact function of human Cdc14 (hCdc14) in cell cycle regulation during vascular diseases is yet to be elucidated. There are two HCdc14 homologs: hCdc14A and hCdc14B. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of hCdc14A in high glucose-, free fatty acids (FFAs)-, and hypoxia-induced injury in cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs). Data revealed that high glucose, FFA, and hypoxia down-regulated hCdc14A expression remarkably, and also affected the expression of other cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclin B, cyclin D, cyclin E, and p53. Furthermore, the combined addition of the three stimuli largely blocked cell cycle progression, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. We also determined that hCdc14A was localized mainly to centrosomes during interphase and spindles during mitosis using confocal microscopy, and that it could affect the expression of other cycle-related proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of hCdc14A accelerated cell cycle progression, enhanced cell proliferation, and promoted neoplastic transformation, whereas the knockdown of hCdc14A using small interfering RNA produced the opposite effects. Therefore, these findings provide novel evidence that hCdc14A might be involved in cell cycle regulation in cultured HBVECs during high glucose-, FFA-, and hypoxia-induced injury.

  15. CTCF interacts with the lytic HSV-1 genome to promote viral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Vladimirova, Olga; Hu, Benxia; Chen, Guijun; Xiao, Yu; Singh, Vikrant; Lu, Danfeng; Li, Lihong; Han, Hongbo; Wickramasinghe, J. M. A. S. P.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Zheng, Chunfu; Li, Qihan; Lieberman, Paul M.; Fraser, Nigel W.; Zhou, Jumin

    2017-01-01

    CTCF is an essential chromatin regulator implicated in important nuclear processes including in nuclear organization and transcription. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen, which enters productive infection in human epithelial and many other cell types. CTCF is known to bind several sites in the HSV-1 genome during latency and reactivation, but its function has not been defined. Here, we report that CTCF interacts extensively with the HSV-1 DNA during lytic infection by ChIP-seq, and its knockdown results in the reduction of viral transcription, viral genome copy number and virus yield. CTCF knockdown led to increased H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, and a reduction of RNA pol II occupancy on viral genes. Importantly, ChIP-seq analysis revealed that there is a higher level of CTD Ser2P modified RNA Pol II near CTCF peaks relative to the Ser5P form in the viral genome. Consistent with this, CTCF knockdown reduced the Ser2P but increased Ser5P modified forms of RNA Pol II on viral genes. These results suggest that CTCF promotes HSV-1 lytic transcription by facilitating the elongation of RNA Pol II and preventing silenced chromatin on the viral genome. PMID:28045091

  16. Melanoma cell lysosome secretory burst neutralizes the CTL-mediated cytotoxicity at the lytic synapse

    PubMed Central

    Khazen, Roxana; Müller, Sabina; Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Espinosa, Eric; Puissegur, Marie-Pierre; Valitutti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Human melanoma cells express various tumour antigens that are recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and elicit tumour-specific responses in vivo. However, natural and therapeutically enhanced CTL responses in melanoma patients are of limited efficacy. The mechanisms underlying CTL effector phase failure when facing melanomas are still largely elusive. Here we show that, on conjugation with CTL, human melanoma cells undergo an active late endosome/lysosome trafficking, which is intensified at the lytic synapse and is paralleled by cathepsin-mediated perforin degradation and deficient granzyme B penetration. Abortion of SNAP-23-dependent lysosomal trafficking, pH perturbation or impairment of lysosomal proteolytic activity restores susceptibility to CTL attack. Inside the arsenal of melanoma cell strategies to escape immune surveillance, we identify a self-defence mechanism based on exacerbated lysosome secretion and perforin degradation at the lytic synapse. Interfering with this synaptic self-defence mechanism might be useful in potentiating CTL-mediated therapies in melanoma patients. PMID:26940455

  17. Preliminary survey of local bacteriophages with lytic activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Latz, Simone; Wahida, Adam; Arif, Assuda; Häfner, Helga; Hoß, Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) represent a potential alternative for combating multi-drug resistant bacteria. Because of their narrow host range and the ever emergence of novel pathogen variants the continued search for phages is a prerequisite for optimal treatment of bacterial infections. Here we performed an ad hoc survey in the surroundings of a University hospital for the presence of phages with therapeutic potential. To this end, 16 aquatic samples of different origins and locations were tested simultaneously for the presence of phages with lytic activity against five current, but distinct strains each from the ESKAPE-group (i.e., Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae). Phages could be isolated for 70% of strains, covering all bacterial species except S. aureus. Apart from samples from two lakes, freshwater samples were largely devoid of phages. By contrast, one liter of hospital effluent collected at a single time point already contained phages active against two-thirds of tested strains. In conclusion, phages with lytic activity against nosocomial pathogens are unevenly distributed across environments with the prime source being the immediate hospital vicinity.

  18. Bacteriophage preparation lytic for Shigella significantly reduces Shigella sonnei contamination in various foods

    PubMed Central

    Woolston, Joelle; Li, Manrong; Das, Chythanya; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ShigaShield™ is a phage preparation composed of five lytic bacteriophages that specifically target pathogenic Shigella species found in contaminated waters and foods. In this study, we examined the efficacy of various doses (9x105-9x107 PFU/g) of ShigaShield™ in removing experimentally added Shigella on deli meat, smoked salmon, pre-cooked chicken, lettuce, melon and yogurt. The highest dose (2x107 or 9x107 PFU/g) of ShigaShield™ applied to each food type resulted in at least 1 log (90%) reduction of Shigella in all the food types. There was significant (P<0.01) reduction in the Shigella levels in all phage treated foods compared to controls, except for the lowest phage dose (9x105 PFU/g) on melon where reduction was only ca. 45% (0.25 log). The genomes of each component phage in the cocktail were fully sequenced and analyzed, and they were found not to contain any “undesirable genes” including those listed in the US Code for Federal Regulations (40 CFR Ch1). Our data suggest that ShigaShield™ (and similar phage preparations with potent lytic activity against Shigella spp.) may offer a safe and effective approach for reducing the levels of Shigella in various foods that may be contaminated with the bacterium. PMID:28362863

  19. Investigating the lytic activity and structural properties of Staphylococcus aureus phenol soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Laabei, Maisem; Jamieson, W David; Yang, Yi; van den Elsen, Jean; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous bacterial pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, expresses a large arsenal of virulence factors essential for pathogenesis. The phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a family of cytolytic peptide toxins which have multiple roles in staphylococcal virulence. To gain an insight into which specific factors are important in PSM-mediated cell membrane disruption, the lytic activity of individual PSM peptides against phospholipid vesicles and T cells was investigated. Vesicles were most susceptible to lysis by the PSMα subclass of peptides (α1-3 in particular), when containing between 10 and 30mol% cholesterol, which for these vesicles is the mixed solid ordered (so)-liquid ordered (lo) phase. Our results show that the PSMβ class of peptides has little effect on vesicles at concentrations comparable to that of the PSMα class and exhibited no cytotoxicity. Furthermore, within the PSMα class, differences emerged with PSMα4 showing decreased vesicle and cytotoxic activity in comparison to its counterparts, in contrast to previous studies. In order to understand this, peptides were studied using helical wheel projections and circular dichroism measurements. The degree of amphipathicity, alpha-helicity and properties such as charge and hydrophobicity were calculated, allowing a structure-function relationship to be inferred. The degree of alpha-helicity of the peptides was the single most important property of the seven peptides studied in predicting their lytic activity. These results help to redefine this class of peptide toxins and also highlight certain membrane parameters required for efficient lysis.

  20. Expanding proteome coverage with orthogonal-specificity α-Lytic proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jesse G.; Kim, Sangtae; Maltby, David A.; Ghassemian, Majid; Bandeira, Nuno; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2014-03-01

    Bottom-up proteomics studies traditionally involve proteome digestion with a single protease, trypsin. However, trypsin alone does not generate peptides that encompass the entire proteome. Alternative proteases have been explored, but most have specificity for charged amino acid side chains. Therefore, additional proteases that improve proteome coverage by cleavage at sequences complimentary to trypsin may increase proteome coverage. We demonstrate the novel application of two proteases for bottom-up proteomics: wild type alpha-lytic protease (WaLP), and an active site mutant of WaLP, M190A alpha-lytic protease (MaLP). We assess several relevant factors including MS/MS fragmentation, peptide length, peptide yield, and protease specificity. By combining data from separate digestions with trypsin, LysC, WaLP, and MaLP, proteome coverage was increased 101% compared to trypsin digestion alone. To demonstrate how the gained sequence coverage can access additional PTM information, we show identification of a number of novel phosphorylation sites in the S. pombe proteome and include an illustrative example from the protein MPD2, wherein two novel sites are identified, one in a tryptic peptide too short to identify and the other in a sequence devoid of tryptic sites. The specificity of WaLP and MaLP for aliphatic amino acid side chains was particularly valuable for coverage of membrane protein sequences, which increased 350% when the data from trypsin, LysC, WaLP, and MaLP were combined.

  1. Bulgecin A: The Key to a Broad-Spectrum Inhibitor That Targets Lytic Transglycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Allison H.; Wheeler, Richard; Thiriau, Constance; Haouz, Ahmed; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Boneca, Ivo G.

    2017-01-01

    Lytic transglycosylases (Lts) are involved in recycling, cell division, and metabolism of the peptidoglycan. They have been understudied for their usefulness as potential antibacterial targets due to their high redundancy in Gram-negative bacteria. Bulgecin A is an O-sulphonated glycopeptide that targets primarily soluble lytic tranglycosylases (Slt). It has been shown that bulgecin A increases the efficacy of β-lactams that target penicillin bindings proteins (PBPs). Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of LtgA from Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58, a membrane bound homolog of Escherichia coli Slt, in complex with bulgecin A. The LtgA-bulgecin A complex reveals the mechanism of inhibition by bulgecin A at near atomic resolution. We further demonstrate that bulgecin A is not only a potent inhibitor of LtgA, but most importantly, it restores the efficacy of β-lactam antibiotics in strains of N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae that have reduced susceptibility to β-lactams. This is particularly relevant for N. gonorrhoeae where no vaccines are available. This work illustrates how best to target dangerous pathogens using a multiple drug target approach, a new and alternative approach to fighting antibiotic resistance. PMID:28241458

  2. Trimethylation of Histone H3 Lysine 4 by Set1 in the Lytic Infection of Human Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Kent, Jennifer R.; Placek, Brandon; Whelan, Kelly A.; Hollow, Charles M.; Zeng, Ping-Yao; Fraser, Nigel W.; Berger, Shelley L.

    2006-01-01

    Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes facial, ocular, and encephalitic disease in humans. Previous work showed that the genome of HSV-1 is associated with acetylated and methylated histones during lytic infection. However, the physiological role of histone modifications in lytic infection of HSV-1 is unclear. We examined the role of protein methylation in lytic infection of HSV-1 using a protein methylation inhibitor, 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). We found that MTA strongly reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1. Moreover, MTA treatment decreases the level of trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3) on the HSV-1 genome. These results suggest that protein methylation, and in particular, histone methylation, is involved in the lytic infection of HSV-1. To delineate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and Set7/9, in the lytic infection of HSV-1. Using small interference RNA, we found that the reduction of Set1, but not Set7/9, reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1 and specifically decreases H3K4me3 on the virus genome. These results indicate that H3K4me3 mediated by Set1 is required for optimal gene expression and replication of HSV-1 during lytic infection and suggest that this pathway could be a potential point of pharmacological intervention during HSV-1 infection. PMID:16731913

  3. Effect of acute exercise-induced fatigue on maximal rate of heart rate increase during submaximal cycling.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Rebecca L; Rogers, Daniel K; Howe, Peter R C; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Different mathematical models were used to evaluate if the maximal rate of heart rate (HR) increase (rHRI) was related to reductions in exercise performance resulting from acute fatigue. Fourteen triathletes completed testing before and after a 2-h run. rHRI was assessed during 5 min of 100-W cycling and a sigmoidal (rHRIsig) and exponential (rHRIexp) model were applied. Exercise performance was assessed using a 5-min cycling time-trial. The run elicited reductions in time-trial performance (1.34 ± 0.19 to 1.25 ± 0.18 kJ · kg(-1), P < 0.001), rHRIsig (2.25 ± 1.0 to 1.14 ± 0.7 beats · min(-1) · s(-1), P < 0.001) and rHRIexp (3.79 ± 2.07 to 1.98 ± 1.05 beats · min(-1) · s(-1), P = 0.001), and increased pre-exercise HR (73.0 ± 8.4 to 90.5 ± 11.4 beats · min(-1), P < 0.001). Pre-post run difference in time-trial performance was related to difference in rHRIsig (r = 0.58, P = 0.04 and r = 0.75, P = 0.003) but not rHRIexp (r = -0.04, P = 0.9 and r = 0.27, P = 0.4) when controlling for differences in pre-exercise and steady-state HR. rHRIsig was reduced following acute exercise-induced fatigue, and correlated with difference in performance.

  4. Radiological and histopathological examination of apparent lytic lesions in allograft long bones—No cause for concern

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Mike; Brooker, Greg; Fisher, Ryan; Goh, Geraldine; Aguiar, Ranieri Falcao; Papadimitriou, John; Wong, Daniel; Carey-Smith, Richard; Cowie, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identify the nature of apparent lytic lesions within human allograft specimens from patients with no known malignancy, using radiological and histopathological analysis Methods 123 Post-retrieval radiographs from 23 donors were examined. Sixty-seven radiographs were noted to show apparent lytic lesions. The number, size, character and position of the apparent lesions were recorded. Results CT scanning of 9 specimens confirmed the lesions to be of air pockets causing artefact. Histopathological analysis showed no malignant or pathological process. Conclusions Apparent lesions were not pathological. Practice implications Specimens with similar appearances, in donors with no malignancy, can be safely used in donation. PMID:27047215

  5. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  6. Phage lysin LysK can be truncated to its CHAP domain and retain lytic activity against live antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Marianne; O'Flynn, Gary; Garry, Jennifer; Cooney, Jakki; Coffey, Aidan; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2009-02-01

    A truncated derivative of the phage endolysin LysK containing only the CHAP (cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase) domain exhibited lytic activity against live clinical staphylococcal isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first known report of a truncated phage lysin which retains high lytic activity against live staphylococcal cells.

  7. The use of lytic bacteriophages to reduce E. coli O157:H7 on fresh cut lettuce introduced through cross-contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 108 PFU/ml or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either 1) spraying on to lettuce piec...

  8. Hydrogen sulfide - cysteine cycle system enhances cadmium tolerance through alleviating cadmium-induced oxidative stress and ion toxicity in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Dou, Yanhua; Liu, Dan; Si, Wantong; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shaolin; Xi, Jiejun; Li, Jisheng

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a common toxic heavy metal ion. We investigated the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and cysteine (Cys) in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The expression of H2S synthetic genes LCD and DES1 were induced by Cd2+ within 3 h, and endogenous H2S was then rapidly released. H2S promoted the expression of Cys synthesis-related genes SAT1 and OASA1, which led to endogenous Cys accumulation. The H2S and Cys cycle system was stimulated by Cd2+ stress, and it maintained high levels in plant cells. H2S inhibited the ROS burst by inducing alternative respiration capacity (AP) and antioxidase activity. H2S weakened Cd2+ toxicity by inducing the metallothionein (MTs) genes expression. Cys promoted GSH accumulation and inhibited the ROS burst, and GSH induced the expression of phytochelatin (PCs) genes, counteracting Cd2+ toxicity. In summary, the H2S and Cys cycle system played a key role in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The Cd2+ tolerance was weakened when the cycle system was blocked in lcddes1-1 and oasa1 mutants. This paper is the first to describe the role of the H2S and Cys cycle system in Cd2+ stress and to explore the relevant and specificity mechanisms of H2S and Cys in mediating Cd2+ stress. PMID:28004782

  9. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  10. Murein Lytic Enzyme TgaA of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 Modulates Dendritic Cell Maturation through Its Cysteine- and Histidine-Dependent Amidohydrolase/Peptidase (CHAP) Amidase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Ivan; Balzaretti, Silvia; Miriani, Matteo; Taverniti, Valentina; De Noni, Ivano; Presti, Ilaria; Stuknyte, Milda; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Granucci, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that have evolved close interaction with their host and especially with the host's immune system. The molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions, however, are largely unidentified. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory potential of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75, a bacterium of human intestinal origin commercially used as a probiotic. Particularly, we focused our attention on TgaA, a protein expressed on the outer surface of MIMBb75's cells and homologous to other known bacterial immunoactive proteins. TgaA is a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP). We ran immunological experiments stimulating dendritic cells (DCs) with the B. bifidum MIMBb75 and TgaA, with the result that both the bacterium and the protein activated DCs and triggered interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. In addition, we observed that the heterologous expression of TgaA in Bifidobacterium longum transferred to the bacterium the ability to induce IL-2. Subsequently, immunological experiments performed using two purified recombinant proteins corresponding to the single domains LT and CHAP demonstrated that the CHAP domain is the immune-reactive region of TgaA. Finally, we also showed that TgaA-dependent activation of DCs requires the protein CD14, marginally involves TRIF, and is independent of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MyD88. In conclusion, our study suggests that the bacterial CHAP domain is a novel microbe-associated molecular pattern actively participating in the cross talk mechanisms between bifidobacteria and the host's immune system. PMID:24814791

  11. Murein lytic enzyme TgaA of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 modulates dendritic cell maturation through its cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) amidase domain.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Zanoni, Ivan; Balzaretti, Silvia; Miriani, Matteo; Taverniti, Valentina; De Noni, Ivano; Presti, Ilaria; Stuknyte, Milda; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Granucci, Francesca

    2014-09-01

    Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that have evolved close interaction with their host and especially with the host's immune system. The molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions, however, are largely unidentified. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory potential of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75, a bacterium of human intestinal origin commercially used as a probiotic. Particularly, we focused our attention on TgaA, a protein expressed on the outer surface of MIMBb75's cells and homologous to other known bacterial immunoactive proteins. TgaA is a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP). We ran immunological experiments stimulating dendritic cells (DCs) with the B. bifidum MIMBb75 and TgaA, with the result that both the bacterium and the protein activated DCs and triggered interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. In addition, we observed that the heterologous expression of TgaA in Bifidobacterium longum transferred to the bacterium the ability to induce IL-2. Subsequently, immunological experiments performed using two purified recombinant proteins corresponding to the single domains LT and CHAP demonstrated that the CHAP domain is the immune-reactive region of TgaA. Finally, we also showed that TgaA-dependent activation of DCs requires the protein CD14, marginally involves TRIF, and is independent of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MyD88. In conclusion, our study suggests that the bacterial CHAP domain is a novel microbe-associated molecular pattern actively participating in the cross talk mechanisms between bifidobacteria and the host's immune system.

  12. Three-dimensional investigation of cycling-induced microstructural changes in lithium-ion battery cathodes using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanshuo; Foster, Jamie M.; Gully, Adam; Krachkovskiy, Sergey; Jiang, Meng; Wu, Yan; Yang, Xingyi; Protas, Bartosz; Goward, Gillian R.; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2016-02-01

    For vehicle electrification, one of the biggest issues for lithium ion batteries is cycle life. Within this context, the mechanisms at the source of capacity degradation during cycling are not yet to be fully understood. In this work, we use state-of-the-art FIB-SEM serial sectioning and imaging techniques to determine the effect of cycling on lithium-ion battery cathodes. The three-dimensional (3D) microstructural study was performed on both pristine and cycled LiNixMnyCo1-x-yO2 (NMC) and Li(Li0.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13)O2 (HE-NMC) cathodes. The spatial distribution of active material, carbon-doped binder and pore spaces were successfully reconstructed by appropriate image processing. Comparisons of NMC and HE-NMC cathodes after different number of cycles showed only minor increases in the number of smaller active particles, possibly negligible, considering the intrinsic microstructure variation within the cathodes. However, the connectivity between carbon-doped binder additives and active particles in NMC and HE-NMC cathodes, assessed using a "neighbor counting" method, showed an appreciable decrease after cycling which indicates a detachment of carbon-doped binder from active particles. This significant cycling-induced detachment effect between the two phases (e.g., ∼22% for HE-NMC) could indicate a loss in electrical connectivity, which may partially explain the capacity fade in the cells.

  13. Radiofrequency radiation (900 MHz)-induced DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in testicular germ cells in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Neelam; Giri, Sarbani; Das, Samrat; Upadhaya, Puja

    2016-10-13

    Even though there are contradictory reports regarding the cellular and molecular changes induced by mobile phone emitted radiofrequency radiation (RFR), the possibility of any biological effect cannot be ruled out. In view of a widespread and extensive use of mobile phones, this study evaluates alterations in male germ cell transformation kinetics following RFR exposure and after recovery. Swiss albino mice were exposed to RFR (900 MHz) for 4 h and 8 h duration per day for 35 days. One group of animals was terminated after the exposure period, while others were kept for an additional 35 days post-exposure. RFR exposure caused depolarization of mitochondrial membranes resulting in destabiliz