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Sample records for m7 non-electric blasting

  1. The effects of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): Does blast mTBI history matter?

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Elbin, R J; Kotwal, Russ S; Lutz, Robert H; Kane, Shawn; Benson, Peter J; Forsten, Robert D; Collins, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    The effects of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have received significant attention since the beginning of the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Surprisingly, little is known about the temporal nature of neurocognitive impairment, mTBI, and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms following combat-related mTBI. It is also unclear as to the role that blast exposure history has on mTBI and PTS impairments and symptoms. The purposes of this study were to examine prospectively the effects of mTBI on neurocognitive performance as well as mTBI and PTS symptoms among US Army Special Operations Command personnel and to study the influence of history of blast mTBI on these effects. Eighty US Army Special Operations Command personnel with (n = 19) and without (n = 61) a history of blast-related mTBI completed the military version of the Immediate Post-concussion Assessment Cognitive Test (ImPACT), Post Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS), and the PTSD Checklist (PCL) at baseline as well as 1 day to 7 days and 8 days to 20 days following a combat-related mTBI. Results indicated that verbal memory (p = 0.002) and processing speed (p = 0.003) scores were significantly lower and mTBI symptoms (p = 0.001) were significantly higher at 1 day to 7 days after injury compared with both baseline and 8 days to 20 days after injury. PTS remained stable across the three periods. Participants with a history of blast mTBI demonstrated lower verbal memory at 1 day to 7 days after mTBI compared with participants without a history of blast mTBI (p = 0.02). Decreases in neurocognitive performance and increased mTBI symptoms are evident in the first 1 day to 7 days following combat-related mTBI, and a history of blast-related mTBI may influence these effects. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level II.

  2. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dangerous. Blasting cap leg wires shall be kept short-circuited (shunted) until they are connected into the..., in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. (f) Connecting wires and lead wires shall be... manufacturer of the electric blasting caps used. (o) The number of electric blasting caps connected to a...

  3. 7 CFR 3201.78 - Blast media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blast media. 3201.78 Section 3201.78 Agriculture... Items § 3201.78 Blast media. (a) Definition. Abrasive particles sprayed forcefully to clean, remove... qualifying biobased blast media. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.78 - Blast media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blast media. 3201.78 Section 3201.78 Agriculture... Items § 3201.78 Blast media. (a) Definition. Abrasive particles sprayed forcefully to clean, remove... qualifying biobased blast media. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  5. 7. LOOKING EAST AT HOIST HOUSE No. 1 AND BLAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LOOKING EAST AT HOIST HOUSE No. 1 AND BLAST FURNACE No. 1, WITH ORE YARD AND ORE BRIDGES IN FOREGROUND. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  6. Blast-wave density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzel, D. V.

    Applications of a densitometer to obtain time-resolved data on the total density in blast-wave flows are described. A beta-source (promethium-147) is separated by a gap from a scintillator and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Attenuation of the radiation beam by the passing blast wave is due to the total density in the gap volume during the wave passage. Signal conditioning and filtering methods permit the system to output linearized data. Results are provided from use of the system to monitor blast waves emitted by detonation of a 10.7 m diameter fiberglass sphere containing 609 tons of ammonium nitrate/fuel oil at a 50.6 m height. Blast wave density data are provided for peak overpressure levels of 245, 172 and 70 kPa and distances of 183, 201 and 314 m from ground zero. Data resolution was of high enough quality to encourage efforts to discriminate dust and gasdynamic phenomena within passing blast waves.

  7. Blast Concussion mTBI, Hypopituitarism, and Psychological Health in OIF/OEF Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    theAmericanCongress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM) as a head trauma resulting in any one of the fol- lowing: loss of consciousness ( LOC ) for 30min or less...participants had a history of blast exposure, head injury with LOC greater than 30min; penetrating head wound; seizure disorder; insulin- dependent...of blast exposures accompanied by acute symptoms of TBI and/or LOC in Iraq and/or Afghanistan and lifetime history of non-blast exposure head injuries

  8. Concussive brain injury from explosive blast

    PubMed Central

    de Lanerolle, Nihal C; Hamid, Hamada; Kulas, Joseph; Pan, Jullie W; Czlapinski, Rebecca; Rinaldi, Anthony; Ling, Geoffrey; Bandak, Faris A; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2014-01-01

    Objective Explosive blast mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with a variety of symptoms including memory impairment and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Explosive shock waves can cause hippocampal injury in a large animal model. We recently reported a method for detecting brain injury in soldiers with explosive blast mTBI using magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). This method is applied in the study of veterans exposed to blast. Methods The hippocampus of 25 veterans with explosive blast mTBI, 20 controls, and 12 subjects with PTSD but without exposure to explosive blast were studied using MRSI at 7 Tesla. Psychiatric and cognitive assessments were administered to characterize the neuropsychiatric deficits and compare with findings from MRSI. Results Significant reductions in the ratio of N-acetyl aspartate to choline (NAA/Ch) and N-acetyl aspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr) (P < 0.05) were found in the anterior portions of the hippocampus with explosive blast mTBI in comparison to control subjects and were more pronounced in the right hippocampus, which was 15% smaller in volume (P < 0.05). Decreased NAA/Ch and NAA/Cr were not influenced by comorbidities – PTSD, depression, or anxiety. Subjects with PTSD without blast had lesser injury, which tended to be in the posterior hippocampus. Explosive blast mTBI subjects had a reduction in visual memory compared to PTSD without blast. Interpretation The region of the hippocampus injured differentiates explosive blast mTBI from PTSD. MRSI is quite sensitive in detecting and localizing regions of neuronal injury from explosive blast associated with memory impairment. PMID:25493283

  9. On the propagation of decaying planar shock and blast waves through non-uniform channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peace, J. T.; Lu, F. K.

    2018-05-01

    The propagation of planar decaying shock and blast waves in non-uniform channels is investigated with the use of a two-equation approximation of the generalized CCW theory. The effects of flow non-uniformity for the cases of an arbitrary strength decaying shock and blast wave in the strong shock limit are considered. Unlike the original CCW theory, the two-equation approximation takes into account the effects of initial temporal flow gradients in the flow properties behind the shock as the shock encounters an area change. A generalized order-of-magnitude analysis is carried out to analyze under which conditions the classical area-Mach (A-M) relation and two-equation approximation are valid given a time constant of decay for the flow properties behind the shock. It is shown that the two-equation approximation extends the applicability of the CCW theory to problems where flow non-uniformity behind the shock is orders of magnitude above that for appropriate use of the A-M relation. The behavior of the two-equation solution is presented for converging and diverging channels and compared against the A-M relation. It is shown that the second-order approximation and A-M relation have good agreement for converging geometries, such that the influence of flow non-uniformity behind the shock is negligible compared to the effects of changing area. Alternatively, the two-equation approximation is shown to be strongly dependent on the initial magnitude of flow non-uniformity in diverging geometries. Further, in diverging geometries, the inclusion of flow non-uniformity yields shock solutions that tend toward an acoustic wave faster than that predicted by the A-M relation.

  10. Optimization of air-blast drying process for manufacturing Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeast as industrial wine starters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae-Byuk; Choi, Won-Seok; Jo, Hyun-Jung; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Park, Heui-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Wine yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D8) and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum S6 and Issatchenkia orientalis KMBL5774) were studied using air-blast drying instead of the conventional drying methods (such as freeze and spray drying). Skim milk-a widely used protective agent-was used and in all strains, the highest viabilities following air-blast drying were obtained using 10% skim milk. Four excipients (wheat flour, nuruk, artichoke powder, and lactomil) were evaluated as protective agents for yeast strains during air-blast drying. Our results showed that 7 g lactomil was the best excipient in terms of drying time, powder form, and the survival rate of the yeast in the final product. Finally, 7 types of sugars were investigated to improve the survival rate of air-blast dried yeast cells: 10% trehalose, 10% sucrose, and 10% glucose had the highest survival rate of 97.54, 92.59, and 79.49% for S. cerevisiae D8, H. uvarum S6, and I. orientalis KMBL5774, respectively. After 3 months of storage, S. cerevisiae D8 and H. uvarum S6 demonstrated good survival rates (making them suitable for use as starters), whereas the survival rate of I. orientalis KMBL5774 decreased considerably compared to the other strains. Air-blast dried S. cerevisiae D8 and H. uvarum S6 showed metabolic activities similar to those of non-dried yeast cells, regardless of the storage period. Air-blast dried I. orientalis KMBL5774 showed a noticeable decrease in its ability to decompose malic acid after 3 months of storage at 4 °C.

  11. Myeloperoxidase mRNA detection for lineage determination of leukemic blasts: retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Crisan, D; Anstett, M J

    1995-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) mRNA is an early myeloid marker; its detection in the morphologically and immunophenotypically primitive blasts of acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL) establishes myeloid lineage and allows reclassification as acute myelogenous leukemia with minimal differentiation (AML-MO). We have previously reported a procedure for MPO mRNA detection by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) and an adaptation for use of routine hematology smears. This variant procedure allows retrospective analysis of mRNA and is used in the present study to evaluate the lineage of leukemic blasts in seven cases with morphology and cytochemistry consistent with AUL. All hematology smears used in this study were air-dried, unstained or Wright-stained and stored at room temperature for periods varying between 3 days and 2 years. MPO mRNA was detected in six cases, establishing the myeloid lineage of the blasts and the diagnosis of AML-MO. In the remaining case, the blasts were MPO mRNA negative, confirming the diagnosis of AUL. The RT-PCR procedure for retrospective mRNA analysis is useful in the clinical setting, due to its high specificity and sensitivity, speed (less than 24 h), safety (no radioactivity) and convenient use of routine hematology smears; it is particularly attractive in clinical situations when fresh or frozen specimens are no longer available at the time when the need for molecular diagnostics becomes apparent.

  12. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact between...

  13. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact between...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact between...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact between...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact between...

  17. Blast waves and how they interact with structures.

    PubMed

    Cullis, I G

    2001-02-01

    The paper defines and describes blast waves, their interaction with a structure and its subsequent response. Explosions generate blast waves, which need not be due to explosives. A blast wave consists of two parts: a shock wave and a blast wind. The paper explains how shock waves are formed and their basic properties. The physics of blast waves is non-linear and therefore non-intuitive. To understand how an explosion generates a blast wave a numerical modelling computer code, called a hydrocode has to be employed. This is briefly explained and the cAst Eulerian hydrocode is used to illustrate the formation and propagation of the blast wave generated by a 1 kg sphere of TNT explosive detonated 1 m above the ground. The paper concludes with a discussion of the response of a structure to a blast wave and shows that this response is governed by the structures natural frequency of vibration compared to the duration of the blast wave. The basic concepts introduced are illustrated in a second simulation that introduces two structures into the blast field of the TNT charge.

  18. M-CARS and EFISHG study of the influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, E.; Louot, C.; Ould-Moussa, N.; Lefort, C.; Kaneyasu, J. F.; Kano, H.; Pagnoux, D.; Couderc, V.; Leproux, P.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule has been studied by means of multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS). A parallel measurement of electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) has also been led. Both techniques suggest a reorientation of the molecule due to the presence of an electric field. This phenomenon can be used to increase the chemical selectivity and the signal to non-resonant background ratio, namely, the sensitivity of the M-CARS spectroscopy.

  19. 7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 7. INTERIOR, STEEL BLAST DOORS, INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR, STEEL BLAST DOORS, INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-4, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. White matter abnormalities are associated with overall cognitive status in blast-related mTBI.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle R; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-08-01

    Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common injury of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. Research has suggested that blast-related mTBI is associated with chronic white matter abnormalities, which in turn are associated with impairment in neurocognitive function. However, findings are inconsistent as to which domains of cognition are affected by TBI-related white matter disruption. Recent evidence that white matter abnormalities associated with blast-related mTBI are spatially variable raises the possibility that the associated cognitive impairment is also heterogeneous. Thus, the goals of this study were to examine (1) whether mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are associated with overall cognitive status and (2) whether white matter abnormalities provide a mechanism by which mTBI influences cognition. Ninety-six Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OEF) veterans were assigned to one of three groups: no-TBI, mTBI without loss of consciousness (LOC) (mTBI-LOC), and mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC). Participants were given a battery of neuropsychological tests that were selected for their sensitivity to mTBI. Results showed that number of white matter abnormalities was associated with the odds of having clinically significant cognitive impairment. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC was indirectly associated with cognitive impairment through its effect on white matter integrity. These results suggest that cognitive difficulties in blast-related mTBI can be linked to injury-induced neural changes when taking into account the variability of injury as well as the heterogeneity in cognitive deficits across individuals.

  2. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not include the following articles: (a) Electric squibs. (b) No. 6 and No. 8 blasting caps, including electric...

  3. MRSI of the Medial Temporal Lobe at 7T in Explosive Blast Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington, HP; Hamid, H; Kulas, J; Ling, G; Bandak, F; de Lanerolle, NC; Pan, JW

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Up to 19% of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with 70% associated with blast exposure. Tragically, 20–50% of this group reports persistent symptoms, including memory loss. Unfortunately, routine clinical imaging is typically normal, making diagnosis and clinical management difficult. The goal of this work was to develop methods to acquire hippocampal MRSI at 7T and evaluate their sensitivity to detect injury in veterans with mTBI. Methods At 7T, hippocampal MRSI measurements are limited by: 1) poor B0 homogeneity; 2) insufficient B1+ strength and homogeneity; and 3) chemical shift dispersion artifacts. To overcome these limitations we: 1) used 3rd degree B0 shimming; 2) an inductively decoupled transceiver array with RF shimming and 3) a volume localized single slice sequence using RF shimming based outer volume suppression. Results In 20 controls and 25 veterans with mTBI due to blast exposure with memory impairment, hippocampal NAA/Cho (P<0.001) and NAA/Cr (P<0.001) were decreased in comparison to control subjects. Conclusion With the appropriate methods robust spectroscopic imaging of the hippocampus can be carried out at 7T. MRSI at 7T can detect hippocampal injury in veterans with mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:23918077

  4. 30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and... shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected...

  5. 30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and... shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected...

  6. 30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and... shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and... shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected...

  8. New possibilities to analyse non-standard explosives and post blast residues in forensic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2005-05-01

    Nonstandard and home-made explosives always pose a considerable threat for security forces in terms of their practically unlimited variability, both in composition and in construction of explosive devises. Electron microscopy - SEM with EDS/WDS is one of the key techniques for an analysis of non-standard explosives and post-blast residues. If the amount of materials allows it, a number of other analytical techniques are utilized, such as XRD that is capable of a direct phase identification of a crystalline substance, namely in mixtures. TLC has constantly proved itself useful for laboratory screening. Furthermore, combinations of FTIR, Raman spectrometry, LC MS, GC MS, XRF, micro XRF and other ones are applied. In the case of identification of post-blast residues, where an investigation is often conducted at the level of separate microscopic particles, the role of SEM is unsubstitutable, whereas the analysis of the organic phase from these often sporadic microparticles has been infeasible until recently. One of the very interesting options appears to be Raman spectrometry technique, which is nowadays obtainable as a supplement to SEM EDX. Newly available is the device that is fully confocal, SEM keeps full functionality and scan range, very high resolution (for green laser resolution 360nm FWHM; 430nm Rayleigh), it is fitted with high quality objective lens, enhances mapping through Raman spectrometry in a volume 250μm x 250μm x 250μm by piezo driven scanner (capacitive feedback linearized) and obtaining a high quality white light image (250μm x 250μm) immediately in the SEM chamber. This technique is currently undergoing intensive testing and it seems that the method could significantly help to address issues with the analysis of organic phases in electron microscopy not only in the case of post-blast residues and explosives.

  9. 30 CFR 7.62 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.62 Definitions. The following definitions apply in this subpart: Blasting circuit. A circuit that includes one or more electric...

  10. 30 CFR 7.62 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.62 Definitions. The following definitions apply in this subpart: Blasting circuit. A circuit that includes one or more electric...

  11. 30 CFR 7.62 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.62 Definitions. The following definitions apply in this subpart: Blasting circuit. A circuit that includes one or more electric...

  12. 30 CFR 7.62 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.62 Definitions. The following definitions apply in this subpart: Blasting circuit. A circuit that includes one or more electric...

  13. 30 CFR 7.62 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.62 Definitions. The following definitions apply in this subpart: Blasting circuit. A circuit that includes one or more electric...

  14. Distinguishing the Unique Neuropathological Profile of Blast Polytrauma

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Shaylen; Eck, Joseph; Lavik, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury sustained after blast exposure (blast-induced TBI) has recently been documented as a growing issue for military personnel. Incidence of injury to organs such as the lungs has decreased, though current epidemiology still causes a great public health burden. In addition, unprotected civilians sustain primary blast lung injury (PBLI) at alarming rates. Often, mild-to-moderate cases of PBLI are survivable with medical intervention, which creates a growing population of survivors of blast-induced polytrauma (BPT) with symptoms from blast-induced mild TBI (mTBI). Currently, there is a lack of preclinical models simulating BPT, which is crucial to identifying unique injury mechanisms of BPT and its management. To meet this need, our group characterized a rodent model of BPT and compared results to a blast-induced mTBI model. Open field (OF) performance trials were performed on rodents at 7 days after injury. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate cellular outcome at day seven following BPT. Levels of reactive astrocytes (GFAP), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3 expression), and vascular damage (SMI-71) were significantly elevated in BPT compared to blast-induced mTBI. Downstream markers of hypoxia (HIF-1α and VEGF) were higher only after BPT. This study highlights the need for unique therapeutics and prehospital management when handling BPT. PMID:28424745

  15. Characterization of Sintering Dust, Blast Furnace Dust and Carbon Steel Electric Arc Furnace Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng; Wu, Shengli; Zhang, Fengjie; Lu, Hua; Du, Kaiping

    In order to make a complete understanding of steel plant metallurgical dusts and to realize the goal of zero-waste, a study of their properties was undertaken. For these purposes, samples of two sintering dusts (SD), two blast furnace dusts (BFD), and one electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) taken from the regular production process were subjected to a series of tests. The tests were carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The dominant elements having an advantage of reuse are Fe, K, Cl, Zn, C. The dominant mineralogical phases identified in sintering dust are KCl, Fe2O3, CaCO3, CaMg(CO3)2, NaCl, SiO2. Mineralogical phases exist in blast furnace dust are Fe2O3, Fe3O4, with small amount of KCl and kaolinite coexist. While in electric arc furnace dust, Fe3O4, ZnFe2O4, CaCO3, CaO, Ca(OH)2 are detected.

  16. Modelling the blast environment and relating this to clinical injury: experience from the 7/7 inquest.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Alan E; Pope, D J; Bishop, M; Kirkman, E; Sedman, A; Russell, R; Mahoney, P F; Clasper, J

    2014-06-01

    This paper addresses the computational modelling of a series of specific blast-related incidents and the relationships of clinical and engineering interpretations. The Royal Centre for Defence Medicine and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory were tasked in 2010 by the UK Ministry of Defence to assist the Coroner's inquests into the 7 July 2005 London bombings. A three phase approach was taken. The first phase included an engineering expert in blast effects on structures reviewing photographs of the damaged carriages and bus to give a view on the likely physical effects on people close to the explosions. The second phase was a clinical review of the evidence by military clinicians to assess blast injury in the casualties. The third phase was to model the blast environment by structural dynamics experts to assess likely blast loading on victims to evaluate the potential blast loading on individuals. This loading information was then assessed by physiology experts. Once all teams (engineering, clinical and modelling/physiological) had separately arrived at their conclusions, the information streams were integrated to arrive at a consensus. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used as a potential model for others to consider if faced with a similar investigation, and to show the benefit of the transition of military knowledge to a civilian environment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. PTSD-Related Behavioral Traits in a Rat Model of Blast-Induced mTBI Are Reversed by the mGluR2/3 Receptor Antagonist BCI-838.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Georgina; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Perez, Gissel M; Otero-Pagan, Alena; Tschiffely, Anna; McCarron, Richard M; Ahlers, Stephen T; Elder, Gregory A; Gandy, Sam

    2018-01-01

    Battlefield blast exposure related to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has become the most common cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mental health problems are common after TBI. A striking feature in the most recent veterans has been the frequency with which mild TBI (mTBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have appeared together, in contrast to the classical situations in which the presence of mTBI has excluded the diagnosis of PTSD. However, treatment of PTSD-related symptoms that follow blast injury has become a significant problem. BCI-838 (MGS0210) is a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) antagonist prodrug, and its active metabolite BCI-632 (MGS0039) has proneurogenic, procognitive, and antidepressant activities in animal models. In humans, BCI-838 is currently in clinical trials for refractory depression and suicidality. The aim of the current study was to determine whether BCI-838 could modify the anxiety response and reverse PTSD-related behaviors in rats exposed to a series of low-level blast exposures designed to mimic a human mTBI or subclinical blast exposure. BCI-838 treatment reversed PTSD-related behavioral traits improving anxiety and fear-related behaviors as well as long-term recognition memory. Treatment with BCI-838 also increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of blast-exposed rats. The safety profile of BCI-838 together with the therapeutic activities reported here, make BCI-838 a promising drug for the treatment of former battlefield Warfighters suffering from PTSD-related symptoms following blast-induced mTBI.

  18. PTSD-Related Behavioral Traits in a Rat Model of Blast-Induced mTBI Are Reversed by the mGluR2/3 Receptor Antagonist BCI-838

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garcia, Georgina; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; Perez, Gissel M.; Otero-Pagan, Alena; Tschiffely, Anna; McCarron, Richard M.; Ahlers, Stephen T.

    2018-01-01

    Battlefield blast exposure related to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has become the most common cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mental health problems are common after TBI. A striking feature in the most recent veterans has been the frequency with which mild TBI (mTBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have appeared together, in contrast to the classical situations in which the presence of mTBI has excluded the diagnosis of PTSD. However, treatment of PTSD-related symptoms that follow blast injury has become a significant problem. BCI-838 (MGS0210) is a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) antagonist prodrug, and its active metabolite BCI-632 (MGS0039) has proneurogenic, procognitive, and antidepressant activities in animal models. In humans, BCI-838 is currently in clinical trials for refractory depression and suicidality. The aim of the current study was to determine whether BCI-838 could modify the anxiety response and reverse PTSD-related behaviors in rats exposed to a series of low-level blast exposures designed to mimic a human mTBI or subclinical blast exposure. BCI-838 treatment reversed PTSD-related behavioral traits improving anxiety and fear-related behaviors as well as long-term recognition memory. Treatment with BCI-838 also increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of blast-exposed rats. The safety profile of BCI-838 together with the therapeutic activities reported here, make BCI-838 a promising drug for the treatment of former battlefield Warfighters suffering from PTSD-related symptoms following blast-induced mTBI. PMID:29387781

  19. Survey of seismic conditions of drilling and blasting operations near overhead electricity power lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, G. I.; Afanasev, P. I.; Bulbasheva, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    The monitoring and survey results of drilling and blasting operations are specified during the development of Afanasyevsky deposit of cement raw materials for a 110 kV electricity power lines structure. Seismic explosion waves and air shock waves were registered in the course of monitoring. The dependency of peak particle velocities on the scaled distance and explosive weight by the delay time was obtained.

  20. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...” position at all times, except when firing. It shall be so designed that the firing lines to the cap circuit... blasting machine shall not be in excess of its rated capacity. Furthermore, in primary blasting, a series..., shall use only blasting galvanometers or other instruments that are specifically designed for this...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...” position at all times, except when firing. It shall be so designed that the firing lines to the cap circuit... blasting machine shall not be in excess of its rated capacity. Furthermore, in primary blasting, a series..., shall use only blasting galvanometers or other instruments that are specifically designed for this...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...” position at all times, except when firing. It shall be so designed that the firing lines to the cap circuit... blasting machine shall not be in excess of its rated capacity. Furthermore, in primary blasting, a series..., shall use only blasting galvanometers or other instruments that are specifically designed for this...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...” position at all times, except when firing. It shall be so designed that the firing lines to the cap circuit... blasting machine shall not be in excess of its rated capacity. Furthermore, in primary blasting, a series..., shall use only blasting galvanometers or other instruments that are specifically designed for this...

  4. 7. COPY OF 1947 PHOTOGRAPH LABELED 'VIEW OF BLAST FURNACES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COPY OF 1947 PHOTOGRAPH LABELED 'VIEW OF BLAST FURNACES AND ORE DOCKS AT CORRIGAN MCKINNEY WORKS.' BROWNHOIST ORE BRIDGE, REECTED C. 1912 IS AT RIGHT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH. PHOTO COURTESY CLEVELAND PICTURE, COLLECTION, PUBLIC LIBRARY. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made by...) Each wire connection in a blasting circuit shall be— (1) Properly spliced; and (2) Separated from other connections in the circuit to prevent accidental contact and arcing. (h) Uninsulated connections in each...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made by...) Each wire connection in a blasting circuit shall be— (1) Properly spliced; and (2) Separated from other connections in the circuit to prevent accidental contact and arcing. (h) Uninsulated connections in each...

  7. Ultrastructural brain abnormalities and associated behavioral changes in mice after low-intensity blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Song, Hailong; Konan, Landry M; Cui, Jiankun; Johnson, Catherine E; Langenderfer, Martin; Grant, DeAna; Ndam, Tina; Simonyi, Agnes; White, Tommi; Demirci, Utkan; Mott, David R; Schwer, Doug; Hubler, Graham K; Cernak, Ibolja; DePalma, Ralph G; Gu, Zezong

    2018-07-16

    Explosive blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), a "signature wound" of recent military conflicts, commonly affects service members. While past blast injury studies have provided insights into TBI with moderate- to high-intensity explosions, the impact of primary low-intensity blast (LIB)-mediated pathobiology on neurological deficits requires further investigation. Our prior considerations of blast physics predicted ultrastructural injuries at nanoscale levels. Here, we provide quantitative data using a primary LIB injury murine model exposed to open field detonation of 350 g of high-energy explosive C4. We quantified ultrastructural and behavioral changes up to 30 days post blast injury (DPI). The use of an open-field experimental blast generated a primary blast wave with a peak overpressure of 6.76 PSI (46.6 kPa) at a 3-m distance from the center of the explosion, a positive phase duration of approximate 3.0 milliseconds (ms), a maximal impulse of 8.7 PSI × ms and a sharp rising time of 9 × 10 -3  ms, with no apparent impact/acceleration in exposed animals. Neuropathologically, myelinated axonal damage was observed in blast-exposed groups at 7 DPI. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed and quantified myelin sheath defects and mitochondrial abnormalities at 7 and 30 DPI. Inverse correlations between blast intensities and neurobehavioral outcomes including motor activities, anxiety levels, nesting behavior, spatial learning and memory occurred. These observations uncover unique ultrastructural brain abnormalities and associated behavioral changes due to primary blast injury and provide key insights into its pathogenesis and potential treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inv(7)(q22q36) in refactory anemia with excess blasts

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Rayburn, J.; Stegeman, D.; Berger, C.

    1994-09-01

    Morphological review of bone marrow from an 89 year-old male revealed an immature cell population with increased blasts (25% CD34 positive). However, the morphology was not sufficiently clear to discriminate lymphoid from myeloid precursors. Immunophenotypically, there was evidence for both lymphoid and myeloid derivation with dual expression of CD5 and CD20, aberrant expression of CD19 versus CD20, and an increased CD13 population. Twenty percent (20%) of the cells were TdT positive. Cytogenetically, an inversion of chromosome 7, inv(7)(q22q36), was observed in 9 of 20 cells. This abnormality has been reported only once previously, in association with refractory anemia with excessmore » blasts (RAEB). The patient, to date, has not developed an acute leukemic process, but remains in a myelodysplastic state, defined as RAEB.« less

  9. Optimal Blast Condition for the Inner Surface of Mass Produced NAS Battery Cylindrical Aluminum Cell Containers as Pretreatment of Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takashi; Harada, Yoshio

    The relationship between roughness caused by blasting and adhesion of spray coatings on aluminum container substrates was studied through various experiments as part of measures for improving the adhesion of the 75mass%Cr-Fe alloy plasma spray coating for sulfi dation corrosion resistance, which is applied on the inner surface of cylindrical Al containers of high-temperature type NAS batteries. Surface roughness of μmRa2.8 - 7.3 was acquired by using Al2O3 particle size #100 (212 - 75μm) to #46 (600 - 250μm) grit. In order to achieve uniform roughness and a clean surface, a combination of blasting when the nozzle was being inserted from the top of the container, and air blowing when the nozzle was being removed was done. It was determined that when Al2O3 particles of size #100 grit was used, a good anchoring shape was formed throughout with a roughened surface of μmRa 2.8. When the internal surface of 3000 Al cylindrical containers were continually blasted using particle size #100 grit, the initial surface roughness of μmRa3.7 - 3.9 only deteriorated to about μmRa2.6. A 75mass%Cr-Fe alloy spray coating was applied to the Al cylindrical containers that were roughened using particle size #100 grit. This coating showed cracks by a bending test, but no peeling occurred. This coating was examined by a tensile strength test and showed good adhesion at 64 - 66 MPa. Through experiments, it was proven that spray coatings formed on the Al cylindrical containers after receiving optimal blasting with particle size #100 grit had good adhesion and corrosion resistance after being used for NAS batteries that stored electrical power for about nine years.

  10. Effects of Low-Level Blast Exposure on the Nervous System: Is There Really a Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Gregory A.; Stone, James R.; Ahlers, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    High-pressure blast waves can cause extensive CNS injury in human beings. However, in combat settings, such as Iraq and Afghanistan, lower level exposures associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or subclinical exposure have been much more common. Yet controversy exists concerning what traits can be attributed to low-level blast, in large part due to the difficulty of distinguishing blast-related mTBI from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We describe how TBI is defined in human beings and the problems posed in using current definitions to recognize blast-related mTBI. We next consider the problem of applying definitions of human mTBI to animal models, in particular that TBI severity in human beings is defined in relation to alteration of consciousness at the time of injury, which typically cannot be assessed in animals. However, based on outcome assessments, a condition of “low-level” blast exposure can be defined in animals that likely approximates human mTBI or subclinical exposure. We review blast injury modeling in animals noting that inconsistencies in experimental approach have contributed to uncertainty over the effects of low-level blast. Yet, animal studies show that low-level blast pressure waves are transmitted to the brain. In brain, low-level blast exposures cause behavioral, biochemical, pathological, and physiological effects on the nervous system including the induction of PTSD-related behavioral traits in the absence of a psychological stressor. We review the relationship of blast exposure to chronic neurodegenerative diseases noting the paradoxical lowering of Abeta by blast, which along with other observations suggest that blast-related TBI is pathophysiologically distinct from non-blast TBI. Human neuroimaging studies show that blast-related mTBI is associated with a variety of chronic effects that are unlikely to be explained by co-morbid PTSD. We conclude that abundant evidence supports low-level blast as having long

  11. Cloth ballistic vest alters response to blast.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Y Y; Mundie, T G; Yelverton, J T; Richmond, D R

    1988-01-01

    Ballistic wounds have been and will remain the principal cause of casualties in combat. Cloth ballistic vests (CBV) play an important role in limiting critical wounds from fragments and small-arms fire. There is an increased risk of primary blast injury on the modern battlefield. In a previous study, volunteers were exposed to short-duration blast waves of low peak pressure (18.6 +/- 0.8 kPa). Pressure measurements made in the distal esophagus as an estimate of intrathoracic pressure (ITP) were significantly higher (p less than 0.05) when the standard U.S. Army ballistic jacket was worn (8.7 +/- 1.2 kPa) than when fatigues alone were worn (7.4 +/- 0.7 kPa). In this study 58 sheep were exposed to nominal blast levels of 115, 230, 295, and 420 kPa peak pressure in groups of 12, 18, 16, and 12, respectively. Half of each group was fitted with a CBV. Lung weight index (LWI), lung weight expressed as a percentage of body weight, was used as a measure of blast injury. Use of the CBV was associated with a significant increase in LWI (p less than 0.05) which averaged 21% for the two middle exposure groups. At the 420 kPa level, two of six non-CBV animals died as opposed to five of six animals wearing the CBV. Intrathoracic pressure was generally higher in the CBV group. Likely mechanisms of injury enhancement include an increase in target surface area and an alteration of the effective loading function on the thorax. This information may be useful in the triage and treatment of casualties exposed to intense blast environments.

  12. A Mouse Model of Blast-Induced mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Ten-Bosch, Meital; Zohar, Ofer; Harrison, Catherine R.; Tempel-Brami, Catherine; Stein, Elliot; Hoffer, Barry J.; Balaban, Carey D.; Schreiber, Shaul; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Pick, Chaim G.

    2011-01-01

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are one of the main causes for casualties among civilians and military personnel in the present war against terror. Mild traumatic brain injury from IEDs induces various degrees of cognitive, emotional and behavioral disturbances but knowledge of the exact brain pathophysiology following exposure to blast is poorly understood. The study was aimed at establishing a murine model for a mild BI-TBI that isolates low-level blast pressure effects to the brain without systemic injuries. An open-field explosives detonation was used to replicate, as closely as possible, low-level blast trauma in the battlefield or at a terror-attack site. No alterations in basic neurological assessment or brain gross pathology were found acutely in the blast-exposed mice. At 7 days post blast, cognitive and behavioral tests revealed significantly decreased performance at both 4 and 7 meters distance from the blast (5.5 and 2.5 PSI, respectively). At 30 days post-blast, clear differences were found in animals at both distances in the object recognition test, and in the 7 m group in the Y maze test. Using MRI, T1 weighted images showed an increased BBB permeability one month post-blast. DTI analysis showed an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) and a decrease in radial diffusivity. These changes correlated with sites of up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase 2 in neurons and CXC-motif chemokine receptor 3 around blood vessels in fiber tracts. These results may represent brain axonal and myelin abnormalities. Cellular and biochemical studies are underway in order to further correlate the blast-induced cognitive and behavioral changes and to identify possible underlying mechanisms that may help develop treatment- and neuroprotective modalities. PMID:21946269

  13. [Confined blasting in microexplosion cystolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Uchida, M

    1989-03-01

    This paper is the 12th report in a series of studies on the application of microexplosion to medicine and biology. Microexplosion lithotripsy is a newly developed technique in our clinic to crush urinary stones with small quantities of explosives. A systematic research project has been performed since the first report of microexplosion lithotripsy in 1977. As a result, microexplosion was successfully applied to the destruction of bladder stones in 130 cases from 1981 to 1988. In blasting to crush rocks in industrial works, two kinds of blasting are available: external charge blasting and confined blasting. The detonation power of the latter is 10 to 50 times larger than that of the former. A detruction test using several kinds of spherical form model calculus and lead azide explosive was performed. The formula to calculate the suitable explosive dose was determined experimentally as shown below. (formula; see text) Thus the theory in general industrial blasting with massive explosives was proved to be effective also in microexplosion with small explosives. An original electric drill system was developed to make a hole in stones for confined blasting. 60 cases, including 2 cases of giant bladder stones over 100 g in weight, were successfully treated by confined blasting using this system without any complication. We consider that any bladder stones, however big or however many, can be treated by microexplosion lithotripsy with confined blasting.

  14. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  15. Exposure to crystalline silica in abrasive blasting operations where silica and non-silica abrasives are used.

    PubMed

    Radnoff, Diane L; Kutz, Michelle K

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to respirable crystalline silica is a hazard common to many industries in Alberta but particularly so in abrasive blasting. Alberta occupational health and safety legislation requires the consideration of silica substitutes when conducting abrasive blasting, where reasonably practicable. In this study, exposure to crystalline silica during abrasive blasting was evaluated when both silica and non-silica products were used. The crystalline silica content of non-silica abrasives was also measured. The facilities evaluated were preparing metal products for the application of coatings, so the substrate should not have had a significant contribution to worker exposure to crystalline silica. The occupational sampling results indicate that two-thirds of the workers assessed were potentially over-exposed to respirable crystalline silica. About one-third of the measurements over the exposure limit were at the work sites using silica substitutes at the time of the assessment. The use of the silica substitute, by itself, did not appear to have a large effect on the mean airborne exposure levels. There are a number of factors that may contribute to over-exposures, including the isolation of the blasting area, housekeeping, and inappropriate use of respiratory protective equipment. However, the non-silica abrasives themselves also contain silica. Bulk analysis results for non-silica abrasives commercially available in Alberta indicate that many contain crystalline silica above the legislated disclosure limit of 0.1% weight of silica per weight of product (w/w) and this information may not be accurately disclosed on the material safety data sheet for the product. The employer may still have to evaluate the potential for exposure to crystalline silica at their work site, even when silica substitutes are used. Limited tests on recycled non-silica abrasive indicated that the silica content had increased. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of product recycling

  16. Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Seaman, John

    2013-01-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittal’s Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel;more » however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.« less

  17. Effect of Human and Sheep Lung Orientation on Primary Blast Injury Induced by Single Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    may be injured by m ore than one of these mechanisms in any given event. Primary blast in juries ( PBI ) are exclusively caused by the blast...overpressure. A PBI usually affects air-containing organs such as t he lung, ears and gastrointestinal tract. Secon dary blast injuries are caused by...orientation on blast injuries predicted in human and sheep models. From th is study, it is predicted that the greatest reduction in lung PBI may be

  18. Experimental investigation of blast mitigation and particle-blast interaction during the explosive dispersal of particles and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontalier, Q.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-05-01

    The attenuation of a blast wave from a high-explosive charge surrounded by a layer of inert material is investigated experimentally in a spherical geometry for a wide range of materials. The blast wave pressure is inferred from extracting the blast wave velocity with high-speed video as well as direct measurements with pressure transducers. The mitigant consists of either a packed bed of particles, a particle bed saturated with water, or a homogeneous liquid. The reduction in peak blast wave overpressure is primarily dependent on the mitigant to explosive mass ratio, M/ C, with the mitigant material properties playing a secondary role. Relative peak pressure mitigation reduces with distance and for low values of M/ C (< 10) can return to unmitigated pressure levels in the mid-to-far field. Solid particles are more effective at mitigating the blast overpressure than liquids, particularly in the near field and at low values of M/ C, suggesting that the energy dissipation during compaction, deformation, and fracture of the powders plays an important role. The difference in scaled arrival time of the blast and material fronts increases with M/ C and scaled distance, with solid particles giving the largest separation between the blast wave and cloud of particles. Surrounding a high-explosive charge with a layer of particles reduces the positive-phase blast impulse, whereas a liquid layer has no influence on the impulse in the far field. Taking the total impulse due to the blast wave and material impact into account implies that the damage to a nearby structure may actually be augmented for a range of distances. These results should be taken into consideration in the design of explosive mitigant systems.

  19. Experimental investigation of blast mitigation and particle-blast interaction during the explosive dispersal of particles and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontalier, Q.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    The attenuation of a blast wave from a high-explosive charge surrounded by a layer of inert material is investigated experimentally in a spherical geometry for a wide range of materials. The blast wave pressure is inferred from extracting the blast wave velocity with high-speed video as well as direct measurements with pressure transducers. The mitigant consists of either a packed bed of particles, a particle bed saturated with water, or a homogeneous liquid. The reduction in peak blast wave overpressure is primarily dependent on the mitigant to explosive mass ratio, M/C, with the mitigant material properties playing a secondary role. Relative peak pressure mitigation reduces with distance and for low values of M/C (< 10) can return to unmitigated pressure levels in the mid-to-far field. Solid particles are more effective at mitigating the blast overpressure than liquids, particularly in the near field and at low values of M/C, suggesting that the energy dissipation during compaction, deformation, and fracture of the powders plays an important role. The difference in scaled arrival time of the blast and material fronts increases with M/C and scaled distance, with solid particles giving the largest separation between the blast wave and cloud of particles. Surrounding a high-explosive charge with a layer of particles reduces the positive-phase blast impulse, whereas a liquid layer has no influence on the impulse in the far field. Taking the total impulse due to the blast wave and material impact into account implies that the damage to a nearby structure may actually be augmented for a range of distances. These results should be taken into consideration in the design of explosive mitigant systems.

  20. Linking blast physics to biological outcomes in mild traumatic brain injury: Narrative review and preliminary report of an open-field blast model.

    PubMed

    Song, Hailong; Cui, Jiankun; Simonyi, Agnes; Johnson, Catherine E; Hubler, Graham K; DePalma, Ralph G; Gu, Zezong

    2018-03-15

    Blast exposures are associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and blast-induced TBIs are common injuries affecting military personnel. Department of Defense and Veterans Administration (DoD/VA) reports for TBI indicated that the vast majority (82.3%) has been mild TBI (mTBI)/concussion. mTBI and associated posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been called "the invisible injury" of the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. These injuries induce varying degrees of neuropathological alterations and, in some cases, chronic cognitive, behavioral and neurological disorders. Appropriate animal models of blast-induced TBI will not only assist the understanding of physical characteristics of the blast, but also help to address the potential mechanisms. This report provides a brief overview of physical principles of blast, injury mechanisms related to blast exposure, current blast animal models, and the neurological behavioral and neuropathological findings related to blast injury in experimental settings. We describe relationships between blast peak pressures and the observed injuries. We also report preliminary use of a highly reproducible and intensity-graded blast murine model carried out in open-field with explosives, and describe physical and pathological findings in this experimental model. Our results indicate close relationships between blast intensities and neuropathology and behavioral deficits, particularly at low level blast intensities relevant to mTBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kobeissy, Firas; Mondello, Stefania; Tümer, Nihal; Toklu, Hale Z.; Whidden, Melissa A.; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Zhang, Zhiqun; Prima, Victor; Yassin, Walid; Anagli, John; Chandra, Namas; Svetlov, Stan; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI). A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal, and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction, and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the “distinct” but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved. PMID:24312074

  2. Assessing neuro-systemic & behavioral components in the pathophysiology of blast-related brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kobeissy, Firas; Mondello, Stefania; Tümer, Nihal; Toklu, Hale Z; Whidden, Melissa A; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Zhang, Zhiqun; Prima, Victor; Yassin, Walid; Anagli, John; Chandra, Namas; Svetlov, Stan; Wang, Kevin K W

    2013-11-21

    Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI). A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal, and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction, and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the "distinct" but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved.

  3. Blast-Wave Generation and Propagation in Rapidly Heated Laser-Irradiated Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, S. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Solodov, A. A.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy was used to study the creation and propagation of a >100-Mbar blast wave in a target irradiated by an intense (>1018W<m:mfenced close="" open="/"><m:mphantom>:mpadded width="0pt">Wcm2m:mpadded>:mfenced> cm2) laser pulse. Blast waves provide a platform to generate immense pressures in the laboratory. A temporal double flash of XUV radiation was observed when viewing the rear side of the target, which is attributed to the emergence of a blast wave following rapid heating by a fast-electron beam generated from the laser pulse. The time-history of XUV emission in the photon energy range of 50 to 200 eV was recorded with an x-ray streak camera with 7-ps temporal resolution. The heating and expansion of the target was simulated with an electron transport code coupled to 1-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The temporal delay between the two flashes measured in a systematic study of target thickness and composition was found to evolve in good agreement with a Sedov-Taylor blast-wave solution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and Department of Energy Office of Science Award Number DE-SC-0012317.

  4. Electrical conductivity modeling in fractal non-saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Cai, J.; Hu, X.; Han, Q.

    2016-12-01

    The variety of electrical conductivity in non-saturated conditions is important to study electric conduction in natural sedimentary rocks. The electrical conductivity in completely saturated porous media is a porosity-function representing the complex connected behavior of single conducting phases (pore fluid). For partially saturated conditions, the electrical conductivity becomes even more complicated since the connectedness of pore. Archie's second law is an empirical electrical conductivity-porosity and -saturation model that has been used to predict the formation factor of non-saturated porous rock. However, the physical interpretation of its parameters, e.g., the cementation exponent m and the saturation exponent n, remains questionable. On basis of our previous work, we combine the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model to build an electrical conductivity model in non-saturated porous media. Our theoretical porosity- and saturation-dependent models contain endmember properties, such as fluid electrical conductivities, pore fractal dimension and tortuosity fractal dimension (representing the complex degree of electrical flowing path). We find the presented model with non-saturation-dependent electrical conductivity datasets indicate excellent match between theory and experiments. This means the value of pore fractal dimension and tortuosity fractal dimension change from medium to medium and depends not only on geometrical properties of pore structure but also characteristics of electrical current flowing in the non-saturated porous media.

  5. An Experimental Study on the Fabrication of Glass-based Acceleration Sensor Body Using Micro Powder Blasting Method

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Sam; Yun, Dae-Jin; Cho, Myeong-Woo; Shin, Bong-Cheol

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of the micro powder blasting technique for the micro fabrication of sensor structures using the Pyrex glass to replace the existing silicon-based acceleration sensor fabrication processes. As the preliminary experiments, the effects of the blasting pressure, the mass flow rate of abrasive and the number of nozzle scanning times on erosion depth of the Pyrex and the soda lime glasses were examined. From the experimental results, optimal blasting conditions were selected for the Pyrex glass machining. The dimensions of the designed glass sensor was 1.7×1.7×0.6mm for the vibrating mass, and 2.9×0.7×0.2mm for the cantilever beam. The machining results showed that the dimensional errors of the machined glass sensor ranged from 3 μm in minimum to 20 μm in maximum. These results imply that the micro powder blasting method can be applied for the micromachining of glass-based acceleration sensors to replace the exiting method.

  6. Blast Wave Experiments at Z

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    radiation flows upward, it passes though a 1.7-mm high, tapered, 25-μm thick gold wall cone that is filled 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel (SiO2). Above...this cone is a 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel filled, 1-mm high, 2.4-mm inner diameter, 25-μm thick gold wall cylinder. On the cylinder rests a 4-mm...diameter gold platform that supports a higher density (40-60 mg/cm3) silica aerogel . This aerogel is the region where the blast wave forms after

  7. 29 CFR 1926.904 - Storage of explosives and blasting agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., electric blasting caps, detonating primers, and primed cartridges shall not be stored in the same magazine... feet of explosives and detonator storage magazine. (d) No explosives or blasting agents shall be... least two modes of exit have been provided. (e) Permanent underground storage magazines shall be at...

  8. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    DOE PAGES

    Duncan-Miller, Gabrielle Christiane; Stone, William D.

    2017-11-16

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky [1] on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and makingmore » use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. Specifically, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.« less

  9. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Duncan-Miller, Gabrielle Christiane; Stone, William D.

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky [1] on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and makingmore » use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. Specifically, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.« less

  10. Perspectives on Creating Clinically Relevant Blast Models for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Lisa A.; Bahraini, Nazanin; Hernández, Theresa D.

    2012-01-01

    Military personnel are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and reporting non-specific physical (somatic), behavioral, psychological, and cognitive symptoms. Many of these symptoms are frequently associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and/or post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite significant attention and advances in assessment and intervention for these two conditions, challenges persist. To address this, clinically relevant blast models are essential in the full characterization of this type of injury, as well as in the testing and identification of potential treatment strategies. In this publication, existing diagnostic challenges and current treatment practices for mTBI and/or PTSD will be summarized, along with suggestions regarding how what has been learned from existing models of PTSD and traditional mechanism (e.g., non-blast) traumatic brain injury can be used to facilitate the development of clinically relevant blast models. PMID:22408635

  11. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan-Miller, G. C.; Stone, W. D.

    2018-07-01

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in the shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky (Astrophys J 398:184-189. https://doi.org/10.1086/171847 , 1992) on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and making use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. In particular, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.

  12. Electrical DNA biosensor using aluminium interdigitated electrode for E.Coli O157:H7 detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natasha, N. Z.; Rajapaksha, R. D. A. A.; Uda, M. N. A.; Hashim, U.

    2017-09-01

    Escherichia Coli (E.Coli) O157:H7 is the one of the most dangerous foodborne pathogens based diseases that presence in our daily life that causes illness and death increase every year. Aluminum Interdigitated Electrode (Al IDE) biosensor was introduced to detect E.Coli O157:H7 in earlier stage. In this paper we investigated ssDNA of E.Coli O157:H7 bacteria detection through electrical behavior of Al IDE sensor. The physical properties of Al IDE biosensor has been characterized using Low Power Microscope (LPM), High Power Microscope (HPM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D Nano Profiler. The bare Al IDE was electrical characterized by using I-V measurement. The surface modification was accomplished by salinization using APTES and immobilization using Carboxylic Probe E.Coli which was the first step in preparing Al IDE biosensor. Geared up prepared biosensor was hybridized with complementary, non-complementary and single based mismatch ssDNA to confirmed specificity detection of E Coli O157:H7 ssDNA target. The Current - Voltage was performed for each step such as bare Al IDE, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization. Sensitivity measurement was accomplished using different concentration of complementary ssDNA target from 1 fM - 10 µM. Selectivity measurements was achieved using same concentration which was 10 µM concentration for complement, non-complement and mismatch E.Coli O157:H7 ssDNA target. It's totally proved that the Al IDE able to detect specific and small current down to Femtomolar concentration.

  13. Low Level Primary Blast Injury in Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela B. L.; Kan, Enci Mary; Salim, Agus; Li, Zhaohui; Ng, Kian Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M.; Ling, Eng-Ang; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure (BOP) exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histopathology of the brains showed that cortical neurons were “darkened” and shrunken with narrowed vasculature in the cerebral cortex day 1 after blast with signs of recovery at day 4 and day 7 after blast. TUNEL-positive cells were predominant in the white matter of the brain at day 1 after blast and double-labeling of brain tissue showed that these DNA-damaged cells were both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but were mainly not apoptotic due to the low caspase-3 immunopositivity. There was also an increase in amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive cells in the white matter which suggests acute axonal damage. In contrast, Iba-1 staining for macrophages or microglia was not different from control post-blast. Blast exposure altered the expression of over 5786 genes in the brain which occurred mostly at day 1 and day 4 post-blast. These genes were narrowed down to 10 overlapping genes after time-course evaluation and functional analyses. These genes pointed toward signs of repair at day 4 and day 7 post-blast. Our findings suggest that the BOP levels in the study resulted in mild cellular injury to the brain as evidenced by acute neuronal, cerebrovascular, and white matter perturbations that showed signs of resolution. It is unclear whether these perturbations exist at a milder level or normalize completely and will need more investigation. Specific changes in gene expression may be further evaluated to understand the mechanism of blast-induced neurotrauma. PMID

  14. Development of a rat model for studying blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingmin; Gu, Jianwen; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Tao; Kuang, Yongqin; Li, Bingcang; Kang, Jianyi

    2010-07-15

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been the predominant cause of neurotrauma in current military conflicts, and it is also emerging as a potential threat in civilian terrorism. The etiology of TBI, however, is poorly understood. Further study on the mechanisms and treatment of blast injury is urgently needed. We developed a unique rat model to simulate blast effects that commonly occur on the battlefield. An electric detonator with the equivalent of 400 mg TNT was developed as the explosive source. The detonator's peak overpressure and impulse of explosion shock determined the explosion intensity in a distance-dependent manner. Ninety-six male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: 5-cm, 7.5-cm, 10-cm, and control groups. The rat was fixed in a specially designed cabin with an adjustable aperture showing the frontal, parietal, and occipital parts of the head exposed to explosion; the eyes, ears, mouth, and nose were protected by the cabin. After each explosion, we assessed the physiologic, neuropathologic, and neurobehavioral consequences of blast injury. Changes of brain tissue water content and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) expression were detected. The results in the 7.5-cm group show that 87% rats developed apnea, limb seizure, poor appetite, and limpness. Diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and edema could be seen within the brain parenchyma, which showed a loss of integrity. Capillary damage and enlarged intercellular and vascular space in the cortex, along with a tattered nerve fiber were observed. These findings demonstrate that we have provided a reliable and reproducible blast-induced TBI model in rats. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of childhood myelodysplastic syndrome, AML FAB M6 or M7, CCG 2891: report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Dorothy R; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Lange, Beverly; Woods, William G

    2007-07-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute erythroleukemia (FAB M6), and acute megakaryocytic leukemia (FAB M7) have overlapping features. Children without Down syndrome or acute promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed with primary myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M6 or M7 were compared to children with de novo AML M0-M5. All children were entered on the Children's Cancer Group therapeutic research study CCG 2891. The presentation and outcomes of the 132 children diagnosed with MDS (60 children), AML FAB M6 (19 children), or AML FAB M7 (53 children) were similar. Children with AML FAB M7 were diagnosed at a significantly younger age (P = 0.001). Children with MDS, M6, or M7 had significantly lower white blood cell (WBC) counts (P = 0.001), lower peripheral blast counts (P < 0.001), and an increased frequency of -7/7q- (P = 0.003) at presentation. All three groups had significantly inferior overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001) and event free survival (P < 0.001) compared with the 748 children diagnosed with AML FAB M0-M5 when assessed from entry on study. This poor survival was largely attributable to induction death and failure. However, when assessed from successful completion of induction therapy, the 5-year OS (P = 0.090)(49.1 vs. 56.9%) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.113)(38.0 vs. 46.3%) therapy were not significantly different from other children with AML. Childhood AML FAB M6 and AML M7 resemble MDS in presentation, poor induction success rates, and outcomes.

  16. Bomb blast injuries: an exploration of patient characteristics and outcome using Pakistan National Emergency Departments Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Bomb blast injuries result in premature deaths and burdening of healthcare systems. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics and outcome of patients presenting to the emergency departments in Pakistan with bomb blast injuries. Methods Active surveillance was conducted in seven major emergency departments of Pakistan from November 2010-March 2011. All the sites are tertiary care urban centers. All the patients who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) following a bomb blast injury as per self-report or the ambulance personnel were included in the study. Frequency of demographics, injury pattern, and outcomes were calculated. Results A total of 103 patients with bomb blast injuries presented to the selected emergency departments. The median age of patients was 30 years. Around three-fourth of the patients were males (n = 74, 74.7%). Most of the bomb blast patients were seen in Peshawar (n = 41, 39.8%) and Karachi city (n = 31, 30.1%) and the most common mode of arrival was non-ambulance transport (n = 71, 76.3%). Upper limb injuries (n = 12, 40%) were common in the under 18 age group and lower limb injuries (n = 31, 39.2%) in the 18 years and above group. There were a total of 8 (7.7%) deaths reported out of these 103 patients. Conclusion Bomb blast injuries in Pakistan generally affect young males. Non-ambulance transport is the most common way to access emergency departments (ED). Overall ED mortality is high and capturing data during a disaster in an emergency department is challenging. PMID:26692453

  17. Bomb blast injuries: an exploration of patient characteristics and outcome using Pakistan National Emergency Departments Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) data.

    PubMed

    Khan, Irum; Khan, Nadeem; Naeem, Rubaba; Kerai, Salima; Allen, Kate; Zia, Nukhba; Shahbaz, Sana; Afridi, Shiraz; Siddiqui, Emaduddin; Khan, Uzma; Hyder, Adnan A; Razzak, Junaid A

    2015-01-01

    Bomb blast injuries result in premature deaths and burdening of healthcare systems. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics and outcome of patients presenting to the emergency departments in Pakistan with bomb blast injuries. Active surveillance was conducted in seven major emergency departments of Pakistan from November 2010-March 2011. All the sites are tertiary care urban centers. All the patients who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) following a bomb blast injury as per self-report or the ambulance personnel were included in the study. Frequency of demographics, injury pattern, and outcomes were calculated. A total of 103 patients with bomb blast injuries presented to the selected emergency departments. The median age of patients was 30 years. Around three-fourth of the patients were males (n = 74, 74.7%). Most of the bomb blast patients were seen in Peshawar (n = 41, 39.8%) and Karachi city (n = 31, 30.1%) and the most common mode of arrival was non-ambulance transport (n = 71, 76.3%). Upper limb injuries (n = 12, 40%) were common in the under 18 age group and lower limb injuries (n = 31, 39.2%) in the 18 years and above group. There were a total of 8 (7.7%) deaths reported out of these 103 patients. Bomb blast injuries in Pakistan generally affect young males. Non-ambulance transport is the most common way to access emergency departments (ED). Overall ED mortality is high and capturing data during a disaster in an emergency department is challenging.

  18. Color changing photonic crystals detect blast exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Xu, Yongan; Reneer, Dexter V.; Browne, Kevin D.; Geddes, James W.; Yang, Shu; Smith, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the “signature wound” of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, with no objective information of relative blast exposure, warfighters with bTBI may not receive appropriate medical care and are at risk of being returned to the battlefield. Accordingly, we have created a colorimetric blast injury dosimeter (BID) that exploits material failure of photonic crystals to detect blast exposure. Appearing like a colored sticker, the BID is fabricated in photosensitive polymers via multi-beam interference lithography. Although very stable in the presence of heat, cold or physical impact, sculpted micro- and nano-structures of the BID are physically altered in a precise manner by blast exposure, resulting in color changes that correspond with blast intensity. This approach offers a lightweight, power-free sensor that can be readily interpreted by the naked eye. Importantly, with future refinement this technology may be deployed to identify soldiers exposed to blast at levels suggested to be supra-threshold for non-impact blast-induced mild TBI. PMID:21040795

  19. 30 CFR 7.64 - Technical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... voltage that can be applied across an electric contact that discharges a capacitor shall not be greater...) Capacitor discharge. The blasting unit shall include an automatic means to dissipate any electric charge remaining in any capacitor after the blasting unit is deenergized and not in use. (j) Construction. Blasting...

  20. 30 CFR 7.64 - Technical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... voltage that can be applied across an electric contact that discharges a capacitor shall not be greater...) Capacitor discharge. The blasting unit shall include an automatic means to dissipate any electric charge remaining in any capacitor after the blasting unit is deenergized and not in use. (j) Construction. Blasting...

  1. 30 CFR 7.64 - Technical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... voltage that can be applied across an electric contact that discharges a capacitor shall not be greater...) Capacitor discharge. The blasting unit shall include an automatic means to dissipate any electric charge remaining in any capacitor after the blasting unit is deenergized and not in use. (j) Construction. Blasting...

  2. Development and evaluation of near-isogenic lines for major blast resistance gene(s) in Basmati rice.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Apurva; Sharma, Vinay; Ellur, Ranjith K; Shikari, Asif B; Gopala Krishnan, S; Singh, U D; Prakash, G; Sharma, T R; Rathour, Rajeev; Variar, Mukund; Prashanthi, S K; Nagarajan, M; Vinod, K K; Bhowmick, Prolay K; Singh, N K; Prabhu, K V; Singh, B D; Singh, Ashok K

    2015-07-01

    A set of NILs carrying major blast resistance genes in a Basmati rice variety has been developed. Also, the efficacy of pyramids over monogenic NILs against rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae has been demonstrated. Productivity and quality of Basmati rice is severely affected by rice blast disease. Major genes and QTLs conferring resistance to blast have been reported only in non-Basmati rice germplasm. Here, we report incorporation of seven blast resistance genes from the donor lines DHMASQ164-2a (Pi54, Pi1, Pita), IRBLz5-CA (Pi2), IRBLb-B (Pib), IRBL5-M (Pi5) and IRBL9-W (Pi9) into the genetic background of an elite Basmati rice variety Pusa Basmati 1 (PB1). A total of 36 near-isogenic lines (NILs) comprising of 14 monogenic, 16 two-gene pyramids and six three-gene pyramids were developed through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). Foreground, recombinant and background selection was used to identify the plants with target gene(s), minimize the linkage drag and increase the recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery (93.5-98.6 %), respectively, in the NILs. Comparative analysis performed using 50,051 SNPs and 500 SSR markers revealed that the SNPs provided better insight into the RPG recovery. Most of the monogenic NILs showed comparable performance in yield and quality, concomitantly, Pusa1637-18-7-6-20 (Pi9), was significantly superior in yield and stable across four different environments as compared to recurrent parent (RP) PB1. Further, among the pyramids, Pusa1930-12-6 (Pi2+Pi5) showed significantly higher yield and Pusa1633-7-8-53-6-8 (Pi54+Pi1+Pita) was superior in cooking quality as compared to RP PB1. The NILs carrying gene Pi9 were found to be the most effective against the concoction of virulent races predominant in the hotspot locations for blast disease. Conversely, when analyzed under artificial inoculation, three-gene pyramids expressed enhanced resistance as compared to the two-gene and monogenic NILs.

  3. Calpains are involved in asexual and sexual development, cell wall integrity and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Ning, Guo-Ao; Huang, Lu-Yao; Zhao, Ya-Hui; Dong, Bo; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are ubiquitous and well-conserved proteins that belong to the calcium-dependent, non-lysosomal cysteine protease family. In this study, 8 putative calpains were identified using Pfam domain analysis and BlastP searches in M. oryzae. Three single gene deletion mutants (ΔMocapn7, ΔMocapn9 and ΔMocapn14) and two double gene deletion mutants (ΔMocapn4ΔMocapn7 and ΔMocapn9ΔMocapn7) were obtained using the high-throughput gene knockout system. The calpain disruption mutants showed defects in colony characteristics, conidiation, sexual reproduction and cell wall integrity. The mycelia of the ΔMocapn7, ΔMocapn4ΔMocapn7 and ΔMocapn9ΔMocapn7 mutants showed reduced pathogenicity on rice and barley. PMID:27502542

  4. Comparison of Explosives Residues from the Blow-in-Place Detonation of 155-mm High-Explosive Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    were M107 high-explosive deep-cavity 155-mm howitzer projectiles with a supplemental charge and an M739 point- detonating fuze mounted in the nose...M107, HE, w/o fuze IOP03E100-011 14 1390010809447 N340 Fuze, point-detonating, M739 MA-84B007-013 14 1375014151232 ML47 Cap, blasting, non-electric 30... M739 N340 0 21 0 ə Cap, blasting, M11 ML47 ə 27 ə ə Cap, blasting, M13 MN03 0 ə 0 ə Cap, blasting, M14 MN06 0 0 0 ə Cord, detonating M456 0

  5. [An experimental study of blast injury].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents some aspects of the authors' experimental research on blast injury in the past two years. The main results are as follows: (1) A new designed 39 meter-long shock tube for biological test has been built in the laboratory. Its maximal overpressure values are 215 kPa (in open condition) and 505 kPa (in closed condition). It may meet the need for inflicting blast injuries with various degree of severity. (2) A study of the effect of simulating gun muzzle blast wave on sheep indicated that in the single explosion, the threshold overpressure values inflicting the injury of internal organs were: Lung-37.27 kPa, G-I tract-41.0 kPa; the upper respiratory tract-negative until 73 kPa, while in the multiple (20 times) explosions, they were 23.7, 23.7 and 41.4 kPa, respectively. (3) Using TEM, SEM and some other special techniques, such as morphometry, freeze-fracture technique, labelled lanthanum nitrate technique, etc, it was demonstrated that in the lung with blast injury there were significant pathological changes in pulmonary capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium and their intercellular junctions with apparent increase of permeability. (4) It has been shown that parallel superficial stripelike hemorrhage typical for lung blast injury is "Intercostal marking" instead of "Rib marking". (5) A new type of material (foamy nickel) for protection against blast wave is presented. It was proved that the material can effectively weaken or eliminate the effect of blast wave on human body.

  6. Preparation of Ceramic-Bonded Carbon Block for Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiwei; Li, Yawei; Sang, Shaobai; Chen, Xilai; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yuanbing; Li, Shujing

    2014-01-01

    Traditional carbon blocks for blast furnaces are mainly produced with electrically calcined anthracite owing to its good hot metal corrosion resistance. However, this kind of material shows low thermal conductivity and does not meet the demands for cooling of the hearth and the bottom of blast furnaces. In this article, a new kind of a high-performance carbon block has been prepared via ceramic-bonded carbon (CBC) technology in a coke bed at 1673 K (1400 °C) using artificial graphite aggregate, alumina, metallic aluminum, and silicon powders as starting materials. The results showed that artificial graphite aggregates were strongly bonded by the three-dimensional network of ceramic phases in carbon blocks. In this case, the good resistance of the CBC blocks against erosion/corrosion by the hot metal is provided by the ceramic matrix and the high thermal conductivity by the graphite aggregates. The microstructure of this carbon block resembles that of CBC composites with a mean pore size of less than 0.1 μm, and up to 90 pct of the porosity shows a pore size <1 μm. Its thermal conductivity is higher than 30 W · m-1 · K-1 [293 K (20 °C)]. Meanwhile, its hot metal corrosion resistance is better than that of traditional carbon blocks.

  7. Immunophenotype of leukemic blasts with small peroxidase-positive granules detected by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vainchenker, W; Villeval, J L; Tabilio, A; Matamis, H; Karianakis, G; Guichard, J; Henri, A; Vernant, J P; Rochant, H; Breton-Gorius, J

    1988-05-01

    Forty-three cases of undifferentiated leukemias by light microscopy examination were diagnosed as acute myeloblastic leukemias by ultrastructural revelation of peroxidase and were subsequently studied by immunological markers. In 41 of these cases, blasts were labeled by at least one of the antimyeloid MoAbs (My 7, My 9, and 80H5). An antimyeloperoxidase polyclonal antibody was used in 23 cases and was clearly positive in 11 of them, while cytochemistry by light microscopy was negative. These myeloblasts were frequently mixed with a minority of blasts from other lineages especially promegakaryoblasts. It is noteworthy that in 6 cases myeloid and lymphoid markers (E rosette receptor, common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (cALLA), CD 9, CD 19 antigens (anti-B4 MoAb] were detected on a fraction of blast cells, suggesting a bilineage leukemia. However, in double labeling experiments, blasts with myeloperoxidase coexpressed lymphoid and myeloid markers including cALLA and CD 19 antigen. In one case, blasts had a typical non-B, non-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia phenotype (HLA-DR, CD 9, CD 19, cALLA positive) without staining by any of the antimyeloid MoAbs. However, 70% of the blasts were labeled by the antimyeloperoxidase antibody and expressed peroxidase-positive granules at ultrastructural level. In conclusion, most of the AML undiagnosed by optical cytochemistry are identified by antimyeloid antibodies. Some of these cases are also stained by some antilymphoid MoAbs. Use of antibodies against myeloperoxidase may improve the diagnosis of difficult cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  8. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary “arms race” between a crop and its pathogen. PMID:25586962

  9. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-14

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary "arms race" between a crop and its pathogen.

  10. Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cmmore » from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff

  11. Investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul A; Ludwigsen, John S; Ford, Corey C

    2014-01-01

    Many troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained blast-related, closed-head injuries from being within non-lethal distance of detonated explosive devices. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms associated with blast exposure that give rise to traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study attempts to identify the precise conditions of focused stress wave energy within the brain, resulting from blast exposure, which will correlate with a threshold for persistent brain injury. This study developed and validated a set of modelling tools to simulate blast loading to the human head. Using these tools, the blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave motions that lead to focal brain damage were simulated. The simulations predict the deposition of three distinct wave energy components, two of which can be related to injury-inducing mechanisms, namely cavitation and shear. Furthermore, the results suggest that the spatial distributions of these damaging energy components are independent of blast direction. The predictions reported herein will simplify efforts to correlate simulation predictions with clinical measures of TBI and aid in the development of protective headwear.

  12. Investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ludwigsen, John S.; Ford, Corey C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained blast-related, closed-head injuries from being within non-lethal distance of detonated explosive devices. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms associated with blast exposure that give rise to traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study attempts to identify the precise conditions of focused stress wave energy within the brain, resulting from blast exposure, which will correlate with a threshold for persistent brain injury. Methods This study developed and validated a set of modelling tools to simulate blast loading to the human head. Using these tools, the blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave motions that lead to focal brain damage were simulated. Results The simulations predict the deposition of three distinct wave energy components, two of which can be related to injury-inducing mechanisms, namely cavitation and shear. Furthermore, the results suggest that the spatial distributions of these damaging energy components are independent of blast direction. Conclusions The predictions reported herein will simplify efforts to correlate simulation predictions with clinical measures of TBI and aid in the development of protective headwear. PMID:24766453

  13. Blast Concussion mTBI, Hypopituitarism, and Psychological Health in OIF/OEF Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    of consciousness ( LOC ) for 30min or less, alteration of mental state for up to 24 h (being dazed, confused, disoriented, etc.), or loss of memory for...antecubital vein. None of the Veteran or community control participants had a history of blast exposure, head injury with LOC greater than 30min; penetrating...which specific inquiries were made regarding total number of blast exposures accompanied by acute symptoms of TBI and/or LOC in Iraq and/or Afghanistan

  14. The Blast Fungus Decoded: Genomes in Flux.

    PubMed

    Langner, Thorsten; Białas, Aleksandra; Kamoun, Sophien

    2018-04-17

    Plant disease outbreaks caused by fungi are a chronic threat to global food security. A prime case is blast disease, which is caused by the ascomycete fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (syn. Pyricularia oryzae ), which is infamous as the most destructive disease of the staple crop rice. However, despite its Linnaean binomial name, M. oryzae is a multihost pathogen that infects more than 50 species of grasses. A timely study by P. Gladieux and colleagues (mBio 9:e01219-17, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01219-17) reports the most extensive population genomic analysis of the blast fungus thus far. M. oryzae consists of an assemblage of differentiated lineages that tend to be associated with particular host genera. Nonetheless, there is clear evidence of gene flow between lineages consistent with maintaining M. oryzae as a single species. Here, we discuss these findings with an emphasis on the ecologic and genetic mechanisms underpinning gene flow. This work also bears practical implications for diagnostics, surveillance, and management of blast diseases. Copyright © 2018 Langner et al.

  15. MoMip11, a MoRgs7-interacting protein, functions as a scaffolding protein to regulate cAMP signaling and pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Zhang, Xiaofang; Wang, Jingzhen; Yang, Lina; Feng, Wanzhen; Chen, Chen; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2018-05-04

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae has eight regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) and RGS-like proteins (MoRgs1 to MoRgs8) that exhibit both distinct and shared regulatory functions in the growth, differentiation and pathogenicity of the fungus. We found MoRgs7 with a unique RGS-seven transmembrane (7-TM) domain motif is localized to the highly dynamic tubule-vesicular compartments during early appressorium differentiation followed by gradually degradation. To explore whether this involves an active signal perception of MoRgs7, we identified a Gbeta-like/RACK1 protein homolog in M. oryzae MoMip11 that interacts with MoRgs7. Interestingly, MoMip11 selectively interacted with several components of the cAMP regulatory pathway, including Gα MoMagA and the high-affinity phosphodiesterase MoPdeH. We further showed that MoMip11 promotes MoMagA activation and suppresses MoPdeH activity thereby upregulating intracellular cAMP levels. Moreover, MoMip11 is required for the response to multiple stresses, a role also shared by Gbeta-like/RACK1 adaptor proteins. In summary, we revealed a unique mechanism by which MoMip11 links MoRgs7 and G-proteins to reugulate cAMP signaling, stress responses and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. Our studies revealed the multitude of regulatory networks that govern growth, development and pathogenicity in this important causal agent of rice blast. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Controlled Blasting for Deconstruction of a Railway Bridge Near Sahibganj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S. K.; Ghosh, A. K.; Oraon, S.

    2018-06-01

    Some of the Indian Railway bridges require reconstruction for electrification and expansion of railway tracks. Dismantling of bridge within time schedule in densely populated area requires controlled and pre-planned blasting methodology for safe pulling down of the structure and quick removal of blasted debris for fast restoration of tracks and smooth plying of trains. The three arched railway bridge (Bridge No. 61) located between Sahibganj and Karamtola cases one such example where the bridge was dismantled and the track was restored within 4 h of blasting, though the stipulated block period for demolition and restoration of tracks was 6 h. The 25.48 m long three-arched bridge was drilled and blasted with 225 number of blastholes (32 mm diameter) and 100 kg explosive (25 mm diameter). Length of blastholes varied between 0.5 and 1.8 m with blast geometry of 0.3-0.35 m burden and 0.33 m spacing. This paper deals with the conceptual and theoretical model developed for identification of the key locations for drilling and implementation of the same. It also discusses about the precautionary measures and the drilling pattern adopted for quick demolition and speedy restoration of tracks.

  17. Controlled Blasting for Deconstruction of a Railway Bridge Near Sahibganj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S. K.; Ghosh, A. K.; Oraon, S.

    2018-02-01

    Some of the Indian Railway bridges require reconstruction for electrification and expansion of railway tracks. Dismantling of bridge within time schedule in densely populated area requires controlled and pre-planned blasting methodology for safe pulling down of the structure and quick removal of blasted debris for fast restoration of tracks and smooth plying of trains. The three arched railway bridge (Bridge No. 61) located between Sahibganj and Karamtola cases one such example where the bridge was dismantled and the track was restored within 4 h of blasting, though the stipulated block period for demolition and restoration of tracks was 6 h. The 25.48 m long three-arched bridge was drilled and blasted with 225 number of blastholes (32 mm diameter) and 100 kg explosive (25 mm diameter). Length of blastholes varied between 0.5 and 1.8 m with blast geometry of 0.3-0.35 m burden and 0.33 m spacing. This paper deals with the conceptual and theoretical model developed for identification of the key locations for drilling and implementation of the same. It also discusses about the precautionary measures and the drilling pattern adopted for quick demolition and speedy restoration of tracks.

  18. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Arora, H.; Kelly, M.; Worley, A.; Del Linz, P.; Fergusson, A.; Hooper, P. A.; Dear, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene–acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson–Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg−1/3, 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411–413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

  19. Characterization of vertical electric fields 500 m and 30 m from triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, M.; Rachidi, F.; Uman, M. A.; Thottappillil, R.; Rakov, V. A.; Nucci, C. A.

    1995-05-01

    Vertical electric field waveforms of leader-return stroke sequences measured 500 m and 30 m from rocket-triggered lightning are presented. The 500-m data were recorded during the summer of 1986, the 30-m data during the summer of 1991, both at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The 40 leader-return stroke field waveforms at 500 m and the 8 waveforms at 30 m all appear as asymmetrical V-shaped pulses, the bottom of the V being associated with the transition from the leader to the return stroke. Only two waveforms at 30 m were suitable for quantitative analysis. The widths of the V at half of peak value for these are 1.8 and 5.0 μs, while for the 500-m data they are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater, with a median value of 100 μs. Applying a widely used and simple leader model to the measured leader electric fields at 500 m, we infer, for the bottom kilometer or so of the leader channel, leader speeds between 2×106 and 2×107 m/s and leader charges per unit length of 0.02×10-3 to 0.08×10-3 C/m. From the two measured leader electric field changes at 30 m we infer, using the same leader model, for the bottom 100 meters or so of the leader channel, speeds of 3×107 and 1×107 m/s (the corresponding measured waveform half widths are 1.8 μs and 5.0 μs) and charges per unit length of 0.14×10-3 and 0.02×10-3 C/m (the corresponding measured leader field changes are 81 kV/m and 12 kV/m). The corresponding measured return stroke peak currents for the above two cases are 40 kA and 7 kA, respectively. A positive correlation is observed between the magnitude of the leader field change at 500 m and the ensuing return stroke current peak.

  20. Micro-blast waves using detonation transmission tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelraj, I. Obed; Jagadeesh, G.; Kontis, K.

    2013-07-01

    Micro-blast waves emerging from the open end of a detonation transmission tube were experimentally visualized in this study. A commercially available detonation transmission tube was used (Nonel tube, M/s Dyno Nobel, Sweden), which is a small diameter tube coated with a thin layer of explosive mixture (HMX + traces of Al) on its inner side. The typical explosive loading for this tube is of the order of 18 mg/m of tube length. The blast wave was visualized using a high speed digital camera (frame rate 1 MHz) to acquire time-resolved schlieren images of the resulting flow field. The visualization studies were complemented by computational fluid dynamic simulations. An analysis of the schlieren images showed that although the blast wave appears to be spherical, it propagates faster along the tube axis than along a direction perpendicular to the tube axis. Additionally, CFD analysis revealed the presence of a barrel shock and Mach disc, showing structures that are typical of an underexpanded jet. A theory in use for centered large-scale explosions of intermediate strength (10 < Δ {p}/{p}_0 ≲ 0.02) gave good agreement with the blast trajectory along the tube axis. The energy of these micro-blast waves was found to be 1.25 ± 0.94 J and the average TNT equivalent was found to be 0.3. The repeatability in generating these micro-blast waves using the Nonel tube was very good (± 2 %) and this opens up the possibility of using this device for studying some of the phenomena associated with muzzle blasts in the near future.

  1. Control technology for crystalline silica exposures in construction: wet abrasive blasting.

    PubMed

    Golla, Vijay; Heitbrink, William

    2004-03-01

    This study was designed to document the effect that wet abrasive blasting has on reducing worker exposure to crystalline silica, which has been associated with silicosis and premature death. In this study, worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica was monitored during wet abrasive blasting on the exterior walls of a parking garage to remove surface concrete and expose the underlying aggregate. In this process a wet sand mix comprised of 80% dry sand and 20% water was used. Sampling and analysis revealed that the geometric mean respirable quartz concentration was 0.2 mg/m(3) for workers conducting abrasive blasting and 0.06 mg/m(3) for helpers. When abrasive blasting was conducted in areas that apparently had reduced natural ventilation, dust exposures appeared to increase. When compared with other published data, this case study suggests that wet abrasive blasting causes less exposure to crystalline silica than dry abrasive blasting.

  2. CrocoBLAST: Running BLAST efficiently in the age of next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tristão Ramos, Ravi José; de Azevedo Martins, Allan Cézar; da Silva Delgado, Gabrielle; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Ürményi, Turán Peter; Silva, Rosane; Koca, Jaroslav

    2017-11-15

    CrocoBLAST is a tool for dramatically speeding up BLAST+ execution on any computer. Alignments that would take days or weeks with NCBI BLAST+ can be run overnight with CrocoBLAST. Additionally, CrocoBLAST provides features critical for NGS data analysis, including: results identical to those of BLAST+; compatibility with any BLAST+ version; real-time information regarding calculation progress and remaining run time; access to partial alignment results; queueing, pausing, and resuming BLAST+ calculations without information loss. CrocoBLAST is freely available online, with ample documentation (webchem.ncbr.muni.cz/Platform/App/CrocoBLAST). No installation or user registration is required. CrocoBLAST is implemented in C, while the graphical user interface is implemented in Java. CrocoBLAST is supported under Linux and Windows, and can be run under Mac OS X in a Linux virtual machine. jkoca@ceitec.cz. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Electric-magnetic dualities in non-abelian and non-commutative gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jun-Kai; Ma, Chen-Te

    2016-08-01

    Electric-magnetic dualities are equivalence between strong and weak coupling constants. A standard example is the exchange of electric and magnetic fields in an abelian gauge theory. We show three methods to perform electric-magnetic dualities in the case of the non-commutative U (1) gauge theory. The first method is to use covariant field strengths to be the electric and magnetic fields. We find an invariant form of an equation of motion after performing the electric-magnetic duality. The second method is to use the Seiberg-Witten map to rewrite the non-commutative U (1) gauge theory in terms of abelian field strength. The third method is to use the large Neveu Schwarz-Neveu Schwarz (NS-NS) background limit (non-commutativity parameter only has one degree of freedom) to consider the non-commutative U (1) gauge theory or D3-brane. In this limit, we introduce or dualize a new one-form gauge potential to get a D3-brane in a large Ramond-Ramond (R-R) background via field redefinition. We also use perturbation to study the equivalence between two D3-brane theories. Comparison of these methods in the non-commutative U (1) gauge theory gives different physical implications. The comparison reflects the differences between the non-abelian and non-commutative gauge theories in the electric-magnetic dualities. For a complete study, we also extend our studies to the simplest abelian and non-abelian p-form gauge theories, and a non-commutative theory with the non-abelian structure.

  4. The Pre-Blast Concept for use on Armour Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    to improve blast resistance Repeated blast test results (up to 7 times) of candidate armour materials showed that the greatest deformation...may be used to increase blast resistance of steels. To test this, the ‘pre-blast’ concept test program includes hardening of materials by sheet charge...steels with hardness 450 HV or higher (up to 650 HV). In general, the improvement in deformation resistance is associated with increases in

  5. Rmg8 and Rmg7, wheat genes for resistance to the wheat blast fungus, recognize the same avirulence gene AVR-Rmg8.

    PubMed

    Anh, Vu Lan; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Asuke, Soichiro; Vy, Trinh Thi Phuong; Anh, Nguyen Tuan; Wang, Shizhen; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio

    2018-05-01

    Rmg8 and Rmg7 are genes for resistance to the wheat blast fungus (Pyricularia oryzae), located on chromosome 2B in hexaploid wheat and chromosome 2A in tetraploid wheat, respectively. AVR-Rmg8, an avirulence gene corresponding to Rmg8, was isolated from a wheat blast isolate through a map-based strategy. The cloned fragment encoded a small protein containing a putative signal peptide. AVR-Rmg8 was recognized not only by Rmg8, but also by Rmg7, suggesting that these two resistance genes are equivalent to a single gene from the viewpoint of resistance breeding. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Abrasive blast cleaning method for the renewal of worn-out acceleration tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartha, L.; Koltay, E.; Mórik, Gy.

    1996-04-01

    The degradation of the electrical properties of acceleration tubes emerging with performance time is known to be assigned mainly to impurities and surface breakdown tracks appearing on the inner surface of the insulators. Consequently, a radical treatment for removing the surface layer may result in a renewal of the tube. An abrasive blast cleaning procedure has been used on a set of worn-out acceleration tube units. The cleaned tube exhibited its original electrical characteristics and it has been used for more than 4000 h of operation up to the maximum rated voltage of our 5 MV electrostatic accelerator without any observable degradation. XRF and PIXE analytical measurements performed on used and blast-treated insulators as well as on electrode and pump oil samples reveal the contribution of elementary processes in the acceleration tube to the ageing of the tube and indicate the effectness of the blasting process used for the re-establishment of clean surface conditions.

  7. Otologic blast injuries due to the Kenya embassy bombing.

    PubMed

    Helling, Eric Robert

    2004-11-01

    Otologic injuries are frequently associated with large blasts. On August 7, 1998, a large truck bomb exploded next to the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya. Initial patient findings and care are reviewed. Five months later, an otologic screening and care mission was then sent to comprehensively screen all remaining blast victims on site in Nairobi and to determine degree of persistent injury. Surgical care appropriate for an outpatient environment was provided. Five of 14 tympanic membranes without intervention failed to heal, while 3 of 3 with previous intervention had. Blast injury severity did not correlate to distance from blast epicenter. This may be due to channeling of the blast through the embassy building and an unpredictable pattern of blast overpressure within the building. It is recommended that comprehensive otologic screening be performed after blast events to identify occult injuries and improve outcomes. Early intervention for tympanic membrane perforation (suctioning, eversion of perforations, and paper patch) is recommended.

  8. Assessment of the Effect of Blast Hole Diameter on the Number of Oversize Boulders Using ANN Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhekne, Prakash; Pradhan, Manoj; Jade, Ravi Krishnarao

    2016-04-01

    Now-a-days, blasts are planned using large diameter blast holes. The loading density (kg/m) and subsequently the energy available for the breakage of the rockmass increase with the diameter. The in-hole velocity of detonation (VoD) of non-ideal explosive also boosts up with the increase in diameter till the optimum diameter is reached. The increase in the energy content and in-hole VoD cause a sizable effect on the rock fragmentation. The effect can be assessed by counting the number of oversize boulders. This paper explains as to how the technique of artificial neural network modeling was used to predict the number of oversize boulders resulting from ANFO and SME blasts with blast holes of different diameters. The results from ANFO blasts indicated that there was no significant variation in the number of oversize boulders with the diameter whereas a perceptible variation was noticed in case of SME blasts with the change in the diameter. The change in the number of oversize boulders in ANFO blasts was negligible because mean energy factor remained almost same even when the diameter of the blast holes was altered. The decrease in the number of oversize boulders in SME blasts was on account of increase in mean energy factor when the blast hole diameter was increased. The increase in the in-hole VoD due to increase in the diameter of the hole was not found to have an effect on the generation of oversize boulders as this increase was not substantial both in SME and ANFO blasts.

  9. Lineage determination of CD7+ CD5- CD2- and CD7+ CD5+ CD2- lymphoblasts: studies on phenotype, genotype, and gene expression of myeloperoxidase, CD3 epsilon, and CD3 delta.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, N; Tatsumi, E; Teshigawara, K; Nagata, S; Nagano, T; Kishimoto, Y; Kimura, T; Yasunaga, K; Yamaguchi, N

    1994-04-01

    The gene expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD3 epsilon, and CD3 delta molecules, the gene rearrangement of T-cell receptor (TCR) delta, gamma, and beta and immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain, and the expression of cell-surface antigens were investigated in seven cases of CD7+ CD5- CD2- and four cases of CD7+ CD5+ CD2- acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL/LBL) blasts, which were negative for cytochemical myeloperoxidase (cyMPO). More mature T-lineage blasts were also investigated in a comparative manner. In conclusion, the CD7+ CD5- CD2- blasts included four categories: undifferentiated blasts without lineage commitment, T-lineage blasts, T-/myeloid lineage blasts, and cyMPO-negative myeloblasts. The CD7+ CD5+ CD2- blasts included two categories; T-lineage and T-/myeloid lineage blasts. The 11 cases were of the germ-line gene (G) for TCR beta and IgH. Four cases were G for TCR delta and TCR gamma. The others were of the monoclonally rearranged gene (R) for TCR delta and G for TCR gamma or R for both TCR delta and TCR gamma. The expression or in vitro induction of CD13 and/or CD33 antigens correlated with the immaturity of these neoplastic T cells, since it was observed in all 11 CD7+ CD5- CD2- and CD7+ CD5+ CD2-, and some CD7+ CD5+ CD2+ (CD3- CD4- CD8-) cases, but not in CD3 +/- CD4+ CD8+ or CD3+ CD4+ CD8- cases. CD3 epsilon mRNA, but not CD3 delta mRNA, was detected in two CD7+ CD5- CD2- cases, while mRNA of neither of the two CD3 molecules was detected in the other tested CD7+ CD5- CD2- cases. In contrast, mRNA of both CD3 epsilon and CD3 delta were detected in all CD7+ CD5+ CD2- cases, indicating that CD7+ CD5- CD2- blasts at least belong to T-lineage. The blasts of two CD7+ CD5- CD2- cases with entire germ-line genes and without mRNA of the three molecules (MPO, CD3 epsilon, and CD3 delta) were regarded as being at an undifferentiated stage prior to their commitment to either T- or myeloid-lineage. The co-expression of the genes of MPO

  10. Evidence that (-)-7-hydroxy-4'-dimethylheptyl-cannabidiol activates a non-CB(1), non-CB(2), non-TRPV1 target in the mouse vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G; Thomas, Adèle; Stevenson, Lesley A; Maor, Yehoshua; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2005-06-01

    Previous experiments showed that R-(+)-WIN55212-induced inhibition of electrically-evoked contractions of mouse vasa deferentia could be antagonized by cannabidiol in a manner that appeared to be competitive but not to involve direct competition for established cannabinoid receptors. We have now discovered that (-)-7-hydroxy-4'-dimethylheptyl-cannabidiol (7-OH-DMH-CBD) inhibits electrically-evoked contractions of the vas deferens (EC(50)=13.3 nM). This it appeared to do by acting on prejunctional neurones as 100 nM 7-OH-DMH-CBD did not attenuate contractile responses to phenylephrine or beta,gamma-methylene-ATP. Although 7-OH-DMH-CBD was antagonized by SR141716A, it was less susceptible to antagonism by this CB(1) receptor antagonist than R-(+)-WIN55212. 7-OH-DMH-CBD was also antagonized by cannabidiol (1 microM; apparent K(B)=222.2 nM) but not by the CB(2) receptor antagonist, SR144528 (32 nM), or by naloxone (300 nM), ruthenium red (1 microM) or capsazepine (10 microM). Yohimbine (100 nM) enhanced the ability of 7-OH-DMH-CBD to inhibit electrically-evoked contractions. R-(+)-WIN55212 was also potentiated by 100 nM yohimbine, possibly reflecting ongoing sequestration of G(i/o) proteins from CB(1) receptors by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Our results suggest that 7-OH-DMH-CBD may activate a neuronal target in the vas deferens that is not a CB(1), CB(2), TRPV1, opioid or alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor but do not exclude the possibility that it also activates CB(1) receptors.

  11. Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation: Report 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    involving the inclusion of non-responding box-type structures in a BLS simulated blast environment. The BLS is a highly tunable com- pressed-gas-driven...Blast Load Simulator (BLS) to evaluate its suitability for a future effort involving the inclusion of non-responding box-type structures located in...Recommendations Preliminary testing indicated that inclusion of the grill and diaphragm striker resulted in a decrease in peak pressure of about 12

  12. Effect of Stemming to Burden Ratio and Powder Factor on Blast Induced Rock Fragmentation- A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Sandeep; Choudhary, B. S.; Mishra, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    Rock fragmentation size is very important parameters for economical point of view in any surface mining. Rock fragment size direct effects on the costs of drilling, blasting, loading, secondary blasting and crushing. The main purpose of this study is to investigate effect of blast design parameters such as burden, blast hole length, stemming length, and powder factor on rock fragmentation. The fragment sizes (MFS, K50, m), and maximum fragment size (K95, m) of rock were determined by using the computer software. For every blast, after blasting operation, the images of whole muck pile are captured and there images were used for fragmentation analysis by using the Fragalyst software. It was observed that the optimal fragment size (MFS, K50, m and maximum fragment size, K95, m) of rock depends strongly on the blast design parameters and explosive parameters.

  13. Blasting, graphical interfaces and Unix

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Knudsen, S.; Preece, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    A discrete element computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code) was developed to simulate blast-induced rock motion. To simplify the complex task of entering material and explosive design parameters as well as bench configuration, a full-featured graphical interface has been developed. DMC is currently executed on both Sun SPARCstation 2 and Sun SPARCstation 10 platforms and routinely used to model bench and crater blasting problems. This paper will document the design and development of the full-featured interface to DMC. The development of the interface will be tracked through the various stages, highlighting the adjustments made to allow the necessary parameters tomore » be entered in terms and units that field blasters understand. The paper also discusses a novel way of entering non-integer numbers and the techniques necessary to display blasting parameters in an understandable visual manner. A video presentation will demonstrate the graphics interface and explains its use.« less

  14. Blasting, graphical interfaces and Unix

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Knudsen, S.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    A discrete element computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code) was developed to simulate blast-induced rock motion. To simplify the complex task of entering material and explosive design parameters as well as bench configuration, a full-featured graphical interface has been developed. DMC is currently executed on both Sun SPARCstation 2 and Sun SPARCstation 10 platforms and routinely used to model bench and crater blasting problems. This paper will document the design and development of the full-featured interface to DMC. The development of the interface will be tracked through the various stages, highlighting the adjustments made to allow the necessary parameters tomore » be entered in terms and units that field blasters understand. The paper also discusses a novel way of entering non-integer numbers and the techniques necessary to display blasting parameters in an understandable visual manner. A video presentation will demonstrate the graphics interface and explains its use.« less

  15. Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation Report 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-01

    establish confidence in the results produced by the simulations. This report describes a set of replicate experiments in which a small, non - responding steel...designed to simulate blast waveforms for explosive yields up to 20,000 lb of TNT equivalent at a peak reflected pressure up to 80 psi and a peak...the pressure loading on a non - responding box-type structure at varying obliquities located in the flow of the BLS simulated blast environment for

  16. Synaptic Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Przekwas, Andrzej; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-01-01

    Blast wave-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common injuries to military personnel. Brain tissue compression/tension due to blast-induced cranial deformations and shear waves due to head rotation may generate diffuse micro-damage to neuro-axonal structures and trigger a cascade of neurobiological events culminating in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. Although diffuse axonal injury is regarded as a signature wound of mild TBI (mTBI), blast loads may also cause synaptic injury wherein neuronal synapses are stretched and sheared. This synaptic injury may result in temporary disconnect of the neural circuitry and transient loss in neuronal communication. We hypothesize that mTBI symptoms such as loss of consciousness or dizziness, which start immediately after the insult, could be attributed to synaptic injury. Although empirical evidence is beginning to emerge; the detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic injury are still elusive. Coordinated in vitro–in vivo experiments and mathematical modeling studies can shed light into the synaptic injury mechanisms and their role in the potentiation of mTBI symptoms. PMID:26834697

  17. 77 FR 9703 - Blasting and the Use of Explosives; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Burden Hours: 1,294. Estimated Cost (Operation and Maintenance): $400,000. IV. Public Participation..., reporting burden (time and costs) is minimal, collection instruments are clearly understood, and OSHA's... blasting operations to prevent the accidental discharge of electric blasting caps caused by current induced...

  18. Alkahest NuclearBLAST : a user-friendly BLAST management and analysis system

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Stephen E; Houfek, Thomas D; Kalat, Sam E; Windham, DE; Burke, Mark; Opperman, Charles; Dean, Ralph A

    2005-01-01

    Background - Sequencing of EST and BAC end datasets is no longer limited to large research groups. Drops in per-base pricing have made high throughput sequencing accessible to individual investigators. However, there are few options available which provide a free and user-friendly solution to the BLAST result storage and data mining needs of biologists. Results - Here we describe NuclearBLAST, a batch BLAST analysis, storage and management system designed for the biologist. It is a wrapper for NCBI BLAST which provides a user-friendly web interface which includes a request wizard and the ability to view and mine the results. All BLAST results are stored in a MySQL database which allows for more advanced data-mining through supplied command-line utilities or direct database access. NuclearBLAST can be installed on a single machine or clustered amongst a number of machines to improve analysis throughput. NuclearBLAST provides a platform which eases data-mining of multiple BLAST results. With the supplied scripts, the program can export data into a spreadsheet-friendly format, automatically assign Gene Ontology terms to sequences and provide bi-directional best hits between two datasets. Users with SQL experience can use the database to ask even more complex questions and extract any subset of data they require. Conclusion - This tool provides a user-friendly interface for requesting, viewing and mining of BLAST results which makes the management and data-mining of large sets of BLAST analyses tractable to biologists. PMID:15958161

  19. miBLAST: scalable evaluation of a batch of nucleotide sequence queries with BLAST

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You Jung; Boyd, Andrew; Athey, Brian D.; Patel, Jignesh M.

    2005-01-01

    A common task in many modern bioinformatics applications is to match a set of nucleotide query sequences against a large sequence dataset. Exis-ting tools, such as BLAST, are designed to evaluate a single query at a time and can be unacceptably slow when the number of sequences in the query set is large. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called miBLAST, that evaluates such batch workloads efficiently. At the core, miBLAST employs a q-gram filtering and an index join for efficiently detecting similarity between the query sequences and database sequences. This set-oriented technique, which indexes both the query and the database sets, results in substantial performance improvements over existing methods. Our results show that miBLAST is significantly faster than BLAST in many cases. For example, miBLAST aligned 247 965 oligonucleotide sequences in the Affymetrix probe set against the Human UniGene in 1.26 days, compared with 27.27 days with BLAST (an improvement by a factor of 22). The relative performance of miBLAST increases for larger word sizes; however, it decreases for longer queries. miBLAST employs the familiar BLAST statistical model and output format, guaranteeing the same accuracy as BLAST and facilitating a seamless transition for existing BLAST users. PMID:16061938

  20. Shock Initiated Reactions of Reactive Multiphase Blast Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new class of reactive multiphase blast explosives (RMBX) and characterization of their blast characteristics. These RMBXs are non-ideal explosive compositions of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), nano aluminum, and a micron-size high-density reactive metal - Tantalum, Zirconium, or Zinc in mass loadings of 66 to 83 percent. Unlike high explosives, these PFPE-metal compositions release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave (rather than a true self-sustaining detonation) that is shock dependent, and can be overdriven to control energy release rate. The term ``reactive multiphase blast'' refers to the post-dispersion blast behavior: multiphase in that there are a gas phase that imparts pressure and a solid (particulate) phase that imparts momentum; and reactive in that the hot metal particles react with atmospheric oxygen and the explosive gas products to give an extended pressure pulse. The RMBX formulations were tested in two spherical core-shell geometries - an RMBX shell exploded by a high explosive core, and an RMBX core imploded by a high explosive shell. The fireball and blast characteristics were compared to a C-4 baseline charge.

  1. Blast induced mild traumatic brain injury/concussion: A physical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, Yan; Hubler, Graham K.; DePalma, Ralph G.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, a consensus exists that low intensity non-impact blast wave exposure leads to mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Considerable interest in this "invisible injury" has developed in the past few years but a disconnect remains between the biomedical outcomes and possible physical mechanisms causing mTBI. Here, we show that a shock wave travelling through the brain excites a phonon continuum that decays into specific acoustic waves with intensity exceeding brain tissue strength. Damage may occur within the period of the phonon wave, measured in tens to hundreds of nanometers, which makes the damage difficult to detect using conventional modalities.

  2. DOE Non-Proliferation Experiment includes seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Jay

    The U.S. Department of Energy detonated approximately 1.29 million kg of a commercial blasting agent, based on ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO), at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on September 22, 1993, at 00:01.080 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time. The blasting agent was emplaced in a cylindrical chamber, approximately 15.2 m in diameter × 5.5 m high, located at 37.20193°N and 116.20986°E in a Rainier Mesa tunnel, 390 m underground. Code-named the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), the explosion had an energy release of approximately 1 kt (1 kiloton = 4.186×1012 joules).

  3. Dry ice blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Aqua-Blasted and Laser-Engraved Type 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, B.; Cook, P.; Hobbs, J.; Engelberg, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of aqua blasting and laser engraving on surface microstructure development, residual stress and corrosion resistance of type 316L stainless steel has been investigated. Aqua blasting resulted in a deformed near-surface microstructure containing compressive residual stresses. Subsequent laser engraving produced a surface layer with tensile residual stresses reaching to a depth of 200 microns. Changes of surface roughness topography were accompanied by the development of a thick oxide/hydroxide film after laser engraving. The atmospheric corrosion behavior of all surfaces with MgCl2-laden droplets was compared to their electrochemical response in 1M NaCl and 0.7 M HCl aqueous solutions. The measured total volume loss after atmospheric corrosion testing was similar for all investigated surface conditions. Laser-engraved surface exhibited the smallest number of corrosion sites, but the largest mean corrosion depth.

  5. Prospectively assessed clinical outcomes in concussive blast vs nonblast traumatic brain injury among evacuated US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Mac Donald, Christine L; Johnson, Ann M; Wierzechowski, Linda; Kassner, Elizabeth; Stewart, Theresa; Nelson, Elliot C; Werner, Nicole J; Zonies, David; Oh, John; Fang, Raymond; Brody, David L

    2014-08-01

    Blast injury has been identified as the signature injury in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. However it remains to be determined whether fundamental differences may exist between blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) and TBI due to other mechanisms. To determine similarities and differences between clinical outcomes in US military personnel with blast-related vs. non-blast-related concussive TBI and to identify the specific domains of impairment that best correlate with overall disability. Prospective cohort study involving active duty US Military personnel evacuated from Iraq or Afghanistan to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, in Landstuhl, Germany. Four groups of participants were enrolled from 2010 to 2013: (1) blast plus impact complex TBI (n=53), (2) non-blast related TBI with injury due to other mechanisms (n=29), (3) blast-exposed controls evacuated for other medical reasons (n=27) (4) non-blast-exposed controls evacuated for other medical reasons (n=69). All patients with TBI met Department of Defense criteria for concussive (mild) TBI. The study participants were evaluated 6-12 months after injury at Washington University in St Louis. In total, 255 subjects were enrolled in the study, and 183 participated in follow-up evaluations, 5 of whom were disqualified. In-person clinical examinations included evaluation for overall disability, a standardized neurological exam, headache questionnaires, neuropsychological test battery, combat exposure and alcohol use surveys, and structured interview evaluations for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Global outcomes, headache severity, neuropsychological performance, and surprisingly even PTSD severity and depression were indistinguishable between the two TBI groups, independent of mechanism of injury. Both TBI groups had higher rates of moderate to severe overall disability than the respective control groups: 41/53 (77%) of blast plus impact TBI and 23/29 (79%) of nonblast TBI vs. 16

  6. Improved Geologic Interpretation of Non-invasive Electrical Resistivity Imaging from In-situ Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucelli, A.; Aborn, L.; Jacob, R.; Malusis, M.; Evans, J.

    2016-12-01

    Non-invasive geophysical techniques are useful in characterizing the subsurface geology without disturbing the environment, however, the ability to interpret the subsurface is enhanced by invasive work. Since geologic materials have electrical resistivity values it allows for a geologic interpretation to be made based on variations of electrical resistivity measured by electrical resistivity imaging (ERI). This study focuses on the pre-characterization of the geologic subsurface from ERI collected adjacent to the Montandon Marsh, a wetland located near Lewisburg, PA within the West Branch of the Susquehanna River watershed. The previous invasive data, boreholes, indicate that the subsurface consists of limestone and shale bedrock overlain with sand and gravel deposits from glacial outwash and aeolian processes. The objective is to improve our understanding of the subsurface at this long-term hydrologic research site by using excavation results, specifically observed variations in geologic materials and electrical resistivity laboratory testing of subsurface samples. The pre-excavation ERI indicated that the shallow-most geologic material had a resistivity value of 100-500 ohm-m. In comparison, the laboratory testing indicated the shallow-most material had the same range of electrical resistivity values depending on saturation levels. The ERI also showed that there was an electrically conductive material, 7 to 70 ohm-m, that was interpreted to be clay and agreed with borehole data, however, the excavation revealed that at this depth range the geologic material varied from stratified clay to clay with cobbles to weathered residual clay. Excavation revealed that the subtle variations in the electrical conductive material corresponded well with the variations in the geologic material. We will use these results to reinterpret previously collected ERI data from the entire long-term research site.

  7. 7 CFR 1700.28 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.28 Section 1700.28 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.28 Electric Program. RUS, through the Electric Program, makes loans and loan guarantees for rural electrification and the furnishing of electric...

  8. 7 CFR 1700.28 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.28 Section 1700.28 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.28 Electric Program. RUS, through the Electric Program, makes loans and loan guarantees for rural electrification and the furnishing of electric...

  9. 7 CFR 1700.28 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.28 Section 1700.28 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.28 Electric Program. RUS, through the Electric Program, makes loans and loan guarantees for rural electrification and the furnishing of electric...

  10. Pioneer Design of Non-contact Synchronized Measurement Devices Using Electric and Magnetic Field Sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Wenxuan; Zhang, Yingchen; Liu, Yong; ...

    2017-04-10

    Traditional synchrophasors rely on CTs and PTs physically connected to transmission lines or buses to acquire input signals for phasor measurement. However, it is challenging to install and maintain traditional phasor measurement units in some remote areas due to lack of facilities. Since transmission lines naturally generate alternating electrical and magnetic fields in the surrounding atmosphere, this paper presents two innovative designs for non-contact synchronized measurement devices (NCSMD), including an electric field sensor based non-contact SMD (E-NCSMD) and a magnetic field sensor based non-contact SMD (M-NCSMD). Compared with conventional synchrophasors, E-NCSMD and M-NCSMD are much more flexible to be deployedmore » and have much lower costs, making E-NCSMDs and M-NCSMD highly accessible and useful for a wide array of phasor measurement applications. Laboratory and field experiment results verified the effectiveness of the designs of both E-NCSMD and M-NCSMD.« less

  11. Pioneer Design of Non-contact Synchronized Measurement Devices Using Electric and Magnetic Field Sensors

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yao, Wenxuan; Zhang, Yingchen; Liu, Yong

    Traditional synchrophasors rely on CTs and PTs physically connected to transmission lines or buses to acquire input signals for phasor measurement. However, it is challenging to install and maintain traditional phasor measurement units in some remote areas due to lack of facilities. Since transmission lines naturally generate alternating electrical and magnetic fields in the surrounding atmosphere, this paper presents two innovative designs for non-contact synchronized measurement devices (NCSMD), including an electric field sensor based non-contact SMD (E-NCSMD) and a magnetic field sensor based non-contact SMD (M-NCSMD). Compared with conventional synchrophasors, E-NCSMD and M-NCSMD are much more flexible to be deployedmore » and have much lower costs, making E-NCSMDs and M-NCSMD highly accessible and useful for a wide array of phasor measurement applications. Laboratory and field experiment results verified the effectiveness of the designs of both E-NCSMD and M-NCSMD.« less

  12. miR-328 Functions as an RNA Decoy to Modulate hnRNP E2 Regulation of mRNA Translation in Leukemic Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Eiring, Anna M.; Harb, Jason G.; Neviani, Paolo; Garton, Christopher; Oaks, Joshua J.; Spizzo, Riccardo; Liu, Shujun; Schwind, Sebastian; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Hickey, Christopher J.; Becker, Heiko; Chandler, Jason C.; Andino, Raul; Cortes, Jorge; Hokland, Peter; Huettner, Claudia S.; Bhatia, Ravi; Roy, Denis C.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Marcucci, Guido; Garzon, Ramiro; Croce, Carlo M.; Calin, George A.; Perrotti, Danilo

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY MicroRNAs and heterogeneous ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are posttranscriptional gene regulators that bind mRNA in a sequence-specific manner. Here, we report that loss of miR-328 occurs in blast crisis chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-BC) in a BCR/ABL dose- and kinase-dependent manner through the MAPK-hnRNP E2 pathway. Restoration of miR-328 expression rescues differentiation and impairs survival of leukemic blasts by simultaneously interacting with the translational regulator poly(rC)-binding protein hnRNP E2 and with the mRNA encoding the survival factor PIM1, respectively. The interaction with hnRNP E2 is independent of the microRNA’s seed sequence and it leads to release of CEBPA mRNA from hnRNP E2-mediated translational inhibition. Altogether, these data reveal the dual ability of a microRNA to control cell fate both through base pairing with mRNA targets and through a decoy activity that interferes with the function of regulatory proteins. PMID:20211135

  13. High-speed imaging and small-scale explosive characterization techniques to understand effects of primary blast-induced injury on nerve cell structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piehler, T.; Banton, R.; Zander, N.; Duckworth, J.; Benjamin, R.; Sparks, R.

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often associated with blast exposure. Even in the absence of penetrating injury or evidence of tissue injury on imaging, blast TBI may trigger a series of neural/glial cellular and functional changes. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and proper treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) caused by explosive blast is challenging, as it is not easy to clinically distinguish blast from non-blast TBI on the basis of patient symptoms. Damage to brain tissue, cell, and subcellular structures continues to occur slowly and in a manner undetectable by conventional imaging techniques. The threshold shock impulse levels required to induce damage and the cumulative effects upon multiple exposures are not well characterized. Understanding how functional and structural damage from realistic blast impact at cellular and tissue levels at variable timescales after mTBI events may be vital for understanding this injury phenomenon and for linking mechanically induced structural changes with measurable effects on the nervous system. Our working hypothesis is that there is some transient physiological dysfunction occurring at cellular and subcellular levels within the central nervous system due to primary blast exposure. We have developed a novel in vitro indoor experimental system that uses real military explosive charges to more accurately represent military blast exposure and to probe the effects of primary explosive blast on dissociated neurons. We believe this system offers a controlled experimental method to analyze and characterize primary explosive blast-induced cellular injury and to understand threshold injury phenomenon. This paper will also focus on the modeling aspect of our work and how it relates to the experimental work.

  14. Simple estimation of induced electric fields in nervous system tissues for human exposure to non-uniform electric fields at power frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarao, Hiroo; Miyamoto, Hironobu; Korpinen, Leena; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    2016-06-01

    Most results regarding induced current in the human body related to electric field dosimetry have been calculated under uniform field conditions. We have found in previous work that a contact current is a more suitable way to evaluate induced electric fields, even in the case of exposure to non-uniform fields. If the relationship between induced currents and external non-uniform fields can be understood, induced electric fields in nervous system tissues may be able to be estimated from measurements of ambient non-uniform fields. In the present paper, we numerically calculated the induced electric fields and currents in a human model by considering non-uniform fields based on distortion by a cubic conductor under an unperturbed electric field of 1 kV m-1 at 60 Hz. We investigated the relationship between a non-uniform external electric field with no human present and the induced current through the neck, and the relationship between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in nervous system tissues such as the brain, heart, and spinal cord. The results showed that the current through the neck can be formulated by means of an external electric field at the central position of the human head, and the distance between the conductor and the human model. As expected, there is a strong correlation between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in the nervous system tissues. The combination of these relationships indicates that induced electric fields in these tissues can be estimated solely by measurements of the external field at a point and the distance from the conductor.

  15. An Empirical Model for Mine-Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-17

    fledged experimental program. The numerical approach however suffers from several drawbacks in the mine blast simulations. First, it is a very...Suffield consisted in a pendulum type device to measure global impulse of buried mine [15]. One of the main purposes of the ONAGER pendulum was to study...TP-1 Terminal effects, KTA 1-34 report, 2004. [15] Bues, R., Hlady, S.L. and Bergeron, D.M., Pendulum Measurement of Land Mine Blast Output, Volume

  16. Water conservation implications for decarbonizing non-electric energy supply: A hybrid life-cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiyuan; Wang, Can; Shi, Lei; Cai, Wenjia; Zhang, Lixiao

    2018-08-01

    Low-carbon transition in the non-electric energy sector, which includes transport and heating energy, is necessary for achieving the 2 °C target. Meanwhile, as non-electric energy accounts for over 60% of total water consumption in the energy supply sector, it is vital to understand future water trends in the context of decarbonization. However, few studies have focused on life-cycle water impacts for non-electric energy; besides, applying conventional LCA methodology to assess non-electric energy has limitations. In this paper, a Multi-Regional Hybrid Life-Cycle Assessment (MRHLCA) model is built to assess total CO 2 emissions and water consumption of 6 non-electric energy technologies - transport energy from biofuel and gasoline, heat supply from natural gas, biogas, coal, and residual biomass, within 7 major emitting economies. We find that a shift to natural gas and residual biomass heating can help economies reduce 14-65% CO 2 and save more than 21% water. However, developed and developing economies should take differentiated technical strategies. Then we apply scenarios from IMAGE model to demonstrate that if economies take cost-effective 2 °C pathways, the water conservation synergy for the whole energy supply sector, including electricity, can also be achieved. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Blast-induced tinnitus and hyperactivity in the auditory cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao; Pace, Edward; Zhang, Jinsheng

    2017-01-06

    Blast exposure can cause tinnitus and hearing impairment by damaging the auditory periphery and direct impact to the brain, which trigger neural plasticity in both auditory and non-auditory centers. However, the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of blast-induced tinnitus are still unknown. In this study, we induced tinnitus in rats using blast exposure and investigated changes in spontaneous firing and bursting activity in the auditory cortex (AC) at one day, one month, and three months after blast exposure. Our results showed that spontaneous activity in the tinnitus-positive group began changing at one month after blast exposure, and manifested as robust hyperactivity at all frequency regions at three months after exposure. We also observed an increased bursting rate in the low-frequency region at one month after blast exposure and in all frequency regions at three months after exposure. Taken together, spontaneous firing and bursting activity in the AC played an important role in blast-induced chronic tinnitus as opposed to acute tinnitus, thus favoring a bottom-up mechanism. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Blast injury research models

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, E.; Watts, S.; Cooper, G.

    2011-01-01

    Blast injuries are an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice. Primary blast injury to the lungs (blast lung) is found in a clinically significant proportion of casualties from explosions even in an open environment, and in a high proportion of severely injured casualties following explosions in confined spaces. Blast casualties also commonly suffer secondary and tertiary blast injuries resulting in significant blood loss. The presence of hypoxaemia owing to blast lung complicates the process of fluid resuscitation. Consequently, prolonged hypotensive resuscitation was found to be incompatible with survival after combined blast lung and haemorrhage. This article describes studies addressing new forward resuscitation strategies involving a hybrid blood pressure profile (initially hypotensive followed later by normotensive resuscitation) and the use of supplemental oxygen to increase survival and reduce physiological deterioration during prolonged resuscitation. Surprisingly, hypertonic saline dextran was found to be inferior to normal saline after combined blast injury and haemorrhage. New strategies have therefore been developed to address the needs of blast-injured casualties and are likely to be particularly useful under circumstances of enforced delayed evacuation to surgical care. PMID:21149352

  19. Rapid evolution of avirulence genes in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating pathogens in rice. Avirulence genes in this fungus share a gene-for-gene relationship with the resistance genes in its host rice. Although numerous studies have shown that rice blast R-genes are extremely diverse and evolve rapidly in their host populations, little is known about the evolutionary patterns of the Avr-genes in the pathogens. Results Here, six well-characterized Avr-genes and seven randomly selected non-Avr control genes were used to investigate the genetic variations in 62 rice blast strains from different parts of China. Frequent presence/absence polymorphisms, high levels of nucleotide variation (~10-fold higher than non-Avr genes), high non-synonymous to synonymous substitution ratios, and frequent shared non-synonymous substitution were observed in the Avr-genes of these diversified blast strains. In addition, most Avr-genes are closely associated with diverse repeated sequences, which may partially explain the frequent presence/absence polymorphisms in Avr-genes. Conclusion The frequent deletion and gain of Avr-genes and rapid non-synonymous variations might be the primary mechanisms underlying rapid adaptive evolution of pathogens toward virulence to their host plants, and these features can be used as the indicators for identifying additional Avr-genes. The high number of nucleotide polymorphisms among Avr-gene alleles could also be used to distinguish genetic groups among different strains. PMID:24725999

  20. Recovery from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Following Uncomplicated Mounted and Dismounted Blast: A Natural History Approach.

    PubMed

    Tschiffely, Anna E; Haque, Ashraful; Haran, Francis J; Cunningham, Craig A; Mehalick, Melissa L; May, Todd; Stuessi, Keith; Walker, Peter B; Norris, Jacob N

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to utilize a natural history approach to describe and understand symptom recovery in personnel diagnosed with a blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from an improvised explosive device blast. The population included military personnel who experienced a blast mTBI while mounted (vehicle; n = 176) or dismounted (on foot; n = 37) (N = 213). Patients had no co-morbid psychiatric or muscle-skeletal issues and were treated within 72 h of injury. Prevalence and duration of self-reported symptoms were separately analyzed by injury context (mounted vs dismounted). Headache was prominently reported in both mounted (85%) and dismounted (75%) populations. The mean time from injury to return to full duty was between 7.8 d (mounted) and 8.5 d (dismounted). The dismounted population reported visual changes that lasted 0.74 d longer. Our analysis implicates that headache is a common and acutely persistent symptom in mTBI regardless of injury context. Additionally, patients in mounted vs dismounted injury did not report significant differences in symptom prevalence. Although knowing the injury context (i.e., dismounted vs mounted) may be beneficial for providers to understand symptom presentations and deliver accurate anticipatory guidance for patients with blast-related mTBI, no significant differences were observed in this population. This may be due to the population characteristic as the trajectory of recovery may vary for patients who were not able to return to full duty within 30 d or required higher levels of care.

  1. Vapor tagging of electric blasting caps with perfluorinated compounds. [For crime detection

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Senum, G I; Gergley, R P; Greene, M

    Vapor tagging of electric blasting caps (EBC) is accomplished with the use of perfluorocarbon taggants. These taggants are absorbed in either the present EBC end closures or in substitute fluoroelastomeric end closures to approximately 5 to 10% of the total weight of end closure. The specific taggants have been chosen to allow a 0.5 to 5 nanoliter per minute vapor taggant emission rate from the tagged EBC over a 5 y lifetime. The taggant emission rates from tagged EBC have been experimentally observed to be well described by a taggant emission rate model. This model provides for experimental selection ofmore » the proper taggant for projected lifetimes of ten years based on just several months of observed emission measurements. Another model has been derived which can predict the taggant concentrations in various realistic scenarios such as room, building, lockers, etc. The model takes into consideration the effect of barriers such as boxes, suitcases, etc., in impeding the release of the taggant vapors from the tagged EBC into the scenario and the dilution effect of the scenarios air circulation system. Taggant concentrations have been experimentally determined using a 425 liter sampling chamber with various barriers and the results are used with the model to predict various scenario taggant concentrations.« less

  2. Causes of electrical deaths and injuries among construction workers.

    PubMed

    McCann, Michael; Hunting, Katherine L; Murawski, Judith; Chowdhury, Risana; Welch, Laura

    2003-04-01

    Contact with electrical current is the fourth leading cause of deaths of construction workers. This study evaluates electrical deaths and injuries to construction workers. Two sources of data were analyzed in detail: (1) 1,019 electrical deaths identified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) for the years 1992-1998; and (2) 61 electrical injuries identified between November 1, 1990 and December 31, 1998 from a George Washington University Emergency Department injury surveillance database. Contact with "live" electrical wiring, equipment, and light fixtures was the main cause of electrical deaths and injuries among electrical workers, followed by contact with overhead power lines. Among non-electrical workers, contact with overhead power lines was the major cause of death. Other causes included contact with energized metal objects, machinery, power tools, and portable lights. Arc flash or blast caused 31% of electrical injuries among construction workers, but less than 2% of electrical deaths. Adoption of a lockout/tagout standard for construction, and training for non-electrical workers in basic electrical safety would reduce the risk of electrical deaths and injuries in construction. Further research is needed on ways to prevent electrical deaths and injuries while working "live". Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Optimal integration of daylighting and electric lighting systems using non-imaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scartezzini, J.-L.; Linhart, F.; Kaegi-Kolisnychenko, E.

    2007-09-01

    Electric lighting is responsible for a significant fraction of electricity consumption within non-residential buildings. Making daylight more available in office and commercial buildings can lead as a consequence to important electricity savings, as well as to the improvement of occupants' visual performance and wellbeing. Over the last decades, daylighting technologies have been developed for that purpose, some of them having proven to be highly efficient such as anidolic daylighting systems. Based on non-imaging optics these optical devices were designed to achieve an efficient collection and redistribution of daylight within deep office rooms. However in order to benefit from the substantial daylight provision obtained through these systems and convert it into effective electricity savings, novel electric lighting strategies are required. An optimal integration of high efficacy light sources and efficient luminaries based on non-imaging optics with anidolic daylighting systems can lead to such novel strategies. Starting from the experience gained through the development of an Anidolic Integrated Ceiling (AIC), this paper presents an optimal integrated daylighting and electric lighting system. Computer simulations based on ray-tracing techniques were used to achieve the integration of 36W fluorescent tubes and non-imaging reflectors with an advanced daylighting system. Lighting power densities lower than 4 W/m2 can be achieved in this way within the corresponding office room. On-site monitoring of an integrated daylighting and electric lighting system carried out on a solar experimental building confirmed the energy and visual performance of such a system: it showed that low lighting power densities can be achieved by combining an anidolic daylighting system with very efficient electric light sources and luminaries.

  4. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Blast-Exposed Military Veterans and a Blast Neurotrauma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Lee E.; Fisher, Andrew M.; Tagge, Chad A.; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A.; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W.; Goletiani, Cezar J.; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M.; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Cantu, Robert C.; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F.; Moss, William C.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Stanton, Patric K.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein–linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory. PMID:22593173

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Lee E; Fisher, Andrew M; Tagge, Chad A; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Goletiani, Cezar J; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D; Nowinski, Christopher J; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K; Wolozin, Benjamin L; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D; Budson, Andrew E; Kowall, Neil W; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F; Moss, William C; Cleveland, Robin O; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Stanton, Patric K; McKee, Ann C

    2012-05-16

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein-linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory.

  6. Analysis of MINIE2013 Explosion Air-Blast Data

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schnurr, Julie M.; Rodgers, Arthur J.; Kim, Keehoon

    We report analysis of air-blast overpressure measurements from the MINIE2013 explosive experiments. The MINIE2013 experiment involved a series of nearly 70 near-surface (height-ofburst, HOB, ranging from -1 to +4 m) low-yield (W=2-20 kg TNT equivalent) chemical highexplosives tests that were recorded at local distances (230 m – 28.5 km). Many of the W and HOB combinations were repeated, allowing for quantification of the variability in air-blast features and corresponding yield estimates. We measured canonical signal features (peak overpressure, impulse per unit area, and positive pulse duration) from the air-blast data and compared these to existing air-blast models. Peak overpressure measurementsmore » showed good agreement with the models at close ranges but tended to attenuate more rapidly at longer range (~ 1 km), which is likely caused by upward refraction of acoustic waves due to a negative vertical gradient of sound speed. We estimated yields of the MINIE2013 explosions using the Integrated Yield Determination Tool (IYDT). Errors of the estimated yields were on average within 30% of the reported yields, and there were no significant differences in the accuracy of the IYDT predictions grouped by yield. IYDT estimates tend to be lower than ground truth yields, possibly because of reduced overpressure amplitudes by upward refraction. Finally, we report preliminary results on a development of a new parameterized air-blast waveform.« less

  7. Structure, Function, Interaction, Co-evolution of Rice Blast Resistance Genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Resistance (R) genes to blast encode proteins that detect pathogen signaling molecules encoded by M. oryzae avirulence (AVR) genes. R genes can be a single or a member of clu...

  8. 2016 SUMMER BLAST PICNIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-09

    MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER DIRECTOR TODD MAY CASTS HIS BALLOT IN THE HOMEMADE ICE CREAM CONTEST DURING THE GREAT EXCHANGE SUMMER BLAST SOCIAL, PRESENTED JUNE 9 BY THE MARSHALL EXCHANGE. THE EXCHANGE IS A NON-APPROPRIATED-FUND ACTIVITY THAT AIMS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE WELFARE, EFFICIENCY AND MORALE OF MARSHALL TEAM MEMBERS, OTHER GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL, RETIRED NASA EMPLOYEES AND THEIR FAMILIES.

  9. A miniature pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to people who deal with explosive devices. Protection from TBI has attracted more and more interest. Great efforts have been taken to the studies on the understanding of the propagation of the blast events and its effect on TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges is that the current available pressure sensors are not fast enough to capture the blast wave especially the transient period. This paper reports an ultrafast pressure sensor that could be very useful for analysis of the fast changing blast signal. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. It uses a 45º angle polished fiber sitting in a V-groove on a silicon chip. The endface of the angle polished fiber and the diaphragm which is lifted off on the side wall of the V-groove form the FP cavity. The sensor is very small and can be mounted on different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. The tests were conducted at Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in Natick, MA. The sensors were mounted in a shock tube, side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increased pressure. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors and their response time is comparable.

  10. Blast Injuries: From Improvised Explosive Device Blasts to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Ditkofsky, Noah G; York, John D; Abujudeh, Hani H; Avery, Laura A; Brunner, John F; Sodickson, Aaron D; Lev, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Although most trauma centers have experience with the imaging and management of gunshot wounds, in most regions blast wounds such as the ones encountered in terrorist attacks with the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are infrequently encountered outside the battlefield. As global terrorism becomes a greater concern, it is important that radiologists, particularly those working in urban trauma centers, be aware of the mechanisms of injury and the spectrum of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury patterns. Primary blast injuries are caused by barotrauma from the initial increased pressure of the explosive detonation and the rarefaction of the atmosphere immediately afterward. Secondary blast injuries are caused by debris carried by the blast wind and most often result in penetrating trauma from small shrapnel. Tertiary blast injuries are caused by the physical displacement of the victim and the wide variety of blunt or penetrating trauma sustained as a result of the patient impacting immovable objects such as surrounding cars, walls, or fences. Quaternary blast injuries include all other injuries, such as burns, crush injuries, and inhalational injuries. Radiography is considered the initial imaging modality for assessment of shrapnel and fractures. Computed tomography is the optimal test to assess penetrating chest, abdominal, and head trauma. The mechanism of blast injuries and the imaging experience of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are detailed, as well as musculoskeletal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary injury patterns from blast injuries. ©RSNA, 2016.

  11. 7 CFR 1700.54 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.54 Section 1700.54 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Loan and Grant Approval Authorities § 1700.54 Electric Program. (a) Administrator: The... Administrator, Electric Program, has the authority to approve the following loans, loan guarantees, and lien...

  12. 7 CFR 1700.54 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.54 Section 1700.54 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Loan and Grant Approval Authorities § 1700.54 Electric Program. (a) Administrator: The... Administrator, Electric Program, has the authority to approve the following loans, loan guarantees, and lien...

  13. 7 CFR 1700.54 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.54 Section 1700.54 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Loan and Grant Approval Authorities § 1700.54 Electric Program. (a) Administrator: The... Administrator, Electric Program, has the authority to approve the following loans, loan guarantees, and lien...

  14. Sensory coding and cognitive processing of sound in Veterans with blast exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Scott; Goldberg, Hannah; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Recent anecdotal reports from VA audiology clinics as well as a few published studies have identified a sub-population of Service Members seeking treatment for problems communicating in everyday, noisy listening environments despite having normal to near-normal hearing thresholds. Because of their increased risk of exposure to dangerous levels of prolonged noise and transient explosive blast events, communication problems in these soldiers could be due to either hearing loss (traditional or “hidden”) in the auditory sensory periphery or from blast-induced injury to cortical networks associated with attention. We found that out of the 14 blast-exposed Service Members recruited for this study, 12 had hearing thresholds in the normal to near-normal range. A majority of these participants reported having problems specifically related to failures with selective attention. Envelope following responses (EFRs) measuring neural coding fidelity of the auditory brainstem to suprathreshold sounds were similar between blast-exposed and non-blast controls. Blast-exposed subjects performed substantially worse than non-blast controls in an auditory selective attention task in which listeners classified the melodic contour (rising, falling, or “zig-zagging”) of one of three simultaneous, competing tone sequences. Salient pitch and spatial differences made for easy segregation of the three concurrent melodies. Poor performance in the blast-exposed subjects was associated with weaker evoked response potentials (ERPs) in frontal EEG channels, as well as a failure of attention to enhance the neural responses evoked by a sequence when it was the target compared to when it was a distractor. These results suggest that communication problems in these listeners cannot be explained by compromised sensory representations in the auditory periphery, but rather point to lingering blast-induced damage to cortical networks implicated in the control of attention. Because all study

  15. Planar blast scaling with condensed-phase explosives in a shock tube

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jackson, Scott L

    2011-01-25

    Blast waves are strong shock waves that result from large power density deposition into a fluid. The rapid energy release of high-explosive (HE) detonation provides sufficiently high power density for blast wave generation. Often it is desirable to quantify the energy released by such an event and to determine that energy relative to other reference explosives to derive an explosive-equivalence value. In this study, we use condensed-phase explosives to drive a blast wave in a shock tube. The explosive material and quantity were varied to produce blast waves of differing strengths. Pressure transducers at varying lengths measured the post-shock pressure,more » shock-wave arrival time and sidewall impulse associated with each test. Blast-scaling concepts in a one-dimensional geometry were then used to both determine the energy release associated with each test and to verify the scaling of the shock position versus time, overpressure versus distance, and impulse. Most blast scaling measurements to-date have been performed in a three-dimensional geometry such as a blast arena. Testing in a three-dimensional geometry can be challenging, however, as spherical shock-wave symmetry is required for good measurements. Additionally, the spherical wave strength decays rapidly with distance and it can be necessary to utilize larger (several kg) quantities of explosive to prevent significant decay from occurring before an idealized blast wave has formed. Such a mode of testing can be expensive, require large quantities of explosive, and be limited by both atmospheric conditions (such as rain) and by noise complaints from the population density near the test arena. Testing is possible in more compact geometries, however. Non-planar blast waves can be formed into a quasi-planar shape by confining the shock diffraction with the walls of a shock tube. Regardless of the initial form, the wave shape will begin to approximate a planar front after successive wave reflections from the

  16. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  17. Development of a Finite Element Model for Blast Brain Injury and the Effects of CSF Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-02

    FIGURE 1. Brain geometry from photo ( left ; Visible Human Project) and plane-strain model ( right ). Development of a Finite Element Model method in LS-Dyna...between the non-cavitating ( left ) and cavitating ( right ) models for the 500 kPa/4 ms blast condition. FIGURE 6. (a) Comparing the time-history and (b...between the non-cavitating ( left ) and cavitating ( right ) models for the 500 kPa/4 ms blast condition. PANZER et al. Brain Response to Blast Over the wide

  18. Close-in Blast Waves from Spherical Charges*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, William; Kuhl, Allen

    2011-06-01

    We study the close-in blast waves created by the detonation of spherical high explosives (HE) charges, via numerical simulations with our Arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (200 μm per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in air, and the reflection of the blast wave from an ideal surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and air were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. The results were analyzed to evaluate the: (i) free air pressure-range curves: Δps (R) , (ii) free air impulse curves, (iii) reflected pressure-range curves, and (iv) reflected impulse-range curves. A variety of explosives were studied. Conclusions are: (i) close-in (R < 10 cm /g 1 / 3) , each explosive had its own (unique) blast wave (e.g., Δps (R , HE) ~ a /Rn , where n is different for each explosive); (ii) these close-in blast waves do not scale with the ``Heat of Detonation'' of the explosive (because close-in, there is not enough time to fully couple the chemical energy to the air via piston work); (iii) instead they are related to the detonation conditions inside the charge. Scaling laws will be proposed for such close-in blast waves.

  19. A Review of Central Nervous System (CNS)/Cognitive Effects Due to Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    head trauma: is brain damage overdiagnosed ? Part 1. J Clin Neurosci, 7(5), 400-8. Mayorga, M. A. (1997). The pathology of primary blast overpressure...Office and is available to the general public, including foreign nationals. Copies may be obtained from the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC...http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RH-BR-TR-2007-0072 has been reviewed and is approved for publication in accordance with assigned distribution

  20. GENERAL VIEW FROM THE SOUTHWEST, SHOWING THE #2 BLAST FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW FROM THE SOUTHWEST, SHOWING THE #2 BLAST FURNACE IN THE RIGHT; THE CENTRAL COMPLEX WITH STOVES IN THE CENTER. ELECTRICAL POWER HOUSE IS ON THE LEFT BEYOND THE CONVEYOR LIFT. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. An RES-Based Model for Risk Assessment and Prediction of Backbreak in Bench Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, F.; Ebrahimi Farsangi, M. A.; Mansouri, H.

    2013-07-01

    Most blasting operations are associated with various forms of energy loss, emerging as environmental side effects of rock blasting, such as flyrock, vibration, airblast, and backbreak. Backbreak is an adverse phenomenon in rock blasting operations, which imposes risk and increases operation expenses because of safety reduction due to the instability of walls, poor fragmentation, and uneven burden in subsequent blasts. In this paper, based on the basic concepts of a rock engineering systems (RES) approach, a new model for the prediction of backbreak and the risk associated with a blast is presented. The newly suggested model involves 16 effective parameters on backbreak due to blasting, while retaining simplicity as well. The data for 30 blasts, carried out at Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict backbreak and the level of risk corresponding to each blast by the RES-based model. The results obtained were compared with the backbreak measured for each blast, which showed that the level of risk achieved is in consistence with the backbreak measured. The maximum level of risk [vulnerability index (VI) = 60] was associated with blast No. 2, for which the corresponding average backbreak was the highest achieved (9.25 m). Also, for blasts with levels of risk under 40, the minimum average backbreaks (<4 m) were observed. Furthermore, to evaluate the model performance for backbreak prediction, the coefficient of correlation ( R 2) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the model were calculated ( R 2 = 0.8; RMSE = 1.07), indicating the good performance of the model.

  2. Blasting response of the Eiffel Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlyck, Lachlan; Hayes, Kieran; Caetano, Ryan; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    A finite element model of the Eiffel Tower was constructed using Strand7 software. The model replicates the existing tower, with dimensions justified through the use of original design drawings. A static and dynamic analysis was conducted to determine the actions of the tower under permanent, imposed and wind loadings, as well as under blast pressure loads and earthquake loads due to an explosion. It was observed that the tower utilises the full axial capacity of individual members by acting as a `truss of trusses'. As such, permanent and imposed loads are efficiently transferred to the primary columns through compression, while wind loads induce tensile forces in the windward legs and compressive forces in the leeward. Under blast loading, the tower experienced both ground vibrations and blast pressures. Ground vibrations induced a negligibly small earthquake loading into the structure which was ignored in subsequent analyses. The blast pressure was significant, and a dynamic analysis of this revealed that further research is required into the damping qualities of the structure due to soil and mechanical properties. In the worst case scenario, the blast was assumed to completely destroy several members in the adjacent leg. Despite this weakened condition, it was observed that the tower would still be able to sustain static loads, at least for enough time for occupant evacuation. Further, an optimised design revealed the structure was structurally sound under a 46% reduction of the metal tower's mass.

  3. Comparison of Some Blast Vibration Predictors for Blasting in Underground Drifts and Some Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Vaibhab Pramod; Dey, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Drilling and blasting are the most economical excavation techniques in underground drifts driven through hard rock formation. Burn cut is the most popular drill pattern, used in this case, to achieve longer advance per blast round. The ground vibration generated due to the propagation of blast waves on the detonation of explosive during blasting is the principal cause for structural and rock damage. Thus, ground vibration is a point of concern for the blasting engineers. The ground vibration from a blast is measured using a seismograph placed at the blast monitoring station. The measured vibrations, in terms of peak particle velocity, are related to the maximum charge detonated at one instant and the distance of seismograph from the blast point. The ground vibrations from a number of blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances are monitored. A number of scaling factors of these dependencies (viz. Distance and maximum charge/delay) have been proposed by different researchers, namely, square root, cube root, CMRI, Langefors and Kihlstrom, Ghosh-Daemon, Indian standard etc. Scaling factors of desired type are computed for all the measured blast rounds. Regression analysis is carried out between the scaling factors and peak particle velocities to establish the coefficients of the vibration predictor equation. Then, the developed predictor equation is used for designing the blast henceforth. Director General of Mine Safety, India, specified that ground vibrations from eight to ten blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances should be monitored to develop a predictor equation; however, there is no guideline about the type of scaling factor to be used. Further to this, from the statistical point of view, a regression analysis on a small sample population cannot be accepted without the testing of hypothesis. To show the importance of the above, in this paper, seven scaling factors are considered for blast data set of a hard-rock underground drift using burn

  4. How Close is too Close? The Effect of a Non-Lethal Electric Shark Deterrent on White Shark Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Ryan M; Egeberg, Channing A; Hart, Nathan S; Ryan, Laura; Chapuis, Lucille; Kerr, Caroline C; Schmidt, Carl; Huveneers, Charlie; Gennari, Enrico; Yopak, Kara E; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Collin, Shaun P

    2016-01-01

    Sharks play a vital role in the health of marine ecosystems, but the potential threat that sharks pose to humans is a reminder of our vulnerability when entering the ocean. Personal shark deterrents are being marketed as the solution to mitigate the threat that sharks pose. However, the effectiveness claims of many personal deterrents are based on our knowledge of shark sensory biology rather than robust testing of the devices themselves, as most have not been subjected to independent scientific studies. Therefore, there is a clear need for thorough testing of commercially available shark deterrents to provide the public with recommendations of their effectiveness. Using a modified stereo-camera system, we quantified behavioural interactions between white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) and a baited target in the presence of a commercially available, personal electric shark deterrent (Shark Shield Freedom7™). The stereo-camera system enabled an accurate assessment of the behavioural responses of C. carcharias when encountering a non-lethal electric field many times stronger than what they would naturally experience. Upon their first observed encounter, all C. carcharias were repelled at a mean (± std. error) proximity of 131 (± 10.3) cm, which corresponded to a mean voltage gradient of 9.7 (± 0.9) V/m. With each subsequent encounter, their proximity decreased by an average of 11.6 cm, which corresponded to an increase in tolerance to the electric field by an average of 2.6 (± 0.5) V/m per encounter. Despite the increase in tolerance, sharks continued to be deterred from interacting for the duration of each trial when in the presence of an active Shark Shield™. Furthermore, the findings provide no support to the theory that electric deterrents attract sharks. The results of this study provide quantitative evidence of the effectiveness of a non-lethal electric shark deterrent, its influence on the behaviour of C. carcharias, and an accurate method for testing

  5. How Close is too Close? The Effect of a Non-Lethal Electric Shark Deterrent on White Shark Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Nathan S.; Ryan, Laura; Chapuis, Lucille; Kerr, Caroline C.; Schmidt, Carl; Huveneers, Charlie; Gennari, Enrico; Yopak, Kara E.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.; Collin, Shaun P.

    2016-01-01

    Sharks play a vital role in the health of marine ecosystems, but the potential threat that sharks pose to humans is a reminder of our vulnerability when entering the ocean. Personal shark deterrents are being marketed as the solution to mitigate the threat that sharks pose. However, the effectiveness claims of many personal deterrents are based on our knowledge of shark sensory biology rather than robust testing of the devices themselves, as most have not been subjected to independent scientific studies. Therefore, there is a clear need for thorough testing of commercially available shark deterrents to provide the public with recommendations of their effectiveness. Using a modified stereo-camera system, we quantified behavioural interactions between white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) and a baited target in the presence of a commercially available, personal electric shark deterrent (Shark Shield Freedom7™). The stereo-camera system enabled an accurate assessment of the behavioural responses of C. carcharias when encountering a non-lethal electric field many times stronger than what they would naturally experience. Upon their first observed encounter, all C. carcharias were repelled at a mean (± std. error) proximity of 131 (± 10.3) cm, which corresponded to a mean voltage gradient of 9.7 (± 0.9) V/m. With each subsequent encounter, their proximity decreased by an average of 11.6 cm, which corresponded to an increase in tolerance to the electric field by an average of 2.6 (± 0.5) V/m per encounter. Despite the increase in tolerance, sharks continued to be deterred from interacting for the duration of each trial when in the presence of an active Shark Shield™. Furthermore, the findings provide no support to the theory that electric deterrents attract sharks. The results of this study provide quantitative evidence of the effectiveness of a non-lethal electric shark deterrent, its influence on the behaviour of C. carcharias, and an accurate method for testing

  6. Electric field measurements during the blowing snow in a cryogenic wind tunnel by a non-contact voltmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, A.; Omiya, S.

    2011-12-01

    It is known that the average atmospheric electric field is +100V/m in fair weather (positive electric field vector points downward). An increase of atmospheric electric field is reported when the blowing snow occurred. This phenomenon is mainly explained by the fact that the blowing snow particles have negative charge in average. It is suggested that an electrostatic force, given by the product of the electric field and the charge of the particle, may influence the particle trajectory and change those movements, saltation and suspension. The purpose of this experiment is to clarify the characteristics of the electric field during blowing snow event. Experiments were carried out in the cryogenic wind tunnel of Snow and Ice Research Center, NIED. A non-contact voltmeter was used to measure the electric field. An artificial blowing snow was generated by a snow particle supply machine. The rolling brushes of the machine scratch the snow surface and supply snow particles into the airflow. This machine made it possible to supply the snow particles at an arbitrary rate. This experiment was conducted in the following experimental conditions; wind speed of 5 to 7 m/s (3 patterns), supply snow quantity of 8.7 to 34.9 g/m/s (4 patterns), air temperature of -10 degree Celsius, fetch of 10 m and hard snow surface. Measured electric field was all negative, which is opposite direction to the previous measurements. This means that the blowing snow particles had positive charges. The negative electric field tended to increase with increase of the wind speed and the mass flux. These results can be explained from the previous experiment by Omiya and Sato (2010). The snow particles gain positive charges by the friction with the rolling brush which is made from polypropylene, however the particles accumulate negative charges gradually with increase of the collisions to the snow surface. Probably, the positive charges might have remained on the snow particles that had passed over the

  7. Sub-lethal Ocular Trauma (SLOT): Establishing a Standardized Blast Threshold to Facilitate Diagnostic, Early Treatment, and Recovery Studies for Blast Injuries to the Eye and Optic Nerve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    the less, we observed 64 a broad array of ocular injuries. Petras et al. (1997) observed a similar trend in rats exposed to overpressures of...2013. PMID: 22185582. Petras , J.M., Bauman, R.A., and Elsayed, N.M., 1997, Visual system degeneration induced by blast overpressure: Toxicology...2012, Primary blast injury to the eye and orbit: Finite element modeling: Investigative Ophthalmology: v. 53, pp. 8057–8066. Sanchez, R., Martin , R

  8. [Blast injuries of the hands in precarious health situation].

    PubMed

    Allah, K C; Kossoko, H; Assi Djè Bi Djè, V; Yéo, S; Bonny, R; Richard Kadio, M

    2014-06-01

    The hands of "blast" resulting from the handling of unstable explosives. Their repercussion is functional and vital in trauma patients. The authors report their experience of care from the hands of blast in precarious health situation. Between 2001 and 2012, 33 hand blasts were supported in 30 injured civilians and military, received emergency, during and after armed conflict. Two women (6.7%) and 28 men (93.3%) were received, including four teenagers (13.3%) and 26 adults (86.7%). During the war, 15 officers weapon (50%) and three civilians (10%) underwent surgery, or 60% of hand injuries. In peacetime, civilians were mostly operated in 33.3% of cases, against 6.7% of cases of agents' weapon. Nineteen hands blast (57.6%) were observed during the war and 14 in peacetime, or 42.4% of cases. The average age was 25.2 years, with extremes of 12 and 50 years. Thirteen left hands (39.4%) and 20 right hands (60.6%) were operated. The lesion concerned all the anatomical structures of the hand. It was unilateral in 27 cases (81.9%) and bilateral in three cases (9.1%). Three types of hand trauma were observed and were as follows: trauma patients with injuries of the hand (18.2%), trauma of severe and isolated proximal hand or finger amputations (75.7%), and trauma of the hand without apparent seriousness (6.1%). The associated lesion was eye (one case), chest (one case), abdominal (five cases). Debridement was performed immediate emergency (93.9%) and delayed (6.1%). The treatment was surgical hemostasis, made mainly of amputations (69.7%) and regularization of digital stumps (12.1%). The repair was performed in 18.2% of cases. One death has been reported in a polytrauma patient with chest blast. Blast injuries of the hand are common in times of war in armed agents. The young people, manual workers and children are paying a heavy price in peacetime. As land mines which affect feet, instable hand grenades are left exposed in nature. In precarious health situation, instead of

  9. H-BLAST: a fast protein sequence alignment toolkit on heterogeneous computers with GPUs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weicai; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yongdong; Xu, Yuesheng

    2017-04-15

    The sequence alignment is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics. BLAST is a routinely used tool for this purpose with over 118 000 citations in the past two decades. As the size of bio-sequence databases grows exponentially, the computational speed of alignment softwares must be improved. We develop the heterogeneous BLAST (H-BLAST), a fast parallel search tool for a heterogeneous computer that couples CPUs and GPUs, to accelerate BLASTX and BLASTP-basic tools of NCBI-BLAST. H-BLAST employs a locally decoupled seed-extension algorithm for better performance on GPUs, and offers a performance tuning mechanism for better efficiency among various CPUs and GPUs combinations. H-BLAST produces identical alignment results as NCBI-BLAST and its computational speed is much faster than that of NCBI-BLAST. Speedups achieved by H-BLAST over sequential NCBI-BLASTP (resp. NCBI-BLASTX) range mostly from 4 to 10 (resp. 5 to 7.2). With 2 CPU threads and 2 GPUs, H-BLAST can be faster than 16-threaded NCBI-BLASTX. Furthermore, H-BLAST is 1.5-4 times faster than GPU-BLAST. https://github.com/Yeyke/H-BLAST.git. yux06@syr.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Radiological-Pathological Correlations Following Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in the Whole Human Brain Using ex Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    were as follows: Blast TBI: Suicide drug overdose – blast years prior Ruptured aneurysm – blast years prior intraventricular hemorrhage...drug overdose Suicide blunt trauma - fall Cancer Cardiac Arrest Tissue fixation was highly variable because cases were obtained from 4 different...blast years prior Civilian Blast DOA Non-blast TBI: MVA – DOA MVA – DOS Suicide – NFL – GSW to chest Cardiac Arrest – NFL Controls: Suicide

  11. Global efforts in managing rice blast disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major destructive disease threatening global food security. Resistance (R) genes to M. oryzae are effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae carry the corresponding avirulence (AVR) genes. Effectiveness of genetic resist...

  12. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics. ...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics. ...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics. ...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics. ...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical...

  19. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics. ...

  20. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical...

  2. Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Leads to Increased Prion Protein in Plasma: A Potential Biomarker for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W.; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the “signature injury” of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4–206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL±0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL±0.14 SE; two tailed test p<0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI. PMID:25058115

  3. Blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Scott M; Sattin, Richard W; Hunt, Richard C; Krohmer, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Current trends in global terrorism mandate that emergency medical services, emergency medicine and other acute care clinicians have a basic understanding of the physics of explosions, the types of injuries that can result from an explosion, and current management for patients injured by explosions. High-order explosive detonations result in near instantaneous transformation of the explosive material into a highly pressurized gas, releasing energy at supersonic speeds. This results in the formation of a blast wave that travels out from the epicenter of the blast. Primary blast injuries are characterized by anatomical and physiological changes from the force generated by the blast wave impacting the body's surface, and affect primarily gas-containing structures (lungs, gastrointestinal tract, ears). "Blast lung" is a clinical diagnosis and is characterized as respiratory difficulty and hypoxia without obvious external injury to the chest. It may be complicated by pneumothoraces and air emboli and may be associated with multiple other injuries. Patients may present with a variety of symptoms, including dyspnea, chest pain, cough, and hemoptysis. Physical examination may reveal tachypnea, hypoxia, cyanosis, and decreased breath sounds. Chest radiography, computerized tomography, and arterial blood gases may assist with diagnosis and management; however, they should not delay diagnosis and emergency interventions in the patient exposed to a blast. High flow oxygen, airway management, tube thoracostomy in the setting of pneumothoraces, mechanical ventilation (when required) with permissive hypercapnia, and judicious fluid administration are essential components in the management of blast lung injury.

  4. Characterization of molecular identity and pathogenicity of rice blast fungus in Hunan province of China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characterization of molecular identity and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus benefits the deployment of effective blast resistance (R) genes. In order to identify blast resistance genes in rice producing areas where most of the hybrid rice is grown in Hunan province, 182 M. oryzae strains were ...

  5. Numerical Simulations of Near-Field Blast Effects using Kinetic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuscamman, Stephanie; Manner, Virginia; Brown, Geoffrey; Glascoe, Lee

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulations using two hydrocodes were compared to near-field measurements of blast impulse associated with ideal and non-ideal explosives to gain insight into testing results and predict untested configurations. The recently developed kinetic plate test was designed to measure blast impulse in the near-field by firing spherical charges in close range from steel plates and probing plate acceleration using laser velocimetry. Plate velocities for ideal, non-ideal and aluminized explosives tests were modeled using a three dimensional hydrocode. The effects of inert additives in the explosive formulation were modeled using a 1-D hydrocode with multiphase flow capability using Lagrangian particles. The relative effect of particle impact on the plate compared to the blast wave impulse is determined and modeling is compared to free field pressure results. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This is abstract LLNL-ABS-622152.

  6. Development and analysis of a leak-based blast attenuator and scaling laws for primary blast peak overpressure for a large caliber muzzleloaded cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Robert Andrew

    as the Figure of Merit (FoM) and defined for any probe location. An average FoM was also defined based on the average of local FoM over different locations/probes. The greater the FoM is above zero, the better the configuration. The average FoM for the CLM-1 configuration was 0.221. In addition to FoM, shock structure and strength were also analyzed for the bulge and channel configurations at both the precursor and blast stages. With the success of the CLM-1 configuration, we then performed a parametric study of the channel leak geometry and examined the effect of different geometric parameters on peak overpressure attenuation. The idea was to further improve the performance of the channel leak method. We divided our parametric study into five groups (i.e., A through E), referred to as CLM-A through CLM-E configurations. The focus in these five groups was on geometric parameters that were expected to be the most influential or relevant. Three relevant geometric parameters were considered in this work. In groups A and B, we focused on channel leak volume. Group C analyzed the effect of channel length while groups D and E investigated the effect of aspect ratio. The five groups were ordered in this way because we anticipated the total leak volume to be the most influential parameter, then the channel length which was followed by the aspect ratio. The total leak volume of 7.5% resulted in a relatively high average FoM. On the other hand, the use of channels with a shorter length was found to be detrimental while a lower value of aspect ratio was beneficial. Three leak configurations of CLM-A1, CLM-E1 and CLM-E2 provided excellent peak overpressure attenuation (i.e., above 45% and up to 63%). Each led to an average FoM above 0.5 while CLM-E configurations resulted in lower local FoM for probes near the muzzle and higher FoM for probes farther from the muzzle, and thus, a higher variation of FoM over the probes. The average FoM based on the far-field probes was about 0

  7. Prediction of blast fragmentation of underground stopes for in situ leaching

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stagg, M.S.; Otterness, R.E.; Djahanguiri, F.

    1994-12-31

    The US Bureau of Mines (USBM) evaluated empirical equations that predict fragmentation from underground stope rounds. Controlled blasting is necessary for creating leaching stopes that maximize the recovery and minimize backbreak of the perimeter wall. This paper presents the fragmentation results from one of the three drop-raise blasts used to develop a reduced-scale cylindrical stope, 1.8 m in diameter and 6 m in height. The stope is located in the Colorado School of Mines Experimental Mine (Edgar Mine) in Idaho Springs, Colorado. This stope is part of a USBM research effort to determine the feasibility of incorporating in situ leachingmore » of rubblized stopes into active underground metal and nonmetal mines. All the material from the first blast, 14 mtons was sieved. The resulting distribution was compared to the distribution predicted from empirical equations. The best fit was found with a USBM equation developed from over 50 sieved, reduced-scale (1- to 2-m) high wall blasts. Modifications to the equations were made to account for the observed differences due to breakout angle, shot geometry, initiation timing, decoupling, rock fracture toughness and explosive energy.« less

  8. Improvements to the Sandia CTH Hydro-Code to Support Blast Analysis and Protective Design of Military Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-15

    used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. 6.0 REFERENCES [1] McGlaun, J., Thompson, S. and Elrick, M. “CTH: A Three-Dimensional Shock-Wave...Validation of a Loading Model for Simulating Blast Mine Effects on Armoured Vehicles,” 7 th International LS-DYNA Users Conference, Detroit, MI 2002. [14

  9. A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage

    PubMed Central

    Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E.; Rex, Tonia S.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:22504073

  10. Electric Charge Accumulation in Polar and Non-Polar Polymers under Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Kenichiro; Honjoh, Masato; Takada, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    The electric charge accumulation under an electron beam irradiation (40 keV and 60 keV) was measured by using the pressure wave propagation (PWP) method in the dielectric insulation materials, such as polar polymeric films (polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET)) and non-polar polymeric films (polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). The PE and PTFE (non-polar polymers) showed the properties of large amount of electric charge accumulation over 50 C/m3 and long saturation time over 80 minutes. The PP and PS (non-polar polymer) showed the properties of middle amount of charge accumulation about 20 C/m3 and middle saturation time about 1 to 20 minutes. The PC, PEN, PI and PET (polar polymers) showed the properties of small amount of charge accumulation about 5 to 20 C/m3 and within short saturation time about 1.0 minutes. This paper summarizes the relationship between the properties of charge accumulation and chemical structural formula, and compares between the electro static potential distribution with negative charged polymer and its chemical structural formula.

  11. Blast Exposure Causes Early and Persistent Aberrant Phospho- and Cleaved-Tau Expression in a Murine Model of Mild Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Bertrand R.; Meabon, James S.; Martin, Tobin J.; Mourad, Pierre D.; Bennett, Raymond; Kraemer, Brian C.; Cernak, Ibolja; Petrie, Eric C.; Emery, Michael J.; Swenson, Erik R.; Mayer, Cynthia; Mehic, Edin; Peskind, Elaine R.; Cook, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is considered the ‘signature injury’ of combat veterans that have served during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This prevalence of mTBI is due in part to the common exposure to high explosive blasts in combat zones. In addition to the threats of blunt impact trauma caused by flying objects and the head itself being propelled against objects, the primary blast overpressure (BOP) generated by high explosives is capable of injuring the brain. Compared to other means of causing TBI, the pathophysiology of mild-to-moderate BOP is less well understood. To study the consequences of BOP exposure in mice, we employed a well-established approach using a compressed gas-driven shock tube that recapitulates battlefield-relevant open-field BOP. We found that 24 hours post-blast a single mild BOP provoked elevation of multiple phosphor- and cleaved-tau species in neurons, as well as elevating manganese superoxide-dismutase (MnSOD or SOD2) levels, a cellular response to oxidative stress. In hippocampus, aberrant tau species persisted for at least 30 days post-exposure, while SOD2 levels returned to sham control levels. These findings suggest that elevated phospho- and cleaved-tau species may be among the initiating pathologic processes induced by mild blast exposure. These findings may have important implications for efforts to prevent blast-induced insults to the brain from progressing into long-term neurodegenerative disease processes. PMID:23948882

  12. 30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (f) Type of material blasted. (g) Sketches of the blast pattern including number of holes, burden, spacing, decks, and delay pattern. (h) Diameter and depth of holes. (i) Types of explosives used. (j...-millisecond period. (l) Initiation system. (m) Type and length of stemming. (n) Mats or other protections used...

  13. 30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (f) Type of material blasted. (g) Sketches of the blast pattern including number of holes, burden, spacing, decks, and delay pattern. (h) Diameter and depth of holes. (i) Types of explosives used. (j...-millisecond period. (l) Initiation system. (m) Type and length of stemming. (n) Mats or other protections used...

  14. 30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (f) Type of material blasted. (g) Sketches of the blast pattern including number of holes, burden, spacing, decks, and delay pattern. (h) Diameter and depth of holes. (i) Types of explosives used. (j...-millisecond period. (l) Initiation system. (m) Type and length of stemming. (n) Mats or other protections used...

  15. 30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (f) Type of material blasted. (g) Sketches of the blast pattern including number of holes, burden, spacing, decks, and delay pattern. (h) Diameter and depth of holes. (i) Types of explosives used. (j...-millisecond period. (l) Initiation system. (m) Type and length of stemming. (n) Mats or other protections used...

  16. Effect of grit-blasting on substrate roughness and coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varacalle, Dominic J.; Guillen, Donna Post; Deason, Douglas M.; Rhodaberger, William; Sampson, Elliott

    2006-09-01

    Statistically designed experiments were performed to compare the surface roughness produced by grit blasting A36/1020 steel using different abrasives. Grit blast media, blast pressure, and working distance were varied using a Box-type statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. The surface textures produced by four metal grits (HG16, HG18, HG25, and HG40) and three conventional grits (copper slag, coal slag, and chilled iron) were compared. Substrate roughness was measured using surface profilometry and correlated with operating parameters. The HG16 grit produced the highest surface roughness of all the grits tested. Aluminum and zinc-aluminum coatings were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates using the twin-wire electric are (TWEA) process. Bond strength of the coatings was measured with a portable adhesion tester in accordance with ASTM standard D 4541. The coatings on substrates roughened with steel grit exhibit superior bond strength to those prepared with conventional grit. For aluminum coatings sprayed onto surfaces prepared with the HG16 grit, the bond strength was most influenced by current, spray distance, and spray gun pressure (in that order). The highest bond strength for the zinc-aluminum coatings was attained on surfaces prepared using the metal grits.

  17. A Multi-Mode Shock Tube for Investigation of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reneer, Dexter V.; Hisel, Richard D.; Hoffman, Joshua M.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Lusk, Braden T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave

  18. A multi-mode shock tube for investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reneer, Dexter V; Hisel, Richard D; Hoffman, Joshua M; Kryscio, Richard J; Lusk, Braden T; Geddes, James W

    2011-01-01

    Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components

  19. Effect of Blast Injury on Auditory Localization in Military Service Members.

    PubMed

    Kubli, Lina R; Brungart, Douglas; Northern, Jerry

    Among the many advantages of binaural hearing are the abilities to localize sounds in space and to attend to one sound in the presence of many sounds. Binaural hearing provides benefits for all listeners, but it may be especially critical for military personnel who must maintain situational awareness in complex tactical environments with multiple speech and noise sources. There is concern that Military Service Members who have been exposed to one or more high-intensity blasts during their tour of duty may have difficulty with binaural and spatial ability due to degradation in auditory and cognitive processes. The primary objective of this study was to assess the ability of blast-exposed Military Service Members to localize speech sounds in quiet and in multisource environments with one or two competing talkers. Participants were presented with one, two, or three topic-related (e.g., sports, food, travel) sentences under headphones and required to attend to, and then locate the source of, the sentence pertaining to a prespecified target topic within a virtual space. The listener's head position was monitored by a head-mounted tracking device that continuously updated the apparent spatial location of the target and competing speech sounds as the subject turned within the virtual space. Measurements of auditory localization ability included mean absolute error in locating the source of the target sentence, the time it took to locate the target sentence within 30 degrees, target/competitor confusion errors, response time, and cumulative head motion. Twenty-one blast-exposed Active-Duty or Veteran Military Service Members (blast-exposed group) and 33 non-blast-exposed Service Members and beneficiaries (control group) were evaluated. In general, the blast-exposed group performed as well as the control group if the task involved localizing the source of a single speech target. However, if the task involved two or three simultaneous talkers, localization ability was

  20. Translation from Russian to English the Book Blast Effects Caused by Explosions Authored by B. Gelfand and M. Silnikov

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    ingredients were freely b ought in the popular shops of chemicals. The following facts can serve as the evidence of wide use of mine -explosive...workshop rooms etc. The HE charges weight restrictions developed for conducting of blasting operations in open-cast mines and testing areas, are...Russian) 8. Silnikov M.V., Serdtsev N.I., Nelezin P.V. On the prospects of methods of explosion localization for the increase of safety of mine

  1. NOBLAST and JAMBLAST: New Options for BLAST and a Java Application Manager for BLAST results.

    PubMed

    Lagnel, Jacques; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2009-03-15

    NOBLAST (New Options for BLAST) is an open source program that provides a new user-friendly tabular output format for various NCBI BLAST programs (Blastn, Blastp, Blastx, Tblastn, Tblastx, Mega BLAST and Psi BLAST) without any use of a parser and provides E-value correction in case of use of segmented BLAST database. JAMBLAST using the NOBLAST output allows the user to manage, view and filter the BLAST hits using a number of selection criteria. A distribution package of NOBLAST and JAMBLAST including detailed installation procedure is freely available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/JAMBLAST/ and http://sourceforge.net/projects/NOBLAST. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Solution pH change in non-uniform alternating current electric fields at frequencies above the electrode charging frequency

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Massa, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    AC Faradaic reactions have been reported as a mechanism inducing non-ideal phenomena such as flow reversal and cell deformation in electrokinetic microfluidic systems. Prior published work described experiments in parallel electrode arrays below the electrode charging frequency (fc), the frequency for electrical double layer charging at the electrode. However, 2D spatially non-uniform AC electric fields are required for applications such as in plane AC electroosmosis, AC electrothermal pumps, and dielectrophoresis. Many microscale experimental applications utilize AC frequencies around or above fc. In this work, a pH sensitive fluorescein sodium salt dye was used to detect [H+] as an indicator of Faradaic reactions in aqueous solutions within non-uniform AC electric fields. Comparison experiments with (a) parallel (2D uniform fields) electrodes and (b) organic media were employed to deduce the electrode charging mechanism at 5 kHz (1.5fc). Time dependency analysis illustrated that Faradaic reactions exist above the theoretically predicted electrode charging frequency. Spatial analysis showed [H+] varied spatially due to electric field non-uniformities and local pH changed at length scales greater than 50 μm away from the electrode surface. Thus, non-uniform AC fields yielded spatially varied pH gradients as a direct consequence of ion path length differences while uniform fields did not yield pH gradients; the latter is consistent with prior published data. Frequency dependence was examined from 5 kHz to 12 kHz at 5.5 Vpp potential, and voltage dependency was explored from 3.5 to 7.5 Vpp at 5 kHz. Results suggest that Faradaic reactions can still proceed within electrochemical systems in the absence of well-established electrical double layers. This work also illustrates that in microfluidic systems, spatial medium variations must be considered as a function of experiment time, initial medium conditions, electric signal potential, frequency, and spatial

  3. In situ emulsification using a non-uniform alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhwan; Saveliev, Alexei V.

    2014-08-01

    We report an electric field based method for in situ emulsification of water droplets immersed in a continuous oil phase. High density water-in-oil emulsions are generated using non-uniform ac electric fields applied between needle and plate electrodes. An initial water droplet is entrained in the area of high electric field near the needle electrode where it is dispersed under the influence of high electric stresses. Breakup mechanisms responsible for a gradual dispersion of the water droplets are investigated. Identified mechanisms involve drop elongation to a cylindrical shape followed by a capillary breakup, ac electrospraying from individual water droplets, and formation and breakup of bead-like structures comprised by the water droplets interconnected by thin water bridges. Water droplets with diameters close to 1 μm and a narrow size distribution are formed at long processing times. The generated emulsion has a well-defined boundary and is confined near the needle electrode in a shape resembling a pendant drop.

  4. 29 CFR 1926.909 - Firing the blast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Firing the blast. (a) A code of blasting signals equivalent to Table U-1, shall be posted on one or more... blasts 5 minutes prior to blast signal. Blast Signal—A series of short blasts 1 minute prior to the shot...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.909 - Firing the blast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Firing the blast. (a) A code of blasting signals equivalent to Table U-1, shall be posted on one or more... blasts 5 minutes prior to blast signal. Blast Signal—A series of short blasts 1 minute prior to the shot...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.909 - Firing the blast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Firing the blast. (a) A code of blasting signals equivalent to Table U-1, shall be posted on one or more... blasts 5 minutes prior to blast signal. Blast Signal—A series of short blasts 1 minute prior to the shot...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.909 - Firing the blast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Firing the blast. (a) A code of blasting signals equivalent to Table U-1, shall be posted on one or more... blasts 5 minutes prior to blast signal. Blast Signal—A series of short blasts 1 minute prior to the shot...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.909 - Firing the blast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Firing the blast. (a) A code of blasting signals equivalent to Table U-1, shall be posted on one or more... blasts 5 minutes prior to blast signal. Blast Signal—A series of short blasts 1 minute prior to the shot...

  9. Quantification and aging of the post-blast residue of TNT landmines.

    PubMed

    Oxley, Jimmie C; Smith, James L; Resende, Elmo; Pearce, Evan

    2003-07-01

    Post-blast residues are potential interferents to chemical detection of landmines. To assess the potential problem related to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), its post-blast residue was identified and quantified. In the first part of this study laboratory-scale samples of TNT (2 g) were detonated in a small-scale explosivity device (SSED) to evaluate the explosive power and collect post-blast residue for chemical analysis. Initiator size was large relative to the TNT charge; thus, issues arose regarding choice of initiator, residue from the initiator, and afterburning of TNT. The second part of this study detonated 75 to 150 g of military-grade TNT (typical of antipersonnel mines) in 55-gal barrels containing various witness materials (metal plates, sand, barrel walls, the atmosphere). The witness materials were analyzed for explosive residue. In a third set of tests, 75-g samples of TNT were detonated over soil (from Fort Leonard Wood or Sandia National Laboratory) in an indoor firing chamber (100 by 4.6 by 2.7 m high). Targeted in these studies were TNT and four explosive-related compounds (ERC): 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), 2- and 4-aminodinitrotoluene (2-ADNT and 4-ADNT). The latter two are microbial degradation products of TNT. Post-blast residue was allowed to age in the soils as a function of moisture contents (5 and 10%) in order to quantify the rate of degradation of the principal residues (TNT, DNT, and DNB) and formation of the TNT microbial degradation products (2-ADNT and 4-ADNT). The major distinction between landmine leakage and post-blast residue was not the identity of the species but relative ratios of amounts. In landmine leakage the DNT/TNT ratio was usually greater than 1. In post-blast residue it was on the order of 1 to 1/100th of a percent, and the total amount of pre-blast residue (landmine leakage) was a factor of 1/100 to 1/1000 less than post-blast. In addition, landmine leakage resulted in low DNT/ADNT ratios, usually

  10. Assessment of Blasting Performance Using Electronic Vis-à-Vis Shock Tube Detonators in Strong Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Suresh Kumar; Rai, Piyush

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation of the shock tube and electronic detonating systems practised in bench blasting. The blast trials were conducted on overburden rocks of Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss formations in one of the largest metalliferous mine of India. The study revealed that the choice of detonating system was crucial in deciding the fragment size and its distribution within the blasted muck-piles. The fragment size and its distribution affected the digging rate of excavators. Also, the shape of the blasted muck-pile was found to be related to the degree of fragmentation. From the present work, it may be inferred that in electronic detonation system, timely release of explosive energy resulted in better overall blasting performance. Hence, the precision in delay time must be considered in designing blast rounds in such overburden rock formations. State-of-art image analysis, GPS based muck-pile profile plotting techniques were rigorously used in the investigation. The study revealed that a mean fragment size (K50) value for shock tube detonated blasts (0.55-0.59 m) was higher than that of electronically detonated blasts (0.43-0.45 m). The digging rate of designated shovels (34 m3) with electronically detonated blasts was consistently more than 5000 t/h, which was almost 13 % higher in comparison to shock tube detonated blasts. Furthermore, favourable muck-pile shapes were witnessed in electronically detonated blasts from the observations made on the dozer performance.

  11. Erosional furrows formed during the lateral blast at Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.; Sturtevant, B.

    1988-01-01

    Nearly horizontal, quasi-periodic erosional features of 7-m average transverse wavelength and of order 100-m length occur in scattered locations from 3.5 to 9 km from the crater at Mount St. Helens under deposits of the lateral blast of May 18, 1980. We attribute the erosional features to scouring by longitudinal vortices resulting from flow instabilities induced by complex topography, namely, by streamline curvature in regions of reattachment downstream of sheltered regions, and by the cross-flow component of flow subparallel to ridge crests. The diameter of the vortices and their transverse spacing, inferred from the distance between furrows, are taken to be of the order of the boundary layer thickness. The inferred boundary layer thickness (???14 m at 9 km from the source of the blast) is consistent with the running length from the mountain to the furrow locations. The orientation of furrows induced by the cross-flow instability can be used to measure the upwash angle and estimate the flow Mach number: at the central ridge of Spirit Lake the Mach number is inferred to have been about 2.5, and the flow velocity approximately 235 m/s. -from Authors

  12. Identification of inorganic ions in post-blast explosive residues using portable CE instrumentation and capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Joseph P; Johns, Cameron; Breadmore, Michael C; Hilder, Emily F; Guijt, Rosanne M; Lennard, Chris; Dicinoski, Greg; Haddad, Paul R

    2008-11-01

    Novel CE methods have been developed on portable instrumentation adapted to accommodate a capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector for the separation and sensitive detection of inorganic anions and cations in post-blast explosive residues from homemade inorganic explosive devices. The methods presented combine sensitivity and speed of analysis for the wide range of inorganic ions used in this study. Separate methods were employed for the separation of anions and cations. The anion separation method utilised a low conductivity 70 mM Tris/70 mM CHES aqueous electrolyte (pH 8.6) with a 90 cm capillary coated with hexadimethrine bromide to reverse the EOF. Fifteen anions could be baseline separated in 7 min with detection limits in the range 27-240 microg/L. A selection of ten anions deemed most important in this application could be separated in 45 s on a shorter capillary (30.6 cm) using the same electrolyte. The cation separation method was performed on a 73 cm length of fused-silica capillary using an electrolyte system composed of 10 mM histidine and 50 mM acetic acid, at pH 4.2. The addition of the complexants, 1 mM hydroxyisobutyric acid and 0.7 mM 18-crown-6 ether, enhanced selectivity and allowed the separation of eleven inorganic cations in under 7 min with detection limits in the range 31-240 microg/L. The developed methods were successfully field tested on post-blast residues obtained from the controlled detonation of homemade explosive devices. Results were verified using ion chromatographic analyses of the same samples.

  13. Simulation of the reflected blast wave from a C-4 charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. Michael; Kuhl, Allen L.; Tringe, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 μm per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 7 ranges (GR = 0, 5.08, 10.16, 15.24, 20.32, 25.4, and 30.48 cm) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 5 cm), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  14. Blast injury from explosive munitions.

    PubMed

    Cernak, I; Savic, J; Ignjatovic, D; Jevtic, M

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of blast in common war injuries. One thousand three hundred and three patients injured by explosive munitions and demonstrating extremity wounds without other penetrating injuries were admitted to the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade between 1991 and 1994. Of these, 665 patients (51%) had symptoms and physical signs that were compatible with the clinical diagnosis of primary blast injury, whereas the remaining 658 patients did not. Random sampling of 65 patients in the blast group during the early posttraumatic period showed statistically significant elevations in blood thromboxane A2 (TxA2), prostacyclin (PGI2), and sulfidopeptide leukotrienes compared with the random sample of 62 patients in the nonblast group. This difference could not be accounted for by differing injury severity between the groups, because the severity of wounds as measured by both the Injury Severity Score and the Red Cross Wound Classification was similar in both groups. Amongst blast patients, 200 patients (30%) had long-term (1 year) symptoms and signs reflecting central nervous system disorders. These symptoms and signs were only sporadically found in 4% of the nonblast patients. These findings indicate that primary blast injury is more common in war injuries than previously thought and that of those affected by blast, a surprisingly high proportion retain long-term neurologic disability. The elevation in eicosanoids could be used to confirm and monitor blast injury. In relation to the immediate management of patients injured by explosive weapons, it follows that particular attention should be paid to the presence and/or development of blast injury. Our findings indicate that blast is more common in war injuries than previously thought. Eicosanoid changes after blast injury suggest that blast injury causes a major physiologic stress. A variety of effects on the central nervous system suggest that blast injury could be responsible for some aspects of what is now

  15. Non-exhaust PM emissions from electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmers, Victor R. J. H.; Achten, Peter A. J.

    2016-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) exposure has been linked to adverse health effects by numerous studies. Therefore, governments have been heavily incentivising the market to switch to electric passenger cars in order to reduce air pollution. However, this literature review suggests that electric vehicles may not reduce levels of PM as much as expected, because of their relatively high weight. By analysing the existing literature on non-exhaust emissions of different vehicle categories, this review found that there is a positive relationship between weight and non-exhaust PM emission factors. In addition, electric vehicles (EVs) were found to be 24% heavier than equivalent internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). As a result, total PM10 emissions from EVs were found to be equal to those of modern ICEVs. PM2.5 emissions were only 1-3% lower for EVs compared to modern ICEVs. Therefore, it could be concluded that the increased popularity of electric vehicles will likely not have a great effect on PM levels. Non-exhaust emissions already account for over 90% of PM10 and 85% of PM2.5 emissions from traffic. These proportions will continue to increase as exhaust standards improve and average vehicle weight increases. Future policy should consequently focus on setting standards for non-exhaust emissions and encouraging weight reduction of all vehicles to significantly reduce PM emissions from traffic.

  16. Divide and Conquer (DC) BLAST: fast and easy BLAST execution within HPC environments

    DOE PAGES

    Yim, Won Cheol; Cushman, John C.

    2017-07-22

    Bioinformatics is currently faced with very large-scale data sets that lead to computational jobs, especially sequence similarity searches, that can take absurdly long times to run. For example, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST and BLAST+) suite, which is by far the most widely used tool for rapid similarity searching among nucleic acid or amino acid sequences, is highly central processing unit (CPU) intensive. While the BLAST suite of programs perform searches very rapidly, they have the potential to be accelerated. In recent years, distributed computing environments have become more widely accessible andmore » used due to the increasing availability of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Therefore, simple solutions for data parallelization are needed to expedite BLAST and other sequence analysis tools. However, existing software for parallel sequence similarity searches often requires extensive computational experience and skill on the part of the user. In order to accelerate BLAST and other sequence analysis tools, Divide and Conquer BLAST (DCBLAST) was developed to perform NCBI BLAST searches within a cluster, grid, or HPC environment by using a query sequence distribution approach. Scaling from one (1) to 256 CPU cores resulted in significant improvements in processing speed. Thus, DCBLAST dramatically accelerates the execution of BLAST searches using a simple, accessible, robust, and parallel approach. DCBLAST works across multiple nodes automatically and it overcomes the speed limitation of single-node BLAST programs. DCBLAST can be used on any HPC system, can take advantage of hundreds of nodes, and has no output limitations. Thus, this freely available tool simplifies distributed computation pipelines to facilitate the rapid discovery of sequence similarities between very large data sets.« less

  17. Divide and Conquer (DC) BLAST: fast and easy BLAST execution within HPC environments

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yim, Won Cheol; Cushman, John C.

    Bioinformatics is currently faced with very large-scale data sets that lead to computational jobs, especially sequence similarity searches, that can take absurdly long times to run. For example, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST and BLAST+) suite, which is by far the most widely used tool for rapid similarity searching among nucleic acid or amino acid sequences, is highly central processing unit (CPU) intensive. While the BLAST suite of programs perform searches very rapidly, they have the potential to be accelerated. In recent years, distributed computing environments have become more widely accessible andmore » used due to the increasing availability of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Therefore, simple solutions for data parallelization are needed to expedite BLAST and other sequence analysis tools. However, existing software for parallel sequence similarity searches often requires extensive computational experience and skill on the part of the user. In order to accelerate BLAST and other sequence analysis tools, Divide and Conquer BLAST (DCBLAST) was developed to perform NCBI BLAST searches within a cluster, grid, or HPC environment by using a query sequence distribution approach. Scaling from one (1) to 256 CPU cores resulted in significant improvements in processing speed. Thus, DCBLAST dramatically accelerates the execution of BLAST searches using a simple, accessible, robust, and parallel approach. DCBLAST works across multiple nodes automatically and it overcomes the speed limitation of single-node BLAST programs. DCBLAST can be used on any HPC system, can take advantage of hundreds of nodes, and has no output limitations. Thus, this freely available tool simplifies distributed computation pipelines to facilitate the rapid discovery of sequence similarities between very large data sets.« less

  18. Effect of pulsed electric field on the proteolysis of cold boned beef M. Longissimus lumborum and M. Semimembranosus.

    PubMed

    Suwandy, Via; Carne, Alan; van de Ven, Remy; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Hopkins, David L

    2015-02-01

    The effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) and ageing (3, 7, 14 and 21 days) on the shear force, protein profile, and post-mortem proteolysis of beef loins (M. Longissimus lumborum, LL) and topsides (M. Semimembranosus, SM) were investigated using a range of pulsed electric field treatments [voltages (5 and 10 kV) and frequencies (20, 50, and 90 Hz)]. PEF treatment decreased the shear force of beef LL and SM muscles by up to 19%. The reduction in the shear force in the LL was not affected by the treatment intensity whereas the reduction in the SM was dependent on PEF frequency. PEF treated beef loins showed increased proteolysis, both early post-mortem and during subsequent post-mortem storage reflected by increased degradation of troponin-T and desmin. The most prominent troponin-T degradation was found in samples treated with 5 kV-90 Hz, 10 kV-20 Hz at day 3 and day 7 post-treatment in addition to 10 kV-50 Hz in subsequent post-treatment times. The degradation of desmin in PEF treated beef loins increased with ageing time.

  19. Air blasts generated by rockfall impacts: Analysis of the 1996 Happy Isles event in Yosemite National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, M.M.; Savage, W.Z.; Wieczorek, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    The July 10, 1996, Happy Isles rockfall in Yosemite National Park, California, released 23,000 to 38,000 m3 of granite in four separate events. The impacts of the first two events which involved a 550-m free fall, generated seismic waves and atmospheric pressure waves (air blasts). We focus on the dynamic behavior of the second air blast that downed over 1000 trees, destroyed a bridge, demolished a snack bar, and caused one fatality and several injuries. Calculated velocities for the air blast from a two-phase, finite difference model are compared to velocities estimated from tree damage. From tornadic studies of tree damage, the air blast is estimated to have traveled <108-120 m/s within 50 m from the impact and decreased to <10-20 m/s within 500 m from the impact. The numerical model simulates the two-dimensional propagation of an air blast through a dusty atmosphere with initial conditions defined by the impact velocity and pressure. The impact velocity (105-107 m/s) is estimated from the Colorado Rockfall Simulation Program that simulates rockfall trajectories. The impact pressure (0.5 MPa) is constrained by the kinetic energy of the impact (1010-1012 J) estimated from the seismic energy generated by the impact. Results from the air blast simulations indicate that the second Happy Isles air blast (weak shock wave) traveled with an initial velocity above the local sound speed. The size and location of the first impact are thought to have injected <50 wt % dust into the atmosphere. This amount of dust lowered the local atmospheric sound speed to ???220 m/s. The discrepancy between calculated velocity data and field estimated velocity data (???220 m/s versus ???110 m/s) is attributed to energy dissipated by the downing of trees and additional entrainment of debris into the atmosphere not included in the calculations. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Air blasts generated by rockfall impacts: Analysis of the 1996 Happy Isles event in Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, M. M.; Savage, W. Z.; Wieczorek, G. F.

    1999-10-01

    The July 10, 1996, Happy Isles rockfall in Yosemite National Park, California, released 23,000 to 38,000 m3 of granite in four separate events. The impacts of the first two events which involved a 550-m free fall, generated seismic waves and atmospheric pressure waves (air blasts). We focus on the dynamic behavior of the second air blast that downed over 1000 trees, destroyed a bridge, demolished a snack bar, and caused one fatality and several injuries. Calculated velocities for the air blast from a two-phase, finite difference model are compared to velocities estimated from tree damage. From tornadic studies of tree damage, the air blast is estimated to have traveled <108-120 m/s within 50 m from the impact and decreased to <10-20 m/s within 500 m from the impact. The numerical model simulates the two-dimensional propagation of an air blast through a dusty atmosphere with initial conditions defined by the impact velocity and pressure. The impact velocity (105-107 m/s) is estimated from the Colorado Rockfall Simulation Program that simulates rockfall trajectories. The impact pressure (0.5 MPa) is constrained by the kinetic energy of the impact (1010-1012 J) estimated from the seismic energy generated by the impact. Results from the air blast simulations indicate that the second Happy Isles air blast (weak shock wave) traveled with an initial velocity above the local sound speed. The size and location of the first impact are thought to have injected <50 wt% dust into the atmosphere. This amount of dust lowered the local atmospheric sound speed to ˜220 m/s. The discrepancy between calculated velocity data and field estimated velocity data (˜220 m/s versus ˜110 m/s) is attributed to energy dissipated by the downing of trees and additional entrainment of debris into the atmosphere not included in the calculations.

  1. Primary blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Y Y

    1986-12-01

    Injury from explosion may be due to the direct cussive effect of the blast wave (primary), being struck by material propelled by the blast (secondary), to whole-body displacement and impact (tertiary), or to miscellaneous effects from burns, toxic acids, and so on. Severe primary blast injury is most likely to be seen in military operations but can occur in civilian industrial accidents or terrorist actions. Damage is seen almost exclusively in air-containing organs--the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, and the auditory system. Pulmonary injury is characterized by pneumothorax, parenchymal hemorrhage, and alveolar rupture. The last is responsible for the arterial air embolism that is the principle cause of early mortality. Treatment for blast injury is similar to that for blunt trauma. The sequalae of air embolization to the cerebral or coronary circulation may be altered by immediate hyperbaric therapy. Use of positive pressure ventilatory systems should be closely monitored as they may increase the risk of air embolism in pneumothorax. Morbidity and mortality may be increased by strenuous exertion after injury and by the wearing of a cloth ballistic vest at the time of the blast.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Various Blast Loading Descriptors as Occupant Injury Predictors for Underbody Blast Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-22

    expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or the DoD, and shall not be used for advertising or...Trembelay, J., “Validation of a Loading Model for Simulating Blast Mine Effects on Armoured Vehicles,” 7th International LS-DYNA Users Conference

  3. Microstructural consequences of blast lung injury characterised with digital volume correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Hari; Nila, Alex; Vitharana, Kalpani; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien N.; Karunaratne, Angelo; Mohammed, Idris K.; Bodey, Andrew J.; Hellyer, Peter J.; Overby, Darryl R.; Schroter, Robert C.; Hollis, Dave

    2017-12-01

    This study focuses on microstructural changes that occur within the mammalian lung when subject to blast and how these changes influence strain distributions within the tissue. Shock tube experiments were performed to generate the blast injured specimens (cadaveric Sprague-Dawley rats). Blast overpressures of 100 kPa and 180 kPa were studied. Synchrotron tomography imaging was used to capture volumetric image data of lungs. Specimens were ventilated using a custom-built system to study multiple inflation pressures during each tomography scan. This data enabled the first digital volume correlation (DVC) measurements in lung tissue to be performed. Quantitative analysis was performed to describe the damaged architecture of the lung. No clear changes in the microstructure of the tissue morphology were observed due to controlled low to moderate level blast exposure. However, significant focal sites of injury were observed using DVC, which allowed detection of bias and concentration in the patterns of strain level. Morphological analysis corroborated the findings, illustrating that the focal damage caused by a blast can give rise to diffuse influence across the tissue. It is important to characterise the non-instantly fatal doses of blast, given the transient nature of blast lung in the clinical setting. This research has highlighted the need for better understanding of focal injury and its zone of influence (alveolar inter-dependency and neighbouring tissue burden as a result of focal injury). Digital volume correlation techniques show great promise as a tool to advance this endeavour, providing a new perspective on lung mechanics post-blast.

  4. Blasting vibrations control: The shortcomings of traditional methods

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Vuillaume, P.M.; Kiszlo, M.; Bernard, T.

    1996-12-31

    In the context of its studies for the French ministry of the environment and for the French national coal board, INERIS (the French institute for the industrial environment and hazards, formerly CERCHAR) has made a complete critical survey of the methods generally used to reduce the levels of blasting vibrations. It is generally acknowledged that the main parameter to control vibrations is the so-called instantaneous charge, or charge per delay. This should be reduced as much as possible in order to diminish vibration levels. On account of this, the use of a new generation of blasting devices, such as non-electricmore » detonators or electronic sequential timers has been developed since the seventies. INERIS has collected data from about 900 blasts in 2 quarries and 3 open pit mines. These data include input parameters such as borehole diameter, burden, spacing, charge per hole, charge per delay, total fired charge, etc ... They also include output measurements, such as vibration peak particle velocities, and main frequencies. These data have been analyzed with the help of multi variable statistical tools. Blasting tests were undertaken to evaluate new methods of vibrations control, such as the superposition of vibration signals. These methods appear to be accurate in many critical cases, but certainly would be highly improved with a better accuracy of firing delays. The development of electronic detonators seems to be the way of the future for a better blasting control.« less

  5. Computer assisted blast design and assessment tools

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cameron, A.R.; Kleine, T.H.; Forsyth, W.W.

    1995-12-31

    In general the software required by a blast designer includes tools that graphically present blast designs (surface and underground), can analyze a design or predict its result, and can assess blasting results. As computers develop and computer literacy continues to rise the development of and use of such tools will spread. An example of the tools that are becoming available includes: Automatic blast pattern generation and underground ring design; blast design evaluation in terms of explosive distribution and detonation simulation; fragmentation prediction; blast vibration prediction and minimization; blast monitoring for assessment of dynamic performance; vibration measurement, display and signal processing;more » evaluation of blast results in terms of fragmentation; and risk and reliability based blast assessment. The authors have identified a set of criteria that are essential in choosing appropriate software blasting tools.« less

  6. BLAST BIOLOGY. Technical Progress Report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    White, C.S.; Richmond, D.R.

    1959-09-18

    Experimental data regarding the biologic consequences of exposure to several environmental variations associated with actual and simulated explosive detonations were reviewed. Blast biology is discussed relative to primary, secondary, tentiary, and miscellaneous blast effects as those attributable, respectively, to variations in environmental pressure, trauma from blast-produced missiles (both penetrating and nonpenetrating), the consequences of physical displacement of biological targets by blast-produced winds, and hazards due to ground shock, dust, and thermal phenomena not caused by thermal radiation per se. Primary blast effects were considered, noting physical-biophysical factors contributing to the observed pathophysiology. A simple hydrostatic model was utilized diagrammatically inmore » pointing out possible etiologic mechanisms. The gross biologic response to single. "fast"-rising overpressures were described as was the tolerance of mice, rats, guinea pigs. and rabbits to "long"-duration pressure pulses rising "rapidly" in single and double steps. Data regarding biological response to "slowly" rising over-pressures of "long" duration are discussed. Attention was called to the similarities under certain circumstances between thoracic trauma from nonpenetrating missiles and that noted from air blast. The association between air emboli, increase in lung weight (hemorrhage and edema), and mortality was discussed. Data relevant to the clinical symptoms and therapy of blast injury are presented. The relation of blast hazards to nuclear explosions was assessed and one approach to predicting the maximal potential casualties from blast phenomena is presented making use of arbitrary and tentative criteria. (auth)« less

  7. Osteogenic differentiation of periosteum-derived stromal cells in blast-associated traumatic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sory, David R.; Amin, Harsh D.; Rankin, Sara M.; Proud, William G.

    2017-06-01

    One of the most recurrent medical complications resulting from blast trauma includes blast-induced heterotopic ossification. Heterotopic ossification refers to the pathologic formation of extraskeletal bone in non-osseous tissue. Although a number of studies have established the interaction between mechanics and biology in bone formation following shock trauma, the exact nature of the mechanical stimuli associated to blast-loading and their influence on the activation of osteogenic differentiation of cells remain unanswered. Here we present the design and calibration of a loading platform compatible with living cells to examine the effects of mechanical stress pulses of blast-associated varying strain rates on the activation of osteogenic differentiation of periosteum (PO) cells. Multiaxial compression loadings of PO cells are performed at different magnitudes of stress and ranges of strain rate. A proof of concept is presented so as to establish a new window to address fundamental questions regarding blast injuries at the cellular level. This work was conducted under the auspices of the Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support of the Royal British Legion.

  8. Blast wave mitigation by dry aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Prete, E.; Chinnayya, A.; Domergue, L.; Hadjadj, A.; Haas, J.-F.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents results of experiments and numerical modeling on the mitigation of blast waves using dry aqueous foams. The multiphase formalism is used to model the dry aqueous foam as a dense non-equilibrium two-phase medium as well as its interaction with the high explosion detonation products. New experiments have been performed to study the mass scaling effects. The experimental as well as the numerical results, which are in good agreement, show that more than an order of magnitude reduction in the peak overpressure ratio can be achieved. The positive impulse reduction is less marked than the overpressures. The Hopkinson scaling is also found to hold particularly at larger scales for these two blast parameters. Furthermore, momentum and heat transfers, which have the main dominant role in the mitigation process, are shown to modify significantly the classical blast wave profile and thereafter to disperse the energy from the peak overpressure due to the induced relaxation zone. In addition, the velocity of the fireball, which acts as a piston on its environment, is smaller than in air. Moreover, the greater inertia of the liquid phase tends to project the aqueous foam far from the fireball. The created gap tempers the amplitude of the transmitted shock wave to the aqueous foam. As a consequence, this results in a lowering of blast wave parameters of the two-phase spherical decaying shock wave.

  9. BLAST: The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, Mark; Ade, Peter; Bock, Jamie; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matt; Gunderson, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    BLAST is the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope. It will fly from a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform from Antarctica. The telescope design incorporates a 2 m primary mirror with large-format bolometer arrays operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns. By providing the first sensitive large-area (10 sq. deg.) sub-mm surveys at these wavelengths, BLAST will address some of the most important galactic and cosmological questions regarding the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies and clusters. Galactic and extragalactic BLAST surveys will: (1) identify large numbers of high-redshift galaxies; (2) measure photometric redshifts, rest-frame FIR luminosities and star formation rates thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the galaxies that produce the FIR and sub-mm background; (3) measure cold pre-stellar sources associated with the earliest stages of star and planet formation; (4) make high-resolution maps of diffuse galactic emission over a wide range of galactic latitudes. In addition to achieving the above scientific goals, the exciting legacy of the BLAST LDB experiment will be a catalogue of 3000-5000 extragalactic sub-mm sources and a 100 sq. deg. sub-mm galactic plane survey. Multi-frequency follow-up observations from SIRTF, ASTRO-F, and Herschel, together with spectroscopic observations and sub-arcsecond imaging from ALMA are essential to understand the physical nature of the BLAST sources.

  10. Shock tubes and blast injury modeling.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ya-Lei; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast injury has become the most prevalent injury in recent military conflicts and terrorist attacks. The magnitude of this kind of polytrauma is complex due to the basic physics of blast and the surrounding environments. Therefore, development of stable, reproducible and controllable animal model using an ideal blast simulation device is the key of blast injury research. The present review addresses the modeling of blast injury and applications of shock tubes.

  11. Modelling the Source of Blasting for the Numerical Simulation of Blast-Induced Ground Vibrations: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainalis, Daniel; Kaufmann, Olivier; Tshibangu, Jean-Pierre; Verlinden, Olivier; Kouroussis, Georges

    2017-01-01

    The mining and construction industries have long been faced with considerable attention and criticism in regard to the effects of blasting. The generation of ground vibrations is one of the most significant factors associated with blasting and is becoming increasingly important as mining sites are now regularly located near urban areas. This is of concern to not only the operators of the mine but also residents. Mining sites are subjected to an inevitable compromise: a production blast is designed to fragment the utmost amount of rock possible; however, any increase in the blast can generate ground vibrations which can propagate great distances and cause structural damage or discomfort to residents in surrounding urban areas. To accurately predict the propagation of ground vibrations near these sensitive areas, the blasting process and surrounding environment must be characterised and understood. As an initial step, an accurate model of the source of blast-induced vibrations is required. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the approaches to model the blasting source in order to critically evaluate developments in the field. An overview of the blasting process and description of the various factors which influence the blast performance and subsequent ground vibrations are also presented. Several approaches to analytically model explosives are discussed. Ground vibration prediction methods focused on seed waveform and charge weight scaling techniques are presented. Finally, numerical simulations of the blasting source are discussed, including methods to estimate blasthole wall pressure time-history, and hydrodynamic codes.

  12. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Lance, Rachel M.; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  13. Micro-scale pollution mechanism of dust diffusion in a blasting driving face based on CFD-DEM coupled model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiming; Cheng, Weimin; Xie, Yao; Peng, Huitian

    2018-05-23

    In order to investigate the diffuse pollution mechanisms of high-concentration dusts in the blasting driving face, the airflow-dust coupled model was constructed based on CFD-DEM coupled model; the diffusion rules of the dusts with different diameters at microscopic scale were analyzed in combination with the field measured results. The simulation results demonstrate that single-exhaust ventilation exhibited more favorable dust suppression performance than single-forced ventilation. Under single-exhaust ventilation condition, the motion trajectories of the dusts with the diameter smaller than 20 μm were close to the airflow streamline and these dusts were mainly distributed near the footway walls; by contrast, under single-forced ventilation condition, the motion trajectories of the dust particles with a diameter range of 20~40 μm were close to the airflow streamlines, and a large number of dusts with the diameter smaller than 20 μm accumulated in the regions 5 m and 17~25 m away from the head-on section. Moreover, under the single-exhaust ventilation, the relationship between dust diameter D and negative-pressured-induced dust emission ratio P can be expressed as P = - 25.03ln(D) + 110.39, and the dust emission ratio was up to 74.36% for 7m dusts, and the path-dependent settling behaviors of the dusts mainly occurred around the head-on section; under single-forced ventilation condition, the z value of the dusts with the diameter over 20 μm decreased and the dusts with a diameter smaller than 7 μm are particularly harmful to human health, but their settling ratios were below 22.36%. Graphical abstract The airflow-dust CFD-DEM coupling model was established. The numerical simulation results were verified. The migration laws of airflow field were obtained in a blasting driving face. The diffusion laws of dusts were obtained after blasting.

  14. Core radial electric field and transport in Wendelstein 7-X plasmas

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Pablant, N. A.; Langenberg, A.; Alonso, A.

    The results from the investigation of neoclassical core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (E r) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the E r profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Investigation of the radial electric field is important in understanding neoclassical transport and in validation of neoclassical calculations. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u ⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric fieldmore » to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity, which can be measured using the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu ⊥~ 5 km/s (ΔE r ~12 kV/m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW. These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between heating power temperature, and density profiles and the radial electric field. Finally, the inferred E r profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations based on measured plasma profiles. The results from several neoclassical codes, sfincs, fortec-3d, and dkes, are compared both with each other and the measurements. Finally, these comparisons show good agreement, giving confidence in the applicability of the neoclassical calculations to the W7-X configuration.« less

  15. Core radial electric field and transport in Wendelstein 7-X plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, N. A.; Langenberg, A.; Alonso, A.; Beidler, C. D.; Bitter, M.; Bozhenkov, S.; Burhenn, R.; Beurskens, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Fuchert, G.; Gates, D.; Geiger, J.; Hill, K. W.; Höfel, U.; Hirsch, M.; Knauer, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Landreman, M.; Lazerson, S.; Maaßberg, H.; Marchuk, O.; Massidda, S.; Neilson, G. H.; Pasch, E.; Satake, S.; Svennson, J.; Traverso, P.; Turkin, Y.; Valson, P.; Velasco, J. L.; Weir, G.; Windisch, T.; Wolf, R. C.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhang, D.; W7-X Team

    2018-02-01

    The results from the investigation of neoclassical core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (Er) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the Er profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Investigation of the radial electric field is important in understanding neoclassical transport and in validation of neoclassical calculations. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric field to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity, which can be measured using the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu⊥˜ 5 km/s (ΔEr ˜ 12 kV/m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW. These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between heating power temperature, and density profiles and the radial electric field. Finally, the inferred Er profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations based on measured plasma profiles. The results from several neoclassical codes, sfincs, fortec-3d, and dkes, are compared both with each other and the measurements. These comparisons show good agreement, giving confidence in the applicability of the neoclassical calculations to the W7-X configuration.

  16. Core radial electric field and transport in Wendelstein 7-X plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Pablant, N. A.; Langenberg, A.; Alonso, A.; ...

    2018-02-12

    The results from the investigation of neoclassical core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (E r) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the E r profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Investigation of the radial electric field is important in understanding neoclassical transport and in validation of neoclassical calculations. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u ⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric fieldmore » to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity, which can be measured using the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu ⊥~ 5 km/s (ΔE r ~12 kV/m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW. These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between heating power temperature, and density profiles and the radial electric field. Finally, the inferred E r profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations based on measured plasma profiles. The results from several neoclassical codes, sfincs, fortec-3d, and dkes, are compared both with each other and the measurements. Finally, these comparisons show good agreement, giving confidence in the applicability of the neoclassical calculations to the W7-X configuration.« less

  17. Low-cost blast wave generator for studies of hearing loss and brain injury: blast wave effects in closed spaces.

    PubMed

    Newman, Andrew J; Hayes, Sarah H; Rao, Abhiram S; Allman, Brian L; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Ding, Dalian; Stolzberg, Daniel; Lobarinas, Edward; Mollendorf, Joseph C; Salvi, Richard

    2015-03-15

    Military personnel and civilians living in areas of armed conflict have increased risk of exposure to blast overpressures that can cause significant hearing loss and/or brain injury. The equipment used to simulate comparable blast overpressures in animal models within laboratory settings is typically very large and prohibitively expensive. To overcome the fiscal and space limitations introduced by previously reported blast wave generators, we developed a compact, low-cost blast wave generator to investigate the effects of blast exposures on the auditory system and brain. The blast wave generator was constructed largely from off the shelf components, and reliably produced blasts with peak sound pressures of up to 198dB SPL (159.3kPa) that were qualitatively similar to those produced from muzzle blasts or explosions. Exposure of adult rats to 3 blasts of 188dB peak SPL (50.4kPa) resulted in significant loss of cochlear hair cells, reduced outer hair cell function and a decrease in neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Existing blast wave generators are typically large, expensive, and are not commercially available. The blast wave generator reported here provides a low-cost method of generating blast waves in a typical laboratory setting. This compact blast wave generator provides scientists with a low cost device for investigating the biological mechanisms involved in blast wave injury to the rodent cochlea and brain that may model many of the damaging effects sustained by military personnel and civilians exposed to intense blasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-Cost Blast Wave Generator for Studies of Hearing Loss and Brain Injury: Blast Wave Effects in Closed Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Andrew J.; Hayes, Sarah H.; Rao, Abhiram S.; Allman, Brian L.; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Ding, Dalian; Stolzberg, Daniel; Lobarinas, Edward; Mollendorf, Joseph C.; Salvi, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Military personnel and civilians living in areas of armed conflict have increased risk of exposure to blast overpressures that can cause significant hearing loss and/or brain injury. The equipment used to simulate comparable blast overpressures in animal models within laboratory settings is typically very large and prohibitively expensive. New Method To overcome the fiscal and space limitations introduced by previously reported blast wave generators, we developed a compact, low-cost blast wave generator to investigate the effects of blast exposures on the auditory system and brain. Results The blast wave generator was constructed largely from off the shelf components, and reliably produced blasts with peak sound pressures of up to 198 dB SPL (159.3 kPa) that were qualitatively similar to those produced from muzzle blasts or explosions. Exposure of adult rats to 3 blasts of 188 dB peak SPL (50.4 kPa) resulted in significant loss of cochlear hair cells, reduced outer hair cell function and a decrease in neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Comparison to existing methods Existing blast wave generators are typically large, expensive, and are not commercially available. The blast wave generator reported here provides a low-cost method of generating blast waves in a typical laboratory setting. Conclusions This compact blast wave generator provides scientists with a low cost device for investigating the biological mechanisms involved in blast wave injury to the rodent cochlea and brain that may model many of the damaging effects sustained by military personnel and civilians exposed to intense blasts. PMID:25597910

  19. Novel non-equilibrium modelling of a DC electric arc in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeva, M.; Benilov, M. S.; Almeida, N. A.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel non-equilibrium model has been developed to describe the interplay of heat and mass transfer and electric and magnetic fields in a DC electric arc. A complete diffusion treatment of particle fluxes, a generalized form of Ohm’s law, and numerical matching of the arc plasma with the space-charge sheaths adjacent to the electrodes are applied to analyze in detail the plasma parameters and the phenomena occurring in the plasma column and the near-electrode regions of a DC arc generated in atmospheric pressure argon for current levels from 20 A up to 200 A. Results comprising electric field and potential, current density, heating of the electrodes, and effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium are presented and discussed. The current-voltage characteristic obtained is in fair agreement with known experimental data. It indicates a minimum for arc current of about 80 A. For all current levels, a field reversal in front of the anode accompanied by a voltage drop of (0.7-2.6) V is observed. Another field reversal is observed near the cathode for arc currents below 80 A.

  20. Blast optimization for improved dragline productivity

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Humphreys, M.; Baldwin, G.

    1994-12-31

    A project aimed at blast optimization for large open pit coal mines is utilizing blast monitoring and analysis techniques, advanced dragline monitoring equipment, and blast simulation software, to assess the major controlling factors affecting both blast performance and subsequent dragline productivity. This has involved collaborative work between the explosives supplier, mine operator, monitoring equipment manufacturer, and a mining research organization. The results from trial blasts and subsequently monitored dragline production have yielded promising results and continuing studies are being conducted as part of a blast optimization program. It should be stressed that the optimization of blasting practices for improved draglinemore » productivity is a site specific task, achieved through controlled and closely monitored procedures. The benefits achieved at one location can not be simply transferred to another minesite unless similar improvement strategies are first implemented.« less

  1. Fragment Size Distribution of Blasted Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jug, Jasmin; Strelec, Stjepan; Gazdek, Mario; Kavur, Boris

    2017-12-01

    Rock mass is a heterogeneous material, and the heterogeneity of rock causes sizes distribution of fragmented rocks in blasting. Prediction of blasted rock mass fragmentation has a significant role in the overall economics of opencast mines. Blasting as primary fragmentation can significantly decrease the cost of loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Blast fragmentation chiefly depends on the specific blast design (geometry of blast holes drilling, the quantity and class of explosive, the blasting form, the timing and partition, etc.) and on the properties of the rock mass (including the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock mass elastic Young modulus, the rock discontinuity characteristics and the rock density). Prediction and processing of blasting results researchers can accomplish by a variety of existing software’s and models, one of them is the Kuz-Ram model, which is possibly the most widely used approach to estimating fragmentation from blasting. This paper shows the estimation of fragmentation using the "SB" program, which was created by the authors. Mentioned program includes the Kuz-Ram model. Models of fragmentation are confirmed and calibrated by comparing the estimated fragmentation with actual post-blast fragmentation from image processing techniques. In this study, the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model has been used for an open-pit limestone quarry in Dalmatia, southern Croatia. The resulting calibrated value of the rock factor enables the quality prognosis of fragmentation in further blasting works, with changed drilling geometry and blast design parameters. It also facilitates simulation in the program to optimize blasting works and get the desired fragmentations of the blasted rock mass.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Various Blast Loading Descriptors as Occupant Injury Predictors for Underbody Blast Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-09

    of Hybrid III ATD LSDYNA model with FTSS v7.1.6 finite element dummy 6 Unclassified: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release...descriptors as occupant injury predictors for underbody blast events Recording injury metrics Response from the dummy especially pelvic acceleration and...Ciip(H&ad CG,2) "’"’ "-......--------, I Max : 122.669 @59.81 7!; Time, ms Pelvic Z acceleration, g I I Clip: -4.75737 Ts:97.4138 Te: 104.414

  3. Civilian blast-related burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is limited English literature describing the experience of a civilian hospital managing blast-related burn injuries. As the largest regional burn unit, we reviewed our cases with the aim of identifying means to improve current management. A 6-year retrospective analysis of all patients coded as sustaining blast-related burns was conducted through the unit’s burns database. Medical case notes were reviewed for information on burn demographics, management and outcomes. 42 patients were identified. Male to female ratio was 37:5. Age range was 12-84 years, (mean=33 years). Total body surface area (%TBSA) burn ranged from 0.25% to 60%, (median=1%). The most common burn injury was flame (31/42, 73.8%). Gas explosions were the most common mechanism of injury (19 cases; 45.2%). 7/42 cases (16.7%) had full ATLS management pre-transfer to the burns unit. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 0-43 (median=2). 17/42 (40.4%) patients required admission. 37/36 (88.1%) patients were managed conservatively of which 1 patient later required surgery due to deeper burns. 5/42 (11.9%) patients required surgical management at presentation and these were noted to be burns with >15% TBSA requiring resuscitation. One case required emergency escharotomies and finger amputations. All patients survived their burn injuries. Blast-related burn injuries are generally uncommon in the civilian setting. Following proper assessment, most of these cases can be deemed as minor injuries and managed conservatively. Improvement in burns management education and training at local emergency departments would provide efficient patient care and avoid unnecessary referrals to a burns unit. PMID:27857651

  4. NCBI BLAST+ integrated into Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Cock, Peter J A; Chilton, John M; Grüning, Björn; Johnson, James E; Soranzo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The NCBI BLAST suite has become ubiquitous in modern molecular biology and is used for small tasks such as checking capillary sequencing results of single PCR products, genome annotation or even larger scale pan-genome analyses. For early adopters of the Galaxy web-based biomedical data analysis platform, integrating BLAST into Galaxy was a natural step for sequence comparison workflows. The command line NCBI BLAST+ tool suite was wrapped for use within Galaxy. Appropriate datatypes were defined as needed. The integration of the BLAST+ tool suite into Galaxy has the goal of making common BLAST tasks easy and advanced tasks possible. This project is an informal international collaborative effort, and is deployed and used on Galaxy servers worldwide. Several examples of applications are described here.

  5. Genetic analysis of rice blast disease resistance genes using USDA rice mini-core and a mapping population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) is one of the most destructive diseases of cultivated rice, resulting in significant yield loss each year all over the world. Developing and utilizing blast resistant rice varieties is the most economical and effective m...

  6. [Expression and significance of P-gp/mdr1 mRNA, MRP and LRP in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Su, Li-ping; Ma, Li; Zhao, Jin; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Yong-an

    2009-03-01

    To explore the expression and clinical significance of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/mdr1mRNA, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) in newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. mdr1 mRNA of in 41 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was assayed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expressions of P-gp, MRP and LRP proteins in lymph node viable blasts were identified by flow cytometry. The results were compared with those obtained from control cases, and the correlation of the changes with clinical outcomes was analyzed. (1) Among the 41 cases, the positive expression of P-gp protein was detected in 8 cases, MRP in 7 cases, LRP in 15 cases, and mdr 1 mRNA in 11 cases. (2) The P-gp and LRP levels in NHL were significantly higher than those in control group, but MRP wasn't. The P-gp over-expression was significantly associated with mdr1mRNA (r = 0.396, P = 0.01). No correlation was showed among the expressions of P-gp, MRP and LRP. (3) Patients with P-gp expression had a poorer outcome of chemotherapy than those with P-gp-negative (P = 0.005). P-gp expression was significantly associated with higher clinical stage (P = 0.046) and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P = 0.032), but not associated with malignant degree (P = 0.298). MRP had no impact on the outcome of chemotherapy (P = 0.212), and wasn't significantly associated with higher clinical stage (P = 0.369), elevated LDH (P = 0.762) and higher malignant degree (P = 0.451). Patients with LRP expression had a poorer outcome of chemotherapy than those LRP-negative (P = 0.012). LRP expression was significantly associated with higher clinical stage (P = 0.0019), elevated LDH (P = 0.02) and higher malignant degree (P = 0.01). The data of this study indicate that P-gp and LRP expressions but not MRP expression are important in the mechanism of drug resistance associated with a poor clinical outcome in previously untreated NHL.

  7. Post-blasting seismicity in Rudna copper mine, Poland - source parameters analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Alicja; Rudziński, Łukasz; Talaga, Adam

    2017-04-01

    The really important hazard in Polish copper mines is high seismicity and corresponding rockbursts. Many methods are used to reduce the seismic hazard. Among others the most effective is preventing blasting in potentially hazardous mining panels. The method is expected to provoke small moderate tremors (up to M2.0) and reduce in this way a stress accumulation in the rockmass. This work presents an analysis, which deals with post-blasting events in Rudna copper mine, Poland. Using the Full Moment Tensor (MT) inversion and seismic spectra analysis, we try to find some characteristic features of post blasting seismic sources. Source parameters estimated for post-blasting events are compared with the parameters of not-provoked mining events that occurred in the vicinity of the provoked sources. Our studies show that focal mechanisms of events which occurred after blasts have similar MT decompositions, namely are characterized by a quite strong isotropic component as compared with the isotropic component of not-provoked events. Also source parameters obtained from spectral analysis show that provoked seismicity has a specific source physics. Among others, it is visible from S to P wave energy ratio, which is higher for not-provoked events. The comparison of all our results reveals a three possible groups of sources: a) occurred just after blasts, b) occurred from 5min to 24h after blasts and c) not-provoked seismicity (more than 24h after blasting). Acknowledgements: This work was supported within statutory activities No3841/E-41/S/2016 of Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Poland.

  8. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate...

  9. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate...

  10. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate...

  11. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate...

  12. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate...

  13. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON PROCESSING IN THE BLAST WAVE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N132D

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tappe, A.; Rho, J.; Boersma, C.

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 14-36 {mu}m mapping observations of the supernova remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study focuses on the processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that we previously identified in the southern blast wave. The mid-infrared spectra show strong continuum emission from shock-heated dust and a unique, nearly featureless plateau in the 15-20 {mu}m region, which we attribute to PAH molecules. The typical PAH emission bands observed in the surrounding interstellar medium ahead of the blast wave disappear, which indicates shock processing of PAH molecules. The PAH plateau appears most strongly at the outer edgemore » of the blast wave and coincides with diffuse X-ray emission that precedes the brightest X-ray and optical filaments. This suggests that PAH molecules in the surrounding medium are swept up and processed in the hot gas of the blast wave shock, where they survive the harsh conditions long enough to be detected. We also observe a broad emission feature at 20 {mu}m appearing with the PAH plateau. We speculate that this feature is either due to FeO dust grains or connected to the processing of PAHs in the supernova blast wave shock.« less

  14. Molecular Signatures and Diagnostic Biomarkers of Cumulative, Blast-Graded Mild TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    These results are in agreement with data obtained using non-blast TBI models (Diet- rich et al., 2004; Maegele et al., 2007). Moreover, CX3CL1 chemokine...the shoulder at Figure 1A), substantially contaminating the blast wave in the direction of shock tube axis (Figure 1A). In addition, the exhaust...highly spe- cific for the CNS and is present in platelets and red blood cells (see Svetlov et al., 2009 for review). In previous studies, we reported a

  15. Computational Analysis of Mine Blast on a Commercial Vehicle Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF MINE BLAST ON A COMMERCIAL VEHICLE STRUCTURE M. Grujicic 1∗ , B. Pandurangan 1 , I. Haque 1 , B. A. Cheeseman 2 , W. N. Roy 2 and R. R. Skaggs...buried in (either dry or saturated sand) underneath the vehicle’s front right wheel is analyzed computationally. The computational analysis included the...A frequency analysis of the pressure versus time signals and visual observation clearly show the differences in the blast loads resulting from the

  16. Spatial Analysis of Rice Blast in China at Three Different Scales.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fangfang; Chen, Xinglong; Lu, Minghong; Yang, Li; Wang, Shi Wei; Wu, Bo Ming

    2018-05-22

    In this study, spatial analyses were conducted at three different scales to better understand the epidemiology of rice blast, a major rice disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae. At regional scale, across the major rice production regions in China, rice blast incidence was monitored on 101 dates at 193 stations from June 10 th to Sep. 10 th during 2009-2014, and surveyed in 143 fields in September, 2016; at county scale, 3 surveys were done covering 1-5 counties in 2015-2016; and at field scale, blast was evaluated in 6 fields in 2015-2016. Spatial cluster and hot spot analyses were conducted in GIS on the geographical pattern of the disease at regional scale, and geostatistical analysis performed at all the three scales. Cluster and hot spot analyses revealed that high-disease areas were clustered in mountainous areas in China. Geostatistical analyses detected spatial dependence of blast incidence with influence ranges of 399 to 1080 km at regional scale, and 5 to 10 m at field scale, but not at county scale. The spatial patterns at different scales might be determined by inherent properties of rice blast and environmental driving forces, and findings from this study provide helpful information to sampling and management of rice blast.

  17. Genetic analysis and identification of SSR markers associated with rice blast disease in a BC2F1 backcross population.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Rafii, M Y; Abdul Rahim, H; Nusaibah, S A; Mazlan, N; Abdullah, S

    2017-01-23

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases in the world. The fungal pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Development of resistant cultivars is the most preferred method to achieve sustainable rice production. However, the effectiveness of resistant cultivars is hindered by the genetic plasticity of the pathogen genome. Therefore, information on genetic resistance and virulence stability are vital to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of blast disease resistance. The present study set out to elucidate the resistance pattern and identify potential simple sequence repeat markers linked with rice blast disease. A backcross population (BC 2 F 1 ), derived from crossing MR264 and Pongsu Seribu 2 (PS2), was developed using marker-assisted backcross breeding. Twelve microsatellite markers carrying the blast resistance gene clearly demonstrated a polymorphic pattern between both parental lines. Among these, two markers, RM206 and RM5961, located on chromosome 11 exhibited the expected 1:1 testcross ratio in the BC 2 F 1 population. The 195 BC 2 F 1 plants inoculated against M. oryzae pathotype P7.2 showed a significantly different distribution in the backcrossed generation and followed Mendelian segregation based on a single-gene model. This indicates that blast resistance in PS2 is governed by a single dominant gene, which is linked to RM206 and RM5961 on chromosome 11. The findings presented in this study could be useful for future blast resistance studies in rice breeding programs.

  18. Blast Mitigation by Water Mist, (3) Mitigation of Confined and Unconfined Blasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-14

    2 (vv)I1 1 j7(T - TJ) (18) In addition to drag, heat transfer, and vaporization, droplet breakup must also be accounted for when large droplets...Mitigation of Confined and Unconfined Blasts Table of Contents 1 . Introduction 2 . Numerical Model and Solution Procedure 2.1 Gas-phase Model 2.2...enclosure at 1 , 2 , 5, and 15 ms after detonation of a 2.12 kg explosive without water mist present. Temperature contour range is from 300 to 2500 K

  19. Computational modeling of human head under blast in confined and open spaces: primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, A; Salimi Jazi, M; Karami, G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computational modeling for biomechanical analysis of primary blast injuries is presented. The responses of the brain in terms of mechanical parameters under different blast spaces including open, semi-confined, and confined environments are studied. In the study, the effect of direct and indirect blast waves from the neighboring walls in the confined environments will be taken into consideration. A 50th percentile finite element head model is exposed to blast waves of different intensities. In the open space, the head experiences a sudden intracranial pressure (ICP) change, which vanishes in a matter of a few milliseconds. The situation is similar in semi-confined space, but in the confined space, the reflections from the walls will create a number of subsequent peaks in ICP with a longer duration. The analysis procedure is based on a simultaneous interaction simulation of the deformable head and its components with the blast wave propagations. It is concluded that compared with the open and semi-confined space settings, the walls in the confined space scenario enhance the risk of primary blast injuries considerably because of indirect blast waves transferring a larger amount of damaging energy to the head. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Multiple Translocation of the AVR-Pita Effector Gene among Chromosomes of the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Chuma, Izumi; Isobe, Chihiro; Hotta, Yuma; Ibaragi, Kana; Futamata, Natsuru; Kusaba, Motoaki; Yoshida, Kentaro; Terauchi, Ryohei; Fujita, Yoshikatsu; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Valent, Barbara; Tosa, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, a devastating problem worldwide. This fungus has caused breakdown of resistance conferred by newly developed commercial cultivars. To address how the rice blast fungus adapts itself to new resistance genes so quickly, we examined chromosomal locations of AVR-Pita, a subtelomeric gene family corresponding to the Pita resistance gene, in various isolates of M. oryzae (including wheat and millet pathogens) and its related species. We found that AVR-Pita (AVR-Pita1 and AVR-Pita2) is highly variable in its genome location, occurring in chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and supernumerary chromosomes, particularly in rice-infecting isolates. When expressed in M. oryzae, most of the AVR-Pita homologs could elicit Pita-mediated resistance, even those from non-rice isolates. AVR-Pita was flanked by a retrotransposon, which presumably contributed to its multiple translocation across the genome. On the other hand, family member AVR-Pita3, which lacks avirulence activity, was stably located on chromosome 7 in a vast majority of isolates. These results suggest that the diversification in genome location of AVR-Pita in the rice isolates is a consequence of recognition by Pita in rice. We propose a model that the multiple translocation of AVR-Pita may be associated with its frequent loss and recovery mediated by its transfer among individuals in asexual populations. This model implies that the high mobility of AVR-Pita is a key mechanism accounting for the rapid adaptation toward Pita. Dynamic adaptation of some fungal plant pathogens may be achieved by deletion and recovery of avirulence genes using a population as a unit of adaptation. PMID:21829350

  1. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  2. Overlapping Ballistic Ejecta Fields: Separating Distinct Blasts at Kings Bowl, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, C.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Hughes, S. S.; Sears, D. W. G.; Heldmann, J. L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Haberle, C. W.; Sears, H.; Elphic, R. C.; Kobayashi, L.; Garry, W. B.; Neish, C.; Karunatillake, S.; Button, N.; Purcell, S.; Mallonee, H.; Ostler, B.

    2015-12-01

    Kings Bowl is a ~2200ka pit crater created by a phreatic blast along a volcanic fissure in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), Idaho. The main crater measures approximately 80m in length, 30m in width, and 30m in depth, with smaller pits located nearby on the Great Rift fissure, and has been targeted by the FINESSE team as a possible analogue for Cyane Fossae, Mars. The phreatic eruption is believed to have occurred due to the interaction of groundwater with lava draining back into the fissure following a lava lake high stand, erupting already solidified basalt from this and previous ERSP lava flows. The contemporaneous draw back of the lava with the explosions may conceal some smaller possible blast pits as more lava drained into the newly formed pits. Ballistic ejecta from the blasts occur on both sides of the fissure. To the east, the ballistic blocks are mantled by fine tephra mixed with eolian dust, the result of a westerly wind during the explosions. We use differential GPS to map the distribution of ballistic blocks on the west side of the fissure, recording position, percent vesiculation, and the length of 3 mutually perpendicular axes for each block >20cm along multiple transects parallel to the fissure. From the several hundred blocks recorded, we have been able to separate the ballistic field into several distinct blast deposits on the basis of size distributions and block concentration. The smaller pits identified from the ballistic fields correspond broadly to the northern and southern limits of the tephra/dust field east of the fissure. Soil formation and bioturbation of the tephra by sagebrush have obliterated any tephrostratigraphy that could have been linked to individual blasts. The ballistic block patterns at Kings Bowl may be used to identify distinct ejecta groups in high-resolution imagery of Mars or other planetary bodies.

  3. Glyburide - Novel Prophylaxis and Effective Treatment for Blast-Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    determine the safety of the SUR1 blocker , glyburide (glibenclamide), as it might be used as prophylaxis against blast-TBI. During the 4th year of...We completed evaluation of the prophylaxis treatment with SUR1 blocker , glyburide in the neurobehavioral outcome after blast-TBI (Obj. 1d, c...APP ( Beta -amyloid precursor protein) 64 qPCR Casp 3 (caspase 3) 28 Tissue hemoglobin detection SP1 (ischemic, hypoxic marker) 7 ED1

  4. Finding similar nucleotide sequences using network BLAST searches.

    PubMed

    Ladunga, Istvan

    2009-06-01

    The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is a keystone of bioinformatics due to its performance and user-friendliness. Beginner and intermediate users will learn how to design and submit blastn and Megablast searches on the Web pages at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. We map nucleic acid sequences to genomes, find identical or similar mRNA, expressed sequence tag, and noncoding RNA sequences, and run Megablast searches, which are much faster than blastn. Understanding results is assisted by taxonomy reports, genomic views, and multiple alignments. We interpret expected frequency thresholds, biological significance, and statistical significance. Weak hits provide no evidence, but hints for further analyses. We find genes that may code for homologous proteins by translated BLAST. We reduce false positives by filtering out low-complexity regions. Parsed BLAST results can be integrated into analysis pipelines. Links in the output connect to Entrez, PUBMED, structural, sequence, interaction, and expression databases. This facilitates integration with a wide spectrum of biological knowledge.

  5. Comment on "chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model".

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jack W

    2012-10-24

    In their recent paper, Goldstein et al. show murine brain tau neuropathology after explosive blast with head rotation but do not present additional evidence that would delineate whether this neuropathology was principally caused by blast exposure alone or by blast exposure plus head rotational injury.

  6. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  7. Multilevel Vehicle Design: Fuel Economy, Mobility and Safety Considerations, Part B. Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    UNCLASSIFIED 11 Occupant Model Inputs: Blast Pulse (apeak) Seat Cushion Foam Stiffness (sc) Seat EA System Stiffness (sEA) Outputs: Upper Neck Axial Force...Floor Pad Surrogate model from linear regression on 300 data points: Inputs: Blast Pulse (apeak) Seat Cushion Foam Stiffness (sc) Seat EA System...B Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading Steven Hoffenson, presenter (U of M) Panos Papalambros, PI (U of M) Michael

  8. Cerebrovascular Injury in Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    TITLE: Cerebrovascular injury in blast loading PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kenneth L. Monson, PhD...SUBTITLE Cerebrovascular injury in blast loading 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0295 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...and pH control. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Blast brain injury; cerebrovascular injury and dysfunction; shock tube 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  9. Clinical characteristics of 15 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia who developed blast crisis: MDS Committee of Japanese Society of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuko; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Zaike, Yuji; Masunaga, Atsuko; Yoshimi, Ayami; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Manabe, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) is a rare haematopoietic stem cell disease of early childhood, which can progress to blast crisis in some children. A total of 153 children diagnosed with JMML were reported to the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Committee in Japan between 1989 and 2007; 15 of them (9·8%) had 20% or more blasts in the bone marrow (blast crisis) during the disease course. Blast crisis occurred during observation without therapy (n = 3) or with oral 6-mercaptopurine treatment (n = 9) and in relapse after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT; n = 3). Six patients had a complex karyotype (5 including monosomy 7) and an additional three patients had isolated monosomy 7 at blast crisis. Seven patients received HSCT after blast crisis and four of them achieved remission. Eleven out of the 15 patients died; the cause of death was disease progression in 10 patients and transplant-related complication in one patient. In summary, patients with blast crisis have poor prognosis and can be cured only by HSCT. The emergence of monosomy 7 and complex karyotype may be characteristic of blast crisis in a substantial subset of children. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Interplay between high energy impulse noise (blast) and antioxidants in the lung.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Nabil M; Gorbunov, Nikolai V

    2003-07-15

    High-energy impulse noise (BLAST) is a physical event characterized by an abrupt rise in atmospheric pressure above ambient lasting for a very short period, but potentially causing significant material and biological damage. Exposure to high-level BLAST can be destructive and lethal. Low-level BLAST similar to what is encountered repeatedly by military personnel during training and combat from detonation of munitions and firing of large caliber weapons, and during occupational use of explosives and some heavy machinery, can also cause significant injury. Globally, civilians are increasingly exposed to BLAST resulting from terrorist bombings or abandoned unmarked mines following numerous wars and conflicts. We have shown previously in several animal models that exposure to non-lethal BLAST results in pathological changes, mostly to the hollow organs characterized in the lungs, the most sensitive organ, by rupture of alveolar septa, and pulmonary hemorrhage and edema. These events potentially can cause alveolar flooding, respiratory insufficiency and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), leading to varying degrees of hypoxia, antioxidant depletion and oxidative damage. We have also observed progressive formation of nitric oxide in blood and other tissues. The totality of these observations supports our general hypothesis that exposure to BLAST can lead to antioxidant depletion and oxidative damage. Understanding the mechanism(s) of BLAST-induced oxidative stress may have important implications that include a potential beneficial role for antioxidants as a prophylaxis or as secondary treatment of injury after exposure alongside other protective and therapeutic modalities. In addition, it suggests a role for endogenous nitric oxide in the injury. This report reviews experimental evidence of BLAST-induced antioxidant depletion, and the potential benefit from antioxidant supplementation before exposure.

  11. Blast Induced Thresholds for Neuronal Networks (BITNeT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-19

    compressive loading. Mech. …. Estrada, J ., Franck, C ., 2014. Microcavitation as a neuronal damage mechanism in blast traumatic brain injury, in...Gennisson, J .-L., Rénier, M., Catheline, S., Barrière, C ., Bercoff, J ., Tanter, M., Fink, M., 2007. Acoustoelasticity in soft solids: assessment of the...Foundations of Trauma. Butterworth-Heinemann, New York, pp. 189–199. Jacob, X., Catheline, S., Gennisson, J .-L., Barrière, C ., Royer, D., Fink, M., 2007

  12. Pathophysiology of blast-induced ocular trauma in rats after repeated exposure to low-level blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Hyek; Greene, Whitney A; Johnson, Anthony J; Chavko, Mikulas; Cleland, Jeffery M; McCarron, Richard M; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of blast-induced ocular injury has dramatically increased due to advances in weaponry and military tactics. A single exposure to blast overpressure (BOP) has been shown to cause damage to the eye in animal models; however, on the battlefield, military personnel are exposed to BOP multiple times. The effects of repeated exposures to BOP on ocular tissues have not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of single or repeated exposure on ocular tissues. A compressed air shock tube was used to deliver 70 ± 7 KPa BOP to rats, once (single blast overpressure [SBOP]) or once daily for 5 days (repeated blast overpressure [RBOP]). Immunohistochemistry was performed to characterize the pathophysiology of ocular injuries induced by SBOP and RBOP. Apoptosis was determined by quantification activated caspase 3. Gliosis was examined by detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Inflammation was examined by detection of CD68. Activated caspase 3 was detected in ocular tissues from all animals subjected to BOP, while those exposed to RBOP had more activated caspase 3 in the optic nerve than those exposed to SBOP. GFAP was detected in the retinas from all animals subjected to BOP. CD68 was detected in optic nerves from all animals exposed to BOP. SBOP and RBOP induced retinal damage. RBOP caused more apoptosis in the optic nerve than SBOP, suggesting that RBOP causes more severe optic neuropathy than SBOP. SBOP and RBOP caused gliosis in the retina and increased inflammation in the optic nerve. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. 30 CFR 780.13 - Operation plan: Blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation plan: Blasting. 780.13 Section 780.13... SURFACE MINING PERMIT APPLICATIONS-MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR RECLAMATION AND OPERATION PLAN § 780.13 Operation plan: Blasting. (a) Blasting plan. Each application shall contain a blasting plan for the proposed...

  14. Nuclear Air Blast Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    AD-All? 43 SCIENCE APPLICATZOhu INC NCLAA VA F/6 19/4I NUICLEAR AIR BLAST IFPCTS(U) JUR " PRY UNCLASSIFID SAI-63-636-VA NLOOI I-C lit? I. 1174~ 132...SiCuftIt, CLASSFICA?1lOw OF fl.IS PAQ-C( fhbl Dal. Lnt.,.d, REPORT DOCUMENTATION4 PAGE apoI ct~ NUCLEAR AIR BLAST EFFECTS FINAL REPORT SAI-83-836-WA...TUCSON a WASHINGTON NUCLEAR AIR BLAST EFFECTS FINAL REPORT SAI-83-836-WA Submitted to: Laboratory for Computational Physics Naval Research Laboratory

  15. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  20. Tympanic membrane perforation after combat blast exposure in Iraq: a poor biomarker of primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Corey D; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Grant, Gerald A

    2009-07-01

    The US military has reported over 10,000 improvised explosive device attacks attributing to over 400 deaths in Iraq in 2005. Otologic blast injury and tympanic membrane (TM) perforation have traditionally been used as a predictor, or biomarker, of serious or occult primary blast injury (PBI). Although combat injuries from the US-Iraq conflict have been described, the utility of TM perforation as a marker of PBI has not. The objective of this study is to determine the incidence of tympanic perforation in patients subject to blast exposures and describe its utility as a biomarker of more serious primary barotrauma, as observed at a US military hospital in Iraq. In our institutional review board-approved study, all patients during a 30-day period who arrived at a tertiary US military hospital in Iraq were evaluated. All patients with blast injures were identified on arrival to the hospital emergency department and were followed up through their hospital course and evacuation to the United States to assure they received proper otolaryngology evaluation and follow-up. Demographic data and manifestations of PBI (TM perforation, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusion, nonpenetrating facial sinus injury, and bowel perforation) and other combat injuries were recorded. The diagnostic tests and clinical examination findings used to identify these complications were also recorded. One hundred sixty-seven patients were enrolled over 30 days. All blast exposures resulted from primary or secondary explosions from munitions used in combat. This included both combatants and civilians. All patients were men. The mean patient age was 28 years (range, 12-55 years). Sixteen percent (27 of 167) of blast-exposed patients had TM perforation. Thirteen of 27 patients with perforations had bilateral perforations. Twelve of 167 patients (7%) had PBI. Six of 12 patients (50%) with PBI had TM perforation. The use of TM perforation as a biomarker for PBI resulted in a sensitivity of 50% (95% CI, 22

  1. Effect of Plate Curvature on Blast Response of Structural Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeredhi, Lakshmi Shireen Banu; Ramana Rao, N. V.; Veeredhi, Vasudeva Rao

    2018-04-01

    In the present work an attempt is made, through simulation studies, to determine the effect of plate curvature on the blast response of a door structure made of ASTM A515 grade 50 steel plates. A door structure with dimensions of 5.142 m × 2.56 m × 10 mm having six different radii of curvatures is analyzed which is subjected to blast load. The radii of curvature investigated are infinity (flat plate), 16.63, 10.81, 8.26, 6.61 and 5.56 m. In the present study, a stand-off distance of 11 m is considered for all the cases. Results showed that the door structure with smallest radius of curvature experienced least plastic deformation and yielding when compared to a door with larger radius of curvature with same projected area. From the present Investigation, it is observed that, as the radius of curvature of the plate increases, the deformation mode gradually shifts from indentation mode to flexural mode. The plates with infinity and 16.63 m radius of curvature have undergone flexural mode of deformation and plates with 6.61 and 5.56 m radius of curvature undergo indentation mode of deformation. Whereas, mixed mode of deformation that consists of both flexural and indentation mode of deformations are seen in the plates with radius of curvature 10.81 and 8.26 m. As the radius of curvature of the plate decreases the ability of the plate to mitigate the effect the blast loads increased. It is observed that the plate with smaller radius of curvature deflects most of the blast energy and results in least indentation mode of deformation. The most significant observation made in the present investigation is that the strain energy absorbed by the steel plate gets reduced to 1/3 rd when the radius of curvature is approximately equal to the stand-off distance which could be the critical radius of curvature.

  2. UCP2- and non-UCP2-mediated electric current in eukaryotic cells exhibits different properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruihua; MoYung, K C; Zhang, M H; Poon, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Using live eukaryotic cells, including cancer cells, MCF-7 and HCT-116, normal hepatocytes and red blood cells in anode and potassium ferricyanide in cathode of MFC could generate bio-based electric current. Electrons and protons generated from the metabolic reaction in both cytosol and mitochondria contributing to the leaking would mediate the generation of electric current. Both resveratrol (RVT) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) used to induce proton leak in mitochondria were found to promote electric current production in all cells except red blood cells without mitochondria. Proton leak might be important for electric current production by bringing the charge balance in cells to enhance the further electron leak. The induced electric current by RVT can be blocked by Genipin, an inhibitor of UCP2-mediated proton leak, while that induced by DNP cannot. RVT could reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in cells better than that of DNP. In addition, RVT increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while DNP decreased it. Results highly suggested the existence of at least two types of electric current that showed different properties. They included UCP2-mediated and non-UCP2-mediated electric current. UCP2-mediated electric current exhibited higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction effect per unit electric current production than that of non-UCP2-mediated electric current. Higher UCP2-mediated electric current observed in cancer cells might contribute to the mechanism of drug resistence. Correlation could not be established between electric current production with either ROS and MMP without distinguishing the types of electric current.

  3. Non-Impact, Blast-Induced Mild TBI and PTSD: Concepts and Caveats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    has been verified by wound ballistics experiments in animals and finite element simulation of blast loads on the torso. Blood surge caused by...ballistic pressure waves in animals An experimental study of wound ballistics demon- strates that a ballistic pressure wave can cause a remote injury to...surge. This hypothesis has been supported by some experimental data. A volumetric surge of blood moved through the thorax and abdomen has been observed

  4. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Maziah, M.; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g−1 in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  5. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Maziah, M; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g(-1) in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  6. Biomarkers of Blast-Induced Neurotrauma: Profiling Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Blast Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Murthy, J.M., Chopra, J.S., and Gulati, D.R. (1979). Subdural hematoma in an adult following a blast injury. Case report. J. Neurosurg. 50, 260–261. Nath...chro- matolytic changes in the neurons (due to degeneration of Nissl bodies, an indication of neuronal damage), diffuse brain injury, and subdural ...al., 2000b). The most common types of TBI are diffuse axonal injury, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage (Vander Vorst et al., 2007). Diffuse axonal

  7. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    allow early screening and assessment of brain abnormality in soldiers to enable timely therapeutic intervention. The current study reports on the...use of qEEG in blast-induced brain injury using a swine model. The purposes are to determine if qEEG can detect brain activity abnormalities early...brain functional abnormalities and deficits in absence of any clinical mTBI symptoms. Methods such as EEG-wavelet entropy measures [36] and Shannon

  8. Characterisation of interface astroglial scarring in the human brain after blast exposure: a post-mortem case series.

    PubMed

    Shively, Sharon Baughman; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Jones, Robert V; Kelly, James P; Armstrong, Regina C; Perl, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    No evidence-based guidelines are available for the definitive diagnosis or directed treatment of most blast-associated traumatic brain injuries, partly because the underlying pathology is unknown. Moreover, few neuropathological studies have addressed whether blast exposure produces unique lesions in the human brain, and if those lesions are comparable with impact-induced traumatic brain injury. We aimed to test the hypothesis that blast exposure produces unique patterns of damage, differing from that associated with impact-induced, non-blast traumatic brain injuries. In this post-mortem case series, we investigated several features of traumatic brain injuries, using clinical histopathology techniques and markers, in brain specimens from male military service members with chronic blast exposures and from those who had died shortly after severe blast exposures. We then compared these results with those from brain specimens from male civilian (ie, non-military) cases with no history of blast exposure, including cases with and without chronic impact traumatic brain injuries and cases with chronic exposure to opiates, and analysed the limited associated clinical histories of all cases. Brain specimens had been archived in tissue banks in the USA. We analysed brain specimens from five cases with chronic blast exposure, three cases with acute blast exposure, five cases with chronic impact traumatic brain injury, five cases with exposure to opiates, and three control cases with no known neurological disorders. All five cases with chronic blast exposure showed prominent astroglial scarring that involved the subpial glial plate, penetrating cortical blood vessels, grey-white matter junctions, and structures lining the ventricles; all cases of acute blast exposure showed early astroglial scarring in the same brain regions. All cases of chronic blast exposure had an antemortem diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder. The civilian cases, with or without history of impact

  9. Army Blast Claims Evaluation Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY ARL-MR-131 Army Blast Claims Evaluation Procedures William P. Wright APPROVED FOR PUBUC RELEASE; DISTRIBtmON IS...NUMBERS Anny Blast Claims Evaluation Procedures 4G061-304-U2 6. AUTHOR(S) William P. Wrisht 1. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...of the technical review process which bas been instituted to develop an opinion as to Army responsibility. 14. SUBJECT TERMS blast effects. muzzle

  10. Two-dimensional explosion experiments examining the interaction between a blast wave and a sand hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Izumo, M.; Ando, H.; Matsuo, A.

    2018-05-01

    Two-dimensional explosion experiments were conducted to discuss the interaction between a blast wave and sand and show the mitigation effect of the sand on the blast wave. The explosive used was a detonating cord 1.0 m in length, which was initiated in a sand hill shaped like a triangular prism and whose cross section was an isosceles triangle with base angles of 30°. Sand-hill heights of 30 and 60 mm were used as parameters to discuss the effect of sand mass upon blast-wave strength. The interaction of the blast wave with the sand/air interface causes multiple peaks in the blast wave, which are induced by successive transmissions at the interface. The increase in the sand mass further mitigates the blast parameters of peak overpressure and positive impulse. The results of this experiment can be utilized to validate the numerical method of solving the problem of interaction between a compressible fluid and a particle layer.

  11. Two-dimensional explosion experiments examining the interaction between a blast wave and a sand hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Izumo, M.; Ando, H.; Matsuo, A.

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional explosion experiments were conducted to discuss the interaction between a blast wave and sand and show the mitigation effect of the sand on the blast wave. The explosive used was a detonating cord 1.0 m in length, which was initiated in a sand hill shaped like a triangular prism and whose cross section was an isosceles triangle with base angles of 30°. Sand-hill heights of 30 and 60 mm were used as parameters to discuss the effect of sand mass upon blast-wave strength. The interaction of the blast wave with the sand/air interface causes multiple peaks in the blast wave, which are induced by successive transmissions at the interface. The increase in the sand mass further mitigates the blast parameters of peak overpressure and positive impulse. The results of this experiment can be utilized to validate the numerical method of solving the problem of interaction between a compressible fluid and a particle layer.

  12. Chronic Hypopituitarism Associated with Increased Postconcussive Symptoms Is Prevalent after Blast-Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Undurti, Arundhati; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Sikkema, Carl L.; Schultz, Jaclyn S.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Wilkinson, Charles W.

    2018-01-01

    The most frequent injury sustained by US service members deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan is mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), or concussion, by far most often caused by blast waves from improvised explosive devices or other explosive ordnance. TBI from all causes gives rise to chronic neuroendocrine disorders with an estimated prevalence of 25–50%. The current study expands upon our earlier finding that chronic pituitary gland dysfunction occurs with a similarly high frequency after blast-related concussions. We measured circulating hormone levels and accessed demographic and testing data from two groups of male veterans with hazardous duty experience in Iraq or Afghanistan. Veterans in the mTBI group had experienced one or more blast-related concussion. Members of the deployment control (DC) group encountered similar deployment conditions but had no history of blast-related mTBI. 12 of 39 (31%) of the mTBI participants and 3 of 20 (15%) veterans in the DC group screened positive for one or more neuroendocrine disorders. Positive screens for growth hormone deficiency occurred most often. Analysis of responses on self-report questionnaires revealed main effects of both mTBI and hypopituitarism on postconcussive and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Symptoms associated with pituitary dysfunction overlap considerably with those of PTSD. They include cognitive deficiencies, mood and anxiety disorders, sleep problems, diminished quality of life, deleterious changes in metabolism and body composition, and increased cardiovascular mortality. When such symptoms are due to hypopituitarism, they may be alleviated by hormone replacement. These findings suggest consideration of routine post-deployment neuroendocrine screening of service members and veterans who have experienced blast-related mTBI and are reporting postconcussive symptoms. PMID:29515515

  13. Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ∼ 515 kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15 sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction.

  14. Characterization and Modeling of Thoraco-Abdominal Response to Blast Waves. Volume 4. Biomechanical Model of Thorax Response to Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    non- zero Dirichlet boundary conditions and/or general mixed type boundary conditions. Note that Neumann type boundary condi- tion enters the problem by...Background ................................. ................... I 1.3 General Description ..... ............ ........... . ....... ...... 2 2. ANATOMICAL...human and varions loading conditions for the definition of a generalized safety guideline of blast exposure. To model the response of a sheep torso

  15. Non-volatile, solid state bistable electrical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A bistable switching element is made of a material whose electrical resistance reversibly decreases in response to intercalation by positive ions. Flow of positive ions between the bistable switching element and a positive ion source is controlled by means of an electrical potential applied across a thermal switching element. The material of the thermal switching element generates heat in response to electrical current flow therethrough, which in turn causes the material to undergo a thermal phase transition from a high electrical resistance state to a low electrical resistance state as the temperature increases above a predetermined value. Application of the electrical potential in one direction renders the thermal switching element conductive to pass electron current out of the ion source. This causes positive ions to flow from the source into the bistable switching element and intercalate the same to produce a non-volatile, low resistance logic state. Application of the electrical potential in the opposite direction causes reverse current flow which de-intercalates the bistable logic switching element and produces a high resistance logic state.

  16. Neurological Effects of Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Ramona R.; Fertig, Stephanie J.; Desrocher, Rebecca E.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Pancrazio, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, thousands of soldiers and an even greater number of civilians have suffered traumatic injuries due to blast exposure, largely attributed to improvised explosive devices in terrorist and insurgent activities. The use of body armor is allowing soldiers to survive blasts that would otherwise be fatal due to systemic damage. Emerging evidence suggests that exposure to a blast can produce neurological consequences in the brain, but much remains unknown. To elucidate the current scientific basis for understanding blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI), the NIH convened a workshop in April, 2008. A multidisciplinary group of neuroscientists, engineers, and clinicians were invited to share insights on bTBI, specifically pertaining to: physics of blast explosions, acute clinical observations and treatments, preclinical and computational models, and lessons from the international community on civilian exposures. This report provides an overview of the state of scientific knowledge of bTBI, drawing from the published literature, as well as presentations, discussions, and recommendations from the workshop. One of the major recommendations from the workshop was the need to characterize the effects of blast exposure on clinical neuropathology. Clearer understanding of the human neuropathology would enable validation of preclinical and computational models, which are attempting to simulate blast wave interactions with the central nervous system. Furthermore, the civilian experience with bTBI suggests that polytrauma models incorporating both brain and lung injuries may be more relevant to the study of civilian countermeasures than considering models with a neurological focus alone. PMID:20453776

  17. Innovative Composite Structure Design for Blast Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    2007-01-0483 Innovative Composite Structure Design for Blast Protection Dongying Jiang, Yuanyuan Liu MKP Structural Design Associates, Inc...protect vehicle and occupants against various explosives. The multi-level and multi-scenario blast simulation and design system integrates three major...numerical simulation of a BTR composite under a blast event. The developed blast simulation and design system will enable the prediction, design, and

  18. [Emission characteristics of PM2.5 from blast furnace iron making].

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen-zhen; Zhao, Ya-li; Zhao, Hao-ning; Liang, Xing-yin; Sun, Jing-wen; Wang, Bao-gui; Wang, Ya-jun

    2014-09-01

    Electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to online analyze the PM2.5 particle size and mass concentration distribution in the trapping field and ore tank of blast furnace iron-making plant. Results showed that the grain number concentration of PM2.5 in trapping field after dust removal was in the range of 10(5)-10(6)cm-3 , and the particle size was mainly below 0. 1 μm. While the grain number concentration of the PM2.5 in ore tank after dust removal was in the range of 10(4)-10(5) cm-3, the particle size was mainly below 1.0 μm, and the mass concentration distribution showed a single peak. The micro-morphology of PM2.5 monomer was mainly divided into two categories, spherical particles and irregular aggregates. Chemical composition analysis indicated that the concentrations of water soluble SO(2-)(4) , K+ , Ca2+ were higher than other ions in PM2.5, with the percentage of 10. 32% -28.55% , 10. 36% -12. 15% , 3.97% -15. 4% , respectively. The major elements was Fe, Si, Al, with 16. 8% -31. 62% , 2. 24% -8.76% , 1.24% -5. 89% of total mass, respectively; organic carbon and elementary carbon were 2. 7% -4. 6% and 0. 8% -1. 3% , respectively. The emission factors of PM2.5 in trapping field and in ore tank after dust removal were ranged from 0.045 to 0.085 kg t(-1) and 0.042 to 0.071 kg t-1, respectively.

  19. Study of blast event propagation in different media using a novel ultrafast miniature optical pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongtao; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI, also called intracranial injury) is a high potential threat to our soldiers. A helmet structural health monitoring system can be effectively used to study the effects of ballistic/blast events on the helmet and human skull to prevent soldiers from TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges lies in that the pressure sensor installed inside the helmet system must be fast enough to capture the blast wave during the transient period. In this paper, an ultrafast optical fiber sensor is presented to measure the blast signal. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometeric principle. An FP cavity is built between the endface of an etched optical fiber tip and the silica thin diaphragm attached on the end of a multimode optical fiber. The sensor is small enough to be installed in different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. Several groups of tests regarding multi-layer blast events were conducted to evaluate the sensors' performance. The sensors were mounted in different segments of a shock tube side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increasing pressure. The segments of the shock tube were filled with different media. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors. In addition, the home-made shock tube could provide a good resource to study the propagation of blast event in different media.

  20. Cloth Ballistic Vest Alters Response to Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701-501 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. jACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) CLOTH BALLSISTIC VEST ALTERS RESPONSE...Suppl. ’rintd in USA Cloth Ballistic Vest Alters Response to Blast YANCY Y. PHILLIPS, M.D., THOMAS G. MUNDIE, PH.D., JOHN T. YELVERTON, M.S., AND DONALD R...RICHMOND, PH.D. Ballistic wounds have been and will remain the principal cause of casualties in combat. Cloth ballistic vests (CBV) play an

  1. Brain Vulnerability to Repeated Blast Overpressure and Polytrauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    characterization of the mouse model of repeated blast also found no cumula- tive effect of repeated blast on cortical levels of reactive oxygen species [39]. C...overpressure in rats to investigate the cumulative effects of multiple blast exposures on neurologic status, neurobehavioral function, and brain...preclinical model of blast overpressure in rats to investigate the cumulative effects of multiple blast exposures using neurological, neurochemical

  2. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge

    PubMed Central

    Onederra, Italo A.; Furtney, Jason K.; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field—the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code’s ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of −22.4% and −42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements. PMID:26412978

  3. Combined Effects of Primary and Tertiary Blast on Rat Brain: Characterization of a Model of Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    military environments, affected in- dividuals (e.g. football players) often sustain additional mild injuries. mTBI symptoms are typically mild and... concussion andmild traumatic brain injury. PM R 3, S354–358; DOI:10.1016/j.pmrj.2011.07.017 (2011). 2. Hendricks, A. M. et al. Screening for mild traumatic...Mendez, M. F. et al. Mild traumatic brain injury from primary blast vs. blunt forces: post- concussion consequences and functional neuroimaging

  4. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Pascale, E.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; postflight pointing reconstruction to <5" rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. On this poster, we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hour, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2006 December. The BLAST collaboration acknowledges the support of NASA through grants NAG5-12785, NAG5-13301, and NNGO-6GI11G, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Canada's Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Innovation Trust, the Puerto Rico Space Grant Consortium, the Fondo Institucional para la Investigacion of the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.

  5. Shock initiated reactions of reactive multi-phase blast explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of non-ideal explosive compositions made of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), nanoaluminum, and a micron-size, high mass density, reactive metal. Unlike high explosives, these compositions release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave rather than a true self-sustaining detonation. Their reaction rates are shock dependent and they can be overdriven to change their energy release rate. These compositions are fuel rich and have an extended aerobic energy release phase. The term "reactive multiphase blast" refers to the post-dispersion blast behavior: multiphase in that there are a gas phase that imparts pressure and a solid (particulate) phase that imparts energy and momentum [1]; and reactive in that the hot metal particles react with atmospheric oxygen and the explosive gas products to give an extended pressure pulse. Tantalum-based RMBX formulations were tested in two spherical core-shell configurations - an RMBX shell exploded by a high explosive core, and an RMBX core imploded by a high explosive shell. The fireball and blast characteristics were compared to a C-4 baseline charge.

  6. Suspended liquid particle disturbance on laser-induced blast wave and low density distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, Takahiro; Zare-Behtash, Hossein; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2017-12-01

    The impurity effect of suspended liquid particles on the laser-induced gas breakdown was experimentally investigated in quiescent gas. The focus of this study is the investigation of the influence of the impurities on the shock wave structure as well as the low density distribution. A 532 nm Nd:YAG laser beam with an 188 mJ/pulse was focused on the chamber filled with suspended liquid particles 0.9 ± 0.63 μm in diameter. Several shock waves are generated by multiple gas breakdowns along the beam path in the breakdown with particles. Four types of shock wave structures can be observed: (1) the dual blast waves with a similar shock radius, (2) the dual blast waves with a large shock radius at the lower breakdown, (3) the dual blast waves with a large shock radius at the upper breakdown, and (4) the triple blast waves. The independent blast waves interact with each other and enhance the shock strength behind the shock front in the lateral direction. The triple blast waves lead to the strongest shock wave in all cases. The shock wave front that propagates toward the opposite laser focal spot impinges on one another, and thereafter a transmitted shock wave (TSW) appears. The TSW interacts with the low density core called a kernel; the kernel then longitudinally expands quickly due to a Richtmyer-Meshkov-like instability. The laser-particle interaction causes an increase in the kernel volume which is approximately five times as large as that in the gas breakdown without particles. In addition, the laser-particle interaction can improve the laser energy efficiency.

  7. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    mTBI) as the signature wound in returning service members [1,2]. Shell shock and post concussive syndrome had a similar prominence during World Wars I...head only exposed blast overpressure of 241 kPa [43]. Turner et al, using a tabletop shock tube, reported graded astrocytic reactivity in the corpus...in astrocytes with increasing pressure [63]. This is different from Turner et al who reported an increase in the number of corpus callosum

  8. Ultra Safe And Secure Blasting System

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hart, M M

    2009-07-27

    The Ultra is a blasting system that is designed for special applications where the risk and consequences of unauthorized demolition or blasting are so great that the use of an extraordinarily safe and secure blasting system is justified. Such a blasting system would be connected and logically welded together through digital code-linking as part of the blasting system set-up and initialization process. The Ultra's security is so robust that it will defeat the people who designed and built the components in any attempt at unauthorized detonation. Anyone attempting to gain unauthorized control of the system by substituting components or tappingmore » into communications lines will be thwarted in their inability to provide encrypted authentication. Authentication occurs through the use of codes that are generated by the system during initialization code-linking and the codes remain unknown to anyone, including the authorized operator. Once code-linked, a closed system has been created. The system requires all components connected as they were during initialization as well as a unique code entered by the operator for function and blasting.« less

  9. 30 CFR 7.72 - New technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New technology. 7.72 Section 7.72 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.72 New technology. MSHA may approve a blasting unit that incorporates technology for which the requirements of this...

  10. 30 CFR 7.72 - New technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New technology. 7.72 Section 7.72 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.72 New technology. MSHA may approve a blasting unit that incorporates technology for which the requirements of this...

  11. 30 CFR 7.72 - New technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New technology. 7.72 Section 7.72 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.72 New technology. MSHA may approve a blasting unit that incorporates technology for which the requirements of this...

  12. 30 CFR 7.72 - New technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New technology. 7.72 Section 7.72 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.72 New technology. MSHA may approve a blasting unit that incorporates technology for which the requirements of this...

  13. 30 CFR 7.72 - New technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New technology. 7.72 Section 7.72 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.72 New technology. MSHA may approve a blasting unit that incorporates technology for which the requirements of this...

  14. Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTIDs) resulting from Chelyabinsk Meteor Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeks, B. J.; Warren, N.; Coster, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    A global network of GPS receivers continuously make line-of-sight (LOS) measurements of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere. This TEC measurement data can be analyzed to 'persistently monitor' natural and man-made activity in the atmosphere (such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, rocket launches, etc) which propagate into the ionosphere to produce TIDs (Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances). As an example we have analyzed in detail the TIDs resulting from the 15 Feb 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor blast as observed by the Artu GPS receiver site in Arti, Russia close to the event. Seven of the GPS satellite measurements with LOS pierce points within 1000 km of the blast show disturbances. Four of these clearly show VTEC oscillations with ~12 minute periods. The other three show much weaker responses, but their LOS pierce points are far from the blast and their aspects between the geomagnetic field & blast propagation vector are unfavorable (near broadside). By fitting all seven measurements we estimate a propagation speed of ~380 m/s for these medium-scale TIDs. As future 'persistent surveillance' efforts we intend to investigate the observability of man-made activities such as static rocket engine firings in TEC measurements. Analysis of MSTIDs resulting from the Chelyabinsk meteor blast

  15. WImpiBLAST: web interface for mpiBLAST to help biologists perform large-scale annotation using high performance computing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parichit; Mantri, Shrikant S

    2014-01-01

    The function of a newly sequenced gene can be discovered by determining its sequence homology with known proteins. BLAST is the most extensively used sequence analysis program for sequence similarity search in large databases of sequences. With the advent of next generation sequencing technologies it has now become possible to study genes and their expression at a genome-wide scale through RNA-seq and metagenome sequencing experiments. Functional annotation of all the genes is done by sequence similarity search against multiple protein databases. This annotation task is computationally very intensive and can take days to obtain complete results. The program mpiBLAST, an open-source parallelization of BLAST that achieves superlinear speedup, can be used to accelerate large-scale annotation by using supercomputers and high performance computing (HPC) clusters. Although many parallel bioinformatics applications using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) are available in the public domain, researchers are reluctant to use them due to lack of expertise in the Linux command line and relevant programming experience. With these limitations, it becomes difficult for biologists to use mpiBLAST for accelerating annotation. No web interface is available in the open-source domain for mpiBLAST. We have developed WImpiBLAST, a user-friendly open-source web interface for parallel BLAST searches. It is implemented in Struts 1.3 using a Java backbone and runs atop the open-source Apache Tomcat Server. WImpiBLAST supports script creation and job submission features and also provides a robust job management interface for system administrators. It combines script creation and modification features with job monitoring and management through the Torque resource manager on a Linux-based HPC cluster. Use case information highlights the acceleration of annotation analysis achieved by using WImpiBLAST. Here, we describe the WImpiBLAST web interface features and architecture, explain design

  16. WImpiBLAST: Web Interface for mpiBLAST to Help Biologists Perform Large-Scale Annotation Using High Performance Computing

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Parichit; Mantri, Shrikant S.

    2014-01-01

    The function of a newly sequenced gene can be discovered by determining its sequence homology with known proteins. BLAST is the most extensively used sequence analysis program for sequence similarity search in large databases of sequences. With the advent of next generation sequencing technologies it has now become possible to study genes and their expression at a genome-wide scale through RNA-seq and metagenome sequencing experiments. Functional annotation of all the genes is done by sequence similarity search against multiple protein databases. This annotation task is computationally very intensive and can take days to obtain complete results. The program mpiBLAST, an open-source parallelization of BLAST that achieves superlinear speedup, can be used to accelerate large-scale annotation by using supercomputers and high performance computing (HPC) clusters. Although many parallel bioinformatics applications using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) are available in the public domain, researchers are reluctant to use them due to lack of expertise in the Linux command line and relevant programming experience. With these limitations, it becomes difficult for biologists to use mpiBLAST for accelerating annotation. No web interface is available in the open-source domain for mpiBLAST. We have developed WImpiBLAST, a user-friendly open-source web interface for parallel BLAST searches. It is implemented in Struts 1.3 using a Java backbone and runs atop the open-source Apache Tomcat Server. WImpiBLAST supports script creation and job submission features and also provides a robust job management interface for system administrators. It combines script creation and modification features with job monitoring and management through the Torque resource manager on a Linux-based HPC cluster. Use case information highlights the acceleration of annotation analysis achieved by using WImpiBLAST. Here, we describe the WImpiBLAST web interface features and architecture, explain design

  17. Selection of Differential Isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae for Postulation of Blast Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Fang, W W; Liu, C C; Zhang, H W; Xu, H; Zhou, S; Fang, K X; Peng, Y L; Zhao, W S

    2018-05-21

    A set of differential isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae is needed for the postulation of blast resistance genes in numerous rice varieties and breeding materials. In this study, the pathotypes of 1,377 M. oryzae isolates from different regions of China were determined by inoculating detached rice leaves of 24 monogenic lines. Among them, 25 isolates were selected as differential isolates based on the following characteristics: they had distinct responses on the monogenic lines, contained the minimum number of avirulence genes, were stable in pathogenicity and conidiation during consecutive culture, were consistent colony growth rate, and, together, could differentiate combinations of the 24 major blast resistance genes. Seedlings of rice cultivars were inoculated with this differential set of isolates to postulate whether they contain 1 or more than 1 of the 24 blast resistance genes. The results were consistent with those from polymerase chain reaction analysis of target resistance genes. Establishment of a standard set of differential isolates will facilitate breeding for blast resistance and improved management of rice blast disease.

  18. Air blast injuries killed the crew of the submarine H.L. Hunley.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Stalcup, Lucas; Wojtylak, Brad; Bass, Cameron R

    2017-01-01

    The submarine H.L. Hunley was the first submarine to sink an enemy ship during combat; however, the cause of its sinking has been a mystery for over 150 years. The Hunley set off a 61.2 kg (135 lb) black powder torpedo at a distance less than 5 m (16 ft) off its bow. Scaled experiments were performed that measured black powder and shock tube explosions underwater and propagation of blasts through a model ship hull. This propagation data was used in combination with archival experimental data to evaluate the risk to the crew from their own torpedo. The blast produced likely caused flexion of the ship hull to transmit the blast wave; the secondary wave transmitted inside the crew compartment was of sufficient magnitude that the calculated chances of survival were less than 16% for each crew member. The submarine drifted to its resting place after the crew died of air blast trauma within the hull.

  19. Air blast injuries killed the crew of the submarine H.L. Hunley

    PubMed Central

    Stalcup, Lucas; Wojtylak, Brad; Bass, Cameron R.

    2017-01-01

    The submarine H.L. Hunley was the first submarine to sink an enemy ship during combat; however, the cause of its sinking has been a mystery for over 150 years. The Hunley set off a 61.2 kg (135 lb) black powder torpedo at a distance less than 5 m (16 ft) off its bow. Scaled experiments were performed that measured black powder and shock tube explosions underwater and propagation of blasts through a model ship hull. This propagation data was used in combination with archival experimental data to evaluate the risk to the crew from their own torpedo. The blast produced likely caused flexion of the ship hull to transmit the blast wave; the secondary wave transmitted inside the crew compartment was of sufficient magnitude that the calculated chances of survival were less than 16% for each crew member. The submarine drifted to its resting place after the crew died of air blast trauma within the hull. PMID:28832592

  20. Porcine head response to blast.

    PubMed

    Shridharani, Jay K; Wood, Garrett W; Panzer, Matthew B; Capehart, Bruce P; Nyein, Michelle K; Radovitzky, Raul A; Bass, Cameron R 'dale'

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300-2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G's and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R(2) = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  1. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  2. Effects of geometry on blast-induced loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher Dyer

    Simulations of blasts in an urban environment were performed using Loci/BLAST, a full-featured fluid dynamics simulation code, and analyzed. A two-structure urban environment blast case was used to perform a mesh refinement study. Results show that mesh spacing on and around the structure must be 12.5 cm or less to resolve fluid dynamic features sufficiently to yield accurate results. The effects of confinement were illustrated by analyzing a blast initiated from the same location with and without the presence of a neighboring structure. Analysis of extreme pressures and impulses on structures showed that confinement can increase blast loading by more than 200 percent.

  3. H-Mode Behavior Induced by Modulated Toroidal Current on HT-7 and HT-6M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J. S.; Luo, J. R.; Xu, Y. H.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhang, X. M.; Li, J. G.; Zhang, X. M.; Gao, X.; Li, Y. D.; Jie, Y. X.; Wu, Z. W.; Hu, L. Q.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, X. D.; Bao, Y.; Yang, K.; Wang, G. X.; Chen, L.; Shi, Y. J.; Qin, P. J.; Gu, X. M.; Cui, N. Z.; Fan, H. Y.; Chen, Y. F.; Xia, C. Y.; Ruan, H. L.; Tong, X. D.; Phillips, P. E.

    2001-10-01

    An improved Ohmic confinement phase (similar to H-mode) has been observed during Modulating Toroidal Current on the Hefei Tokamak-6M (HT-6M) and Hefei super-conducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). This improved plasma confinement phase is characterized by: (a) an increase in ne and T_e(0); (b) reduced H_α radiation from the edge; (c) steeper density and temperature profiles at the edge; (d) a more negative radial electric field inside the limiter; (e) a deeper electrostatic potential well at the edge; (f) reduced magnetic fluctuations at the edge; (g) MHD suppressing; (h) and by an increase in global energy confinement time, τ _e, by 27%-45%. The well-like structure of the radial electric field E_r, appears at an L-H like transition.

  4. Numerical modeling and characterization of blast waves for application in blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael G.

    Human exposure to blast waves, including blast-induced traumatic brain injury, is a developing field in medical research. Experiments with explosives have many disadvantages including safety, cost, and required area for trials. Shock tubes provide an alternative method to produce free field blast wave profiles. A compressed nitrogen shock tube experiment instrumented with static and reflective pressure taps is modeled using a numerical simulation. The geometry of the numerical model is simplified and blast wave characteristics are derived based upon static and pressure profiles. The pressure profiles are analyzed along the shock tube centerline and radially away from the tube axis. The blast wave parameters found from the pressure profiles provide guidelines for spatial location of a specimen. The location could be based on multiple parameters and provides a distribution of anticipated pressure profiles experience by the specimen.

  5. 30 CFR 77.1910 - Explosives and blasting; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting; general. 77.1910... COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking § 77.1910 Explosives and blasting; general. (a) Light and power circuits shall be disconnected or removed from the blasting area before charging and blasting. (b) All...

  6. Functional Interactions of Major Rice Blast Resistance Genes Pi-ta with Pi-b and Minor Blast Resistance QTLs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Major blast resistance (R) genes confer resistance in a gene-for-gene manner. However, little information is available on interactions between R genes. In this study, interactions between two rice blast R genes, Pi-ta and Pi-b, and other minor blast resistance quantitative trait locus (QTLs) were in...

  7. 30 CFR 7.67 - Construction test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Construction test. 7.67 Section 7.67 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.67 Construction test. The constuction test is to be performed on the blasting unit subsequent to the output energy test of...

  8. 30 CFR 7.67 - Construction test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Construction test. 7.67 Section 7.67 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.67 Construction test. The constuction test is to be performed on the blasting unit subsequent to the output energy test of...

  9. 30 CFR 7.67 - Construction test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction test. 7.67 Section 7.67 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.67 Construction test. The constuction test is to be performed on the blasting unit subsequent to the output energy test of...

  10. Economic and Environmental Impact of Rice Blast Pathogen (Magnaporthe oryzae) Alleviation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nalley, Lawton; Tsiboe, Francis; Durand-Morat, Alvaro; Shew, Aaron; Thoma, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) is a key concern in combating global food insecurity given the disease is responsible for approximately 30% of rice production losses globally-the equivalent of feeding 60 million people. These losses increase the global rice price and reduce consumer welfare and food security. Rice is the staple crop for more than half the world's population so any reduction in rice blast would have substantial beneficial effects on consumer livelihoods. In 2012, researchers in the US began analyzing the feasibility of creating blast-resistant rice through cisgenic breeding. Correspondingly, our study evaluates the changes in producer, consumer, and environmental welfare, if all the rice produced in the Mid-South of the US were blast resistant through a process like cisgenics, using both international trade and environmental assessment modeling. Our results show that US rice producers would gain 69.34 million dollars annually and increase the rice supply to feed an additional one million consumers globally by eliminating blast from production in the Mid-South. These results suggest that blast alleviation could be even more significant in increasing global food security given that the US is a small rice producer by global standards and likely experiences lower losses from blast than other rice-producing countries because of its ongoing investment in production technology and management. Furthermore, results from our detailed life cycle assessment (LCA) show that producing blast-resistant rice has lower environmental (fossil fuel depletion, ecotoxicity, carcinogenics, eutrophication, acidification, global warming potential, and ozone depletion) impacts per unit of rice than non-blast resistant rice production. Our findings suggest that any reduction in blast via breeding will have significantly positive impacts on reducing global food insecurity through increased supply, as well as decreased price and environmental impacts in production.

  11. Economic and Environmental Impact of Rice Blast Pathogen (Magnaporthe oryzae) Alleviation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) is a key concern in combating global food insecurity given the disease is responsible for approximately 30% of rice production losses globally—the equivalent of feeding 60 million people. These losses increase the global rice price and reduce consumer welfare and food security. Rice is the staple crop for more than half the world’s population so any reduction in rice blast would have substantial beneficial effects on consumer livelihoods. In 2012, researchers in the US began analyzing the feasibility of creating blast-resistant rice through cisgenic breeding. Correspondingly, our study evaluates the changes in producer, consumer, and environmental welfare, if all the rice produced in the Mid-South of the US were blast resistant through a process like cisgenics, using both international trade and environmental assessment modeling. Our results show that US rice producers would gain 69.34 million dollars annually and increase the rice supply to feed an additional one million consumers globally by eliminating blast from production in the Mid-South. These results suggest that blast alleviation could be even more significant in increasing global food security given that the US is a small rice producer by global standards and likely experiences lower losses from blast than other rice-producing countries because of its ongoing investment in production technology and management. Furthermore, results from our detailed life cycle assessment (LCA) show that producing blast-resistant rice has lower environmental (fossil fuel depletion, ecotoxicity, carcinogenics, eutrophication, acidification, global warming potential, and ozone depletion) impacts per unit of rice than non-blast resistant rice production. Our findings suggest that any reduction in blast via breeding will have significantly positive impacts on reducing global food insecurity through increased supply, as well as decreased price and environmental impacts in production. PMID

  12. Magneto-electric nano-particles for non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kun; Guduru, Rakesh; Hong, Jeongmin; Liang, Ping; Nair, Madhavan; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2012-01-01

    This paper for the first time discusses a computational study of using magneto-electric (ME) nanoparticles to artificially stimulate the neural activity deep in the brain. The new technology provides a unique way to couple electric signals in the neural network to the magnetic dipoles in the nanoparticles with the purpose to enable a non-invasive approach. Simulations of the effect of ME nanoparticles for non-invasively stimulating the brain of a patient with Parkinson's Disease to bring the pulsed sequences of the electric field to the levels comparable to those of healthy people show that the optimized values for the concentration of the 20-nm nanoparticles (with the magneto-electric (ME) coefficient of 100 V cm(-1) Oe(-1) in the aqueous solution) is 3 × 10(6) particles/cc, and the frequency of the externally applied 300-Oe magnetic field is 80 Hz.

  13. Robotic Water Blast Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, M. H.; Roberts, M. L.; Hill, W. E.; Jackson, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Water blasting system under development removes hard, dense, extraneous material from surfaces. High pressure pump forces water at supersonic speed through nozzle manipulated by robot. Impact of water blasts away unwanted material from workpiece rotated on air bearing turntable. Designed for removing thermal-protection material, system is adaptable to such industrial processes as cleaning iron or steel castings.

  14. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  15. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W [Livermore, CA; Hollaway, Rocky [Modesto, CA; Henning, Carl D [Livermore, CA; Deteresa, Steve [Livermore, CA; Grundler, Walter [Hayward, CA; Hagler, Lisle B [Berkeley, CA; Kokko, Edwin [Dublin, CA; Switzer, Vernon A [Livermore, CA

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  16. Overexpression of the wasabi defensin gene confers enhanced resistance to blast fungus ( Magnaporthe grisea) in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, H.; Nirasawa, S.; Saitoh, H.; Ito, M.; Nishihara, M.; Terauchi, R.; Nakamura, I.

    2002-11-01

    Transgenic rice ( Oryza sativa cv. Sasanishiki) overexpressing the wasabi defensin gene, a plant defensin effective against the rice blast fungus, was generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Twenty-two T2 homozygous lines harboring the wasabi defensin gene were challenged by the blast fungus. Transformants exhibited resistance to rice blast at various levels. The inheritance of the resistance over generations was investigated. T3 plants derived from two highly blast-resistant T2 lines (WT14-5 and WT43-5) were challenged with the blast fungus using the press-injured spots method. The average size of disease lesions of the transgenic line WT43-5 was reduced to about half of that of non-transgenic plants. The 5-kDa peptide, corresponding to the processed form of the wasabi defensin, was detected in the total protein fraction extracted from the T3 progeny. Transgenic rice plants overproducing wasabi defensin are expected to possess a durable and wide-spectrum resistance (i.e. field resistance) against various rice blast races.

  17. Use of molecular markers in identification and characterization of resistance to rice blast in India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; S, Aravindan; Ngangkham, Umakanta; Shubudhi, H N; Bag, Manas Kumar; Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Samantaray, Sanghamitra; Jena, Mayabini

    2017-01-01

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive disease causing huge losses to rice yield in different parts of the world. Therefore, an attempt has been made to find out the resistance by screening and studying the genetic diversity of eighty released rice varieties by National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack (NRVs) using molecular markers linked to twelve major blast resistance (R) genes viz Pib, Piz, Piz-t, Pik, Pik-p, Pikm Pik-h, Pita/Pita-2, Pi2, Pi9, Pi1 and Pi5. Out of which, nineteen varieties (23.75%) showed resistance, twenty one were moderately resistant (26.25%) while remaining forty varieties (50%) showed susceptible in uniform blast nursery. Rice varieties possessing blast resistance genes varied from four to twelve and the frequencies of the resistance genes ranged from 0 to 100%. The cluster analysis grouped the eighty NRVs into two major clusters at 63% level of genetic similarity coefficient. The PIC value for seventeen markers varied from 0 to 0.37 at an average of 0.20. Out of seventeen markers, only five markers, 195R-1, Pi9-i, Pita3, YL155/YL87 and 40N23r corresponded to three broad spectrum R genes viz. Pi9, Pita/Pita2 and Pi5 were found to be significantly associated with the blast disease with explaining phenotypic variance from 3.5% to 7.7%. The population structure analysis and PCoA divided the entire 80 NRVs into two sub-groups. The outcome of this study would help to formulate strategies for improving rice blast resistance through genetic studies, plant-pathogen interaction, identification of novel R genes, development of new resistant varieties through marker-assisted breeding for improving rice blast resistance in India and worldwide.

  18. Thermoelectric Properties of Pulsed Electric Current Sintered Samples of AgPb m SbSe17 ( m = 16 or 17)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-I.; Todorov, Ilyia; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Timm, Edward; Case, Eldon D.; Schock, Harold; Hogan, Timothy P.

    2012-06-01

    Lead chalcogenide materials have drawn attention in recent years because of their outstanding thermoelectric properties. Bulk n-type materials of AgPb m SbTe2+ m have been reported to exhibit high figure of merit, ZT, as high as 1.7 at 700 K. Recent reports have shown p-type lead selenide-based compounds with comparable ZT. The analogous material AgPb m SbSe17 shares a similar cubic rock-salt structure with PbTe-based compounds; however, it exhibits a higher melting point, and selenium is more abundant than tellurium. Using solid solution chemistry, we have fabricated cast AgPb15SbSe17 samples that show a peak power factor of approximately 17 μW/cm K2 at 450 K. Increasing the strength of such materials is commonly achieved through powder processing, which also helps to homogenize the source materials. Pulsed electric current sintering (PECS) is a hot-pressing technique that utilizes electric current through the die and sample for direct Joule heating during pressing. The mechanisms present during PECS processing have captured significant research interest and have led to some notable improvements in sample properties compared with other densification techniques. We report the thermoelectric properties of PECS samples of AgPb m SbSe17 along with sample fabrication and processing details.

  19. Core Radial Electric Field and Transport in Wendelstein 7-X Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, Novimir

    2016-10-01

    Results from the investigation of core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (Er) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the Er profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Neoclassical particle fluxes are not intrinsically ambipolar, which leads to the formation of a radial electric field that enforces ambipolarity. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric field to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu⊥ 5km /s (ΔEr 12kV / m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW . These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between, heating power, response of the temperature and density profiles and the response of the radial electric field. Estimations of the core transport are based on power balance and utilize electron temperature (Te) profiles from the ECE and Thomson scattering, electron density profiles (ne) from interferometry and Thomson scattering, ion temperature (Ti) profiles from XICS, along with measurements of the total stored energy and radiated power. Also described are a set core impurity confinement experiments and results. Impurity confinement has been investigated through the injection of trace amount of argon impurity gas at the plasma edge in conjunction with measurements of the density of various ionization states of argon from the XICS and High Efficiency eXtreme-UV Overview Spectrometer (HEXOS) diagnostics. Finally the inferred Er and heat flux profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations using measured

  20. Low-Level Blast Exposure Increases Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Expression in the Rat Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Por, Elaine D.; Choi, Jae-Hyek; Lund, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Blast-related ocular injuries sustained by military personnel have led to rigorous efforts to elucidate the effects of blast exposure on neurosensory function. Recent studies have provided some insight into cognitive and visual deficits sustained following blast exposure; however, limited data are available on the effects of blast on pain and inflammatory processes. Investigation of these secondary effects of blast exposure is necessary to fully comprehend the complex pathophysiology of blast-related injuries. The overall purpose of this study is to determine the effects of single and repeated blast exposure on pain and inflammatory mediators in ocular tissues. Methods: A compressed air shock tube was used to deliver a single or repeated blast (68.0 ± 2.7 kPa) to anesthetized rats daily for 5 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed on ocular tissues to determine the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) following single and repeated blast exposure. Neutrophil infiltration and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expression were also assessed in blast tissues via immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis, respectively. Results: TRPV1 expression was increased in rat corneas exposed to both single and repeated blast. Increased secretion of CGRP, SP, and ET-1 was also detected in rat corneas as compared to control. Moreover, repeated blast exposure resulted in neutrophil infiltration in the cornea and stromal layer as compared to control animals. Conclusion: Single and repeated blast exposure resulted in increased expression of TRPV1, CGRP, SP, and ET-1 as well as neutrophil infiltration. Collectively, these findings provide novel insight into the activation of pain and inflammation signaling mediators following blast exposure. PMID:27049881

  1. Physical properties of the Ce 2 M Al 7 Ge 4 heavy-fermion compounds ( M = Co , Ir , Ni , Pd )

    DOE PAGES

    Ghimire, N. J.; Cary, S. K.; Eley, S.; ...

    2016-05-23

    Here, we report the synthesis, crystal structure, and characterization by means of single-crystal x-ray diffraction, neutron powder diffraction, and magnetic, thermal, and transport measurements of the new heavy-fermion compounds Ce 2MAl 7Ge 4 (M=Co,Ir,Ni,Pd). These compounds crystallize in a noncentrosymmetric tetragonal space group Pmore » $$\\bar{4}$$2 1m, consisting of layers of square nets of Ce atoms separated by Ge-Al and M-Al-Ge blocks. Ce 2CoAl 7Ge 4,Ce 2IrAl 7Ge 4, and Ce 2NiAl 7Ge 4 order magnetically below TM=1.8, 1.6, and 0.8 K, respectively. There is no evidence of magnetic ordering in Ce 2PdAl 7Ge 4 down to 0.4 K. Furthermore, the small amount of entropy released in the magnetic state of Ce 2MAl 7Ge 4 (M = Co, Ir, Ni) and the reduced specific heat jump at T M suggest a strong Kondo interaction in these materials. Ce 2PdAl 7Ge 4 shows non-Fermi liquid behavior, possibly due to the presence of a nearby quantum critical point.« less

  2. On the Propagation and Interaction of Spherical Blast Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics and the scaling laws of isolated spherical blast waves have been briefly reviewed. Both self-similar solutions and numerical solutions of isolated blast waves are discussed. Blast profiles in the near-field (strong shock region) and the far-field (weak shock region) are examined. Particular attention is directed at the blast overpressure and shock propagating speed. Consideration is also given to the interaction of spherical blast waves. Test data for the propagation and interaction of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure.

  3. Blast investigation by fast multispectral radiometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devir, A. D.; Bushlin, Y.; Mendelewicz, I.; Lessin, A. B.; Engel, M.

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge regarding the processes involved in blasts and detonations is required in various applications, e.g. missile interception, blasts of high-explosive materials, final ballistics and IED identification. Blasts release large amount of energy in short time duration. Some part of this energy is released as intense radiation in the optical spectral bands. This paper proposes to measure the blast radiation by a fast multispectral radiometer. The measurement is made, simultaneously, in appropriately chosen spectral bands. These spectral bands provide extensive information on the physical and chemical processes that govern the blast through the time-dependence of the molecular and aerosol contributions to the detonation products. Multi-spectral blast measurements are performed in the visible, SWIR and MWIR spectral bands. Analysis of the cross-correlation between the measured multi-spectral signals gives the time dependence of the temperature, aerosol and gas composition of the blast. Farther analysis of the development of these quantities in time may indicate on the order of the detonation and amount and type of explosive materials. Examples of analysis of measured explosions are presented to demonstrate the power of the suggested fast multispectral radiometric analysis approach.

  4. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME III. BLAST FURNACE IRONMAKING, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  5. [Gangrene of the right colon after blast injury caused by abdominal gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, Dragan; Misović, Sidor; Jevtić, Miodrag

    2005-06-01

    To present a patient with an indirect secondary non-perforating blast injury of the right colon following abdominal gunshot injury, which led to necrosis and the right colon gangrene, and was surgically managed. A 26-year-old male was shot in the abdomen by four projectiles causing the secondary indirect blast injury of the right colon that turned into gangrene after 24 hours. Two days after admission, laparotomy was performed, but the primary anastomosis was not done because of the stomach and pancreatic injury, and the resection of the colon with terminal ileostomy was done instead. Three months later, the reconstruction of the colon was performed using ileocolotransverso-terminolatetral anastomosis. Secondary blast injuries should be anticipated in gunshot injuries, and could be expected to any organs, particularly the air filled ones.

  6. Modeling the Blast Load Simulator Airblast Environment using First Principles Codes. Report 1, Blast Load Simulator Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 16 -3 1 Modeling the Blast Load Simulator Airblast Environment Using First Principles Codes Report 1, Blast Load...Simulator Airblast Environment using First Principles Codes Report 1, Blast Load Simulator Environment Gregory C. Bessette, James L. O’Daniel...evaluate several first principles codes (FPCs) for modeling airblast environments typical of those encountered in the BLS. The FPCs considered were

  7. [Indirect blast rupture of the pancreas with a primary unperforated blast injury of the duodenum].

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, Dragan; Ignjatović, Mile; Jevtić, Miodrag

    2006-02-01

    To present a patient with an indirect blast rupture of the head of pancreas, as well as with a blast contusion of the duodenum following abdominal gunshot injury. A patient with the abdominal gunshot injury was submitted to the management of the injury of the liver, gaster and the right kidney in the field hospital. The revealed rupture of the head of the pancreas and the contusion of the duodenum were managed applying the method of Whipple. Indirect blast injuries require extensive surgical interventions, especially under war conditions.

  8. Panicle blast 1 (Pb1) resistance is dependent on at least four QTLs in the rice genome.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Nakamura, Mitsuru; Mizubayashi, Tatsumi; Takahashi, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Fukuoka, Shuuichi; Hayashi, Nagao

    2017-12-01

    Rice blast is the most serious disease afflicting rice and there is an urgent need for the use of disease resistance (R) genes in blast tolerance breeding programs. Pb1 is classified as a quantitative resistance gene and it does not have fungal specificity. Pb1-mediated resistance develops in the latter stages of growth. However, some cultivars, such as Kanto209 (K209), cultivar name Satojiman, despite possessing Pb1, do not exert resistance to rice blast during the reproductive stage. We found that the expression of WRKY45 gene downstream of Pb1 was weakly induced by rice blast inoculation at the full heading stage in K209. Genetic analysis using the SNP-based Golden Gate assay of K209 crossing with Koshihikari Aichi SBL (KASBL) found at least four regions related to the resistance in the rice genome (Chr8, Chr9, Chr7, Chr11). Mapping of QTL related to Chr7 confirmed the existence of factors that were required for the resistance of Pb1 in the 22 to 23 Mbp region of the rice genome. We clarified how the K209 cultivar is vulnerable to the blast disease despite possessing Pb1 and found the DNA marker responsible for the quantitative resistance of Pb1. We identified the QTL loci required for Pb1-mediated resistance to rice panicle blast. Pb1 was negatively dependent on at least three QTLs, 7, 9 and 11, and positively dependent on one, QTL 8, in the K209 genome. This finding paves the way for creating a line to select optimal QTLs in order to make use of Pb1-mediated resistance more effectively.

  9. BEAUTY-X: enhanced BLAST searches for DNA queries.

    PubMed

    Worley, K C; Culpepper, P; Wiese, B A; Smith, R F

    1998-01-01

    BEAUTY (BLAST Enhanced Alignment Utility) is an enhanced version of the BLAST database search tool that facilitates identification of the functions of matched sequences. Three recent improvements to the BEAUTY program described here make the enhanced output (1) available for DNA queries, (2) available for searches of any protein database, and (3) more up-to-date, with periodic updates of the domain information. BEAUTY searches of the NCBI and EMBL non-redundant protein sequence databases are available from the BCM Search Launcher Web pages (http://gc.bcm.tmc. edu:8088/search-launcher/launcher.html). BEAUTY Post-Processing of submitted search results is available using the BCM Search Launcher Batch Client (version 2.6) (ftp://gc.bcm.tmc. edu/pub/software/search-launcher/). Example figures are available at http://dot.bcm.tmc. edu:9331/papers/beautypp.html (kworley,culpep)@bcm.tmc.edu

  10. Neuronal DNA Methylation Profiling of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Ge, Yongchao; Chen, Sean; Xin, Yurong; Umali, Michelle U; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Ahlers, Stephen T; Elder, Gregory A

    2015-08-15

    Long-term molecular changes in the brain resulting from blast exposure may be mediated by epigenetic changes, such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, that regulate gene expression. Aberrant regulation of gene expression is associated with behavioral abnormalities, where DNA methylation bridges environmental signals to sustained changes in gene expression. We assessed DNA methylation changes in the brains of rats exposed to three 74.5 kPa blast overpressure events, conditions that have been associated with long-term anxiogenic manifestations weeks or months following the initial exposures. Rat frontal cortex eight months post-exposure was used for cell sorting of whole brain tissue into neurons and glia. We interrogated DNA methylation profiles in these cells using Expanded Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing. We obtained data for millions of cytosines, showing distinct methylation profiles for neurons and glia and an increase in global methylation in neuronal versus glial cells (p<10(-7)). We detected DNA methylation perturbations in blast overpressure-exposed animals, compared with sham blast controls, within 458 and 379 genes in neurons and glia, respectively. Differentially methylated neuronal genes showed enrichment in cell death and survival and nervous system development and function, including genes involved in transforming growth factor β and nitric oxide signaling. Functional validation via gene expression analysis of 30 differentially methylated neuronal and glial genes showed a 1.2 fold change in gene expression of the serotonin N-acetyltransferase gene (Aanat) in blast animals (p<0.05). These data provide the first genome-based evidence for changes in DNA methylation induced in response to multiple blast overpressure exposures. In particular, increased methylation and decreased gene expression were observed in the Aanat gene, which is involved in converting serotonin to the circadian hormone melatonin and is implicated in sleep

  11. Effect of non-metallic precipitates and grain size on core loss of non-oriented electrical silicon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiayi; Ren, Qiang; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Lifeng

    2018-04-01

    In the current study, the number density and size of non-metallic precipitates and the size of grains on the core loss of the 50W800 non-oriented electrical silicon steel sheets were investigated. The number density and size of precipitates and grains were statistically analyzed using an automatic scanning electron microscope (ASPEX) and an optical microscope. Hypothesis models were established to reveal the physical feature for the function of grain size and precipitates on the core loss of the steel. Most precipitates in the steel were AlN particles smaller than 1 μm so that were detrimental to the core loss of the steel. These finer AlN particles distributed on the surface of the steel sheet. The relationship between the number density of precipitates (x in number/mm2 steel area) and the core loss (P1.5/50 in W/kg) was regressed as P1.5/50 = 4.150 + 0.002 x. The average grain size was approximately 25-35 μm. The relationship between the core loss and grain size (d in μm) was P1.5/50 = 3.851 + 20.001 d-1 + 60.000 d-2.

  12. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W [Livermore, CA; Hollaway, Rocky [Modesto, CA; Henning, Carl D [Livermore, CA; Deteresa, Steve [Livermore, CA; Grundler, Walter [Hayward, CA; Hagler, Lisle B [Berkeley, CA; Kokko, Edwin [Dublin, CA; Switzer, Vernon A [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  13. Circulating endothelial cells are increased in chronic myeloid leukemia blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Godoy, C R T; Levy, D; Giampaoli, V; Chamone, D A F; Bydlowski, S P; Pereira, J

    2015-06-01

    We measured circulating endothelial precursor cells (EPCs), activated circulating endothelial cells (aCECs), and mature circulating endothelial cells (mCECs) using four-color multiparametric flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 84 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients and 65 healthy controls; and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by quantitative real-time PCR in 50 CML patients and 32 healthy controls. Because of an increase in mCECs, the median percentage of CECs in CML blast crisis (0.0146%) was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (0.0059%, P<0.01) and in the accelerated phase (0.0059%, P=0.01). There were no significant differences in the percentages of CECs in chronic- or active-phase patients and healthy subjects (P>0.05). In addition, VEGF gene expression was significantly higher in all phases of CML: 0.245 in blast crisis, 0.320 in the active phase, and 0.330 in chronic phase patients than it was in healthy subjects (0.145). In conclusion, CML in blast crisis had increased levels of CECs and VEGF gene expression, which may serve as markers of disease progression and may become targets for the management of CML.

  14. Dismounted Complex Blast Injury.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Romney C; Fleming, Mark; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Gordon, Wade T; Nanos, George P; Charlton, Michael T; Ficke, James R

    2012-01-01

    The severe Dismounted Complex Blast Injury (DCBI) is characterized by high-energy injuries to the bilateral lower extremities (usually proximal transfemoral amputations) and/or upper extremity (usually involving the non-dominant side), in addition to open pelvic injuries, genitourinary, and abdominal trauma. Initial resuscitation and multidisciplinary surgical management appear to be the keys to survival. Definitive treatment follows general principals of open wound management and includes decontamination through aggressive and frequent debridement, hemorrhage control, viable tissue preservation, and appropriate timing of wound closure. These devastating injuries are associated with paradoxically favorable survival rates, but associated injuries and higher amputation levels lead to more difficult reconstructive challenges.

  15. Effect of casing yield stress on bomb blast impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, M. D.

    2012-08-01

    An equation to predict blast effects from cased charges was first proposed by U. Fano in 1944 and revised by E.M. Fisher in 1953 [1]. Fisher's revision provides much better matches to available blast impulse data, but still requires empirical parameter adjustments. A new derivation [2], based on the work of R.W. Gurney [3] and G.I. Taylor [4], has resulted in an equation which nearly matches experimental data. This new analytical model is also capable of being extended, through the incorporation of additional physics, such as the effects of early case fracture, finite casing thickness, casing metal strain energy dissipation, explosive gas escape through casing fractures and the comparative dynamics of blast wave and metal fragment impacts. This paper will focus on the choice of relevant case fracture strain criterion, as it will be shown that this allows the explicit inclusion of the dynamic properties of the explosive and casing metal. It will include a review and critique of the most significant earlier work on this topic, contained in a paper by Hoggatt and Recht [5]. Using this extended analytical model, good matches can readily be made to available free-field blast impulse data, without any empirical adjustments being needed. Further work will be required to apply this model to aluminised and other highly oxygen-deficient explosives.

  16. Kv7 potassium channel subunits and M currents in cultured hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Grigorov, Alexej; Moskalyuk, Anastasia; Kravchenko, Mykola; Veselovsky, Nikolai; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Fedulova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    Potassium channels of the Kv7 family that mediate the non-inactivating M current regulate the excitability of many types of neurons in the central nervous system, including some in the hippocampus. We report here that individual interneurons from newborn rat hippocampi in long-term culture strongly express messenger RNA specific for Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 and, to a lesser extent, Kv7.5 channel subunits but not for the Kv7.4 subunit. An M-like current was electrophysiologically identified in two subpopulations of interneurons distinct in their spiking behaviour (regular or fast spiking). The M-channel enhancer retigabine reduced interneuronal excitability by constraining the number of action potentials generated during imposed depolarisations; this effect was inhibited by specific the M-channel blocking drugs. In paired synaptically connected interneuron-target cell recordings, anatomically localised applications of retigabine indicated that M channels were present in both the interneuron soma and its GABA-ergic inhibitory axon. We conclude that M-channel subunits and functional M channels are broadly expressed in hippocampal interneurons and their axons and are potentially capable of strongly regulating their firing properties.

  17. Comparative genomics and association mapping approaches for blast resistant genes in finger millet using SSRs.

    PubMed

    Babu, B Kalyana; Dinesh, Pandey; Agrawal, Pawan K; Sood, S; Chandrashekara, C; Bhatt, Jagadish C; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The major limiting factor for production and productivity of finger millet crop is blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea. Since, the genome sequence information available in finger millet crop is scarce, comparative genomics plays a very important role in identification of genes/QTLs linked to the blast resistance genes using SSR markers. In the present study, a total of 58 genic SSRs were developed for use in genetic analysis of a global collection of 190 finger millet genotypes. The 58 SSRs yielded ninety five scorable alleles and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.186 to 0.677 at an average of 0.385. The gene diversity was in the range of 0.208 to 0.726 with an average of 0.487. Association mapping for blast resistance was done using 104 SSR markers which identified four QTLs for finger blast and one QTL for neck blast resistance. The genomic marker RM262 and genic marker FMBLEST32 were linked to finger blast disease at a P value of 0.007 and explained phenotypic variance (R²) of 10% and 8% respectively. The genomic marker UGEP81 was associated to finger blast at a P value of 0.009 and explained 7.5% of R². The QTLs for neck blast was associated with the genomic SSR marker UGEP18 at a P value of 0.01, which explained 11% of R². Three QTLs for blast resistance were found common by using both GLM and MLM approaches. The resistant alleles were found to be present mostly in the exotic genotypes. Among the genotypes of NW Himalayan region of India, VHC3997, VHC3996 and VHC3930 were found highly resistant, which may be effectively used as parents for developing blast resistant cultivars in the NW Himalayan region of India. The markers linked to the QTLs for blast resistance in the present study can be further used for cloning of the full length gene, fine mapping and their further use in the marker assisted breeding programmes for introgression of blast resistant alleles into locally adapted cultivars.

  18. Properties of large electric fields in the plasma sheet at 4-7RE measured with Polar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiling, A.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C.; Johnson, M.; Temerin, M.; Mozer, F. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Scudder, J.; Russell, C. T.

    2001-04-01

    Measurements from the Polar satellite provide evidence for large electric field structures in the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of 4-7RE. These structures had amplitudes perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field that can exceed 100 mV m-1 (6 s averaged). Two years (from May 1, 1996, to April 30, 1998) of electric field data (EZ component, approximately along GSE z) were surveyed. The distribution in invariant latitude (ILAT) and magnetic local time (MLT) of large perpendicular electric field events (defined as >=20 mV m-1 for a 6-s average) delineates the statistical auroral oval with the majority of events occurring in the nightside centered around midnight and a smaller concentration around 1500 MLT. The magnitude-versus-altitude distribution of the electric fields between 4 and 7RE in the nightside could be explained by models which assume either shear Alfvén waves propagating into regions of larger background magnetic fields or electrostatic structures being mapped quasi-statically along equipotential magnetic field lines. In addition, this survey yielded 24 very large amplitude events with |E⊥|>=100mVm-1 (6 s averaged), all of which occurred in the nightside. In the spacecraft frame, the electric field structures occurred on timescales ranging from 10 to 60 s. About 85% of these events occurred in the vicinity of the outer boundary of the plasma sheet; the rest occurred in the central plasma sheet. The polarity of the electric fields was dominantly perpendicular to the nominal plasma sheet boundary. For a large fraction of events (<=50%) the ratios of electric and magnetic fields in the period range from 10 to 60 s were consistent with Alfvén waves. Large Poynting flux (up to 2.5 ergs cm-2s-1) dominantly directed downward along the background magnetic field was associated with 21 events. All 24 events occurred during geomagnetic disturbances such as magnetic substorms. A conjugate study with ground stations for 14 events (out of the 24 events

  19. Single-cell Pharmacodynamic Monitoring of S6 Ribosomal Protein Phosphorylation in AML Blasts During a Clinical Trial Combining the mTOR Inhibitor Sirolimus and Intensive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Alexander E.; Kasner, Margaret T.; Shank, Doris; Luger, Selina M.; Carroll, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Integration of signal transduction inhibitors into chemotherapy regimens generally has generally not led to anticipated increases in response and survival. However, it remains unclear whether this is because of inadequate or inconsistent inhibition of target or other complex biology. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is frequently activated in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and we previously demonstrated the safety of combining the mTOR inhibitor, sirolimus, with mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine (MEC) chemotherapy. However, we did not reliably determine the extent of mTOR inhibition on that study. Here we sought to develop an assay that allowed us to serially quantify mTOR kinase’s activation state during therapy. Experimental design To provide evidence of mTOR kinase activation and inhibition, we applied a validated whole blood fixation/permeabilization technique for flow cytometry in order to serially monitor S6 ribosomal protein (S6) phosphorylation in immunophenotypically-identified AML blasts. Results With this approach, we demonstrate activation of mTOR signaling in 8/10 subjects’ samples (80%) and conclusively show inhibition of mTOR in the majority of subjects’ tumor cell during therapy. Of note, S6 phosphorylation in AML blasts is heterogeneous and, in some cases, intrinsically resistant to rapamycin at clinically achieved concentrations. Conclusions The methodology described is rapid and reproducible. We demonstrate the feasibility of real-time, direct pharmacodynamic monitoring by flow cytometry during clinical trials combining intensive chemotherapy and signal transduction inhibitors. This approach greatly clarifies pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships and has broad application to pre-clinical and clinical testing of drugs whose direct or downstream effects disrupt PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. PMID:22167413

  20. 7 CFR 1700.28 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.28 Section 1700.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... regulatory environment of RUS borrowers and recommends policies and procedures. [63 FR 16085, Apr. 2, 1998...

  1. 7 CFR 1700.28 - Electric Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electric Program. 1700.28 Section 1700.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... regulatory environment of RUS borrowers and recommends policies and procedures. [63 FR 16085, Apr. 2, 1998...

  2. Attenuation of blast pressure behind ballistic protective vests.

    PubMed

    Wood, Garrett W; Panzer, Matthew B; Shridharani, Jay K; Matthews, Kyle A; Capehart, Bruce P; Myers, Barry S; Bass, Cameron R

    2013-02-01

    Clinical studies increasingly report brain injury and not pulmonary injury following blast exposures, despite the increased frequency of exposure to explosive devices. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of personal body armour use on the potential for primary blast injury and to determine the risk of brain and pulmonary injury following a blast and its impact on the clinical care of patients with a history of blast exposure. A shock tube was used to generate blast overpressures on soft ballistic protective vests (NIJ Level-2) and hard protective vests (NIJ Level-4) while overpressure was recorded behind the vest. Both types of vest were found to significantly decrease pulmonary injury risk following a blast for a wide range of conditions. At the highest tested blast overpressure, the soft vest decreased the behind armour overpressure by a factor of 14.2, and the hard vest decreased behind armour overpressure by a factor of 56.8. Addition of body armour increased the 50th percentile pulmonary death tolerance of both vests to higher levels than the 50th percentile for brain injury. These results suggest that ballistic protective body armour vests, especially hard body armour plates, provide substantial chest protection in primary blasts and explain the increased frequency of head injuries, without the presence of pulmonary injuries, in protected subjects reporting a history of blast exposure. These results suggest increased clinical suspicion for mild to severe brain injury is warranted in persons wearing body armour exposed to a blast with or without pulmonary injury.

  3. Blast-induced phenotypic switching in cerebral vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Dabiri, Borna E.; Goss, Josue A.; Hemphill, Matthew A.; Brigham, Mark D.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2011-01-01

    Vasospasm of the cerebrovasculature is a common manifestation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) reported among combat casualties in the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Cerebral vasospasm occurs more frequently, and with earlier onset, in bTBI patients than in patients with other TBI injury modes, such as blunt force trauma. Though vasospasm is usually associated with the presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), SAH is not required for vasospasm in bTBI, which suggests that the unique mechanics of blast injury could potentiate vasospasm onset, accounting for the increased incidence. Here, using theoretical and in vitro models, we show that a single rapid mechanical insult can induce vascular hypercontractility and remodeling, indicative of vasospasm initiation. We employed high-velocity stretching of engineered arterial lamellae to simulate the mechanical forces of a blast pulse on the vasculature. An hour after a simulated blast, injured tissues displayed altered intracellular calcium dynamics leading to hypersensitivity to contractile stimulus with endothelin-1. One day after simulated blast, tissues exhibited blast force dependent prolonged hypercontraction and vascular smooth muscle phenotype switching, indicative of remodeling. These results suggest that an acute, blast-like injury is sufficient to induce a hypercontraction-induced genetic switch that potentiates vascular remodeling, and cerebral vasospasm, in bTBI patients. PMID:21765001

  4. Blasting CME

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This LASCO C2 image, taken 8 January 2002, shows a widely spreading coronal mass ejection (CME) as it blasts more than a billion tons of matter out into space at millions of kilometers per hour. The C2 image was turned 90 degrees so that the blast seems to be pointing down. An EIT 304 Angstrom image from a different day was enlarged and superimposed on the C2 image so that it filled the occulting disk for effect. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  5. 39 CFR 262.7 - Non-records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-records. 262.7 Section 262.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.7 Non-records. (a) Non-record material. Includes blank forms and surplus publications...

  6. 39 CFR 262.7 - Non-records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Non-records. 262.7 Section 262.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.7 Non-records. (a) Non-record material. Includes blank forms and surplus publications...

  7. 39 CFR 262.7 - Non-records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Non-records. 262.7 Section 262.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.7 Non-records. (a) Non-record material. Includes blank forms and surplus publications...

  8. 39 CFR 262.7 - Non-records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Non-records. 262.7 Section 262.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.7 Non-records. (a) Non-record material. Includes blank forms and surplus publications...

  9. 39 CFR 262.7 - Non-records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Non-records. 262.7 Section 262.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.7 Non-records. (a) Non-record material. Includes blank forms and surplus publications...

  10. RESEARCH PAPERS : Ionospheric signature of surface mine blasts from Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Eric; Bernard Minster, J.; Hofton, Michelle; Hedlin, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Sources such as atmospheric or buried explosions and shallow earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a way of directly measuring the total electron content in the ionosphere and, therefore, of detecting such perturbations in the upper atmosphere. In July and August 1996, three large surface mine blasts (1.5 Kt each) were detonated at the Black Thunder coal mine in eastern Wyoming. As part of a seismic and acoustic monitoring experiment, we deployed five dual-frequency GPS receivers at distances ranging from 50 to 200 km from the mine and were able to detect the ionospheric perturbation caused by the blasts. The perturbation starts 10 to 15 min after the blast, lasts for about 30 min, and propagates with an apparent horizontal velocity of 1200 m s- 1. Its amplitude reaches 3 × 1014 el m- 2 in the 7-3 min period band, a value close to the ionospheric perturbation caused by the M=6.7 Northridge earthquake (Calais & Minster 1995). The small signal-to-noise ratio of the perturbation can be improved by slant-stacking the electron content time-series recorded by the different GPS receivers taking into account the horizontal propagation of the perturbation. The energy of the perturbation is concentrated in the 200 to 300 s period band, a result consistent with previous observations and numerical model predictions. The 300 s band probably corresponds to gravity modes and shorter periods to acoustic modes, respectively. Using a 1-D stratified velocity model of the atmosphere we show that linear acoustic ray tracing fits arrival times at all GPS receivers. We interpret the perturbation as a direct acoustic wave caused by the explosion itself. This study shows that even relatively small subsurface events can produce

  11. Design and modeling of magnetically driven electric-field sensor for non-contact DC voltage measurement in electric power systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Decai; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the design and modeling of a magnetically driven electric-field sensor for non-contact DC voltage measurement are presented. The magnetic drive structure of the sensor is composed of a small solenoid and a cantilever beam with a cylindrical magnet mounted on it. The interaction of the magnet and the solenoid provides the magnetic driving force for the sensor. Employing magnetic drive structure brings the benefits of low driving voltage and large vibrating displacement, which consequently results in less interference from the drive signal. In the theoretical analyses, the capacitance calculation model between the wire and the sensing electrode is built. The expression of the magnetic driving force is derived by the method of linear fitting. The dynamical model of the magnetic-driven cantilever beam actuator is built by using Euler-Bernoulli theory and distributed parameter method. Taking advantage of the theoretical model, the output voltage of proposed sensor can be predicted. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical results. The proposed sensor shows a favorable linear response characteristic. The proposed sensor has a measuring sensitivity of 9.87 μV/(V/m) at an excitation current of 37.5 mA. The electric field intensity resolution can reach 10.13 V/m.

  12. Neuronal Injury and Glial Changes Are Hallmarks of Open Field Blast Exposure in Swine Frontal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Desai, Alok; Feng, Ke; Tummala, Sharvani; Saif, Tal; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhang, Liying; Cavanaugh, John M.; King, Albert I.

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of blast induced traumatic brain injuries and associated neuropsychological consequences in veterans returning from the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, the need to better understand the neuropathological sequelae following exposure to an open field blast exposure is still critical. Although a large body of experimental studies have attempted to address these pathological changes using shock tube models of blast injury, studies directed at understanding changes in a gyrencephalic brain exposed to a true open field blast are limited and thus forms the focus of this study. Anesthetized, male Yucatan swine were subjected to forward facing medium blast overpressure (peak side on overpressure 224–332 kPa; n = 7) or high blast overpressure (peak side on overpressure 350–403 kPa; n = 5) by detonating 3.6 kg of composition-4 charge. Sham animals (n = 5) were subjected to all the conditions without blast exposure. After a 3-day survival period, the brain was harvested and sections from the frontal lobes were processed for histological assessment of neuronal injury and glial reactivity changes. Significant neuronal injury in the form of beta amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive zones in the gray and white matter was observed in the frontal lobe sections from both the blast exposure groups. A significant increase in the number of astrocytes and microglia was also observed in the blast exposed sections compared to sham sections. We postulate that the observed acute injury changes may progress to chronic periods after blast and may contribute to short and long-term neuronal degeneration and glial mediated inflammation. PMID:28107370

  13. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...' approval schedules, and if it is in permissible condition: (1) Multiple-Shot Blasting Units, part 7 subpart...; (4) Flame Safety Lamps; (5) Portable Methane Detectors, part 22; (6) Telephone and Signaling Devices, part 23; (7) Single-Shot Blasting Units; (8) Lighting Equipment for Illuminating Underground Workings...

  14. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...' approval schedules, and if it is in permissible condition: (1) Multiple-Shot Blasting Units, part 7 subpart...; (4) Flame Safety Lamps; (5) Portable Methane Detectors, part 22; (6) Telephone and Signaling Devices, part 23; (7) Single-Shot Blasting Units; (8) Lighting Equipment for Illuminating Underground Workings...

  15. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...' approval schedules, and if it is in permissible condition: (1) Multiple-Shot Blasting Units, part 7 subpart...; (4) Flame Safety Lamps; (5) Portable Methane Detectors, part 22; (6) Telephone and Signaling Devices, part 23; (7) Single-Shot Blasting Units; (8) Lighting Equipment for Illuminating Underground Workings...

  16. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...' approval schedules, and if it is in permissible condition: (1) Multiple-Shot Blasting Units, part 7 subpart...; (4) Flame Safety Lamps; (5) Portable Methane Detectors, part 22; (6) Telephone and Signaling Devices, part 23; (7) Single-Shot Blasting Units; (8) Lighting Equipment for Illuminating Underground Workings...

  17. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...' approval schedules, and if it is in permissible condition: (1) Multiple-Shot Blasting Units, part 7 subpart...; (4) Flame Safety Lamps; (5) Portable Methane Detectors, part 22; (6) Telephone and Signaling Devices, part 23; (7) Single-Shot Blasting Units; (8) Lighting Equipment for Illuminating Underground Workings...

  18. Predictive control of thermal state of blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbasova, T. A.; Filimonova, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The work describes the structure of the model for predictive control of the thermal state of a blast furnace. The proposed model contains the following input parameters: coke rate; theoretical combustion temperature, comprising: natural gas consumption, blasting temperature, humidity, oxygen, blast furnace cooling water; blast furnace gas utilization rate. The output parameter is the cast iron temperature. The results for determining the cast iron temperature were obtained following the identification using the Hammerstein-Wiener model. The result of solving the cast iron temperature stabilization problem was provided for the calculated values of process parameters of the target area of the respective blast furnace operation mode.

  19. Blast-Induced Tinnitus and Elevated Central Auditory and Limbic Activity in Rats: A Manganese-Enhanced MRI and Behavioral Study.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jessica; Pace, Edward; Lepczyk, Laura; Kaufman, Michael; Zhang, Jessica; Perrine, Shane A; Zhang, Jinsheng

    2017-07-07

    Blast-induced tinitus is the number one service-connected disability that currently affects military personnel and veterans. To elucidate its underlying mechanisms, we subjected 13 Sprague Dawley adult rats to unilateral 14 psi blast exposure to induce tinnitus and measured auditory and limbic brain activity using manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Tinnitus was evaluated with a gap detection acoustic startle reflex paradigm, while hearing status was assessed with prepulse inhibition (PPI) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Both anxiety and cognitive functioning were assessed using elevated plus maze and Morris water maze, respectively. Five weeks after blast exposure, 8 of the 13 blasted rats exhibited chronic tinnitus. While acoustic PPI remained intact and ABR thresholds recovered, the ABR wave P1-N1 amplitude reduction persisted in all blast-exposed rats. No differences in spatial cognition were observed, but blasted rats as a whole exhibited increased anxiety. MEMRI data revealed a bilateral increase in activity along the auditory pathway and in certain limbic regions of rats with tinnitus compared to age-matched controls. Taken together, our data suggest that while blast-induced tinnitus may play a role in auditory and limbic hyperactivity, the non-auditory effects of blast and potential traumatic brain injury may also exert an effect.

  20. COLLIMATION AND ASYMMETRY OF THE HOT BLAST WAVE FROM THE RECURRENT NOVA V745 Sco

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Kashyap, Vinay; Delgado, Laura

    The recurrent symbiotic nova V745 Sco exploded on 2014 February 6 and was observed on February 22 and 23 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Transmission Grating Spectrometers. By that time the supersoft source phase had already ended, and Chandra spectra are consistent with emission from a hot, shock-heated circumstellar medium with temperatures exceeding 10{sup 7} K. X-ray line profiles are more sharply peaked than expected for a spherically symmetric blast wave, with a full width at zero intensity of approximately 2400 km s{sup 1}, an FWHM of 1200 ± 30 km s{sup 1}, and an average net blueshift of 165more » ± 10 km s{sup 1}. The red wings of lines are increasingly absorbed toward longer wavelengths by material within the remnant. We conclude that the blast wave was sculpted by an aspherical circumstellar medium in which an equatorial density enhancement plays a role, as in earlier symbiotic nova explosions. Expansion of the dominant X-ray-emitting material is aligned close to the plane of the sky and is most consistent with an orbit seen close to face-on. Comparison of an analytical blast wave model with the X-ray spectra, Swift observations, and near-infrared line widths indicates that the explosion energy was approximately 10{sup 43} erg and confirms an ejected mass of approximately 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙}. The total mass lost is an order of magnitude lower than the accreted mass required to have initiated the explosion, indicating that the white dwarf is gaining mass and is a Type Ia supernova progenitor candidate.« less

  1. 7 CFR 1724.50 - Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Electric System Design § 1724.50 Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code...

  2. 7 CFR 1724.50 - Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Electric System Design § 1724.50 Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code...

  3. 7 CFR 1724.50 - Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Electric System Design § 1724.50 Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code...

  4. 7 CFR 1724.50 - Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Electric System Design § 1724.50 Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code...

  5. 7 CFR 1724.50 - Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code (NESC... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Electric System Design § 1724.50 Compliance with National Electrical Safety Code...

  6. Enhancements and Analysis of CTH Software for Underbody Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or the DoD, and shall not be used for advertising or...Trembelay, J., “Validation of a Loading Model for Simulating Blast Mine Effects on Armoured Vehicles,” 7th International LS-DYNA Users Conference

  7. BPS objects in D = 7 supergravity and their M-theory origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Petri, Nicolò

    2017-12-01

    We study several different types of BPS flows within minimal N=1 , D = 7 supergravity with SU(2) gauge group and non-vanishing topological mass. After reviewing some known domain wall solutions involving only the metric and the ℝ+ scalar field, we move to considering more general flows involving a "dyonic" profile for the 3-form gauge potential. In this context, we consider flows featuring a Mkw3 as well as an AdS3 slicing, write down the corresponding flow equations, and integrate them analytically to obtain many examples of asymptotically AdS7 solutions in presence of a running 3-form. Furthermore, we move to adding the possibility of non-vanishing vector fields, find the new corresponding flows and integrate them numerically. Finally, we discuss the eleven-dimensional interpretation of the aforementioned solutions as effective descriptions of M2 - M5 bound states.

  8. Primary Blast Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat: Relating Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-14

    collegiate football players: the NCAA concussion study. JAMA (2003) 290:2556–63. doi:10.1001/ jama.290.19.2556 6. DePalma RG, Burris DG, Champion HR... concussions in retired pro- fessional football players. Am J Sports Med (2012) 40:2206–12. doi: 10.1177/0363546512456193 10. Verfaellie M, Lafleche G...low-blast exposures and limited excur- sions during high-blast exposures. Angular accelerations were well below the threshold for mild concussion in

  9. Military blast exposure, ageing and white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Benjamin B.; Robinson, Meghan E.; Milberg, William P.; McGlinchey, Regina E.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, is associated with a range of neural changes including altered white matter structure. There is emerging evidence that blast exposure—one of the most pervasive causes of casualties in the recent overseas conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan—is accompanied by a range of neurobiological events that may result in pathological changes to brain structure and function that occur independently of overt concussion symptoms. The potential effects of brain injury due to blast exposure are of great concern as a history of mild traumatic brain injury has been identified as a risk factor for age-associated neurodegenerative disease. The present study used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate whether military-associated blast exposure influences the association between age and white matter tissue structure integrity in a large sample of veterans of the recent conflicts (n = 190 blast-exposed; 59 without exposure) between the ages of 19 and 62 years. Tract-based spatial statistics revealed a significant blast exposure × age interaction on diffusion parameters with blast-exposed individuals exhibiting a more rapid cross-sectional age trajectory towards reduced tissue integrity. Both distinct and overlapping voxel clusters demonstrating the interaction were observed among the examined diffusion contrast measures (e.g. fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity). The regions showing the effect on fractional anisotropy included voxels both within and beyond the boundaries of the regions exhibiting a significant negative association between fractional anisotropy and age in the entire cohort. The regional effect was sensitive to the degree of blast exposure, suggesting a ‘dose-response’ relationship between the number of blast exposures and white matter integrity. Additionally, there was an age-independent negative association between fractional anisotropy and years since most severe blast exposure in a subset of the blast

  10. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... herein on handling and storing explosives. (h) When more than one charge is placed under water, a float...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... herein on handling and storing explosives. (h) When more than one charge is placed under water, a float...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... herein on handling and storing explosives. (h) When more than one charge is placed under water, a float...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... herein on handling and storing explosives. (h) When more than one charge is placed under water, a float...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... herein on handling and storing explosives. (h) When more than one charge is placed under water, a float...

  15. Introgression of Blast Resistance Genes (Putative Pi-b and Pi-kh) into Elite Rice Cultivar MR219 through Marker-Assisted Selection

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Fatah A.; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Harun A.; Ahmed, Fahim; Ashkani, Sadegh; Latif, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Blast is the most common biotic stress leading to the reduction of rice yield in many rice-growing areas of the world, including Malaysia. Improvement of blast resistance of rice varieties cultivated in blast endemic areas is one of the most important objectives of rice breeding programs. In this study, the marker-assisted backcrossing strategy was applied to improve the blast resistance of the most popular Malaysian rice variety MR219 by introgressing blast resistance genes from the Pongsu Seribu 2 variety. Two blast resistance genes, Pi-b and Pi-kh, were pyramided into MR219. Foreground selection coupled with stringent phenotypic selection identified 15 plants homozygous for the Pi-b and Pi-kh genes, and background selection revealed more than 95% genome recovery of MR219 in advanced blast resistant lines. Phenotypic screening against blast disease indicated that advanced homozygous blast resistant lines were strongly resistant against pathotype P7.2 in the blast disease endemic areas. The morphological, yield, grain quality, and yield-contributing characteristics were significantly similar to those of MR219. The newly developed blast resistant improved lines will retain the high adoptability of MR219 by farmers. The present results will also play an important role in sustaining the rice production of Malaysia. PMID:26734013

  16. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  17. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Charles W; Pagulayan, Kathleen F; Petrie, Eric C; Mayer, Cynthia L; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A; Shofer, Jane B; Hart, Kim L; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A; Peskind, Elaine R

    2012-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation.

  18. Comparative Genomics and Association Mapping Approaches for Blast Resistant Genes in Finger Millet Using SSRs

    PubMed Central

    Babu, B. Kalyana; Dinesh, Pandey; Agrawal, Pawan K.; Sood, S.; Chandrashekara, C.; Bhatt, Jagadish C.; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The major limiting factor for production and productivity of finger millet crop is blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea. Since, the genome sequence information available in finger millet crop is scarce, comparative genomics plays a very important role in identification of genes/QTLs linked to the blast resistance genes using SSR markers. In the present study, a total of 58 genic SSRs were developed for use in genetic analysis of a global collection of 190 finger millet genotypes. The 58 SSRs yielded ninety five scorable alleles and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.186 to 0.677 at an average of 0.385. The gene diversity was in the range of 0.208 to 0.726 with an average of 0.487. Association mapping for blast resistance was done using 104 SSR markers which identified four QTLs for finger blast and one QTL for neck blast resistance. The genomic marker RM262 and genic marker FMBLEST32 were linked to finger blast disease at a P value of 0.007 and explained phenotypic variance (R2) of 10% and 8% respectively. The genomic marker UGEP81 was associated to finger blast at a P value of 0.009 and explained 7.5% of R2. The QTLs for neck blast was associated with the genomic SSR marker UGEP18 at a P value of 0.01, which explained 11% of R2. Three QTLs for blast resistance were found common by using both GLM and MLM approaches. The resistant alleles were found to be present mostly in the exotic genotypes. Among the genotypes of NW Himalayan region of India, VHC3997, VHC3996 and VHC3930 were found highly resistant, which may be effectively used as parents for developing blast resistant cultivars in the NW Himalayan region of India. The markers linked to the QTLs for blast resistance in the present study can be further used for cloning of the full length gene, fine mapping and their further use in the marker assisted breeding programmes for introgression of blast resistant alleles into locally adapted cultivars. PMID:24915067

  19. Measurement of Radiative Non-Equilibrium for Air Shocks Between 7-9 Km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a recent characterization of non-equilibrium radiation for shock speeds between 7 and 9 km/s in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) Facility. Data is spectrally resolved from 190- 1450 nm and spatially resolved behind the shock front. Comparisons are made to DPLR/NEQAIR simulations using different modeling options and recommendations for future study are made based on these comparisons.

  20. Non-local electrical spin injection and detection in germanium at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rortais, F.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Vila, L.; Attané, J.-P.; Widiez, J.; Zucchetti, C.; Bottegoni, F.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2017-10-01

    Non-local carrier injection/detection schemes lie at the very foundation of information manipulation in integrated systems. This paradigm consists in controlling with an external signal the channel where charge carriers flow between a "source" and a well separated "drain." The next generation electronics may operate on the spin of carriers in addition to their charge and germanium appears as the best hosting material to develop such a platform for its compatibility with mainstream silicon technology and the predicted long electron spin lifetime at room temperature. In this letter, we demonstrate injection of pure spin currents (i.e., with no associated transport of electric charges) in germanium, combined with non-local spin detection at 10 K and room temperature. For this purpose, we used a lateral spin valve with epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions as spin injector and spin detector. The non-local magnetoresistance signal is clearly visible and reaches ≈15 mΩ at room temperature. The electron spin lifetime and diffusion length are 500 ps and 1 μm, respectively, the spin injection efficiency being as high as 27%. This result paves the way for the realization of full germanium spintronic devices at room temperature.

  1. Full-scale testing of leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room exposed to external air blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codina, R.; Ambrosini, D.

    2018-03-01

    For the last few decades, the effects of blast loading on structures have been studied by many researchers around the world. Explosions can be caused by events such as industrial accidents, military conflicts or terrorist attacks. Urban centers have been prone to various threats including car bombs, suicide attacks, and improvised explosive devices. Partially vented constructions subjected to external blast loading represent an important topic in protective engineering. The assessment of blast survivability inside structures and the development of design provisions with respect to internal elements require the study of the propagation and leakage of blast waves inside buildings. In this paper, full-scale tests are performed to study the effects of the leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room that is subjected to different external blast loadings. The results obtained may be useful for proving the validity of different methods of calculation, both empirical and numerical. Moreover, the experimental results are compared with those computed using the empirical curves of the US Defense report/manual UFC 3-340. Finally, results of the dynamic response of the front masonry wall are presented in terms of accelerations and an iso-damage diagram.

  2. Activation of Pax7-Positive Cells in a Non-Contractile Tissue Contributes to Regeneration of Myogenic Tissues in the Electric Fish S. macrurus

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christopher M.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Unguez, Graciela A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to regenerate tissues is shared across many metazoan taxa, yet the type and extent to which multiple cellular mechanisms come into play can differ across species. For example, urodele amphibians can completely regenerate all lost tissues, including skeletal muscles after limb amputation. This remarkable ability of urodeles to restore entire limbs has been largely linked to a dedifferentiation-dependent mechanism of regeneration. However, whether cell dedifferentiation is the fundamental factor that triggers a robust regeneration capacity, and whether the loss or inhibition of this process explains the limited regeneration potential in other vertebrates is not known. Here, we studied the cellular mechanisms underlying the repetitive regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus. Our in vivo microinjection studies of high molecular weight cell lineage tracers into single identified adult myogenic cells (muscle or noncontractile muscle-derived electrocytes) revealed no fragmentation or cellularization proximal to the amputation plane. In contrast, ultrastructural and immunolabeling studies verified the presence of myogenic stem cells that express the satellite cell marker Pax7 in mature muscle fibers and electrocytes of S. macrurus. These data provide the first example of Pax-7 positive muscle stem cells localized within a non-contractile electrogenic tissue. Moreover, upon amputation, Pax-7 positive cells underwent a robust replication and were detected exclusively in regions that give rise to myogenic cells and dorsal spinal cord components revealing a regeneration process in S. macrurus that is dependent on the activation of myogenic stem cells for the renewal of both skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. These data are consistent with the emergent concept in vertebrate regeneration that different tissues provide a distinct progenitor cell population to the regeneration blastema, and these progenitor cells

  3. Temporal Progression of Visual Injury from Blast Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    carprofen one day before the blast for pain management. A baseline of vision functionality is established before the blast using the metrics...returned to the animal facility. While animals do not show signs of pain following the blast exposure, carprofen is administered the next day as a

  4. Blast furnace supervision and control system

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Remorino, M.; Lingiardi, O.; Zecchi, M.

    1997-12-31

    On December 1992, a group of companies headed by Techint, took over Somisa, the state-owned integrated steel plant located at San Nicolas, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, culminating an ambitious government privatization scheme. The blast furnace 2 went into a full reconstruction and relining in January 1995. After a 140 MU$ investment the new blast furnace 2 was started in September 1995. After more than one year of operation of the blast furnace the system has proven itself useful and reliable. The main reasons for the success of the system are: same use interface for all blast furnace areas --more » operation, process, maintenance and management, (full horizontal and vertical integration); and full accessibility to all information and process tools though some restrictions apply to field commands (people empowerment). The paper describes the central system.« less

  5. Assessing Quantitative Changes in Intrinsic Thalamic Networks in Blast and Nonblast Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for Mechanisms of Injury.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Dominic E; Bellgowan, Julie F; Oakes, Terrence R; French, Louis M; Nadar, Sreenivasan R; Sham, Elyssa B; Liu, Wei; Riedy, Gerard

    2016-06-01

    In the global war on terror, the increased use of improvised explosive devices has resulted in increased incidence of blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Diagnosing mTBI is both challenging and controversial due to heterogeneity of injury location, trauma intensity, transient symptoms, and absence of focal biomarkers on standard clinical imaging modalities. The goal of this study is to identify a brain biomarker that is sensitive to mTBI injury. Research suggests the thalamus may be sensitive to changes induced by mTBI. A significant number of connections to and from various brain regions converge at the thalamus. In addition, the thalamus is involved in information processing, integration, and regulation of specific behaviors and mood. In this study, changes in task-free thalamic networks as quantified by graph theory measures in mTBI blast (N = 186), mTBI nonblast (N = 80), and controls (N = 21) were compared. Results show that the blast mTBI group had significant hyper-connectivity compared with the controls and nonblast mTBI group. However, after controlling for post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), the blast mTBI group was not different from the controls, but the nonblast mTBI group showed significant hypo-connectivity. The results suggest that there are differences in the mechanisms of injury related to mTBI as reflected in the architecture of the thalamic networks. However, the effect of PTSS and its relationship to mTBI is difficult to distinguish and warrants more research.

  6. Early detection of subclinical visual damage after blast-mediated TBI enables prevention of chronic visual deficit by treatment with P7C3-S243.

    PubMed

    Dutca, Laura M; Stasheff, Steven F; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Rudd, Danielle S; Batra, Nikhil; Blodi, Frederick R; Yorek, Matthew S; Yin, Terry; Shankar, Malini; Herlein, Judith A; Naidoo, Jacinth; Morlock, Lorraine; Williams, Noelle; Kardon, Randy H; Anderson, Michael G; Pieper, Andrew A; Harper, Matthew M

    2014-12-02

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently leads to chronic visual dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of TBI on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), and to test whether treatment with the novel neuroprotective compound P7C3-S243 could prevent in vivo functional deficits in the visual system. Blast-mediated TBI was modeled using an enclosed over-pressure blast chamber. The RGC physiology was evaluated using a multielectrode array and pattern electroretinogram (PERG). Histological analysis of RGC dendritic field and cell number were evaluated at the end of the study. Visual outcome measures also were evaluated based on treatment of mice with P7C3-S243 or vehicle control. We show that deficits in neutral position PERG after blast-mediated TBI occur in a temporally bimodal fashion, with temporary recovery 4 weeks after injury followed by chronically persistent dysfunction 12 weeks later. This later time point is associated with development of dendritic abnormalities and irreversible death of RGCs. We also demonstrate that ongoing pathologic processes during the temporary recovery latent period (including abnormalities of RGC physiology) lead to future dysfunction of the visual system. We report that modification of PERG to provocative postural tilt testing elicits changes in PERG measurements that correlate with a key in vitro measures of damage: the spontaneous and light-evoked activity of RGCs. Treatment with P7C3-S243 immediately after injury and throughout the temporary recovery latent period protects mice from developing chronic visual system dysfunction. Provocative PERG testing serves as a noninvasive test in the living organism to identify early damage to the visual system, which may reflect corresponding damage in the brain that is not otherwise detectable by noninvasive means. This provides the basis for developing an earlier diagnostic test to identify patients at risk for developing chronic CNS and visual system damage after TBI at

  7. Early Detection of Subclinical Visual Damage After Blast-Mediated TBI Enables Prevention of Chronic Visual Deficit by Treatment With P7C3-S243

    PubMed Central

    Dutca, Laura M.; Stasheff, Steven F.; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Rudd, Danielle S.; Batra, Nikhil; Blodi, Frederick R.; Yorek, Matthew S.; Yin, Terry; Shankar, Malini; Herlein, Judith A.; Naidoo, Jacinth; Morlock, Lorraine; Williams, Noelle; Kardon, Randy H.; Anderson, Michael G.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Harper, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently leads to chronic visual dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of TBI on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), and to test whether treatment with the novel neuroprotective compound P7C3-S243 could prevent in vivo functional deficits in the visual system. Methods. Blast-mediated TBI was modeled using an enclosed over-pressure blast chamber. The RGC physiology was evaluated using a multielectrode array and pattern electroretinogram (PERG). Histological analysis of RGC dendritic field and cell number were evaluated at the end of the study. Visual outcome measures also were evaluated based on treatment of mice with P7C3-S243 or vehicle control. Results. We show that deficits in neutral position PERG after blast-mediated TBI occur in a temporally bimodal fashion, with temporary recovery 4 weeks after injury followed by chronically persistent dysfunction 12 weeks later. This later time point is associated with development of dendritic abnormalities and irreversible death of RGCs. We also demonstrate that ongoing pathologic processes during the temporary recovery latent period (including abnormalities of RGC physiology) lead to future dysfunction of the visual system. We report that modification of PERG to provocative postural tilt testing elicits changes in PERG measurements that correlate with a key in vitro measures of damage: the spontaneous and light-evoked activity of RGCs. Treatment with P7C3-S243 immediately after injury and throughout the temporary recovery latent period protects mice from developing chronic visual system dysfunction. Conclusions. Provocative PERG testing serves as a noninvasive test in the living organism to identify early damage to the visual system, which may reflect corresponding damage in the brain that is not otherwise detectable by noninvasive means. This provides the basis for developing an earlier diagnostic test to identify patients at risk for developing chronic

  8. BLAST FURNACE CAST HOUSE EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study describes the state-of-the-art of controlling fumes escaping from blast furnace cast houses. Background information is based on: a study of existing literature; visits to blast furnaces in the U.S., Japan, and Europe; meetings with an ad hoc group of experienced blast f...

  9. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  10. Flux compactification of M-theory on compact manifolds with spin(7) holonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Dragos Eugeniu

    2005-11-01

    At the leading order, M-theory admits minimal supersymmetric compactifications if the internal manifold has exceptional holonomy. The inclusion of non-vanishing fluxes in M-theory and string theory compactifications induce a superpotential in the lower dimensional theory, which depends on the fluxes. In this work, we check the conjectured form of this superpotential in the case of warped M-theory compactifications on Spin (7) holonomy manifolds. We perform a Kaluza-Klein reduction of the eleven-dimensional supersymmetry transformation for the gravitino and we find by direct comparison the superpotential expression. We check the conjecture for the heterotic string compactified on a Calabi-Yau three-fold as well. The conjecture can be checked indirectly by inspecting the scalar potential obtained after the compactification of M-theory on Spin (7) holonomy manifolds with non-vanishing fluxes. The scalar potential can be written in terms of the superpotential and we show that this potential stabilizes all the moduli fields describing deformations of the metric except for the radial modulus. All the above analyses require the knowledge of the minimal supergravity action in three dimensions. Therefore we calculate the most general causal N = 1 three-dimensional, gauge invariant action coupled to matter in superspace and derive its component form using Ectoplasmic integration theory. We also show that the three-dimensional theory which results from the compactification is in agreement with the more general supergravity construction. The compactification procedure takes into account higher order quantum correction terms in the low energy effective action. We analyze the properties of these terms on a Spin (7) background. We derive a perturbative set of solutions which emerges from a warped compactification on a Spin (7) holonomy manifold with non-vanishing flux for the M-theory field strength and we show that in general the Ricci flatness of the internal manifold is lost

  11. RFLP Mapping of Genes Conferring Complete and Partial Resistance to Blast in a Durably Resistant Rice Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G. L.; Mackill, D. J.; Bonman, J. M.; McCouch, S. R.; Champoux, M. C.; Nelson, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Moroberekan, a japonica rice cultivar with durable resistance to blast disease in Asia, was crossed to the highly susceptible indica cultivar, CO39, and 281 F(7) recombinant inbred (RI) lines were produced by single seed descent. The population was evaluated for blast resistance in the greenhouse and the field, and was analyzed with 127 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Two dominant loci associated with qualitative resistance to five isolates of the fungus were tentatively named Pi-5(t) and Pi-7(t). They were mapped on chromosomes 4 and 11, respectively. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting partial resistance, RI lines were inoculated with isolate PO6-6 of Pyricularia oryzae in polycyclic tests. Ten chromosomal segments were found to be associated with effects on lesion number (P < 0.0001 and LOD > 6.0). Three of the markers associated with QTLs for partial resistance had been reported to be linked to complete blast resistance in previous studies. QTLs identified in greenhouse tests were good predictors of blast resistance at two field sites. This study illustrates the usefulness of RI lines for mapping a complex trait such as blast resistance and suggests that durable resistance in the traditional variety, Moroberekan, involves a complex of genes associated with both partial and complete resistance. PMID:7912216

  12. Controlled Low-Pressure Blast-Wave Exposure Causes Distinct Behavioral and Morphological Responses Modelling Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Comorbid Mild Traumatic Brain Injury-Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Amitai; Ram, Omri; Ifergane, Gal; Matar, Michael A; Sagi, Ram; Ostfeld, Ishay; Hoffman, Jay R; Kaplan, Zeev; Sadot, Oren; Cohen, Hagit

    2017-01-01

    The intense focus in the clinical literature on the mental and neurocognitive sequelae of explosive blast-wave exposure, especially when comorbid with post-traumatic stress-related disorders (PTSD) is justified, and warrants the design of translationally valid animal studies to provide valid complementary basic data. We employed a controlled experimental blast-wave paradigm in which unanesthetized animals were exposed to visual, auditory, olfactory, and tactile effects of an explosive blast-wave produced by exploding a thin copper wire. By combining cognitive-behavioral paradigms and ex vivo brain MRI to assess mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) phenotype with a validated behavioral model for PTSD, complemented by morphological assessments, this study sought to examine our ability to evaluate the biobehavioral effects of low-intensity blast overpressure on rats, in a translationally valid manner. There were no significant differences between blast- and sham-exposed rats on motor coordination and strength, or sensory function. Whereas most male rats exposed to the blast-wave displayed normal behavioral and cognitive responses, 23.6% of the rats displayed a significant retardation of spatial learning acquisition, fulfilling criteria for mTBI-like responses. In addition, 5.4% of the blast-exposed animals displayed an extreme response in the behavioral tasks used to define PTSD-like criteria, whereas 10.9% of the rats developed both long-lasting and progressively worsening behavioral and cognitive "symptoms," suggesting comorbid PTSD-mTBI-like behavioral and cognitive response patterns. Neither group displayed changes on MRI. Exposure to experimental blast-wave elicited distinct behavioral and morphological responses modelling mTBI-like, PTSD-like, and comorbid mTBI-PTSD-like responses. This experimental animal model can be a useful tool for elucidating neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of blast-wave-induced mTBI and PTSD and comorbid mTBI-PTSD.

  13. 7 CFR 771.7 - Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.7 Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements. No recipient of a boll weevil eradication loan shall directly...

  14. 7 CFR 771.7 - Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.7 Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements. No recipient of a boll weevil eradication loan shall directly...

  15. 7 CFR 771.7 - Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.7 Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements. No recipient of a boll weevil eradication loan shall directly...

  16. 7 CFR 771.7 - Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.7 Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements. No recipient of a boll weevil eradication loan shall directly...

  17. 7 CFR 771.7 - Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.7 Equal opportunity and non-discrimination requirements. No recipient of a boll weevil eradication loan shall directly...

  18. Dynamic changes of rice blast fungus in the USA through six decades

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious rice disease in the USA and worldwide. M. oryzae is highly adaptive and changeable due to the instability of its genome and resistance genes which are effective only when M. oryzae isolates contain the cognate avirulence (AVR) g...

  19. On firework blasts and qualitative parameter dependency.

    PubMed

    Zohdi, T I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to qualitatively simulate the progressive time-evolution of a blast from a simple firework. Estimates are made for the blast radius that one can expect for a given amount of detonation energy and pyrotechnic display material. The model balances the released energy from the initial blast pulse with the subsequent kinetic energy and then computes the trajectory of the material under the influence of the drag from the surrounding air, gravity and possible buoyancy. Under certain simplifying assumptions, the model can be solved for analytically. The solution serves as a guide to identifying key parameters that control the evolving blast envelope. Three-dimensional examples are given.

  20. Bomb blast imaging: bringing order to chaos.

    PubMed

    Dick, E A; Ballard, M; Alwan-Walker, H; Kashef, E; Batrick, N; Hettiaratchy, S; Moran, C G

    2018-06-01

    Blast injuries are complex, severe, and outside of our everyday clinical practice, but every radiologist needs to understand them. By their nature, bomb blasts are unpredictable and affect multiple victims, yet require an immediate, coordinated, and whole-hearted response from all members of the clinical team, including all radiology staff. This article will help you gain the requisite expertise in blast imaging including recognising primary, secondary, and tertiary blast injuries. It will also help you understand the fundamental role that imaging plays during mass casualty attacks and how to avoid radiology becoming a bottleneck to the forward flow of severely injured patients as they are triaged and treated. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. On firework blasts and qualitative parameter dependency

    PubMed Central

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to qualitatively simulate the progressive time-evolution of a blast from a simple firework. Estimates are made for the blast radius that one can expect for a given amount of detonation energy and pyrotechnic display material. The model balances the released energy from the initial blast pulse with the subsequent kinetic energy and then computes the trajectory of the material under the influence of the drag from the surrounding air, gravity and possible buoyancy. Under certain simplifying assumptions, the model can be solved for analytically. The solution serves as a guide to identifying key parameters that control the evolving blast envelope. Three-dimensional examples are given. PMID:26997903

  2. Assessment of the Knowledge of Blast Injuries Management among Physicians Working in Tripoli Hospitals (Libya).

    PubMed

    Oun, Abdulhakim M; Hadida, Elmokhtar M; Stewart, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Introduction No study on hospital staff preparedness for managing blast injuries has been conducted in Libya. The internal conflict in Libya since 2011 and the difficulties faced by the hospitals has highlighted the need for such studies. Hypothesis Physicians working in Tripoli (capital city Libya) hospitals are inadequately prepared for the management of blast injuries. A survey was conducted in all 13 hospitals in Tripoli between June 2014 and May 2015 by using interviews based on a questionnaire consisting of 29 questions covering physicians' education related to blast injury, hospital management of mass casualties, and aspects of hospital preparedness for such incidents. Of 3,799 physicians working in Tripoli hospitals, 607 physicians were interviewed (16.0%). All but one of the physicians reported that there was no disaster response plan, none of them had read such a plan, 496 (81.7%) reported that hospitals were not prepared, and 471 (77.6%) that hospitals were not equipped for blast injuries. Though 414 (68.2%) reported that radiological equipment was available, 597 (98.3%) revealed that hospitals do not adopt training for blast injury. Only 39 (6.4%) had received professional training, though 183 (30.1%) were seeing blast injury patients at least once a week in their daily practice. Nevertheless, 185 (30.5%) had previous knowledge and experience in blast injuries management and 338 (55.70%) were aware of the major physical findings, but only 75 (12.4%) were following specific guidelines. According to approximately one-third of the physicians (192; 31%), staff and patient safety were not priorities for the hospital administration. Almost all (606; 99.9%) revealed that personal protective equipment for chemical and nuclear accidents was not available. Preparedness for blast injuries in Tripoli hospitals is seriously deficient. Planning optimized blast and disaster management in Libya is essential. Oun AM , Hadida EM , Stewart C . Assessment of the knowledge

  3. Electrical interference in non-competitive pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Sowton, E.; Gray, K.; Preston, T.

    1970-01-01

    Patients with 41 implanted non-competitive pacemakers were investigated. A variety of domestic electrical equipment, a motor-car, and a physiotherapy diathermy apparatus were each operated in turn at various ranges from the patient. Interference effects on pacemaker function were assessed on the electrocardiograph. Medtronic demand 5841 pacemakers were stopped by diathermy while Cordis Ectocor pacemakers developed a fast discharge rate. Cordis triggered pacemakers (both Atricor and Ectocor) were sensitive to interference from many items of domestic equipment and the motor car. The Elema EM153 ran at an increased rate when an electric razor was running close to the pacemaker. The Devices demand 2980 and the Medtronic demand 5841 were not affected by the domestic equipment tested. The significance of interference effects is discussed in relation to pacemaker design. Images PMID:5470044

  4. Comment on "chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model".

    PubMed

    Tisdall, Martin; Petzold, Axel

    2012-10-24

    In a case study, the authors report an increase in phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain, a marker of neuroaxonal damage, in the plasma of a blast-exposed patient immediately after injury. They suggest that this phosphoprotein may be a useful body fluid indicator of acute blast traumatic brain injury.

  5. Factor Analysis of Persistent Post-Concussive Symptoms within a Military Sample with Blast Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Franke, L.M.; Czarnota, J.N.; Ketchum, J.M.; Walker, W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the factor structure of persistent post-concussive syndrome (PPCS) symptoms in a blast-exposed military sample and validate factors against objective and symptom measures. Setting Veterans Affairs medical center and military bases. Participants One hundred eighty-one service members and veterans with at least one significant exposure to blast during deployment within the two years prior to study enrollment. Design Confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis of the Rivermead Post-concussion Questionnaire (RPQ). Main Measures RPQ, PTSD Symptom Checklist-Civilian, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression inventory, Sensory Organization Test, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, California Verbal Learning Test, Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System subtests. Results The three-factor structure of PPCS was not confirmed. A four-factor structure was extracted, and factors were interpreted as reflecting emotional, cognitive, visual, and vestibular functions. All factors were associated with scores on psychological symptom inventories; visual and vestibular factors were also associated with balance performance. There was no significant association between the cognitive factor and neuropsychological performance, nor between a history of mTBI and factor scores. Conclusion Persistent post-concussive symptoms observed months after blast exposure seem to be related to four distinct forms of distress, but not to mTBI per se, with vestibular and visual factors possibly related to injury of sensory organs by blast. PMID:24695267

  6. Genome-wide association mapping of virulence gene in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae using a genotyping by sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Korinsak, Siripar; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Pootakham, Wirulda; Wanchana, Samart; Plabpla, Anucha; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Patarapuwadol, Sujin; Vanavichit, Apichart; Toojinda, Theerayut

    2018-05-15

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a fungal pathogen causing blast disease in many plant species. In this study, seventy three isolates of M. oryzae collected from rice (Oryza sativa) in 1996-2014 were genotyped using a genotyping-by-sequencing approach to detect genetic variation. An association study was performed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with virulence genes using 831 selected SNP and infection phenotypes on local and improved rice varieties. Population structure analysis revealed eight subpopulations. The division into eight groups was not related to the degree of virulence. Association mapping showed five SNPs associated with fungal virulence on chromosome 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7. The SNP on chromosome 1 was associated with virulence against RD6-Pi7 and IRBL7-M which might be linked to the previously reported AvrPi7. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 30 CFR 7.66 - Output energy test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.66 Output energy... load between 3 ohms and the maximum blasting circuit resistance. (3) One ohm. (b) Acceptable...

  8. 30 CFR 7.66 - Output energy test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.66 Output energy... load between 3 ohms and the maximum blasting circuit resistance. (3) One ohm. (b) Acceptable...

  9. 30 CFR 7.66 - Output energy test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.66 Output energy... load between 3 ohms and the maximum blasting circuit resistance. (3) One ohm. (b) Acceptable...

  10. 30 CFR 7.66 - Output energy test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.66 Output energy... load between 3 ohms and the maximum blasting circuit resistance. (3) One ohm. (b) Acceptable...

  11. 30 CFR 7.66 - Output energy test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Multiple-Shot Blasting Units § 7.66 Output energy... load between 3 ohms and the maximum blasting circuit resistance. (3) One ohm. (b) Acceptable...

  12. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Neubauer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The deployment and use of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in automotive and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high up-front costs. Given that batteries degrade with use and storage, such optimizations must evaluate many years of operation. As the degradation mechanisms are sensitive to temperature, state-of-charge (SOC) histories, current levels, and cycle depth and frequency, it is important to model both the battery and the application to a high level of detail to ensure battery response is accurately predicted. To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulationmore » Tool (BLAST) suite. This suite of tools pairs NREL’s high-fidelity battery degradation model with a battery electrical and thermal performance model, application-specific electrical and thermal performance models of the larger system (e.g., an electric vehicle), application-specific system use data (e.g., vehicle travel patterns and driving data), and historic climate data from cities across the United States. This provides highly realistic long-term predictions of battery response and thereby enables quantitative comparisons of varied battery use strategies.« less

  13. Computational Hydrocode Study of Target Damage due to Fragment-Blast Impact

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hatch-Aguilar, T; Najjar, F; Szymanski, E

    2011-03-24

    A target's terminal ballistic effects involving explosively generated fragments, along with the original blast, are of critical importance for many different security and safety related applications. Personnel safety and protective building design are but a few of the practical disciplines that can gain from improved understanding combined loading effects. Traditionally, any engineering level analysis or design effort involving explosions would divide the target damage analysis into two correspondingly critical areas: blast wave and fragment related impact effects. The hypothesis of this paper lies in the supposition that a linear combination of a blast-fragment loading, coupled with an accurate target responsemore » description, can lead to a non-linear target damage effect. This non-linear target response could then stand as the basis of defining what a synergistic or combined frag-blast loading might actually look like. The table below, taken from Walters, et. al. categorizes some of the critical parameters driving any combined target damage effect and drives the evaluation of results. Based on table 1 it becomes clear that any combined frag-blast analysis would need to account for the target response matching similar ranges for the mechanics described above. Of interest are the critical times upon which a blast event or fragment impact loading occurs relative to the target's modal response. A blast, for the purposes of this paper is defined as the sudden release of chemical energy from a given material (henceforth referred to as an energetic material) onto its surrounding medium. During the coupling mechanism a discrete or discontinuous shockwave is generated. This shockwave travels outward from the source transferring energy and momentum to any surrounding objects including personnel and engineering structures. From an engineering perspective blast effects are typically characterized by way of physical characteristics such as Peak Pressure (PP), Time of

  14. 30 CFR 57.6312 - Secondary blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6312 Secondary blasting. Secondary blasts fired at the same time in...

  15. Seismo-acoustic analysis of the near quarry blasts using Plostina small aperture array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Stancu, Iulian; Ionescu, Constantin

    2013-04-01

    Seismic and acoustic signals are important to recognize different type of industrial blasting sources in order to discriminate between them and natural earthquakes. We have analyzed the seismic events listed in the Romanian catalogue (Romplus) for the time interval between 2011 and 2012, and occurred in the Dobrogea region, in order to determine detection seismo-acoustic signals of quarry blasts by Plostina array stations. Dobrogea is known as a seismic region characterized by crustal earthquakes with low magnitudes; at the same time, over 40 quarry mines are located in the area, being sources of blasts recorded both with the seismic and infrasound sensors of the Romanian Seismic Network. Plostina seismo-acoustic array, deployed in the central part of Romania, consists of 7 seismic sites (3C broad-band instruments and accelerometers) collocated with 7 infrasound instruments. The array is particularly used for the seismic monitoring of the local and regional events, as well as for the detection of infrasonic signals produced by various sources. Considering the characteristics of the infrasound sensors (frequency range, dynamic, sensibility), the array proved its efficiency in observing the signals produced by explosions, mine explosion and quarry blasts. The quarry mines included for this study cover distances of two hundreds of kilometers from the station and routinely generate explosions that are detected as seismic and infrasonic signals with Plostina array. The combined seismo-acoustic analysis uses two types of detectors for signal identification: one, applied for the seismic signal identification, is based on array processing techniques (beamforming and frequency-wave number analysis), while the other one, which is used for infrasound detection and characterization, is the automatic detector DFX-PMCC (Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation Method). Infrasonic waves generated by quarry blasts have frequencies ranging from 0.05 Hz up to at least 6 Hz and

  16. Measurement and Diagnosis of the Noise from a General Electric C36-7 Diesel Electric Locomotive

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-12-01

    Measurements of the noise from a General Electric C36-7 diesel electric locomotive were performed with the locomotive stationary and attached to a load cell during powered and unpowered pass-by tests. The pass-by tests demonstrated that wheel/rail no...

  17. The use of beeswax as heating element in non-electric infant incubator.

    PubMed

    Fadhillah Nugraha, Putri; Putra, Nandy; Ariantara, Bambang; Amin, Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    Non-electric infant incubators are needed in remote areas that have no access to electricity to reduce infant mortality nationwide. In previous studies, non-electric infant incubators have been developed using phase change material of beeswax as the heating element. This study aims to improve the performance of beeswax non-electric infant incubator to obtain a more reliable and practical one. The design of the original beeswax cartridge in the form of copper boxes was modified into tubes of stainless steel. The geometry and location of the air holes were also modified. Wood that was previously used as the body material was replaced with polyurethane to reduce the weight of the incubator. The beeswax cartridges were heated using boiling water until the beeswax melted. For temperature measurement, five 0.5 mm k-type thermocouples were placed inside of the incubator according to the National Industrial Standard of SNI 16-4221. The beeswax cartridge arrangement was varied to obtain the best performance. The results showed that polyurethane provides infant incubator lighter and more practical to use. The new design of non-electric infant incubator was capable of providing a temperature of 32-36 °C for 2 h.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.905 - Loading of explosives or blasting agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loading of explosives or blasting agents. 1926.905 Section... Explosives § 1926.905 Loading of explosives or blasting agents. (a) Procedures that permit safe and efficient... have contained explosives or blasting agents. (g) No explosives or blasting agents shall be left...

  19. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  20. Investigations of primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, T. W.; Josey, T.; Wang, Y.; Villanueva, M.; Ritzel, D. V.; Nelson, P.; Lee, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    The development of an advanced blast simulator (ABS) has enabled the reproducible generation of single-pulse shock waves that simulate free-field blast with high fidelity. Studies with rodents in the ABS demonstrated the necessity of head restraint during head-only exposures. When the head was not restrained, violent global head motion was induced by pressures that would not produce similar movement of a target the size and mass of a human head. This scaling artefact produced changes in brain function that were reminiscent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to impact-acceleration effects. Restraint of the rodent head eliminated these, but still produced subtle changes in brain biochemistry, showing that blast-induced pressure waves do cause brain deficits. Further experiments were carried out with rat brain cell aggregate cultures that enabled the conduct of studies without the gross movement encountered when using rodents. The suspension nature of this model was also exploited to minimize the boundary effects that complicate the interpretation of primary blast studies using surface cultures. Using this system, brain tissue was found not only to be sensitive to pressure changes, but also able to discriminate between the highly defined single-pulse shock waves produced by underwater blast and the complex pressure history exposures experienced by aggregates encased within a sphere and subjected to simulated air blast. The nature of blast-induced primary TBI requires a multidisciplinary research approach that addresses the fidelity of the blast insult, its accurate measurement and characterization, as well as the limitations of the biological models used.

  1. Windows .NET Network Distributed Basic Local Alignment Search Toolkit (W.ND-BLAST)

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Scot E; Zaragoza, Joaquin; Rodriguez, Javier R; Oliver, Melvin J; Payton, Paxton R

    2005-01-01

    Background BLAST is one of the most common and useful tools for Genetic Research. This paper describes a software application we have termed Windows .NET Distributed Basic Local Alignment Search Toolkit (W.ND-BLAST), which enhances the BLAST utility by improving usability, fault recovery, and scalability in a Windows desktop environment. Our goal was to develop an easy to use, fault tolerant, high-throughput BLAST solution that incorporates a comprehensive BLAST result viewer with curation and annotation functionality. Results W.ND-BLAST is a comprehensive Windows-based software toolkit that targets researchers, including those with minimal computer skills, and provides the ability increase the performance of BLAST by distributing BLAST queries to any number of Windows based machines across local area networks (LAN). W.ND-BLAST provides intuitive Graphic User Interfaces (GUI) for BLAST database creation, BLAST execution, BLAST output evaluation and BLAST result exportation. This software also provides several layers of fault tolerance and fault recovery to prevent loss of data if nodes or master machines fail. This paper lays out the functionality of W.ND-BLAST. W.ND-BLAST displays close to 100% performance efficiency when distributing tasks to 12 remote computers of the same performance class. A high throughput BLAST job which took 662.68 minutes (11 hours) on one average machine was completed in 44.97 minutes when distributed to 17 nodes, which included lower performance class machines. Finally, there is a comprehensive high-throughput BLAST Output Viewer (BOV) and Annotation Engine components, which provides comprehensive exportation of BLAST hits to text files, annotated fasta files, tables, or association files. Conclusion W.ND-BLAST provides an interactive tool that allows scientists to easily utilizing their available computing resources for high throughput and comprehensive sequence analyses. The install package for W.ND-BLAST is freely downloadable from

  2. Development of a Portable Tool for Screening Neuromotor Sequelae From Repetitive Low-Level Blast Exposure.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Ross, Scott E; Long, Benjamin; Jakiela, Jason T; Bailie, Jason M; Yanagi, Matthew A; Haran, F Jay; Wright, W Geoffrey; Robins, Rebecca K; Sargent, Paul D; Duckworth, Joshua L

    2017-03-01

    Blast exposure is a prevalent cause of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in military personnel in combat. However, it is more common for a service member to be exposed to a low-level blast (LLB) that does not result in a clinically diagnosable mTBI. Recent research suggests that repetitive LLB exposure can result in symptomology similar to symptoms observed after mTBI. This manuscript reports on the use of an Android-based smartphone application (AccWalker app) to capture changes in neuromotor functioning after blast exposure. Active duty U.S. Navy personnel (N = 59) performed a stepping-in-place task before repetitive LLB exposure (heavy weapons training), and again immediately after, 24 hours after, and 72 to 96 hours after the completion of the training. The AccWalker app revealed that there are changes in neuromotor functioning after LLB exposure (slower self-selected movement pace and increased stride time variability) in participants who experienced neurocognitive decline. These data suggest that neurocognitive and neuromotor decline can occur after repeated LLB exposure. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. 7 CFR 1724.74 - List of electric program standard contract forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false List of electric program standard contract forms... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RUS Contract Forms § 1724.74 List of electric program standard contract forms. (a...

  4. 7 CFR 1724.74 - List of electric program standard contract forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false List of electric program standard contract forms... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RUS Contract Forms § 1724.74 List of electric program standard contract forms. (a...

  5. 7 CFR 1724.74 - List of electric program standard contract forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false List of electric program standard contract forms... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RUS Contract Forms § 1724.74 List of electric program standard contract forms. (a...

  6. 7 CFR 1724.74 - List of electric program standard contract forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of electric program standard contract forms... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RUS Contract Forms § 1724.74 List of electric program standard contract forms. (a...

  7. 7 CFR 1724.74 - List of electric program standard contract forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false List of electric program standard contract forms... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES AND DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RUS Contract Forms § 1724.74 List of electric program standard contract forms. (a...

  8. 7 CFR 1726.304 - List of electric program standard contract forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of electric program standard contract forms... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RUS Standard Forms § 1726.304 List of electric program standard contract forms. (a) General. This section...

  9. Acceleration from short-duration blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzel, D. V.; Van Albert, S.; Sajja, V.; Long, J.

    2018-01-01

    The blast-induced motion of spheres has been studied experimentally where the shock wave is rapidly decaying during the period that quasi-steady acceleration would be developed in the case of a step-function shock wave as considered in most shock-tube studies. The motion of sphere models ranging from 39 to 251 mm in diameter and having a range of densities was assessed using the "free-flight" method in a simulator specially designed to replicate the decaying shock wave profile of spherical blast including negative phase and positive entropy gradient. A standardized blast-wave simulation of 125 kPa and 6-ms positive-phase duration was applied for all experiments. In all cases, there are three phases to the motion: a relatively low "kickoff" velocity from the shock diffraction, acceleration or deceleration during the positive duration, then deceleration through the negative phase and subsequent quiescent air. The unexpected deceleration of larger spheres after their kickoff velocity during the decaying yet high-speed flow of the blast wave seems associated with the persistence of a ring vortex on the downstream side of the sphere. The flow is entirely unsteady with initial forces dominated by the shock diffraction; therefore, the early motion of spheres under such conditions is not governed by quasi-steady drag as in classical aerodynamics. The work will help establish scaling rules for model studies of blast-induced motion relevant to improvised explosive devices, and preliminary results are shown for motion imparted to a human skull surrogate.

  10. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-14

    pathology of traumatic axonal injury involves distinct injury processes, neurofilament compaction (NFC) and impaired axoplasmic transport (IAT)1. In rat...assessments and may render diagnosis of blast related pathology even more difficult. These neuronal injury changes in the grey matter that appeared...were from blast studies using rodents16,17 and impulse noise18. A putative pathological implication for microglia comes from studies by Kane et al

  11. Primary Blast Injury Criteria for Animal/Human TBI Models using Field Validated Shock Tubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Software, Inc., San Jose, CA). Dose-response models for heart rate and pulmonary injury were fitted with Origin 9.0 software (OriginLab Corp...impulse. We observed only a few cases where pathological score exceeded 21 for the blast 7 strength higher than 300 kPa BOP with high standard...average heart rates (ΔHR) decreased gradually with increase in blast intensity: -29±10 (60 kPa), - 26±20 (100 kPa), -43±26 (130 kPa), -62±21 (190

  12. 29. GENERAL VIEW OF ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PROTECTED BY CONCRETE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. GENERAL VIEW OF ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PROTECTED BY CONCRETE AND EARTH BLAST BERM; VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28402, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. 28. GENERAL VIEW OF ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PROTECTED BY CONCRETE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. GENERAL VIEW OF ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PROTECTED BY CONCRETE AND EARTH BLAST BERM; VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28402, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Michael W.; Courtney, Amy C.

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  15. Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  16. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-30

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts, with debilitating, costly, and long-lasting effects. Although mechanisms by which head impacts cause TBI have been well-researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient skull flexure to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even without a head impact. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for injury diagnosis and armor design.

  17. Information modeling system for blast furnace control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirin, N. A.; Gileva, L. Y.; Lavrov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Modern Iron & Steel Works as a rule are equipped with powerful distributed control systems (DCS) and databases. Implementation of DSC system solves the problem of storage, control, protection, entry, editing and retrieving of information as well as generation of required reporting data. The most advanced and promising approach is to use decision support information technologies based on a complex of mathematical models. The model decision support system for control of blast furnace smelting is designed and operated. The basis of the model system is a complex of mathematical models created using the principle of natural mathematical modeling. This principle provides for construction of mathematical models of two levels. The first level model is a basic state model which makes it possible to assess the vector of system parameters using field data and blast furnace operation results. It is also used to calculate the adjustment (adaptation) coefficients of the predictive block of the system. The second-level model is a predictive model designed to assess the design parameters of the blast furnace process when there are changes in melting conditions relative to its current state. Tasks for which software is developed are described. Characteristics of the main subsystems of the blast furnace process as an object of modeling and control - thermal state of the furnace, blast, gas dynamic and slag conditions of blast furnace smelting - are presented.

  18. 30 CFR 56.6312 - Secondary blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Use § 56.6312 Secondary blasting. Secondary blasts fired at the same time in the same work area shall be initiated from...

  19. Dynamic changes in the rice blast population in the USA over six decades

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of rice. Field isolates of M. oryzae rapidly adapt to the hosts and climate. Tracking the genetic and pathogenic variability of the field isolates is essential to understand how M. oryzae interacts with hosts an...

  20. Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury: a Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis on the cognitive outcomes of concussion among military personnel.

    PubMed

    Karr, Justin E; Areshenkoff, Corson N; Duggan, Emily C; Garcia-Barrera, Mauricio A

    2014-12-01

    Throughout their careers, many soldiers experience repeated blasts exposures from improvised explosive devices, which often involve head injury. Consequentially, blast-related mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) has become prevalent in modern conflicts, often occuring co-morbidly with psychiatric illness (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]). In turn, a growing body of research has begun to explore the cognitive and psychiatric sequelae of blast-related mTBI. The current meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the chronic effects of blast-related mTBI on cognitive performance. A systematic review identified 9 studies reporting 12 samples meeting eligibility criteria. A Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis was conducted with cognitive construct and PTSD symptoms explored as moderators. The overall posterior mean effect size and Highest Density Interval (HDI) came to d = -0.12 [-0.21, -0.04], with executive function (-0.16 [-0.31, 0.00]), verbal delayed memory (-0.19 [-0.44, 0.06]) and processing speed (-0.11 [-0.26, 0.01]) presenting as the most sensitive cognitive domains to blast-related mTBI. When dividing executive function into diverse sub-constructs (i.e., working memory, inhibition, set-shifting), set-shifting presented the largest effect size (-0.33 [-0.55, -0.05]). PTSD symptoms did not predict cognitive effects sizes, β PTSD  = -0.02 [-0.23, 0.20]. The results indicate a subtle, but chronic cognitive impairment following mTBI, especially in set-shifting, a relevant aspect of executive attention. These findings are consistent with past meta-analyses on multiple mTBI and correspond with past neuroimaging research on the cognitive correlates of white matter damage common in mTBI. However, all studies had cross-sectional designs, which resulted in universally low quality ratings and limited the conclusions inferable from this meta-analysis.

  1. Application of Carbon Composite Bricks for Blast Furnace Hearth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Haibin; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Jianliang; Zhao, Yongan; Jiao, Kexin

    Traditional refractory materials for blast furnace hearth lining are mainly composed of carbon bricks and the ceramic cup. However, these materials can't meet the demands for long service life design of blast furnaces. In this paper, a new refractory called carbon composite brick (CCB) was introduced, which combined the advantages of carbon bricks and the ceramic cup. In this case, the resistance of the CCB against corrosion was equal to the ceramic cup and the thermal conductivity of the CCB was equal to carbon bricks. From the results of more than 20 blast furnaces, the CCB could be well used in small blast furnaces and large blast furnaces. In the bad condition of low grade burden and high smelting intensity, the CCB gave full play to the role of cooling system, and effectively resisted the erosion of hot metal to improve the service life of blast furnaces.

  2. Numerical Study of the Reduction Process in an Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    Based on computational fluid dynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, principles of transfer in metallurgy, and other principles, a multi-fluid model for a traditional blast furnace was established. The furnace conditions were simulated with this multi-fluid mathematical model, and the model was verified with the comparison of calculation and measurement. Then a multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace in the gasifier-full oxygen blast furnace process was established based on this traditional blast furnace model. With the established multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace, the basic characteristics of iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace were summarized, including the changing process of the iron ore reduction degree and the compositions of the burden, etc. The study found that compared to the traditional blast furnace, the magnetite reserve zone in the furnace shaft under oxygen blast furnace condition was significantly reduced, which is conducive to the efficient operation of blast furnace. In order to optimize the oxygen blast furnace design and operating parameters, the iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace was researched under different shaft tuyere positions, different recycling gas temperatures, and different allocation ratios of recycling gas between the hearth tuyere and the shaft tuyere. The results indicate that these three factors all have a substantial impact on the ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace. Moderate shaft tuyere position, high recycling gas temperature, and high recycling gas allocation ratio between hearth and shaft could significantly promote the reduction of iron ore, reduce the scope of the magnetite reserve zone, and improve the performance of oxygen blast furnace. Based on the above findings, the recommendations for improvement of the oxygen blast furnace design and operation were proposed.

  3. Quantitative electroencephalography in a swine model of blast-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoyang; Zhou, Chengpeng; Cavanaugh, John M; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Desai, Alok; Zhang, Liying; King, Albert I

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to examine brain activity abnormalities earlier after blast exposure using a swine model to develop a qEEG data analysis protocol. Anaesthetized swine were exposed to 420-450 Kpa blast overpressure and survived for 3 days after blast. EEG recordings were performed at 15 minutes before the blast and 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 2 hours and 1, 2 and 3 days post-blast using surface recording electrodes and a Biopac 4-channel data acquisition system. Off-line quantitative EEG (qEEG) data analysis was performed to determine qEEG changes. Blast induced qEEG changes earlier after blast exposure, including a decrease of mean amplitude (MAMP), an increase of delta band power, a decrease of alpha band root mean square (RMS) and a decrease of 90% spectral edge frequency (SEF90). This study demonstrated that qEEG is sensitive for cerebral injury. The changes of qEEG earlier after the blast indicate the potential of utilization of multiple parameters of qEEG for diagnosis of blast-induced brain injury. Early detection of blast induced brain injury will allow early screening and assessment of brain abnormalities in soldiers to enable timely therapeutic intervention.

  4. Blast pulmonaire primaire chez le brûlé. a propos d’un cas et revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Siah, S.; Emane, A.; Bertin-Maghit, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Le blast est à l’origine de lésions spécifiques pour lesquelles une prise en charge spécialisée est nécessaire. Après une explosion on peut observer des lésions de blast primaire, liées à l’onde de choc, secondaire par polycriblage et tertiaire par projection du patient. Les blasts secondaire et tertiaire sont plus fréquents que le blast primaire et peuvent entraîner un polytraumatisme. Dans 5% des cas, on retrouve des brûlures pouvant faire partie du blast quaternaire, qui regroupe toutes les lésions d’autres mécanismes que ceux précités. La prise en charge des lésions secondaires et tertiaires de blast est comparable à celle des traumatisés graves. Le blast pulmonaire primaire aggrave le pronostic des blessés les plus graves mais impose rarement une prise en charge spécifique. La connaissance des particularités physiopathologiques et lésionnelles permet de mieux traiter les blastés et brûlés graves survivants. Nous rapportons une observation de blast pulmonaire primaire chez un brûlé. PMID:28149247

  5. Blast waves from detonated military explosive reduce GluR1 and synaptophysin levels in hippocampal slice cultures✩

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Marquitta; Piehler, Thuvan; Benjamin, Richard; Farizatto, Karen L.; Pait, Morgan C.; Almeida, Michael F.; Ghukasyan, Vladimir V.; Bahr, Ben A.

    2017-01-01

    Explosives create shockwaves that cause blast-induced neurotrauma, one of the most common types of traumatic brain injury (TBI) linked to military service. Blast-induced TBIs are often associated with reduced cognitive and behavioral functions due to a variety of factors. To study the direct effects of military explosive blasts on brain tissue, we removed systemic factors by utilizing rat hippocampal slice cultures. The long-term slice cultures were briefly sealed air-tight in serum-free medium, lowered into a 37 °C water-filled tank, and small 1.7-gram assemblies of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) were detonated 15 cm outside the tank, creating a distinct shockwave recorded at the culture plate position. Compared to control mock-treated groups of slices that received equal submerge time, 1–3 blast impacts caused a dose-dependent reduction in the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. While only a small reduction was found in hippocampal slices exposed to a single RDX blast and harvested 1–2 days later, slices that received two consecutive RDX blasts 4 min apart exhibited a 26–40% reduction in GluR1, and the receptor subunit was further reduced by 64–72% after three consecutive blasts. Such loss correlated with increased levels of HDAC2, a histone deacetylase implicated in stress-induced reduction of glutamatergic transmission. No evidence of synaptic marker recovery was found at 72 h post-blast. The presynaptic marker synaptophysin was found to have similar susceptibility as GluR1 to the multiple explosive detonations. In contrast to the synaptic protein reductions, actin levels were unchanged, spectrin breakdown was not detected, and Fluoro-Jade B staining found no indication of degenerating neurons in slices exposed to three RDX blasts, suggesting that small, sub-lethal explosives are capable of producing selective alterations to synaptic integrity. Together, these results indicate that blast waves from military explosive cause signs of synaptic compromise

  6. Logistics Complete Round Charts: Grenades, Mines, Pyrotechnics, Rockets, Rocket Motors, Demolition Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Flash 3. (342 g) Electrically Comp Actuated By Blasting Machine or Battery 5/ 8 STD 37524 Simulator, Projectile M1lSA2 0.30 7549246 MIL-S-10058 Hand...8799710 Blastin Comp (0.07 oz) Blasting (Whistle) Fuze Fuze 8-14 Frictio Friction (Burst) ’ l3AI M3A1 721 Igniter 8833721 Igniter last 5-10 8799714...8799715 iBlasti Blasting Sec FuzeN Fuze M3A1 •721 Igniter 8833721 Igniter Inst 6-10 8799714 879971 Blast Blasting See Fuze Puze N13A1 587 FrictLi 8848587

  7. Application of AI techniques to blast furnace operations

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Iida, Osamu; Ushijima, Yuichi; Sawada, Toshiro

    1995-10-01

    It was during the first stages of application of artificial intelligence (AI) to industrial fields, that the ironmaking division of Mizushima works at Kawasaki Steel recognized its potential. Since that time, the division has sought applications for these techniques to solve various problems. AI techniques applied to control the No. 3 blast furnace operations at the Mizushima works include: Blast furnace control by a diagnostic type of expert system that gives guidance to the actions required for blast furnace operation as well as control of furnace heat by automatically setting blast temperature; Hot stove combustion control by a combination ofmore » fuzzy inference and a physical model to insure good thermal efficiency of the stove; and blast furnace burden control using neural networks makes it possible to connect the pattern of gas flow distribution with the condition of the furnace. Experience of AI to control the blast furnace and other ironmaking operations has proved its capability for achieving automation and increased operating efficiency. The benefits are very high. For these reasons, the applications of AI techniques will be extended in the future and new techniques studied to further improve the power of AI.« less

  8. The quinary pattern of blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Yoram; Nimrod, Adi; Biderman, Philippe; Mayo, Ami; Sorkin, Patric

    2007-01-01

    Bombing is the primary weapon of global terrorism, and it results in a complicated, multidimensional injury pattern. It induces bodily injuries through the well-documented primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary mechanisms of blast. Their effects dictate special medical concern and timely implementation of diagnostic and management strategies. Our objective is to report on clinical observations of patients admitted to the Tel Aviv Medical Center following a terrorist bombing. The explosion injured 27 patients, and three died. Four survivors who had been in close proximity to the explosion, as indicated by their eardrum perforation and additional blast injuries, were exposed to the blast wave. They exhibited a unique and immediate hyperinflammatory state, two upon admission to the intensive care unit and two during surgery. This hyperinflammatory state manifested as hyperpyrexia, sweating, low central venous pressure, and positive fluid balance. This state did not correlate with the complexity of injuries sustained by any of the 67 patients admitted to the intensive care unit after previous bombings. The patients' hyperinflammatory behavior, unrelated to their injury complexity and severity of trauma, indicates a new injury pattern in explosions, termed the "quinary blast injury pattern." Unconventional materials used in the manufacture of the explosive can partly explain the observed early hyperinflammatory state. Medical personnel caring for blast victims should be aware of this new type of bombing injury.

  9. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY AMONG VICTIMS OF BOMB BLAST

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv; Gupta, I.D.; Batra, Lalit; Sharma, Himanshiu; Khandelwal, Rakesh; Pant, Anshuman

    1998-01-01

    Thirty one victims of bomb blast in a bus caused by terrorist activity in Dausa district, Rajasthan on 22.5.96, were evaluated for psychological reactions 3 days & 2 weeks after the incident. All hospitalized & non hospitalised bomb blast victims were assessed within 3 days of injury by objective predictors (percent of burnt area, facial disfigurement, limb amputations, fractures etc.) and subjective predictors (emotional distress and perceived social support). Detailed history, physical and mental state examination of all patients was carried out and for those having scores more then 17 on GHQ-60 (Hindi version), IPIS was administered. Diagnosis was made by 3 senior consultant psychiatrists of Psychiatric Centre, Jaipur, on the basis oflCD-10. At day 3 of 31 patients studied 11 (35.45%) had psychiatric morbidity. Out of which 6 (19.35%) had acute stress reaction, 3 (9.68%) had depression and 2 (6.45%) dissociative amnesia. Most commonly reported symptoms on IPIS were depersonalisation, derealisation, sleep disturbances specially generalised sleep loss, loss of appetite, nightmares, situational anxiety, depression, mental irritability, dulness of feelings, self blame, guilt, loss of interest, suicidal ideas, and worry about money, spouse, work and children. Most common physical injury was burns, followed by hearing disturbances, wounds received due to glass <& metal pieces and non specific pains and aches. Findings of follow up have been discussed and battery of tests for evaluation of victims of acute trauma has been suggested. PMID:21494441

  10. Concepts and strategies for clinical management of blast-induced traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

    2013-01-01

    After exposure of the human body to blast, kinetic energy of the blast shock waves might be transferred into hydraulic energy in the cardiovascular system to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of blood (a volumetric blood surge). The volumetric blood surge moves through blood vessels from the high-pressure body cavity to the low-pressure cranial cavity, causing damage to tiny cerebral blood vessels and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Large-scale cerebrovascular insults and BBB damage that occur globally throughout the brain may be the main causes of non-impact, blast-induced brain injuries, including the spectrum of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The volumetric blood surge may be a major contributor not only to blast-induced brain injuries resulting from physical trauma, but may also be the trigger to psychiatric disorders resulting from emotional and psychological trauma. Clinical imaging technologies, which are able to detect tiny cerebrovascular insults, changes in blood flow, and cerebral edema, may help diagnose both TBI and PTSD in the victims exposed to blasts. Potentially, prompt medical treatment aiming at prevention of secondary neuronal damage may slow down or even block the cascade of events that lead to progressive neuronal damage and subsequent long-term neurological and psychiatric impairment.

  11. Comprehensive Numerical Modeling of the Blast Furnace Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chenn; Tang, Guangwu; Wang, Jichao; Fu, Dong; Okosun, Tyamo; Silaen, Armin; Wu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Blast furnaces are counter-current chemical reactors, widely utilized in the ironmaking industry. Hot reduction gases injected from lower regions of the furnace ascend, reacting with the descending burden. Through this reaction process, iron ore is reduced into liquid iron that is tapped from the furnace hearth. Due to the extremely harsh environment inside the blast furnace, it is difficult to measure or observe internal phenomena during operation. Through the collaboration between steel companies and the Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation, multiple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to simulate the complex multiphase reacting flow in the three regions of the furnace, the shaft, the raceway, and the hearth. The models have been used effectively to troubleshoot and optimize blast furnace operations. In addition, the CFD models have been integrated with virtual reality. An interactive virtual blast furnace has been developed for training purpose. This paper summarizes the developments and applications of blast furnace CFD models and the virtual blast furnace.

  12. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism. PMID:26539158

  13. Survey of rice blast race identity for blast resistance gene identification in the USA and Puerto Rico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease is a significant threat to stable rice production in the USA and worldwide. The major resistance gene (Pi-ta) located within a cluster of resistance genes on rice chromosome 12 has been demonstrated to confer resistance to the rice blast disease. Katy, a rice cultivar released in ...

  14. The Vestibular Effects of Repeated Low-Level Blasts.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Philip D; Pinto, Robin L; Burrows, Holly L; Brungart, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use a prospective cohort of United States Marine Corps (USMC) instructors to identify any acute or long-term vestibular dysfunction following repeated blast exposures during explosive breaching training. They were assessed in clinic and on location during training at the USMC Methods of Entry School, Quantico, VA. Subjects received comprehensive baseline vestibular assessments and these were repeated in order to identify longitudinal changes. They also received shorter assessments immediately following blast exposure in order to identify acute findings. The main outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, vestibular Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of subjective vestibular function, videonystagmography (VNG), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), rotary chair (including the unilateral centrifugation test), computerized dynamic posturography, and computerized dynamic visual acuity. A total of 11 breachers and 4 engineers were followed for up to 17 months. No acute effects or longitudinal deteriorations were identified, but there were some interesting baseline group differences. Upbeat positional nystagmus was common, and correlated (p<0.005) with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several instructors had abnormally short low-frequency phase leads on rotary chair testing. This study evaluated breaching instructors over a longer test period than any other study, and the results suggest that this population appears to be safe from a vestibular standpoint at the current exposure levels. Upbeat positional nystagmus correlated with a history of mTBI in this population, and this has not been described elsewhere. The data trends also suggest that this nystagmus could be an acute blast effect. However, the reasons for the abnormally short phase leads seen in rotary chair testing are unclear at this time. Further investigation seems warranted.

  15. Exploration of the molecular basis of blast injury in a biofidelic model of traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielen, P.; Mehoke, T.; Gleason, J.; Iwaskiw, A.; Paulson, J.; Merkle, A.; Wester, B.; Dymond, J.

    2018-01-01

    Biological response to blast overpressure is complex and results in various and potentially non-concomitant acute and long-term deficits to exposed individuals. Clinical links between blast severity and injury outcomes remain elusive and have yet to be fully described, resulting in a critical inability to develop associated protection and mitigation strategies. Further, experimental models frequently fail to reproduce observed physiological phenomena and/or introduce artifacts that confound analysis and reproducibility. New models are required that employ consistent mechanical inputs, scale with biological analogs and known clinical data, and permit high-throughput examination of biological responses for a range of environmental and battlefield- relevant exposures. Here we describe a novel, biofidelic headform capable of integrating complex biological samples for blast exposure studies. We additionally demonstrate its utility in detecting acute transcriptional responses in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans after exposure to blast overpressure. This approach enables correlation between mechanical exposure and biological outcome, permitting both the enhancement of existing surrogate and computational models and the high-throughput biofidelic testing of current and future protection systems.

  16. International Symposium on Military Applications of Blast Simulation (5th)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-22

    Centre d’Etudes de Grainat, Gramat , France, de- scribed their work in designing a blast simulator with a test section of 12—rn width and 7—rn height...de Gramat , Gramat , France) on the dynamic behavior of limestone. Through a series of high—pressure experiments of the type developed in the recent

  17. Modelling and Testing of Blast Effect On the Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figuli, Lucia; Jangl, Štefan; Papán, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    As a blasting agent in the blasting and mining engineering, has been using one of so called new generation of explosives which offer greater flexibility in their range and application, and such explosive is ANFO. It is type of explosive consists of an oxidiser and a fuel (ammonium nitrate and fuel oil). One of such ANFO explosives which are industrially made in Slovakia is POLONIT. The explosive is a mixture of ammonium nitrate, methyl esters of higher fatty acids, vegetable oil and red dye. The paper deals with the analysis of structure subjected to the blast load created by the explosion of POLONIT charge. First part of paper is describing behaviour and characteristic of blast wave generated from the blast (detonation characteristics, physical characteristics, time-history diagram etc.) and the second part presents the behaviour of such loaded structures, because of the analysis of such dynamical loaded structure is required knowing the parameters of blast wave, its effect on structure and the tools for the solution of dynamic analysis. The real field tests of three different weight of charges and two different structures were done. The explosive POLONIT was used together with 25 g of ignition explosive PLNp10. Analytical and numerical model of blast loaded structure is compared with the results obtained from the field tests (is compared with the corresponding experimental accelerations). For the modelling structures were approximated as a one-degree system of freedom (SDOF), where the blast wave was estimated with linear decay and exponential decay using positive and negative phase of blast wave. Numerical solution of the steel beam dynamic response was performed via FEM (Finite Element Method) using standard software Visual FEA.

  18. Index theorem for non-supersymmetric fermions coupled to a non-Abelian string and electric charge quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.; Yung, A.

    2018-03-01

    Non-Abelian strings are considered in non-supersymmetric theories with fermions in various appropriate representations of the gauge group U(N). We derive the electric charge quantization conditions and the index theorems counting fermion zero modes in the string background both for the left-handed and right-handed fermions. In both cases we observe a non-trivial N dependence.

  19. Broad-band simulation of M7.2 earthquake on the North Tehran fault, considering non-linear soil effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidinejad, A.; Zafarani, H.; Vahdani, S.

    2018-05-01

    The North Tehran fault (NTF) is known to be one of the most drastic sources of seismic hazard on the city of Tehran. In this study, we provide broad-band (0-10 Hz) ground motions for the city as a consequence of probable M7.2 earthquake on the NTF. Low-frequency motions (0-2 Hz) are provided from spectral element dynamic simulation of 17 scenario models. High-frequency (2-10 Hz) motions are calculated with a physics-based method based on S-to-S backscattering theory. Broad-band ground motions at the bedrock level show amplifications, both at low and high frequencies, due to the existence of deep Tehran basin in the vicinity of the NTF. By employing soil profiles obtained from regional studies, effect of shallow soil layers on broad-band ground motions is investigated by both linear and non-linear analyses. While linear soil response overestimate ground motion prediction equations, non-linear response predicts plausible results within one standard deviation of empirical relationships. Average Peak Ground Accelerations (PGAs) at the northern, central and southern parts of the city are estimated about 0.93, 0.59 and 0.4 g, respectively. Increased damping caused by non-linear soil behaviour, reduces the soil linear responses considerably, in particular at frequencies above 3 Hz. Non-linear deamplification reduces linear spectral accelerations up to 63 per cent at stations above soft thick sediments. By performing more general analyses, which exclude source-to-site effects on stations, a correction function is proposed for typical site classes of Tehran. Parameters for the function which reduces linear soil response in order to take into account non-linear soil deamplification are provided for various frequencies in the range of engineering interest. In addition to fully non-linear analyses, equivalent-linear calculations were also conducted which their comparison revealed appropriateness of the method for large peaks and low frequencies, but its shortage for small to

  20. Multiple lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections alter interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-10 and IL-6 and IL-7 receptor mRNA in CNS and spleen.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Figlewicz, Dianne P; Beuca, Timothy Petru; Bullock, Kristin; Hansen, Kim; Banks, William A; Raskind, Murray A; Peskind, Elaine R

    2017-07-04

    Neuroinflammation is proposed to be an important component in the development of several central nervous system (CNS) disorders including depression, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and traumatic brain injury. However, exactly how neuroinflammation leads to, or contributes to, these central disorders is unclear. The objective of the study was to examine and compare the expression of mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-10 and the receptors for IL-6 (IL-6R) and IL-7 (IL-7R) using in situ hybridization in discrete brain regions and in the spleen after multiple injections of 3mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a model of neuroinflammation. In the spleen, LPS significantly elevated IL-6 mRNA expression, then IL-10 mRNA, with no effect on IL-7 or IL-7R mRNA, while significantly decreasing IL-6R mRNA expression. In the CNS, LPS administration had the greatest effect on IL-6 and IL-6R mRNA. LPS increased IL-6 mRNA expression only in non-neuronal cells throughout the brain, but significantly elevated IL-6R mRNA in neuronal populations, where observed, except the cerebellum. LPS resulted in variable effects on IL-10 mRNA, and had no effect on IL-7 or IL-7R mRNA expression. These studies indicate that LPS-induced neuroinflammation has substantial but variable effects on the regional and cellular patterns of CNS IL-6, IL-7 and IL-10, and for IL-6R and IL-7R mRNA expression. It is apparent that administration of LPS can affect non-neuronal and neuronal cells in the brain. Further research is required to determine how CNS inflammatory changes associated with IL-6, IL-10 and IL-6R could in turn contribute to the development of CNS neurological disorders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Blast Injury: Translating Research Into Operational Medicine (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    i Blast Injury: Translating Research into Operational Medicine Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for...SUBTITLE Blast Injury: Translating Research Into Operational Medicine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Z39-18 iii Blast Injury: Translating Research into Operational Medicine Preprint BI-QP-JHS-CH10 Borden Institute This chapter was originally

  2. Relationship between Orientation to a Blast and Pressure Wave Propagation Inside the Rat Brian

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    8217·’ 2.9 ± 0.4’ ·• 64 M. Chavko ec at. I j ournal of Neuroscience Mecl1ods 195 (20!1 ) 61-66 A 60 ~ c 60 ~ ------> ------> 40 40 ~ 20 20 v :; VI...WA, Prusaczyk WK. McCarron RM. Measurement or blast wave by a miniature fiber optic pressure transducer in the rat brain. J Neurosci Methods...AI. Blast related neuro- trauma: a review or cellular injury. Mol Cell Biomech 2008;3: 155-68. ling G. Bandak F, Armonda R, Grant G, Ecklund J

  3. On the Interaction and Coalescence if Spherical Blast Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    The scaling and similarity laws concerning the propagation of isolated spherical blast waves are briefly reviewed. Both point source explosions and high pressure gas explosions are considered. Test data on blast overpressure from the interaction and coalescence of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives in the form of shaped charges of different strength placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure. The results point out the possibility of detecting source explosions from far-field pressure measurements.

  4. Measurement and Prediction of Radiative Non-Equilibrium for Air Shocks Between 7-9 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper describes a recent characterization of thermochemical non-equilibrium for shock speeds between 7 and 9 km/s in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) Facility. Data are spectrally resolved from 190-1450 nm and spatially resolved behind the shock front. The data are analyzed in terms of a spectral non-equilibrium metric, defined as the average radiance within +/-2 cm of the peak. Simulations with DPLR/NEQAIR using different rate chemistries show these conditions to be poorly replicated. The sources of discrepancy are examined, leading to an update to the NEQAIR non-Boltzmann model and DPLR rate chemistry. New parameters for the rate chemistry and non-Boltzmann modeling are reported.

  5. Measurement and Prediction of Radiative Non-Equilibrium for Air Shocks Between 7-9 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper describes a recent characterization of thermochemical non-equilibrium for shock speeds between 7 and 9 km/s in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) Facility. Data are spectrally resolved from 190-1450 nm and spatially resolved behind the shock front. The data are analyzed in terms of a spectral non-equilibrium metric, defined as the average radiance within +/- 2 cm of the peak. Simulations with DPLR/NEQAIR using different rate chemistries show these conditions to be poorly replicated. The sources of discrepancy are examined, leading to an update to the NEQAIR non-Boltzmann model and DPLR rate chemistry. New parameters for the rate chemistry and non-Boltzmann modeling are reported.

  6. Determination of Destress Blasting Effectiveness Using Seismic Source Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtecki, Łukasz; Mendecki, Maciej J.; Zuberek, Wacaław M.

    2017-12-01

    Underground mining of coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin is currently performed under difficult geological and mining conditions. The mining depth, dislocations (faults and folds) and mining remnants are responsible for rockburst hazard in the highest degree. This hazard can be minimized by using active rockburst prevention, where destress blastings play an important role. Destress blastings in coal seams aim to destress the local stress concentrations. These blastings are usually performed from the longwall face to decrease the stress level ahead of the longwall. An accurate estimation of active rockburst prevention effectiveness is important during mining under disadvantageous geological and mining conditions, which affect the risk of rockburst. Seismic source parameters characterize the focus of tremor, which may be useful in estimating the destress blasting effects. Investigated destress blastings were performed in coal seam no. 507 during its longwall mining in one of the coal mines in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin under difficult geological and mining conditions. The seismic source parameters of the provoked tremors were calculated. The presented preliminary investigations enable a rapid estimation of the destress blasting effectiveness using seismic source parameters, but further analysis in other geological and mining conditions with other blasting parameters is required.

  7. Computational modeling of blast exposure associated with recoilless weapons combat training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiri, S.; Ritter, A. C.; Bailie, J. M.; Needham, C.; Duckworth, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    Military personnel are exposed to blast as part of routine combat training with shoulder-fired recoilless rifles. These weapons fire large-caliber ammunitions capable of disabling structures and uparmored vehicles (e.g., tanks). Scientific, medical, and military leaders are beginning to recognize the blast overpressure from these shoulder-fired weapons may result in acute and even long-term physiological effects to military personnel. However, the back blast generated from the Carl Gustav and Shoulder-launched Multipurpose Assault Weapon (SMAW) shoulder-fired weapons on the weapon operator has not been quantified. By quantifying and modeling the full-body blast exposure from these weapons, better injury correlations can be constructed. Blast exposure data from the Carl Gustav and SMAW were used to calibrate a propellant burn source term for computational simulations of blast exposure on operators of these shoulder-mounted weapon systems. A propellant burn model provided the source term for each weapon to capture blast effects. Blast data from personnel-mounted gauges during weapon firing were used to create initial, high-fidelity 3D computational fluid dynamic simulations using SHAMRC (Second-order Hydrodynamic Automatic Mesh Refinement Code). These models were then improved upon using data collected from static blast sensors positioned around the military personnel while weapons were utilized in actual combat training. The final simulation models for both the Carl Gustav and SMAW were in good agreement with the data collected from the personnel-mounted and static pressure gauges. Using the final simulation results, contour maps were created for peak overpressure and peak overpressure impulse experienced by military personnel firing the weapon as well as those assisting with firing of those weapons. Reconstruction of the full-body blast loading enables a more accurate assessment of the cause of potential mechanisms of injury due to air blast even for subjects not

  8. Functional Status after Blast-Plus-Impact Complex Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury in Evacuated United States Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Christine L.; Johnson, Ann M.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Werner, Nicole J.; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fundamental questions remain unanswered about the longitudinal impact of blast-plus-impact complex traumatic brain injuries (TBI) from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This prospective, observational study investigated measures of clinical outcome in US military personnel evacuated to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) in Germany after such “blast-plus” concussive TBIs. Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended assessments completed 6–12 months after injury indicated a moderate overall disability in 41/47 (87%) blast-plus TBI subjects and a substantial but smaller number (11/18, 61%, p=0.018) of demographically similar US military controls without TBI evacuated for other medical reasons. Cognitive function assessed with a neuropsychological test battery was not different between blast-plus TBI subjects and controls; performance of both groups was generally in the normal range. No subject was found to have focal neurological deficits. However, 29/47 (57%) of blast-plus subjects with TBI met all criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) versus 5/18 (28%) of controls (p=0.014). PTSD was highly associated with overall disability; 31/34 patients with PTSD versus 19/31 patients who did not meet full PTSD criteria had moderate to severe disability (p=0.0003). Symptoms of depression were also more severe in the TBI group (p=0.05), and highly correlated with PTSD severity (r=0.86, p<0.0001). Thus, in summary, high rates of PTSD and depression but not cognitive impairment or focal neurological deficits were observed 6–12 months after concussive blast-plus-impact complex TBI. Overall disability was substantially greater than typically reported in civilian non-blast concussive (“mild”) patients with TBI, even with polytrauma. The relationship between these clinical outcomes and specific blast-related aspects of brain injuries versus other combat-related factors remains unknown. PMID:24367929

  9. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed Yb 2 Ti 2 O 7

    DOE PAGES

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; ...

    2015-10-27

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J=7/2 Yb 3+ ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb 2Ti 2O 7. The precise ground state of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak “stuffing,” wherein a small proportion, approximately 2%, of the nonmagnetic Ti 4+ sites are occupied by excess Yb 3+. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Ybmore » 2Ti 2O 7, as well as a crushed single crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb 2+xTi 2–xO 7+y with x = 0.046. All samples display three crystalline electric field transitions out of the ground state, and the ground state doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of m J = ±1/2, as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb 2+xTi 2–xO 7+y induces a similar finite crystalline electric field lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb 2Ti 2O 7 by elevated temperature. In conclusion, an extended strain field exists about each local “stuffed” site, which produces a distribution of random crystalline electric field environments in the lightly stuffed Yb 2+xTi 2–xO 7+y, in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different crystalline electric field eigenvalues and eigenvectors.« less

  10. Blast Upgrading of Existing Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    covered with soil, the response is different from triat when subjected to a blast load . Table 2-3 is a summary of the maxi- mum load bearing ... load ) 5 W14 384 El =5 (40) 16 (192)3 394 x 1.85 x 106 x 98.93 6 =0.32 0.53 O.K. Bearing at-Support = 3.5 1.5 = 2 in. 2 l° MIST f L V 533 f 7 psi < 4-s...10 psf dead load (91 psf live load ). Shear fv = 2.03(51.6) = 105 psi, and bearing fc= 2.03 (178) are = 361 psi well within conventional ,safe limits

  11. Mechanisms of Hearing Loss after Blast Injury to the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Il; Gao, Simon S.; Xia, Anping; Wang, Rosalie; Salles, Felipe T.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Abaya, Homer; Wachtel, Jacqueline; Baek, Jongmin; Jacobs, David; Rasband, Matthew N.; Oghalai, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Given the frequent use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the world, the study of traumatic blast injuries is of increasing interest. The ear is the most common organ affected by blast injury because it is the body’s most sensitive pressure transducer. We fabricated a blast chamber to re-create blast profiles similar to that of IEDs and used it to develop a reproducible mouse model to study blast-induced hearing loss. The tympanic membrane was perforated in all mice after blast exposure and found to heal spontaneously. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated no evidence for middle ear or otic capsule injuries; however, the healed tympanic membrane was thickened. Auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shifts were found to be correlated with blast intensity. As well, these threshold shifts were larger than those found in control mice that underwent surgical perforation of their tympanic membranes, indicating cochlear trauma. Histological studies one week and three months after the blast demonstrated no disruption or damage to the intra-cochlear membranes. However, there was loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) within the basal turn of the cochlea and decreased spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and afferent nerve synapses. Using our mouse model that recapitulates human IED exposure, our results identify that the mechanisms underlying blast-induced hearing loss does not include gross membranous rupture as is commonly believed. Instead, there is both OHC and SGN loss that produce auditory dysfunction. PMID:23840874

  12. Draft de novo transcriptome assembly and proteome characterization of the electric lobe of Tetronarce californica: a molecular tool for the study of cholinergic neurotransmission in the electric organ.

    PubMed

    Stavrianakou, Maria; Perez, Ricardo; Wu, Cheng; Sachs, Matthew S; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Harlow, Mark

    2017-08-14

    information was used to predict the position in human pathways of the conserved members of the T. californica MetaProteome. We found proteins not detected before in T. californica, corresponding to processes involved in synaptic vesicle biology. Finally, we identified 42 transporter proteins in TCDB that were detected by the T. californica MetaProteome (electric fish) and not selected by a control proteome consisting of the combined proteomes of 12 widely diverse non-electric fishes by Reverse-Blast-Hit Blast. Combined, the information provided here is not only a unique tool for the study of cholinergic neurotransmission, but it is also a starting point for understanding the evolution of early vertebrates.

  13. Numerical Analyses of the Influence of Blast-Induced Damaged Rock Around Shallow Tunnels in Brittle Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiang, David; Nordlund, Erling

    2009-06-01

    Most of the railway tunnels in Sweden are shallow-seated (<20 m of rock cover) and are located in hard brittle rock masses. The majority of these tunnels are excavated by drilling and blasting, which, consequently, result in the development of a blast-induced damaged zone around the tunnel boundary. Theoretically, the presence of this zone, with its reduced strength and stiffness, will affect the overall performance of the tunnel, as well as its construction and maintenance. The Swedish Railroad Administration, therefore, uses a set of guidelines based on peak particle velocity models and perimeter blasting to regulate the extent of damage due to blasting. However, the real effects of the damage caused by blasting around a shallow tunnel and their criticality to the overall performance of the tunnel are yet to be quantified and, therefore, remain the subject of research and investigation. This paper presents a numerical parametric study of blast-induced damage in rock. By varying the strength and stiffness of the blast-induced damaged zone and other relevant parameters, the near-field rock mass response was evaluated in terms of the effects on induced boundary stresses and ground deformation. The continuum method of numerical analysis was used. The input parameters, particularly those relating to strength and stiffness, were estimated using a systematic approach related to the fact that, at shallow depths, the stress and geologic conditions may be highly anisotropic. Due to the lack of data on the post-failure characteristics of the rock mass, the traditional Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion was assumed and used. The results clearly indicate that, as expected, the presence of the blast-induced damage zone does affect the behaviour of the boundary stresses and ground deformation. Potential failure types occurring around the tunnel boundary and their mechanisms have also been identified.

  14. Quantifying electrical impacts on redundant wire insertion in 7nm unidirectional designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Schroeder, Uwe Paul; Srinivasan, Ramya; Narisetty, Haritez; Malik, Shobhit; Madhavan, Sriram

    2017-04-01

    In nano-meter scale Integrated Circuits, via fails due to random defects is a well-known yield detractor, and via redundancy insertion is a common method to help enhance semiconductors yield. For the case of Self Aligned Double Patterning (SADP), which might require unidirectional design layers as in the case of some advanced technology nodes, the conventional methods of inserting redundant vias don't work any longer. This is because adding redundant vias conventionally requires adding metal shapes in the non-preferred direction, which will violate the SADP design constraints in that case. Therefore, such metal layers fabricated using unidirectional SADP require an alternative method for providing the needed redundancy. This paper proposes a post-layout Design for Manufacturability (DFM) redundancy insertion method tailored for the design requirements introduced by unidirectional metal layers. The proposed method adds redundant wires in the preferred direction - after searching for nearby vacant routing tracks - in order to provide redundant paths for electrical signals. This method opportunistically adds robustness against failures due to silicon defects without impacting area or incurring new design rule violations. Implementation details of this redundancy insertion method will be explained in this paper. One known challenge with similar DFM layout fixing methods is the possible introduction of undesired electrical impact, causing other unintentional failures in design functionality. In this paper, a study is presented to quantify the electrical impacts of such redundancy insertion scheme and to examine if that electrical impact can be tolerated. The paper will show results to evaluate DFM insertion rates and corresponding electrical impact for a given design utilization and maximum inserted wire length. Parasitic extraction and static timing analysis results will be presented. A typical digital design implemented using GLOBALFOUNDRIES 7nm technology is used for

  15. 7 CFR 1728.97 - Incorporation by reference of electric standards and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Incorporation by reference of electric standards and...) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION § 1728.97 Incorporation by reference of electric standards and specifications. The...

  16. 7 CFR 1728.97 - Incorporation by reference of electric standards and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Incorporation by reference of electric standards and...) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION § 1728.97 Incorporation by reference of electric standards and specifications. The...

  17. Collimation and Asymmetry of the Hot Blast Wave from the Recurrent Nova V745 Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Delgado, Laura; Laming, J. Martin; Starrfield, Sumner; Kashyap, Vinay; Orlando, Salvatore; Page, Kim L.; Hernanz, M.; Ness, J.-U.; Gehrz, R. D.; van Rossum, Daan; Woodward, Charles E.

    2016-07-01

    The recurrent symbiotic nova V745 Sco exploded on 2014 February 6 and was observed on February 22 and 23 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Transmission Grating Spectrometers. By that time the supersoft source phase had already ended, and Chandra spectra are consistent with emission from a hot, shock-heated circumstellar medium with temperatures exceeding 107 K. X-ray line profiles are more sharply peaked than expected for a spherically symmetric blast wave, with a full width at zero intensity of approximately 2400 km s-1, an FWHM of 1200 ± 30 km s-1, and an average net blueshift of 165 ± 10 km s-1. The red wings of lines are increasingly absorbed toward longer wavelengths by material within the remnant. We conclude that the blast wave was sculpted by an aspherical circumstellar medium in which an equatorial density enhancement plays a role, as in earlier symbiotic nova explosions. Expansion of the dominant X-ray-emitting material is aligned close to the plane of the sky and is most consistent with an orbit seen close to face-on. Comparison of an analytical blast wave model with the X-ray spectra, Swift observations, and near-infrared line widths indicates that the explosion energy was approximately 1043 erg and confirms an ejected mass of approximately 10-7 M ⊙. The total mass lost is an order of magnitude lower than the accreted mass required to have initiated the explosion, indicating that the white dwarf is gaining mass and is a Type Ia supernova progenitor candidate.

  18. Reactive Blast Waves from Composite Charges

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-10-16

    Investigated here is the performance of composite explosives - measured in terms of the blast wave they drive into the surrounding environment. The composite charge configuration studied here was a spherical booster (1/3 charge mass), surrounded by aluminum (Al) powder (2/3 charge mass) at an initial density of {rho}{sub 0} = 0.604 g/cc. The Al powder acts as a fuel but does not detonate - thereby providing an extreme example of a 'non-ideal' explosive (where 2/3 of the charge does not detonate). Detonation of the booster charge creates a blast wave that disperses the Al powder and ignites the ensuingmore » Al-air mixture - thereby forming a two-phase combustion cloud embedded in the explosion. Afterburning of the booster detonation products with air also enhances and promotes the Al-air combustion process. Pressure waves from such reactive blast waves have been measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Here we describe numerical simulations of those experiments. A Heterogeneous Continuum Model was used to model the dispersion and combustion of the Al particle cloud. It combines the gasdynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a dilute continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models of Khasainov. It incorporates a combustion model based on mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) was used to capture the energy-bearing scales of the turbulent flow on the computational grid, and to track

  19. Molecular progress on the mapping and cloning of functional genes for blast disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.): current status and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, S; Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Ghasemzadeh, A; Ravanfar, S A; Latif, M A

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease, which is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is a recurring problem in all rice-growing regions of the world. The use of resistance (R) genes in rice improvement breeding programmes has been considered to be one of the best options for crop protection and blast management. Alternatively, quantitative resistance conferred by quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is also a valuable resource for the improvement of rice disease resistance. In the past, intensive efforts have been made to identify major R-genes as well as QTLs for blast disease using molecular techniques. A review of bibliographic references shows over 100 blast resistance genes and a larger number of QTLs (∼500) that were mapped to the rice genome. Of the blast resistance genes, identified in different genotypes of rice, ∼22 have been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. In this review, we have summarized the reported rice blast resistance genes and QTLs for utilization in future molecular breeding programmes to introgress high-degree resistance or to pyramid R-genes in commercial cultivars that are susceptible to M. oryzae. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the significant studies in order to update our understanding of the molecular progress on rice and M. oryzae. This information will assist rice breeders to improve the resistance to rice blast using marker-assisted selection which continues to be a priority for rice-breeding programmes.

  20. Lateral blasts at Mount St. Helens and hazard zonation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, D.R.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Lateral blasts at andesitic and dacitic volcanoes can produce a variety of direct hazards, including ballistic projectiles which can be thrown to distances of at least 10 km and pyroclastic density flows which can travel at high speed to distances of more than 30 km. Indirect effect that may accompany such explosions include wind-borne ash, pyroclastic flows formed by the remobilization of rock debris thrown onto sloping ground, and lahars. Two lateral blasts occurred at a lava dome on the north flank of Mount St. Helens about 1200 years ago; the more energetic of these threw rock debris northeastward across a sector of about 30?? to a distance of at least 10 km. The ballistic debris fell onto an area estimated to be 50 km2, and wind-transported ash and lapilli derived from the lateral-blast cloud fell on an additional lobate area of at least 200 km2. In contrast, the vastly larger lateral blast of May 18, 1980, created a devastating pyroclastic density flow that covered a sector of as much as 180??, reached a maximum distance of 28 km, and within a few minutes directly affected an area of about 550 km2. The May 18 lateral blast resulted from the sudden, landslide-induced depressurization of a dacite cryptodome and the hydrothermal system that surrounded it within the volcano. We propose that lateral-blast hazard assessments for lava domes include an adjoining hazard zone with a radius of at least 10 km. Although a lateral blast can occur on any side of a dome, the sector directly affected by any one blast probably will be less than 180??. Nevertheless, a circular hazard zone centered on the dome is suggested because of the difficulty of predicting the direction of a lateral blast. For the purpose of long-term land-use planning, a hazard assessment for lateral blasts caused by explosions of magma bodies or pressurized hydrothermal systems within a symmetrical volcano could designate a circular potential hazard area with a radius of 35 km centered on the volcano