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Sample records for macaque cd8aa homodimer

  1. Poster: the macaque genome.

    PubMed

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) facilitates an extraordinary range of biomedical and basic research, and the publication of the genome only makes it a more powerful model for studies of human disease; moreover, the macaque's position relative to humans and chimpanzees affords the opportunity to learn about the processes that have shaped the last 25 million years of primate evolution. To allow users to explore these themes of the macaque genome, Science has created a special interactive version of the poster published in the print edition of the 13 April 2007 issue. The interactive version includes additional text and exploration, as well as embedded video featuring seven scientists discussing the importance of the macaque and its genome sequence in studies of biomedicine and evolution. We have also created an accompanying teaching resource, including a lesson plan aimed at teachers of advanced high school life science students, for exploring what a comparison of the macaque and human genomes can tell us about human biology and evolution. These items are free to all site visitors.

  2. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition).

  3. Chemical shift imprint of intersubunit communication in a symmetric homodimer

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Bradley T.; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric communication is critical for protein function and cellular homeostasis, and it can be exploited as a strategy for drug design. However, unlike many protein–ligand interactions, the structural basis for the long-range communication that underlies allostery is not well understood. This lack of understanding is most evident in the case of classical allostery, in which a binding event in one protomer is sensed by a second symmetric protomer. A primary reason why study of interdomain signaling is challenging in oligomeric proteins is the difficulty in characterizing intermediate, singly bound species. Here, we use an NMR approach to isolate and characterize a singly ligated state (“lig1”) of a homodimeric enzyme that is otherwise obscured by rapid exchange with apo and saturated forms. Mixed labeled dimers were prepared that simultaneously permit full population of the lig1 state and isotopic labeling of either protomer. Direct visualization of peaks from lig1 yielded site-specific ligand-state multiplets that provide a convenient format for assessing mechanisms of intersubunit communication from a variety of NMR measurements. We demonstrate this approach on thymidylate synthase from Escherichia coli, a homodimeric enzyme known to be half-the-sites reactive. Resolving the dUMP1 state shows that active site communication occurs not upon the first dUMP binding, but upon the second. Surprisingly, for many sites, dUMP1 peaks are found beyond the limits set by apo and dUMP2 peaks, indicating that binding the first dUMP pushes the enzyme ensemble to further conformational extremes than the apo or saturated forms. The approach used here should be generally applicable to homodimers. PMID:27466406

  4. Deprotonated Dicarboxylic Acid Homodimers: Hydrogen Bonds and Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-03-31

    Dicarboxylic acids represent an important class of water-soluble organic compounds found in the atmosphere. In this work we are studying properties of dicarboxylic acid homodimer complexes (HO2(CH2)nCO2-[HO2(CH2)nCO2H], n = 0-12), as potentially important intermediates in aerosol formation processes. Our approach is based on experimental data from negative ion photoelectron spectra of the dimer complexes combined with updated measurements of the corresponding monomer species. These results are analyzed with quantum-mechanical calculations, which provide further information about equilibrium structures, thermochemical parameters associated with the complex formation, and evaporation rates. We find that upon formation of the dimer complexes the electron binding energies increase by 1.3–1.7 eV (30.0–39.2 kcal/mol), indicating increased stability of the dimerized complexes. Calculations indicate that these dimer complexes are characterized by the presence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds with high binding energies and are thermodynamically favorable to form with low evaporation rates. Comparison with previously studied HSO4-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] complex (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 779-785) shows that HO2(CH2)2CO2-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] has very similar thermochemical properties. These results imply that dicarboxylic acids not only can contribute to the heterogeneous complexes formation involving sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic acids, but also can promote the formation of homogenous complexes by involving dicarboxylic acids themselves.

  5. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Dong, Shengzhang; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Beerntsen, Brenda; Feng, Qili; Song, Qisheng

    2017-02-22

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs α and burs β), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that bursicon homodimers act in prophylactic immunity in insects, and possibly arthropods, generally, using the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. We found that burs α and burs β are expressed in larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Treating newly emerged Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster adults with recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon) heterodimer led to cuticle tanning in both species. Treating larvae and adults with r-bursicon homodimers led to up-regulation of five anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes, noting the possibility that bursicon heterodimers also lead to up-regulation of these genes can not been excluded. The induced AMPs effectively suppressed the growth of bacteria in vitro. RNAi knock-down of the transcriptional factor Relish2 abolished the influence of r-bursicon homodimers on AMP production. We infer the bursicon homodimers induce expression of AMP genes via Relish2 in Ae. aegypti, as prophylactic immunity to protect mosquitoes during the vulnerable stages of each molt.

  6. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Dong, Shengzhang; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Beerntsen, Brenda; Feng, Qili; Song, Qisheng

    2017-01-01

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs α and burs β), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that bursicon homodimers act in prophylactic immunity in insects, and possibly arthropods, generally, using the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. We found that burs α and burs β are expressed in larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Treating newly emerged Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster adults with recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon) heterodimer led to cuticle tanning in both species. Treating larvae and adults with r-bursicon homodimers led to up-regulation of five anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes, noting the possibility that bursicon heterodimers also lead to up-regulation of these genes can not been excluded. The induced AMPs effectively suppressed the growth of bacteria in vitro. RNAi knock-down of the transcriptional factor Relish2 abolished the influence of r-bursicon homodimers on AMP production. We infer the bursicon homodimers induce expression of AMP genes via Relish2 in Ae. aegypti, as prophylactic immunity to protect mosquitoes during the vulnerable stages of each molt. PMID:28225068

  7. Nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms homo-dimers stabilized by disulfide bonds

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Daniel; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Bueno, Carlos; Santos, Marco; Pando-Robles, Victoria; Batista, Cesar V.; Zimic, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant wild-pyrazinamidase from H37Rv M. tuberculosis was analyzed by gel electrophoresis under differential reducing conditions to evaluate its quaternary structure. PZAse was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography under non-reducing conditions. PZAse activity was measured and mass spectrometry analysis was performed to determine the identity of proteins by de novo sequencing and to determine the presence of disulfide bonds. This study confirmed that M. tuberculosis wild type PZAse was able to form homo-dimers in vitro. Homo-dimers showed a slightly lower specific PZAse activity compared to monomeric PZAse. PZAse dimers were dissociated into monomers in response to reducing conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the existence of disulfide bonds (C72-C138 and C138-C138) stabilizing the quaternary structure of the PZAse homo-dimer. PMID:25199451

  8. Phosphorylated nuclear receptor CAR forms a homodimer to repress its constitutive activity for ligand activation.

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Osabe, Makoto; Perera, Lalith; Moore, Rick; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-03-06

    Nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3) regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolism as well as cell fate. Its activation can be a critical factor in drug-induced toxicity and disease development such as diabetes and tumors. CAR inactivates its constitutive activity by phosphorylation at threonine 38. Utilizing receptor for protein kinase 1 (RACK1) as the regulatory subunit, protein phosphatase PP2A dephosphorylates threonine 38 to activate CAR. Here we have demonstrated that CAR undergoes its homodimer-monomer conversion to regulate this dephosphorylation. By co-expressing two differently-tagged CAR proteins in Huh-7 cells, mouse primary hepatocytes and mouse livers, co-immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that CAR can form a homodimer in a configuration in which the PP2A/RACK1 binding site is buried within its dimer interface. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to stimulate CAR homo-dimerization, thus constraining CAR in its inactive form. The agonistic ligand CITCO binds directly to the CAR homodimer and dissociates phosphorylated CAR into its monomer, exposing the PP2A/RACK1 binding site for dephosphorylation. Phenobarbital, which is not a CAR ligand, binds the EGF receptor, reversing the EGF signal to monomerize CAR for its indirect activation. Thus, the homodimer-monomer conversion is the underlying molecular mechanism that regulates CAR activation, by placing phosphorylated threonine 38 as the common target for both direct and in direct activation of CAR.

  9. A Set of Computationally Designed Orthogonal Antiparallel Homodimers that Expands the Synthetic Coiled-Coil Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular engineering of protein assemblies, including the fabrication of nanostructures and synthetic signaling pathways, relies on the availability of modular parts that can be combined to give different structures and functions. Currently, a limited number of well-characterized protein interaction components are available. Coiled-coil interaction modules have been demonstrated to be useful for biomolecular design, and many parallel homodimers and heterodimers are available in the coiled-coil toolkit. In this work, we sought to design a set of orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils using a computational approach. There are very few antiparallel homodimers described in the literature, and none have been measured for cross-reactivity. We tested the ability of the distance-dependent statistical potential DFIRE to predict orientation preferences for coiled-coil dimers of known structure. The DFIRE model was then combined with the CLASSY multistate protein design framework to engineer sets of three orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils. Experimental measurements confirmed the successful design of three peptides that preferentially formed antiparallel homodimers that, furthermore, did not interact with one additional previously reported antiparallel homodimer. Two designed peptides that formed higher-order structures suggest how future design protocols could be improved. The successful designs represent a significant expansion of the existing protein-interaction toolbox for molecular engineers. PMID:25337788

  10. Structures of the Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase Rnr2 and Rnr4 Homodimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerhalter, M.; Voegtli, W.C.; Perlstein, D.L.; Ge, J.; Stubbe, J.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Class I ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Eukaryotic RNRs comprise two subunits, the R1 subunit, which contains substrate and allosteric effector binding sites, and the R2 subunit, which houses a catalytically essential diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there are two variants of the R2 subunit, called Rnr2 and Rnr4. Rnr4 is unique in that it lacks three iron-binding residues conserved in all other R2s. Nevertheless, Rnr4 is required to activate Rnr2, and the functional species in vivo is believed to be a heterodimeric complex between the two proteins. The crystal structures of the Rnr2 and Rnr4 homodimers have been determined and are compared to that of the heterodimer. The homodimers are very similar to the heterodimer and to mouse R2 in overall fold, but there are several key differences. In the Rnr2 homodimer, one of the iron-binding helices, helix {alpha}B, is not well-ordered. In the heterodimer, interactions with a loop region connecting Rnr4 helices {alpha}A and {alpha}3 stabilize this Rnr2 helix, which donates iron ligand Asp 145. Sequence differences between Rnr2 and Rnr4 prevent the same interactions from occurring in the Rnr2 homodimer. These findings provide a structural rationale for why the heterodimer is the preferred complex in vivo. The active-site region in the Rnr4 homodimer reveals interactions not apparent in the heterodimer, supporting previous conclusions that this subunit does not bind iron. When taken together, these results support a model in which Rnr4 stabilizes Rnr2 for cofactor assembly and activity.

  11. From Homodimer to Heterodimer and Back: Elucidating the TonB Energy Transduction Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gresock, Michael G.; Kastead, Kyle A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The TonB system actively transports large, scarce, and important nutrients through outer membrane (OM) transporters of Gram-negative bacteria using the proton gradient of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). In Escherichia coli, the CM proteins ExbB and ExbD harness and transfer proton motive force energy to the CM protein TonB, which spans the periplasmic space and cyclically binds OM transporters. TonB has two activity domains: the amino-terminal transmembrane domain with residue H20 and the periplasmic carboxy terminus, through which it binds to OM transporters. TonB is inactivated by all substitutions at residue H20 except H20N. Here, we show that while TonB trapped as a homodimer through its amino-terminal domain retained full activity, trapping TonB through its carboxy terminus inactivated it by preventing conformational changes needed for interaction with OM transporters. Surprisingly, inactive TonB H20A had little effect on homodimerization through the amino terminus and instead decreased TonB carboxy-terminal homodimer formation prior to reinitiation of an energy transduction cycle. That result suggested that the TonB carboxy terminus ultimately interacts with OM transporters as a monomer. Our findings also suggested the existence of a separate equimolar pool of ExbD homodimers that are not in contact with TonB. A model is proposed where interaction of TonB homodimers with ExbD homodimers initiates the energy transduction cycle, and, ultimately, the ExbD carboxy terminus modulates interactions of a monomeric TonB carboxy terminus with OM transporters. After TonB exchanges its interaction with ExbD for interaction with a transporter, ExbD homodimers undergo a separate cycle needed to re-energize them. IMPORTANCE Canonical mechanisms of active transport across cytoplasmic membranes employ ion gradients or hydrolysis of ATP for energy. Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes lack these resources. The TonB system embodies a novel means of active transport

  12. Encapsulation and Characterization of Proton-Bound Amine Homodimers in a Water Soluble, Self-Assembled Supramolecular Host

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael; Fiedler, Dorothea; Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    Cyclic amines can be encapsulated in a water-soluble self-assembled supramolecular host upon protonation. The hydrogen bonding ability of the cyclic amines, as well as the reduced degrees of rotational freedom, allows for the formation of proton-bound homodimers inside of the assembly which are otherwise not observable in aqueous solution. The generality of homodimer formation was explored with small N-alkyl aziridines, azetidines, pyrrolidines and piperidines. Proton-bound homodimer formation is observed for N-alkylaziridines (R = methyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl), N-alkylazetidines (R = isopropyl, tertbutyl), and N-methylpyrrolidine. At high concentration, formation of a proton-bound homotrimer is observed in the case of N-methylaziridine. The homodimers stay intact inside the assembly over a large concentration range, thereby suggesting cooperative encapsulation. Both G3(MP2)B3 and G3B3 calculations of the proton-bound homodimers were used to investigate the enthalpy of the hydrogen bond in the proton-bound homodimers and suggest that the enthalpic gain upon formation of the proton-bound homodimers may drive guest encapsulation.

  13. HorC, a hop-resistance related protein, presumably functions in homodimer form.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Asano, Shizuka; Ogata, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2009-08-01

    To determine whether two HorC molecules coordinately form a single unit, the functional properties of covalently linked dimers of HorC encoded by tandemly fused horC genes were studied. Lactobacillus brevis introduced with the fused horC genes and a single horC gene exhibited same degree of resistance to hop compounds and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. This suggests that HorC functions as a homodimer.

  14. Modulation of the FGF14:FGF14 homodimer interaction through short peptide fragments

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed; Shavkunov, Alexander; Panova, Neli; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Laezza, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) is a member of the intracellular FGF (iFGFs) family and a functionally relevant component of the neuronal voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel complex. Through a monomeric interaction with the intracellular C-terminus of neuronal Nav channels, FGF14 modulates Na+ currents in an Nav isoform-specific manner serving as a fine-tuning regulator of excitability. Previous studies based on the highly homologous FGF13 homodimer crystal structure have proposed a conserved protein:protein interaction (PPI) interface common to both Nav channel binding and iFGF homodimer formation. This interface could provide a novel target for drug design against neuronal Nav channels. Here, we provide the first in-cell reconstitution of the FGF14:FGF14 protein complex and measure the dimer interaction using the split-luciferase complementation assay (LCA). Based on the FGF14 dimer structure generated in silico, we designed short peptide fragments against the FGF14 dimer interface. One of these fragments, FLPK aligns with the pocket defined by the β12-strand and β8-β9 loop, reducing the FGF14:FGF14 dimer interaction by 25% as measured by LCA. We further compared the relative interaction strength of FGF14 wild type homodimers with FGF14 hetero- and homodimers carrying double N mutations at the Y153 and V155 residues, located at the β8-β9 loop. The Y153N/V155N double mutation counteracts the FLPK effect by increasing the strength of the dimer interaction. These data suggest that the β12 strand of FGF14 might serve as scaffold for drug design against neuronal FGF14 dimers and Nav channels. PMID:25426956

  15. Assembly of Bak homodimers into higher order homooligomers in the mitochondrial apoptotic pore

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Tirtha; Shin, Seungjin; Aluvila, Sreevidya; Chen, Hui-Chen; Grieve, Carter; Choe, Jun-Yong; Cheng, Emily H.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondrial apoptosis, Bak is activated by death signals to form pores of unknown structure on the mitochondrial outer membrane via homooligomerization. Cytochrome c and other apoptotic factors are released from the intermembrane space through these pores, initiating downstream apoptosis events. Using chemical crosslinking and double electron electron resonance (DEER)-derived distance measurements between specific structural elements in Bak, here we clarify how the Bak pore is assembled. We propose that previously described BH3-in-groove homodimers (BGH) are juxtaposed via the ‘α3/α5’ interface, in which the C-termini of helices α3 and α5 are in close proximity between two neighboring Bak homodimers. This interface is observed concomitantly with the well-known ‘α6:α6’ interface. We also mapped the contacts between Bak homodimers and the lipid bilayer based on EPR spectroscopy topology studies. Our results suggest a model for the lipidic Bak pore, whereby the mitochondrial targeting C-terminal helix does not change topology to accommodate the lining of the pore lumen by BGH. PMID:27488021

  16. Muscle dimensions in the Japanese macaque hand.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Oishi, Motoharu

    2012-10-01

    Macaques have been used as an important paradigm for understanding the neural control mechanisms of human precision grip capabilities. Therefore, we dissected the forearms and hands of two male Japanese macaques to systematically record the muscle mass, fascicle length and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA). Comparisons of the mass fractions and PCSA fractions of the hand musculature among the Japanese macaque, chimpanzee, and human demonstrated that the sizes of the thenar and hypothenar eminence muscle groups are more balanced in the macaque and chimpanzee, but those of the thenar eminence group are much larger in the human, indicating that the capacity to generate force at the tip of the thumb is more restricted in macaques, despite their high manual dexterity. In the macaque, however, the extrinsic flexor muscles are much larger, possibly to facilitate weight bearing by the forelimbs in pronograde quadrupedal locomotion and forceful grasping of arboreal supports in gap-crossing movements such as leaping. Taking such anatomical differences imposed on the hand musculoskeletal system into consideration seems to be an important method of clarifying the mechanisms of precision grip in macaques.

  17. Evaluation of a technetium-99m labeled bombesin homodimer for GRPR imaging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zilin; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Ananias, Hildo J K; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Liu, Shuang; Helfrich, Wijnand; Wang, Fan; de Jong, Igle J; Elsinga, Philip H

    2013-02-01

    Multimerization of peptides can improve the binding characteristics of the tracer by increasing local ligand concentration and decreasing dissociation kinetics. In this study, a new bombesin homodimer was developed based on an ε-aminocaproic acid-bombesin(7-14) (Aca-bombesin(7-14)) fragment, which has been studied for targeting the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in prostate cancer. The bombesin homodimer was conjugated to 6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC) and labeled with (99m)Tc for SPECT imaging. The in vitro binding affinity to GRPR, cell uptake, internalization and efflux kinetics of the radiolabeled bombesin dimer were investigated in the GRPR-expressing human prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Biodistribution and the GRPR-targeting potential were evaluated in PC-3 tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. When compared with the bombesin monomer, the binding affinity of the bombesin dimer is about ten times lower. However, the (99m)Tc labeled bombesin dimer showed a three times higher cellular uptake at 4 h after incubation, but similar internalization and efflux characters in vitro. Tumor uptake and in vivo pharmacokinetics in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice were comparable. The tumor was visible on the dynamic images in the first hour and could be clearly distinguished from non-targeted tissues on the static images after 4 h. The GRPR-targeting ability of the (99m)Tc labeled bombesin dimer was proven in vitro and in vivo. This bombesin homodimer provides a good starting point for further studies on enhancing the tumor targeting activity of bombesin multimers.

  18. Macaque-human interactions and the societal perceptions of macaques in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Sha, John Chih Mun; Gumert, Michael D; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Chan, Sharon; Fuentes, Agustín

    2009-10-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human-macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human-macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows people

  19. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability.

  20. Tonkean macaques communicate with their right hand.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Hélène; Fizet, Jonas; Vauclair, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    There are two conflicting hypotheses to explain the origins of language. Vocal origin theory states that language results from the gradual evolution of animals' vocal communication, but gestural origin theory considers that language evolved from gestures, with the initial left-hemispheric control of manual gestures gradually encompassing vocalizations. To contribute to this debate, we investigated functional hemispheric specialization related to hand biases when grasping or showing an object through manual gesture in Tonkean macaques. The results of this study, the first quantitative study on Tonkean macaques' handedness, showed a remarkable convergence of the Tonkean macaques' handedness patterns with those of baboons and human infants, with hand preferences for manual communicative gestures significantly favoring the use of the right hand. Our findings support the hypothesis that left hemispheric lateralization for language is derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of macaques, baboons and humans.

  1. Sexual partner preference in female Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Paul L

    2002-02-01

    Whether animals ever exhibit a preference for same-sex sexual partners is a subject of debate. Japanese macaques represent excellent models for examining issues related to sexual preference in animals because females, in certain populations, routinely engage in both heterosexual and homosexual behavior over the course of their life spans. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that female homosexual behavior in Japanese macaques is a sexual behavior, not a sociosexual one. Additional evidence indicates that female Japanese macaques do not engage in homosexual behavior simply because acceptable male mates are unavailable or unmotivated to copulate. Patterns of sexual partner choice by female Japanese macaques that are the focus of intersexual competition indicate that females of this species choose same-sex sexual partners even when they are simultaneously presented with a motivated, opposite-sex alternative. Thus, in some populations of Japanese macaques, females prefer certain same-sex sexual partners relative to certain male mates, and vice versa. Taken together, this evidence suggests that female Japanese macaques are best characterized as bisexual in orientation, not preferentially homosexual or preferentially heterosexual.

  2. An aerosol challenge model of tuberculosis in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, S. A.; White, A. D.; Sibley, L.; Gleeson, F.; Hall, G. A.; Basaraba, R. J.; McIntyre, A.; Clark, S. O.; Gooch, K.; Marsh, P. D.; Williams, A.; Dennis, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background New interventions for tuberculosis are urgently needed. Non-human primate (NHP) models provide the most relevant pre-clinical models of human disease and play a critical role in vaccine development. Models utilising Asian cynomolgus macaque populations are well established but the restricted genetic diversity of the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques may be of added value. Methods Mauritian cynomolgus macaques were exposed to a range of doses of M. tuberculosis delivered by aerosol, and the outcome was assessed using clinical, imaging and pathology-based measures. Results All macaques developed characteristic clinical signs and disease features of tuberculosis (TB). Disease burden and the ability to control disease were dependent on exposure dose. Mauritian cynomolgus macaques showed less variation in pulmonary disease burden and total gross pathology scores within exposure dose groups than either Indian rhesus macaques or Chinese cynomolgus macaques Conclusions The genetic homogeneity of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques makes them a potentially useful model of human tuberculosis. PMID:28273087

  3. Spectral-luminescent and photochemical characteristics of homodimers of the styrylcyanine dye Sbt in solutions.

    PubMed

    Kurtaliev, Eldar N

    2011-10-15

    The influence of concentration, solvent nature on the intermolecular interaction and its spectroscopic manifestations in solutions of styrylcyanine dye Sbt ((E)-2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-3-ium iodide) and its homodimers, i.e. dyes with two interconnected chromophores, was studied. It was found out that, depending on the concentration, the structure of dye molecules, the nature of the solvent various forms of associated molecules are forms; each of these forms is manifested in the spectra of absorption and fluorescence in its own way. It is shown that the intensity of the main absorption band of the studied dyes in aqueous solutions and in a mixture of water+ethanol decreases in the process of light irradiation and a new band is observed in the region of shorter wavelengths; the intensity of the new band increases with increase of radiation exposure of solutions.

  4. Unique Pattern of Enzootic Primate Viruses in Gibraltar Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A.; Pizarro, Mark; Shaw, Eric; Cortes, John; Fuentes, Agustin; Barry, Peter; Lerche, Nicholas; Grant, Richard; Cohn, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Because Gibraltar's macaques (Macaca sylvanus) have frequent contact with humans, we assayed 79 macaques for antibodies to enzootic primate viruses. All macaques were seronegative for herpesvirus B, simian T-cell lymphotropic virus, simian retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and rhesus cytomegalovirus. Seroprevalence of simian foamy virus reached 88% among adult animals. PMID:18598634

  5. Faces and objects in macaque cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Knutsen, Tamara A; Mandeville, Joseph B; Tootell, Roger B H

    2003-09-01

    How are different object categories organized by the visual system? Current evidence indicates that monkeys and humans process object categories in fundamentally different ways. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that humans have a ventral temporal face area, but such evidence is lacking in macaques. Instead, face-responsive neurons in macaques seem to be scattered throughout temporal cortex, with some relative concentration in the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Here, using fMRI in alert fixating macaque monkeys and humans, we found that macaques do have discrete face-selective patches, similar in relative size and number to face patches in humans. The face patches were embedded within a large swath of object-selective cortex extending from V4 to rostral TE. This large region responded better to pictures of intact objects compared to scrambled objects, with different object categories eliciting different patterns of activity, as in the human. Overall, our results suggest that humans and macaques share a similar brain architecture for visual object processing.

  6. COUP-TF II homodimers are formed in preference to heterodimers with RXR alpha or TR beta in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, A J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor (COUP-TF) represses the transcriptional activity of a number of nuclear receptors, including that of retinoid receptors (RAR and RXR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR). Since COUP-TF is capable of binding to DNA in vitro either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with RXR or TR, it has not been possible to distinguish between competitive DNA binding and heterodimer formation as a mechanism to account for the repression. Using a two-hybrid system we have investigated the dimerisation properties of COUP-TF II in intact cells. In conditions where COUP-TF II homodimers and RXR alpha-RAR alpha heterodimers were formed we were unable to detect the formation of heterodimers between COUP-TF II and RXR alpha. Moreover, we were unable to detect an interaction between COUP-TF II and RXR alpha on DNA. Similarly COUP-TF II homodimers and RXR alpha-TR beta heterodimers are favoured over COUP-TF II-TR beta heterodimers. We conclude that the formation of functionally inactive heterodimers is unlikely to represent a general mechanism by which COUP-TF represses the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors and favour a model in which repression is mediated by COUP-TF homodimers competing for binding to DNA. Images PMID:7479078

  7. Heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits have different paracrine action in the modulation of luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, A.J.W.; Dahl, K.D.; Vaughan, J.; Tucker, E.; Rivier, J.; Bardin, C.W.; Vale, W.

    1987-07-01

    Inhibin, a gonadal hormone capable of preferential suppression of pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion, has recently been purified. The major form of this protein is an ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer encoded by two separate genes. In contrast to the FSH-suppressing action of the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer, the ..beta beta.. homodimer stimulates FSH secretion. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-secreting pituitary cells and gonadal androgen-producing cells have long been shown to form a closed-loop feedback axis. Based on recent studies demonstrated the FSH stimulation of inhibin biosynthesis by ovarian granulosa and testis Sertoli cells, an additional closed-loop feedback axis exists between pituitary FSH- and gonadal inhibin-producing cells. Because uncharacterized Sertoli cell factors have been suggested to either stimulate or inhibit androgen production by testicular Leydig cells, the authors have tested the intragonadal paracrine actions of heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits. In primary cultures of testis cells, the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer of inhibin enhances Leydig cell androgen biosynthesis stimulated by LH, whereas the ..beta beta.. homodimer suppresses androgen production. The data indicate that the inhibin-related gene products synthesized by Sertoli and granulosa cells may form heterodimers or homodimers to serve as intragonadal paracrine signals in the modulation of LH-stimulated androgen biosynthesis and allow cross-communication between the two feedback loops.

  8. Ambiguity aversion in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Benjamin Y; Heilbronner, Sarah R; Platt, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    People generally prefer risky options, which have fully specified outcome probabilities, to ambiguous options, which have unspecified probabilities. This preference, formalized in economics, is strong enough that people will reliably prefer a risky option to an ambiguous option with a greater expected value. Explanations for ambiguity aversion often invoke uniquely human faculties like language, self-justification, or a desire to avoid public embarrassment. Challenging these ideas, here we demonstrate that a preference for unambiguous options is shared with rhesus macaques. We trained four monkeys to choose between pairs of options that both offered explicitly cued probabilities of large and small juice outcomes. We then introduced occasional trials where one of the options was obscured and examined their resulting preferences; we ran humans in a parallel experiment on a nearly identical task. We found that monkeys reliably preferred risky options to ambiguous ones, even when this bias was costly, closely matching the behavior of humans in the analogous task. Notably, ambiguity aversion varied parametrically with the extent of ambiguity. As expected, ambiguity aversion gradually declined as monkeys learned the underlying probability distribution of rewards. These data indicate that ambiguity aversion reflects fundamental cognitive biases shared with other animals rather than uniquely human factors guiding decisions.

  9. Comparative Pathobiology of Macaque Lymphocryptoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G

    2008-01-01

    Lymphocryptoviruses (LCVs) have been identified as naturally occurring infections of both Old and New World nonhuman primates. These viruses are closely related to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, Human herpesvirus 4) and share similar genomic organization and biological properties. Nonhuman primate LCVs have the ability to immortalize host cells and express a similar complement of viral lytic and latent genes as those found in EBV. Recent evidence indicates that nonhuman primate LCVs can immortalize B cells from genetically related species, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between these viruses and their respective hosts. Early work with EBV in tamarins and owl monkeys revealed that cross species transmission of lymphocryptoviruses from the natural to inadvertent host may be associated with oncogenesis and the development of malignant lymphoma. Moreover, simian LCVs have the ability to induce malignant lymphomas in immunodeficient hosts and have been associated with posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease in cynomolgus macaques undergoing solid organ transplantation. This review will focus on the comparative pathobiology of lymphocryptoviral infection and discuss the derivation of specific pathogen-free animals. PMID:19793458

  10. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Erin A.; Olson, Carl R.

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system. PMID:26067532

  11. A stable double-stranded DNA-ethidium homodimer complex: application to picogram fluorescence detection of DNA in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, A N; Peck, K; Mathies, R A

    1990-01-01

    The complex between double-stranded DNA and ethidium homodimer (5,5'-diazadecamethylene)bis(3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridini um) cation, formed at a ratio of 1 homodimer per 4 or 5 base pairs, is stable in agarose gels under the usual conditions for electrophoresis. This unusual stability allows formation of the complex before electrophoresis and then separation and detection in the absence of background stain. Competition experiments between the preformed DNA-ethidium homodimer complex and a 50-fold molar excess of unlabeled DNA show that approximately one-third of the dye is retained within the original complex independent of the duration of the competition. However, dye-extraction experiments show that these are not covalent complexes. After electrophoretic separation, detection of bands containing 25 pg of DNA was readily achieved in 1-mm thick agarose gels with laser excitation at 488 nm and a scanning confocal fluorescence imaging system. The band intensity was linear with the amount of DNA applied from 0.2 to 1.0 ng per lane and with the number of kilobase pairs (kbp) per band within a lane. Analysis of an aliquot of a polymerase-chain-reaction mixture permitted ready detection of 80 pg of a 1.6-kbp amplified fragment. The use of the ethidium homodimer complex together with laser excitation for DNA detection on gels is at least two orders of magnitude more sensitive than conventional fluorescence-based procedures. The homodimer-DNA complex exemplifies a class of fluorescent probes where the intercalation of dye chromophores in DNA forms a stable, highly fluorescent ensemble. Images PMID:2339125

  12. A stable double-stranded DNA-ethidium homodimer complex: Application to picogram fluorescence detection of DNA in agarose gels

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA ); Peck, K. )

    1990-05-01

    The complex between double-stranded DNA and ethidium homodimer (5,5{prime}-diazadecamethylene)bis(3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridinium) cation, formed at a ratio of 1 homodimer per 4 or 5 base pairs, is stable in agarose gels under the usual conditions for electrophoresis. This unusual stability allows formation of the complex before electrophoresis and then separation and detection in the absence of background stain. Competition experiments between the performed DNA-ethidium homodimer complex and a 50-fold molar excess of unlabeled DNA show that approximately one-third of the dye is retained within the original complex independent of the duration of the competition. However, dye-extraction experiments show that these are not covalent complexes. After electrophoretic separation, detection of bands containing 25 pg of DNA was readily achieved in 1-mm thick agarose gels with laser excitation at 488 nm and a scanning confocal fluorescence imaging system. The band intensity was linear with the amount of DNA applied from 0.2 to 1.0 ng per lane and with the number of kilobase pairs (kbp) per band within a lane. Analysis of an aliquot of a polymerase-chain-reaction mixture permitted ready detection of 80 pg of a 1.6-kbp amplified fragment. The use of the ethidium homodimer complex together with laser excitation for DNA detection on gels is at least two orders of magnitude more sensitive than conventional fluorescence-based procedures. The homodimer-DNA complex exemplifies a class of fluorescent probes where the intercalation of dye chromophores in DNA forms a stable, highly fluorescent ensemble.

  13. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-06-14

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  14. Insect Neuropeptide Bursicon Homodimers Induce Innate Immune and Stress Genes during Molting by Activating the NF-κB Transcription Factor Relish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Gilbert, Lawrence I.; Stanley, David; Song, Qisheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Bursicon is a heterodimer neuropeptide composed of two cystine knot proteins, bursicon α (burs α) and bursicon β (burs β), that elicits cuticle tanning (melanization and sclerotization) through the Drosophila leucine-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor 2 (DLGR2). Recent studies show that both bursicon subunits also form homodimers. However, biological functions of the homodimers have remained unknown until now. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we show in Drosophila melanogaster that both bursicon homodimers induced expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in neck-ligated adults following recombinant homodimer injection and in larvae fat body after incubation with recombinant homodimers. These AMP genes were also up-regulated in 24 h old unligated flies (when the endogenous bursicon level is low) after injection of recombinant homodimers. Up-regulation of AMP genes by the homodimers was accompanied by reduced bacterial populations in fly assay preparations. The induction of AMP expression is via activation of the NF-κB transcription factor Relish in the immune deficiency (Imd) pathway. The influence of bursicon homodimers on immune function does not appear to act through the heterodimer receptor DLGR2, i.e. novel receptors exist for the homodimers. Conclusions/Significance Our results reveal a mechanism of CNS-regulated prophylactic innate immunity during molting via induced expression of genes encoding AMPs and genes of the Turandot family. Turandot genes are also up-regulated by a broader range of extreme insults. From these data we infer that CNS-generated bursicon homodimers mediate innate prophylactic immunity to both stress and infection during the vulnerable molting cycle. PMID:22470576

  15. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  16. Regulation of the PI3K pathway through a p85α monomer–homodimer equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Lydia WT; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Besong, Tabot MD; Guo, Huifang; Hawke, David H; Arold, Stefan T; Mills, Gordon B

    2015-01-01

    The canonical action of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is to associate with the p110α catalytic subunit to allow stimuli-dependent activation of the PI3K pathway. We elucidate a p110α-independent role of homodimerized p85α in the positive regulation of PTEN stability and activity. p110α-free p85α homodimerizes via two intermolecular interactions (SH3:proline-rich region and BH:BH) to selectively bind unphosphorylated activated PTEN. As a consequence, homodimeric but not monomeric p85α suppresses the PI3K pathway by protecting PTEN from E3 ligase WWP2-mediated proteasomal degradation. Further, the p85α homodimer enhances the lipid phosphatase activity and membrane association of PTEN. Strikingly, we identified cancer patient-derived oncogenic p85α mutations that target the homodimerization or PTEN interaction surface. Collectively, our data suggest the equilibrium of p85α monomer–dimers regulates the PI3K pathway and disrupting this equilibrium could lead to disease development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06866.001 PMID:26222500

  17. Identification and characterization of a novel splice variant of rhesus macaque MHC IA.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zhang, Xi-He; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2013-03-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules play a pivotal role in the immune recognition to intracellular pathogens. A number of important splice variants have already been characterized for these molecules in different species, suggesting their important roles in modulation of immune responses. In this study, we have identified and characterized a novel alternatively spliced form of rhesus macaque MHC IA (designated MHC IA-sv2) that lacks exons coding for the α2 and α3 domains. Despite lacking the α2 and α3 domains, MHC IA-sv2 is targeted to the cell surface, as a 23-kDa glycoprotein that is totally susceptible to endoglycosidase-H digestion and is reduced to 18kDa after deglycosylation with PNGase F. In contrast, the full-length MHC IA reaches the cell surface as a 43-kDa protein of form with complex-type N-glycosylation (endoglycosidase-H resistant). Moreover, we provide evidence here that MHC IA-sv2 can self-associate, forming homodimers, or associate with the fully mature MHC IA molecule, forming a heterodimeric structure in mammalian cells. These data demonstrate that the formation of heterodimers may have some functional implications in the fine tuning of MHC IA-mediated innate and adaptive immune responses.

  18. Camptomelia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hopper, Kelly; Morales, Pablo; Garcia, Anapatricia; Wagner, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    An 8.5-mo-old female rhesus macaque was examined for an apparent lump on the right arm, below the elbow. The macaque showed no signs of pain or discomfort. Examination revealed that the lump was actually a bend in the forearm. Radiography demonstrated that some of the long bones of the animal were bowed. Differential diagnoses included rickets, hyperparathyroidism, pseudohyperparathyroidism, and a growth dysplasia. No other similar abnormalities in animals from that cage or any other enclosure in our large colony were observed. Blood chemistries and a complete hemogram were within normal limits for a macaque of this age. Serum was submitted for a vitamin D profile that included assays for parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and ionized calcium. Serum samples from sex- and age-matched normal controls were sent for comparison and to establish a baseline profile. The affected animal had vitamin D levels comparable to unaffected controls. Bone biopsies appeared normal for a macaque of this age. Fluorine levels in the drinking water supply were within acceptable limits. Consistent with the information available, a diagnosis of idiopathic camptomelia, or bowing of the long bones, was made. In humans, developmental camptomelia is associated with several bone dysplasias in infants and children. These conditions are thought to be caused by genetic mutations in enzymes or transcription factors that control development of the epiphyses and are almost always associated with other lethal and nonlethal developmental abnormalities.

  19. Personality structure and social style in macaques.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark James; Majolo, Bonaventura; Ostner, Julia; Schülke, Oliver; De Marco, Arianna; Thierry, Bernard; Engelhardt, Antje; Widdig, Anja; Gerald, Melissa S; Weiss, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Why regularities in personality can be described with particular dimensions is a basic question in differential psychology. Nonhuman primates can also be characterized in terms of personality structure. Comparative approaches can help reveal phylogenetic constraints and social and ecological patterns associated with the presence or absence of specific personality dimensions. We sought to determine how different personality structures are related to interspecific variation in social style. Specifically, we examined this question in 6 different species of macaques, because macaque social style is well characterized and can be categorized on a spectrum of despotic (Grade 1) versus tolerant (Grade 4) social styles. We derived personality structures from adjectival ratings of Japanese (Macaca fuscata; Grade 1), Assamese (M. assamensis; Grade 2), Barbary (M. sylvanus; Grade 3), Tonkean (M. tonkeana; Grade 4), and crested (M. nigra; Grade 4) macaques and compared these species with rhesus macaques (M. mulatta; Grade 1) whose personality was previously characterized. Using a nonparametric method, fuzzy set analysis, to identify commonalities in personality dimensions across species, we found that all but 1 species exhibited consistently defined Friendliness and Openness dimensions, but that similarities in personality dimensions capturing aggression and social competence reflect similarities in social styles. These findings suggest that social and phylogenetic relationships contribute to the origin, maintenance, and diversification of personality.

  20. Apelin receptor homodimer-oligomers revealed by single-molecule imaging and novel G protein-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Bai, Bo; Zhang, Rumin; Wang, Chunmei; Chen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The apelin receptor (APJ) belongs to family A of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and is a potential pharmacotherapeutic target for heart failure, hypertension, and other cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence APJ heterodimerizes with other GPCRs; however, the existence of APJ homodimers and oligomers remains to be investigated. Here, we measured APJ monomer-homodimer-oligomer interconversion by monitoring APJ dynamically on cells and compared their proportions, spatial arrangement, and mobility using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, resonance energy transfer, and proximity biotinylation. In cells with <0.3 receptor particles/μm2, approximately 60% of APJ molecules were present as dimers or oligomers. APJ dimers were present on the cell surface in a dynamic equilibrium with constant formation and dissociation of receptor complexes. Furthermore, we applied interference peptides and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to confirm APJ homo-dimer and explore the dimer-interfaces. Peptides corresponding to transmembrane domain (TMD)1, 2, 3, and 4, but not TMD5, 6, and 7, disrupted APJ dimerization. APJ mutants in TMD1 and TMD2 also decreased bioluminescence resonance energy transfer of APJ dimer. APJ dimerization resulted in novel functional characteristics, such as a distinct G-protein binding profile and cell responses after agonist stimulation. Thus, dimerization may serve as a unique mechanism for fine-tuning APJ-mediated functions. PMID:28091541

  1. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A.

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  2. Cholate-solubilized erythrocyte glucose transporters exist as a mixture of homodimers and homotetramers.

    PubMed

    Hebert, D N; Carruthers, A

    1991-05-14

    The molecular size of purified, human erythrocyte glucose transport protein (GLUT1) solubilized in cholic acid was determined by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. GLUT1 purified in the presence of dithiothreitol (GLUT1 + DTT) is resolved as a complex of average Stokes' radius 5.74 nm by SEC. This complex displays D-glucose-inhibitable cytochalasin B binding and, upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, catalyzes cytochalasin B inhibitable D-glucose transport. GLUT1 purified in the absence of dithiothreitol (GLUT1-DTT) is resolved by SEC as at least two particles of average Stokes' radii 5.74 (minor component) and 7.48 nm (major component). Solubilization of GLUT1-DTT in the presence of dithiothreitol reduces the amount of 7.48-nm complex and increases the amount of 5.74-nm complex resolved by SEC. GLUT1-DTT displays D-glucose-inhibitable cytochalasin B binding and, upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, catalyzes cytochalasin B inhibitable D-glucose transport. Sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation of GLUT1 + DTT in cholate resolves GLUT1 into two components of 4.8 and 7.6 S. The 4.8S complex is the major component of GLUT1 + DTT. The reverse profile is observed upon sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation of GLUT1-DTT. SEC of human erythrocyte membrane proteins resolves GLUT1 as a major broad peak of average Stokes' radius 7.48 nm and a minor component of 5.74 nm. Both components are characterized by D-glucose-inhibitable cytochalasin B binding. Purified GLUT1 is associated with approximately 26 tightly bound lipid molecules per monomer of transport protein. These data suggest that purified GLUT1 exists as a mixture of homodimers and homotetramers in cholate-lipid micelles and that the presence of reductant during solubilization favors dimer formation.

  3. MHC class I characterization of Indonesian cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pendley, Chad J.; Becker, Ericka A.; Karl, Julie A.; Blasky, Alex J.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Hughes, Austin L.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; O’Connor, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are quickly becoming a useful model for infectious disease and transplantation research. Even though cynomolgus macaques from different geographic regions are used for these studies, there has been limited characterization of full-length Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I immunogenetics of distinct geographic populations. Here, we identified 48 MHC class I cDNA nucleotide sequences in eleven Indonesian cynomolgus macaques, including 41 novel Mafa-A and Mafa-B sequences. We found seven MHC class I sequences in Indonesian macaques that were identical to MHC class I sequences identified in Malaysian or Mauritian macaques. Sharing of nucleotide sequences between these geographically distinct populations is also consistent with the hypothesis that Indonesia was a source of the Mauritian macaque population. In addition, we found that the Indonesian cDNA sequence Mafa-B*7601 is identical throughout its peptide binding domain to Mamu-B*03, an allele that has been associated with control of SIV viremia in Indian rhesus macaques. Overall, a better understanding of the MHC class I alleles present in Indonesian cynomolgus macaques improves their value as a model for disease research and it better defines the biogeography of cynomolgus macaques throughout Southeast Asia. PMID:18504574

  4. Development of Object Concepts in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Scott P.; Price, Tracy A.; Vance, Jayme A.; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    One of the most interesting questions in cognitive development is how we acquire and mentally represent knowledge about objects. We investigated the development of object concepts in macaque monkeys. Monkeys viewed trajectory occlusion movies in which a ball followed a linear path that was occluded for some portion of the display while their point of gaze was recorded with a corneal-reflection eye tracker. We analyzed the pattern of eye movements as an indicator of object representation. A majority of eye movements of adult monkeys were anticipatory, implying a functional internal object representation that guided oculomotor behavior. The youngest monkeys lacked this strong internal representation of objects. Longitudinal testing showed that this ability develops over time providing compelling evidence that object concepts develop similarly in monkeys and humans. Therefore, the macaque monkey provides an animal model with which to examine neural mechanisms underlying the development of object representations. PMID:18335495

  5. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2009-03-15

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 A resolution to R{sub work} = 16.1% and R{sub free} = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 A, 1.042{sup o}, and 0.071{sup o}, respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 A. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 A. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K{sup +} ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  6. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 Å resolution to R work = 16.1% and R free = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 Å, 1.042°, and 0.071°, respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 Å. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 Å. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K+ ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  7. Symmetry perception in humans and macaques.

    PubMed

    Beck, Diane M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    The human ability to detect symmetry has been a topic of interest to psychologists and philosophers since the 19th century, yet surprisingly little is known about the neural basis of symmetry perception. In a recent fMRI study, Sasaki and colleagues begin to remedy this situation. By identifying the neural structures that respond to symmetry in both humans and macaques, the authors lay the groundwork for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying symmetry perception.

  8. Characterization of Corynebacterium species in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Jaime; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Marini, Robert P.; Shen, Zeli; Buckley, Ellen M.; Peters, Yaicha; Taylor, Nancy; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Tondella, Maria L.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Corynebacterium are important primary and opportunistic pathogens. Many are zoonotic agents. In this report, phenotypic (API Coryne analysis), genetic (rpoB and 16S rRNA gene sequencing), and physical methods (MS) were used to distinguish the closely related diphtheroid species Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, and to definitively diagnose Corynebacterium renale from cephalic implants of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques used in cognitive neuroscience research. Throat and cephalic implant cultures yielded 85 isolates from 43 macaques. Identification by API Coryne yielded C. ulcerans (n = 74), Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (n = 2), C. renale or most closely related to C. renale (n = 3), and commensals and opportunists (n = 6). The two isolates identified as C. pseudotuberculosis by API Coryne required genetic and MS analysis for accurate characterization as C. ulcerans. Of three isolates identified as C. renale by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only one could be confirmed as such by API Coryne, rpoB gene sequencing and MS. This study emphasizes the importance of adjunct methods in identification of coryneforms and is the first isolation of C. renale from cephalic implants in macaques. PMID:22723254

  9. Serial Cognition and Personality in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Altschul, Drew M.; Terrace, Herbert S.; Weiss, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We examined the associations between serial cognition and personality in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Nine macaques were tested on a simultaneous chaining task to assess their cognitive abilities. They were also rated for personality traits and scored according to a previously extracted six component structure derived from free-ranging rhesus macaques. Friendliness and Openness were positively associated with good performance on three measures of accuracy on the serial learning task: Progress, Error, and Rewarded (i.e., correctly completed) Trials. Faster Reaction Times were associated with lower Friendliness and higher Confidence, as well as higher Openness when only correct responses were analyzed. We also used regularized exploratory factor analysis to extract two, three, four, five, and six factor structures, and found consistent associations between accuracy and single factors within each of these structures. Prior results on intelligence in other nonhuman primate species have focused on basic intelligence tests; this study demonstrates that more complex, abstract cognitive tasks can be used to assess intelligence and personality in nonhuman primates. PMID:27158661

  10. Cooperative Signaling between Homodimers of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 1 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Sevastyanova, Tatyana N.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) function as dimers. Recent work suggests that mGluR1 and mGluR5 may physically interact, but the nature and functional consequences of this relationship have not been addressed. In this study, the functional and pharmacological consequences of this interaction were investigated. Using heterologous expression of mGluR cDNA in rat sympathetic neurons from the superior cervical ganglion and inhibition of the native calcium currents as an assay for receptor activation, a functional interdependence between mGluR1 and mGluR5 was demonstrated. In neurons coexpressing these receptors, combining a selective mGluR1 competitive antagonist with either an mGluR1- or mGluR5-selective negative allosteric modulator (NAM) BAY36-7620 [(3aS,6aS)-hexahydro-5-methylene-6a-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-1H-cyclopenta[c]furan-1-one] or MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride], respectively, strongly occluded signaling by both receptors to an approximately equal degree. By contrast, in cells coexpressing mGluR1 and mGluR2, combining the same mGluR1 competitive inhibitor with an mGluR1 or mGluR2 NAM yielded partial and full inhibition of the response, respectively, as expected for independently acting receptors. In neurons expressing mGluR1 and mGluR5, the selective NAMs each strongly inhibited the response to glutamate, suggesting that these receptors do not interact as heterodimers, which would not be inhibited by selective NAMs. Finally, evidence for a similar mGluR1/mGluR5 functional dependence is shown in medium spiny striatal neurons. Together, these data demonstrate cooperative signaling between mGluR1 and mGluR5 in a manner inconsistent with heterodimerization, and thus suggest an interaction between homodimers. PMID:25113912

  11. Juxtaarticular Myxoma in a Pigtail Macaque (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Brianna L; Johnson, Crystal H; Lacy, Shannon H

    2016-01-01

    A 10-y-old pigtail macaque presented with a subcutaneous, soft-tissue mass overlying the right stifle joint. Here we describe the clinical case and histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of this lesion. This case represents the first published report of juxtaarticular myxoma in a pigtail macaque. PMID:27780010

  12. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, R; Bellanca, R U; Lee, G H; Thom, J P; Worlein, J M

    2014-04-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic, and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions.

  13. The Ability to Form Homodimers Is Essential for RDM1 to Function in RNA-Directed DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Taku; Lorković, Zdravko J.; Liang, Shih-Chieh; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-01-01

    RDM1 (RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION1) is a small plant-specific protein required for RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). RDM1 interacts with RNA polymerase II (Pol II), ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4), and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE2 (DRM2) and binds to methylated single stranded DNA. As the only protein identified so far that interacts directly with DRM2, RDM1 plays a pivotal role in the RdDM mechanism by linking the de novo DNA methyltransferase activity to AGO4, which binds short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that presumably base-pair with Pol II or Pol V scaffold transcripts synthesized at target loci. RDM1 also acts together with the chromatin remodeler DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION1 (DRD1) and the structural-maintenance-of-chromosomes solo hinge protein DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING3 (DMS3) to form the DDR complex, which facilitates synthesis of Pol V scaffold transcripts. The manner in which RDM1 acts in both the DDR complex and as a factor bridging DRM2 and AGO4 remains unclear. RDM1 contains no known protein domains but a prior structural analysis suggested distinct regions that create a hydrophobic pocket and promote homodimer formation, respectively. We have tested several mutated forms of RDM1 altered in the predicted pocket and dimerization regions for their ability to complement defects in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing, support synthesis of Pol V transcripts, form homodimers, and interact with DMS3. Our results indicate that the ability to form homodimers is essential for RDM1 to function fully in the RdDM pathway and may be particularly important during the de novo methylation step. PMID:24498436

  14. Comparing face patch systems in macaques and humans.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Moeller, Sebastian; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2008-12-09

    Face recognition is of central importance for primate social behavior. In both humans and macaques, the visual analysis of faces is supported by a set of specialized face areas. The precise organization of these areas and the correspondence between individual macaque and human face-selective areas are debated. Here, we examined the organization of face-selective regions across the temporal lobe in a large number of macaque and human subjects. Macaques showed 6 regions of face-selective cortex arranged in a stereotypical pattern along the temporal lobe. Human subjects showed, in addition to 3 reported face areas (the occipital, fusiform, and superior temporal sulcus face areas), a face-selective area located anterior to the fusiform face area, in the anterior collateral sulcus. These results suggest a closer anatomical correspondence between macaque and human face-processing systems than previously realized.

  15. The active form of the norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a homodimer with cooperative activity.

    PubMed

    Högbom, Martin; Jäger, Katrin; Robel, Ivonne; Unge, Torsten; Rohayem, Jacques

    2009-02-01

    Norovirus (NV) is a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide and a major public health concern. So far, the replication strategy of NV remains poorly understood, mainly because of the lack of a cell system to cultivate the virus. In this study, the function and the structure of a key viral enzyme of replication, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, NS7), was examined. The overall structure of the NV NS7 RdRp was determined by X-ray crystallography to a 2.3 A (0.23 nm) resolution (PDB ID 2B43), displaying a right-hand fold typical of the template-dependent polynucleotide polymerases. Biochemical analysis evidenced that NV NS7 RdRp is active as a homodimer, with an apparent K(d) of 0.649 microM and a positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient n(H)=1.86). Crystals of the NV NS7 homodimer displayed lattices containing dimeric arrangements with high shape complementarity statistics. This experimental data on the structure and function of the NV RdRp may set the cornerstone for the development of polymerase inhibitors to control the infection with NV, a medically relevant pathogen.

  16. ThWRKY4 from Tamarix hispida Can Form Homodimers and Heterodimers and Is Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liuqiang; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Chunrui; Wang, Yucheng; Lu, Mengzhu; Gao, Caiqiu

    2015-11-13

    WRKY proteins are a large family of transcription factors that are involved in diverse developmental processes and abiotic stress responses in plants. However, our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of WRKYs participation in protein-protein interactions is still fragmentary, and such protein-protein interactions are fundamental in understanding biological networks and the functions of proteins. In this study, we report that a WRKY protein from Tamarix hispida, ThWRKY4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers with ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3. In addition, ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 can both bind to W-box motif with binding affinities similar to that of ThWRKY4. Further, the expression patterns of ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 are similar to that of ThWRKY4 when plants are exposed to abscisic acid (ABA). Subcellular localization shows that these three ThWRKY proteins are nuclear proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ThWRKY4 is a dimeric protein that can form functional homodimers or heterodimers that are involved in abiotic stress responses.

  17. Crystal structure of endonuclease G in complex with DNA reveals how it nonspecifically degrades DNA as a homodimer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jason L. J.; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Yang, Wei-Zen; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is an evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial protein in eukaryotes that digests nucleus chromosomal DNA during apoptosis and paternal mitochondrial DNA during embryogenesis. Under oxidative stress, homodimeric EndoG becomes oxidized and converts to monomers with diminished nuclease activity. However, it remains unclear why EndoG has to function as a homodimer in DNA degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans EndoG homologue, CPS-6, in complex with single-stranded DNA at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Two separate DNA strands are bound at the ββα-metal motifs in the homodimer with their nucleobases pointing away from the enzyme, explaining why CPS-6 degrades DNA without sequence specificity. Two obligatory monomeric CPS-6 mutants (P207E and K131D/F132N) were constructed, and they degrade DNA with diminished activity due to poorer DNA-binding affinity as compared to wild-type CPS-6. Moreover, the P207E mutant exhibits predominantly 3′-to-5′ exonuclease activity, indicating a possible endonuclease to exonuclease activity change. Thus, the dimer conformation of CPS-6 is essential for maintaining its optimal DNA-binding and endonuclease activity. Compared to other non-specific endonucleases, which are usually monomeric enzymes, EndoG is a unique dimeric endonuclease, whose activity hence can be modulated by oxidation to induce conformational changes. PMID:27738134

  18. Niche separation of sympatric macaques, Macaca assamensis and M. mulatta, in limestone habitats of Nonggang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qihai; Wei, Hua; Tang, Huaxing; Huang, Zhonghao; Krzton, Ali; Huang, Chengming

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of sympatric species are essential in understanding those species' behavioral and ecological adaptations as well as the mechanisms that can reduce resource competition enough to allow coexistence. We collected data on diet, activity budget and habitat use from two sympatric macaque species, the Assamese macaque (Macaca assamensis) and the rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), in a limestone seasonal rainforest of Nonggang Nature Reserve, southwestern Guangxi, China. Our results show that the two sympatric macaques differ in diet, activity budget, and habitat use: (1) out of the 131 plant species that were used by both macaque species as food over the year, only 15 plant species (11 %) were shared. Rhesus macaques used more plant species as major foods, and had higher dietary diversity and evenness indexes than Assamese macaques. (2) Assamese macaques fed predominantly on leaves, whereas rhesus macaques fed more selectively on fruits. The rhesus macaques' diet varied according to season, and was significantly correlated to season fluctuation in fruit availability. (3) Assamese macaques devoted more time to resting, and less time to feeding than rhesus macaques (4) Assamese macaques were present mostly on the cliff, and tended to stay on the ground, whereas rhesus macaques were present mostly on the hillside, and showed preference to lower and middle canopy. The observed differences in diet and habitat use between the two macaque species represent behavioral patterns enabling their coexistence.

  19. Ulcerative cheilitis in a rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C C; Miller, A D

    2012-03-01

    A 2-year-old, female, simian immunodeficiency virus E543-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia due to a history of diarrhea, weight loss, and a small, round ulcer along the left labial commissure. Histopathologic examination of the ulcer revealed infiltration by large numbers of degenerate and nondegenerate neutrophils and macrophages admixed with syncytial epithelial cells. Rare epithelial cells contained herpetic inclusion bodies. These cells stained positive for Human herpesvirus 1 via immunohistochemistry, and DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of closely related Macacine herpesvirus 1 (B virus).

  20. Formation of retinoid X receptor homodimers leads to repression of T3 response: hormonal cross talk by ligand-induced squelching.

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Graupner, G; Lee, M O; Hermann, T; Hoffmann, B; Pfahl, M

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) form heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Heterodimerization is required for efficient TR DNA binding to most response elements and transcriptional activation by thyroid hormone. RXRs also function as auxiliary proteins for several other receptors. In addition, RXR alpha can be induced by specific ligands to form homodimers. Here we report that RXR-specific retinoids that induce RXR homodimers are effective repressors of the T3 response. We provide evidence that this repression by RXR-specific ligands occurs by sequestering of RXR from TR-RXR heterodimers into RXR homodimers. This ligand-induced squelching may represent an important mechanism by which RXR-specific retinoids and 9-cis retinoic acid mediate hormonal cross talk among a subfamily of nuclear receptors activated by structurally unrelated ligands. Images PMID:8246986

  1. SHIV Susceptibility Changes during the Menstrual Cycle of Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen N.; Henning, Tara; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica; Butler, Katherine; Adams, Debra R.; Guenthner, Patricia; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, James; Radzio, Jessica; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Dobard, Charles; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormonal changes during menstrual cycling may affect susceptibility to HIV. Methods We determined the SHIV acquisition time point in 43 cycling pigtail macaques infected by repeated vaginal virus exposures initiated randomly in the cycle. Results SHIV infection was first detected in the follicular phase in 38 macaques (88%), and in the luteal phase in 5 macaques (12%), indicating a statistically significant timing difference. Assuming a 7-day eclipse phase, most infections occurred during or following a high-progesterone period associated with menstruation, vaginal epithelium thinning and suppressed mucosal immunity. Conclusions This raises questions whether other high progesterone conditions (pregnancy, hormonal contraception) similarly affect HIV risk. PMID:24779484

  2. The function of Barbary macaque copulation calls.

    PubMed Central

    Semple, S

    1998-01-01

    In a wide variety of animal species, females produce vocalizations specific to mating contexts. It has been proposed that these copulation calls function to incite males to compete for access to the calling female. Two separate advantages of inciting male-male competition in this way have been put forward. The first suggests that as a result of calling, females are only mated by the highest ranking male in the vicinity (indirect mate choice hypothesis). The second proposes that copulation calling results in a female being mated by many males, thus promoting competition at the level of sperm (sperm competition hypothesis). In this paper, I give results from the first experimental study to test these hypotheses. Playback was used to examine the function of copulation calls of female Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in Gibraltar. Although rank did not affect lone males' likelihood of approaching copulation calls, when playbacks were given to pairs of males only the higher ranking individual approached. Moreover, females were mated significantly sooner after playback of their copulation call than after playback of a control stimulus. These results suggest that the copulation calls of female Barbary macaques play a key role in affecting patterns of male reproductive behaviour, not only providing an indirect mechanism of female choice, but also promoting sperm competition by reducing the interval between copulations. Potential fitness benefits of inciting male-male competition at these two levels are discussed. PMID:9523431

  3. The Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Sperm Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew; Polpitiya, Ashoka; Petritis, Konstantinos; Dorus, Steve; Karr, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics has facilitated sperm composition studies in several mammalian species but no studies have been undertaken in non-human primate species. Here we report the analysis of the 1247 proteins that comprise the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome (termed the MacSP). Comparative analysis with previously characterized mouse and human sperm proteomes reveals substantial levels of orthology (47% and 40% respectively) and widespread overlap of functional categories based on Gene Ontology analyses. Approximately 10% of macaque sperm genes (113/1247) are significantly under-expressed in the testis as compared with other tissues, which may reflect proteins specifically acquired during epididymal maturation. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses of three MacSP ADAMs (A-Disintegrin and Metalloprotease proteins), ADAM18-, 20- and 21-like, provides empirical support for sperm genes functioning in non-human primate taxa which have been subsequently lost in the lineages leading to humans. The MacSP contains proteasome proteins of the 20S core subunit, the 19S proteasome activator complex and an alternate proteasome activator PA200, raising the possibility that proteasome activity is present in mature sperm. Robust empirical characterization of the Rhesus sperm proteome should greatly expand the possibility for targeted molecular studies of spermatogenesis and fertilization in a commonly used model species for human infertility. PMID:23816990

  4. Serum Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) Concentrations in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) and Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) with Chronic Idiopathic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Izzi, Jessica M; Beck, Sarah E; Adams, Robert J; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Hutchinson, Eric K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea poses a significant threat to the health of NHP research colonies, and its primary etiology remains unclear. In macaques, the clinical presentation of intractable diarrhea and weight loss that are accompanied by inflammatory infiltrates within the gastrointestinal tract closely resembles inflammatory bowel disease of humans, dogs, and cats, in which low serum and tissue cobalamin (vitamin B12) levels are due to intestinal malabsorption. We therefore hypothesized that macaques with chronic idiopathic diarrhea (CID) have lower serum cobalamin concentrations than do healthy macaques. Here we measured serum cobalamin concentrations in both rhesus and pigtailed macaques with CID and compared them with those of healthy controls. Serum cobalamin levels were 2.5-fold lower in pigtailed macaques with CID than control animals but did not differ between rhesus macaques with CID and their controls. This finding supports the use of serum cobalamin concentration as an adjunct diagnostic tool in pigtailed macaques that present with clinical symptoms of chronic gastrointestinal disease. This use of serum vitamin B12 levels has implications for the future use of parenteral cobalamin supplementation to improve clinical outcomes in this species. PMID:27538863

  5. Homodimer of p50 (NF kappa B1) does not introduce a substantial directed bend into DNA according to three different experimental assays.

    PubMed Central

    Kuprash, D V; Rice, N R; Nedospasov, S A

    1995-01-01

    Transcription factors can distort the conformation of the DNA double helix upon binding to their target sites. Previously, studies utilizing circular permutation--electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggested that the homodimer of p50 (NF kappa B1), canonical NF-kappa B (p65-p50), as well as several non-canonical NF-kappa B/Rel complexes, may induce substantial DNA bending at the binding site. Here we have applied three additional experimental approaches, helical phasing analysis, minicircle binding and cyclization kinetics, and conclude that the homodimer of p50 introduces virtually no directed bend into the consensus kappa B sequences GGGACTTTCC or GGGAATTCCC. Images PMID:7885838

  6. Thermal and chemical unfolding pathways of PaSdsA1 sulfatase, a homo-dimer with topologically interlinked chains.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Goto, Yuji; Costas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms as to how interlinked proteins entangle and fold is a challenge. PaSdsA1 sulfatase is a homo-dimer containing two zinc atoms per monomer. The monomer chains are interlinked in a dimerization domain. To study the unfolding pathways denaturation experiments were performed. In the native protein three forms coexist in chemical equilibrium, each with a different number of zinc atoms. In the chemical unfolding of the holo-dimers the entanglement of the chains is preserved and acts as a 'folding seed', allowing the unfolding process to be reversible. Thermal irreversible unfolding of the holo-dimers favours dissociation, producing monomers that are SDS-stabilized. The thermal unfolding of these monomers is reversible. However, it is not possible to form dimers from unfolded monomers.

  7. Structure of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the native state at 1.9 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Pavlyuk, B. F.; Lashkov, A. A.; Seregina, T. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Vaĭnshteĭn, B. K.; Mikhaĭlov, A. M.

    2007-11-01

    Uridine phosphorylase ( UPh) belongs to pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases. This enzyme catalyzes cleavage of the C-N glycoside bond in uridine to form uracil and ribose-1’-phosphate. Uridine phosphorylase supplies cells with nucleotide precursors by catalyzing the phosphorolysis of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides. This is an alternative to de novo nucleotide synthesis. The three-dimensional structure of native uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) in a new crystal form was solved and refined at 1.90 Å resolution ( R st = 20.37%; R free = 24.69%; the rmsd of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.009 Å and 1.223°, respectively). A homodimer containing two asynchronously functioning active sites was demonstrated to be the minimum structural unit necessary for function of the hexameric StUPh molecule ( L 33 L 2). Each active site is formed by amino acid residues of both subunits.

  8. A novel EID family member, EID-3, inhibits differentiation and forms a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sasajima, Yuka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Satoshi; Yuasa, Yasuhito . E-mail: yuasa.monc@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    The EID family members, i.e., E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation-1 (EID-1) and EID-1-like inhibitor of differentiation-2 (EID-2), were identified as negative regulators of cellular differentiation. EID-1 seems to inhibit differentiation by blocking histone acetyltransferase activity and EID-2 possibly inhibits differentiation through binding to class I histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we report a novel inhibitor of differentiation exhibiting homology with EID-2 termed EID-3 (EID-2-like inhibitor of differentiation-3). Like EID-2, EID-3 inhibited MyoD- and GR{alpha}-dependent transcription and blocked muscle differentiation in cultured cells by binding to class I HDACs. Unlike that of EID-2, the C-terminus, but not the N-terminus, of EID-3 was required for nuclear localization. EID-3 formed a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2. These results suggest that EID-3 inhibits differentiation by blocking transcription as a complex in cells.

  9. B-virus from pet macaque monkeys: an emerging threat in the United States?

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, S. R.; Leslie, M. J.; Parrott, T.; Abelt, S.; Piercy, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    Of primary concern when evaluating macaque bites are bacterial and B-virus infections. B-virus infection is highly prevalent (80% to 90%) in adult macaques and may cause a potentially fatal meningoencephalitis in humans. We examined seven nonoccupational exposure incidents involving 24 persons and eight macaques. Six macaques were tested for herpes B; four (67%) were seropositive. A common observation was that children were more than three times as likely to be bitten than adults. The virus must be assumed to be a potential health hazard in macaque bite wounds; this risk makes macaques unsuitable as pets. PMID:9452406

  10. Condylomatous genital lesions in cynomolgus macaques from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ariana; Wood, Charles E; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; Domaingue, Marie Claire; Elmore, David; Koenig, Patricia; Wagner, Janice D; Jennings, Ryan N; Burk, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    Genital condyloma-like lesions were observed on male and female cynomolgus macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) originating from the island of Mauritius. Cytobrush and/or biopsy samples were obtained from lesions of 57 affected macaques. Primary histologic features included eosinophilic, neutrophilic, and lymphoplasmacytic penile and vulvar inflammation, epidermal hyperplasia with acanthosis, and increased collagenous stroma. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays to amplify viral DNA revealed the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) DNA but not papillomavirus or poxvirus DNA. Subsequent DNA analyses of 3 genomic regions of LCV identified isolates associated with lesions in 19/25 (76%) biopsies and 19/57 (33%) cytology samples. Variable immunolabeling for proteins related to the human LCV Epstein Barr Virus was observed within intralesional plasma cells, stromal cells, and epithelial cells. Further work is needed to characterize the epidemiologic features of these lesions and their association with LCV infection in Mauritian-origin macaques.

  11. Disseminated Hemangiosarcoma in a Juvenile Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Amanda P; Gray, Stanton B; Chaffee, Beth K

    2016-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma is a malignant tumor of vascular endothelial origin that is sporadically reported in rhesus macaques. This report describes the clinicopathologic features of a 1-y-old rhesus macaque with spontaneous disseminated hemangiosarcoma that originally presented as a focal cutaneous mass. Histopathologic examination of multiple tumor foci revealed regions in which the neoplastic cells formed diffuse sheets, as well as the well-defined vascular channels typically associated with hemangiosarcoma. Multiple endothelial cell immunomarkers were used to confirm the diagnosis in this rhesus macaque. The tumor exhibited staining properties consistent with those seen in domestic animals and humans. In addition, to our knowledge, this animal represents the youngest case of any form of spontaneous hemangiosarcoma reported in the rhesus macaque to date. PMID:27298251

  12. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  13. Communication between the ERRalpha homodimer interface and the PGC-1alpha binding surface via the helix 8-9 loop.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Althage, Magnus; Flaig, Ralf; Sato, Yoshiteru; Chavant, Virginie; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Choulier, Laurence; Cronet, Philippe; Rochel, Natacha; Schüle, Roland; Strömstedt, Per-Erik; Moras, Dino

    2008-07-18

    Although structural studies on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) have established the general mode of nuclear receptor (NR)/coactivator interaction, determinants of binding specificity are only partially understood. The LBD of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), for example, interacts only with a region of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1alpha, which contains the canonical LXXLL motif (NR box2), whereas the LBD of estrogen-related receptor-alpha (ERRalpha) also binds efficiently an untypical, LXXYL-containing region (NR box3) of PGC-1alpha. Surprisingly, in a previous structural study, the ERalpha LBD has been observed to bind NR box3 of transcriptional intermediary factor (TIF)-2 untypically via LXXYL, whereas the ERRalpha LBD binds this region of TIF-2 only poorly. Here we present a new crystal structure of the ERRalpha LBD in complex with a PGC-1alpha box3 peptide. In this structure, residues N-terminal of the PGC-1alpha LXXYL motif formed contacts with helix 4, the loop connecting helices 8 and 9, and with the C terminus of the ERRalpha LBD. Interaction studies using wild-type and mutant PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha showed that these contacts are functionally relevant and are required for efficient ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha interaction. Furthermore, a structure comparison between ERRalpha and ERalpha and mutation analyses provided evidence that the helix 8-9 loop, which differs significantly in both nuclear receptors, is a major determinant of coactivator binding specificity. Finally, our results revealed that in ERRalpha the helix 8-9 loop allosterically links the LBD homodimer interface with the coactivator cleft, thus providing a plausible explanation for distinct PGC-1alpha binding to ERRalpha monomers and homodimers.

  14. Color vision test for dichromatic and trichromatic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koida, Kowa; Yokoi, Isao; Okazawa, Gouki; Mikami, Akichika; Widayati, Kanthi Arum; Miyachi, Shigehiro; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2013-11-01

    Dichromacy is a color vision defect in which one of the three cone photoreceptors is absent. Individuals with dichromacy are called dichromats (or sometimes "color-blind"), and their color discrimination performance has contributed significantly to our understanding of color vision. Macaque monkeys, which normally have trichromatic color vision that is nearly identical to humans, have been used extensively in neurophysiological studies of color vision. In the present study we employed two tests, a pseudoisochromatic color discrimination test and a monochromatic light detection test, to compare the color vision of genetically identified dichromatic macaques (Macaca fascicularis) with that of normal trichromatic macaques. In the color discrimination test, dichromats could not discriminate colors along the protanopic confusion line, though trichromats could. In the light detection test, the relative thresholds for longer wavelength light were higher in the dichromats than the trichromats, indicating dichromats to be less sensitive to longer wavelength light. Because the dichromatic macaque is very rare, the present study provides valuable new information on the color vision behavior of dichromatic macaques, which may be a useful animal model of human dichromacy. The behavioral tests used in the present study have been previously used to characterize the color behaviors of trichromatic as well as dichromatic new world monkeys. The present results show that comparative studies of color vision employing similar tests may be feasible to examine the difference in color behaviors between trichromatic and dichromatic individuals, although the genetic mechanisms of trichromacy/dichromacy is quite different between new world monkeys and macaques.

  15. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-01-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96–704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3–4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices. PMID:12960378

  16. Vicarious reinforcement in rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chang, Steve W C; Winecoff, Amy A; Platt, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1) and/or rewards to another monkey (M2) with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in non-social control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making.

  17. A new quadruple hydrogen-bonding module with a DDAA array: formation of a stable homodimer without competition from undesired hydrogen-bonded dimers.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Yosuke; Shirai, Naohiro; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Odashima, Kazunori

    2009-10-01

    A new DDAA hydrogen-bonding module (UImp-2), based on a ureidoimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine structure, forms a highly stable homodimer (K(dim) > 1.1 x 10(5) M(-1) in CDCl(3)) without competition from undesired hydrogen-bonded dimers.

  18. A Putative Multiple-Demand System in the Macaque Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew H.; Buckley, Mark J.; Mitchell, Anna S.; Sallet, Jerome; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, cognitively demanding tasks of many types recruit common frontoparietal brain areas. Pervasive activation of this “multiple-demand” (MD) network suggests a core function in supporting goal-oriented behavior. A similar network might therefore be predicted in nonhuman primates that readily perform similar tasks after training. However, an MD network in nonhuman primates has not been described. Single-cell recordings from macaque frontal and parietal cortex show some similar properties to human MD fMRI responses (e.g., adaptive coding of task-relevant information). Invasive recordings, however, come from limited prespecified locations, so they do not delineate a macaque homolog of the MD system and their positioning could benefit from knowledge of where MD foci lie. Challenges of scanning behaving animals mean that few macaque fMRI studies specifically contrast levels of cognitive demand, so we sought to identify a macaque counterpart to the human MD system using fMRI connectivity in 35 rhesus macaques. Putative macaque MD regions, mapped from frontoparietal MD regions defined in humans, were found to be functionally connected under anesthesia. To further refine these regions, an iterative process was used to maximize their connectivity cross-validated across animals. Finally, whole-brain connectivity analyses identified voxels that were robustly connected to MD regions, revealing seven clusters across frontoparietal and insular cortex comparable to human MD regions and one unexpected cluster in the lateral fissure. The proposed macaque MD regions can be used to guide future electrophysiological investigation of MD neural coding and in task-based fMRI to test predictions of similar functional properties to human MD cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In humans, a frontoparietal “multiple-demand” (MD) brain network is recruited during a wide range of cognitively demanding tasks. Because this suggests a fundamental function, one might expect a similar

  19. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  20. Seed dispersal by rhesus macaques Macaca mulatta in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Asmita; McConkey, Kim R; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2014-12-01

    Frugivorous primates are important seed dispersers and their absence from forest patches is predicted to be detrimental to tropical forest regeneration and recruitment. With the reduction of primate populations globally, ecologically resilient primate species, characterized by dietary flexibility and the ability to thrive in a variety of habitats, assume new importance as seed dispersers. The most widely distributed non-human primate, the rhesus macaque Macaca mulatta has been intensively studied but little is known about its role in maintaining ecosystem structure and functions. Due to their frugivorous diet, large group sizes, large home ranges and tolerance to disturbance, rhesus macaques may be effective seed dispersers. We studied seed dispersal by rhesus macaques at the Buxa Tiger Reserve, India, through a combination of behavioural observations and germination experiments. Rhesus macaques dispersed 84% of the 49 species they fed on either through spitting or defecation. Nearly 96% of the handled seeds were undamaged and 61% of the species for which germination tests were performed had enhanced germination. Almost 50% of the monitored seeds among those deposited in situ germinated and 22% established seedlings, suggesting that rhesus macaques are important seed dispersers in tropical forests. Due to their widespread distribution and large populations, rhesus macaques are perceived as common and are categorized as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, effectively excluding them from any conservation plans. Based on the results of our study, we argue that rhesus macaques fulfill critical ecological functions in their habitat and that this parameter must be taken into consideration when they are reviewed for conservation priorities.

  1. Risk and Resilience: Early Manipulation of Macaque Social Experience and Persistent Behavioral and Neurophysiological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Leckman, James F.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    A literature review on macaque monkeys finds that peer rearing of young macaques and rearing of young macaques by mothers that are undergoing variable foraging conditions result in emotional and neurophysiological disturbance. Certain genotypes contribute to resilience to this disturbance. The findings have implications to child mental health and…

  2. An Optimized Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Core Adopts a Functional Homodimer That Efficiently Blocks Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Kathleen; Boo, Irene; Owczarek, Catherine M; Hardy, Matthew P; Perugini, Matthew A; Fabri, Louis; Scotney, Pierre; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Drummer, Heidi E

    2017-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 is the major target of broadly neutralizing antibodies in vivo and is the focus of efforts in the rational design of a universal B cell vaccine against HCV. The E2 glycoprotein exhibits a high degree of amino acid variability which localizes to three discrete regions: hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), hypervariable region 2 (HVR2), and the intergenotypic variable region (igVR). All three variable regions contribute to immune evasion and/or isolate-specific structural variations, both important considerations for vaccine design. A high-resolution structural definition of the intact HCV envelope glycoprotein complex containing E1 and E2 remains to be elucidated, while crystallographic structures of a recombinant E2 ectodomain failed to resolve HVR1, HVR2, and a major neutralization determinant adjacent to HVR1. To obtain further information on E2, we characterized the role of all three variable regions in E2 ectodomain folding and function in the context of a recombinant ectodomain fragment (rE2). We report that removal of the variable regions accelerates binding to the major host cell receptor CD81 and that simultaneous deletion of HVR2 and the igVR is required to maintain wild-type CD81-binding characteristics. The removal of the variable regions also rescued the ability of rE2 to form a functional homodimer. We propose that the rE2 core provides novel insights into the role of the variable motifs in the higher-order assembly of the E2 ectodomain and may have implications for E1E2 structure on the virion surface. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects ∼2% of the population globally, and no vaccine is available. HCV is a highly variable virus, and understanding the presentation of key antigenic sites at the virion surface is important for the design of a universal vaccine. This study investigates the role of three surface-exposed variable regions in E2 glycoprotein folding and function in the context

  3. Do vervets and macaques respond differently to BMAA?

    PubMed

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-12-01

    Vervets with chronic dietary exposure to BMAA develop neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and sparse β-amyloid plaque-like deposits in the brain. Macaques dosed via oral gavage with BMAA developed marked neurological signs in the absence of cell death. These differences may result from increased vulnerability of macaques to BMAA, the higher effective dose they received via oral gavage, and the possibility of stable adducts due to the bicarbonate used to neutralize their BMAA dose. Confirmation of chromatolysis and cell death in macaque brains was visualized using toluidine staining. In contrast, immunological staining with AT8 and β-amyloid (1-42) antibodies and thioflavine-S stain in vervet brains suggests early stage labeling of neurites and NFT and plaque-like formation in the absence of neuronal loss. The lack of neurologic deficits reported in vervets is in keeping with early preclinical pathology observed with these immunohistochemical methods. BMAA toxicity in vervet brains causes the early events that occur in the genesis of neurofibrillary pathology. Taken together, these different studies of vervets and macaques demonstrate BMAA toxicity in the brain due to chronic exposures. The use of more sensitive immunohistochemical methods in the vervet study most likely explains the differences in neuropathology reported for vervets and macaques.

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Infects Rhesus Macaque Hepatocytes and Simianized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Shi, Chao; de Jong, Ype P.; Gerold, Gisa; Ries, Moritz; von Schaewen, Markus; Donovan, Bridget M.; Labitt, Rachael N.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gaska, Jenna M.; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Xiao, Jing W.; Flatley, Brenna; Fung, Canny; Chiriboga, Luis; Walker, Christopher M.; Evans, David T.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    At least 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Due to the narrow host range of HCV and restricted use of chimpanzees, there is currently no suitable animal model for HCV pathogenesis studies or the development of a HCV vaccine. To identify cellular determinants of interspecies transmission and establish a novel immunocompetent model system, we examined the ability of HCV to infect hepatocytes from a small non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We show that the rhesus orthologs of critical HCV entry factors support viral glycoprotein-dependent virion uptake. Primary hepatocytes from rhesus macaques are also permissive for HCV RNA replication and particle production, which is enhanced when antiviral signaling is suppressed. We demonstrate that this may be due to the diminished capacity of HCV to antagonize MAVS-dependent innate cellular defenses. To test the ability of HCV to establish persistent replication in vivo, we engrafted primary rhesus macaque hepatocytes into immunocompromised xenorecipients. Inoculation of resulting simian liver chimeric mice with either HCV genotype 1a or 2a resulted in HCV serum viremia for up to 10 weeks. Conclusion: Together, these data indicate that rhesus macaques may be a viable model for HCV and implicate host immunity as a potential species-specific barrier to HCV infection. We conclude that suppression of host immunity or further viral adaptation may allow robust HCV infection in rhesus macaques and creation of a new animal model for studies of HCV pathogenesis, lentivirus coinfection and vaccine development. PMID:25820364

  5. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic background of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is made complex by the high genetic diversity, population structure, and gene introgression from the closely related rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Herein we report the whole-genome sequence of a Malaysian cynomolgus macaque male with more than 40-fold coverage, which was determined using a resequencing method based on the Indian rhesus macaque genome. Results We identified approximately 9.7 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) between the Malaysian cynomolgus and the Indian rhesus macaque genomes. Compared with humans, a smaller nonsynonymous/synonymous SNV ratio in the cynomolgus macaque suggests more effective removal of slightly deleterious mutations. Comparison of two cynomolgus (Malaysian and Vietnamese) and two rhesus (Indian and Chinese) macaque genomes, including previously published macaque genomes, suggests that Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been more affected by gene introgression from rhesus macaques. We further identified 60 nonsynonymous SNVs that completely differentiated the cynomolgus and rhesus macaque genomes, and that could be important candidate variants for determining species-specific responses to drugs and pathogens. The demographic inference using the genome sequence data revealed that Malaysian cynomolgus macaques have experienced at least three population bottlenecks. Conclusions This list of whole-genome SNVs will be useful for many future applications, such as an array-based genotyping system for macaque individuals. High-quality whole-genome sequencing of the cynomolgus macaque genome may aid studies on finding genetic differences that are responsible for phenotypic diversity in macaques and may help control genetic backgrounds among individuals. PMID:22747675

  6. Impaired Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Homodimer Formation Triggers Development of Transplant Vasculopathy - Insights from a Murine Aortic Transplantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Oberhuber, Rupert; Riede, Gregor; Cardini, Benno; Bernhard, David; Messner, Barbara; Watschinger, Katrin; Steger, Christina; Brandacher, Gerald; Pratschke, Johann; Golderer, Georg; Werner, Ernst R.; Maglione, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Transplant vasculopathy (TV) represents a major obstacle to long-term graft survival and correlates with severity of ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Donor administration of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS) co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin has been shown to prevent IRI. Herein, we analysed whether tetrahydrobiopterin is also involved in TV development. Using a fully allogeneic mismatched (BALB/c to C57BL/6) murine aortic transplantation model grafts subjected to long cold ischemia time developed severe TV with intimal hyperplasia (α-smooth muscle actin positive cells in the neointima) and endothelial activation (increased P-selectin expression). Donor pretreatment with tetrahydrobiopterin significantly minimised these changes resulting in only marginal TV development. Severe TV observed in the non-treated group was associated with increased protein oxidation and increased occurrence of endothelial NOS monomers in the aortic grafts already during graft procurement. Tetrahydrobiopterin supplementation of the donor prevented all these early oxidative changes in the graft. Non-treated allogeneic grafts without cold ischemia time and syngeneic grafts did not develop any TV. We identified early protein oxidation and impaired endothelial NOS homodimer formation as plausible mechanistic explanation for the crucial role of IRI in triggering TV in transplanted aortic grafts. Therefore, targeting endothelial NOS in the donor represents a promising strategy to minimise TV. PMID:27883078

  7. Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tropak, Michael B; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Thompson, Patrick; Wakarchuk, Warren; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don

    2016-01-01

    Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA). Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM), CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels. PMID:26966698

  8. Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tropak, Michael B; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Thompson, Patrick; Wakarchuk, Warren; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don

    2016-01-01

    Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA). Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM), CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels.

  9. Albumin Homodimers in Patients with Cirrhosis: Clinical and Prognostic Relevance of a Novel Identified Structural Alteration of the Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Domenicali, Marco; Naldi, Marina; Laggetta, Maristella; Giannone, Ferdinando A.; Biselli, Maurizio; Patrono, Daniela; Bertucci, Carlo; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Decompensated cirrhosis is associated to extensive post-transcriptional changes of human albumin (HA). This study aims to characterize the occurrence of HA homodimerization in a large cohort of patients with decompensated cirrhosis and to evaluate its association with clinical features and prognosis. HA monomeric and dimeric isoforms were identified in peripheral blood by using a HPLC-ESI-MS technique in 123 cirrhotic patients hospitalized for acute decompensation and 50 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. Clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded and patients followed up to one year. Among the monomeric isoforms identified, the N- and C-terminal truncated and the native HA underwent homodimerization. All three homodimers were significantly more abundant in patients with cirrhosis, acute-on-chronic liver failure and correlate with the prognostic scores. The homodimeric N-terminal truncated isoform was independently associated to disease complications and was able to stratify 1-year survival. As a result of all these changes, the monomeric native HA was significantly decreased in patients with cirrhosis, being also associated with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion homodimerization is a novel described structural alteration of the HA molecule in decompensated cirrhosis and contributes to the progressive reduction of the monomeric native HA, the only isoform provided of structural and functional integrity. PMID:27782157

  10. Structure of the human NF-kappaB p52 homodimer-DNA complex at 2.1 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, P; Larson, C J; Verdine, G L; Müller, C W

    1997-01-01

    The crystal structure of human NF-kappaB p52 in its specific complex with the natural kappaB DNA binding site MHC H-2 has been solved at 2.1 A resolution. Whereas the overall structure resembles that of the NF-kappaB p50-DNA complex, pronounced differences are observed within the 'insert region'. This sequence segment differs in length between different Rel proteins. Compared with NF-kappaB p50, the compact alpha-helical insert region element is rotated away from the core of the N-terminal domain, opening up a mainly polar cleft. The insert region presents potential interaction surfaces to other proteins. The high resolution of the structure reveals many water molecules which mediate interactions in the protein-DNA interface. Additional complexity in Rel protein-DNA interaction comes from an extended interfacial water cavity that connects residues at the edge of the dimer interface to the central DNA bases. The observed water network might acount for differences in binding specificity between NF-kappaB p52 and NF-kappaB p50 homodimers. PMID:9384586

  11. PDGF A chain homodimers drive proliferation of bipotential (O-2A) glial progenitor cells in the developing rat optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, N; Collarini, E J; Mosley, M J; Heldin, C H; Westermark, B; Richardson, W D

    1989-01-01

    The bipotential glial progenitor cells (O-2A progenitors), which during development of the rat optic nerve give rise to oligodendrocytes and type 2 astrocytes, are stimulated to divide in culture by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and there is evidence that PDGF is important for development of the O-2A cell lineage in vivo. We have visualized PDGF mRNA in the rat optic nerve by in situ hybridization, and its spatial distribution is compatible with the idea that type 1 astrocytes are the major source of PDGF in the nerve. We can detect mRNA encoding the A chain, but not the B chain of PDGF in the brain and optic nerve, suggesting that the major form of PDGF in the central nervous system is a homodimer of A chains (PDGF-AA). PDGF-AA is a more potent mitogen for O-2A progenitor cells than is PDGF-BB, while the reverse is true for human or rat fibroblasts. Fibroblasts display two types of PDGF receptors, type A receptors which bind to all three dimeric isoforms of PDGF, and type B receptors which bind PDGF-BB and PDGF-AB, but have low affinity for PDGF-AA. Our results suggest that O-2A progenitor cells possess predominantly type A receptors, and proliferate during development in response to PDGF-AA secreted by type 1 astrocytes. Images PMID:2545439

  12. PDGF A chain homodimers drive proliferation of bipotential (O-2A) glial progenitor cells in the developing rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Pringle, N; Collarini, E J; Mosley, M J; Heldin, C H; Westermark, B; Richardson, W D

    1989-04-01

    The bipotential glial progenitor cells (O-2A progenitors), which during development of the rat optic nerve give rise to oligodendrocytes and type 2 astrocytes, are stimulated to divide in culture by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and there is evidence that PDGF is important for development of the O-2A cell lineage in vivo. We have visualized PDGF mRNA in the rat optic nerve by in situ hybridization, and its spatial distribution is compatible with the idea that type 1 astrocytes are the major source of PDGF in the nerve. We can detect mRNA encoding the A chain, but not the B chain of PDGF in the brain and optic nerve, suggesting that the major form of PDGF in the central nervous system is a homodimer of A chains (PDGF-AA). PDGF-AA is a more potent mitogen for O-2A progenitor cells than is PDGF-BB, while the reverse is true for human or rat fibroblasts. Fibroblasts display two types of PDGF receptors, type A receptors which bind to all three dimeric isoforms of PDGF, and type B receptors which bind PDGF-BB and PDGF-AB, but have low affinity for PDGF-AA. Our results suggest that O-2A progenitor cells possess predominantly type A receptors, and proliferate during development in response to PDGF-AA secreted by type 1 astrocytes.

  13. Whole-genome sequencing of tibetan macaque (Macaca Thibetana) provides new insight into the macaque evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenxin; Zhao, Guang; Li, Peng; Osada, Naoki; Xing, Jinchuan; Yi, Yong; Du, Lianming; Silva, Pedro; Wang, Hongxing; Sakate, Ryuichi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Xu, Huailiang; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Macaques are the most widely distributed nonhuman primates and used as animal models in biomedical research. The availability of full-genome sequences from them would be essential to both biomedical and primate evolutionary studies. Previous studies have reported whole-genome sequences from rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaque (M. fascicularis, CE), both of which belong to the fascicularis group. Here, we present a 37-fold coverage genome sequence of the Tibetan macaque (M. thibetana; TM). TM is an endemic species to China belonging to the sinica group. On the basis of mapping to the rhesus macaque genome, we identified approximately 11.9 million single-nucleotide variants), of which 3.9 million were TM specific, as assessed by comparison two Chinese rhesus macaques (CR) and two CE genomes. Some genes carried TM-specific homozygous nonsynonymous variants (TSHNVs), which were scored as deleterious in human by both PolyPhen-2 and SIFT (Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant) and were enriched in the eye disease genes. In total, 273 immune response and disease-related genes carried at least one TSHNV. The heterozygosity rates of two CRs (0.002617 and 0.002612) and two CEs (0.003004 and 0.003179) were approximately three times higher than that of TM (0.000898). Polymerase chain reaction resequencing of 18 TM individuals showed that 29 TSHNVs exhibited high allele frequencies, thus confirming their low heterozygosity. Genome-wide genetic divergence analysis demonstrated that TM was more closely related to CR than to CE. We further detected unusual low divergence regions between TM and CR. In addition, after applying statistical criteria to detect putative introgression regions (PIRs) in the TM genome, up to 239,620 kb PIRs (8.84% of the genome) were identified. Given that TM and CR have overlapping geographical distributions, had the same refuge during the Middle Pleistocene, and show similar mating behaviors, it is highly likely that there was an ancient

  14. MaqFACS (Macaque Facial Action Coding System) can be used to document facial movements in Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus)

    PubMed Central

    Julle-Danière, Églantine; Whitehouse, Jamie; Joly, Marine; Gass, Carolin; Burrows, Anne M.; Waller, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    Human and non-human primates exhibit facial movements or displays to communicate with one another. The evolution of form and function of those displays could be better understood through multispecies comparisons. Anatomically based coding systems (Facial Action Coding Systems: FACS) are developed to enable such comparisons because they are standardized and systematic and aid identification of homologous expressions underpinned by similar muscle contractions. To date, FACS has been developed for humans, and subsequently modified for chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, orangutans, hylobatids, dogs, and cats. Here, we wanted to test whether the MaqFACS system developed in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could be used to code facial movements in Barbary macaques (M. sylvanus), a species phylogenetically close to the rhesus macaques. The findings show that the facial movement capacity of Barbary macaques can be reliably coded using the MaqFACS. We found differences in use and form of some movements, most likely due to specializations in the communicative repertoire of each species, rather than morphological differences. PMID:26401458

  15. A potential aphrodisiac for female macaques.

    PubMed

    Pertovaara, Antti; Linnankoski, Ilkka; Artchakov, Denis; Rämä, Pia; Carlson, Synnöve

    2004-09-01

    Earlier studies suggest that alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and dopamine receptor agonists may enhance sexual activity in human and nonhuman male primates. It is not known whether these compounds influence the sexual behavior of female primates. We determined whether the administration of a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist (atipamezole), a dopamine receptor agonist (apomorphine), or their combination to female Macaca arctoides (stumptail macaque) monkeys produces changes in sexual behavior of the female with a male. Following the administration of drugs to the female, the behavior of the female with a male stumptail was observed for 30 min. Atipamezole dose dependently (0.03-0.3 mg/kg im) increased short-time mounting behavior of the male and the total number of copulations. Apomorphine alone (0.125-0.25 mg/kg) or in combination with atipamezole had no significant effects on sexual behavior. The result indicates that a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist administered in the female stumptail increases sexual behavior of the male with the female. A plausible explanation for this finding is that a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist increases sexual arousal in female stumptails and this, possibly due to a change in psychosocial behavior of the female, triggers increased sexual activity in males.

  16. Retinotopy versus face selectivity in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Rajimehr, Reza; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B H

    2014-12-01

    Retinotopic organization is a ubiquitous property of lower-tier visual cortical areas in human and nonhuman primates. In macaque visual cortex, the retinotopic maps extend to higher-order areas in the ventral visual pathway, including area TEO in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. Distinct regions within IT cortex are also selective to specific object categories such as faces. Here we tested the topographic relationship between retinotopic maps and face-selective patches in macaque visual cortex using high-resolution fMRI and retinotopic face stimuli. Distinct subregions within face-selective patches showed either (1) a coarse retinotopic map of eccentricity and polar angle, (2) a retinotopic bias to a specific location of visual field, or (3) nonretinotopic selectivity. In general, regions along the lateral convexity of IT cortex showed more overlap between retinotopic maps and face selectivity, compared with regions within the STS. Thus, face patches in macaques can be subdivided into smaller patches with distinguishable retinotopic properties.

  17. Human-wildlife conflict: proximate predictors of aggression between humans and rhesus macaques in India.

    PubMed

    Beisner, Brianne A; Heagerty, Allison; Seil, Shannon K; Balasubramaniam, Krishna N; Atwill, Edward R; Gupta, Brij K; Tyagi, Praveen C; Chauhan, Netrapal P S; Bonal, B S; Sinha, P R; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    Macaques live in close contact with humans across South and Southeast Asia, and direct interaction is frequent. Aggressive contact is a concern in many locations, particularly among populations of rhesus and longtail macaques that co-inhabit urbanized cities and towns with humans. We investigated the proximate factors influencing the occurrence of macaque aggression toward humans as well as human aggression toward macaques to determine the extent to which human behavior elicits macaque aggression and vice versa. We conducted a 3-month study of four free-ranging populations of rhesus macaques in Dehradun, India from October-December 2012, using event sampling to record all instances of human-macaque interaction (N = 3120). Our results show that while human aggression was predicted by the potential for economic losses or damage, macaque aggression was influenced by aggressive or intimidating behavior by humans as well as recent rates of conspecific aggression. Further, adult female macaques participated in aggression more frequently than expected, whereas adult and subadult males participated as frequently as expected. Our analyses demonstrate that neither human nor macaque aggression is unprovoked. Rather, both humans and macaques are responding to one another's behavior. Mitigation of human-primate conflict, and indeed other types of human-wildlife conflict in such coupled systems, will require a holistic investigation of the ways in which each participant is responding to, and consequently altering, the behavior of the other.

  18. Heterologous Protection against Asian Zika Virus Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Christina M.; Mohr, Emma L.; Gellerup, Dane D.; Breitbach, Meghan E.; Buechler, Connor R.; Rasheed, Mustafa N.; Mohns, Mariel S.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Barry, Gabrielle L.; Weisgrau, Kim L.; Eudailey, Josh A.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Vosler, Logan J.; Post, Jennifer; Capuano, Saverio; Golos, Thaddeus G.; Permar, Sallie R.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; O’Connor, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) was declared a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO) in February 2016, because of the evidence linking infection with ZIKV to neurological complications, such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome in adults and congenital birth defects including microcephaly in the developing fetus. Because development of a ZIKV vaccine is a top research priority and because the genetic and antigenic variability of many RNA viruses limits the effectiveness of vaccines, assessing whether immunity elicited against one ZIKV strain is sufficient to confer broad protection against all ZIKV strains is critical. Recently, in vitro studies demonstrated that ZIKV likely circulates as a single serotype. Here, we demonstrate that immunity elicited by African lineage ZIKV protects rhesus macaques against subsequent infection with Asian lineage ZIKV. Methodology/Principal Findings Using our recently developed rhesus macaque model of ZIKV infection, we report that the prototypical ZIKV strain MR766 productively infects macaques, and that immunity elicited by MR766 protects macaques against heterologous Asian ZIKV. Furthermore, using next generation deep sequencing, we found in vivo restoration of a putative N-linked glycosylation site upon replication in macaques that is absent in numerous MR766 strains that are widely being used by the research community. This reversion highlights the importance of carefully examining the sequence composition of all viral stocks as well as understanding how passage history may alter a virus from its original form. Conclusions/Significance An effective ZIKV vaccine is needed to prevent infection-associated fetal abnormalities. Macaques whose immune responses were primed by infection with East African ZIKV were completely protected from detectable viremia when subsequently rechallenged with heterologous Asian ZIKV. Therefore, these data suggest that immunogen selection

  19. Transmission of naturally occurring lymphoma in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R D; Blake, B J; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; King, N W; Letvin, N L

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:6576377

  20. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  1. Transmission of Naturally Occurring Lymphoma in Macaque Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronald D.; Blake, Beverly J.; Chalifoux, Laura V.; Sehgal, Prabhat K.; King, Norval W.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1983-08-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys.

  2. Simian Retrovirus 4 Induces Lethal Acute Thrombocytopenia in Japanese Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Nakagawa, So; Miura, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2001-2002, six of seven Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) died after developing hemorrhagic syndrome at the Kyoto University Primate Research Institute (KUPRI). While the cause of death was unknown at the time, we detected simian retrovirus 4 (SRV-4) in samples obtained from a similar outbreak in 2008-2011, during which 42 of 43 Japanese macaques died after exhibiting hemorrhagic syndrome. In this study, we isolated SRV-4 strain PRI-172 from a Japanese macaque showing severe thrombocytopenia. When inoculated into four Japanese macaques, the isolate induced severe thrombocytopenia in all within 37 days. We then constructed an infectious molecular clone of strain PRI-172, termed pSR415, and inoculated the clone-derived virus into two Japanese macaques. These animals also developed severe thrombocytopenia in just 31 days after inoculation, and the virus was reisolated from blood, bone marrow, and stool. At necropsy, we observed bleeding from the gingivae and subcutaneous bleeding in all animals. SRV-4 infected a variety of tissues, especially in digestive organs, including colon and stomach, as determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, we identified the SRV-4 receptor as ASCT2, a neutral amino acid transporter. ASCT2 mRNA was expressed in a variety of tissues, and the distribution of SRV-4 proviruses in infected Japanese macaques correlated well with the expression levels of ASCT2 mRNA. From these results, we conclude that the causative agent of hemorrhagic syndrome in KUPRI Japanese macaques was SRV-4, and its receptor is ASCT2. IMPORTANCE During two separate outbreaks at the KUPRI, in 2001-2002 and 2008-2011, 96% of Japanese macaques (JM) that developed an unknown hemorrhagic syndrome died. Here, we isolated SRV-4 from a JM developing thrombocytopenia. The SRV-4 isolate and a molecularly cloned SRV-4 induced severe thrombocytopenia in virus-inoculated JMs within 37 days. At necropsy, we

  3. Definition of the surface in the thyroid hormone receptor ligand binding domain for association as homodimers and heterodimers with retinoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, R C; Feng, W; Wagner, R L; Costa, C H; Pereira, A C; Apriletti, J W; Fletterick, R J; Baxter, J D

    2001-05-04

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) bind as homodimers or heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) to DNA elements with diverse orientations of AGGTCA half-sites. We performed a comprehensive x-ray crystal structure-guided mutation analysis of the TR ligand binding domain (TR LBD) surface to map the functional interface for TR homodimers and heterodimers with RXR in the absence and/or in the presence of DNA. We also identified the molecular contacts in TR LBDs crystallized as dimers. The results show that crystal dimer contacts differ from those found in the functional studies. We found that identical TR LBD residues found in helices 10 and 11 are involved in TR homodimerization and heterodimerization with RXR. Moreover, the same TR LBD surface is operative for dimerization with direct repeats spaced by 4 base pairs (DR-4) and with the inverted palindrome spaced by 6 base pairs (F2), but not with TREpal (unspaced palindrome), where homodimers appear to be simply two monomers binding independently to DNA. We also demonstrate that interactions between the TR and RXR DNA binding domains stabilize TR-RXR heterodimers on DR-4. The dimer interface can be functional in the cell, because disruption of key residues impairs transcriptional activity of TRs mediated through association with RXR LBD linked to GAL4 DNA-binding domain.

  4. BMP2/7 heterodimer is a stronger inducer of bone regeneration in peri-implant bone defects model than BMP2 or BMP7 homodimer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Jingxiao; Zheng, Yuanna; Fan, Yi; Gu, Zhiyuan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of bone morphogenetic protein BMP2/7 heterodimer and BMP homodimers on bone regeneration in bone defects model. Identical peri-implant bone defects model were created using proper controls on the frontal skull in 18 minipigs. Collagen sponges with low-dose (30 ng/mL) BMP2/7 heterodimer, BMP2 or BMP7 homodimer were filled in the defects. New bone formation and the expression of type I collagen (Col1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) were evaluated after 2, 3, and 6 weeks of implantation. BMP2/7 resulted in significantly higher new bone areas percentage in the defect region than BMP2 and BMP7 (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining of Col1, ALP and OCN was stronger in BMP2/7 group than BMP2, BMP7 and control group (p<0.05). These results demonstrate that BMP2/7 heterodimer is a stronger inducer of osteoblastogenesis and could be applied at low dose to reduce the cost and side effects of BMP homodimers.

  5. Structural Analysis of Guanylyl Cyclase-Activating Protein-2 (GCAP-2) Homodimer by Stable Isotope-Labeling, Chemical Cross-Linking, and Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettelkau, Jens; Thondorf, Iris; Theisgen, Stephan; Lilie, Hauke; Schröder, Thomas; Arlt, Christian; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The topology of the GCAP-2 homodimer was investigated by chemical cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry. Complementary conducted size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicated that GCAP-2 forms a homodimer both in the absence and in the presence of Ca2+. In-depth MS and MS/MS analysis of the cross-linked products was aided by 15 N-labeled GCAP-2. The use of isotope-labeled protein delivered reliable structural information on the GCAP-2 homodimer, enabling an unambiguous discrimination between cross-links within one monomer (intramolecular) or between two subunits (intermolecular). The limited number of cross-links obtained in the Ca2+-bound state allowed us to deduce a defined homodimeric GCAP-2 structure by a docking and molecular dynamics approach. In the Ca2+-free state, GCAP-2 is more flexible as indicated by the higher number of cross-links. We consider stable isotope-labeling to be indispensable for deriving reliable structural information from chemical cross-linking data of multi-subunit protein assemblies.

  6. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  7. A conserved proline residue in the leucine zipper region of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 in Arabidopsis thaliana interferes with the formation of homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Huaishun; Cao Kaiming; Wang Xiping

    2007-10-19

    Two putative Arabidopsis E group bZIP transcript factors, AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61, are nuclear-localized and their transcriptional activation domain is in their N-terminal region. By searching GenBank, we found other eight plant homologues of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61. All of them have a proline residue in the third heptad of zipper region. Yeast two-hybrid assay and EMSA showed that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could not form homodimer while their mutant forms, AtbZIP34m and AtbZIP61m, which the proline residue was replaced by an alanine residue in the zipper region, could form homodimer and bind G-box element. These results suggest that the conserved proline residue interferes with the homodimer formation. However, both AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could form heterodimers with members of I group and S group transcription factors in which some members involved in vascular development. So we speculate that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 may participate in plant development via interacting with other group bZIP transcription factors.

  8. Two new crystal forms of the choline-binding domain of the major pneumococcal autolysin: insights into the dynamics of the active homodimer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; García, Ernesto; López, Rubens; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2002-08-02

    Very little is known about the in vivo regulation of the catalytic activity of the major pneumococcal autolysin (LytA), a surface-exposed enzyme that rules the self-destruction of pneumococcal cells through degradation of their peptidoglycan backbone. Two new crystal forms of the cell wall anchoring domain of LytA were obtained, and their structures were solved and refined to 2.4A and 2.8A resolution. The domain is a homodimer with a boomerang-like shape in which the tertiary structure of each monomer is comprised by six independent beta hairpins arranged in a superhelical fashion. Choline molecules at the hydrophobic interface of consecutive hairpins maintain this unique structure. The C-terminal hairpin (last 13 residues of LytA) in the solenoid is responsible for the formation of the catalytically active homodimer. Although the general fold in the structures derived from both crystal forms is essentially the same, two different conformations of the basic homodimer are observed. Biochemical approaches have demonstrated the fundamental role of the 11 C-terminal residues in the catalytic activity of LytA. The studies reported here reveal the importance of some amino acid residues at the C terminus in the determination of the relative distance of the active dimeric form of the autolysin, which appears to be essential for the catalytic activity of this enzyme.

  9. Surgical technique for allogeneic uterus transplantation in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Hideaki; Kisu, Iori; Kato, Yojiro; Yamada, Yohei; Matsubara, Kentaro; Emoto, Katsura; Adachi, Masataka; Matoba, Yusuke; Umene, Kiyoko; Nogami, Yuya; Banno, Kouji; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Itagaki, Iori; Kawamoto, Ikuo; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Itoh, Yasushi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Saiki, Yoko; Sato, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Kenshi; Shiina, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    No study has reported an animal model of uterus transplantation (UTx) using cynomolgus macaques. We aimed to establish a surgical technique of allogeneic UTx assuming the recovery of a uterus from a deceased donor in cynomolgus macaques. Four allogeneic UTxs were performed in female cynomolgus macaques. Donor surgeries comprised en bloc recovery of organs with iliac vessels on both sides, and/or abdominal aorta/vena cava after sufficient perfusion from one femoral artery or external iliac artery. Before perfusion, 150 mL of whole blood was obtained from the donor for subsequent blood transfusion to the recipient. Four uterine grafts were orthotopically transplanted to recipients. End-to-side anastomosis was performed to the iliac vessels on one side in case 1 and iliac vessels on both sides in case 2; aorto-aorto/cavo-caval anastomosis was performed in cases 3 and 4. Arterial blood flow of the uterine grafts was determined by intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography. ICG angiography results showed sufficient blood flow to all uterine grafts, and anaemia did not progress. Under appropriate immune suppression, all recipients survived for more than 90 days post-transplantation, without any surgical complications. We describe a surgical technique for allogeneic UTx in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27786258

  10. Personality of Wild Male Crested Macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christof; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Animal personalities, i.e. consistent differences in behavior across time and/or context, have received increased attention of behavioral biologists over the last years. Recent research shows that personalities represent traits on which natural and sexual selection work and which can have substantial fitness consequences. The aim of this study is to establish the personality structure of crested macaque (Macaca nigra) males as foundation for future studies on its adaptive value. We collected behavioral data through focal animal sampling and additionally conducted two sets of playback experiments. Results of a factor analysis on the behavioral data revealed a four factor structure with components we labeled Anxiety, Sociability, Connectedness and Aggressiveness. Results from the experiments revealed an additional and independent Boldness factor but the absence of Neophilia. Overall, this structure resembles other macaque and animal species with the exception of Connectedness, which might be a consequence of the species' tolerant social style. Our results thus not only form the basis for future studies on the adaptive value of personality in crested macaques but also contribute an important data point for investigating the evolution of personality structure from a comparative perspective by refining, for example, which personality factors characterized the last common ancestor of hominids and macaques. PMID:23940517

  11. Spatial Relational Memory in 9-Month-Old Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys ("Macaca mulatta"). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in…

  12. Testosterone Correlates with Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus in Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-29

    19], and azoosper- mia has been associated with SIV infection in young male rhesus macaques [20]. Depressed androgen levels during physiological...Cytokine Networks in Tissue Immunity Edited by: Meltzer MS, Mantovani A. New York:Wiley-Liss; 1991:77-82. 11. Muehlenbein MP, Bribiescas RG

  13. Neonatal Amygdala Lesions Alter Responsiveness to Objects in Juvenile Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Toscano, Jessica E.; Bauman, Melissa; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is widely recognized to play a central role in emotional processing. In nonhuman primates, the amygdala appears to be critical for generating appropriate behavioral responses in emotionally salient contexts. One common finding is that macaque monkeys that receive amygdala lesions as adults are behaviorally uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. While control animals avoid these objects, amygdala-lesioned animals readily interact with them. Despite a large literature documenting the role of the amygdala in emotional processing in adult rhesus macaques, little research has assessed the role of the amygdala across the macaque neurodevelopmental trajectory. We assessed the behavioral responses of three-year-old (juvenile) rhesus macaques that received bilateral ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus at two weeks of age. Animals were presented with salient objects known to produce robust fear-related responses in macaques (e.g., snakes and reptile-like objects), mammal-like objects that included animal-like features (e.g., eyes and mouths) but not reptile-like features (e.g., scales), and non-animal objects. The visual complexity of objects was scaled to vary the objects' salience. In contrast to control and hippocampus-lesioned animals, amygdale-lesioned animals were uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. They readily retrieved food rewards placed near these objects and physically explored the objects. Furthermore, while control and hippocampus-lesioned animals differentiated between levels of object complexity, amygdala-lesioned animals did not. Taken together, these findings suggest that early damage to the amygdala, like damage during adulthood, permanently compromises emotional processing. PMID:21215794

  14. Characterization of spontaneous malignant lymphomas in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Hirata, A; Hashimoto, K; Katoh, Y; Sakai, H; Bruce, A G; Rose, T M; Kaneko, A; Suzuki, J; Nikami, H; Yanai, T

    2015-05-01

    Lymphomas are common spontaneous tumors in nonhuman primates but remain poorly characterized in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). This study examined 5 cases of spontaneous malignant lymphoma in Japanese macaques, focusing on the immunophenotypes and presence of simian lymphocryptoviruses, which are Epstein-Barr virus-related herpesviruses in nonhuman primates. The macaques with lymphoma were 5 to 28 years old, indicating that lymphomas develop over a wide age range. The common macroscopic findings were splenomegaly and enlargement of lymph nodes. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that all cases were non-Hodgkin type and exhibited a T-cell phenotype, positive for CD3 but negative for CD20 and CD79α. The lymphomas exhibited diverse cellular morphologies and were subdivided into 3 types according to the World Health Organization classification. These included 3 cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified; 1 case of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia; and 1 case of an unclassifiable T-cell lymphoma. Positive signals were detected by in situ hybridization in 2 of the 4 examined cases using probes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA (EBER). Furthermore, the presence of M. fuscata lymphocryptovirus 2, a macaque homolog of Epstein-Barr virus, was demonstrated in EBER-positive cases by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by direct sequencing. Immunohistochemistry using antibody to the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 was negative, even in the EBER-positive cases. The present study suggests that T-cell lymphoma is more common than B-cell lymphoma in Japanese macaques and that M. fuscata lymphocryptovirus 2 is present in some cases.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  16. Heading Tuning in Macaque Area V6

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Reuben H.; Liu, Sheng; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical areas, such as the dorsal subdivision of the medial superior temporal area (MSTd) and the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), have been shown to integrate visual and vestibular self-motion signals. Area V6 is interconnected with areas MSTd and VIP, allowing for the possibility that V6 also integrates visual and vestibular self-motion cues. An alternative hypothesis in the literature is that V6 does not use these sensory signals to compute heading but instead discounts self-motion signals to represent object motion. However, the responses of V6 neurons to visual and vestibular self-motion cues have never been studied, thus leaving the functional roles of V6 unclear. We used a virtual reality system to examine the 3D heading tuning of macaque V6 neurons in response to optic flow and inertial motion stimuli. We found that the majority of V6 neurons are selective for heading defined by optic flow. However, unlike areas MSTd and VIP, V6 neurons are almost universally unresponsive to inertial motion in the absence of optic flow. We also explored the spatial reference frames of heading signals in V6 by measuring heading tuning for different eye positions, and we found that the visual heading tuning of most V6 cells was eye-centered. Similar to areas MSTd and VIP, the population of V6 neurons was best able to discriminate small variations in heading around forward and backward headings. Our findings support the idea that V6 is involved primarily in processing visual motion signals and does not appear to play a role in visual–vestibular integration for self-motion perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To understand how we successfully navigate our world, it is important to understand which parts of the brain process cues used to perceive our direction of self-motion (i.e., heading). Cortical area V6 has been implicated in heading computations based on human neuroimaging data, but direct measurements of heading selectivity in individual V6 neurons have been lacking. We

  17. Macaques in farms and folklore: exploring the human-nonhuman primate interface in Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riley, Erin P; Priston, Nancy E C

    2010-09-01

    The island of Sulawesi is an ecologically diverse and anthropogenically complex region in the Indonesian archipelago; it is home to multiple macaque species and a key locus of human-nonhuman primate interconnections. Here, we review the ethnoprimatology of Sulawesi by exploring two primary domains of the human-macaque interface: overlapping resource use and cultural perceptions of macaques. Crop raiding is the primary form of overlapping resource use. While the raiding of cacao plantations predominates in Central and South Sulawesi, subsistence crops (e.g., sweet potato and maize) are most vulnerable on Buton, Southeast Sulawesi. Despite this overlap levels of conflict are generally low, with farmers showing considerable tolerance. This tolerance can be explained by positive perceptions of the macaques despite their crop raiding behavior, and the finding that in some areas macaques figure prominently in local folklore, hence affording them protection. These findings provide some hope for the future management and conservation of these endemic macaques.

  18. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound homodimers determined by guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry: application to cytosine and 5-substituted cytosines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2013-11-19

    Base-pairing interactions in proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)·C) are the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Permethylation of cytosine in extended (CCG)·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats has been shown to cause fragile-X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. Oligonucleotides containing 5-bromo- or 5-fluorocytosine can bind to proteins that selectively bind methylated DNA, suggesting that halogenated cytosine damage products can potentially mimic methylation signals. However, the influence of methylation or halogenation on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of proton-bound dimers of cytosine and their impact on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations is presently unknown. To address this, proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and 5-methyl-, 5-fluoro-, 5-bromo-, and 5-iodocytosine are investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The BPEs of proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and the modified cytosines are measured by threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. 5-Methylation of cytosine is found to increase the BPE and would therefore tend to stabilize DNA i-motif conformations. In contrast, 5-halogenation lowers the BPE. However, the BPEs of the proton-bound 5-halocytosine homodimers examined here still significantly exceed that of Watson-Crick G·C base pairs, such that DNA i-motif conformations should be preserved in the presence of these modifications. Excellent agreement between TCID measured and B3LYP calculated BPEs is found, suggesting that B3LYP calculations can be used to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  19. Macaque–Human Interactions and the Societal Perceptions of Macaques in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    SHA, JOHN CHIH MUN; GUMERT, MICHAEL D.; LEE, BENJAMIN P. Y-H.; JONES-ENGEL, LISA; CHAN, SHARON; FUENTES, AGUSTÍN

    2015-01-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human–macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human–macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows

  20. Homodimers of cytosine and 1-methylcytosine. A DFT study of geometry, relative stability and H-NMR shifts in gas-phase and selected solvents.

    PubMed

    Paytakov, Guvanchmyrat; Gorb, Leonid; Stepanyugin, Andriy; Samiylenko, Svitlana; Hovorun, Dmytro; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    Dimers of cytosine and its N¹-methylated counterpart were investigated in gas-phase and in various solvents including chloroform, dimethylsulfoxide, and water. The studies were performed at DFT/M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Relative stabilities of tautomers of cytosine solvated explicitly by a small number of solvent molecules were evaluated. Further solvation effect calculations for homodimers were carried out with conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM). H-NMR shifts and IR frequencies for optimized structures were calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  1. Gastric trichobezoars in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Mook, Deborah M

    2002-12-01

    On physical examination, a 5 x 10-cm abdominal mass was found in an eight-year-old female rhesus macaque. Radiography revealed an opaque mass in the cranial portion of the abdomen, displacing the stomach craniad. Percutaneous biopsy obtained hair with little tissue, confirming a diagnosis of trichobezoar. Initially, the hairball was medically managed by oral administration of lubricants. Medical management proved unsuccessful, the macaque began to lose weight, and two gastric trichobezoars were subsequently removed surgically. Normal appetite and activity were regained within one week. Gastric trichobezoars may lead to severe clinical illness, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for anorexia and/or weight loss in any nonhuman primate. Trichobezoars may also be detected and treated prior to development of illness.

  2. Diet and vasectomy: effects on atherogenesis in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T B; Lombardi, D M; Alexander, N J; Lewis, J C

    1986-02-01

    We report here the effect of a moderately atherogenic diet on the progression of atherosclerosis among cynomolgus macaques that were either vasectomized or sham vasectomized. Both groups were compared to sham vasectomized monkeys fed a control Monkey Chow diet. As expected, slight hyperlipoproteinemia induced by the moderately atherogenic diet increased endothelial cell replication rates and resulted in the development of intimal lesions among sham vasectomized monkeys. Unexpectedly, vasectomy resulted in reduced leukocyte adherence to arterial surfaces, reduced endothelial cell replication rates in response to the moderately atherogenic diet, and at most arterial sites, smaller intimal lesions were produced. These data suggest that with slight hyperlipoproteinemia vasectomy may result in a small protective effect against atherosclerosis, while other studies have shown that marked hyperlipoproteinemia in cynomolgus macaques along with vasectomy results in exacerbation of atherogenesis.

  3. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2011-11-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans.

  4. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Guzman, Roberto E; Radi, Zaher A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis characterized by multifocal follicular lymphoid cell infiltrates with germinal centers, thyroid acinar atrophy and pituitary cell hyperplasia/hypertrophy of the adenohypophysis was detected in a vehicle control, 4-year-old female Cynomolgus macaque in a routine toxicology study. Lymphoid cells of germinal centers were positive for the B-cell marker CD20 by immunohistochemistry (IHC), while remaining lymphocytes were positive for the T-cell marker CD3. Hypertrophied/hyperplastic pituitary cells were positive for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by IHC, consistent with an adaptive response due to removal of hormonal negative feedback from the diseased thyroid gland. Features of this case are similar to chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in humans, an autoimmune disorder also known as Hashimoto's disease. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with compensatory pituitary changes may occur spontaneously in young, clinically normal cynomolgus macaques and its presence in drug treated animals should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Richard A; Rogers, Jeffrey; Katze, Michael G; Bumgarner, Roger; Weinstock, George M; Mardis, Elaine R; Remington, Karin A; Strausberg, Robert L; Venter, J Craig; Wilson, Richard K; Batzer, Mark A; Bustamante, Carlos D; Eichler, Evan E; Hahn, Matthew W; Hardison, Ross C; Makova, Kateryna D; Miller, Webb; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Palermo, Robert E; Siepel, Adam; Sikela, James M; Attaway, Tony; Bell, Stephanie; Bernard, Kelly E; Buhay, Christian J; Chandrabose, Mimi N; Dao, Marvin; Davis, Clay; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen H; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Fulton, Lucinda A; Gabisi, Ramatu Ayiesha; Garner, Toni T; Godfrey, Jennifer; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hines, Sandra; Holder, Michael; Hume, Jennifer; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Joshi, Vandita; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kirkness, Ewen F; Cree, Andrew; Fowler, R Gerald; Lee, Sandra; Lewis, Lora R; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Yih-Shin; Moore, Stephanie M; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne V; Ngo, Dinh Ngoc; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pai, Grace; Parker, David; Paul, Heidie A; Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Pohl, Craig S; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Ruiz, San Juana; Sabo, Aniko; Santibanez, Jireh; Schneider, Brian W; Smith, Scott M; Sodergren, Erica; Svatek, Amanda F; Utterback, Teresa R; Vattathil, Selina; Warren, Wesley; White, Courtney Sherell; Chinwalla, Asif T; Feng, Yucheng; Halpern, Aaron L; Hillier, Ladeana W; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Minx, Pat; Nelson, Joanne O; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Qin, Xiang; Sutton, Granger G; Venter, Eli; Walenz, Brian P; Wallis, John W; Worley, Kim C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Jones, Steven M; Marra, Marco A; Rocchi, Mariano; Schein, Jacqueline E; Baertsch, Robert; Clarke, Laura; Csürös, Miklós; Glasscock, Jarret; Harris, R Alan; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Andrew R; Jiang, Huaiyang; Liu, Yue; Messina, David N; Shen, Yufeng; Song, Henry Xing-Zhi; Wylie, Todd; Zhang, Lan; Birney, Ewan; Han, Kyudong; Konkel, Miriam K; Lee, Jungnam; Smit, Arian F A; Ullmer, Brygg; Wang, Hui; Xing, Jinchuan; Burhans, Richard; Cheng, Ze; Karro, John E; Ma, Jian; Raney, Brian; She, Xinwei; Cox, Michael J; Demuth, Jeffery P; Dumas, Laura J; Han, Sang-Gook; Hopkins, Janet; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Kim, Young H; Pollack, Jonathan R; Vinar, Tomas; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Denby, Alexandra; Hubisz, Melissa J; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Lahn, Bruce T; Lawson, Heather A; Marklein, Alison; Nielsen, Rasmus; Vallender, Eric J; Clark, Andrew G; Ferguson, Betsy; Hernandez, Ryan D; Hirani, Kashif; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Kolb, Jessica; Patil, Shobha; Pu, Ling-Ling; Ren, Yanru; Smith, David Glenn; Wheeler, David A; Schenck, Ian; Ball, Edward V; Chen, Rui; Cooper, David N; Giardine, Belinda; Hsu, Fan; Kent, W James; Lesk, Arthur; Nelson, David L; O'brien, William E; Prüfer, Kay; Stenson, Peter D; Wallace, James C; Ke, Hui; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Peng; Xiang, Andy Peng; Yang, Fan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Karolchik, Donna; Kern, Andy D; Kuhn, Robert M; Smith, Kayla E; Zwieg, Ann S

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.

  6. Analysing Local Sparseness in the Macaque Brain Network

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raghavendra; Nagar, Seema; Nanavati, Amit A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the network structure of long distance pathways in the brain is a necessary step towards developing an insight into the brain’s function, organization and evolution. Dense global subnetworks of these pathways have often been studied, primarily due to their functional implications. Instead we study sparse local subnetworks of the pathways to establish the role of a brain area in enabling shortest path communication between its non-adjacent topological neighbours. We propose a novel metric to measure the topological communication load on a vertex due to its immediate neighbourhood, and show that in terms of distribution of this local communication load, a network of Macaque long distance pathways is substantially different from other real world networks and random graph models. Macaque network contains the entire range of local subnetworks, from star-like networks to clique-like networks, while other networks tend to contain a relatively small range of subnetworks. Further, sparse local subnetworks in the Macaque network are not only found across topographical super-areas, e.g., lobes, but also within a super-area, arguing that there is conservation of even relatively short-distance pathways. To establish the communication role of a vertex we borrow the concept of brokerage from social science, and present the different types of brokerage roles that brain areas play, highlighting that not only the thalamus, but also cingulate gyrus and insula often act as “relays” for areas in the neocortex. These and other analysis of communication load and roles of the sparse subnetworks of the Macaque brain provide new insights into the organisation of its pathways. PMID:26437077

  7. Analysing Local Sparseness in the Macaque Brain Network.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raghavendra; Nagar, Seema; Nanavati, Amit A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the network structure of long distance pathways in the brain is a necessary step towards developing an insight into the brain's function, organization and evolution. Dense global subnetworks of these pathways have often been studied, primarily due to their functional implications. Instead we study sparse local subnetworks of the pathways to establish the role of a brain area in enabling shortest path communication between its non-adjacent topological neighbours. We propose a novel metric to measure the topological communication load on a vertex due to its immediate neighbourhood, and show that in terms of distribution of this local communication load, a network of Macaque long distance pathways is substantially different from other real world networks and random graph models. Macaque network contains the entire range of local subnetworks, from star-like networks to clique-like networks, while other networks tend to contain a relatively small range of subnetworks. Further, sparse local subnetworks in the Macaque network are not only found across topographical super-areas, e.g., lobes, but also within a super-area, arguing that there is conservation of even relatively short-distance pathways. To establish the communication role of a vertex we borrow the concept of brokerage from social science, and present the different types of brokerage roles that brain areas play, highlighting that not only the thalamus, but also cingulate gyrus and insula often act as "relays" for areas in the neocortex. These and other analysis of communication load and roles of the sparse subnetworks of the Macaque brain provide new insights into the organisation of its pathways.

  8. Rhesus macaque IFITM3 gene polymorphisms and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Michael; Gärtner, Sabine; Wrensch, Florian; Krawczak, Michael; Sauermann, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) have been recognized as important antiviral effectors of the innate immune system, both in cell culture and in infected humans. In particular, polymorphisms of the human IFITM3 gene have been shown to affect disease severity and progression in influenza A virus (FLUAV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, respectively. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are commonly used to model human infections and the experimental inoculation of these animals with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is one of the best models for HIV/AIDS in humans. However, information on the role of IFITM3 in SIV infection of rhesus macaques is currently lacking. We show that rhesus macaque (rh) IFITM3 inhibits SIV and FLUAV entry in cell culture, although with moderately reduced efficiency as compared to its human counterpart. We further report the identification of 16 polymorphisms in the rhIFITM3 gene, three of which were exonic and synonymous while the remainder was located in non-coding regions. Employing previously characterized samples from two cohorts of SIV-infected rhesus macaques, we investigated the relationship between these rhIFITM3 polymorphisms and both AIDS-free survival time and virus load. In cohort 1, several intronic polymorphisms were significantly associated with virus load or survival. However, an association with both parameters was not observed and significance was lost in most cases when animals were stratified for the presence of MHC allele Mamu-A1*001. Moreover, no significant genotype-phenotype associations were detected in cohort 2. These results suggest that, although IFITM3 can inhibit SIV infection in cell culture, genetic variation in rhIFITM3 might have only a minor impact on the course of SIV infection in experimentally infected animals. PMID:28257482

  9. Intersegmental Coordination in the Kinematics of Prehension Movements of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    The most popular model to explain how prehensile movements are organized assumes that they comprise two “components”, the reaching component encoding information regarding the object’s spatial location and the grasping component encoding information on the object’s intrinsic properties such as size and shape. Comparative kinematic studies on grasping behavior in the humans and in macaques have been carried out to investigate the similarities and differences existing across the two species. Although these studies seem to favor the hypothesis that macaques and humans share a number of kinematic features it remains unclear how the reaching and grasping components are coordinated during prehension movements in free-ranging macaque monkeys. Twelve hours of video footage was filmed of the monkeys as they snatched food items from one another (i.e., snatching) or collect them in the absence of competitors (i.e., unconstrained). The video samples were analyzed frame-by-frame using digitization techniques developed to perform two-dimensional post-hoc kinematic analyses of the two types of actions. The results indicate that only for the snatching condition when the reaching variability increased there was an increase in the amplitude of maximum grip aperture. Besides, the start of a break-point along the deceleration phase of the velocity profile correlated with the time at which maximum grip aperture occurred. These findings suggest that macaques can spatially and temporally couple the reaching and the grasping components when there is pressure to act quickly. They offer a substantial contribution to the debate about the nature of how prehensile actions are programmed. PMID:26176232

  10. The Human Homologue of Macaque Area V6A

    PubMed Central

    Pitzalis, S.; Sereno, M.I.; Committeri, G.; Fattori, P.; Galati, G.; Tosoni, A.; Galletti, C.

    2013-01-01

    In macaque monkeys, V6A is a visuomotor area located in the anterior bank of the POs, dorsal and anterior to retinotopically-organized extrastriate area V6 (Galletti et al 1996). Unlike V6, V6A represents both contra- and ipsilateral visual fields and is broadly retinotopically organized (Galletti et al 1999b). The contralateral lower visual field is overrepresented in V6A. The central 20°–30° of the visual field are mainly represented dorsally (V6Ad) and the periphery ventrally (V6Av), at the border with V6. Both sectors of area V6A contain arm movement-related cells, active during spatially-directed reaching movements (Gamberini et al., 2011). In humans, we previously mapped the retinotopic organization of area V6 (Pitzalis et al., 2006). Here, using phase-encoded fMRI, cortical surface-based analysis and wide-field retinotopic mapping, we define a new cortical region that borders V6 anteriorly and shows a clear over-representation of the contralateral lower visual field and of the periphery. As with macaque V6A, the eccentricity increases moving ventrally within the area. The new region contains a non-mirror-image representation of the visual field. Functional mapping reveals that, as in macaque V6A, the new region, but not the nearby area V6, responds during finger pointing and reaching movements. Based on similarity in position, retinotopic properties, functional organization and relationship with the neighbouring extrastriate visual areas, we propose that the new cortical region is the human homologue of macaque area V6A. PMID:23770406

  11. Distributed acoustic cues for caller identity in macaque vocalization.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Doyle, Alex M; Mullarkey, Matthew P; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Individual primates can be identified by the sound of their voice. Macaques have demonstrated an ability to discern conspecific identity from a harmonically structured 'coo' call. Voice recognition presumably requires the integrated perception of multiple acoustic features. However, it is unclear how this is achieved, given considerable variability across utterances. Specifically, the extent to which information about caller identity is distributed across multiple features remains elusive. We examined these issues by recording and analysing a large sample of calls from eight macaques. Single acoustic features, including fundamental frequency, duration and Weiner entropy, were informative but unreliable for the statistical classification of caller identity. A combination of multiple features, however, allowed for highly accurate caller identification. A regularized classifier that learned to identify callers from the modulation power spectrum of calls found that specific regions of spectral-temporal modulation were informative for caller identification. These ranges are related to acoustic features such as the call's fundamental frequency and FM sweep direction. We further found that the low-frequency spectrotemporal modulation component contained an indexical cue of the caller body size. Thus, cues for caller identity are distributed across identifiable spectrotemporal components corresponding to laryngeal and supralaryngeal components of vocalizations, and the integration of those cues can enable highly reliable caller identification. Our results demonstrate a clear acoustic basis by which individual macaque vocalizations can be recognized.

  12. Distributed acoustic cues for caller identity in macaque vocalization

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alex M.; Mullarkey, Matthew P.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2015-01-01

    Individual primates can be identified by the sound of their voice. Macaques have demonstrated an ability to discern conspecific identity from a harmonically structured ‘coo’ call. Voice recognition presumably requires the integrated perception of multiple acoustic features. However, it is unclear how this is achieved, given considerable variability across utterances. Specifically, the extent to which information about caller identity is distributed across multiple features remains elusive. We examined these issues by recording and analysing a large sample of calls from eight macaques. Single acoustic features, including fundamental frequency, duration and Weiner entropy, were informative but unreliable for the statistical classification of caller identity. A combination of multiple features, however, allowed for highly accurate caller identification. A regularized classifier that learned to identify callers from the modulation power spectrum of calls found that specific regions of spectral–temporal modulation were informative for caller identification. These ranges are related to acoustic features such as the call’s fundamental frequency and FM sweep direction. We further found that the low-frequency spectrotemporal modulation component contained an indexical cue of the caller body size. Thus, cues for caller identity are distributed across identifiable spectrotemporal components corresponding to laryngeal and supralaryngeal components of vocalizations, and the integration of those cues can enable highly reliable caller identification. Our results demonstrate a clear acoustic basis by which individual macaque vocalizations can be recognized. PMID:27019727

  13. Acquisition and functional consequences of social knowledge in macaques

    PubMed Central

    di Sorrentino, Eugenia Polizzi; Fischer, Julia; Schino, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    To manoeuvre in complex societies, it is beneficial to acquire knowledge about the social relationships existing among group mates, so as to better predict their behaviour. Although such knowledge has been firmly established in a variety of animal taxa, how animals acquire such knowledge, as well as its functional significance, remains poorly understood. In order to understand how primates acquire and use their social knowledge, we studied kin-biased redirected aggression in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) relying on a large database of over 15 000 aggressive episodes. Confirming previous research, macaques redirected aggression preferentially to the kin of their aggressor. An analysis that controlled for the rate of affiliation between aggressors and targets of redirection showed that macaques identified the relatives of group mates on the basis of the frequency of their ongoing associations. By contrast, having observed group mates interact with their mother as infants did not increase the monkeys' success in correctly identifying kin relationships among third parties. Inter-individual variation in the successful identification of the kin of aggressors and in redirecting aggression accordingly translated into differences in the amount of aggression received, highlighting a selective advantage for those individuals that were better able to acquire and use social knowledge. PMID:28386423

  14. Cryotolerance of Sperm from Transgenic Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Sean P; Chi, Tim; Prucha, Melinda S; Agca, Yuksel; Chan, Anthony WS

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an important tool routinely used in preserving sperm for assisted reproductive technologies and for genetic preservation of unique animal models. Here we investigated the viability of fresh and frozen sperm from rhesus macaques on the basis of motility, membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity. Sperm motility was determined by visual evaluation; membrane and acrosome integrity were assessed simultaneously through triple staining with Hoechst 33342, propidium iodide, and fluorescein isothiocyanate–peanut agglutinin. We compared thawed semen that had been cryopreserved by using 2 different media with fresh semen from wildtype (WT) macaques; fresh semen from a model of Huntington disease (HD) with fresh WT semen; and fresh HD with cryopreserved-thawed HD semen. Our new freezing media (TEST EQ) preserved the acrosome better, with less net damage, than did traditional TEST (egg yolk extender containing TES and Tris) media. In addition, the percentage of membrane-damaged cells was similar in fresh HD semen (38.6% ± 2.9%) and WT semen (35.5% ±1.9%). Membrane and acrosomal damage were not different between HD and WT sperm after cryopreservation and subsequent thawing. Furthermore, cryopreservation had similar negative effects on the motility of HD and WT sperm. These data illustrate that semen from a rhesus macaque model of HD is similarly cryotoleratant to that from WT animals. PMID:27657705

  15. Auditory artificial grammar learning in macaque and marmoset monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Slater, Heather; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2013-11-27

    Artificial grammars (AG) are designed to emulate aspects of the structure of language, and AG learning (AGL) paradigms can be used to study the extent of nonhuman animals' structure-learning capabilities. However, different AG structures have been used with nonhuman animals and are difficult to compare across studies and species. We developed a simple quantitative parameter space, which we used to summarize previous nonhuman animal AGL results. This was used to highlight an under-studied AG with a forward-branching structure, designed to model certain aspects of the nondeterministic nature of word transitions in natural language and animal song. We tested whether two monkey species could learn aspects of this auditory AG. After habituating the monkeys to the AG, analysis of video recordings showed that common marmosets (New World monkeys) differentiated between well formed, correct testing sequences and those violating the AG structure based primarily on simple learning strategies. By comparison, Rhesus macaques (Old World monkeys) showed evidence for deeper levels of AGL. A novel eye-tracking approach confirmed this result in the macaques and demonstrated evidence for more complex AGL. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown level of AGL complexity in Old World monkeys that seems less evident in New World monkeys, which are more distant evolutionary relatives to humans. The findings allow for the development of both marmosets and macaques as neurobiological model systems to study different aspects of AGL at the neuronal level.

  16. Expression of the Memory Marker CD45RO on Helper T Cells in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Michael; Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A.; Mack, Heather; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Polacino, Patricia; Ho, On; Cristillo, Anthony; Kyung Chung, Hye; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Pincus, Seth H.

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans it has been reported that a major site of the latent reservoir of HIV is within CD4+ T cells expressing the memory marker CD45RO, defined by the mAb UCHL1. There are conflicting reports regarding the expression of this antigen in macaques, the most relevant animal species for studying HIV pathogenesis and testing new therapies. There is now a major effort to eradicate HIV reservoirs and cure the infection. One approach is to eliminate subsets of cells housing the latent reservoir, using UCHL1 to target these cells. So that such studies may be performed in macaques, it is essential to determine expression of CD45RO. Methods We have used immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to study cell surface expression of CD45RO on lymphocytes from PBMC, lymphoid, and GI organs of rhesus, pigtailed, and cynomolgus macaques. Both direct and indirect immunofluorescence experiments were performed. Findings CD45RO is expressed on a subset of CD4+ lymphocytes of all pigtailed, a fraction of rhesus, and neither of the cynomolgus macaques studied. The binding of UCHL1 to macaque cells was of lower avidity than to human cells. This could be overcome by forming UCHL1 multimers. Directly conjugating fluors to UCHL1 can inhibit UCHL1 binding to macaque cells. Patterns of UCHL1 expression differ somewhat in macaques and humans, and from that of other memory markers often used in macaques. Conclusions CD45RO, defined with mAb UCHL1, is well expressed on CD4+ cells in pigtailed macaques. Using tissues recovered from latently infected pigtailed macaques we are determining whether UCHL1, or other memory markers, can define the cellular locus of the reservoir. The low avidity of this interaction could limit the utility of UCHL1, in its conventional form, to eliminate cells in vivo and test this approach in macaque models of HIV infection. PMID:24023920

  17. Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of Japanese Macaque Babesia-1 (JM-1) detected from a Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata fuscata)

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Haruyuki; Kawai, Satoru; Maeda, Mari; Jinnai, Michio; Fujisawa, Kohei; Katakai, Yuko; Hikosaka, Kenji; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here the identification and phylogenetic characterization of Babesia microti (B. microti)-like parasite detected from a splenectomized Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata fuscata) at a facility for laboratory animal science. On Day 133 after splenectomy, intra-erythrocytic parasites were found on light microscopic examination, and the level of parasitemia reached 0.3% on blood smear. Molecular characterization of the parasite using nested-polymerization chain reactions targeting the 18S rRNA, β-tubulin, and subunit 7 (eta) of the chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT7) genes were identified as a B. microti-like parasite, designated the Japanese Macaque Babesia-1 (JM-1). PMID:21976563

  18. Relationship of menstrual cycle and vaginal infection in female rhesus macaques challenged with repeated, low doses of SIVmac251.

    PubMed

    Morris, Monica R; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Villinger, Francois; Henning, Tara C; Butler, Katherine; Ansari, Aftab A; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-10-01

    Varying susceptibility during menstrual cycling could be a factor for S(H)IV infection risk in female rhesus macaques. We retrospectively determined vaginal SIV infection time points relative to the menstrual cycle in a group of rhesus macaques (n=11) enrolled in an HIV transmission trial. Eight of nine rhesus macaques became infected around menstruation time.

  19. Macaque-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1: breaking out of the host restriction factors

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Macaque monkeys serve as important animal models for understanding the pathogenesis of lentiviral infections. Since human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) hardly replicates in macaque cells, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or chimeric viruses between HIV-1 and SIV (SHIV) have been used as challenge viruses in this research field. These viruses, however, are genetically distant from HIV-1. Therefore, in order to evaluate the efficacy of anti-HIV-1 drugs and vaccines in macaques, the development of a macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) having the ability to replicate efficiently in macaques has long been desired. Recent studies have demonstrated that host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 family and TRIM5, impose a strong barrier against HIV-1 replication in macaque cells. By evading these restriction factors, others and we have succeeded in developing an HIV-1mt that is able to replicate in macaques. In this review, we have attempted to shed light on the role of host factors that affect the susceptibility of macaques to HIV-1mt infection, especially by focusing on TRIM5-related factors. PMID:23847610

  20. Interindividual Differences in Neonatal Imitation and the Development of Action Chains in Rhesus Macaques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Paukner, Annika; Ruggiero, Angela; Darcey, Lisa; Unbehagen, Sarah; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to imitate facial gestures is highly variable in rhesus macaques and this variability may be related to differences in specific neurobehavioral patterns of development. This study evaluated the differential neonatal imitative response of 41 macaques in relation to the development of sensory, motor, and cognitive skills throughout the…

  1. Novel cynomolgus macaque MHC-DPB1 polymorphisms in three South-East Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Shiina, T; Kohara, S; Yanagiya, K; Hosomichi, K; Shimizu, S; Anzai, T; Watanabe, A; Ogasawara, K; Torii, R; Kulski, J K; Inoko, H

    2006-04-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis, Mafa), alias the crab-eating monkeys or long-tailed macaques, live across a vast range of South-East Asia. These non-human primates have emerged as important animal models in infectious and chronic diseases and transplantation studies, necessitating a more extensive characterization of their major histocompatibility complex polymorphic regions. The current information on the polymorphic variation or diversity of the Mafa-DPB1 locus is largely limited in comparison with the more commonly studied rhesus macaque DPB1 locus. In this article, to better elucidate the degree and types of polymorphisms and genetic differences of Mafa-DPB1 locus among three South-East Asian populations and to investigate how the allele differences between macaques and humans might affect their respective immune responses, we identified 40 alleles within exon 2 of the Mafa-DPB1 locus by DNA sequencing using 217 individuals. We also performed evolutionary and population analyses using these sequences to reveal some population-specific alleles and trans-species allelic conservation between the cynomolgus macaques and the rhesus macaques. Of the 40 new alleles, eight belong to a newly identified lineage group not previously found in the rhesus macaque species. This allele information will be useful for medical researchers using the cynomolgus macaques in disease and immunological studies.

  2. The population genomics of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) based on whole-genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Cheng; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Harris, R. Alan; Fawcett, Gloria L.; Liu, Xiaoming; White, Simon; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Rio Deiros, David; Below, Jennifer E.; Salerno, William; Cox, Laura; Fan, Guoping; Ferguson, Betsy; Horvath, Julie; Johnson, Zach; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Kubisch, H. Michael; Liu, Dahai; Platt, Michael; Smith, David G.; Sun, Binghua; Vallender, Eric J.; Wang, Feng; Wiseman, Roger W.; Chen, Rui; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Yu, Fuli; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are the most widely used nonhuman primate in biomedical research, have the largest natural geographic distribution of any nonhuman primate, and have been the focus of much evolutionary and behavioral investigation. Consequently, rhesus macaques are one of the most thoroughly studied nonhuman primate species. However, little is known about genome-wide genetic variation in this species. A detailed understanding of extant genomic variation among rhesus macaques has implications for the use of this species as a model for studies of human health and disease, as well as for evolutionary population genomics. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of 133 rhesus macaques revealed more than 43.7 million single-nucleotide variants, including thousands predicted to alter protein sequences, transcript splicing, and transcription factor binding sites. Rhesus macaques exhibit 2.5-fold higher overall nucleotide diversity and slightly elevated putative functional variation compared with humans. This functional variation in macaques provides opportunities for analyses of coding and noncoding variation, and its cellular consequences. Despite modestly higher levels of nonsynonymous variation in the macaques, the estimated distribution of fitness effects and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous variants suggest that purifying selection has had stronger effects in rhesus macaques than in humans. Demographic reconstructions indicate this species has experienced a consistently large but fluctuating population size. Overall, the results presented here provide new insights into the population genomics of nonhuman primates and expand genomic information directly relevant to primate models of human disease. PMID:27934697

  3. The population genomics of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) based on whole-genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Harris, R Alan; Fawcett, Gloria L; Liu, Xiaoming; White, Simon; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Rio Deiros, David; Below, Jennifer E; Salerno, William; Cox, Laura; Fan, Guoping; Ferguson, Betsy; Horvath, Julie; Johnson, Zach; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Kubisch, H Michael; Liu, Dahai; Platt, Michael; Smith, David G; Sun, Binghua; Vallender, Eric J; Wang, Feng; Wiseman, Roger W; Chen, Rui; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Yu, Fuli; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are the most widely used nonhuman primate in biomedical research, have the largest natural geographic distribution of any nonhuman primate, and have been the focus of much evolutionary and behavioral investigation. Consequently, rhesus macaques are one of the most thoroughly studied nonhuman primate species. However, little is known about genome-wide genetic variation in this species. A detailed understanding of extant genomic variation among rhesus macaques has implications for the use of this species as a model for studies of human health and disease, as well as for evolutionary population genomics. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of 133 rhesus macaques revealed more than 43.7 million single-nucleotide variants, including thousands predicted to alter protein sequences, transcript splicing, and transcription factor binding sites. Rhesus macaques exhibit 2.5-fold higher overall nucleotide diversity and slightly elevated putative functional variation compared with humans. This functional variation in macaques provides opportunities for analyses of coding and noncoding variation, and its cellular consequences. Despite modestly higher levels of nonsynonymous variation in the macaques, the estimated distribution of fitness effects and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous variants suggest that purifying selection has had stronger effects in rhesus macaques than in humans. Demographic reconstructions indicate this species has experienced a consistently large but fluctuating population size. Overall, the results presented here provide new insights into the population genomics of nonhuman primates and expand genomic information directly relevant to primate models of human disease.

  4. Comparative demography of two commensal macaques in India: implications for population status and conservation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rishi; Sinha, Anindya; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2013-01-01

    Rhesus and bonnet macaques are among the most common primates found in India and have been categorised as being of Least Concern by the IUCN. Despite the wealth of information on their ecology and behaviour, little attention has been paid to their demography or population status. We studied the demographic status of the two species along their common distribution zone in western, central and south-eastern India. Bonnet macaques were largely found in forest areas whereas rhesus macaques were observed more often in human-dominated habitats. The troop sizes of the two species also tended to be largest in different habitats, bonnet macaques in forested areas and rhesus macaques in urban areas. We suggest that the presence of large numbers of rhesus macaques in anthropogenic areas in south-eastern India is not a natural phenomenon but has been caused by human intervention. The bonnet macaque population has decreased in number in the common distribution zone, and as this species, unlike the rhesus macaque, is endemic to India, we strongly recommend the need to reassess its conservation status.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly conserved in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques

    PubMed Central

    Street, Summer L; Kyes, Randall C; Grant, Richard; Ferguson, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Background Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus or longtail macaques) is the most commonly used non-human primate in biomedical research. Little is known about the genomic variation in cynomolgus macaques or how the sequence variants compare to those of the well-studied related species, Macaca mulatta (rhesus macaque). Previously we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in portions of 94 rhesus macaque genes and reported that Indian and Chinese rhesus had largely different SNPs. Here we identify SNPs from some of the same genomic regions of cynomolgus macaques (from Indochina, Indonesia, Mauritius and the Philippines) and compare them to the SNPs found in rhesus. Results We sequenced a portion of 10 genes in 20 cynomolgus macaques. We identified 69 SNPs in these regions, compared with 71 SNPs found in the same genomic regions of 20 Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques. Thirty six (52%) of the M. fascicularis SNPs were overlapping in both species. The majority (70%) of the SNPs found in both Chinese and Indian rhesus macaque populations were also present in M. fascicularis. Of the SNPs previously found in a single rhesus population, 38% (Indian) and 44% (Chinese) were also identified in cynomolgus macaques. In an alternative approach, we genotyped 100 cynomolgus DNAs using a rhesus macaque SNP array representing 53 genes and found that 51% (29/57) of the rhesus SNPs were present in M. fascicularis. Comparisons of SNP profiles from cynomolgus macaques imported from breeding centers in China (where M. fascicularis are not native) showed they were similar to those from Indochina. Conclusion This study demonstrates a surprisingly high conservation of SNPs between M. fascicularis and M. mulatta, suggesting that the relationship of these two species is closer than that suggested by morphological and mitochondrial DNA analysis alone. These findings indicate that SNP discovery efforts in either species will generate useful resources for both macaque species

  6. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring protects high-dose depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques from multiple SHIV exposures.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Srinivasan, Priya; Teller, Ryan S; Lo, Yungtai; Dinh, Chuong T; Kiser, Patrick F; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical HIV prevention models use either a single high-dose viral challenge in depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques or repeated viral challenges in cycling macaques. We tested the efficacy of an intravaginal tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) ring in a model combining repeated 30-mg injections of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate every 6 weeks with vaginal viral challenges weekly for 12 weeks. Twelve macaques were randomized to TDF or placebo rings. All placebo macaques became infected after a median of 2 exposures, whereas only 1 TDF macaque became infected at the eighth exposure (P = 0.0012). The TDF ring provides durable protection in a stringent challenge model.

  7. An in Vitro and in Vivo Investigation of Bivalent Ligands That Display Preferential Binding and Functional Activity for Different Melanocortin Receptor Homodimers.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Cody J; Freeman, Katie T; Schnell, Sathya M; Adank, Danielle N; Speth, Robert C; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-04-14

    Pharmacological probes for the melanocortin receptors have been utilized for studying various disease states including cancer, sexual function disorders, Alzheimer's disease, social disorders, cachexia, and obesity. This study focused on the design and synthesis of bivalent ligands to target melanocortin receptor homodimers. Lead ligands increased binding affinity by 14- to 25-fold and increased cAMP signaling potency by 3- to 5-fold compared to their monovalent counterparts. Unexpectedly, different bivalent ligands showed preferences for particular melanocortin receptor subtypes depending on the linker that connected the binding scaffolds, suggesting structural differences between the various dimer subtypes. Homobivalent compound 12 possessed a functional profile that was unique from its monovalent counterpart providing evidence of the discrete effects of bivalent ligands. Lead compound 7 significantly decreased feeding in mice after intracerebroventricular administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a melanocortin bivalent ligand's in vivo physiological effects.

  8. Intrasulcal electrocorticography in macaque monkeys with minimally invasive neurosurgical protocols.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Keisuke; Osada, Takahiro; Sawahata, Hirohito; Suzuki, Takafumi; Shibata, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Nakahara, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Atsuhiko; Sato, Noboru; Kawai, Kensuke; Saito, Nobuhito; Hasegawa, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG), multichannel brain-surface recording and stimulation with probe electrode arrays, has become a potent methodology not only for clinical neurosurgery but also for basic neuroscience using animal models. The highly evolved primate's brain has deep cerebral sulci, and both gyral and intrasulcal cortical regions have been implicated in important functional processes. However, direct experimental access is typically limited to gyral regions, since placing probes into sulci is difficult without damaging the surrounding tissues. Here we describe a novel methodology for intrasulcal ECoG in macaque monkeys. We designed and fabricated ultra-thin flexible probes for macaques with micro-electro-mechanical systems technology. We developed minimally invasive operative protocols to implant the probes by introducing cutting-edge devices for human neurosurgery. To evaluate the feasibility of intrasulcal ECoG, we conducted electrophysiological recording and stimulation experiments. First, we inserted parts of the Parylene-C-based probe into the superior temporal sulcus to compare visually evoked ECoG responses from the ventral bank of the sulcus with those from the surface of the inferior temporal cortex. Analyses of power spectral density and signal-to-noise ratio revealed that the quality of the ECoG signal was comparable inside and outside of the sulcus. Histological examination revealed no obvious physical damage in the implanted areas. Second, we placed a modified silicone ECoG probe into the central sulcus and also on the surface of the precentral gyrus for stimulation. Thresholds for muscle twitching were significantly lower during intrasulcal stimulation compared to gyral stimulation. These results demonstrate the feasibility of intrasulcal ECoG in macaques. The novel methodology proposed here opens up a new frontier in neuroscience research, enabling the direct measurement and manipulation of electrical activity in the whole brain.

  9. Rapid Expansion of Phenylthiocarbamide Non-Tasters among Japanese Macaques.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Hayakawa, Takashi; Matsui, Atsushi; Go, Yasuhiro; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko; Hirai, Hirohisa; Satta, Yoko; Imai, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2R proteins) allow mammals to detect and avoid ingestion of toxins in food. Thus, TAS2Rs play an important role in food choice and are subject to complex natural selection pressures. In our previous study, we examined nucleotide variation in TAS2R38, a gene expressing bitter taste receptor for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), in 333 Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) from 9 local populations in Japan. We identified a PTC "non-taster" TAS2R38 allele in Japanese macaques that was caused by a loss of the start codon. This PTC non-taster allele was only found in a limited local population (the Kii area), at a frequency of 29%. In this study, we confirmed that this allele was present in only the Kii population by analyzing an additional 264 individuals from eight new populations. Using cellular and behavioral experiments, we found that this allele lost its receptor function for perceiving PTC. The nucleotide sequences of the allele including flanking regions (of about 10 kb) from 23 chromosomes were identical, suggesting that a non-taster allele arose and expanded in the Kii population during the last 13,000 years. Genetic analyses of non-coding regions in Kii individuals and neighboring populations indicated that the high allele frequency in the Kii population could not be explained by demographic history, suggesting that positive selection resulted in a rapid increase in PTC non-tasters in the Kii population. The loss-of-function that occurred at the TAS2R38 locus presumably provided a fitness advantage to Japanese macaques in the Kii population. Because TAS2R38 ligands are often found in plants, this functional change in fitness is perhaps related to feeding habit specificity. These findings should provide valuable insights for elucidating adaptive evolutionary changes with respect to various environments in wild mammals.

  10. Cross-Species Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bimber, Benjamin N.; Reed, Jason S.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Bhusari, Amruta; Hammond, Katherine B.; Klug, Alex; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMV) are highly species-specific due to millennia of co-evolution and adaptation to their host, with no successful experimental cross-species infection in primates reported to date. Accordingly, full genome phylogenetic analysis of multiple new CMV field isolates derived from two closely related nonhuman primate species, Indian-origin rhesus macaques (RM) and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (MCM), revealed distinct and tight lineage clustering according to the species of origin, with MCM CMV isolates mirroring the limited genetic diversity of their primate host that underwent a population bottleneck 400 years ago. Despite the ability of Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) laboratory strain 68–1 to replicate efficiently in MCM fibroblasts and potently inhibit antigen presentation to MCM T cells in vitro, RhCMV 68–1 failed to productively infect MCM in vivo, even in the absence of host CD8+ T and NK cells. In contrast, RhCMV clone 68–1.2, genetically repaired to express the homologues of the HCMV anti-apoptosis gene UL36 and epithelial cell tropism genes UL128 and UL130 absent in 68–1, efficiently infected MCM as evidenced by the induction of transgene-specific T cells and virus shedding. Recombinant variants of RhCMV 68–1 and 68–1.2 revealed that expression of either UL36 or UL128 together with UL130 enabled productive MCM infection, indicating that multiple layers of cross-species restriction operate even between closely related hosts. Cumulatively, these results implicate cell tropism and evasion of apoptosis as critical determinants of CMV transmission across primate species barriers, and extend the macaque model of human CMV infection and immunology to MCM, a nonhuman primate species with uniquely simplified host immunogenetics. PMID:27829026

  11. Patterns of Immune Regulation in Rhesus Macaque and Human Families

    PubMed Central

    Burlingham, William J.; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Kempton, Steve; Haynes, Lynn; Kaufman, Dixon B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naturally acquired immune regulation amongst family members can result in mutual regulation between living related renal transplant donor and recipients. Pretransplant bidirectional regulation predisposed to superior renal allograft outcome in a CAMPATH-1H protocol. We tested whether Rhesus macaques, a large animal model of choice for preclinical transplant studies, share these immunoregulatory properties. Methods Antigen-specific linked suppression was measured by trans vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity [tvDTH] response. Neutralizing antibodies to regulatory cytokines, IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-35 were coinjected to ascertain the role of these cytokines in the regulatory response. Results Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 116 Rhesus macaques in 50 families and 78 human subjects in 25 families were analyzed. Suppression of the recall response of 25% or greater was detected in 30 of 51 (59%) monkeys, and 25 of 36 (69%) human subjects when PBMC were coinjected with antigens of the mother, containing the noninherited maternal antigens. In 33% of Rhesus and 32% of human subjects, linked suppression was also seen when PBMC from the mother was assayed with antigens from offspring. Bidirectional regulation was also seen between greater than 50% of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-identical full siblings; subcellular antigens caused significant linked suppression in 7 of 10 (Rhesus) and 8 of 15 (human) cases, indicating the importance of familial minor H antigens. The lowest incidence of regulation was seen in MHC-1 haplotype mismatched siblings in both species. Linked suppression was most effectively reversed by antibodies that neutralized TGFβ1, and the 2 subunits of IL-35 (Ebi3 and IL12p35). Conclusions Rhesus macaques provide a suitable model for analyzing the impact of bidirectional regulation in living related donor-recipient pairs. PMID:27500222

  12. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection. PMID:28133458

  13. Selective reaching in macaques: evidence for action-centred attention.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Maria; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Straulino, Elisa; Sartori, Luisa; D'Amico, Enrico; Castiello, Umberto

    2017-03-01

    When a monkey selects a piece of food lying on the ground from among other viable objects in the near vicinity, only the desired item governs the particular pattern and direction of the animal's reaching action. It would seem then that selection is an important component controlling the animal's action. But, we may ask, is the selection process in such cases impervious to the presence of other objects that could constitute potential obstacles to or constraints on movement execution? And if it is, in fact, pervious to other objects, do they have a direct influence on the organization of the response? The kinematics of macaques' reaching movements were examined by the current study that analysed some exemplars as they selectively reached to grasp a food item in the absence as well as in the presence of potential obstacles (i.e., stones) that could affect the arm trajectory. Changes in movement parameterization were noted in temporal measures, such as movement time, as well as in spatial ones, such as paths of trajectory. Generally speaking, the presence of stones in the vicinity of the acting hand stalled the reaching movement and affected the arm trajectory as the hand veered away from the stone even when it was not a physical obstacle. We concluded that nearby objects evoke a motor response in macaques, and the attentional mechanisms that allow for a successful action selection are revealed in the reaching path. The data outlined here concur with human studies indicating that potential obstacles are internally represented, a finding implying basic cognitive operations allowing for action selection in macaques.

  14. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive amacrine cells of macaque retina

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kathryn E.; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of authors have observed amacrine cells containing high levels of immunoreactive parvalbumin in primate retinas. The experiments described here were designed to identify these cells morphologically, to determine their neurotransmitter, to record their light responses, and to describe the other cells that they contact. Macaque retinas were fixed in paraformaldehyde and labeled with antibodies to parvalbumin and one or two other markers, and this double- and triple-labeled material was analyzed by confocal microscopy. In their morphology and dendritic stratification patterns, the parvalbumin-positive cells closely resembled the knotty type 2 amacrine cells described using the Golgi method in macaques. They contained immunoreactive glycine transporter, but not immunoreactive γ-aminobutyric acid, and therefore, they use glycine as their neurotransmitter. Their spatial density was relatively high, roughly half that of AII amacrine cells. They contacted lobular dendrites of AII cells, and they are expected to be presynaptic to AII cells based on earlier ultrastructural studies. They also made extensive contacts with axon terminals of OFF midget bipolar cells whose polarity cannot be predicted with certainty. A macaque amacrine cell of the same morphological type depolarized at the onset of increments in light intensity, and it was well coupled to other amacrine cells. Previously, we described amacrine cells like these that contacted OFF parasol ganglion cells and OFF starburst amacrine cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that one function of these amacrine cells is to inhibit the transmission of signals from rods to OFF bipolar cells via AII amacrine cells. Another function may be inhibition of the OFF pathway following increments in light intensity. PMID:19435546

  15. Genomic Sequencing and Characterization of Cynomolgus Macaque Cytomegalovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Ambagala, Aruna P. N.; Dzamba, Misko; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Pilon, Richard; Fournier, Jocelyn; Sandstrom, Paul; Brudno, Michael; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients or people living with HIV/AIDS, and congenital CMV is the leading viral cause of developmental disabilities in infants. Due to the highly species-specific nature of CMV, animal models that closely recapitulate human CMV (HCMV) are of growing importance for vaccine development. Here we present the genomic sequence of a novel nonhuman primate CMV from cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis; CyCMV). CyCMV (Ottawa strain) was isolated from the urine of a healthy, captive-bred, 4-year-old cynomolgus macaque of Philippine origin, and the viral genome was sequenced using next-generation Illumina sequencing to an average of 516-fold coverage. The CyCMV genome is 218,041 bp in length, with 49.5% G+C content and 84% protein-coding density. We have identified 262 putative open reading frames (ORFs) with an average coding length of 789 bp. The genomic organization of CyCMV is largely colinear with that of rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV). Of the 262 CyCMV ORFs, 137 are homologous to HCMV genes, 243 are homologous to RhCMV 68.1, and 200 are homologous to RhCMV 180.92. CyCMV encodes four ORFs that are not present in RhCMV strain 68.1 or 180.92 but have homologies with HCMV (UL30, UL74A, UL126, and UL146). Similar to HCMV, CyCMV does not produce the RhCMV-specific viral homologue of cyclooxygenase-2. This newly characterized CMV may provide a novel model in which to study CMV biology and HCMV vaccine development. PMID:21994460

  16. Carcinogenic heavy metals replace Ca{sup 2+} for DNA binding and annealing activities of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Aiko; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Fusao

    2010-10-01

    Mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was purified from rat liver nuclei. The homodimer form of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was able to unwind dsDNA in a Mg{sup 2+}- and ATP-dependent manner, and to anneal ssDNA in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. Phospholipids decreased the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} required for maximal annealing activity. Heavy metals such as As{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 6+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} substituted for Ca{sup 2+} in the ssDNA binding and annealing activities of annexin A1. While these metals inhibited the unwinding of dsDNA by nuclear annexin A1 in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and ATP, they enhanced dsDNA-dependent ATPase activity of annexin A1. Heavy metals may have produced dsDNA, a substrate for the DNA unwinding reaction, via the DNA annealing reaction. DNA synthesomes were isolated from L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells in exponential growth, and were found to contain helicase activities. The As{sup 3+}- or Cr{sup 6+}-induced increases in ssDNA binding activity of DNA synthesomes were reduced by a mono-specific anti-annexin A1 antibody, but not by anti-Ig antibody. Anti-annexin A1 antibody also blocked the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of As{sup 3+} or Cr{sup 6+} towards DNA unwinding and annealing activities of DNA synthesomes. Based on these observations, it can be concluded that the effects of heavy metals on DNA annealing and unwinding activities are mediated, at least in substantial part, through actions of the mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 homodimer.

  17. Latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by enhancing NF-κB p50 homodimer formation and downregulating NAPA expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zchong-Zcho; Chow, Kai-Ping N; Kuo, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2011-12-15

    Expression of the oncogenic latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus is involved in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and lymphoma. In previous studies, we found that expression of LMP1 was sufficient to transform BALB/c-3T3 cells. In contrast, other studies have shown that LMP1 induces apoptosis in a NF-κB-dependent manner and also inhibits the growth of tumors in mice, thereby indicating that LMP1 may produce various biological effects depending on the biological and cellular context. Still, the mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic activity of LMP1 remains unclear. In the present study, we found that LMP1 inhibits the expression of NAPA, an endoplasmic reticulum SNARE protein that possesses anti-apoptotic properties against the DNA-damaging drug cisplatin. Accordingly, LMP1-transformed BALB/c-3T3 cells were sensitized to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas no sensitization effect was noted following treatment with the mitotic spindle-damaging drugs vincristine and taxol. Knockdown of LMP1 with antisense oligonucleotides restored NAPA protein level and rendered the cells resistant to cisplatin. Similarly, overexpression of NAPA reduced the effect of LMP1 and induced resistance to cisplatin. LMP1 was shown to upregulate the NF-κB subunit p50, leading to formation of p50 homodimers on the NAPA promoter. These findings suggest that the viral protein LMP1 may sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin chemotherapy by downregulating NAPA and by enhancing the formation of p50 homodimers which in turn inhibit the expression of NF-κB regulated anti-apoptotic genes. These findings provide an explanatory mechanism for the pro-apoptotic activity of LMP1 as well as new therapeutic targets to control tumor growth.

  18. Both JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 of Juglans regia mediate responses to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid through formation of homodimers and interaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Yi-Maer, A-Y; Zhai, M; Xu, Z

    2017-03-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to a large protein family that is involved in diverse developmental processes and abiotic stress responses. Currently, there is little understanding of the role of WRKY transcription factors in regulatory mechanisms in plants, especially in the protein-protein interactions that are essential for biological regulatory functions and networks. In the present study, yeast one-hybrid, yeast two-hybrid, transient expression and quantitative RT-PCR were applied to investigate the potential characteristics of two WRKY proteins from Juglans regia, JrWRKY2 (GenBank Accession No. KU057089) and JrWRKY7 (GenBank Accession No. KP784651). JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 can form homodimers and interact with each other. JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 can bind to W-box motifs. Similarly high levels of transcription were found for JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 under NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG) stresses, as well as at different developmental stages, e.g., the pistil or terminal leaf. JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 were transiently overexpressed in an independent manner in the terminal leaf. Analyses of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and electrolyte leakage rate showed that JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 overexpression improved plant tolerance to NaCl, PEG, abscisic acid, and cold stress. Additionally, JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 overexpression elevated transcription of SOD, POD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and MYB genes, but downregulated the expression of NAC. Overall, the results demonstrate that JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 are dimeric proteins that can form functional homodimers and interact with each other and that they are involved in abiotic stress responses.

  19. Seroconversion to HCoV-NL63 in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Dijkman, Ronald; Mulder, H Lie; Rumping, Lynne; Kraaijvanger, Ilse; Deijs, Martin; Jebbink, Maarten F; Verschoor, Ernst J; van der Hoek, Lia

    2009-12-01

    HCoV-NL63 is a recently identified respiratory virus. Its pathogenesis has not been fully unraveled because an animal model is currently lacking. Here we examined whether rhesus macaques encounter HCoV-NL63 infections during life, by examining the levels of antibodies to HCoV-NL63 in time. The animals were followed for 7 up till 19 years, and in three animals we observed a steep rise in antibodies during follow up, indicative of a natural infection with HCoV-NL63.

  20. Transmission of Chagas Disease via Blood Transfusions in 2 Immunosuppressed Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Derek L; Torrence, Annie E; Vogel, Keith W; Stockinger, Diane E; Nelson, Veronica; Murnane, Robert D; Baldessari, Audrey; Kuller, LaRene; Agy, Michael; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E

    2014-01-01

    A 2.25-y-old male pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) was experimentally irradiated and received a bone marrow transplant. After transplantation and engraftment, the macaque had unexpected recurring pancytopenia and dependent edema of the prepuce, scrotum, and legs. The diagnostic work-up included a blood smear, which revealed a trypomastigote consistent with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). We initially hypothesized that the macaque had acquired the infection when it lived in Georgia. However, because the animal had received multiple blood transfusions, all blood donors were screened for CD. One male pigtailed macaque blood donor, which was previously housed in Louisiana, was positive for T. cruzi antibodies via serology. Due to the low prevalence of infection in Georgia, the blood transfusion was hypothesized to be the source of T. cruzi infection. The transfusion was confirmed as the mechanism of transmission when screening of archived serum revealed seroconversion after blood transfusion from the seropositive blood donor. The macaque made a full clinical recovery, and further follow-up including thoracic radiography, echocardiography, and gross necropsy did not show any abnormalities associated with CD. Other animals that received blood transfusions from the positive blood donor were tested, and one additional pigtailed macaque on the same research protocol was positive for T. cruzi. Although CD has been reported to occur in many nonhuman primate species, especially pigtailed macaques, the transmission of CD via blood transfusion in nonhuman primates has not been reported previously. PMID:24512963

  1. Forest seasonality shapes diet of limestone-living rhesus macaques at Nonggang, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuangbin; Huang, Libin; Huang, Zhonghao; Krzton, Ali; Lu, Changhu; Zhou, Qihai

    2016-01-01

    Limestone forests are an unusual habitat for primates, but little information is available for the genus Macaca in such habitats, making a comparative understanding of extant limestone primates' behavioral adaptation incomplete. We collected data on the diet of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in a limestone habitat at Nonggang Nature Reserve, southwestern Guangxi, China, and examined the effects of forest seasonality on their diet. Our results indicated that a total of 114 species of plants are consumed by macaques. Young leaves are a preferred food, accounting for 48.9 and 56.9% of the overall diets. One group significantly increased young leaf consumption in response to availability. Fruits contributed to only 27.3 and 28.7% of overall diet. The macaque diet varied according to season. They fed on more fruits in the rainy season. Consumption of mature leaves increased when the availability of young leaves and fruits declined in the dry season, indicating that mature leaves are a fallback food for macaques in a limestone habitat. Similar to sympatric Assamese macaques, Bonia saxatilis, a shrubby, karst-endemic bamboo was consumed by rhesus macaques throughout the year, and was the top food species through most of the year, suggesting that bamboo consumption represents a key factor in the macaque's dietary adaptation to limestone habitat.

  2. Genetic diversity of Bartonella quintana in macaques suggests zoonotic origin of trench fever.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Bai, Jie-Ying; Wang, Li-Yuan; Zeng, Lin; Shi, Yan-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Liang; Ye, Hua-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Lu, Qing-Bin; Kosoy, Michael; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2013-04-01

    Bartonella quintana is a bacterium that causes a broad spectrum of diseases in humans including trench fever. Humans were previously considered to be the primary, if not the only, reservoir hosts for B. quintana. To identify the animal reservoir and extend our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary history of B. quintana, we examined blood samples from macaques and performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. We demonstrated the prevalence of B. quintana infection was common in macaques from main primate centres in mainland China. Overall, 18.0% (59/328) of rhesus macaques and 12.7% (39/308) of cynomolgus macaques were found to be infected with B. quintana by blood culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. The infection was more frequently identified in juvenile and young monkeys compared with adult animals. In contrast with the relatively low level of sequence divergence of B. quintana reported in humans, our investigation revealed much higher genetic diversity in nonhuman primates. We identified 44 new nucleotide variable sites and 14 novel sequence types (STs) among the B. quintana isolates by MLST analysis. Some STs were found only in cynomolgus macaques, while some others were detected only in rhesus macaques, suggesting evidence of host-cospeciation, which were further confirmed by phylogenetic analysis and Splits decomposition analysis. Our findings suggest that trench fever may primarily be a zoonotic disease with macaques as the natural hosts.

  3. Macaques immunized with HLA-DR are protected from challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Bess, J W; Urban, R G; Strominger, J L; Morton, W R; Mann, D L; Henderson, L E; Benveniste, R E

    1995-01-01

    Macaques immunized with uninfected human cells have been shown to be protected from challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) propagated in human cells. To identify the potential antigens involved in this protection, macaques were immunized with uninfected human cells, sucrose density gradient-purified culture fluid from uninfected human cells (mock virus), beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2M), immunoaffinity-purified HLA class I and class II proteins from these human cells, and adjuvant. Although all macaques immunized with beta 2M and HLA class I developed high antibody titers to beta 2M, these animals were not protected from a subsequent challenge with infectious SIV grown in human cells. In contrast, the macaques immunized with class II protein (HLA-DR) and mock virus developed antibodies to class II protein and were protected from the intravenous infectious virus challenge. The class II protein- and mock virus-immunized animals which were protected from challenge were given boosters of the appropriate antigen and challenged with the same SIV propagated in macaque cells. All animals became infected, indicating that the protection seen with human class II protein did not extend to protection from infection with SIV containing macaque class II proteins. Since the virus released from SIV-infected macaque cells would contain macaque class II proteins, our results suggest that the initial SIV infected was completely prevented. In addition, the lack of protection from challenge with SIV propagated in macaque cells provided strong evidence that the protection was due to an immune response to the cellular proteins and not to epitopes cross-reactive between class II proteins and the viral proteins, since the identical virus proteins were present in both challenge stocks. These results are the first demonstration that immunization with a purified cellular protein can protect from virus infection. PMID:7707540

  4. Social determinants of eyeblinks in adult male macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ballesta, Sébastien; Mosher, Clayton P.; Szep, Jeno; Fischl, Kate D.; Gothard, Katalin M.

    2016-01-01

    Videos with rich social and emotional content elicit natural social behaviors in primates. Indeed, while watching videos of conspecifics, monkeys engage in eye contact, gaze follow, and reciprocate facial expressions. We hypothesized that the frequency and timing of eyeblinks also depends on the social signals contained in videos. We monitored the eyeblinks of four male adult macaques while they watched videos of conspecifics displaying facial expressions with direct or averted gaze. The instantaneous blink rate of all four animals decreased during videos. The temporal synchrony of blinking, however, increased in response to segments depicting appeasing or aggressive facial expressions directed at the viewer. Two of the four monkeys, who systematically reciprocated the direct gaze of the stimulus monkeys, also showed eyeblink entrainment, a temporal coordination of blinking between social partners engaged in dyadic interactions. Together, our results suggest that in macaques, as in humans, blinking depends not only on the physiological imperative to protect the eyes and spread a film of tears over the cornea, but also on several socio-emotional factors. PMID:27922101

  5. Advantages of an Improved Rhesus Macaque Genome for Evolutionary Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gradnigo, Julien S.; Majumdar, Abhishek; Norgren, Robert B.; Moriyama, Etsuko N.

    2016-01-01

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is widely used in molecular evolutionary analyses, particularly to identify genes under adaptive or unique evolution in the human lineage. For such studies, it is necessary to align nucleotide sequences of homologous protein-coding genes among multiple species. The validity of these analyses is dependent on high quality genomic data. However, for most mammalian species (other than humans and mice), only draft genomes are available. There has been concern that some results obtained from evolutionary analyses using draft genomes may not be correct. The rhesus macaque provides a unique opportunity to determine whether an improved genome (MacaM) yields better results than a draft genome (rheMac2) for evolutionary studies. We compared protein-coding genes annotated in the rheMac2 and MacaM genomes with their human orthologs. We found many genes annotated in rheMac2 had apparently spurious sequences not present in genes derived from MacaM. The rheMac2 annotations also appeared to inflate a frequently used evolutionary index, ω (the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates). Genes with these spurious sequences must be filtered out from evolutionary analyses to obtain correct results. With the MacaM genome, improved sequence information means many more genes can be examined for indications of selection. These results indicate how upgrading genomes from draft status to a higher level of quality can improve interpretation of evolutionary patterns. PMID:27911958

  6. MHC and KIR Polymorphisms in Rhesus Macaque SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Lutz; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer lymphocytes are essentially involved as the first line of defense against agents such as viruses and malignant cells. The activity of these cells is regulated via interaction of specific and diverse killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with the highly polymorphic cognate MHC class I proteins on target cells. Genetic variability of both KIR and MHC-I ligands has been shown to be associated with resistance to many diseases, including infection with the immunodeficiency virus. Disease course and progression to AIDS after infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is essentially influenced by the presence of the stimulatory KIR3DS1 receptor in combination with HLA-Bw4. Knowledge of such genetic interactions that contribute to not only disease resistance but also susceptibility are just as important. Such combined genetic factors were recently reported in the rhesus macaque AIDS model. Here, we review the rhesus macaque MHC class I and KIR gene systems and the role of their polymorphisms in the SIV infection model. PMID:26557119

  7. Growth rates in a captive population of Tonkean macaques.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Andrea; De Marco, Arianna; Thierry, Bernard; Cozzolino, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Measuring variations in body mass is necessary to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of life-history patterns, and it provides information on the timing of sexual maturity and the development of sexual dimorphism. In this study, we collected longitudinal data on body mass from infancy to adulthood in a captive population of Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana). Tests to evaluate whether social group, maternal age, and dominance rank influenced growth rates showed that they had no significant effect. We investigated the timing and magnitude of breaking points in the growth paths of males and females, and checked whether these breaking points could correspond to specific reproductive and morphological developmental events. We found that male and female Tonkean macaques have roughly equivalent body masses until around the age of four, when males go through an adolescent growth spurt and females continue to grow at a constant rate. Males not only grow faster than females, but they also continue to grow for nearly one and a half years after females have attained their full body mass. Growth rate differences account for approximately two-thirds of the body mass sexual dimorphism; only the remaining third results from continued male growth beyond the age where full body mass is reached in females. We also discovered remarkable correspondences between the timing of testicular enlargement and the adolescent growth spurt in males, and between dental development and slowdown breaking points in both sexes.

  8. Palmoplantar nonpustular psoriasiform dermatitis in a rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Piedras, María José G M; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Sendagorta, Elena; Miró-Murillo, Marta; Cavada, Carmen

    2011-04-01

    A case of psoriasiform dermatitis in an adult male rhesus macaque is reported. Appearing spontaneously, the condition presented the clinical and histopathological features of human palmoplantar nonpustular psoriasis. The animal developed multiple scaly plaques on his palms and soles, as well as nail hyperkeratosis and widening of the nail root. Microscopically, the skin lesions showed epidermal hyperkeratosis with multifocal parakeratosis, neutrophil microabscesses in the stratum corneum, a loss of granule cell layer under the microabscesses, acanthosis, and elongation of the rete ridges; the superficial dermis showed a dense inflammatory infiltrate containing lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils, as well as dilated and tortuous blood vessels. The lesions improved for 15 days after intramuscular corticosteroid depot therapy and worsened slightly afterwards. Later, a spontaneous, progressive remission coincided with the beginning of spring and lasted until the end of summer; the skin lesions practically disappeared during this period, and the nails looked nearly normal. During the next autumn and winter only nail hyperkeratosis was present. Serum analyses showed hyperproteinaemia and hyperglobulinaemia during the outbreak phase and normal values during remission. The clinical and histopathological features of this case, as well as its evolution, are compared with the three other reported cases of psoriasiform skin lesions in nonhuman primates. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a definite palmoplantar nonpustular psoriasiform dermatitis in a rhesus macaque.

  9. Gonadectomy increases neurogenesis in the male adolescent rhesus macaque hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Allen, K M; Fung, S J; Rothmond, D A; Noble, P L; Weickert, C Shannon

    2014-02-01

    New neurons are continuously produced in the subgranular zone of the adult hippocampus and can modulate hippocampal plasticity across life. Adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes in sex hormone levels, and social and emotional behaviors. It is also an age for increased risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, which may involve altered hippocampal neurogenesis. The extent to which testosterone and other testicular hormones modulate hippocampal neurogenesis and adolescent behavioral development is unclear. This study aimed to determine if removal of testicular hormones during adolescence alters neurogenesis in the male rhesus macaque hippocampus. We used stereology to examine levels of cell proliferation, cell survival and neuronal differentiation in late adolescent male rhesus macaques (4.6-yrs old) that had previously been gonadectomized or sham operated prior to puberty (2.4-yrs old). While the absence of adolescent testicular hormones had no effect on cell proliferation, cell survival was increased by 65% and indices of immature neuronal differentiation were increased by 56% in gonadectomized monkeys compared to intact monkeys. We show for the first time that presence of circulating testicular hormones, including testosterone, may decrease neuronal survival in the primate hippocampus during adolescence. Our findings are in contrast to existing studies in adults where testosterone tends to be a pro-survival factor and demonstrate that testicular hormones may reduce hippocampal neurogenesis during the age typical of schizophrenia onset.

  10. Determinants of immigration strategies in male crested macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Pascal R.; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into a new group can produce substantial costs due to resistance from residents, but also reproductive benefits. Whether or not individuals base their immigration strategy on prospective cost-benefit ratios remains unknown. We investigated individual immigration decisions in crested macaques, a primate species with a high reproductive skew in favour of high-ranking males. We found two different strategies. Males who achieved low rank in the new group usually immigrated after another male had immigrated within the previous 25 days and achieved high rank. They never got injured but also had low prospective reproductive success. We assume that these males benefitted from immigrating into a destabilized male hierarchy. Males who achieved high rank in the new group usually immigrated independent of previous immigrations. They recieved injuries more frequently and therefore bore immigration costs. They, however, also had higher reproductive success prospects. We conclude that male crested macaques base their immigration strategy on relative fighting ability and thus potential rank in the new group i.e. potential reproductive benefits, as well as potential costs of injury. PMID:27535622

  11. Cooperation in wild Barbary macaques: factors affecting free partner choice.

    PubMed

    Molesti, Sandra; Majolo, Bonaventura

    2016-01-01

    A key aspect of cooperation is partner choice: choosing the best available partner improves the chances of a successful cooperative interaction and decreases the likelihood of being exploited. However, in studies on cooperation subjects are rarely allowed to freely choose their partners. Group-living animals live in a complex social environment where they can choose among several social partners differing in, for example, sex, age, temperament, or dominance status. Our study investigated whether wild Barbary macaques succeed to cooperate using an experimental apparatus, and whether individual and social factors affect their choice of partners and the degree of cooperation. We used the string pulling task that requires two monkeys to manipulate simultaneously a rope in order to receive a food reward. The monkeys were free to interact with the apparatus or not and to choose their partner. The results showed that Barbary macaques are able to pair up with a partner to cooperate using the apparatus. High level of tolerance between monkeys was necessary for the initiation of successful cooperation, while strong social bond positively affected the maintenance of cooperative interactions. Dominance status, sex, age, and temperament of the subjects also affected their choice and performance. These factors thus need to be taken into account in cooperative experiment on animals. Tolerance between social partners is likely to be a prerequisite for the evolution of cooperation.

  12. Distinctive Leukocyte Subpopulations According to Organ Type in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zitsman, Jonah S; Alonso-Guallart, Paula; Ovanez, Christopher; Kato, Yojiro; Rosen, Joanna F; Weiner, Joshua I; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (CYNO; Macaca fascicularis) are a well-established NHP model used for studies in immunology. To provide reference values on the baseline cell distributions in the hematopoietic and lymphoid organs (HLO) of these animals, we used flow cytometry to analyze the peripheral blood, bone marrow, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus of a cohort of male, adult, research-naïve, Mauritian CYNO. Our findings demonstrate that several cell distribution patterns differ between CYNO and humans. First, the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio is lower in CYNO compared with humans. Second, the peripheral blood of CYNO contains a population of CD4+CD8+ T cells. Third, the CD31 level was elevated in all organs studied, suggesting that CD31 may not be an accurate marker of recent thymic emigrants within the CD4+ T cells of CYNO. Finally the B-cell population is lower in CYNO compared with humans. In summary, although the majority of immune cell populations are similar between cynomolgus macaques and humans, several important differences should be considered when using CYNO in immunologic studies. Our current findings provide valuable information to not only researchers but also veterinarians working with CYNO at research centers, in zoos, or in the wild. PMID:27538862

  13. Collective arousal when reuniting after temporary separation in Tonkean macaques.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Arianna; Cozzolino, Roberto; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco; Thierry, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Celebrations and bursts of communal joy can occur spontaneously in human communities based on mechanisms of emotional contagion. Some examples of similar collective excitement have been reported in animals when they reunite or anticipate rewards, but little is known about the processes and meaning of these multiple interactions. We experimentally studied such collective arousals in two captive groups of Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana) within the context of reunions following the temporary separation of two subgroups. We compared the behaviors of individuals after separation periods of 2 and 48 h with a control period with no separation. This study showed that it is possible to reproducibly induce bursts of friendly interactions in which groupmates run around over a period of several minutes, embracing and grasping one another while displaying numerous affiliative vocalizations and facial expressions. The longer the period of separation, the higher and longer-lasting the rates of affiliative interactions were. Individuals affiliated more frequently with groupmates from a previously separated subgroup than with those having stayed in their own subgroup. Collective arousal was followed by a quieter period characterized by high rates of contact-sitting and social grooming. These results point at the role of collective arousals in social cohesion; they could resolve social tension and renew social relationships. We propose that the emotional state experienced by Tonkean macaques during such events represents a disposition similar to that giving rise to what we humans call "shared joy."

  14. Giant Thoracic Schwannoma in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Derron A; Bell, Todd M; Benton, Carrie; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Stevens, Edward L

    2010-01-01

    A 15-y-old male rhesus macaque with a 3-d history of labored breathing, was culled from a nonhuman primate research colony after thoracic radiographs and exploratory surgery revealed a 10-cm, well-circumscribed space-occupying mass in the posterior thoracic cavity. The multilobulated cystic and necrotic neoplasm was composed of interlacing streams and fascicles of neoplastic spindle cells arranged in Antoni A, and less commonly, Antoni B patterns. Verocay bodies were present also. The neoplasm was encapsulated mostly, and histomorphologic features were benign. Immunohistochemistry indicated that neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, S100, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and nerve growth factor receptor. Reticulin histochemical staining and immunohistochemical stains for collagen IV and laminin showed a prominent basal lamina surrounding the neoplastic cells. The histologic features and results of the immunohistochemical stains confirmed peripheral nerve origin and were consistent with schwannoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of thoracic schwannoma in a rhesus macaque and the second reported case of schwannoma in a nonhuman primate. PMID:21205456

  15. Visual Field Map Clusters in Macaque Extrastriate Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kolster, Hauke; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Arsenault, John T.; Ekstrom, Leeland B.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Vanduffel, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The macaque visual cortex contains more than 30 different functional visual areas, yet surprisingly little is known about the underlying organizational principles that structure its components into a complete ‘visual’ unit. A recent model of visual cortical organization in humans suggests that visual field maps are organized as clusters. Clusters minimize axonal connections between individual field maps that represent common visual percepts, with different clusters thought to carry out different functions. Experimental support for this hypothesis, however, is lacking in macaques, leaving open the question of whether it is unique to humans or a more general model for primate vision. Here we show, using high-resolution BOLD fMRI data in the awake monkey at 7 Tesla, that area MT/V5 and its neighbors are organized as a cluster with a common foveal representation and a circular eccentricity map. This novel view on the functional topography of area MT/V5 and satellites indicates that field map clusters are evolutionarily preserved and may be a fundamental organizational principle of the old world primate visual cortex. PMID:19474330

  16. Visceral and Neural Larva Migrans in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Alfonso S; Maximova, Olga A; StClaire, Marisa C; Montali, Richard J; Ward, Jerrold M; Cheng, Lily I; Elkins, William R; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2008-01-01

    Large ascarid larvae within granulomas were noted histologically in the mesenteric and pancreatic lymph nodes of 13 of 21 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) euthanized as part of an experimental viral pathogenesis study. In addition, 7 of the 13 monkeys had cerebral granulomas, which in 4 animals contained nematode larvae similar to those within the lymph nodes. Despite the lesions, the animals did not show clinical signs associated with the parasitic infections. Characteristics of the larvae included, on cross-section, a midbody diameter of approximately 60 to 80 µm, a centrally located and slightly compressed intestine flanked on either side by large triangular excretory columns, and prominent single lateral cuticular alae. The morphology of the larvae was compatible with Baylisascaris spp. Baylisascariasis is a well-described infection of animals and humans that is caused by migrating larvae of the raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis. A similar species, B. columnaris, is found in skunks and can cause cerebrospinal nematodiasis, but most reported cases of baylisascariasis have been due to B. procyonis. Our macaques were born free-ranging on an island in the southeastern United States where raccoons, but not skunks, were found to be common inhabitants, indicating that B. procyonis was the most likely parasite involved. These cases are similar to the low-level or covert cases of Baylisascaris infection described to occur in humans and provide further evidence of the existence of this parasite in the southeastern United States. PMID:18702454

  17. Spatial relational memory in 9-month-old macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in one of two sets of three distinct locations. Monkeys were tested in two different conditions: (1) when local visual cues marked the two sets of potentially baited locations, so that monkeys could use both local and spatial information to discriminate these locations from never-baited locations; and (2) when no local visual cues marked the two sets of potentially baited locations, so that monkeys had to rely on a spatial relational representation of the environment to discriminate these locations. No 9-mo-old or adult monkey associated the presence of the proximal landmarks, at the center of the arena, with the presence of food in one set of three distinct locations. All monkeys, however, discriminated the potentially baited locations in the presence of local visual cues, thus providing evidence of visual discrimination learning. More importantly, all 9-mo-old monkeys tested discriminated the potentially baited locations in absence of the local visual cues, thus exhibiting evidence of spatial relational learning. These findings indicate that spatial memory processes characterized by a relational representation of the environment are present as early as 9 mo of age in macaque monkeys.

  18. Monkeying around with HIV vaccines: using rhesus macaques to define 'gatekeepers' for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Devon J; Silvestri, Guido; Weiner, David B

    2009-10-01

    Rhesus macaques are an important animal model for the study of human disease and the development of vaccines against HIV and AIDS. HIV vaccines have been benchmarked in rhesus macaque preclinical challenge studies using chimeric viruses made up of parts of HIV and simian immunodeficiency viruses. However, the lack of efficacy in a recent clinical trial calls for a re-evaluation of the scientific assumptions regarding the predictive value of using data generated from rhesus macaques as a 'gatekeeper' for the advancement of candidate vaccines into the clinic. In this context, there is significant consensus among HIV vaccinologists that next-generation HIV vaccines must generate 'better' immunity in rhesus macaques than clinically unsuccessful vaccines generated using validated assays. Defining better immunity is the core challenge of HIV vaccine development in this system and is the focus of this Review.

  19. Effects of Ketamine on Metabolomics of Serum and Urine in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xueying; Zeng, Xiancheng; Hong, Jiehua; Yuan, Congli; Cui, Li; Ma, Jing; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a metabolomics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and pertinent multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the effect of ketamine on metabolic markers in cynomolgus macaques. Principal component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis showed that ketamine (10 mg/kg) induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, ketamine-treated macaques had lower serum levels of α-glucose, myoinositol, lactate and succinate and lower urine levels of pyruvate and lactate. In contrast, the levels of leucine in serum and arginine in urine were significantly higher in the ketamine group. Our results also demonstrated that a single injection of ketamine influenced the major energy and amino acid metabolic pathways in cynomolgus macaques. Our study suggests that these influences should be considered in the design of experiments and the interpretation related blood and urine data from ketamine-sedated cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27657710

  20. Faces in Motion: Selectivity of Macaque and Human Face Processing Areas for Dynamic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Polosecki, Pablo; Moeller, Sebastian; Schweers, Nicole; Romanski, Lizabeth M.; Tsao, Doris Y.

    2013-01-01

    Face recognition mechanisms need to extract information from static and dynamic faces. It has been hypothesized that the analysis of dynamic face attributes is performed by different face areas than the analysis of static facial attributes. To date, there is no evidence for such a division of labor in macaque monkeys. We used fMRI to determine specializations of macaque face areas for motion. Face areas in the fundus of the superior temporal sulcus responded to general object motion; face areas outside of the superior temporal sulcus fundus responded more to facial motion than general object motion. Thus, the macaque face-processing system exhibits regional specialization for facial motion. Human face areas, processing the same stimuli, exhibited specializations for facial motion as well. Yet the spatial patterns of facial motion selectivity differed across species, suggesting that facial dynamics are analyzed differently in humans and macaques. PMID:23864665

  1. Faces in motion: selectivity of macaque and human face processing areas for dynamic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Polosecki, Pablo; Moeller, Sebastian; Schweers, Nicole; Romanski, Lizabeth M; Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2013-07-17

    Face recognition mechanisms need to extract information from static and dynamic faces. It has been hypothesized that the analysis of dynamic face attributes is performed by different face areas than the analysis of static facial attributes. To date, there is no evidence for such a division of labor in macaque monkeys. We used fMRI to determine specializations of macaque face areas for motion. Face areas in the fundus of the superior temporal sulcus responded to general object motion; face areas outside of the superior temporal sulcus fundus responded more to facial motion than general object motion. Thus, the macaque face-processing system exhibits regional specialization for facial motion. Human face areas, processing the same stimuli, exhibited specializations for facial motion as well. Yet the spatial patterns of facial motion selectivity differed across species, suggesting that facial dynamics are analyzed differently in humans and macaques.

  2. A simple multiplex polymerase chain reaction to determine ABO blood types of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S; Satkoski, J; Smith, D G

    2011-06-01

    Rhesus macaques are the most common nonhuman primate model organism used in biomedical research. Their increasingly frequent use as subjects in studies involving transplantation requires that blood and other tissue antigens of donors and recipients be compatible. We report here an easy and rapid multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine the ABO blood group phenotypes of rhesus macaques that can be performed with only small amounts of DNA. We phenotyped 78 individuals and found this species to exhibit the A, B and AB phenotypes in frequencies that vary by geographic region. The probability of randomly pairing rhesus macaque donors and recipients that exhibit major ABO phenotype incompatibility is approximately 0.35 and 0.45 for Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques, respectively.

  3. CYP1B1 is polymorphic in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Akinori; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 is involved in the metabolic activation of various procarcinogens, and some CYP1B1 genetic variants alter CYP1B1-dependent procarcinogen metabolism. Cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in toxicity tests due to their evolutionary closeness to humans. In this study, we attempted to identify CYP1B1 genetic variants in 13 cynomolgus and 4 rhesus macaques. A total of 17 genetic variants were identified, including 8 non-synonymous genetic variants, indicating that, similar to humans, CYP1B1 is polymorphic in macaques. These CYP1B1 genetic variants could be the basis for understanding potential inter-animal differences in macaque CYP1B1-dependent metabolism of promutagens.

  4. Alopecia in Rhesus macaques correlates with immunophenotypic alterations in dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with hypersensitivity etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joshua; Fahey, Michele; Santos, Rosemary; Carville, Angela; Wachtman, Lynn; Mansfield, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background Although alopecia is a commonly recognized problem affecting many captive Rhesus macaque colonies, there is no consensus as to the underlying etiology or appropriate course of management. Methods and Results We performed skin biopsies on a group of Rhesus macaques and demonstrate that alopecia is associated with superficial dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates and skin pathology consistent with chronic hypersensitivity dermatitis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the inflammation is primarily composed of CD4+ cells admixed with histiocytes and mast cells. Inflammation is correlated with degree of alopecia. Further analysis in different groups of macaques revealed that animals born outdoors or infected with lung mites had reduced dermal inflammatory cell infiltrates and a lower incidence of alopecia. Conclusions These findings support a hypothesis that an altered housing status resulting in decreased pathogen burden in Rhesus macaque colonies may contribute to dermal immunophenotypic alterations and subsequent development of dermatitis with resultant alopecia. PMID:20102458

  5. Emergence of infectious malignant thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by SRV-4 after transmission to a novel host

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Munehiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Ono, Fumiko; Nakamura, Shota; Sato, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakai, Kouji; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagata, Noriyo; Takano, Jun-ichiro; Okabayashi, Sachi; Hamano, Masataka; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakaya, Takaaki; Iida, Tetsuya; Horii, Toshihiro; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Watanabe, Akino; Kaneko, Akihisa; Saito, Akatsuki; Matsui, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Juri; Akari, Hirofumi; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a lethal hemorrhagic syndrome arising from severe thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques kept at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Extensive investigation identified that simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4) was the causative agent of the disease. SRV-4 had previously been isolated only from cynomolgus macaques in which it is usually asymptomatic. We consider that the SRV-4 crossed the so-called species barrier between cynomolgus and Japanese macaques, leading to extremely severe acute symptoms in the latter. Infectious agents that cross the species barrier occasionally amplify in virulence, which is not observed in the original hosts. In such cases, the new hosts are usually distantly related to the original hosts. However, Japanese macaques are closely related to cynomolgus macaques, and can even hybridize when given the opportunity. This lethal outbreak of a novel pathogen in Japanese macaques highlights the need to modify our expectations about virulence with regards crossing species barriers. PMID:25743183

  6. Expression of prokineticin 2 and its receptor in the Macaque monkey brain

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Katherine J.; Li, Xiaohan; Li, Baoan; Cheng, Michelle Y.; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Zhou, Qun-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2) has been indicated as an output signaling molecule for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian clock. Most of these studies were performed with nocturnal animals, particularly mice and rats. In the current study, the PK2 and its receptor, PKR2, was cloned from a species of diurnal macaque monkey. The macaque monkey PK2 and PKR2 were found to be highly homologous to that of other mammalian species. The mRNA expression of PK2 and PKR2 in the macaque brain was examined by in situ hybridization. The expression patterns of PK2 and PKR2 in the macaque brain were found to be quite similar to that of the mouse brain. Particularly, PK2 mRNA was shown to oscillate in the SCN of the macaque brain in the same phase and with similar amplitude with that of nocturnal mouse brain. PKR2 expression was also detected in known primary SCN targets, including the midline thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei. However, the PKR2 expression was only detected in the dorsal SCN of the macaque brain, in contrast to the broad expression of PKR2 in the dorsal and ventral segments of the mouse SCN. The likely functional importance of this differential expression of PKR2 in the SCN segments in the diurnal monkey vs nocturnal mouse remains to be explored. In addition, we detected the expression of PKR2 mRNA in the dorsal raphe nucleus of both macaque and mouse brains. As a likely SCN to dorsal raphe projection has previously been indicated, the expression of PKR2 in the raphe nuclei of both macaque and mouse brain signifies a possible role of dorsal raphe nucleus as a previously unrecognized primary SCN projection target. PMID:26818846

  7. An MRI based average macaque monkey stereotaxic atlas and space (MNI monkey space).

    PubMed

    Frey, Stephen; Pandya, Deepak N; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Bailey, Lara; Petrides, Michael; Collins, D Louis

    2011-04-15

    In studies of the human brain, a standard stereotaxic space such as the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI space) is widely used to provide a common reference for the three-dimensional localization of functional activation foci and anatomical structures, enabling the comparison of results obtained across different studies. Here we present a standard macaque monkey brain MRI template that offers a common stereotaxic reference frame to localize anatomical and functional information in an organized and reliable way for comparison across individual monkeys and studies. We have used MRI volumes from a group of 25 normal adult macaque monkeys (18 cynomolgus and 7 rhesus) to create a common standard macaque monkey brain as well as atlases for each of these species separately. In addition, the digital macaque monkey volume was subjected to 3D volumetric analysis and comparison of brain structures between the individual brains and the average atlas. Furthermore, we provide a means of transforming any macaque MRI volume into MNI monkey space coordinates in 3D using simple web based tools. Coordinates in MNI monkey space can also be transformed into the coordinate system of a detailed neuroanatomical paper atlas (Paxinos et al., 2008), enabling researchers to identify and delineate cortical and subcortical structures in their individual macaque monkey brains.

  8. Cervical carotid and circle of willis arterial anatomy of macaque monkeys: a comparative anatomy study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishant; Lee, John J; Perlmutter, Joel S; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2009-07-01

    Macaque monkeys are used in many research applications, including cerebrovascular investigations. However, detailed catalogs of the relevant vascular anatomy are scarce. We present our experience with macaque vessel patterns as determined by digital subtraction angiography of 34 different monkeys. We retrospectively analyzed digital subtraction angiograms obtained during experimental internal carotid artery (ICA) catheterization and subsequent injection of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Results were catalogued according to vascular distribution and variants observed. Macaque monkeys have a bovine aortic arch. The carotid vessels generally bifurcate, but are occasionally observed to divide into three vessels. The external carotid gives rise primarily to two trunks: an occipital branch and a common vessel that subsequently gives off the lingual, facial, and superior thyroid arteries. The internal maxillary artery may be present as a terminal branch of the external carotid or as a branch of the occipital artery. The ICA is similar in course to that of the human. The anterior circle of Willis was intact in all monkeys in our study. Its primary difference from that of the human is the union of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries as a single (azygous) median vessel. Macaque cervical carotid and circle of Willis arterial anatomy differs from humans in a couple of specific patterns. Knowledge of these differences and similarities between human and macaque anatomy is important in developing endovascular macaque models of human diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  9. Dietary adaptations of Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis) in limestone forests in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhonghao; Huang, Chengming; Tang, Chuangbin; Huang, Libin; Tang, Huaxing; Ma, Guangzhi; Zhou, Qihai

    2015-02-01

    Limestone hills are an unusual habitat for primates, prompting them to evolve specific behavioral adaptations to the component karst habitat. From September 2012 to August 2013, we collected data on the diet of one group of Assamese macaques living in limestone forests at Nonggang National Nature Reserve, Guangxi Province, China, using instantaneous scan sampling. Assamese macaques were primarily folivorous, young leaves accounting for 75.5% and mature leaves an additional 1.8% of their diet. In contrast, fruit accounted for only 20.1%. The young leaves of Bonia saxatilis, a shrubby, karst-endemic bamboo that is superabundant in limestone hills, comprised the bulk of the average monthly diet. Moreover, macaques consumed significantly more bamboo leaves during the season when the availability of fruit declined, suggesting that bamboo leaves are an important fallback food for Assamese macaques in limestone forests. In addition, diet composition varied seasonally. The monkeys consumed significantly more fruit and fewer young leaves in the fruit-rich season than in the fruit-lean season. Fruit consumption was positively correlated with fruit availability, indicating that fruit is a preferred food for Assamese macaques. Of seventy-eight food species, only nine contributed >0.5% of the annual diet, and together these nine foods accounted for 90.7% of the annual diet. Our results suggest that bamboo consumption represents a key factor in the Assamese macaque's dietary adaptation to limestone habitat.

  10. Chagas Disease in 2 Geriatric Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Housed in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Mary F; Astorga, Nestor Gerardo; Astorga, Nestor Rodrigo; Lewis, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is endemic in Latin America but also is found in the southern United States, particularly Texas and along the Gulf Coast. Typical clinical manifestations of Chagas disease are not well-characterized in rhesus macaques, but conduction abnormalities, myocarditis, and encephalitis and megaesophagus have been described. Here we report 2 cases of Chagas disease in rhesus macaques housed in the northwestern United States. The first case involved a geriatric male macaque with cardiomegaly, diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy on ultrasonographic examination. Postmortem findings included myocarditis as well as ganglioneuritis in the esophagus, stomach, and colon. The second case affected a geriatric female macaque experimentally infected with SIV. She was euthanized for a protocol-related time point. Microscopic examination revealed chronic myocarditis with amastigotes present in the cardiomyocytes, ganglioneuritis, and opportunistic infections attributed to her immunocompromised status. Banked serum samples from both macaques had positive titers for T. cruzi. T. cruzi DNA was amplified by conventional PCR from multiple tissues from both animals. Review of their histories revealed that both animals had been obtained from facilities in South Texas more than 12 y earlier. Given the long period of clinical latency, Chagas disease may be more prevalent in rhesus macaques than typically has been reported. T. cruzi infection should be considered for animals with unexplained cardiac or gastrointestinal pathology and that originated from areas known to have a high risk for disease transmission. PMID:25296019

  11. Preliminary study on eye colour in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in their natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Watanabe, Kunio

    2007-04-01

    Eye colour in Japanese macaques shows apparent differences between individuals, continuously ranging from orange (bright), through shades of yellow and hazel-blue to dark blue (dark). We arbitrarily classified them into either 'yellow' eyes or 'blue' eyes based on the yellow area occupying in the iris' peripupillary ring. Most Japanese macaques have yellow eyes after infant phase, whilst 19, 17, 12, and 15% of monkeys (>6 months, sexes combined) have blue-eye in studied two groups of Shodoshima and two groups of Takasakiyama, respectively. Frequency of eye colour did not differ between males and females, but significantly differed in each age class. Blue eyes significantly more frequently occurred in newborns, infants and aged monkeys than in juveniles and prime adults. Data from mother-infant pairs indicated eye colour could be inherited from their parents. A case of asymmetric eye colour in Japanese macaques was found from a sample of 1962 individuals. Eye colour variation of Japanese macaques was discussed in relation to those of humans and rhesus macaques. A possible evolutionary model of eye colour in Japanese macaques was discussed.

  12. Small intestine CD4+ cell reduction and enteropathy in simian/human immunodeficiency virus KS661-infected rhesus macaques in the presence of low viral load.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Katsuhisa; Fukazawa, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Kenta; Himeno, Ai; Matsuyama, Megumi; Ibuki, Kentaro; Miura, Yoshiharu; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Nakajima, Atsushi; Blumberg, Richard S; Takahashi, Hidemi; Hayami, Masanori; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2010-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, simian immunodeficiency virus and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection generally lead to death of the host accompanied by high viraemia and profound CD4(+) T-cell depletion. SHIV clone KS661-infected rhesus macaques with a high viral load set point (HVL) ultimately experience diarrhoea and wasting at 6-12 months after infection. In contrast, infected macaques with a low viral load set point (LVL) usually live asymptomatically throughout the observation period, and are therefore referred to as asymptomatic LVL (Asym LVL) macaques. Interestingly, some LVL macaques exhibit diarrhoea and wasting similar to the symptoms of HVL macaques and are termed symptomatic LVL (Sym LVL) macaques. This study tested the hypothesis that Sym LVL macaques have the same degree of intestinal abnormalities as HVL macaques. The proviral DNA loads in lymphoid tissue and the intestines of Sym LVL and Asym LVL macaques were comparable and all infected monkeys showed villous atrophy. Notably, the CD4(+) cell frequencies of lymphoid tissues and intestines in Sym LVL macaques were remarkably lower than those in Asym LVL and uninfected macaques. Furthermore, Sym LVL and HVL macaques exhibited an increased number of activated macrophages. In conclusion, intestinal disorders including CD4(+) cell reduction and abnormal immune activation can be observed in SHIV-KS661-infected macaques independent of virus replication levels.

  13. Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) recognize when they are being imitated.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Annika; Anderson, James R; Borelli, Eleonora; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Ferrari, Pier F

    2005-06-22

    This study investigated whether monkeys recognize when a human experimenter imitates their actions towards an object. Two experimenters faced 10 pigtailed macaques, who were given access to an interesting object. One experimenter imitated the monkeys' object-directed actions, the other performed temporally contingent but structurally different object-directed actions. Results show a significant visual preference for the imitator during manual object manipulations, but not mouthing actions. We argue that the ability to match actions could be based on both visual-visual and kinaesthetic-visual matching skills, and that mirror neurons, which have both visual and motor properties, could serve as a neural basis for recognizing imitation. However, imitation recognition as assessed by visual preference does not necessarily imply the capacity to attribute imitative intentionality to the imitator. The monkeys might implicitly recognize when they are being imitated without deeper insight into the mental processes of others.

  14. A face feature space in the macaque temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2009-09-01

    The ability of primates to effortlessly recognize faces has been attributed to the existence of specialized face areas. One such area, the macaque middle face patch, consists almost entirely of cells that are selective for faces, but the principles by which these cells analyze faces are unknown. We found that middle face patch neurons detect and differentiate faces using a strategy that is both part based and holistic. Cells detected distinct constellations of face parts. Furthermore, cells were tuned to the geometry of facial features. Tuning was most often ramp-shaped, with a one-to-one mapping of feature magnitude to firing rate. Tuning amplitude depended on the presence of a whole, upright face and features were interpreted according to their position in a whole, upright face. Thus, cells in the middle face patch encode axes of a face space specialized for whole, upright faces.

  15. Genetic origins of social networks in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Lauren J. N.; Heilbronner, Sarah R.; Horvath, Julie E.; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Robinson, Athy G.; Skene, J. H. Pate; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Sociality is believed to have evolved as a strategy for animals to cope with their environments. Yet the genetic basis of sociality remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that social network tendencies are heritable in a gregarious primate. The tendency for rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta, to be tied affiliatively to others via connections mediated by their social partners - analogous to friends of friends in people - demonstrated additive genetic variance. Affiliative tendencies were predicted by genetic variation at two loci involved in serotonergic signalling, although this result did not withstand correction for multiple tests. Aggressive tendencies were also heritable and were related to reproductive output, a fitness proxy. Our findings suggest that, like humans, the skills and temperaments that shape the formation of multi-agent relationships have a genetic basis in nonhuman primates, and, as such, begin to fill the gaps in our understanding of the genetic basis of sociality. PMID:23304433

  16. Development of a Zika Virus Infection Model in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Fusataka; Goebel, Scott; Snyder, Beth; Walters, Kevin B.; Gast, Alison; Hagelin, Kimberly; Kalkeri, Raj; Rayner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Limited availability of Indian rhesus macaques (IRM) is a bottleneck to study Zika virus (ZIKV) pathogenesis and evaluation of appropriate control measures in non-human primates. To address these issues, we report here the Mauritian cynomolgus macaque (MCM) model for ZIKV infection. In brief, six MCMs (seronegative for Dengue and ZIKV) were subdivided into three cohorts with a male and female each and challenged with different doses of Asian [PRVABC59 (Puerto Rico) or FSS13025 (Cambodia)] or African (IBH30656) lineage ZIKV isolates. Clinical signs were monitored; and biological fluids (serum, saliva, and urine) and tissues (testes and brain) were assessed for viral load by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and neutralizing antibodies (Nab) by 50% Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT50) at various times post-infection (p.i). PRVABC59 induced viremia detectable up to day 10, with peak viral load at 2–3 days p.i. An intermittent viremia spike was observed on day 30 with titers reaching 2.5 × 103 genomes/mL. Moderate viral load was observed in testes, urine and saliva. In contrast, FSS13025 induced viremia lasting only up to 6 days and detectable viral loads in testes but not in urine and saliva. Recurrent viremia was detected but at lower titers compare to PRVABC59. Challenge with either PRVABC59 or FSS13025 resulted in 100% seroconversion; with mean PRNT50 titers ranging from 597 to 5179. IBH30656 failed to establish infection in MCM suggesting that MCM are susceptible to infection with ZIKV isolates of the Asian lineage but not from Africa. Due to the similarity of biphasic viremia and Nab responses between MCM and IRM models, MCM could be a suitable alternative for evaluation of ZIKV vaccine and therapeutic candidates. PMID:28066354

  17. Depth perception from moving cast shadow in macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Usui, Nobuo; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Taira, Masato; Katsuyama, Narumi

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, we investigate whether the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow. To accomplish this, we conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, an adult Japanese monkey was trained in a motion discrimination task in depth by binocular disparity. A square was presented on the display so that it appeared with a binocular disparity of 0.12 degrees (initial position), and moved toward (approaching) or away from (receding) the monkey for 1s. The monkey was trained to discriminate the approaching and receding motion of the square by GO/delayed GO-type responses. The monkey showed a significantly high accuracy rate in the task, and the performance was maintained when the position, color, and shape of the moving object were changed. In the next experiment, the change in the disparity was gradually decreased in the motion discrimination task. The results showed that the performance of the monkey declined as the distance of the approaching and receding motion of the square decreased from the initial position. However, when a moving cast shadow was added to the stimulus, the monkey responded to the motion in depth induced by the cast shadow in the same way as by binocular disparity; the reward was delivered randomly or given in all trials to prevent the learning of the 2D motion of the shadow in the frontal plane. These results suggest that the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow as well as using binocular disparity.

  18. Discovery of a secular trend in Cayo Santiago macaque reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Kessler, Matthew J; Delgado, Diana L; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Sabat, Alberto M

    2016-02-01

    Reproductive synchrony and the consequent clustering of births are hypothesized to be regulated by seasonal changes in rainfall and food availability. Such climate-related seasonality is, however, questionable in tropical populations occupying temporally invariant habitats year round. Using the long-term data of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques from 1973 to 2013, this study distinguishes synchrony (a greater than chance clustering of births) from seasonality (a cluster of births during a period of the year when abiotic conditions are favorable) and shows that females are highly synchronized (>72% of births in a 3-month period) but the effects of environmental zeitgebers on reproduction are overridden by biological factors. Specifically, biotic and abiotic factors including (i) loss of immature offspring; (ii) population density; (iii) age at delivery; (iv) rainfall; and (v) changes in colony management were modeled in relation to the annual onset of births and the median birth date. Females experiencing loss of immature offspring had an interbirth interval of <365 days in average and the proportion of these females increased up to 48% due to changes in colony management overtime, although reproductive synchrony increased with increasing population density. A secular trend in both the onset of births and the median date of birth is documented and the model predicts that the median birth date will advance across all calendar-based seasons by 2050. The secular trend in reproduction appears to be triggered by changes in the age at delivery of females, the absence of physiological constraints from maternal investment due to offspring loss, shorter interbirth interval, and a higher degree of coordination due to increasing population density. This study challenges the reproductive phenology previously described for rhesus macaques highlighting the importance of long-term studies in addressing the ultimate causes of reproductive synchrony.

  19. Homo-Dimers of Vanillin and Apocynin Decrease Metastatic Potential of Human Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the FAK/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jantaree, Phatcharida; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Kaewsri, Wilailak; Thongsornkleeb, Charnsak; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Atjanasuppat, Korakot; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2017-03-01

    The spread of cancer cells to distant organs, in a process called metastasis, is the main factor that contributes to most death in cancer patients. Vanillin, the vanilla flavoring agent, has been shown to suppress metastasis in a mouse model. Here, we evaluated the anti-metastatic potential of the food additive divanillin, the homo-dimer of vanillin, and their structurally related compounds, apocynin and diapocynin, in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The Transwell invasion assay showed that the dimeric forms exhibited higher potency than vanillin and apocynin in inhibiting invasion, with IC50 values of 23.3±7.4 to 41.3±4.2 μM for the dimers, which are 26-34 fold lower than IC50 values of vanillin and apocynin (p<0.05). Both monomeric and dimeric forms target regulation of the invasion process, by inhibiting phosphorylation of FAK and Akt. Molecular docking studies suggested that the dimers should bind more tightly than vanillin and apocynin to the Y397 pocket of FAK FERM domain. Thus, the food additive divanillin has greater anti-metastatic potential than the flavoring agent vanillin.

  20. The APC/C subunit Cdc16/Cut9 is a contiguous tetratricopeptide repeat superhelix with a homo-dimer interface similar to Cdc27

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziguo; Kulkarni, Kiran; Hanrahan, Sarah J; Thompson, Andrew J; Barford, David

    2010-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), an E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for controlling cell cycle transitions, is a multisubunit complex assembled from 13 different proteins. Numerous APC/C subunits incorporate multiple copies of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR). Here, we report the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cut9 (Cdc16/Apc6) in complex with Hcn1 (Cdc26), showing that Cdc16/Cut9 is a contiguous TPR superhelix of 14 TPR units. A C-terminal block of TPR motifs interacts with Hcn1, whereas an N-terminal TPR block mediates Cdc16/Cut9 self-association through a homotypic interface. This dimer interface is structurally related to the N-terminal dimerization domain of Cdc27, demonstrating that both Cdc16/Cut9 and Cdc27 form homo-dimers through a conserved mechanism. The acetylated N-terminal Met residue of Hcn1 is enclosed within a chamber created from the Cut9 TPR superhelix. Thus, in complex with Cdc16/Cut9, the N-acetyl-Met residue of Hcn1, a putative degron for the Doa10 E3 ubiquitin ligase, is inaccessible for Doa10 recognition, protecting Hcn1/Cdc26 from ubiquitin-dependent degradation. This finding may provide a structural explanation for a mechanism to control the stoichiometry of proteins participating in multisubunit complexes. PMID:20924356

  1. Replication-specific conversion of the Staphylococcus aureus pT181 initiator protein from an active homodimer to an inactive heterodimer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, A; Wang, P Z; Novick, R P

    1994-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus rolling circle plasmid pT181 regulates its replication by controlling the synthesis of its initiator protein RepC. RepC is inactivated during pT181 replication by the addition of an oligodeoxynucleotide, giving rise to a new form, RepC*. We analyzed RepC and RepC* in four classes of mutants: plasmid copy number mutants, two classes of RepC mutants affecting different portions of the protein and oriC (origin) mutants. We have found that in the cell with wild-type RepC there are similar relative amounts of RepC and RepC*, regardless of copy number, and that the conversion of RepC to RepC* is replication dependent. Genetic and biochemical evidence is presented that RepC functions as a dimer and that during replication the RepC homodimer is converted to the RepC/RepC* heterodimer. Images PMID:7957090

  2. Plasmodium knowlesi: Reservoir Hosts and Tracking the Emergence in Humans and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim-Sung; Divis, Paul C. S.; Zakaria, Siti Khatijah; Matusop, Asmad; Julin, Roynston A.; Conway, David J.; Cox-Singh, Janet; Singh, Balbir

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite originally thought to be restricted to macaques in Southeast Asia, has recently been recognized as a significant cause of human malaria. Unlike the benign and morphologically similar P. malariae, these parasites can lead to fatal infections. Malaria parasites, including P. knowlesi, have not yet been detected in macaques of the Kapit Division of Malaysian Borneo, where the majority of human knowlesi malaria cases have been reported. In order to extend our understanding of the epidemiology and evolutionary history of P. knowlesi, we examined 108 wild macaques for malaria parasites and sequenced the circumsporozoite protein (csp) gene and mitochondrial (mt) DNA of P. knowlesi isolates derived from macaques and humans. We detected five species of Plasmodium (P. knowlesi, P. inui, P. cynomolgi, P. fieldi and P. coatneyi) in the long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques, and an extremely high prevalence of P. inui and P. knowlesi. Macaques had a higher number of P. knowlesi genotypes per infection than humans, and some diverse alleles of the P. knowlesi csp gene and certain mtDNA haplotypes were shared between both hosts. Analyses of DNA sequence data indicate that there are no mtDNA lineages associated exclusively with either host. Furthermore, our analyses of the mtDNA data reveal that P. knowlesi is derived from an ancestral parasite population that existed prior to human settlement in Southeast Asia, and underwent significant population expansion approximately 30,000–40,000 years ago. Our results indicate that human infections with P. knowlesi are not newly emergent in Southeast Asia and that knowlesi malaria is primarily a zoonosis with wild macaques as the reservoir hosts. However, ongoing ecological changes resulting from deforestation, with an associated increase in the human population, could enable this pathogenic species of Plasmodium to switch to humans as the preferred host. PMID:21490952

  3. Diversity and Molecular Phylogeny of Mitochondrial DNA of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    HASAN, M. KAMRUL; FEEROZ, M. MOSTAFA; JONES-ENGEL, LISA; ENGEL, GREGORY A.; KANTHASWAMY, SREE; SMITH, DAVID GLENN

    2015-01-01

    While studies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the eastern (e.g., China) and western (e.g., India) parts of their geographic range have revealed major genetic differences that warrant the recognition of two different subspecies, little is known about genetic characteristics of rhesus macaques in the transitional zone extending from eastern India and Bangladesh through the northern part of Indo-China, the probable original homeland of the species. We analyzed genetic variation of 762 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 86 fecal swab samples and 19 blood samples from 25 local populations of rhesus macaque in Bangladesh collected from January 2010 to August 2012. These sequences were compared with those of rhesus macaques from India, China, and Myanmar. Forty-six haplotypes defined by 200 (26%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected. Estimates of gene diversity, expected heterozygosity, and nucleotide diversity for the total population were 0.9599 ± 0.0097, 0.0193 ± 0.0582, and 0.0196 ± 0.0098, respectively. A mismatch distribution of paired nucleotide differences yielded a statistically significantly negative value of Tajima's D, reflecting a population that rapidly expanded after the terminal Pleistocene. Most haplotypes throughout regions of Bangladesh, including an isolated region in the southwestern area (Sundarbans), clustered with haplotypes assigned to the minor haplogroup Ind-2 from India reflecting an east to west dispersal of rhesus macaques to India. Haplotypes from the southeast region of Bangladesh formed a cluster with those from Myanmar, and represent the oldest rhesus macaque haplotypes of Bangladesh. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus macaques first entered Bangladesh from the southeast, probably from Indo-China, then dispersed westward throughout eastern and central India. PMID:24810278

  4. Diversity and molecular phylogeny of mitochondrial DNA of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2014-11-01

    While studies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the eastern (e.g., China) and western (e.g., India) parts of their geographic range have revealed major genetic differences that warrant the recognition of two different subspecies, little is known about genetic characteristics of rhesus macaques in the transitional zone extending from eastern India and Bangladesh through the northern part of Indo-China, the probable original homeland of the species. We analyzed genetic variation of 762 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 86 fecal swab samples and 19 blood samples from 25 local populations of rhesus macaque in Bangladesh collected from January 2010 to August 2012. These sequences were compared with those of rhesus macaques from India, China, and Myanmar. Forty-six haplotypes defined by 200 (26%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected. Estimates of gene diversity, expected heterozygosity, and nucleotide diversity for the total population were 0.9599 ± 0.0097, 0.0193 ± 0.0582, and 0.0196 ± 0.0098, respectively. A mismatch distribution of paired nucleotide differences yielded a statistically significantly negative value of Tajima's D, reflecting a population that rapidly expanded after the terminal Pleistocene. Most haplotypes throughout regions of Bangladesh, including an isolated region in the southwestern area (Sundarbans), clustered with haplotypes assigned to the minor haplogroup Ind-2 from India reflecting an east to west dispersal of rhesus macaques to India. Haplotypes from the southeast region of Bangladesh formed a cluster with those from Myanmar, and represent the oldest rhesus macaque haplotypes of Bangladesh. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus macaques first entered Bangladesh from the southeast, probably from Indo-China, then dispersed westward throughout eastern and central India.

  5. Effector-repressor interactions, binding of a single effector molecule to the operator-bound TtgR homodimer mediates derepression.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2006-03-17

    The RND family transporter TtgABC and its cognate repressor TtgR from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E were both shown to possess multidrug recognition properties. Structurally unrelated molecules such as chloramphenicol, butyl paraben, 1,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and several flavonoids are substrates of TtgABC and activate pump expression by binding to the TtgR-operator complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of these molecules to TtgR. Dissociation constants were in the range from 1 to 150 microm, the binding stoichiometry was one effector molecule per dimer of TtgR, and the process was driven by favorable enthalpy changes. Although TtgR exhibits a large multidrug binding profile, the plant-derived compounds phloretin and quercetin were shown to bind with the highest affinity (K(D) of around 1 microm), in contrast to other effectors (chloramphenicol and aromatic solvents) for which exhibited a more reduced affinity. Structure-function studies of effectors indicate that the presence of aromatic rings as well as hydroxyl groups are determinants for TtgR binding. The binding of TtgR to its operator DNA does not alter the protein effector profile nor the effector binding stoichiometry. Moreover, we demonstrate here for the first time that the binding of a single effector molecule to the DNA-bound TtgR homodimer induces the dissociation of the repressor-operator complex. This provides important insight into the molecular mechanism of effector-mediated derepression.

  6. Longitudinal assessment of pigtailed macaque lower genital tract microbiota by pyrosequencing reveals dissimilarity to the genital microbiota of healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Spear, Gregory T; Kersh, Ellen; Guenthner, Patricia; Vishwanathan, Sundaram Ajay; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Landay, Alan; Zheng, Luyang; Gillevet, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Vaginal bacterial communities play an important role in human health and have been shown to influence HIV infection. Pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) are used as an animal model of HIV vaginal infection of women. Since the bacterial microbiota could influence retrovirus infection of pigtailed macaques, the genital microbiota in 10 cycling macaques was determined by pyrosequencing. The microbiota of all macaques was polymicrobial with a median of 13 distinct genera. Strikingly, the genera Sneathia and Fusobacterium, both in the phylum Fusobacteria, accounted for 18.9% and 13.3% of sequences while the next most frequent were Prevotella (5.6%), Porphyromonas (4.1%), Atopobium (3.6%), and Parvimonas (2.6%). Sequences corresponding to Lactobacillus comprised only 2.2% of sequences on average and were essentially all L. amylovorus. Longitudinal sampling of the 10 macaques over an 8-week period, which spanned at least one full ovulatory cycle, showed a generally stable presence of the major types of bacteria with some exceptions. These studies show that the microbiota of the pigtailed macaques is substantially dissimilar to that found in most healthy humans, where the genital microbiota is usually dominated by Lactobacillus sp. The polymicrobial makeup of the macaque bacterial populations, the paucity of lactobacilli, and the specific types of bacteria present suggest that the pigtailed macaque microbiota could influence vaginal retrovirus infection.

  7. Longitudinal Assessment of Pigtailed Macaque Lower Genital Tract Microbiota by Pyrosequencing Reveals Dissimilarity to the Genital Microbiota of Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen; Guenthner, Patricia; Vishwanathan, Sundaram Ajay; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M. Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Landay, Alan; Zheng, Luyang; Gillevet, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vaginal bacterial communities play an important role in human health and have been shown to influence HIV infection. Pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) are used as an animal model of HIV vaginal infection of women. Since the bacterial microbiota could influence retrovirus infection of pigtailed macaques, the genital microbiota in 10 cycling macaques was determined by pyrosequencing. The microbiota of all macaques was polymicrobial with a median of 13 distinct genera. Strikingly, the genera Sneathia and Fusobacterium, both in the phylum Fusobacteria, accounted for 18.9% and 13.3% of sequences while the next most frequent were Prevotella (5.6%), Porphyromonas (4.1%), Atopobium (3.6%), and Parvimonas (2.6%). Sequences corresponding to Lactobacillus comprised only 2.2% of sequences on average and were essentially all L. amylovorus. Longitudinal sampling of the 10 macaques over an 8-week period, which spanned at least one full ovulatory cycle, showed a generally stable presence of the major types of bacteria with some exceptions. These studies show that the microbiota of the pigtailed macaques is substantially dissimilar to that found in most healthy humans, where the genital microbiota is usually dominated by Lactobacillus sp. The polymicrobial makeup of the macaque bacterial populations, the paucity of lactobacilli, and the specific types of bacteria present suggest that the pigtailed macaque microbiota could influence vaginal retrovirus infection. PMID:22264029

  8. Expression of Kv3.1b potassium channel is widespread in macaque motor cortex pyramidal cells: A histological comparison between rat and macaque.

    PubMed

    Soares, David; Goldrick, Isabelle; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander; Greensmith, Linda; Kalmar, Bernadett

    2017-02-18

    There are substantial differences across species in the organisation and function of the motor pathways. These differences extend to basic electrophysiological properties. Thus, in rat motor cortex, pyramidal cells have long duration action potentials, while in the macaque, some pyramidal neurons exhibit short duration 'thin' spikes. These differences may be related to the expression of the fast potassium channel Kv3.1b, which in rat interneurons is associated with generation of thin spikes. Rat pyramidal cells typically lack these channels, while there are reports that they are present in macaque pyramids. Here we made a systematic, quantitative comparison of the expression of Kv3.1b in sections from macaque and rat motor cortex, using two different antibodies (NeuroMab, Millipore). As our standard reference, we examined, in the same sections, Kv3.1b staining in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, which show strong Kv3.1b immunoreactivity. In macaque motor cortex, a large sample of pyramidal neurons were nearly all found to express Kv3.1b in their soma membranes. These labelled neurons were identified as pyramidal based either by expression of SMI32 (a pyramidal marker), or by their shape and size, lack of expression of parvalbumin (a marker for some classes of interneuron). Large (Betz cells), medium and small pyramidal neurons all expressed Kv3.1b. In rat motor cortex, SMI32-postive pyramidal neurons expressing Kv3.1b were very rare and weakly stained. Thus, there is a marked species difference in the immunoreactivity of Kv3.1b in pyramidal neurons, and this may be one of the factors explaining the pronounced electrophysiological differences between rat and macaque pyramidal neurons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  10. Allele frequency of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in wild-caught cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Higashino, Atsunori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ikoma, Tomoko; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ami, Yasushi; Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A recent study showed that the frequency of an antiretroviral factor TRIM5 gene-derived isoform, TRIMCyp, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) varies widely according to the particular habitat examined. However, whether the findings actually reflect the prevalence of TRIMCyp in wild cynomolgus macaques is still uncertain because the previous data were obtained with captive monkeys in breeding and rearing facilities. Here, we characterized the TRIM5 gene in cynomolgus macaques captured in the wild, and found that the frequency of the TRIMCyp allele was comparable to those in captive monkeys. This suggests that the previous results with captive monkeys do indeed reflect the natural allele frequency and that breeding and rearing facilities may not affect the frequency of TRIM5 alleles. Interestingly, the prevalence of a minor haplotype of TRIMCyp in wild macaques from the Philippines was significantly lower than in captive ones, suggesting that it is advantageous for wild monkeys to possess the major haplotype of TRIMCyp. Overall, our results add to our understanding of the geographic and genetic prevalence of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp. PMID:22969754

  11. Possible shift in macaque trophic level following a century of biodiversity loss in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Luke

    2011-07-01

    Biodiversity loss in tropical forests is a major problem in conservation biology, and nowhere is this more dire than in Southeast Asia. Deforestation and the associated loss of species may trigger shifts in habitat and feeding preferences of persisting species. In this study, I compared the habitat use and diet of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) populations in Singapore from two time periods: museum specimens originally collected between 1893 and 1944, and living macaques sampled in 2009. I collected hair and used stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis to identify temporal changes in dietary source and trophic position, respectively. δ(13)C ratios were virtually identical, suggesting that macaques foraged in similar habitats during both time periods. However, δ(15)N ratios decreased considerably over time, suggesting that macaques today feed at a lower trophic level than previously. This decline in trophic level may be because of the disappearance or decline of other species that compete with macaques for fruit. This study highlights the effect of biodiversity loss on persisting species in degraded habitats of Southeast Asia, and improves our understanding of how species will adapt to further human-driven changes in tropical forest habitats.

  12. Comparison of physiologic and pharmacologic parameters in Asian and mauritius cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kozlosky, John C; Mysore, Jagannatha; Clark, Shawn P; Burr, Holly N; Li, Jinze; Aranibar, Nelly; Vuppugalla, Ragini; West, Ronald C; Mangipudy, Raja S; Graziano, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    This comparative study was conducted to assess background physiologic and pharmacologic parameters of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Cambodia, from a mixed Asian source (Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia), and from Mauritius. This evaluation provides a comprehensive assessment of several of these parameters in a single study. Ten male and 10 female captive-bred, age-matched macaques from each source were evaluated. Criteria for evaluation included weight gain, assessment of drug metabolizing enzyme activity, metabolomic analysis, immunologic assessments (lymphocyte subsets, TDAR, and serum Ig isotyping), clinical pathology evaluations, physical (respiratory, neurologic, cardiovascular, and ophthalmologic) examinations, pathogen screening, organ weights, and gross and microscopic pathology analyses. The results of this evaluation indicate that, compared to macaques of Asian origin, macaques from Mauritius had the lowest incidence and/or severity of spontaneous pathologic findings in several organs and tissues (lymphoid organs, stomach, kidney, urothelium, heart, arteries and lung) and better testicular maturity at a given age with minimal variability in organ weights. Although slight differences were observed in other parameters, none were considered detrimental to the use of macaques of Asian or Mauritius origin in pharmaceutical candidate safety studies with the use of a consistent source, concomitant controls, and appropriate background knowledge and screening.

  13. Adenocarcinoma of the ileocolic junction and multifocal hepatic sarcomas in an aged rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lang, Cynthia D; Daviau, Judith S; Merton, Daniel A; Caraker, Susan M

    2013-08-01

    An aged male rhesus macaque in our colony had decreased appetite and a loss of interest in behavioral testing. CBC analysis revealed a regenerative, microcytic, hypochromic anemia with thrombocytosis, consistent with iron deficiency. A fecal occult blood test was positive. Ultrasound imaging revealed numerous, vascularized focal liver lesions that suggested metastases. The macaque's appetite continued to decrease, and he became more lethargic. At this point, the investigator elected to euthanize the macaque. At necropsy, the ileocolic junction was white and abnormally thickened, and the liver was pale tan with approximately 18 discrete white masses randomly scattered throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Histologically, the mass at the ileocolic junction was identified as an intestinal adenocarcinoma, whereas the liver masses were confirmed to be undifferentiated hepatic sarcomas. This case report describes a rhesus macaque that had 2 unrelated primary neoplasms. A review of the literature indicates that this rhesus macaque is the first reported to have an adenocarcinoma of the ileocolic junction and multiple hepatic sarcomas simultaneously.

  14. Survey of prevalence of overweight body condition in laboratory-housed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sharon A; Leslie, Ken E; Pearl, David L; Fournier, Jocelyn; Turner, Patricia V

    2010-07-01

    Excessive weight gain has been reported to occur in captive cynomolgus macaques with little to no change in diet. Overweight body condition can result in development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes and should be avoided. The purpose of this survey was to assess the prevalence of overweight cynomolgus macaques in North American research facilities, including breeding colonies and short-term and long-term facilities, and to describe current methods used to assess body condition. The survey consisted of 51 questions covering animal population demographics, body weight and body condition scoring, feeding, and behavior. Voluntary participants included veterinarians and animal care managers. Respondents from 13 facilities completed the survey, and information was collected on 17,500 cynomolgus macaques. The majority of surveyed facilities housed juvenile and young adult macaques. The reported prevalence of overweight (greater than 10% of ideal body weight) animals ranged between 0% and 20% and reportedly was more frequent in animals younger than 10 y. Most facilities had weight reduction strategies in place. Despite these programs, a significant proportion of animals were reported as being overweight. The results of this survey demonstrate that most North American facilities housing cynomolgus macaques recognize the importance of tracking body condition regularly. However, implementing effective weight reduction programs may be difficult in captive housing environments. Because of the potential for adverse health effects, facilities should have a means of regularly tracking body weight as well as an action plan for managing overweight animals.

  15. An analysis of leg joint synergy during bipedal walking in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Kaichida, Shoko; Hashizume, Yoshimitsu; Ogihara, Naomichi; Nishii, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed bipedal locomotion of Japanese macaques from the view point of leg joint synergy by the UCM (Uncontrolled manifold) analysis in order to examine how and when hip, knee and ankle joints cooperate so as to suppress the variances of the toe position relative to the hip position. Our results showed that joint synergy is exploited at some moments during walking. For instance, the variance of the vertical toe position was suppressed by joint synergy when the tip of the finger passes its lowest position from the ground. Some characteristics of the synergy pattern of macaques have been also reported in human walking, on the other hand, some differences between humans and macaques were found. For instance, high degree of joint synergy that suppresses the variance of hip height was observed around the end of stance phase in human walking, but such synergy was weak in macaques. The results suggest that different control strategies are used in bipedal walking of macaques and humans.

  16. Effects of age and sex on the hematology and blood chemistry of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yi, Yong; Sun, Fei; Zhou, Liang; Yang, Feng; Wang, Hongxing; Zhang, Guodong; Zhang, Yu Alex; Yue, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana), also known as Chinese stump-tailed macaques, are a threatened primate species. Although Tibetan macaques are Old World monkeys in the genus of Macaca, limited age- and sex-related physiologic data are available for this particular species. We used 69 apparently healthy Tibetan male and female macaques to explore the effect of age and sex on physiologic parameters. Somatometric measurements, biochemistry, and hematologic parameters were analyzed. Significant age-related differences were found for weight, BMI, RBC count, Hgb, Hct, neutrophils, eosinophil count, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, creatine kinase (muscle and brain subtypes), LDH, α-amylase, creatinine, apolipoprotein A1, total protein, albumin, cholesterol, HDL, and potassium. Significant differences by sex were noted for weight, BMI, ALT, total bilirubin, and indirect bilirubin. An interaction between age and sex accounted for statistically significant differences in the values for weight, BMI, and lymphocyte and eosinophil counts. These physiologic data will provide veterinarians and researchers with important age- and sex-specific reference ranges for evaluating experimental results from Tibetan macaques.

  17. Breaking Barriers to an AIDS Model with Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Ruan, Hongmei; Kimata, Jason T

    2012-05-12

    The development of an animal model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)/AIDS that is suitable for preclinical testing of antiretroviral therapy, vaccines, curative strategies, and studies of pathogenesis has been hampered by the human-specific tropism of HIV-1. Although simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or HIV-1/SIV chimeric viruses (SHIVs)-rhesus macaque models are excellent surrogates for AIDS research, the genetic differences between SIV or SHIV and HIV-1 limit their utility as model systems. The identification of innate retro viral restriction factors has increased our understanding about blockades to HIV-1 replication in macaques and provided a guide for the construction of macaque-tropic HIV-1 clones. However, while these viruses replicate in macaque cells in vitro, they are easily controlled and have not caused AIDS in host animals, indicating that we may not fully understand the restrictive barriers of innate immunity. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding HIV-1 restriction factors, particularly as they apply to cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses and the development of a macaque model of HIV-1/AIDS.

  18. Training rhesus macaques for venipuncture using positive reinforcement techniques: a comparison with chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kristine; Pranger, Lindsay; Maier, Adriane; Lambeth, Susan P; Perlman, Jaine E; Thiele, Erica; Schapiro, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    As more emphasis is placed on enhancing the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates, many research facilities have started using positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques to train primates to voluntarily participate in husbandry and research procedures. PRT increases the animal's control over its environment and desensitizes the animal to stressful stimuli. Blood draw is a common husbandry and research procedure that can be particularly stressful for nonhuman primate subjects. Although studies have demonstrated that chimpanzees can be trained for in-cage venipuncture using PRT only, fewer studies have demonstrated success using similar techniques to train macaques. It is often assumed that macaques cannot be trained in the same manner as apes. In this study, we compare PRT data from singly housed adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 8) with data from group-housed adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 4). All subjects were trained to place an arm in a 'blood sleeve' and remain stationary for venipuncture. Both facilities used similar PRT techniques. We were able to obtain repeated blood samples from 75% of the macaques and all of the chimpanzees. The training time did not differ significantly between the 2 species. These data demonstrate that macaques can be trained for venipuncture in a manner similar to that used for chimpanzees.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Oxymorphone in Titi Monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R; Pypendop, Bruno H; Grayson, J Kevin; Stanley, Scott D; Christe, Kari L; Summers, Laura M; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2011-01-01

    Oxymorphone is a pure μ-opioid receptor agonist that is commonly used in nonhuman primate medicine and surgery to minimize pain ranging in intensity from moderate to severe. We compared pharmacokinetic profiles and physiologic and behavioral responses to oxymorphone between titi monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Titi monkeys (n = 4) and rhesus macaques (n = 4) were injected intravenously with either a bolus of 0.075 mg/kg oxymorphone or placebo on multiple occasions, with a minimal washout period of 14 d between trials. Blood collection was limited to no more than 3 samples per trial, with samples collected at multiple time points until 10 h after injection. Collection periods, animal order, and testing day were randomized. In addition, macaques underwent a single serial collection at all time points to validate study design. A 2-compartment model best described the disposition of oxymorphone in both species. Clearance was faster in macaques than titi monkeys, in which terminal half-life was longer. Statistically significant physiologic differences were found between species and between treatments within species. Apart from these effects, oxymorphone did not significantly change physiologic parameters over time. After oxymorphone treatment, macaques demonstrated behaviors reflecting pruritis, whereas titi monkeys exhibited sedation. Despite its mild side effects, we recommend the consideration of oxymorphone for pain management protocols in both Old and New World nonhuman primates. PMID:21439215

  20. Buton macaques (Macaca ochreata brunnescens): crops, conflict, and behavior on farms.

    PubMed

    Priston, Nancy E C; Wyper, Rebecca M; Lee, Phyllis C

    2012-01-01

    One consequence of anthropogenic habitat alteration is that many nonhuman primates are forced into conflict interactions with humans and their livelihood activities, especially through crop raiding. These problems are particularly acute for the endemic and threatened Buton Island macaque (Macaca ochreata brunnescens), in southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Our study investigated the crop raiding behavior of this species over time. Foods eaten and the behavioral repertoire exhibited by macaques during crop raiding at and inside farm perimeters were observed over a period of 8 years (2002-2009). Storage organ crops (e.g. sweet potato) were abundant and most frequently raided by macaques. Individual macaques were most commonly observed to raid close (0-10 m) to farm perimeters. Activities such as feeding, resting, moving, and social interaction varied significantly as a function of penetration distance into the farm, but only marginally between age-sex classes. The annual average raid frequency per farm decreased over the latter years of the study period, raising questions about changes in macaque foraging and ranging behavior over time and their response to farm management and mitigation strategies.

  1. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation.

  2. Influence of heavy snow on the feeding behavior of Japanese macaques (macaca fuscata) in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Enari, Hiroto; Sakamaki-Enari, Haruka

    2013-06-01

    Natural disasters can degrade primate habitat and alter feeding behavior. Here, we examined the influence of unusually heavy snow on diet and feeding-site use by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in northern Japan. To compare the winter-feeding behavior under different snow conditions, we recorded the plant species foraged on by macaques in multiple transects of the Shirakami Mountains from 2008 to 2012 (excluding 2011). We used cluster analysis to describe foraged plant assemblages, and applied multiple dimensional scaling and decision tree modeling to evaluate annual variation in feeding-site use by macaques. Our cluster analysis revealed five types of foraged plant assemblages. The proportion of each type present in transects varied considerably across the years, indicating that the diet of macaques in heavy snow conditions was influenced more by resource accessibility than by preference. Multiple dimensional scaling and decision tree modeling demonstrated that heavy snow conditions restricted feeding-site use. Moreover, the distribution of refuges relative to severe external ambient environments was a stronger limiting factor for feeding-site use than was the availability of food resources. While most primate species facing unexpected starvation employ risk-prone foraging tactics (i.e., choosing the option with higher pay-off by accepting risk), Japanese macaques have a tendency to adopt risk-averse foraging behavior (i.e., minimizing energy loss when searching for preferred diet items under long-lasting heavy snow conditions), because winters with temperatures below freezing have higher thermoregulatory costs.

  3. Biophysical characterization of the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax, an alternatively spliced isoform of Max found in tumor cells: Towards the validation of a tumor suppressor role for the Max homodimers.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Loïka; Montagne, Martin; Bédard, Mikaël; Tremblay, Cynthia; Soucek, Laura; Lavigne, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    It is classically recognized that the physiological and oncogenic functions of Myc proteins depend on specific DNA binding enabled by the dimerization of its C-terminal basic-region-Helix-Loop-Helix-Leucine Zipper (b-HLH-LZ) domain with that of Max. However, a new paradigm is emerging, where the binding of the c-Myc/Max heterodimer to non-specific sequences in enhancers and promoters drives the transcription of genes involved in diverse oncogenic programs. Importantly, Max can form a stable homodimer even in the presence of c-Myc and bind DNA (specific and non-specific) with comparable affinity to the c-Myc/Max heterodimer. Intriguingly, alterations in the Max gene by germline and somatic mutations or changes in the gene product by alternative splicing (e.g. ΔMax) were recently associated with pheochromocytoma and glioblastoma, respectively. This has led to the proposition that Max is, by itself, a tumor suppressor. However, the actual mechanism through which it exerts such an activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that contrary to the WT motif, the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax does not homodimerize in the absence of DNA. In addition, although ΔMax can still bind the E-box sequence as a homodimer, it cannot bind non-specific DNA in that form, while it can heterodimerize with c-Myc and bind E-box and non-specific DNA as a heterodimer with high affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that the WT Max homodimer is important for attenuating the binding of c-Myc to specific and non-specific DNA, whereas ΔMax is unable to do so. Conversely, the splicing of Max into ΔMax could provoke an increase in overall chromatin bound c-Myc. According to the new emerging paradigm, the splicing event and the stark reduction in homodimer stability and DNA binding should promote tumorigenesis impairing the tumor suppressor activity of the WT homodimer of Max.

  4. Biophysical characterization of the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax, an alternatively spliced isoform of Max found in tumor cells: Towards the validation of a tumor suppressor role for the Max homodimers

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, Loïka; Montagne, Martin; Bédard, Mikaël; Tremblay, Cynthia; Soucek, Laura

    2017-01-01

    It is classically recognized that the physiological and oncogenic functions of Myc proteins depend on specific DNA binding enabled by the dimerization of its C-terminal basic-region-Helix-Loop-Helix-Leucine Zipper (b-HLH-LZ) domain with that of Max. However, a new paradigm is emerging, where the binding of the c-Myc/Max heterodimer to non-specific sequences in enhancers and promoters drives the transcription of genes involved in diverse oncogenic programs. Importantly, Max can form a stable homodimer even in the presence of c-Myc and bind DNA (specific and non-specific) with comparable affinity to the c-Myc/Max heterodimer. Intriguingly, alterations in the Max gene by germline and somatic mutations or changes in the gene product by alternative splicing (e.g. ΔMax) were recently associated with pheochromocytoma and glioblastoma, respectively. This has led to the proposition that Max is, by itself, a tumor suppressor. However, the actual mechanism through which it exerts such an activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that contrary to the WT motif, the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax does not homodimerize in the absence of DNA. In addition, although ΔMax can still bind the E-box sequence as a homodimer, it cannot bind non-specific DNA in that form, while it can heterodimerize with c-Myc and bind E-box and non-specific DNA as a heterodimer with high affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that the WT Max homodimer is important for attenuating the binding of c-Myc to specific and non-specific DNA, whereas ΔMax is unable to do so. Conversely, the splicing of Max into ΔMax could provoke an increase in overall chromatin bound c-Myc. According to the new emerging paradigm, the splicing event and the stark reduction in homodimer stability and DNA binding should promote tumorigenesis impairing the tumor suppressor activity of the WT homodimer of Max. PMID:28350847

  5. Induction of asymmetry into homodimers.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, B; Cho, Y R; Westwell, M S; Williams, D H

    1998-01-01

    The self-regulation of biological signalling receptors via homodimerization is discussed in relation to the symmetry changes occurring when these receptors bind their target ligand. The idea of positive and negative cooperativity between dimerization and ligand binding, mediated by changes in the symmetry of the system as a source of signalling control is considered; an analogy made with the homodimerization of a glycopeptide antibiotic, ristocetin A, which displays negative cooperativity. Finally, the regulation of the bacterial aspartate receptor and the human growth hormone receptor is discussed as a function of ligand-induced asymmetry.

  6. The TB-specific CD4+ T cell immune repertoire in both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques largely overlap with humans

    PubMed Central

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Dow, Courtney; Dillon, Myles B.C.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Bohn, Patrick; Karl, Julie; Golden, Nadia A.; Gilpin, Trey; Foreman, Taylor W.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Mehra, Smriti; Scriba, Thomas J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kaushal, Deepak; O’Connor, David H.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Non-human primate (NHP) models of tuberculosis (TB) immunity and pathogenesis, especially rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, are particularly attractive because of the high similarity of the human and macaque immune systems. However, little is known about the MHC class II epitopes recognized in macaques, thus hindering the establishment of immune correlates of immunopathology and protective vaccination. We characterized immune responses in rhesus macaques vaccinated against and/or infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), to a panel of antigens currently in human vaccine trials. We defined 54 new immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes, and noted that antigens immunodominant in humans are also immunodominant in rhesus macaques, including Rv3875 (ESAT-6) and Rv3874 (CFP10). Pedigree and inferred restriction analysis demonstrated that this phenomenon was not due to common ancestry or inbreeding, but rather presentation by common alleles, as well as, promiscuous binding. Experiments using a second cohort of rhesus macaques demonstrated that a pool of epitopes defined in the previous experiments can be used to detect T cell responses in over 75% of individual monkeys. Additionally, 100% of cynomolgus macaques, irrespective of their latent or active TB status, responded to rhesus and human defined epitope pools. Thus, these findings reveal an unexpected general repertoire overlap between MHC class II epitopes recognized in both species of macaques and in humans, showing that epitope pools defined in humans can also be used to characterize macaque responses, despite differences in species and antigen exposure. The results have general implications for the evaluation of new vaccines and diagnostics in NHPs, and immediate applicability in the setting of macaque models of TB. PMID:26526557

  7. Transient Inactivation of Orbitofrontal Cortex Blocks Reinforcer Devaluation in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    West, Elizabeth A.; DesJardin, Jacqueline T.; Gale, Karen; Malkova, Ludise

    2011-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and its interactions with the basolateral amygdala (BLA) are critical for goal-directed behavior, especially for adapting to changes in reward value. Here we used a reinforcer devaluation paradigm to investigate the contribution of OFC to this behavior in four macaques. Subjects that had formed associations between objects and two different primary reinforcers (foods) were presented with choices of objects overlying the two different foods. When one of the two foods was devalued by selective satiation, the subjects shifted their choices toward the objects that represented the nonsated food reward (devaluation effect). Transient inactivation of OFC by infusions of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into area 13 blocked the devaluation effect: the monkeys did not reduce their selection of objects associated with the devalued food. This effect was observed when OFC was inactivated during both satiation and the choice test, and during the choice test only. This supports our hypothesis that OFC activity is required during the postsatiety object choice period to guide the selection of objects. This finding sharply contrasts with the role of BLA in the same devaluation process (Wellman et al., 2005). Whereas activity in BLA was required during the selective satiation procedure, it was not necessary for guiding the subsequent object choice. Our results are the first to demonstrate that transient inactivation of OFC is sufficient to disrupt the devaluation effect, and to document a role for OFC distinct from that of BLA for the conditioned reinforcer devaluation process in monkeys. PMID:22016546

  8. Transient inactivation of orbitofrontal cortex blocks reinforcer devaluation in macaques.

    PubMed

    West, Elizabeth A; DesJardin, Jacqueline T; Gale, Karen; Malkova, Ludise

    2011-10-19

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and its interactions with the basolateral amygdala (BLA) are critical for goal-directed behavior, especially for adapting to changes in reward value. Here we used a reinforcer devaluation paradigm to investigate the contribution of OFC to this behavior in four macaques. Subjects that had formed associations between objects and two different primary reinforcers (foods) were presented with choices of objects overlying the two different foods. When one of the two foods was devalued by selective satiation, the subjects shifted their choices toward the objects that represented the nonsated food reward (devaluation effect). Transient inactivation of OFC by infusions of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol into area 13 blocked the devaluation effect: the monkeys did not reduce their selection of objects associated with the devalued food. This effect was observed when OFC was inactivated during both satiation and the choice test, and during the choice test only. This supports our hypothesis that OFC activity is required during the postsatiety object choice period to guide the selection of objects. This finding sharply contrasts with the role of BLA in the same devaluation process (Wellman et al., 2005). Whereas activity in BLA was required during the selective satiation procedure, it was not necessary for guiding the subsequent object choice. Our results are the first to demonstrate that transient inactivation of OFC is sufficient to disrupt the devaluation effect, and to document a role for OFC distinct from that of BLA for the conditioned reinforcer devaluation process in monkeys.

  9. You Mate, I Mate: Macaque Females Synchronize Sex not Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Fürtbauer, Ines; Mundry, Roger; Heistermann, Michael; Schülke, Oliver; Ostner, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Extended female sexuality in species living in multimale-multifemale groups appears to enhance benefits from multiple males. Mating with many males, however, requires a low female monopolizability, which is affected by the spatiotemporal distribution of receptive females. Ovarian cycle synchrony potentially promotes overlapping receptivity if fertile and receptive periods are tightly linked. In primates, however, mating is often decoupled from hormonal control, hence reducing the need for synchronizing ovarian events. Here, we test the alternative hypothesis that females behaviorally coordinate their receptivity while simultaneously investigating ovarian cycle synchrony in wild, seasonal Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis), a promiscuous species with extremely extended female sexuality. Using fecal hormone analysis to assess ovarian activity we show that fertile phases are randomly distributed, and that dyadic spatial proximity does not affect their distribution. We present evidence for mating synchrony, i.e., the occurrence of the females' receptivity was significantly associated with the proportion of other females mating on a given day. Our results suggest social facilitation of mating synchrony, which explains (i) the high number of simultaneously receptive females, and (ii) the low male mating skew in this species. Active mating synchronization may serve to enhance the benefits of extended female sexuality, and may proximately explain its patterning and maintenance. PMID:22022541

  10. Macaque accessory optic system: II. Connections with the pretectum

    SciTech Connect

    Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M.; Cooper, H.M. )

    1990-12-08

    Connections of the accessory optic system (AOS) with the pretectum are described in the macaque monkey. Injections of tritiated amino acids in the pretectum demonstrate a major contralateral projection to the dorsal (DTN), lateral (LTN), and medial (MTN) terminal nuclei of the AOS and a sparser projection to the ipsilateral LTN. Injections of retrograde tracers, Fast Blue (FB), or wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) plus nonconjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the LTN show that the pretectal-LTN projection originates from two nuclei. The main source of pretectal efferents to the LTN is from the pretectal olivary nucleus (OPN) and is entirely contralateral. This projection, which appears unique to primates, originates from the large multipolar cells of the OPN. In addition to this projection, the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) projects to the ipsilateral LTN, as in nonprimates. Injection of WGA-HRP in the pretectum shows a reciprocal predominantely ipsilateral projection from the LTN to the pretectum. Retinas were observed after injection of FB in the LTN. The retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are mainly distributed near the fovea and in the nasal region of the contralateral eye, suggesting a nasotemporal pattern of decussation. The demonstration of a direct connection between LTN and OPN forces to a reconsideration of the functional role of the AOS. Previous descriptions of luminance responsive cells in the LTN support a possible participation of this nucleus in the control of the pupillary light reflex.

  11. Copying hierarchical leaders’ voices? Acoustic plasticity in female Japanese macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, Alban; Jubin, Ronan; Masataka, Nobuo; Arlet, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    It has been historically claimed that call production in nonhuman primates has been shaped by genetic factors, although, recently socially-guided plasticity and cortical control during vocal exchanges have been observed. In humans, context-dependent vocal convergence with relatives, friends or leaders’ voices can be found. Comparative studies with monkeys and apes presenting tolerant social organizations have demonstrated that affiliative bonding is the determining factor of convergence. We tested whether vocal copying could also exist in a primate species with a despotic social organization. We compared the degree of inter-individual similarity of contact calls in two groups of Japanese macaques as a function of age, dominance rank, maternal kin and affiliative bonds. We found a positive relationship between dyadic acoustic similarity and female rank differences. Since most call exchanges were initiated by dominant females and since this species is known for the ability of responders to acoustically match initiators’ calls, we conclude that high social status may motivate vocal convergence in this despotic society. Accordingly, intra-individual comparisons showed that isolated calls were more stereotyped than exchanged calls, and that dominants had more stereotyped voices than subordinates. This opens new lines of research with regard to social motivation guiding acoustic plasticity in primates. PMID:26880673

  12. Social and ecological factors influencing offspring survival in wild macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kerhoas, Daphne; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Premature loss of offspring decreases direct fitness of parents. In gregarious mammals, both ecological and social variables impact offspring survival and may interact with each other in this regard. Although a number of studies have investigated factors influencing offspring loss in mammals, we still know very little on how different factors interact with one another. We therefore investigated fetal and infant mortality in 3 large groups of wild crested macaques (Macaca nigra) over a period of up to 5 years by including potential social causes such as maternal dominance rank, male immigration, between group encounters, and ecological conditions such as rainfall in a multivariate survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards model. Infant but not fetal survival was most impaired after a recent takeover of the alpha-male position by an immigrant male. Furthermore, infant survival probability increased when there was an increase in number of group adult females and rainfall. Fetal survival probability also increased with an increase of these 2 factors, but more in high-ranking than low-ranking females. Fetal survival, unlike that of infants, was also improved by an increase of intergroup encounter rates. Our study thus stresses the importance of survival analyses using a multivariate approach and encompassing more than a single offspring stage to investigate the determinants of female direct fitness. We further provide evidence for fitness costs and benefits of group living, possibly deriving from high pressures of both within- and between-group competition, in a wild primate population. PMID:25214754

  13. Response inhibition during perceptual decision making in humans and macaques

    PubMed Central

    Middlebrooks, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Response inhibition in stop signal tasks has been explained as the outcome of a race between GO and STOP processes (e.g., Logan, 1981). Response choice in two-alternative perceptual categorization tasks has been explained as the outcome of an accumulation of evidence for the alternative responses. To begin unifying these two powerful investigation frameworks, we obtained data from humans and macaque monkeys performing a stop signal task with responses guided by perceptual categorization and variable degrees of difficulty, ranging from low to high accuracy. Comparable results across species reinforced the validity of this animal model. Response times and errors increased with categorization difficulty. The probability of failing to inhibit responses on stop signal trials increased with stop signal delay, and the response times for failed stop signal trials were shorter than those for trials with no stop signal. Thus, the Logan race model could be applied to estimate the duration of the stopping process. We found that the duration of the STOP process did not vary across a wide range of discrimination accuracies. This is consistent with the functional, and possibly mechanistic, independence of choice and inhibition mechanisms. PMID:24306985

  14. Multimodal convergence within the intraparietal sulcus of the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Guipponi, Olivier; Wardak, Claire; Ibarrola, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Pinède, Serge; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2013-02-27

    The parietal cortex is highly multimodal and plays a key role in the processing of objects and actions in space, both in human and nonhuman primates. Despite the accumulated knowledge in both species, we lack the following: (1) a general description of the multisensory convergence in this cortical region to situate sparser lesion and electrophysiological recording studies; and (2) a way to compare and extrapolate monkey data to human results. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the monkey to provide a bridge between human and monkey studies. We focus on the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and specifically probe its involvement in the processing of visual, tactile, and auditory moving stimuli around and toward the face. We describe three major findings: (1) the visual and tactile modalities are strongly represented and activate mostly nonoverlapping sectors within the IPS. The visual domain occupies its posterior two-thirds and the tactile modality its anterior one-third. The auditory modality is much less represented, mostly on the medial IPS bank. (2) Processing of the movement component of sensory stimuli is specific to the fundus of the IPS and coincides with the anatomical definition of monkey ventral intraparietal area (VIP). (3) A cortical sector within VIP processes movement around and toward the face independently of the sensory modality. This amodal representation of movement may be a key component in the construction of peripersonal space. Overall, our observations highlight strong homologies between macaque and human VIP organization.

  15. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  16. Inexpensive outdoor enclosure for Japanese macaques used in biobehavioral research.

    PubMed

    Crowley, T J; Goebel, A; Nesbitt, T

    1989-09-01

    For studies of alcohol self-administration in a monkey social group, we effectively and humanely enclosed nine Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in an ellipse 32 x 40m, with a 1 m high chain-link fence surmounted by a 3 m curtain of electrically conductive nylon net. High-voltage brief-pulse charges prevent climbing on the net. Materials for this fence cost less than $14.50 per running meter. Weeds and grass grew freely within the ellipse, and seven dead trees interconnected with ropes permitted climbing and swinging. An open, roofed gazebo provided sun and rain shelter, and its single wall blocked the prevailing wind. Mouth activated drinkometer spouts in the corral supplied solutions for voluntary alcohol self-administration. Automatic counters informed an observer of exact doses consumed by each subject. Another observer recorded the frequency of occurrence of various social behaviors. A small kennel run, roofed over with chain-link fencing, connected the corral with a paddock-like, partially heated building, to and from which the monkeys usually had free access. It contained three interconnected chain-link pens. A raceway opening from the pens incorporated a squeeze cage used for weighing animals, drawing blood samples, or administering medications. This unique facility promotes the psychological well-being of research primates, which is being mandated by federal law.

  17. Subcortical connections of area V4 in the macaque

    PubMed Central

    Gattass, Ricardo; Galkin, Thelma W; Desimone, Robert; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Area V4 has numerous, topographically organized connections with multiple cortical areas, some of which are important for spatially organized visual processing, and others which seem important for spatial attention. Although the topographic organization of V4’s connections with other cortical areas has been established, the detailed topography of its connections with subcortical areas is unclear. We therefore injected retrograde and anterograde tracers in different topographical regions of V4 in nine macaques to determine the organization of its subcortical connections. The injection sites included representations ranging from the fovea to far peripheral eccentricities in both the upper and lower visual fields. The topographically organized connections of V4 included bidirectional connections with four subdivisions of the pulvinar, two subdivisions of the claustrum, and the interlaminar portions of the lateral geniculate nucleus, and efferent projections to the superficial and intermediate layers of the superior colliculus, the thalamic reticular nucleus, and the caudate nucleus. All of these structures have a possible role in spatial attention. The nontopographic, or converging, connections included bidirectional connections with the lateral nucleus of the amygdala, afferent inputs from the dorsal raphe, median raphe, locus coeruleus, ventral tegmentum and nucleus basalis of Meynert, and efferent projections to the putamen. Any role of these structures in attention may be less spatially specific. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1941–1965, 2014. PMID:24288173

  18. Seasonal changes in the structure of rhesus macaque social networks.

    PubMed

    Brent, Lauren J N; Maclarnon, Ann; Platt, Michael L; Semple, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Social structure emerges from the patterning of interactions between individuals and plays a critical role in shaping some of the main characteristics of animal populations. The topological features of social structure, such as the extent to which individuals interact in clusters, can influence many biologically important factors, including the persistence of cooperation, and the rate of spread of disease. Yet the extent to which social structure topology fluctuates over relatively short periods of time in relation to social, demographic or environmental events remains unclear. Here, we use social network analysis to examine seasonal changes in the topology of social structures that emerge from socio-positive associations in adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Behavioral data for two different association types (grooming, spatial proximity) were collected for females in two free-ranging groups during two seasons: the mating and birth seasons. Stronger dyadic bonds resulted in social structures that were more tightly connected (i.e. of greater density) in the mating season compared to the birth season. Social structures were also more centralized around a subset of individuals, and were more clustered in the mating season than the birth season, although the latter differences were mostly driven by differences in density alone. Our results suggest a degree of temporal variation in the topological features of social structure in this population. Such variation may feed back on interactions, hence affecting the behaviors of individuals, and may therefore be important to take into account in studies of animal behavior.

  19. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  20. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; ...

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection wasmore » cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.« less

  1. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing.

  2. Gain Modulation by Nicotine in Macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Anita A.; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetylcholine is a ubiquitous cortical neuromodulator implicated in cognition. In order to understand the potential for acetylcholine to play a role in visual attention, we studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization and function in area V1 of the macaque. We found nAChRs presynaptically at thalamic synapses onto excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurons in the primary thalamorecipient layer 4c. Furthermore, consistent with the release enhancement suggested by this localization, we discovered that nicotine increases responsiveness and lowers contrast threshold in layer 4c neurons. We also found that nAChRs are expressed by GABAergic interneurons in V1 but rarely by pyramidal neurons, and that nicotine suppresses visual responses outside layer 4c. All sensory systems incorporate gain control mechanisms, or processes which dynamically alter input/output relationships. We demonstrate that at the site of thalamic input to visual cortex, the effect of this nAChR-mediated gain is an enhancement of the detection of visual stimuli. PMID:18031686

  3. Neural correlates of reward and attention in macaque area LIP.

    PubMed

    Bendiksby, Michael S; Platt, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    Saccade reaction times decrease and the frequency of target choices increases with the size of rewards delivered for orienting to a particular visual target. Similarly, increasing rewards for orienting to a visual target enhances neuronal responses in the macaque lateral intraparietal area (LIP), as well as other brain areas. These observations raise several questions. First, are reward-related modulations in neuronal activity in LIP, as well as other areas, spatially specific or more global in nature? Second, to what extent does reward modulation of neuronal activity in area LIP reflect changes in visual rather than motor processing? And third, to what degree are reward-related modulations in LIP activity independent of performance-related modulations thought to reflect changes in attention? Here we show that increasing the size of fluid rewards in blocks reduced saccade reaction times and improved performance in monkeys performing a peripherally-cued saccade task. LIP neurons responded to visual cues spatially segregated from the saccade target, and for many neurons visual responses were systematically modulated by expected reward size. Neuronal responses also were positively correlated with reaction times independent of reward size, consistent with re-orienting of attention to the saccade target. These observations suggest that motivation and attention independently contribute to the strength of sustained visual responses in LIP. Our data thus implicate LIP in the integration of the sensory, motor, and motivational variables that guide orienting.

  4. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism. PMID:25027164

  5. Selectivity and tolerance for visual texture in macaque V2

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Corey M.; Freeman, Jeremy; Movshon, J. Anthony; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2016-01-01

    As information propagates along the ventral visual hierarchy, neuronal responses become both more specific for particular image features and more tolerant of image transformations that preserve those features. Here, we present evidence that neurons in area V2 are selective for local statistics that occur in natural visual textures, and tolerant of manipulations that preserve these statistics. Texture stimuli were generated by sampling from a statistical model, with parameters chosen to match the parameters of a set of visually distinct natural texture images. Stimuli generated with the same statistics are perceptually similar to each other despite differences, arising from the sampling process, in the precise spatial location of features. We assessed the accuracy with which these textures could be classified based on the responses of V1 and V2 neurons recorded individually in anesthetized macaque monkeys. We also assessed the accuracy with which particular samples could be identified, relative to other statistically matched samples. For populations of up to 100 cells, V1 neurons supported better performance in the sample identification task, whereas V2 neurons exhibited better performance in texture classification. Relative to V1, the responses of V2 show greater selectivity and tolerance for the representation of texture statistics. PMID:27173899

  6. Spatial choices of macaque monkeys based on abstract visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Nekovarova, Tereza; Nedvidek, Jan; Bures, Jan

    2006-11-01

    Our study investigates whether macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are able to make spatial choices in a real space according to abstract visual stimuli presented on a computer screen. We tested whether there was a difference in the processing of stimuli reflecting the configuration of a response space ("spatial stimuli") and stimuli of simple geometrical patterns lacking implicit spatial information. We trained two monkeys to choose one of nine touch-holes on a transparent panel attached to a computer monitor according to one of four visual stimuli successively displayed on the screen. The first monkey followed the visual stimuli designed as a representation of the response space ("configurations"), the second monkey observed geometrical patterns or pictures without information about the response space. In the first phase the position or the size of the stimuli varied but the shapes remained the same. In the second phase we changed the stimuli - "configurations" represented the response space in a similar way as in the previous phase, but marked different touch-holes - the patterns were changed entirely. The comparison of these two monkeys using different stimuli was expected to reveal potential differences between pattern discrimination and using configuration information included in the stimuli. The results of this experiment showed that both monkeys were able to use visual stimuli in phase 1 effectively (independently on their position on the screen), but only the monkey that obtained configuration information learnt an effective strategy after the change of stimuli in phase 2.

  7. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-07-15

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism.

  8. Comparative Analysis of the Macroscale Structural Connectivity in the Macaque and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bezgin, Gleb; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Roebroeck, Alard; Stiers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The macaque brain serves as a model for the human brain, but its suitability is challenged by unique human features, including connectivity reconfigurations, which emerged during primate evolution. We perform a quantitative comparative analysis of the whole brain macroscale structural connectivity of the two species. Our findings suggest that the human and macaque brain as a whole are similarly wired. A region-wise analysis reveals many interspecies similarities of connectivity patterns, but also lack thereof, primarily involving cingulate regions. We unravel a common structural backbone in both species involving a highly overlapping set of regions. This structural backbone, important for mediating information across the brain, seems to constitute a feature of the primate brain persevering evolution. Our findings illustrate novel evolutionary aspects at the macroscale connectivity level and offer a quantitative translational bridge between macaque and human research. PMID:24676052

  9. Characterization and distribution of Mhc-DPB1 alleles in chimpanzee and rhesus macaque populations.

    PubMed

    Otting, N; Doxiadis, G G; Versluis, L; de Groot, N G; Anholts, J; Verduin, W; Rozemuller, E; Claas, F; Tilanus, M G; Bontrop, R E

    1998-10-01

    Allelic diversity at the nonhuman primate Mhc-DPB1 locus was studied by determining exon 2 nucleotide sequences. This resulted in the detection of 17 chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), 2 orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and 16 rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) alleles. These were compiled with primate Mhc-DPB1 nucleotide sequences that were published previously. Based upon the results, a sequence specific oligotyping method was developed allowing us to investigate the distribution of Mhc-DPB1 alleles in distinct chimpanzee and rhesus macaque colonies. Like found in humans, chimpanzee and rhesus macaque populations originating from different geographic backgrounds appear to be characterized by the presence of a few dominant Mhc-DPB1 alleles.

  10. Sleep duration is affected by social relationships among sleeping partners in wild Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Koji; Nishikawa, Mari

    2014-03-01

    Co-sleeping behaviour, such as sharing a sleeping site or bed, should play an important role in determining sleep structure in mammals by mitigating predation pressure and harsh abiotic conditions during sleep. Although environmental factors surrounding sleeping sites have been studied, there is very little information on the effects of the social environment within the site on sleep in animals other than humans. Here, we quantified the duration of nighttime sleep of wild primates during behavioural observations. Wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) form clusters at sleeping sites, where they huddle with group members. Macaques slept for longer when huddled in sleeping clusters with natal members than in those with non-natal members. A high degree of synchronisation of wakefulness in pairs of macaques huddling in non-natal clusters suggested that their sleep was often interrupted by the wakefulness of huddling members at night. Our results suggest that familiarity and closeness to huddling partners influence sleep duration.

  11. Characterization of the Genital Microenvironment of Female Rhesus Macaques Prior to and After SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Whitney A.; Birke, Leslie; Dufour, Jason; Loganantharaj, Nisha; Bagby, Gregory J.; Nelson, Steve; Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Problem HIV infection among women is frequently modeled in female rhesus macaques. Longitudinal studies on genital compartment and hormonal factors that can influence susceptibility to SIV infection are lacking in this animal model. Methods of Study Genital specimens and menstruation of indoor-housed female rhesus macaques were analyzed prior to and after SIV-infection. Results Median menstrual cycle length averaged 27 days, although highly variable cycle lengths and frequent periods of amenorrhea were observed during summer months. The vaginal microbiota, characterized by adapted Nugent scoring, showed predominance of small gram-variable rods and gram-positive cocci. Highly variable vaginal cytokine levels were observed pre- and post-SIV infection. Vaginal viral loads correlated with plasma viral loads, but were not associated with progesterone levels. Conclusion These results provide an integrated characterization of important factors in the vaginal microenvironment that are relevant to the experimental design of HIV prevention and transmission studies in female rhesus macaques. PMID:26290147

  12. Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-03-01

    Artificial grammars (AG) can be used to generate rule-based sequences of stimuli. Some of these can be used to investigate sequence-processing computations in non-human animals that might be related to, but not unique to, human language. Previous AG learning studies in non-human animals have used different AGs to separately test for specific sequence-processing abilities. However, given that natural language and certain animal communication systems (in particular, song) have multiple levels of complexity, mixed-complexity AGs are needed to simultaneously evaluate sensitivity to the different features of the AG. Here, we tested humans and Rhesus macaques using a mixed-complexity auditory AG, containing both adjacent (local) and non-adjacent (longer-distance) relationships. Following exposure to exemplary sequences generated by the AG, humans and macaques were individually tested with sequences that were either consistent with the AG or violated specific adjacent or non-adjacent relationships. We observed a considerable level of cross-species correspondence in the sensitivity of both humans and macaques to the adjacent AG relationships and to the statistical properties of the sequences. We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques. A subset of humans was sensitive to this non-adjacent relationship, revealing interesting between- and within-species differences in AG learning strategies. The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties. However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans.

  13. Geographical, genetic and functional diversity of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kono, Ken; Nomaguchi, Masako; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Shioda, Tatsuo; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    The antiretroviral factor tripartite motif protein 5 (TRIM5) gene-derived isoform (TRIMCyp) has been found in at least three species of Old World monkey: rhesus (Macaca mulatta), pig-tailed (Macaca nemestrina) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Although the frequency of TRIMCyp has been well studied in rhesus and pig-tailed macaques, the frequency and prevalence of TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques remain to be definitively elucidated. Here, the geographical and genetic diversity of TRIM5α/TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques was studied in comparison with their anti-lentiviral activity. It was found that the frequency of TRIMCyp in a population in the Philippines was significantly higher than those in Indonesian and Malaysian populations. Major and minor haplotypes of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclophilin A domain were also found. The functional significance of the polymorphism in TRIMCyp was examined, and it was demonstrated that the major haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but not HIV-2, whilst the minor haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed HIV-2 but not HIV-1. The major haplotype of TRIMCyp did not restrict a monkey-tropic HIV-1 clone, NL-DT5R, which contains a capsid with the simian immunodeficiency virus-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 and the entire vif gene. These results indicate that polymorphisms of TRIMCyp affect its anti-lentiviral activity. Overall, the results of this study will help our understanding of the genetic background of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp, as well as the host factors composing species barriers of primate lentiviruses. PMID:22113010

  14. Evolutionary Interrogation of Human Biology in Well-Annotated Genomic Framework of Rhesus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Jian; Liu, Chu-Jun; Yu, Peng; Zhong, Xiaoming; Chen, Jia-Yu; Yang, Xinzhuang; Peng, Jiguang; Yan, Shouyu; Wang, Chenqu; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Yong E.; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    With genome sequence and composition highly analogous to human, rhesus macaque represents a unique reference for evolutionary studies of human biology. Here, we developed a comprehensive genomic framework of rhesus macaque, the RhesusBase2, for evolutionary interrogation of human genes and the associated regulations. A total of 1,667 next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets were processed, integrated, and evaluated, generating 51.2 million new functional annotation records. With extensive NGS annotations, RhesusBase2 refined the fine-scale structures in 30% of the macaque Ensembl transcripts, reporting an accurate, up-to-date set of macaque gene models. On the basis of these annotations and accurate macaque gene models, we further developed an NGS-oriented Molecular Evolution Gateway to access and visualize macaque annotations in reference to human orthologous genes and associated regulations (www.rhesusbase.org/molEvo). We highlighted the application of this well-annotated genomic framework in generating hypothetical link of human-biased regulations to human-specific traits, by using mechanistic characterization of the DIEXF gene as an example that provides novel clues to the understanding of digestive system reduction in human evolution. On a global scale, we also identified a catalog of 9,295 human-biased regulatory events, which may represent novel elements that have a substantial impact on shaping human transcriptome and possibly underpin recent human phenotypic evolution. Taken together, we provide an NGS data-driven, information-rich framework that will broadly benefit genomics research in general and serves as an important resource for in-depth evolutionary studies of human biology. PMID:24577841

  15. Admixture in Humans of Two Divergent Plasmodium knowlesi Populations Associated with Different Macaque Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Divis, Paul C. S.; Singh, Balbir; Anderios, Fread; Hisam, Shamilah; Matusop, Asmad; Kocken, Clemens H.; Assefa, Samuel A.; Duffy, Craig W.; Conway, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Human malaria parasite species were originally acquired from other primate hosts and subsequently became endemic, then spread throughout large parts of the world. A major zoonosis is now occurring with Plasmodium knowlesi from macaques in Southeast Asia, with a recent acceleration in numbers of reported cases particularly in Malaysia. To investigate the parasite population genetics, we developed sensitive and species-specific microsatellite genotyping protocols and applied these to analysis of samples from 10 sites covering a range of >1,600 km within which most cases have occurred. Genotypic analyses of 599 P. knowlesi infections (552 in humans and 47 in wild macaques) at 10 highly polymorphic loci provide radical new insights on the emergence. Parasites from sympatric long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and pig-tailed macaques (M. nemestrina) were very highly differentiated (FST = 0.22, and K-means clustering confirmed two host-associated subpopulations). Approximately two thirds of human P. knowlesi infections were of the long-tailed macaque type (Cluster 1), and one third were of the pig-tailed-macaque type (Cluster 2), with relative proportions varying across the different sites. Among the samples from humans, there was significant indication of genetic isolation by geographical distance overall and within Cluster 1 alone. Across the different sites, the level of multi-locus linkage disequilibrium correlated with the degree of local admixture of the two different clusters. The widespread occurrence of both types of P. knowlesi in humans enhances the potential for parasite adaptation in this zoonotic system. PMID:26020959

  16. Comparative pathology of rhesus macaque and common marmoset animal models with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pin; Xu, Yanfeng; Deng, Wei; Bao, Linlin; Huang, Lan; Xu, Yuhuan; Yao, Yanfeng; Qin, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), which is caused by a newly discovered coronavirus (CoV), has recently emerged. It causes severe viral pneumonia and is associated with a high fatality rate. However, the pathogenesis, comparative pathology and inflammatory cell response of rhesus macaques and common marmosets experimentally infected with MERS-CoV are unknown. We describe the histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings from rhesus macaque and common marmoset animal models of MERS-CoV infection. The main histopathological findings in the lungs of rhesus macaques and common marmosets were varying degrees of pulmonary lesions, including pneumonia, pulmonary oedema, haemorrhage, degeneration and necrosis of the pneumocytes and bronchial epithelial cells, and inflammatory cell infiltration. The characteristic inflammatory cells in the lungs of rhesus macaques and common marmosets were eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively. Based on these observations, the lungs of rhesus macaques and common marmosets appeared to develop chronic and acute pneumonia, respectively. MERS-CoV antigens and viral RNA were identified in type I and II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells, and ultrastructural observations showed that viral protein was found in type II pneumocytes and inflammatory cells in both species. Correspondingly, the entry receptor DDP4 was found in type I and II pneumocytes, bronchial epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophages. The rhesus macaque and common marmoset animal models of MERS-CoV can be used as a tool to mimic the oncome of MERS-CoV infections in humans. These models can help to provide a better understanding of the pathogenic process of this virus and to develop effective medications and prophylactic treatments. PMID:28234937

  17. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  18. Evolutionary interrogation of human biology in well-annotated genomic framework of rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Jian; Liu, Chu-Jun; Yu, Peng; Zhong, Xiaoming; Chen, Jia-Yu; Yang, Xinzhuang; Peng, Jiguang; Yan, Shouyu; Wang, Chenqu; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Yong E; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2014-05-01

    With genome sequence and composition highly analogous to human, rhesus macaque represents a unique reference for evolutionary studies of human biology. Here, we developed a comprehensive genomic framework of rhesus macaque, the RhesusBase2, for evolutionary interrogation of human genes and the associated regulations. A total of 1,667 next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets were processed, integrated, and evaluated, generating 51.2 million new functional annotation records. With extensive NGS annotations, RhesusBase2 refined the fine-scale structures in 30% of the macaque Ensembl transcripts, reporting an accurate, up-to-date set of macaque gene models. On the basis of these annotations and accurate macaque gene models, we further developed an NGS-oriented Molecular Evolution Gateway to access and visualize macaque annotations in reference to human orthologous genes and associated regulations (www.rhesusbase.org/molEvo). We highlighted the application of this well-annotated genomic framework in generating hypothetical link of human-biased regulations to human-specific traits, by using mechanistic characterization of the DIEXF gene as an example that provides novel clues to the understanding of digestive system reduction in human evolution. On a global scale, we also identified a catalog of 9,295 human-biased regulatory events, which may represent novel elements that have a substantial impact on shaping human transcriptome and possibly underpin recent human phenotypic evolution. Taken together, we provide an NGS data-driven, information-rich framework that will broadly benefit genomics research in general and serves as an important resource for in-depth evolutionary studies of human biology.

  19. Effective spatial scales for evaluating environmental determinants of population density in Yakushima macaques.

    PubMed

    Agetsuma, Naoki; Koda, Ryosuke; Tsujino, Riyou; Agetsuma-Yanagihara, Yoshimi

    2015-02-01

    Population densities of wildlife species tend to be correlated with resource productivity of habitats. However, wildlife density has been greatly modified by increasing human influences. For effective conservation, we must first identify the significant factors that affect wildlife density, and then determine the extent of the areas in which the factors should be managed. Here, we propose a protocol that accomplishes these two tasks. The main threats to wildlife are thought to be habitat alteration and hunting, with increases in alien carnivores being a concern that has arisen recently. Here, we examined the effect of these anthropogenic disturbances, as well as natural factors, on the local density of Yakushima macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui). We surveyed macaque densities at 30 sites across their habitat using data from 403 automatic cameras. We quantified the effect of natural vegetation (broad-leaved forest, mixed coniferous/broad-leaved forest, etc.), altered vegetation (forestry area and agricultural land), hunting pressure, and density of feral domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). The effect of each vegetation type was analyzed at numerous spatial scales (between 150 and 3,600-m radii from the camera locations) to determine the best scale for explaining macaque density (effective spatial scale). A model-selection procedure (generalized linear mixed model) was used to detect significant factors affecting macaque density. We detected that the most effective spatial scale was 400 m in radius, a scale that corresponded to group range size of the macaques. At this scale, the amount of broad-leaved forest was selected as a positive factor, whereas mixed forest and forestry area were selected as negative factors for macaque density. This study demonstrated the importance of the simultaneous evaluation of all possible factors of wildlife population density at the appropriate spatial scale.

  20. Laboratory rhesus macaque social housing and social changes: Implications for research.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Darcy L; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Vandeleest, Jessica; McCowan, Brenda; Capitanio, John

    2017-01-01

    Macaque species, specifically rhesus (Macaca mulatta), are the most common nonhuman primates (NHPs) used in biomedical research due to their suitability as a model of high priority diseases (e.g., HIV, obesity, cognitive aging), cost effective breeding and housing compared to most other NHPs, and close evolutionary relationship to humans. With this close evolutionary relationship, however, is a shared adaptation for a socially stimulating environment, without which both their welfare and suitability as a research model are compromised. While outdoor social group housing provides the best approximation of a social environment that matches the macaque behavioral biology in the wild, this is not always possible at all facilities, where animals may be housed indoors in small groups, in pairs, or alone. Further, animals may experience many housing changes in their lifetime depending on project needs, changes in social status, management needs, or health concerns. Here, we review the evidence for the physiological and health effects of social housing changes and the potential impacts on research outcomes for studies using macaques, particularly rhesus. We situate our review in the context of increasing regulatory pressure for research facilities to both house NHPs socially and mitigate trauma from social aggression. To meet these regulatory requirements and further refine the macaque model for research, significant advances must be made in our understanding and management of rhesus macaque social housing, particularly pair-housing since it is the most common social housing configuration for macaques while on research projects. Because most NHPs are adapted for sociality, a social context is likely important for improving repeatability, reproducibility, and external validity of primate biomedical research. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22528, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Gallay, Philippe A

    2015-11-09

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate.

  2. Consistency and change in the behavior of rhesus macaque abusive mothers with successive infants.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, D; Tomaszycki, M; Carroll, K A

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the abusive behavior and parenting styles of 7 rhesus macaque mothers with infants born in 2 consecutive years. All subjects lived in captive social groups and were observed during the first 12 weeks of infant life. With the exception of 1 individual, mothers were generally consistent in the frequency with which they abused their successive infants. Similarities were also found in the temporal course of infant abuse, the use of the most common pattern of abuse, and some measures of parenting style, notably those reflecting maternal protectiveness. The findings of this study are discussed in relation to different hypothesized relationships between infant abuse and parenting style in macaques.

  3. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by an orally delivered CCR5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Springer, Martin S; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P

    2005-12-01

    Pre-exposure oral prophylaxis with antiviral drugs is a potential method for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We show that oral delivery of CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to the CCR5 coreceptor, for 10-14 d can protect a substantial proportion of macaques from vaginal infection with a CCR5-using virus (SHIV-162P3). The macaques that became infected despite receiving CMPD167 had reduced plasma viremia levels during the earliest stages of infection.

  4. The Human Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter (hSGLT1) Is a Disulfide-Bridged Homodimer with a Re-Entrant C-Terminal Loop

    PubMed Central

    Sasseville, Louis J.; Morin, Michael; Coady, Michael J.; Blunck, Rikard; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Na-coupled cotransporters are proteins that use the trans-membrane electrochemical gradient of Na to activate the transport of a second solute. The sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) constitutes a well-studied prototype of this transport mechanism but essential molecular characteristics, namely its quaternary structure and the exact arrangement of the C-terminal transmembrane segments, are still debated. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, human SGLT1 molecules (hSGLT1) were labelled on an externally accessible cysteine residue with a thiol-reactive fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine-C5-maleimide, TMR). Addition of dipicrylamine (DPA, a negatively-charged amphiphatic fluorescence “quencher”) to the fluorescently-labelled oocytes is used to quench the fluorescence originating from hSGLT1 in a voltage-dependent manner. Using this arrangement with a cysteine residue introduced at position 624 in the loop between transmembrane segments 12 and 13, the voltage-dependent fluorescence signal clearly indicated that this portion of the 12–13 loop is located on the external side of the membrane. As the 12–13 loop begins on the intracellular side of the membrane, this suggests that the 12–13 loop is re-entrant. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we observed that different hSGLT1 molecules are within molecular distances from each other suggesting a multimeric complex arrangement. In agreement with this conclusion, a western blot analysis showed that hSGLT1 migrates as either a monomer or a dimer in reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively. A systematic mutational study of endogenous cysteine residues in hSGLT1 showed that a disulfide bridge is formed between the C355 residues of two neighbouring hSGLT1 molecules. It is concluded that, 1) hSGLT1 is expressed as a disulfide bridged homodimer via C355 and that 2) a portion of the intracellular 12–13 loop is re-entrant and readily accessible from the extracellular milieu. PMID:27137918

  5. The Human Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter (hSGLT1) Is a Disulfide-Bridged Homodimer with a Re-Entrant C-Terminal Loop.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Louis J; Morin, Michael; Coady, Michael J; Blunck, Rikard; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Na-coupled cotransporters are proteins that use the trans-membrane electrochemical gradient of Na to activate the transport of a second solute. The sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) constitutes a well-studied prototype of this transport mechanism but essential molecular characteristics, namely its quaternary structure and the exact arrangement of the C-terminal transmembrane segments, are still debated. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, human SGLT1 molecules (hSGLT1) were labelled on an externally accessible cysteine residue with a thiol-reactive fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine-C5-maleimide, TMR). Addition of dipicrylamine (DPA, a negatively-charged amphiphatic fluorescence "quencher") to the fluorescently-labelled oocytes is used to quench the fluorescence originating from hSGLT1 in a voltage-dependent manner. Using this arrangement with a cysteine residue introduced at position 624 in the loop between transmembrane segments 12 and 13, the voltage-dependent fluorescence signal clearly indicated that this portion of the 12-13 loop is located on the external side of the membrane. As the 12-13 loop begins on the intracellular side of the membrane, this suggests that the 12-13 loop is re-entrant. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we observed that different hSGLT1 molecules are within molecular distances from each other suggesting a multimeric complex arrangement. In agreement with this conclusion, a western blot analysis showed that hSGLT1 migrates as either a monomer or a dimer in reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively. A systematic mutational study of endogenous cysteine residues in hSGLT1 showed that a disulfide bridge is formed between the C355 residues of two neighbouring hSGLT1 molecules. It is concluded that, 1) hSGLT1 is expressed as a disulfide bridged homodimer via C355 and that 2) a portion of the intracellular 12-13 loop is re-entrant and readily accessible from the extracellular milieu.

  6. Human behavior and opportunities for parasite transmission in communities surrounding long-tailed macaque populations in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lane-DeGraaf, Kelly E; Putra, I G A Arta; Wandia, I Nengah; Rompis, Aida; Hollocher, Hope; Fuentes, Agustin

    2014-02-01

    Spatial overlap and shared resources between humans and wildlife can exacerbate parasite transmission dynamics. In Bali, Indonesia, an agricultural-religious temple system provides sanctuaries for long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), concentrating them in areas in close proximity to humans. In this study, we interviewed individuals in communities surrounding 13 macaque populations about their willingness to participate in behaviors that would put them at risk of exposure to gastrointestinal parasites to understand if age, education level, or occupation are significant determinants of exposure behaviors. These exposure risk behaviors and attitudes include fear of macaques, direct contact with macaques, owning pet macaques, hunting and eating macaques, and overlapping water uses. We find that willingness to participate in exposure risk behaviors are correlated with an individual's occupation, age, and/or education level. We also found that because the actual risk of infection varies across populations, activities such as direct macaque contact and pet ownership, could be putting individuals at real risk in certain contexts. Thus, we show that human demographics and social structure can influence willingness to participate in behaviors putting them at increased risk for exposure to parasites.

  7. Natural Infection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in an Imported Pigtail Macaque (Macaca nemestrina) and Management of the Exposed Colony

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Crystal H; Skinner, Brianna L; Dietz, Sharon M; Blaney, David; Engel, Robyn M; Lathrop, George W; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Gee, Jay E; Elrod, Mindy G; Powell, Nathaniel; Walke, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the select agent Burkholderia pseudomallei in macaques imported into the United States is rare. A purpose-bred, 4.5-y-old pigtail macaque (Macaca nemestrina) imported from Southeast Asia was received from a commercial vendor at our facility in March 2012. After the initial acclimation period of 5 to 7 d, physical examination of the macaque revealed a subcutaneous abscess that surrounded the right stifle joint. The wound was treated and resolved over 3 mo. In August 2012, 2 mo after the stifle joint wound resolved, the macaque exhibited neurologic clinical signs. Postmortem microbiologic analysis revealed that the macaque was infected with B. pseudomallei. This case report describes the clinical evaluation of a B. pseudomallei-infected macaque, management and care of the potentially exposed colony of animals, and protocols established for the animal care staff that worked with the infected macaque and potentially exposed colony. This article also provides relevant information on addressing matters related to regulatory issues and risk management of potentially exposed animals and animal care staff. PMID:24326230

  8. SPL7013 gel as a topical microbicide for prevention of vaginal transmission of SHIV89.6P in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-Hou; Emau, Peter; Cairns, J Scott; Flanary, Leon; Morton, William R; McCarthy, Tom D; Tsai, Che-Chung

    2005-03-01

    SPL7013 is a dendrimer with a polyanionic outer surface that allows multiple interactions with target sites. It potently binds and blocks HIV-1 and chimeric simian/HIV-1 viruses (SHIVs) replication in vitro. Gels containing different concentrations of SPL7013 were used as topical microbicides in female pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) to study their ability to prevent vaginal transmission of SHIV(89,6P). On virus challenge, all untreated macaques (8/8) and seven of eight macaques treated with placebo gel were infected within 2 weeks postinfection (PI) and showed high plasma viremia and dramatic CD4(+) cell decline within 4 weeks PI. In contrast, 6/6 macaques, 5/6 macaques, and 2/6 macaques treated with 5% w/w (50 mg/ml), 3% w/w (30 mg/ml), and 1% w/w (10 mg/ml) SPL7013 gels, respectively, resisted viral challenge. The results showed that animals treated with SPL7013 showed a dose-dependent resistance to virus challenge. Neither SPL7013 nor placebo gels produced any adverse effects following the single application in the study. These results showed that 3-5% w/w SPL7013 gels were effective in blocking vaginal transmission of SHIV in macaques after single gel application followed by single virus challenge. These results suggest that SPL7013 gel may be a promising anti-HIV microbicide formulation for further evaluation.

  9. Neurobiology of Stress-Induced Reproductive Dysfunction In Female Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Centeno, Maria Luisa; Cameron, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well accepted that stress can precipitate mental and physical illness. However, it is becoming clear that given the same stress, some individuals are very vulnerable and will succumb to illness while others are more resilient and cope effectively, rather than becoming ill. This difference between individuals is called stress sensitivity. Stress-sensitivity of an individual appears to be influenced by genetically inherited factors, early life (even prenatal) stress, and by the presence or absence of factors that provide protection from stress. In comparison to other stress-related diseases, the concept of sensitivity versus resilience to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction has received relatively little attention. The studies presented herein were undertaken to begin to identify stable characteristics and the neural underpinnings of individuals with sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction. Female cynomolgus macaques with normal menstrual cycles either stop ovulating (Stress Sensitive) or to continue to ovulate (Stress Resilient) upon exposure to a combined metabolic and psychosocial stress. However, even in the absence of stress, the stress sensitive animals have lower secretion of the ovarian steroids, estrogen and progesterone, have higher heart rates, have lower serotonin function, have fewer serotonin neurons and lower expression of pivotal serotonin-related genes, have lower expression of 5HT2A and 2C genes in the hypothalamus, have higher gene expression of GAD67 and CRH in the hypothalamus and have reduced GnRH transport to the anterior pituitary. Altogether, the results suggest that the neurobiology of reproductive circuits in stress sensitive individuals is compromised. We speculate that with the application of stress, the dysfunction of these neural systems becomes exacerbated and reproductive function ceases. PMID:18931961

  10. Aerosolized oxytocin increases cerebrospinal fluid oxytocin in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Modi, Meera E; Connor-Stroud, Fawn; Landgraf, Rainer; Young, Larry J; Parr, Lisa A

    2014-07-01

    Intranasal (IN) administration is a widely used method for examining the effect of oxytocin (OT) on social behavior and cognition in healthy subjects and psychiatric populations. IN-OT in humans enhances trust, emotional perception, and empathetic behavior and is under investigation as a potential pharmacotherapy to enhance social functioning in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Nonhuman primates (NHP) are an important model for understanding the effect of OT on social cognition, its neural mechanisms, and the development of IN-OT as a pharmacotherapy for treating social deficits in humans. However, NHP and even some human populations, such as very young infants and children, cannot easily follow the detailed self-administration protocol used in the majority of human IN-OT studies. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of several OT-administration routes for elevating central OT concentrations in rhesus macaques. First, we examined the effect of IN and intravenous (IV) routes of OT administration on concentrations of OT and vasopressin (AVP) in plasma and lumbar CSF. Second, we examined these same measures in monkeys after an aerosolized (AE) OT delivery route. All three administration routes significantly increased plasma OT concentrations, but only the AE-OT route significantly increased concentrations of CSF OT. No route affected concentrations of AVP in plasma or CSF. This study confirms that the AE route is the most effective method for increasing central OT concentrations in monkeys, and may also be an effective route, alternative to IN, for administering OT to some human populations.

  11. Pathophysiology of the Rhesus Macaque Model for Inhalational Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephen M.; Pak, Dennis H.; Lindsay, Amber; Fisher, David A.; Barnewall, Roy E.; Briscoe, Crystal M.; Anderson, Michael S.; Warren, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the rhesus macaque (RM) as a model for inhalational brucellosis in support of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Animal Rule. The pathophysiology of chronic Brucella melitensis aerosol infection was monitored in two phases that each occurred over an 8-week time period; dose escalation (8 RMs; targeted doses of 5.0E+03, 5.0E+04, or 5.0E+05 CFU/animal or the unchallenged control) and natural history (12 RMs; targeted dose of 2.50E+05 CFU/animal or the unchallenged control). RMs given an aerosol challenge with B. melitensis developed undulating fevers (6/6 phase I; 8/9 phase II), positive enriched blood cultures (5/10; phase II), and bacterial burdens in tissues starting 14 to 21 days postchallenge (6/6 phase I; 10/10 phase II). In addition, 80% (8/10; phase II) of infected RMs seroconverted 14 to 21 days postchallenge. RMs developed elevations in certain liver enzymes and had an increased inflammatory response by 3 weeks postchallenge as shown by increases in C-reactive protein (6/8) and neopterin (4/8), which correlated with the onset of a fever. As early as 14 days postchallenge, positive liver biopsy specimens were detected (2/8), and ultrasound imaging showed the development of splenomegaly. Finally, histopathologic examination found lesions attributed to Brucella infection in the liver, kidney, lung, and/or spleen of all animals. The disease progression observed with the RMs in this study is analogous to human brucellosis pathophysiology. Thus, the results from this study support the use of the RM as an animal model for inhalational brucellosis to evaluate the efficacy of novel vaccines and therapeutics against B. melitensis. PMID:22064715

  12. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes macaque follicle development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, C L; Yan, J; Zhi, X; Xia, X; Wang, T R; Yan, L Y; Yu, Y; Ding, T; Gao, J M; Li, R; Qiao, J

    2015-05-01

    Fertility preservation is an important type of frontier scientific research in the field of reproductive health. The culture of ovarian cortices to i) initiate primordial follicle growth and ii) procure developing follicles for later oocyte maturation is a promising fertility preservation strategy, especially for older women or cancer patients. At present, this goal remains largely unsubstantiated in primates because of the difficulty in attaining relatively large follicles via ovarian cortex culture. To overcome this hurdle, we cultured macaque monkey ovarian cortices with FSH, kit ligand (KL), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and/or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The various factors and factor combinations promoted primordial follicle development to different extents. Notably, both bFF (bFGF, 100 ng/ml and FSH, 50 ng/ml) and KF (KL, 100 ng/ml and FSH, 50 ng/ml) contributed to the activation of primordial follicles at day 12 (D12) of culture, whereas at D18, the proportions of developing follicles were significantly higher in the bFF and KF groups relative to the other treatment groups, particularly in the bFF group. Estradiol and progesterone production were also highest in the bFF group, and primary follicle diameters were the largest. Up until D24, the bFF group still exhibited the highest proportion of developing follicles. In conclusion, the bFGF-FSH combination promotes nonhuman primate primordial follicle development in vitro, with the optimal experimental window within 18 days. These results provide evidence for the future success of human ovarian cortex culture and the eventual acquisition of mature human follicles or oocytes for fertility restoration.

  13. A Neural Circuit Covarying with Social Hierarchy in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Franz X.; O'Reilly, Jill X.; Andersson, Jesper L.; Mitchell, Anna S.; Bell, Andrew H.; Miller, Karla L.; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread interest in social dominance, little is known of its neural correlates in primates. We hypothesized that social status in primates might be related to individual variation in subcortical brain regions implicated in other aspects of social and emotional behavior in other mammals. To examine this possibility we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which affords the taking of quantitative measurements noninvasively, both of brain structure and of brain function, across many regions simultaneously. We carried out a series of tests of structural and functional MRI (fMRI) data in 25 group-living macaques. First, a deformation-based morphometric (DBM) approach was used to show that gray matter in the amygdala, brainstem in the vicinity of the raphe nucleus, and reticular formation, hypothalamus, and septum/striatum of the left hemisphere was correlated with social status. Second, similar correlations were found in the same areas in the other hemisphere. Third, similar correlations were found in a second data set acquired several months later from a subset of the same animals. Fourth, the strength of coupling between fMRI-measured activity in the same areas was correlated with social status. The network of subcortical areas, however, had no relationship with the sizes of individuals' social networks, suggesting the areas had a simple and direct relationship with social status. By contrast a second circuit in cortex, comprising the midsuperior temporal sulcus and anterior and dorsal prefrontal cortex, covaried with both individuals' social statuses and the social network sizes they experienced. This cortical circuit may be linked to the social cognitive processes that are taxed by life in more complex social networks and that must also be used if an animal is to achieve a high social status. PMID:25180883

  14. Generation of Rhesus Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Clones That Are Resistant to Major Anti-HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nomaguchi, Masako; Yokoyama, Masaru; Kono, Ken; Nakayama, Emi E.; Shioda, Tatsuo; Doi, Naoya; Fujiwara, Sachi; Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Ryo, Akihide; Ode, Hirotaka; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in macaque cells is restricted mainly by antiviral cellular APOBEC3, TRIM5α/TRIM5CypA, and tetherin proteins. For basic and clinical HIV-1/AIDS studies, efforts to construct macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) have been made by us and others. Although rhesus macaques are commonly and successfully used as infection models, no HIV-1 derivatives suitable for in vivo rhesus research are available to date. In this study, to obtain novel HIV-1mt clones that are resistant to major restriction factors, we altered Gag and Vpu of our best HIV-1mt clone described previously. First, by sequence- and structure-guided mutagenesis, three amino acid residues in Gag-capsid (CA) (M94L/R98S/G114Q) were found to be responsible for viral growth enhancement in a macaque cell line. Results of in vitro TRIM5α susceptibility testing of HIV-1mt carrying these substitutions correlated well with the increased viral replication potential in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different TRIM5 alleles, suggesting that the three amino acids in HIV-1mt CA are involved in the interaction with TRIM5α. Second, we replaced the transmembrane domain of Vpu of this clone with the corresponding region of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgsn166 Vpu. The resultant clone, MN4/LSDQgtu, was able to antagonize macaque but not human tetherin, and its Vpu effectively functioned during viral replication in a macaque cell line. Notably, MN4/LSDQgtu grew comparably to SIVmac239 and much better than any of our other HIV-1mt clones in rhesus macaque PBMCs. In sum, MN4/LSDQgtu is the first HIV-1 derivative that exhibits resistance to the major restriction factors in rhesus macaque cells. PMID:23966385

  15. A long-acting integrase inhibitor protects female macaques from repeated high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Chasity D; Yueh, Yun Lan; Spreen, William R; St Bernard, Leslie; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Rodriguez, Kristina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Ford, Susan; Mohri, Hiroshi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Ho, David D; Markowitz, Martin

    2015-01-14

    Long-acting GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) is a strand transfer inhibitor of the HIV/SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) integrase and was shown to be an effective preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) agent in a low-dose intrarectal SHIV (simian-human immunodeficiency virus) rhesus macaque challenge model. We examined the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of GSK744 LA as PrEP against repeat high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge in female rhesus macaques treated with Depo-Provera (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate), which promotes viral transmission vaginally. When Depo-Provera-treated female rhesus macaques were dosed with GSK744 LA (50 mg/kg) monthly, systemic and tissue drug concentrations were lower than previously observed in male rhesus macaques. GSK744 concentrations were fivefold lower on average in cervical tissues than in rectal tissues. Eight female rhesus macaques were treated with GSK744 LA at week 0, and four female rhesus macaques served as controls. All animals received a high-dose challenge of SHIV162P3 at week 1. No infection was detected in GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques, whereas viremia was detected 1 to 2 weeks after SHIV challenge in all control animals. The GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques were given a second administration of drug at week 4 and further challenged at weeks 5 and 7. GSK744 LA treatment protected six of eight female rhesus macaques against three high-dose SHIV challenges, whereas all control animals became infected after the first challenge (P = 0.0003, log-rank test). These results support further clinical development of GSK744 LA for PrEP.

  16. Inhibition of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication by CD8+ cells of SIV-infected rhesus macaques: implications for immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blackbourn, D J; Chuang, L F; Killam, K F; Chuang, R Y

    1994-08-01

    The ability of the CD8+ cells from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques to inhibit SIV replication was investigated. Inhibition was produced by a heat-stable soluble factor of molecular size greater than 10kDa. CD8+ supernatants from some macaques were found not only to suppress SIV growth but also to be cytolytic toward both infected and uninfected CD4+ cells. Such indiscriminate CD8+ cell-mediated cell killing may therefore account for DC4+ cell depletion in certain SIV-infected macaques.

  17. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Simian Foamy Virus Isolate from a Cynomolgus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koji; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete proviral genome sequence (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession no. LC094267) of a simian foamy virus, SFVmfa/Cy5061, isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). This proviral genome consists of 12,965 nucleotides and has five open reading frames, gag, pol, env, tas, and bet, as with other foamy viruses. PMID:27908992

  18. Developmental and Cross-Situational Stability in Infant Pigtailed Macaque Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Adrienne; Ha, James

    2011-01-01

    We assessed developmental stability and context generalizability of temperament in pigtailed macaques ("Macaca nemestrina") from the University of Washington Infant Primate Research Lab. A principal components analysis condensed 6 behavioral measures into 2 components, interpreted as reactivity and boldness. Changes in these measures over the 1st…

  19. Identification of a novel CXCL1-like chemokine gene in macaques and its inactivation in hominids.

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Otsuka-Ono, Kaori; Miura, Retsu; Osada, Naoki; Terao, Keiji; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusuda, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are a rapidly evolving cytokine gene family. Because of various genome rearrangements after divergence of primates and rodents, humans and mice have different sets of chemokine genes, with humans having members outnumbering those of mice. Here, we report the occurrence of lineage-specific chemokine gene generation or inactivation events within primates. By using human chemokine sequences as queries, we isolated a novel cynomolgus macaque CXC chemokine cDNA. The encoded chemokine, termed CXCL1L (from CXCL1-like) showed the highest similarity to human CXCL1. A highly homologous gene was also found in the rhesus macaque genome. By comparing the genome organization of the major CXC chemokine clusters among the primates, we found that one copy of the duplicated CXCL1 genes turned into a pseudogene in the hominids, whereas the gene in macaques has been maintained as a functionally active CXCL1L. In addition, cynomolgus macaque was found to contain an additional CXC chemokine highly homologous to CXCL3, termed CXCL3L (from CXCL3-like). These results demonstrate the birth-and-death process of a new gene in association with gene duplication within the primates.

  20. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  1. Coagulation Biomarkers in Healthy Chinese-Origin Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, Galit H; Bendapudi, Pavan K; Marini, Robert P; Vanderburg, Charles R; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fox, James G

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are a common model for the study of human biology and disease. To manage coagulopathies in these animals and to study their clotting changes, the ability to measure coagulation biomarkers is necessary. Currently, few options for coagulation testing in NHP are commercially available. In this study, assays for 4 coagulation biomarkers—D-dimer, antithrombin III, protein C, and soluble P-selectin—were developed and optimized for rhesus macaques. Whole blood was collected from 28 healthy Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (11 male; 17 female) ranging in age from 5 to 20 y. Coagulation biomarkers were measured by using bead-based sandwich ELISA technology. The ranges (mean ± 90% confidence interval) for these biomarkers were: antithrombin III, 124.2 to 133.4 μg/mL; protein C, 3.2 to 3.6 μg/mL; D-dimer, 110.3 to 161.3 ng/mL; soluble P-selectin, 0.12 to 0.14 ng/106 platelets. These reference values did not differ significantly according to sex or age. These new assays for coagulation biomarkers in rhesus macaques will facilitate the evaluation of in vivo hemostasis. PMID:27177557

  2. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar infections in captive macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Windell L; Yason, John Anthony D L; Adao, Davin Edric V

    2010-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that infects man and animals. This parasite has a global distribution and the disease it causes is usually characterized by diarrhea. In order to detect the parasite, it is necessary to differentiate it from Entamoeba dispar. E. dispar appears morphologically similar to E. histolytica but does not cause disease and tissue invasion. This study reports on the prevalence of E. histolytica and E. dispar among captive macaques in a primate facility in the Philippines. PCR was used to correctly identify both Entamoeba species. Indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) was also performed to determine the seroprevalence of amebiasis in the captive macaques. Based on PCR targeting of the peroxiredoxin gene, of the 96 stool samples collected, 23 (24%) contained E. histolytica while 32 (33%) contained E. dispar. IFAT revealed 26 (27%) serum samples positive for antibodies against E. histolytica. Sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene showed that the 23 E. histolytica isolates were identical to human E. histolytica isolates deposited in the GenBank and not Entamoeba nuttalli as found in macaques in other recent reports. The Philippines is a major exporter of monkeys for biomedical research purposes, so screening animals before transporting them to other locations lessens the risk of spreading zoonoses to a wider area. This is the first report of the molecular detection of E. histolytica and E. dispar among macaques in the Philippines. This study complements the limited information available on the animal hosts of E. histolytica in the Philippines.

  3. Trisomy 16 in a Pigtailed Macaque ("M. nemestrina") with Multiple Anomalies and Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppenthal, Gerald C.; Moore, Charleen M.; Best, Robert G.; Walker-Gelatt, Coleen G.; Delio, Patrick J.; Sackett, Gene P.

    2004-01-01

    A female pigtailed macaque ("Macaca nemestrina") with unusual physical characteristics, deficits in learning and cognitive tasks, abnormal social behavior, and abnormal reflexes and motor control was followed from birth until 3 years of age and found to have trisomy 16, which is homologous to trisomy 13 in humans. The animal described here showed…

  4. Social Preferences by and for Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca Nemestrina) with Trisomy 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Karyl B.; Sackett, Gene P.

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of social choices of trisomic macaques and of control groups found that groups showed few differences in preferences for stimulus animals with and without disabilities. Results suggest that the avoidance of individuals with disabilities is not a general primate trait and the presence of mental retardation and physical handicaps need not…

  5. Coagulation Biomarkers in Healthy Chinese-Origin Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Bendapudi, Pavan K; Marini, Robert P; Vanderburg, Charles R; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fox, James G

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are a common model for the study of human biology and disease. To manage coagulopathies in these animals and to study their clotting changes, the ability to measure coagulation biomarkers is necessary. Currently, few options for coagulation testing in NHP are commercially available. In this study, assays for 4 coagulation biomarkers-D-dimer, antithrombin III, protein C, and soluble P-selectin-were developed and optimized for rhesus macaques. Whole blood was collected from 28 healthy Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (11 male; 17 female) ranging in age from 5 to 20 y. Coagulation biomarkers were measured by using bead-based sandwich ELISA technology. The ranges (mean ± 90% confidence interval) for these biomarkers were: antithrombin III, 124.2 to 133.4 μg/mL; protein C, 3.2 to 3.6 μg/mL; D-dimer, 110.3 to 161.3 ng/mL; soluble P-selectin, 0.12 to 0.14 ng/10(6) platelets. These reference values did not differ significantly according to sex or age. These new assays for coagulation biomarkers in rhesus macaques will facilitate the evaluation of in vivo hemostasis.

  6. Persistent Peripheral Nervous System Damage in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Jamie L; Mangus, Lisa M; Hauer, Peter; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Queen, Suzanne E; Laast, Victoria A; Adams, Robert J; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurologic complication associated with HIV infection. In addition to virus-mediated injury of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), treatment of HIV infection with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may induce toxic neuropathy as a side effect. Antiretroviral toxic neuropathy is clinically indistinguishable from the sensory neuropathy induced by HIV; in some patients, these 2 processes are likely superimposed. To study these intercurrent PNS disease processes, we first established a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/pigtailed macaque model in which more than 90% of animals developed PNS changes closely resembling those seen in HIV-infected individuals with distal sensory neuropathy. To determine whether cART alters the progression of SIV-induced PNS damage, dorsal root ganglia and epidermal nerve fibers were evaluated in SIV-infected macaques after long-term suppressive cART. Although cART effectively suppressed SIV replication and reduced macrophage activation in the dorsal root ganglia, PGP 9.5 immunostaining and measurements of epidermal nerve fibers in the plantar surface of the feet of treated SIV-infected macaques clearly showed that cART did not normalize epidermal nerve fiber density. These findings illustrate that significant PNS damage persists in SIV-infected macaques on suppressive cART.

  7. A 22-channel receive array with Helmholtz transmit coil for anesthetized macaque MRI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Thomas; Keil, Boris; Serano, Peter; Mareyam, Azma; McNab, Jennifer A; Wald, Lawrence L; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-11-01

    The macaque monkey is an important model for cognitive and sensory neuroscience that has been used extensively in behavioral, electrophysiological, molecular and, more recently, neuroimaging studies. However, macaque MRI has unique technical differences relative to human MRI, such as the geometry of highly parallel receive arrays, which must be addressed to optimize imaging performance. A 22-channel receive coil array was constructed specifically for rapid high-resolution anesthetized macaque monkey MRI at 3 T. A local Helmholtz transmit coil was used for excitation. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared with those of single- and four-channel receive coils routinely used for macaque MRI. The 22-channel coil yielded significant improvements in SNR throughout the brain. Using this coil, the SNR in peripheral brain was 2.4 and 1.7 times greater than that obtained with single- or four-channel coils, respectively. In the central brain, the SNR gain was 1.5 times that of both the single- and four-channel coils. Finally, the performance of the array for functional, anatomical and diffusion-weighted imaging was evaluated. For all three modalities, the use of the 22-channel array allowed for high-resolution and accelerated image acquisition.

  8. Biological variables in the hair uptake of methylmercury from blood in the Macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mottet, N.K.; Body, R.L.; Wilkens, V.; Burbacher, T.M.

    1987-04-01

    The total mercury (Hg) in hair and blood of 45 young healthy adult female Macaque fascicularis given 0, 50, 70, or 90 ..mu..g MeHg/kg body wt orally in apple juice daily revealed a close and constant ratio between blood Hg and hair. The amount of hair Hg does not increase with time (maximum period of observation 490 days) at a given dose level. Also the ratio was unchanged between background and subtoxic dose levels. Individuals at a given dose level with a higher-than-average blood level had a proportionately higher hair level. The Macaque blood/hair ratio is markedly lower than that reported for humans. Pregnancy did not have an appreciable effect on the hair mercury level. Review of the known variables in human and Macaque hair growth and structures does not provide an explanation for the difference. They suggest that an as yet unidentified biological variable(s), possibly circumfollicular blood flow, could account for the difference. This ratio difference notwithstanding, controlled studies on Macaque hair such as this add support for the validity of terminal hair as a trace metal exposure indicator.

  9. High maltose sensitivity of sweet taste receptors in the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata)

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Emiko; Tsutsui, Kei; Imai, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    Taste sensitivity differs among animal species depending on feeding habitat. To humans, sucrose is one of the sweetest natural sugars, and this trait is expected to be similar in other primates. However, previous behavioral tests have shown that some primate species have equal preferences for maltose and sucrose. Because sweet tastes are recognized when compounds bind to the sweet taste receptor Tas1R2/Tas1R3, we evaluated the responses of human and Japanese macaque Tas1R2/Tas1R3 to various natural sugars using a heterologous expression system. Human Tas1R2/Tas1R3 showed high sensitivity to sucrose, as expected; however, Japanese macaque Tas1R2/Tas1R3 showed equally high sensitivity to maltose and sucrose. Furthermore, Japanese macaques showed equally high sensitivity to sucrose and maltose in a two-bottle behavioral experiment. These results indicate that Japanese macaques have high sensitivity to maltose, and this sensitivity is directly related to Tas1R2/Tas1R3 function. This is the first molecular biological evidence that for some primate species, sucrose is not the most preferable natural sugar, as it is for humans. PMID:27982108

  10. Can Gender Differences Be Evaluated in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia?

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephanie J; Kirsch, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Wenri; Grafe, Marjorie R; West, G Alex; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Traystman, Richard J; Hurn, Patricia D

    2008-01-01

    Gender differences, sex steroid effects, and sex-specific candidate therapeutics in ischemic stroke have been studied in rodents but not in nonhuman primates. In this feasibility study (n = 3 per group), we developed a model of transient focal cerebral ischemia in adult male and female rhesus macaques that consistently includes white matter injury. The animals also were used to determine whether gender-linked differences in histopathologic outcomes could be evaluated in this model in future, larger preclinical trials. Histologic brain pathology was evaluated at 4 d after 90 min of reversible occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). MCA occlusion was accomplished by using a transorbital approach and temporary placement of an aneurysm clip. Male and female rhesus macaques 7 to 11 y of age were studied. Baseline and intraischemic blood glucose, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, end-tidal CO2, and rectal temperatures were not different among groups. The variability in injury volume was comparable to that observed in human focal cerebrovascular ischemia and in other nonhuman primate models using proximal MCA occlusion. In this small sample, the volume of injury was not different between male and female subjects, but observed variability was higher in female caudate nucleus, putamen, and hemisphere. This report is the first to compare cerebral ischemic outcomes in female and male rhesus macaques. The female rhesus macaque ischemic stroke model could be used after rodent studies to provide preclinical data for clinical trials in women. PMID:19149416

  11. Effects of Category Learning on the Stimulus Selectivity of Macaque Inferior Temporal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Baene, Wouter; Ons, Bart; Wagemans, Johan; Vogels, Rufin

    2008-01-01

    Primates can learn to categorize complex shapes, but as yet it is unclear how this categorization learning affects the representation of shape in visual cortex. Previous studies that have examined the effect of categorization learning on shape representation in the macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex have produced diverse and conflicting results…

  12. Reference Intervals for Preprandial and Postprandial Serum Bile Acid in Adult Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee MF; Westworth, Diccon R; Ardeshir, Amir; Tarara, Ross P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the 12-h fasting preprandial and 2-h postprandial serum bile acid concentration (SBAC) reference intervals for healthy, adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We hypothesized that the mean 2-h postprandial SBAC would be significantly higher than the mean preprandial SBAC. We included 40 (24 male, 16 female) macaques after confirming that their health records, physical examinations, CBC, serum chemistry panels, and urinalyses were all within normal limits. In addition, hepatitis A titers were determined, an ultrasound examination of the liver was performed, and two 16-gauge ultrasound guided percutaneous liver biopsies were collected and submitted for histopathology. Macaques were confirmed healthy according to hepatitis A screens and sonographic and histologic evaluation of hepatic tissue. Within 2 wk of the screening procedures, preprandial and postprandial SBACs were measured. Preprandial SBAC (mean ± 1 SD) was 11.1 ± 1.9 µmol/L and postprandial SBAC was 19.7 ± 8.0 µmol/L, which was significantly higher than the preprandial value. Sex and hepatitis titers did not significantly influence preprandial and postprandial SBAC. The current study indicates that the SBAC reference values for rhesus macaques are higher than those reported for humans and companion animals. PMID:23849441

  13. Effects of Human Management Events on Conspecific Aggression in Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Theil, Jacob H; Beisner, Brianne A; Hill, Ashley E; McCowan, Brenda

    2017-03-01

    Conspecific aggression in outdoor-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at primate research facilities is a leading source of trauma and can potentially influence animal wellbeing and research quality. Although aggression between macaques is a normal part of daily social interactions, human presence might affect the frequency of various behaviors and instigate increases in conspecific aggression. We sought to determine how and which human management events affect conspecific aggression both immediately after an event and throughout the course of a day. From June 2008 through December 2009, we recorded agonistic encounters among macaques living in 7 social groups in large outdoor field cages. Behavioral data were then synchronized with specific management events (for example, feeding, enclosure cleaning, animal catching) that occurred within or near the enclosure. By using an Information Theoretical approach, 2 generalized linear mixed models were developed to estimate the effects of human management events on 1) aggression after individual management events and 2) daily levels of aggression. Univariate analysis revealed an increase in the rate of aggression after a management event occurred. The best predictor of aggression in a cage was the type of management event that occurred. Various factors including the number of daily management events, the total time of management events, the technicians involved, reproductive season, and their interactions also showed significant associations with daily aggression levels. Our findings demonstrate that human management events are associated with an increase in conspecific aggression between rhesus macaques and thus have implications regarding how humans manage primates in research facilities.

  14. Plasticity of Ability to Form Cross-Modal Representations in Infant Japanese Macaques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Ikuma; Kuwahata, Hiroko; Fujita, Kazuo; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, Adachi, Kuwahata, Fujita, Tomonaga & Matsuzawa demonstrated that infant Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) form cross-modal representations of conspecifics but not of humans. However, because the subjects in the experiment were raised in a large social group and had considerably less exposure to humans than to…

  15. Comparative diffusion tractography of corticostriatal motor pathways reveals differences between humans and macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zandbelt, B. B.; Schall, M. S.; Schall, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The primate corticobasal ganglia circuits are understood to be segregated into parallel anatomically and functionally distinct loops. Anatomical and physiological studies in macaque monkeys are summarized as showing that an oculomotor loop begins with projections from the frontal eye fields (FEF) to the caudate nucleus, and a motor loop begins with projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the putamen. However, recent functional and structural neuroimaging studies of the human corticostriatal system report evidence inconsistent with this organization. To obtain conclusive evidence, we directly compared the pattern of connectivity between cortical motor areas and the striatum in humans and macaques in vivo using probabilistic diffusion tractography. In macaques we found that FEF is connected with the head of the caudate and anterior putamen, and M1 is connected with more posterior sections of the caudate and putamen, corroborating neuroanatomical tract tracing findings. However, in humans FEF and M1 are connected to largely overlapping portions of posterior putamen and only a small portion of the caudate. These results demonstrate that the corticobasal connectivity for the oculomotor and primary motor loop is not entirely segregated for primates at a macroscopic level and that the description of the anatomical connectivity of corticostriatal motor systems in humans does not parallel that of macaques, perhaps because of an expansion of prefrontal projections to striatum in humans. PMID:25589589

  16. Influence of sexual competition and social context on homosexual behavior in adolescent female Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Gunst, Noëlle; Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Vasey, Paul L

    2015-05-01

    We explored the role that sexual and social partners play in the expression of female homosexual behavior among adolescent female Japanese macaques at Arashiyama, Japan. Our data fully or partially supported all the predictions related to four non-mutually exclusive hypotheses, namely the "adult male disinterest in adolescent females" hypothesis, the "numerous homosexual adult females" hypothesis, the "safer homosexual interactions" hypothesis and the "same-sex sexual interactions" hypothesis. Our results show that both sexual context (e.g., lack of adolescent female attractivity toward adult males, presence of motivated same-sex sexual partners), and social context (e.g., risk of aggression) help explain the high frequency and prevalence of homosexual behavior in adolescent females in the Arashiyama group of Japanese macaques. As with adult females, whose homosexual consortships do not reflect generalized patterns of social affiliation or kinship, we found that adolescent females' same-sex sexual partners were neither kin, nor were they non-kin individuals with whom adolescent females were closely affiliated outside of a consortship context. Our study furthers the growing database of female homosexual behavior in Japanese macaques and provides additional evidence that homosexual behavior as expressed by adolescent female Japanese macaques is, like heterosexual behavior, sexual in nature. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a broader comparative approach that may shed light upon the development and evolution of human homosexuality.

  17. Infant Abuse Runs in Families of Group-Living Pigtail Macaques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestripieri, Dario; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Infant abuse and neglect were investigated in five families of group-living pigtail macaques over five generations. Neglect was mostly limited to first-born and newborns; closely related rather than distantly related females were more prone to abuse; and infants with siblings previously abused were at highest risk. Results provide evidence of…

  18. Impact assessment of dam construction and forest management for Japanese macaque habitats in snowy areas.

    PubMed

    Enari, Hiroto; Sakamaki-Enari, Haruka

    2014-03-01

    Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in their northernmost habitats represent a keystone species and play a central role in heavy snowfall ecosystems. However, distributions have been restricted by pre-war hunting, and populations are facing issues of natural forest losses caused by new dam constructions and massive conifer plantations. In the present study, we predicted the influences of these environmental conditions on macaque habitats during each season, and evaluated the effect of natural forest restoration as a mitigation measure. We constructed multiple habitat suitability models on the basis of different forest change scenarios, by using maximum entropy modeling (Maxent). We predicted the influence of each scenario by calculating the habitat unit (habitat quality × habitat quantity). We made the following predictions: (1) the influences of environmental conditions on habitat models vary seasonally, but dam construction destroys the optimum macaque habitats in every season; (2) restoration of conifer plantations to semi-natural forests does not always contribute to the improvement of total habitat unit, except in snowy seasons; and (3) in comparison with encouraging natural forest restoration in plantation areas and maintaining the standard-rotation plantation management, the implementation of long-rotation plantation in existing plantation areas provides more suitable alternative habitats for macaques in non-snowy seasons.

  19. Spontaneous Representations of Small Numbers of Objects by Rhesus Macaques: Examinations of Content and Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Marc D.; Carey, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The project of comparative cognition benefits from common measures across species. We report here on five experiments using the violation of expectancy looking time measure with free-ranging rhesus macaques ("Macaca mulatta"), each designed to build on current knowledge concerning spontaneous representations of number. Each subject, tested in only…

  20. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Transplantation in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fasicularis).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kristin A; Tonsho, Makoto; Madsen, Joren C

    2015-08-01

    A 5.5-y-old intact male cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fasicularis) presented with inappetence and weight loss 57 d after heterotopic heart and thymus transplantation while receiving an immunosuppressant regimen consisting of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone to prevent graft rejection. A serum chemistry panel, a glycated hemoglobin test, and urinalysis performed at presentation revealed elevated blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (727 mg/dL and 10.1%, respectively), glucosuria, and ketonuria. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed, and insulin therapy was initiated immediately. The macaque was weaned off the immunosuppressive therapy as his clinical condition improved and stabilized. Approximately 74 d after discontinuation of the immunosuppressants, the blood glucose normalized, and the insulin therapy was stopped. The animal's blood glucose and HbA1c values have remained within normal limits since this time. We suspect that our macaque experienced new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation, a condition that is commonly observed in human transplant patients but not well described in NHP. To our knowledge, this report represents the first documented case of new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  1. Comparative genomics of the human, macaque and mouse major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Takashi; Blancher, Antoine; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K

    2017-02-01

    The MHC is a highly polymorphic genomic region that encodes the transplantation and immune regulatory molecules. It receives special attention for genetic investigation because of its important role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses and its strong association with numerous infectious and/or autoimmune diseases. The MHC locus was first discovered in the mouse and for the past 50 years it has been studied most intensively in both mice and humans. However, in recent years the macaque species have emerged as some of the more important and advanced experimental animal models for biomedical research into MHC with important human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus and transplantation studies undertaken in association with precise MHC genotyping and haplotyping methods using Sanger sequencing and next-generation sequencing. Here, in this special issue on 'Macaque Immunology' we provide a short review of the genomic similarities and differences among the human, macaque and mouse MHC class I and class II regions, with an emphasis on the association of the macaque class I region with MHC polymorphism, haplotype structure and function.

  2. A Generalizability Analysis of Subjective Personality Assessments in the Stumptail Macaque and the Zebra Finch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueredo, Aurelio Jose; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two longitudinal studies involving 29 raters concerning the construct validity, temporal stability, and interrater reliability of the latent common factors underlying subjective assessments by human raters of personality traits in the stumptail macaque and the zebra finch illustrate the use of generalizability analysis to test prespecified…

  3. Effects of seasonal changes in dietary energy on body weight of captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kouhei; Mitsutsuka, Syuuhei; Yamazaki, Ato; Nagai, Kazumi; Tezuka, Atsuko; Tsuji, Yamato

    2015-01-01

    Food availability varies seasonally for wild animals, and body weight fluctuates accordingly in the wild. In contrast, controlling availability of diet under captive condition is difficult from keepers' standpoint, and monotonous diet often causes health problems in captive animals. We evaluated the effects of a seasonally controlled diet on body weight of captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in an outside enclosure at Ueno Zoo, Tokyo, Japan. We fed a high-energy diet in spring and fall, and a more restricted diet in summer and winter for 3 years (2011-2013). Seasonal changes in body weight were similar to those that occur in wild macaques: for both sexes, body weight was higher in spring and fall and lower in winter. A decrease in body weight between fall and winter occurred only in adults, which implied that reducing dietary intake in winter had a more severe effect on adults than on juveniles. Different from wild populations, the body weight of captive macaques did not decrease between spring and summer, which we attributed to a lack of movement within the enclosure and to excess energy intake in summer. In addition to controlling dietary composition, providing large enclosure with complex structure and making efforts of giving unpredictability in feeding are necessary to motivate the captive animals to be more active, which would cause the macaques to show seasonal change in body weight, which is found in wild.

  4. Tetanus as cause of mass die-off of captive Japanese macaques, Japan, 2008.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tomomi; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Takahashi, Motohide; Une, Yumi

    2012-10-01

    In 2008 in Japan, 15/60 captive Japanese macaques died. Clostridium tetani was isolated from 1 monkey, and 11 had tetanus-specific symptoms. We conclude the outbreak resulted from severe environmental C. tetani contamination. Similar outbreaks could be prevented by vaccinating all monkeys, disinfecting housing areas/play equipment, replacing highly C. tetani-contaminated soil, and conducting epidemiologic surveys.

  5. Thromboelastography values from pigtail macaques ( Macaca nemestrina): effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Fong, Derek L; Ha, James C; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E

    2012-01-01

    Thromboelastography is a clinical laboratory test used to assess global hemostasis. With technologic advances and the test's reemergence in human medicine, its utility in veterinary medicine is being explored. Because assays for PT, aPTT, and d-dimers require platelet-poor plasma, whereas thromboelastography is performed on whole blood, thromboelastography provides a more accurate representation of coagulation and allows the identification of hypocoagulable, hypercoagulable, and hyperfibrinolytic states. Conflicting information has been reported about the effects of age and sex on thromboelastog- raphy in humans and animals. Human studies have reported significant effects of age and sex on thromboelastography more often than have animal studies, but few publications are available about thromboelastography in the nonhuman primate and laboratory animal literature. We used a sample of 50 pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina) to determine whether age or sex influence thromboelastography values. Of 5 measured and 2 calculated variables produced by thromboelastography, sex had a significant effect only on the lysis-30 parameter, which also showed significant interaction between age and sex; values increased with age in male macaques but decreased with age in female macaques. In addition, we used the data to define reference intervals for thromboelastography parameters in pigtail macaques.

  6. An anterior temporal face patch in human cortex, predicted by macaque maps

    PubMed Central

    Rajimehr, Reza; Young, Jeremy C.; Tootell, Roger B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that primate visual cortex has a specialized architecture for processing discrete object categories such as faces. Human fMRI studies have described a localized region in the fusiform gyrus [the fusiform face area (FFA)] that responds selectively to faces. In contrast, in nonhuman primates, electrophysiological and fMRI studies have instead revealed 2 apparently analogous regions of face representation: the posterior temporal face patch (PTFP) and the anterior temporal face patch (ATFP). An earlier study suggested that human FFA is homologous to the PTFP in macaque. However, in humans, no obvious homologue of the macaque ATFP has been demonstrated. Here, we used fMRI to map face-selective sites in both humans and macaques, based on equivalent stimuli in a quantitative topographic comparison. This fMRI evidence suggests that such a face-selective area exists in human anterior inferotemporal cortex, comprising the apparent homologue of the fMRI-defined ATFP in macaques. PMID:19179278

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Hydromorphone after Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration in Male Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R; Pypendop, Bruno H; Christe, Kari L

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of hydromorphone after intravenous and intramuscular administration to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta ). Hydromorphone (0.075 mg/kg) was administered intravenously as a bolus or intramuscularly on separate occasions to healthy, socially housed, socially reared, adult, intact male rhesus macaques (n = 4). Blood samples were collected prior to and until 10 h after administration. Serum hydromorphone concentrations were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartment models were fit to time–concentration data. A 3-compartment model with input in and elimination from the central compartment best fit intravenous data, whereas a 1-comparment model best fit intramuscular data. After intravenous administration, the median clearance and terminal half-life were 37.7 (range, 33.7 to 47.1) mL/kg/min and 142 (range, 131 to 218) min, respectively. The median (range) elimination half-life after intramuscular administration was 81.5 (77.2 to 92.5) min. Median intramuscular bioavailability was 92% (range, 75% to 104%). Rhesus macaques maintained concentrations greater than or equal to 4.0 ng/mL for at least 2 h after intravenous and intramuscular administration. The disposition of hydromorphone was characterized by a large volume of distribution and moderate clearance. Intramuscular administration resulted in rapid and almost complete drug absorption. Whole-body pruritus, sedation, and decreased appetite were observed in all macaques after initial drug administration. PMID:25255074

  8. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Transdermal Fentanyl in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Amy M; Kelly, Richard; Fetterer, David P; Rico, Pedro J; Bailey, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is a μ-opioid agonist that often is used as the analgesic component for balanced anesthesia in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing, and the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl are unknown in NHP. The pharmacokinetic properties of 2 transdermal fentanyl delivery methods, a solution (2.6 and 1.95 mg/kg) and a patch (25 µg/h), were determined when applied topically to the dorsal scapular area of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Serum fentanyl concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Compared with the patch, the transdermal fentanyl solution generated higher drug concentrations over longer time. Adverse reactions occurred in the macaques that received the transdermal fentanyl solution at 2.6 mg/kg. Both preparations showed significant interanimal variability in the maximal serum drug levels, time to achieve maximal fentanyl levels, elimination half-life, and AUC values. Both the maximal concentration and the time at which this concentration occurred were increased in macaques compared with most other species after application of the transdermal fentanyl patch and compared with dogs after application of the transdermal fentanyl solution. The pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal fentanyl in macaques are markedly different from those in other veterinary species and preclude its use as a long-acting analgesic drug in NHP. PMID:27423151

  9. Ranking network of a captive rhesus macaque society: a sophisticated corporative kingdom.

    PubMed

    Fushing, Hsieh; McAssey, Michael P; Beisner, Brianne; McCowan, Brenda

    2011-03-15

    We develop a three-step computing approach to explore a hierarchical ranking network for a society of captive rhesus macaques. The computed network is sufficiently informative to address the question: Is the ranking network for a rhesus macaque society more like a kingdom or a corporation? Our computations are based on a three-step approach. These steps are devised to deal with the tremendous challenges stemming from the transitivity of dominance as a necessary constraint on the ranking relations among all individual macaques, and the very high sampling heterogeneity in the behavioral conflict data. The first step simultaneously infers the ranking potentials among all network members, which requires accommodation of heterogeneous measurement error inherent in behavioral data. Our second step estimates the social rank for all individuals by minimizing the network-wide errors in the ranking potentials. The third step provides a way to compute confidence bounds for selected empirical features in the social ranking. We apply this approach to two sets of conflict data pertaining to two captive societies of adult rhesus macaques. The resultant ranking network for each society is found to be a sophisticated mixture of both a kingdom and a corporation. Also, for validation purposes, we reanalyze conflict data from twenty longhorn sheep and demonstrate that our three-step approach is capable of correctly computing a ranking network by eliminating all ranking error.

  10. Tracking Epidermal Nerve Fiber Changes in Asian Macaques: Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Lisa M; Dorsey, Jamie L; Weinberg, Rachel L; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Hauer, Peter; Laast, Victoria A; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative assessment of epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs) has become a widely used clinical tool for the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathies such as diabetic neuropathy and human immunodeficiency virus-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN). To model and investigate the pathogenesis of HIV-SN using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Asian macaques, we adapted the skin biopsy and immunostaining techniques currently employed in human patients and then developed two unbiased image analysis techniques for quantifying ENF in macaque footpad skin. This report provides detailed descriptions of these tools and techniques for ENF assessment in macaques and outlines important experimental considerations that we have identified in the course of our long-term studies. Although initially developed for studies of HIV-SN in the SIV-infected macaque model, these methods could be readily translated to a range of studies involving peripheral nerve degeneration and neurotoxicity in nonhuman primates as well as preclinical investigations of agents aimed at neuroprotection and regeneration.

  11. Videotape-Versus Pellet-Reward Preferences in Joystick Tasks by Macaques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Andrews and Rosenblum (1993) convincingly demonstrated the effectiveness of live-social-video reward for joystick-task performance by bonnet macaques. We performed a similar series of experiments with quite different results. Taken together, these experiments emphasize the importance of the variability in individual preferences for reward effectiveness.

  12. Effects of Transportation on Antioxidant Status in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xueying; Lu, Liang; Zeng, Xiancheng; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of transportation on oxidative stress in cynomolgus monkeys, we measured serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (PC) and the activities of total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase in cynomolgus macaques before transportation (day 0), on the day of arrival (day 1), and on days 7, 14, and 21 after transportation. Compared with that on day 0, TAOC and catalase activities on days 1, 7, and 14 after transportation were significantly decreased, reached their nadirs on day 7, and increased thereafter to reach their pretransportation levels by day 21 after transportation. Compared with day 0 levels, mean SOD activity and GSH concentration were decreased significantly on day 1; they thereafter increased to reach their pretransportation measures by day 7 after transportation. In contrast, PC and malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and the activity of GSH-Px were increased on day 1 compared with day 0 and thereafter decreased to reach their pretransportation levels by day 14 after transportation. In summary, GSH, TAOC, catalase, and SOD levels decreased and malondialdehyde, PC, and GSH-Px concentrations increased in cynomolgus macaques after transportation. These results suggest that transportation might imbalance oxidant and antioxidant levels to create excess oxidative stress in cynomolgus macaques. Therefore, cynomolgus macaques should have at least 21 d to recover after transportation and regain their healthy status. PMID:27657707

  13. Female rhesus macaques discriminate unfamiliar paternal sisters in playback experiments: support for acoustic phenotype matching

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferle, Dana; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Widespread evidence exists that when relatives live together, kinship plays a central role in shaping the evolution of social behaviour. Previous studies showed that female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) recognize familiar maternal kin using vocal cues. Recognizing paternal kin might, however, be more difficult as rhesus females mate promiscuously during the possible conception period, most probably concealing paternity. Behavioural observations indicate that semi free-ranging female rhesus macaques prefer to associate with their paternal half-sisters in comparison to unrelated females within the same group, particularly when born within the same age cohort. However, the cues and mechanism/s used in paternal kin discrimination remain under debate. Here, we investigated whether female rhesus macaques use the acoustic modality to discriminate between paternal half-sisters and non-kin, and tested familiarity and phenotype matching as the underlying mechanisms. We found that test females responded more often to calls of paternal half-sisters compared with calls of unrelated females, and that this discrimination ability was independent of the level of familiarity between callers and test females, which provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence for acoustic phenotype matching. Our study strengthens the evidence that female rhesus macaques can recognize their paternal kin, and that vocalizations are used as a cue. PMID:24225452

  14. Visual Recognition Memory in High- and Low-Risk Infant Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca Nemestrina).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Virginia M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Study looks at pigtailed macaque in the context of visual recognition problems adapted from a standardized test developed for use with human infants. Results demonstrate that the low-risk group easily differentiated novel from previously seen targets; the high-risk group gave no evidence of recognition. (Author/RWB)

  15. Anomaly in aortic arch alters pathological outcome of transient global ischemia in Rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Koichi; Yasuhara, Takao; Maki, Mina; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yu, Guolong; Xu, Lin; Tambrallo, Laura; Rodriguez, Nancy A.; Stern, David M.; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Kawase, Takeshi; Hess, David C.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a non-human primate (NHP) transient global ischemia (TGI) model which was induced by clipping the arteries originating from the aortic arch. Previously we demonstrated that our TGI model in adult Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) results in marked neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal region, specifically the cornu Ammonis (CA1) region. However, we observed varying degrees of hippocampal cell loss among animals. Here, we report for the first time an anomaly of the aortic arch in some Rhesus macaques that appears as a key surgical factor in ensuring the success of the TGI model in this particular NHP. Eleven adult Rhesus macaques underwent the TGI surgery, which involved 10-15-minute clipping of both innominate and subclavian arteries. Animals were allowed to survive between 1 day and 28 days after TGI. Because of our experience and knowledge that Japanese macaques exhibited only innominate and subclavian arteries arising from the aortic arch, macroscopic visualization of these two arteries alone in the Rhesus macaques initially assured us that clipping both arteries was sufficient to produce TGI. During the course of one TGI operation, however, we detected 3 arterial branches arising from the aortic arch, which prompted us to subsequently search for 3 branches in succeeding TGI surgeries. In addition, we performed post-mortem examination of the heart to confirm the number of arterial branches in the aortic arch. Finally, in order to reveal the pathological effect of the aortic arch anomaly, we compared the hippocampal cell loss between animals found to have 3 arterial branches but had all or only two branches clipped during TGI operation. Post-mortem examination revealed eight NHPs had the typical two arterial aortic branches, but three NHPs displayed an extra arterial aortic branch, indicating that about 30% of Rhesus macaques had 3 arterial branches arising from the aorta. Histological analyses using Nissl staining showed that in NHPs with the

  16. Ranging and site fidelity in northern pigtailed macaques (Macaca leonina) over different temporal scales.

    PubMed

    José-Domínguez, Juan Manuel; Savini, Tommaso; Asensio, Norberto

    2015-08-01

    Space-use patterns are crucial to understanding the ecology, evolution, and conservation of primates, but detailed ranging data are scarce for many species, especially those in Southeast Asia. Researchers studying site fidelity to either home ranges or core areas have focused mainly on territorial species, whereas less information is available for non-territorial species. We analyzed the ranging patterns and site fidelity of one wild troop of northern pigtailed macaques over 16 months at different temporal scales. We used characteristic hull polygons in combination with spatial statistics to estimate home ranges and core areas. The total home range and core areas were 449 ha and 190 ha, respectively. Average daily path length was 2,246 m. The macaques showed a high defendabili--ty index according to the expected ranging of a non-territorial species in which movement does not theoretically permit the defense of a large territory. Overall, the study troop ranged more extensively than conspecific groups and closely related species studied elsewhere. These differences may reflect variable troop size, degree of terrestriality and habitat characteristics, but could also reflect methodological differences. The location, size and shape of home ranges and core areas, and extent of daily path lengths changed on a monthly basis resulting in low site fidelity between months. The macaques also showed clear shifts in the location of daily home ranges with low site fidelity scores between consecutive days. Daily home range and daily path length were related to seasonality, with greater values during the fruit-abundant period. Low site fidelity associated with lack of territoriality is consistent with macaques structuring their movement based on available food sources. However, ranging patterns and site fidelity can also be explained by macaques feeding on the move, a foraging strategy that hinders frequent and long visits to the same location.

  17. Macaques at the margins: the biogeography and extinction of Macaca sylvanus in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, Sarah; O'Regan, Hannah J.

    2014-07-01

    The genus Macaca (Primates: Cercopithecidae) originated in Africa, dispersed into Europe in the Late Miocene and resided there until the Late Pleistocene. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the evolutionary history of Macaca in Europe, putting it into context with the wider late Miocene, Pliocene and Pleistocene European monkey fossil record (also comprising Mesopithecus, Paradolichopithecus, Dolichopithecus and Theropithecus). The Pliocene and Pleistocene European Macaca fossil material is largely regarded as Macaca sylvanus, the same species as the extant Barbary macaque in North Africa. The M. sylvanus specimens found at West Runton in Norfolk (53°N) during the Middle Pleistocene are among the most northerly euprimates ever discovered. Our simple time-budget model indicates that short winter day lengths would have imposed a significant constraint on activity at such relatively high latitudes, so macaque populations in Britain may have been at the limit of their ecological tolerance. Two basic models using climatic and topographic data for the Last Interglacial and the Last Glacial Maximum alongside Middle and Late Pleistocene fossil distributions indicate that much of Europe may have been suitable habitat for macaques. The models also indicate that areas of southern Europe in the present day have a climate that could support macaque populations. However, M. sylvanus became locally extinct in the Late Pleistocene, possibly at a similar time as the straight-tusked elephant, Palaeoloxodon antiquus, and narrow-nosed rhinoceros, Stephanorhinus hemitoechus. Its extinction may be related to vegetation change or increased predation from Homo, although other factors (such as stochastic factors occurring as a result of small population sizes) cannot be ruled out. Notwithstanding the cause of extinction, the European macaque may thus be a previously overlooked member of the Late Pleistocene faunal turnover.

  18. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge.

  19. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  20. Nasotemporal asymmetries in V1: ocular dominance columns of infant, adult, and strabismic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tychsen, L; Burkhalter, A

    1997-11-10

    To quantify asymmetries of input from the two eyes into each cerebral hemisphere, we measured ocular dominance column (ODC) widths and areas in the striate visual cortex (area V1) of macaque monkeys. Ocular dominance stripes in layer 4C were labeled by using transneuronal transport of intraocularly injected wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) or cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, after deafferentation of one eye or even by leaving afferent input intact. In infant monkey aged 4 and 8 weeks, ocular dominance stripes labeled by WGA-HRP appeared adultlike with smooth, sharply defined borders. In normal infant and normal adult macaque, ocular dominance stripes driven by the nasal retina (i.e., contralateral eye) were consistently wider than stripes driven by the temporal retina (i.e., ipsilateral eye). Asymmetries in the percentage of area V1 driven by nasal vs. temporal ODCs showed a similar "nasal bias": in infant macaque, approximately 58% of ODCs in V1 were driven by nasal retina, and in adult macaque approximately 57%. The asymmetries tended to be slightly smaller in opercular V1 and greater in calcarine V1. "Spontaneous" ocular dominance stripes were revealed by CO staining of V1 in a naturally strabismic monkey and in a monkey made strabismic by early postnatal alternating monocular occlusion. In these animals, ocular dominance stripes and CO blobs corresponding to the nasal retina stained more intensely for CO in both the right and left V1. ODC spacing and the nasotemporal asymmetry in ODC width and area were similar in strabismic and normal monkeys. Our results in normal monkeys extend the observations of previous investigators and verify that nasotemporal inputs to opercular and calcarine V1 are unequal, with a consistent bias favoring inputs from the nasal retina. The CO results in strabismic macaque suggest that the nasal ODC bias promotes interocular suppression when activity in neighboring ODCs is decorrelated by abnormal binocular

  1. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs.

  2. A MIV-150/Zinc Acetate Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT Infection in Macaque Vaginal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Barnable, Patrick; Calenda, Giulia; Ouattara, Louise; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Kizima, Larisa; Rodríguez, Aixa; Abraham, Ciby; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Cooney, Michael L.; Roberts, Kevin D.; Sperling, Rhoda; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernandez-Romero, Jose A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Robbiani, Melissa; Teleshova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    To extend our observations that single or repeated application of a gel containing the NNRTI MIV-150 (M) and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) (MZC) inhibits vaginal transmission of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-RT in macaques, we evaluated safety and anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZC and related gel formulations ex vivo in macaque mucosal explants. In addition, safety was further evaluated in human ectocervical explants. The gels did not induce mucosal toxicity. A single ex vivo exposure to diluted MZC (1∶30, 1∶100) and MC (1∶30, the only dilution tested), but not to ZC gel, up to 4 days prior to viral challenge, significantly inhibited SHIV-RT infection in macaque vaginal mucosa. MZC's activity was not affected by seminal plasma. The antiviral activity of unformulated MIV-150 was not enhanced in the presence of ZA, suggesting that the antiviral activity of MZC was mediated predominantly by MIV-150. In vivo administration of MZC and CG significantly inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection (51–62% inhibition relative to baselines) of vaginal (but not cervical) mucosa collected 24 h post last gel exposure, indicating barrier effect of CG. Although the inhibitory effect of MZC (65–74%) did not significantly differ from CG (32–45%), it was within the range of protection (∼75%) against vaginal SHIV-RT challenge 24 h after gel dosing. Overall, the data suggest that evaluation of candidate microbicides in macaque explants can inform macaque efficacy and clinical studies design. The data support advancing MZC gel for clinical evaluation. PMID:25259616

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Ceftiofur Crystalline Free Acid in Male Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) after Subcutaneous Administration

    PubMed Central

    Salyards, Gregory W; Knych, Heather K; Hill, Ashley E; Kelly, Kristi R; Christe, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a common sequela to agonistic social encounters in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and veterinarians often prescribe antibiotics as part of a balanced treatment plan. Long-acting, single-dose, injectable antibiotics for use in rhesus macaques are unavailable currently. Ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA) is a long-acting, single-dose, injectable third-generation cephalosporin that provides at least 7 d of ceftiofur therapeutic plasma concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domesticus). We hypothesized that CCFA would achieve similar therapeutic concentrations (≥0.2 μg/mL) in rhesus macaques. We describe the pharmacokinetic profile of CCFA in healthy, adult male rhesus macaques (n = 6) in this 2-period, 2-treatment crossover study of 5 and 20 mg/kg SC administered once. Plasma ceftiofur metabolite concentrations were determined prior to and for a maximum of 21 d after administration. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The 5-mg dose achieved a maximal plasma concentration of 2.24 ± 0.525 μg/mL at 2.59 ± 1.63 h, an AUC of 46.9 ± 17.6 h/μg/mL, and a terminal elimination half-life of 56.5 ± 21.7 h; for the 20-mg/kg dose, these parameters were 9.18 ± 4.90 μg/mL at 1.82 ± 1.30 h, 331 ± 84.4 h/μg/mL, and 69.7 ± 8.86 h, respectively. No adverse effects were noted after either dose. Macaques maintained plasma ceftiofur concentrations of 0.2 μg/mL or greater for at least 2 d after 5 mg/kg SC and at least 7 d after 20 mg/kg SC. PMID:26424255

  4. Intrinsic functional architecture of the macaque dorsal and ventral lateral frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Alexandros; Stiers, Peter; Hutchison, R Matthew; Everling, Stefan; Petrides, Michael; Margulies, Daniel S

    2017-03-01

    Investigations of the cellular and connectional organization of the lateral frontal cortex (LFC) of the macaque monkey provide indispensable knowledge for generating hypotheses about the human LFC. However, despite numerous investigations, there are still debates on the organization of this brain region. In vivo neuroimaging techniques such as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to define the functional circuitry of brain areas, producing results largely consistent with gold-standard invasive tract-tracing techniques and offering the opportunity for cross-species comparisons within the same modality. Our results using resting-state fMRI from macaque monkeys to uncover the intrinsic functional architecture of the LFC corroborate previous findings and inform current debates. Specifically, within the dorsal LFC, we show that 1) the region along the midline and anterior to the superior arcuate sulcus is divided in two areas separated by the posterior supraprincipal dimple, 2) the cytoarchitectonically defined area 6DC/F2 contains two connectional divisions, and 3) a distinct area occupies the cortex around the spur of the arcuate sulcus, updating what was previously proposed to be the border between dorsal and ventral motor/premotor areas. Within the ventral LFC, the derived parcellation clearly suggests the presence of distinct areas: 1) an area with a somatomotor/orofacial connectional signature (putative area 44), 2) an area with an oculomotor connectional signature (putative frontal eye fields), and 3) premotor areas possibly hosting laryngeal and arm representations. Our results illustrate in detail the intrinsic functional architecture of the macaque LFC, thus providing valuable evidence for debates on its organization.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Resting-state functional MRI is used as a complementary method to invasive techniques to inform current debates on the organization of the macaque lateral frontal cortex. Given that the macaque

  5. Cerebellar lesions and prism adaptation in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Baizer, J S; Kralj-Hans, I; Glickstein, M

    1999-04-01

    If a laterally displacing prism is placed in front of one eye of a person or monkey with the other eye occluded, they initially will point to one side of a target that is located directly in front of them. Normally, people and monkeys adapt easily to the displaced vision and correct their aim after a few trials. If the prism then is removed, there is a postadaptation shift in which the subject misses the target and points in the opposite direction for a few trials. We tested five Macaque monkeys for their ability to adapt to a laterally displacing prism and to show the expected postadaptation shift. When tested as normals, all five animals showed the typical pattern of adaptation and postadaptation shift. Like human subjects, the monkeys also showed complete interocular transfer of the adaptation but no transfer of the adaptation between the two arms. When preoperative training and testing was complete, we made lesions of various target areas on the cerebellar cortex. A cerebellar lesion that included the dorsal paraflocculus and uvula abolished completely the normal prism adaptation for the arm ipsilateral to the lesion in one of the five monkeys. The other four animals retained the ability to prism-adapt normally and showed the expected postadaptation shift. In the one case in which the lesion abolished prism adaptation, the damage included Crus I and II, paramedian lobule and the dorsal paraflocculus of the cerebellar hemispheres as well as lobule IX, of the vermis. Thus in this case, the lesion included virtually all the cerebellar cortex that receives mossy-fiber visual information relayed via the pontine nuclei from the cerebral cortex. The other four animals had damage to lobule V, the classical anterior lobe arm area and/or vermian lobules VI/VII, the oculomotor region. When tested postoperatively, some of these animals showed a degree of ataxia equivalent to that of the case in which prism adaptation was affected, but prism adaptation and the

  6. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  7. Comparison of noncontact infrared thermometry and 3 commercial subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Brunell, Marla K

    2012-07-01

    This study compared a noncontact infrared laser thermometer and 3 different brands of subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in 50 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The data were analyzed by using intraclass correlation coefficients and limits of agreement. In addition, the technical capabilities and practicality of the thermometers in the clinical setting were reviewed. None of the alternative techniques investigated was equivalent to rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques. Temperatures obtained by using microchips had higher correlation and agreed more closely with rectal temperatures than did those obtained by the noncontact infrared method. However, transponding microchips did not yield consistent results. Due to difficulty in positioning nonsedated macaques in their homecage, subcutaneous microchips were not practical in the clinical setting. Furthermore, pair-housed macaques may be able to break or remove microchips from their cagemates.

  8. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed.

  9. Problems associated with the seed-trap method when measuring seed dispersal in forests inhabited by Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Riyou; Yumoto, Takakazu

    2014-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of seed/litter traps in seed dispersal ecology, several problems have arisen when using this method in forests inhabited by semi-terrestrial monkeys. The first issue is the height of the trap relative to the location where macaques spit seeds and/or defecate. For Japanese macaques in the lowland forests of Yakushima Island, southern Japan, 30-50% of the seeds emitted from cheek pouches and faeces will not be caught by seed traps, leading to underestimation of seed fall. The second issue is the attractiveness of seed traps. Macaques sometimes play with the traps, potentially affecting the results of the seed-trap method in complex ways, including both negative and positive effects. To obtain reasonable estimates of total seed dispersal, we recommend that researchers conduct the seed-trap method concurrently with monkey observations, and that they should affix traps more securely to prevent macaques from destroying the traps.

  10. Specific Pathogen Free Macaque Colonies: A Review of Principles and Recent Advances for Viral Testing and Colony Management

    PubMed Central

    Yee, JoAnn L.; Vandeford, Thomas H.; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Gray, Stanton; Lewis, Anne; Roberts, Jeffrey; Taylor, Kerry; Bohm, Rudolf P.

    2016-01-01

    Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) macaques provide valuable animal models for biomedical research. In 1989 the National Center for Research Resources (now Office of Research Infrastructure Programs ORIP) of the National Institutes of Health initiated experimental research contracts to establish and maintain SPF colonies. The derivation and maintenance of SPF macaque colonies is a complex undertaking requiring knowledge of the biology of the agents for exclusion and normal physiology and behavior of macaques, application of the latest diagnostic technology, facilities management, and animal husbandry. This review provides information on the biology of the four viral agents targeted for exclusion in ORIP SPF macaque colonies, describes current state-of-the-art viral diagnostic algorithms, presents data from proficiency testing of diagnostic assays between laboratories at institutions participating in the ORIP SPF program, and outlines management strategies for maintaining the integrity of SPF colonies using results of diagnostic testing as a guide to decision making. PMID:26932456

  11. Neisseria infection of rhesus macaques as a model to study colonization, transmission, persistence, and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Nathan J.; Wertheimer, Anne M.; Hobbs, Theodore R.; Sisko, Jennifer L.; Taku, Nyiawung A.; Gregston, Lindsay D.; Clary, Susan; Higashi, Dustin L.; Biais, Nicolas; Brown, Lewis M.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Wong, Scott W.; So, Magdalene

    2013-01-01

    The strict tropism of many pathogens for man hampers the development of animal models that recapitulate important microbe–host interactions. We developed a rhesus macaque model for studying Neisseria–host interactions using Neisseria species indigenous to the animal. We report that Neisseria are common inhabitants of the rhesus macaque. Neisseria isolated from the rhesus macaque recolonize animals after laboratory passage, persist in the animals for at least 72 d, and are transmitted between animals. Neisseria are naturally competent and acquire genetic markers from each other in vivo, in the absence of selection, within 44 d after colonization. Neisseria macacae encodes orthologs of known or presumed virulence factors of human-adapted Neisseria, as well as current or candidate vaccine antigens. We conclude that the rhesus macaque model will allow studies of the molecular mechanisms of Neisseria colonization, transmission, persistence, and horizontal gene transfer. The model can potentially be developed further for preclinical testing of vaccine candidates. PMID:23382234

  12. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-01-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. PMID:27053572

  13. Self-Injurious Behavior Secondary to Cytomegalovirus-Induced Neuropathy in an SIVInfected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Gumber, Sanjeev; Strobert, Elizabeth; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jean, Sherrie M

    2015-06-01

    A 3.5-y-old, female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIVmac239 presented 8 mo later for inappetence and facial bruising. Physical examination revealed a superficial skin abrasion below the left eye, bruising below the left brow, and epistaxis of the left nostril. There were no significant findings on CBC, serum chemistry, urinalysis, or radiographs. Differential diagnoses included infectious etiologies, self-injurious behavior, immune-mediated dermatitis, and neoplasia. Lack of response to antibiotic and analgesic therapy and observations of the macaque made it apparent that the skin lesions were self-inflicted. The excoriations rapidly progressed to extend over the nose, and the left palpebrae became edematous. Euthanasia was elected because the macaque appeared to be experiencing continued discomfort despite analgesic therapy. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection involving the facial nerves, periocular nerves, meninges, and perimesenteric lymph nodes. CMV is a common infection in macaques, with adult seroprevalence close to 100% in most colonies. Infection in immunocompetent animals is usually asymptomatic but can cause significant clinical disease in immunodeficient hosts. CMV is associated with a painful peripheral neuropathy in human AIDS patients, and analgesic treatment is often unsatisfactory. Peripheral neuropathy secondary to CMV should be considered as an underlying cause of self-injurious behavior in SIV-infected macaques. Macaques affected by other diseases and disorders may also be at risk for development of painful peripheral neuropathies.

  14. Self-Injurious Behavior Secondary to Cytomegalovirus-Induced Neuropathy in an SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Gumber, Sanjeev; Strobert, Elizabeth; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jean, Sherrie M

    2015-06-01

    A 3.5-y-old, female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIVmac239 presented 8 mo later for inappetence and facial bruising. Physical examination revealed a superficial skin abrasion below the left eye, bruising below the left brow, and epistaxis of the left nostril. There were no significant findings on CBC, serum chemistry, urinalysis, or radiographs. Differential diagnoses included infectious etiologies, self-injurious behavior, immune-mediated dermatitis, and neoplasia. Lack of response to antibiotic and analgesic therapy and observations of the macaque made it apparent that the skin lesions were self-inflicted. The excoriations rapidly progressed to extend over the nose, and the left palpebrae became edematous. Euthanasia was elected because the macaque appeared to be experiencing continued discomfort despite analgesic therapy. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection involving the facial nerves, periocular nerves, meninges, and perimesenteric lymph nodes. CMV is a common infection in macaques, with adult seroprevalence close to 100% in most colonies. Infection in immunocompetent animals is usually asymptomatic but can cause significant clinical disease in immunodeficient hosts. CMV is associated with a painful peripheral neuropathy in human AIDS patients, and analgesic treatment is often unsatisfactory. Peripheral neuropathy secondary to CMV should be considered as an underlying cause of self-injurious behavior in SIV-infected macaques. Macaques affected by other diseases and disorders may also be at risk for development of painful peripheral neuropathies.

  15. Self-Injurious Behavior Secondary to Cytomegalovirus-Induced Neuropathy in an SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Gumber, Sanjeev; Strobert, Elizabeth; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jean, Sherrie M

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5-y-old, female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIVmac239 presented 8 mo later for inappetence and facial bruising. Physical examination revealed a superficial skin abrasion below the left eye, bruising below the left brow, and epistaxis of the left nostril. There were no significant findings on CBC, serum chemistry, urinalysis, or radiographs. Differential diagnoses included infectious etiologies, self-injurious behavior, immune-mediated dermatitis, and neoplasia. Lack of response to antibiotic and analgesic therapy and observations of the macaque made it apparent that the skin lesions were self-inflicted. The excoriations rapidly progressed to extend over the nose, and the left palpebrae became edematous. Euthanasia was elected because the macaque appeared to be experiencing continued discomfort despite analgesic therapy. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection involving the facial nerves, periocular nerves, meninges, and perimesenteric lymph nodes. CMV is a common infection in macaques, with adult seroprevalence close to 100% in most colonies. Infection in immunocompetent animals is usually asymptomatic but can cause significant clinical disease in immunodeficient hosts. CMV is associated with a painful peripheral neuropathy in human AIDS patients, and analgesic treatment is often unsatisfactory. Peripheral neuropathy secondary to CMV should be considered as an underlying cause of self-injurious behavior in SIV-infected macaques. Macaques affected by other diseases and disorders may also be at risk for development of painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26141451

  16. Sustained release of the CCR5 inhibitors CMPD167 and maraviroc from vaginal rings in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, R Karl; Veazey, Ronald S; Geer, Leslie; Lowry, Deborah; Fetherston, Susan M; Murphy, Diarmaid J; Boyd, Peter; Major, Ian; Shattock, Robin J; Klasse, Per Johan; Doyle, Lara A; Rasmussen, Kelsi K; Goldman, Laurie; Ketas, Thomas J; Moore, John P

    2012-05-01

    Antiretroviral entry inhibitors are now being considered as vaginally administered microbicide candidates for the prevention of the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Previous studies testing the entry inhibitors maraviroc and CMPD167 in aqueous gel formulations showed efficacy in the macaque challenge model, although protection was highly dependent on the time period between initial gel application and subsequent challenge. In this paper, we describe the sustained release of maraviroc and CMPD167 from matrix-type silicone elastomer vaginal rings both in vitro and in vivo. Both inhibitors were released continuously during 28 days from rings in vitro at rates of 100 to 2,500 μg/day. In 28-day pharmacokinetic studies in rhesus macaques, the compounds were measured in the vaginal fluid and vaginal tissue; steady-state fluid concentrations were ~10(6)-fold greater than the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) for simian human immunodeficiency virus 162P3 inhibition in macaque lymphocytes in vitro. Plasma concentrations for both compounds were very low. The pretreatment of macaques with Depo-Provera (DP), which is commonly used in macaque challenge studies, was shown to significantly modify the biodistribution of the inhibitors but not the overall amount released. Vaginal fluid and tissue concentrations were significantly decreased while plasma levels increased with DP pretreatment. These observations have implications for designing macaque challenge experiments and also for ring performance during the human female menstrual cycle.

  17. Using Data from Macaques To Predict Gamma Interferon Responses after Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination in Humans: a Proof-of-Concept Study of Immunostimulation/Immunodynamic Modeling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sarfas, Charlotte; Knight, Gwenan M.; White, Andrew; Pathan, Ansar A.; McShane, Helen; Evans, Thomas G.; Sharpe, Sally; White, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macaques play a central role in the development of human tuberculosis (TB) vaccines. Immune and challenge responses differ across macaque and human subpopulations. We used novel immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling methods in a proof-of-concept study to determine which macaque subpopulations best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations. Data on gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4+ T cells over time after recent Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination were available for 55 humans and 81 macaques. Human population covariates were baseline BCG vaccination status, time since BCG vaccination, gender, and the monocyte/lymphocyte cell count ratio. The macaque population covariate was the colony of origin. A two-compartment mathematical model describing the dynamics of the IFN-γ T cell response after BCG vaccination was calibrated to these data using nonlinear mixed-effects methods. The model was calibrated to macaque and human data separately. The association between subpopulations and the BCG immune response in each species was assessed. The macaque subpopulations that best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations were identified using Bayesian information criteria. We found that the macaque colony and the human baseline BCG status were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with the BCG-induced immune response. For humans who were BCG naïve at baseline, Indonesian cynomolgus macaques and Indian rhesus macaques best predicted the immune response. For humans who had already been BCG vaccinated at baseline, Mauritian cynomolgus macaques best predicted the immune response. This work suggests that the immune responses of different human populations may be best modeled by different macaque colonies, and it demonstrates the potential utility of immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling to accelerate TB vaccine development. PMID:28077441

  18. Using Data from Macaques To Predict Gamma Interferon Responses after Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination in Humans: a Proof-of-Concept Study of Immunostimulation/Immunodynamic Modeling Methods.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Sophie J; Sarfas, Charlotte; Knight, Gwenan M; White, Andrew; Pathan, Ansar A; McShane, Helen; Evans, Thomas G; Fletcher, Helen; Sharpe, Sally; White, Richard G

    2017-03-01

    Macaques play a central role in the development of human tuberculosis (TB) vaccines. Immune and challenge responses differ across macaque and human subpopulations. We used novel immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling methods in a proof-of-concept study to determine which macaque subpopulations best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations. Data on gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4(+) T cells over time after recent Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination were available for 55 humans and 81 macaques. Human population covariates were baseline BCG vaccination status, time since BCG vaccination, gender, and the monocyte/lymphocyte cell count ratio. The macaque population covariate was the colony of origin. A two-compartment mathematical model describing the dynamics of the IFN-γ T cell response after BCG vaccination was calibrated to these data using nonlinear mixed-effects methods. The model was calibrated to macaque and human data separately. The association between subpopulations and the BCG immune response in each species was assessed. The macaque subpopulations that best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations were identified using Bayesian information criteria. We found that the macaque colony and the human baseline BCG status were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with the BCG-induced immune response. For humans who were BCG naïve at baseline, Indonesian cynomolgus macaques and Indian rhesus macaques best predicted the immune response. For humans who had already been BCG vaccinated at baseline, Mauritian cynomolgus macaques best predicted the immune response. This work suggests that the immune responses of different human populations may be best modeled by different macaque colonies, and it demonstrates the potential utility of immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling to accelerate TB vaccine development.

  19. Induction of HIV-specific antibody response and protection against vaginal SHIV transmission by intranasal immunization with inactivated SHIV-capturing nanospheres in macaques.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ariko; Akagi, Takami; Enose, Yoshimi; Ueno, Masamichi; Kawamura, Masaki; Horiuchi, Reii; Hiraishi, Katsuya; Adachi, Masakazu; Serizawa, Takeshi; Narayan, Opendra; Akashi, Mitsuru; Baba, Masanori; Hayami, Masanori

    2004-07-01

    We have previously reported that concanavalin A-immobilized polystyrene nanospheres (Con A-NS) could efficiently capture HIV-1 particles and that intranasal immunization with inactivated HIV-1-capturing nanospheres (HIV-NS) induced vaginal anti-HIV-1 IgA antibody response in mice. In this study, to evaluate the protective effect of immunization, each three macaques was intranasally immunized with Con A-NS or inactivated simian/human immunodeficiency virus KU-2-capturing nanospheres (SHIV-NS) and then intravaginally challenged with a pathogenic virus, SHIV KU-2. After a series of six immunizations, vaginal anti-HIV-1 gp120 IgA and IgG antibodies were detected in all SHIV-NS-immunized macaques. After intravaginal challenge, one of the three macaques in each of the Con A-NS- and SHIV-NS-immunized groups was infected. Plasma viral RNA load of infected macaque in SHIV-NS-immunized macaques was substantially less than that in unimmunized control macaque and reached below the detectable level. However, it could not be determined whether intranasal immunization with SHIV-NS is effective in giving complete protection against intravaginal challenge. To explore the effect of the SHIV-NS vaccine, the remaining non-infected macaques were rechallenged intravenously with SHIV KU-2. After intravenous challenge, all macaques became infected. However, SHIV-NS-immunized macaques had lower viral RNA loads and higher CD4(+) T cell counts than unimmunized control macaques. Plasma anti-HIV-1 gp120 IgA and IgG antibodies were induced more rapidly in the SHIV-NS-immunized macaques than in the controls. The rapid antibody responses having neutralizing activity might contribute to the clearance of the challenge virus. Thus, SHIV-NS-immunized macaques exhibited partial protection to vaginal and systemic challenges with SHIV KU-2.

  20. The Organization of Collective Group Movements in Wild Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus): Social Structure Drives Processes of Group Coordination in Macaques.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Anne; Majolo, Bonaventura; Schülke, Oliver; Ostner, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Social animals have to coordinate activities and collective movements to benefit from the advantages of group living. Animals in large groups maintain cohesion by self-organization processes whereas in smaller groups consensus decisions can be reached. Where consensus decisions are relevant leadership may emerge. Variation in the organization of collective movements has been linked to variation in female social tolerance among macaque species ranging from despotic to egalitarian. Here we investigated the processes underlying group movements in a wild macaque species characterized by a degree of social tolerance intermediate to previously studied congeneric species. We focused on processes before, during and after the departure of the first individual. To this end, we observed one group of wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in the Middle Atlas, Morocco using all-occurrence behaviour sampling of 199 collective movements. We found that initiators of a collective movement usually chose the direction in which more individuals displayed pre-departure behavior. Dominant individuals contributed to group movements more than subordinates, especially juveniles, measured as frequencies of successful initiations and pre-departure behaviour. Joining was determined by affiliative relationships and the number of individuals that already joined the movement (mimetism). Thus, in our study group partially shared consensus decisions mediated by selective mimetism seemed to be prevalent, overall supporting the suggestion that a species' social style affects the organization of group movements. As only the most tolerant species show equally shared consensus decisions whereas in others the decision is partially shared with a bias to dominant individuals the type of consensus decisions seems to follow a stepwise relation. Joining order may also follow a stepwise, however opposite, relationship, because dominance only determined joining in highly despotic, but not in intermediate and

  1. The Organization of Collective Group Movements in Wild Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus): Social Structure Drives Processes of Group Coordination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, Anne; Majolo, Bonaventura

    2013-01-01

    Social animals have to coordinate activities and collective movements to benefit from the advantages of group living. Animals in large groups maintain cohesion by self-organization processes whereas in smaller groups consensus decisions can be reached. Where consensus decisions are relevant leadership may emerge. Variation in the organization of collective movements has been linked to variation in female social tolerance among macaque species ranging from despotic to egalitarian. Here we investigated the processes underlying group movements in a wild macaque species characterized by a degree of social tolerance intermediate to previously studied congeneric species. We focused on processes before, during and after the departure of the first individual. To this end, we observed one group of wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in the Middle Atlas, Morocco using all-occurrence behaviour sampling of 199 collective movements. We found that initiators of a collective movement usually chose the direction in which more individuals displayed pre-departure behavior. Dominant individuals contributed to group movements more than subordinates, especially juveniles, measured as frequencies of successful initiations and pre-departure behaviour. Joining was determined by affiliative relationships and the number of individuals that already joined the movement (mimetism). Thus, in our study group partially shared consensus decisions mediated by selective mimetism seemed to be prevalent, overall supporting the suggestion that a species’ social style affects the organization of group movements. As only the most tolerant species show equally shared consensus decisions whereas in others the decision is partially shared with a bias to dominant individuals the type of consensus decisions seems to follow a stepwise relation. Joining order may also follow a stepwise, however opposite, relationship, because dominance only determined joining in highly despotic, but not in intermediate

  2. Synaptic specializations associated with the outer hair cells of the Japanese macaque.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Henson, M M; Smith, D W

    1997-06-01

    Across species the innervation of outer hair cells (OHCs) shows a remarkable similarity. There are, however, notable differences in fine structure. The present work describes the normal synaptic morphology of OHCs in the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata), as determined by examination of serial sections with transmission electron microscopy. The nerve endings at the base of OHCs were divided primarily into two groups: vesiculated (efferent) and non-vesiculated (afferent). In addition, we found supranuclear efferent nerve endings and reciprocal synapses in all three cochlear turns. We also found presynaptic bodies in OHCs at the afferent synapse, the branching of afferent nerve fibers and axodendritic synapses between afferent and efferent fibers in the outer spiral bundle and just beneath OHCs. In terms of synaptic structure, the data indicate that that the Japanese macaque is more similar to that of the human than other species examined to date.

  3. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-05

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  4. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Pesavento, Patricia A.; Keesler, Rebekah I.; Singapuri, Anil; Watanabe, Jennifer; Watanabe, Rie; Yee, JoAnn; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Cruzen, Christina; Christe, Kari L.; Reader, J. Rachel; von Morgenland, Wilhelm; Gibbons, Anne M.; Allen, A. Mark; Linnen, Jeff; Gao, Kui; Delwart, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Stone, Mars; Lanteri, Marion; Bakkour, Sonia; Busch, Michael; Morrison, John

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV) are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA) could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants. PMID:28141843

  5. Fetal sex determination of macaque monkeys by a nested PCR using maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Fusako; Ueiwa, Miyuki; Kamanaka, Yoshirou; Morimoto, Mayumi; Nakamura, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive fetal sex determination is required for biomedical studies, in which some sexual difference would be expected in fetal events, in order to make a choice of male or female fetus. To detect male fetal DNA of the sex-determining region Y gene (SRY) in maternal macaque plasma, nested real-time PCR using the SYBR Green system was developed. In all cases of pregnant macaques with male fetuses, a nested PCR product of SRY was amplified from the mother's plasma, while no amplicon was detected in any case of pregnancy with a female fetus. Interestingly, fetal SRY DNA appeared to be cleared rapidly from the maternal blood after parturition. The current method is sensitive and can be performed with a regular PCR machine.

  6. Single-neuron and genetic correlates of autistic behavior in macaque

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kyoko; Go, Yasuhiro; Kushima, Itaru; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Imai, Hiroo; Saito, Nobuhito; Iriki, Atsushi; Ozaki, Norio; Isoda, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Atypical neurodevelopment in autism spectrum disorder is a mystery, defying explanation despite increasing attention. We report on a Japanese macaque that spontaneously exhibited autistic traits, namely, impaired social ability as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors, along with our single-neuron and genomic analyses. Its social ability was measured in a turn-taking task, where two monkeys monitor each other’s actions for adaptive behavioral planning. In its brain, the medial frontal neurons responding to others’ actions, abundant in the controls, were almost nonexistent. In its genes, whole-exome sequencing and copy number variation analyses identified rare coding variants linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders in 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C (HTR2C) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–binding cassette subfamily A13 (ABCA13). This combination of systems neuroscience and cognitive genomics in macaques suggests a new, phenotype-to-genotype approach to studying mental disorders. PMID:27679817

  7. Event-related potentials elicited by errors during the stop-signal task. I: Macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, David C.; Emeric, Erik E.; Segovis, Courtney M.; Young, Michelle S.; Schall, Jeffrey D.; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) and positivity (Pe) are components of event-related potential (ERP) waveforms recorded from humans that are thought to reflect performance monitoring. Error-related signals have also been found in single-neuron responses and local-field potentials recorded in supplementary eye field and anterior cingulate cortex of macaque monkeys. However, the homology of these neural signals across species remains controversial. Here, we show that monkeys exhibit ERN and Pe components when they commit errors during a saccadic stop-signal task. The voltage distributions and current densities of these components were similar to those found in humans performing the same task. Subsequent analyses show that neither stimulus- nor response-related artifacts accounted for the error-ERPs. This demonstration of macaque homologues of the ERN and Pe forms a keystone in the bridge linking human and nonhuman primate studies on the neural basis of performance monitoring. PMID:22049407

  8. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Lark L; Pesavento, Patricia A; Keesler, Rebekah I; Singapuri, Anil; Watanabe, Jennifer; Watanabe, Rie; Yee, JoAnn; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Cruzen, Christina; Christe, Kari L; Reader, J Rachel; von Morgenland, Wilhelm; Gibbons, Anne M; Allen, A Mark; Linnen, Jeff; Gao, Kui; Delwart, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Stone, Mars; Lanteri, Marion; Bakkour, Sonia; Busch, Michael; Morrison, John; Van Rompay, Koen K A

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV) are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA) could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants.

  9. Prevention of vaginal SHIV transmission in macaques by a live recombinant Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Lagenaur, L A; Sanders-Beer, B E; Brichacek, B; Pal, R; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Yu, R; Venzon, D; Lee, P P; Hamer, D H

    2011-11-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmissions in women occur through the cervicovaginal mucosa, which is coated by a bacterial biofilm including Lactobacillus. This commensal bacterium has a role in maintaining a healthy mucosa and can be genetically engineered to produce antiviral peptides. Here, we report a 63% reduction in transmission of a chimeric simian/HIV (SHIV(SF162P3)) after repeated vaginal challenges of macaques treated with Lactobacillus jensenii expressing the HIV-1 entry inhibitor cyanovirin-N. Furthermore, peak viral loads in colonized macaques with breakthrough infection were reduced sixfold. Colonization and prolonged antiviral protein secretion by the genetically engineered lactobacilli did not cause any increase in proinflammatory markers. These findings lay the foundation for an accessible and durable approach to reduce heterosexual transmission of HIV in women, which is coitally independent, inexpensive, and enhances the natural protective effects of the vaginal microflora.

  10. Acrylamide effects on the macaque visual system. I. Psychophysics and electrophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Barkdoll, E.; Maurissen, J.P.J.; Eskin, T.A.; Lapham, L.W.

    1985-03-01

    Oral acrylamide produces axonal swelling and later degeneration and gliosis in the distal optic tract, especially within the lateral geniculate nucleus, of macaque monkeys. Measures of visual thresholds and cortical-evoked potentials were used to study the time course of visual changes during exposure to acrylamide in macaque monkeys. Contrast sensitivity, visual acuity, and flicker fusion frequency were reduced during exposure, and only flicker fusion recovered rapidly and completely after exposure. Pattern-reversal-evoked responses exhibited increased latency and reduced amplitude during dosing but substantially recovered after exposure. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity for high spatial frequencies were decreased throughout the 140 days of testing after dosing. These results suggest an acute general depression of visual capacities as the initial effect of acrylamide exposure, whereas later effects were confined to high spatial frequencies. 29 references, 6 figures.

  11. Representations of faces and body parts in macaque temporal cortex: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Mark A; DeSimone, Kevin; Moore, Tirin; Gross, Charles G; Kastner, Sabine

    2005-05-10

    Human neuroimaging studies suggest that areas in temporal cortex respond preferentially to certain biologically relevant stimulus categories such as faces and bodies. Single-cell studies in monkeys have reported cells in inferior temporal cortex that respond selectively to faces, hands, and bodies but provide little evidence of large clusters of category-specific cells that would form "areas." We probed the category selectivity of macaque temporal cortex for representations of monkey faces and monkey body parts relative to man-made objects using functional MRI in animals trained to fixate. Two face-selective areas were activated bilaterally in the posterior and anterior superior temporal sulcus exhibiting different degrees of category selectivity. The posterior face area was more extensively activated in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. Immediately adjacent to the face areas, regions were activated bilaterally responding preferentially to body parts. Our findings suggest a category-selective organization for faces and body parts in macaque temporal cortex.

  12. Physiological, Behavioral, and Scientific Impact of Different Fluid Control Protocols in the Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Henri; Mindus, Claire; Flecknell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rhesus macaques are an important model in behavioral neuroscience due to their advanced cognitive abilities. To motivate animals to engage in complex tasks, fluid rewards, in conjunction with fluid control protocols, are often used. The impact of these protocols on animal welfare is controversial. We compared two fluid control protocols against a protocol providing free access to water and evaluated the impacts on physiological states of hydration, behavioral measures of welfare, and scientific output. Blood physiology did not significantly differ between any of the protocols, and urine measures were indicative of well functioning, healthy kidneys. Changes in behaviors were limited, the main one being an increase in motivation to drink on the stricter fluid control protocol, and improved task performance early in the week. Overall, fluid control protocols had little measurable impact on the welfare of rhesus macaques while ensuring that scientific data of high quality could be obtained. PMID:27679812

  13. A Review of Plasmodium coatneyi-Macaque Models of Severe Malaria.

    PubMed

    Lombardini, E D; Gettayacamin, M; Turner, G D H; Brown, A E

    2015-11-01

    Malaria remains one of the most significant public health concerns in the world today. Approximately half the human population is at risk for infection, with children and pregnant women being most vulnerable. More than 90% of the total human malaria burden, which numbers in excess of 200 million annually, is due to Plasmodium falciparum. Lack of an effective vaccine and a dwindling stockpile of antimalarial drugs due to increased plasmodial resistance underscore the critical need for valid animal models. Plasmodium coatneyi was described in Southeast Asia 50 years ago. This plasmodium of nonhuman primates has been used sporadically as a model for severe malaria, as it mimics many of the pathophysiologic features of human disease. This review covers the reported macroscopic, microscopic, ultrastructural, and molecular pathology of P. coatneyi infection in macaques, specifically focusing on the rhesus macaque, as well as describing the critical needs still outstanding in the validation of this crucial model of human disease.

  14. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Maiello, Pauline; Gideon, Hannah P.; Cadena, Anthony M.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Gregg, Robert; O’Malley, Melanie; Fillmore, Daniel; Frye, L. James; Rutledge, Tara; DiFazio, Robert M.; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Andersen, Peter L.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT) of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26) before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25). Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection. PMID:27379816

  15. Effects of B Cell Depletion on Early Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Jiayao; Wong, Eileen A.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Maiello, Pauline; Coleman, M. Teresa; Hendricks, Matthew R.; Ruden, Rachel; Cirrincione, Lauren R.; Chan, John; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies in mice have shown that components of B cell and humoral immunity can modulate the immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the roles of these components in human and nonhuman primate infections are unknown. The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of M. tuberculosis infection closely mirrors the infection outcomes and pathology in human tuberculosis (TB). The present study used rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to deplete B cells in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques to examine the contribution of B cells and humoral immunity to the control of TB in nonhuman primates during the acute phase of infection. While there was no difference in the overall pathology, disease profession, and clinical outcome between the rituximab-treated and untreated macaques in acute infection, analyzing individual granulomas revealed that B cell depletion resulted in altered local T cell and cytokine responses, increased bacterial burden, and lower levels of inflammation. There were elevated frequencies of T cells producing interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, and IL-17 and decreased IL-6 and IL-10 levels within granulomas from B cell-depleted animals. The effects of B cell depletion varied among granulomas in an individual animal, as well as among animals, underscoring the previously reported heterogeneity of local immunologic characteristics of tuberculous granulomas in nonhuman primates. Taken together, our data clearly showed that B cells can modulate the local granulomatous response in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques during acute infection. The impact of these alterations on disease progression and outcome in the chronic phase remains to be determined. PMID:26883591

  16. Evolutionary relevance and experience contribute to face discrimination in infant macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Paukner, Annika

    2015-01-01

    In human children and adults, familiar face types—typically own-age and own-species faces—are discriminated better than other face types; however, human infants do not appear to exhibit an own-age bias, but instead better discriminate adult faces, which they see more often. There are two possible explanations for this pattern: Perceptual attunement, which predicts advantages in discrimination for the most-experienced face types; additionally or alternatively, there may be an experience-independent bias for infants to discriminate own-species faces, an adaptation for evolutionarily relevant faces. These possibilities have not been disentangled in studies thus far, which did not control infants’ early experiences with faces. In the present study, we tested these predictions in infant macaques (Macaca mulatta) reared under controlled environments, not exposed to adult conspecifics. We measured newborns’ (15–25 days; n = 27) and 6- to 7-month-olds’ (n = 35) discrimination of human and macaque faces of three ages—young infants, old infants, and adults—in a visual paired comparison task. We found that 6- to 7-month-olds were the best at discriminating adult macaque faces; however, in the first few seconds of looking, additionally discriminated familiar face types—same-aged peer and adult human faces—highlighting the importance of experience with certain face categories. The present data suggest that macaque infants possess both experience-independent and experientially tuned face biases. In human infants, early face skills may likewise be driven by both experience and evolutionary relevance; future studies should consider both of these factors. PMID:27212893

  17. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Port System for the Collection of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Rhonda Pung; Lester McCully, Cynthia M; Bacher, John; Thomas Iii, Marvin L; Cruz, Rafael; Wangari, Solomon; Warren, Katherine E

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical translational research frequently incorporates collection of CSF from NHP, because CSF drug levels are used as a surrogate for CNS tissue penetration in pharmacokinetic and dynamic studies. Surgical placement of a CNS ventricular catheter reservoir for CSF collection is an intensive model to create and maintain and thus may not be feasible or practical for short-term studies. Furthermore, previous NHP lumbar port models require laminectomy for catheter placement. The new model uses a minimally invasive technique for percutaneous placement of a lumbar catheter to create a closed, subcutaneous system for effective, repeated CSF sample collection. None of the rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 10) implanted with our minimally invasive lumbar port (MILP) system experienced neurologic deficits, postoperative infection of the surgical site, or skin erosion around the port throughout the 21.7-mo study. Functional MILP systems were maintained in 70% of the macaques, with multiple, high-quality, 0.5- to 1.0-mL samples of CSF collected for an average of 3 mo by using aspiration or gravitational flow. Among these macaques, 57% had continuous functionality for a mean of 19.2 mo; 50% of the cohort required surgical repair for port repositioning and replacement during the study. The MILP was unsuccessful in 2 macaques, at an average of 9.5 d after surgery. Nonpatency in these animals was attributed to the position of the lumbar catheter. The MILP system is an appropriate replacement for temporary catheterization and previous models requiring laminectomy and is a short-term alternative for ventricular CSF collection systems in NHP.

  18. Macaque Proteome Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and 1918 Reassortant Influenza Virus Infections▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joseph N.; Palermo, Robert E.; Baskin, Carole R.; Gritsenko, Marina; Sabourin, Patrick J.; Long, James P.; Sabourin, Carol L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The host proteome response and molecular mechanisms that drive disease in vivo during infection by a human isolate of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and 1918 pandemic influenza virus remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lung tissue over 7 days of infection with HPAI (the most virulent), a reassortant virus containing 1918 hemagglutinin and neuraminidase surface proteins (intermediate virulence), or a human seasonal strain (least virulent). A high-sensitivity two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy strategy and functional network analysis were implemented to gain insight into response pathways activated in macaques during influenza virus infection. A macaque protein database was assembled and used in the identification of 35,239 unique peptide sequences corresponding to approximately 4,259 proteins. Quantitative analysis identified an increase in expression of 400 proteins during viral infection. The abundance levels of a subset of these 400 proteins produced strong correlations with disease progression observed in the macaques, distinguishing a “core” response to viral infection from a “high” response specific to severe disease. Proteome expression profiles revealed distinct temporal response kinetics between viral strains, with HPAI inducing the most rapid response. While proteins involved in the immune response, metabolism, and transport were increased rapidly in the lung by HPAI, the other viruses produced a delayed response, characterized by an increase in proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, RNA processing, and translation. Proteomic results were integrated with previous genomic and pathological analysis to characterize the dynamic nature of the influenza virus infection process. PMID:20844032

  19. Amblyomma maculatum Feeding Augments Rickettsia parkeri Infection in a Rhesus Macaque Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Banajee, Kaikhushroo H.; Embers, Monica E.; Langohr, Ingeborg M.; Doyle, Lara A.; Hasenkampf, Nicole R.; Macaluso, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia parkeri is an emerging eschar-causing human pathogen in the spotted fever group of Rickettsia and is transmitted by the Gulf coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum. Tick saliva has been shown to alter both the cellular and humoral components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. However, the effect of this immunomodulation on Rickettsia transmission and pathology in an immunocompetent vertebrate host has not been fully examined. We hypothesize that, by modifying the host immune response, tick feeding enhances infection and pathology of pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia sp. In order to assess this interaction in vivo, a pilot study was conducted using five rhesus macaques that were divided into three groups. One group was intradermally inoculated with low passage R. parkeri (Portsmouth strain) alone (n = 2) and another group was inoculated during infestation by adult, R. parkeri-free A. maculatum (n = 2). The final macaque was infested with ticks alone (tick feeding control group). Blood, lymph node and skin biopsies were collected at several time points post-inoculation/infestation to assess pathology and quantify rickettsial DNA. As opposed to the tick-only animal, all Rickettsia-inoculated macaques developed inflammatory leukograms, elevated C-reactive protein concentrations, and elevated TH1 (interferon-γ, interleukin-15) and acute phase inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6) post-inoculation, with greater neutrophilia and interleukin-6 concentrations in the tick plus R. parkeri group. While eschars formed at all R. parkeri inoculation sites, larger and slower healing eschars were observed in the tick feeding plus R. parkeri group. Furthermore, dissemination of R. parkeri to draining lymph nodes early in infection and increased persistence at the inoculation site were observed in the tick plus R. parkeri group. This study indicates that rhesus macaques can be used to model R. parkeri rickettsiosis, and suggests that immunomodulatory factors

  20. Patches of face-selective cortex in the macaque frontal lobe.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Schweers, Nicole; Moeller, Sebastian; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2008-08-01

    In primates, specialized occipital-temporal face areas support the visual analysis of faces, but it is unclear whether similarly specialized areas exist in the frontal lobe. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in alert macaques, we identified three discrete regions of highly face-selective cortex in ventral prefrontal cortex, one of which was strongly lateralized to the right hemisphere. These prefrontal face patches may constitute dedicated modules for retrieving and responding to facial information.

  1. Comparison of influenza and SIV specific CD8 T cell responses in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Reece, Jeanette C; De Rose, Robert; Stambas, John; Sullivan, Lucy; Brooks, Andrew G; Kent, Stephen J; Sexton, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Macaques are a potentially useful non-human primate model to compare memory T-cell immunity to acute virus pathogens such as influenza virus and effector T-cell responses to chronic viral pathogens such as SIV. However, immunological reagents to study influenza CD8(+) T-cell responses in the macaque model are limited. We recently developed an influenza-SIV vaccination model of pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina) and used this to study both influenza-specific and SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells in 39 pigtail macaques expressing the common Mane-A*10(+) (Mane-A01*084) MHC-I allele. To perform comparative studies between influenza and SIV responses a common influenza nucleoprotein-specific CD8(+) T-cell response was mapped to a minimal epitope (termed RA9), MHC-restricted to Mane-A*10 and an MHC tetramer developed to study this response. Influenza-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response maintained a highly functional profile in terms of multitude of effector molecule expression (CD107a, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-2) and showed high avidity even in the setting of SIV infection. In contrast, within weeks following active SIV infection, SIV-specific CD8(+) effector T-cells expressed fewer cytokines/degranulation markers and had a lower avidity compared to influenza specific CD8(+) T-cells. Further, the influenza specific memory CD8 T-cell response retained stable expression of the exhaustion marker programmed death-marker-1 (PD-1) and co-stimulatory molecule CD28 following infection with SIV. This contrasted with the effector SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells following SIV infection which expressed significantly higher amounts of PD-1 and lower amounts of CD28. Our results suggest that strategies to maintain a more functional CD8(+) T-cell response, profile may assist in controlling HIV disease.

  2. Intravaginal ring eluting tenofovir disoproxil fumarate completely protects macaques from multiple vaginal simian-HIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Rastogi, Rachna; Teller, Ryan S; Srinivasan, Priya; Mesquita, Pedro M M; Nagaraja, Umadevi; McNicholl, Janet M; Hendry, R Michael; Dinh, Chuong T; Martin, Amy; Herold, Betsy C; Kiser, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Topical preexposure prophylaxis interrupts HIV transmission at the site of mucosal exposure. Intermittently dosed vaginal gels containing the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir protected pigtailed macaques depending on the timing of viral challenge relative to gel application. However, modest or no protection was observed in clinical trials. Intravaginal rings (IVRs) may improve efficacy by providing long-term sustained drug delivery leading to constant mucosal antiretroviral concentrations and enhancing adherence. Although a few IVRs have entered the clinical pipeline, 100% efficacy in a repeated macaque vaginal challenge model has not been achieved. Here we describe a reservoir IVR technology that delivers the tenofovir prodrug tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) continuously over 28 d. With four monthly ring changes in this repeated challenge model, TDF IVRs generated reproducible and protective drug levels. All TDF IVR-treated macaques (n = 6) remained seronegative and simian-HIV RNA negative after 16 weekly vaginal exposures to 50 tissue culture infectious dose SHIV162p3. In contrast, 11/12 control macaques became infected, with a median of four exposures assuming an eclipse of 7 d from infection to virus RNA detection. Protection was associated with tenofovir levels in vaginal fluid [mean 1.8 × 10(5) ng/mL (range 1.1 × 10(4) to 6.6 × 10(5) ng/mL)] and ex vivo antiviral activity of cervicovaginal lavage samples. These observations support further advancement of TDF IVRs as well as the concept that extended duration drug delivery devices delivering topical antiretrovirals could be effective tools in preventing the sexual transmission of HIV in humans.

  3. Historical Outbreaks of Simian Hemorrhagic Fever in Captive Macaques Were Caused by Distinct Arteriviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lauck, Michael; Alkhovsky, Sergey V.; Bào, Yīmíng; Bailey, Adam L.; Shevtsova, Zinaida V.; Shchetinin, Alexey M.; Vishnevskaya, Tatyana V.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Postnikova, Elena; Mazur, Steven; Wada, Jiro; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Lapin, Boris A.; Deriabin, Petr G.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Goldberg, Tony L.; O'Connor, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) is lethal for macaques. Based on clinical presentation and serological diagnosis, all reported SHF outbreaks were thought to be caused by different strains of the same virus, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV; Arteriviridae). Here we show that the SHF outbreaks in Sukhumi in 1964 and in Alamogordo in 1989 were caused not by SHFV but by two novel divergent arteriviruses. Our results indicate that multiple divergent simian arteriviruses can cause SHF. PMID:25972539

  4. High incidence of supernumerary nipples and twins in formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis) at Mt. Longevity, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, M J; Moore, J; Lin, J F; Agoramoorthy, G

    2000-12-01

    A population of Formosan macaques at Mt. Longevity exhibits an unusually high incidence of supernumerary nipples (polythelia: between 1-6 accessory nipples and/or areolae on 33% of adults), as well as a high rate of twinning (about 1% of births). The coexistence of these unusual traits suggests a connection, which is further supported by a tendency for mothers of twins to have accessory nipples and for twins to be born in troops with high incidence of polythelia.

  5. Neural representations of faces and body parts in macaque and human cortex: a comparative FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Mark A; Arcaro, Michael; Weiner, Kevin S; Kalkus, Jan F; Inati, Souheil J; Gross, Charles G; Kastner, Sabine

    2009-05-01

    Single-cell studies in the macaque have reported selective neural responses evoked by visual presentations of faces and bodies. Consistent with these findings, functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in humans and monkeys indicate that regions in temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces and bodies. However, it is not clear how these areas correspond across the two species. Here, we directly compared category-selective areas in macaques and humans using virtually identical techniques. In the macaque, several face- and body part-selective areas were found located along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). In the human, similar to previous studies, face-selective areas were found in ventral occipital and temporal cortex and an additional face-selective area was found in the anterior temporal cortex. Face-selective areas were also found in lateral temporal cortex, including the previously reported posterior STS area. Body part-selective areas were identified in the human fusiform gyrus and lateral occipitotemporal cortex. In a first experiment, both monkey and human subjects were presented with pictures of faces, body parts, foods, scenes, and man-made objects, to examine the response profiles of each category-selective area to the five stimulus types. In a second experiment, face processing was examined by presenting upright and inverted faces. By comparing the responses and spatial relationships of the areas, we propose potential correspondences across species. Adjacent and overlapping areas in the macaque anterior STS/MTG responded strongly to both faces and body parts, similar to areas in the human fusiform gyrus and posterior STS. Furthermore, face-selective areas on the ventral bank of the STS/MTG discriminated both upright and inverted faces from objects, similar to areas in the human ventral temporal cortex. Overall, our findings demonstrate commonalities and differences in the wide-scale brain organization between

  6. Paternal early experiences influence infant development through non-social mechanisms in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Early experiences influence the developing organism, with lifelong and potentially adaptive consequences. It has recently become clear that the effects of early experiences are not limited to the exposed generation, but can influence physiological and behavioral traits in the next generation. Mechanisms of transgenerational effects of parental early experiences on offspring development are often attributed to prenatal or postnatal parental influence, but recent data suggest that germ-line plasticity may also play a role in the transgenerational effects of early experiences. These non-genetic transgenerational effects are a potentially important developmental and evolutionary force, but the effects of parental experiences on behavior and physiology are not well understood in socially complex primates. In the non-human primate, the rhesus macaque, nursery rearing (NR) is an early life manipulation used for colony management purposes, and involves separating infants from parents early in life. We examined the effects of maternal and paternal early NR on infant rhesus macaque immunity, physiology, and behavior. Results We theorized that differences in behavior or physiology in the absence of parent-offspring social contact would point to biological and perhaps germ-line, rather than social, mechanisms of effect. Thus, all subjects were themselves NR. Male and female infant rhesus macaques (N= 206) were separated from parents and social groups in the first four days of life to undergo NR. These infants differed only in their degree of NR ancestry – whether their dams or sires were themselves NR. At 3-4 months of age, infants underwent a standardized biobehavioral assessment. Factors describing immunity, plasma cortisol, and emotion regulation were generated from these data using factor analysis. Paternal, but not maternal, NR was associated with greater emotionality and higher plasma cortisol, compared with infants born to CONTROL reared fathers

  7. Human contact influences the foraging behaviour and parasite community in long-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Wenz-Mücke, Alexandra; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Petney, Trevor N; Taraschewski, Horst

    2013-05-01

    Human–wildlife interactions have reached unprecedented levels, and humans are influencing the earth’s ecosystems more rapidly and extensively than ever before. This situation is cause for serious concern, especially since disease interactions between wildlife and humans have been recognized as major conservation threats. In this study, long-tailed macaques, Macaca fascicularis, from 2 forest parks located in north-eastern Thailand were investigated to determine the influence of habitat modification by humans on helminth parasite associations in non-human primates. Macaque populations with contact to anthropogenically modified environments were compared with sylvatic groups in nearby natural environments. In order to test for human–non-human primate transmission of parasites, the local human populations were also examined. Humans were infected with a number of potentially pathogenic parasites, including Opisthorchis viverrini and Strongyloides stercoralis. However, eggs of these helminths were not detected in macaque feces. Thus, no direct parasite transfer from humans to non-human primates could be confirmed. However, macaque groups with more frequent contact with human modified habitats, and a higher portion of human-provided food in their diet, had significantly higher prevalences and intensities of Strongyloides fuelleborni and of an intestinal fluke (probably Haplorchis sp.) than sylvatic groups. Positive correlations were found between the time foraging on the ground and infection with S. fuelleborni, and the amount of human-provided food and intestinal fluke infection. Human alteration of habitat and associated modifications in nonhuman primate behaviour are likely to play a role in determining the occurrence, prevalence and intensity of zoonotic helminth infection of wild non-human primates.

  8. Divergent Simian Arteriviruses Cause Simian Hemorrhagic Fever of Differing Severities in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, Louise H.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Charlier, Olivia; Rojas, Oscar; Byrum, Russell; Ragland, Dan R.; Cohen, Melanie; Sanford, Hannah B.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) is a highly lethal disease in captive macaques. Three distinct arteriviruses are known etiological agents of past SHF epizootics, but only one, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV), has been isolated in cell culture. The natural reservoir(s) of the three viruses have yet to be identified, but African nonhuman primates are suspected. Eleven additional divergent simian arteriviruses have been detected recently in diverse and apparently healthy African cercopithecid monkeys. Here, we report the successful isolation in MARC-145 cell culture of one of these viruses, Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1), from serum of a naturally infected red colobus (Procolobus [Piliocolobus] rufomitratus tephrosceles) sampled in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Intramuscular (i.m.) injection of KRCV-1 into four cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) resulted in a self-limiting nonlethal disease characterized by depressive behavioral changes, disturbance in coagulation parameters, and liver enzyme elevations. In contrast, i.m. injection of SHFV resulted in typical lethal SHF characterized by mild fever, lethargy, lymphoid depletion, lymphoid and hepatocellular necrosis, low platelet counts, increased liver enzyme concentrations, coagulation abnormalities, and increasing viral loads. As hypothesized based on the genetic and presumed antigenic distance between KRCV-1 and SHFV, all four macaques that had survived KRCV-1 injection died of SHF after subsequent SHFV injection, indicating a lack of protective heterotypic immunity. Our data indicate that SHF is a disease of macaques that in all likelihood can be caused by a number of distinct simian arteriviruses, although with different severity depending on the specific arterivirus involved. Consequently, we recommend that current screening procedures for SHFV in primate-holding facilities be modified to detect all known simian arteriviruses. PMID:26908578

  9. Inter-Annual Variation in Characteristics of Endozoochory by Wild Japanese Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yamato

    2014-01-01

    Endozoochory is important to the dynamics and regeneration of forest ecosystems. Despite the universality of inter-annual variation in fruit production, few studies have addressed the sign (seed predation versus seed dispersal) and strength (frequency and quantity) of fruit-frugivore interaction and the effectiveness of endozoochory in response to the long-term temporal context. In this study I evaluated the characteristics of endozoochorous dispersal by wild Japanese macaques Macaca fuscata inhabiting deciduous forest in northern Japan for five different years. I collected 378 fecal samples from the macaques in fall (September to November) and quantified the proportion of feces containing seeds, number of seeds per fecal sample, ratio of intact seeds, and seed diversity. The proportion of feces containing seeds of any species (five-year mean: 85.9%, range: 78–97%) did not show significant inter-annual variation, while species-level proportions did. The intact ratio of seeds (mean: 83%, range: 61–98%) varied significantly both between years and between months, and this varied among dominant plant species. The number of seeds per fecal sample (mean: 78, range: 32–102) varied monthly but did not between years, and the seed diversity (mean: 0.66, range: 0.57–0.81) did not show significant inter-annual variation, both of which were attributed to longer duration of macaques’ gastro-intestinal passage time of seeds exceed their feeding bouts. This study demonstrated that frequency and success of seed dispersal over seed predation of macaque endozoochory showed inter-annual variation, indicating low specificity across the seed–macaque network. The temporal variability in the quality of seed dispersal may provide evidence of high resilience in response to fluctuating environmental conditions in the temperate forests. PMID:25272286

  10. Severe Encephalitis in Cynomolgus Macaques Exposed to Aerosolized Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    the illness. The onset of illness was dose dependent, but once a febrile response was observed, macaques were moribund within 36 h. Simultaneously, a...high mortality caused by a group of arboviruses found in the eastern half of North America and por- tions of Central and South America [1]. EEE viruses...encepha- litis (VEE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE) viruses, EEE viruses are mosquito transmitted and circulate through a natural reservoir

  11. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Live-Attenuated Junin (Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever) Vaccine in Rhesus Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    virus from animals in every dose group. vetted 1-2.5 weeks after initial virus recovery. That the viruses recovered were Junin virus is certain: all...wild-type strains (LI 1.25). When vivo neutralization and virus clearance are com- we used this system to examine viruses recovered plex and multi...Fredertcktfarniand Abstract. The safety and immunogenicity of Candid #1. a live-attenuated Junin- virus vaccine, were evaluated in rhesus macaques. Candid #1 was

  12. Hybridization and population genetics of two macaque species in Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Evans, B J; Supriatna, J; Melnick, D J

    2001-08-01

    This study investigates hybridization and population genetics of two species of macaque monkey in Sulawesi, Indonesia, using molecular markers from mitochondrial, autosomal, and Y-chromosome DNA. Hybridization is the interbreeding of individuals from different parental taxa that are distinguishable by one or more heritable characteristics. Because hybridization can affect population structure of the parental taxa, it is an important consideration for conservation management. On the Indonesian island of Sulawesi an explosive diversification of macaques has occurred; seven of 19 species in the genus Macaca live on this island. The contact zone of the subjects of this study, M. maura and M. tonkeana, is located at the base of the southwestern peninsula of Sulawesi. Land conversion in Sulawesi is occurring at an alarming pace; currently two species of Sulawesi macaque, one of which is M. maura, are classified as endangered species. Results of this study indicate that hybridization among M. maura and M. tonkeana has led to different distributions of molecular variation in mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA in the contact zone; mitochondrial DNA shows a sharp transition from M. maura to M. tonkeana haplotypes, but nuclear DNA from the parental taxa is homogenized in a narrow hybrid zone. Similarly, within M. maura divergent mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are geographically structured but population subdivision in the nuclear genome is low or absent. In M. tonkeana, mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are geographically structured and a high level of nuclear DNA population subdivision is present in this species. These results are largely consistent with a macaque behavioral paradigm of female philopatry and obligate male dispersal, suggest that introgression between M. maura and M. tonkeana is restricted to the hybrid zone, and delineate one conservation management unit in M. maura and at least two in M. tonkeana.

  13. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  14. Standard trivalent influenza virus protein vaccination does not prime antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Amarasena, Thakshila H; Laurie, Karen L; Tan, Hyon-Xhi; Butler, Jeff; Parsons, Matthew S; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P; Hurt, Aeron C; Reading, Patrick C; Kent, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Yearly vaccination with the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) is recommended, since current vaccines induce little cross neutralization to divergent influenza strains. Whether the TIV can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses that can cross-recognize divergent influenza virus strains is unknown. We immunized 6 influenza-naive pigtail macaques twice with the 2011-2012 season TIV and then challenged the macaques, along with 12 control macaques, serially with H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. We measured ADCC responses in plasma to a panel of H1 and H3 hemagglutinin (HA) proteins and influenza virus-specific CD8 T cell (CTL) responses using a sensitive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer reagent. The TIV was weakly immunogenic and, although binding antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), did not induce detectable influenza virus-specific ADCC or CTL responses. The H1N1 challenge elicited robust ADCC to both homologous and heterologous H1 HA proteins, but not influenza virus HA proteins from different subtypes (H2 to H7). There was no anamnestic influenza virus-specific ADCC or CTL response in vaccinated animals. The subsequent H3N2 challenge did not induce or boost ADCC either to H1 HA proteins or to divergent H3 proteins but did boost CTL responses. ADCC or CTL responses were not induced by TIV vaccination in influenza-naive macaques. There was a marked difference in the ability of infection compared to that of vaccination to induce cross-reactive ADCC and CTL responses. Improved vaccination strategies are needed to induce broad-based ADCC immunity to influenza.

  15. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  16. Evaluation of Functional NK Cell Responses in Vaccinated and SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Ying, Olivia; Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are crucial components of the innate immune system due to their capacity to exert rapid cytotoxic and immunomodulatory function in the absence of prior sensitization. NK cells can become activated by exposure to target cells and/or by cytokines produced by antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined the effects of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine regimen and subsequent SIV infection on the cytotoxic and immunomodulatory functions of circulatory NK cells. While vaccination did not significantly impact the capacity of NK cells to kill MHC-devoid 721.221 target cells, SIV-infection led to a significant decrease in target cell killing. NK cells from uninfected macaques were responsive to a low dose (5 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation, leading to significant increases in their cytotoxic potential, however, NK cells from SIV-infected macaques required a higher dose (50 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation in order to significantly increase their cytotoxic potential. By contrast, no differences were observed in the capacity of NK cells from vaccinated and SIV-infected macaques to respond to IL-12 and IL-18. Similarly, NK cells both before and after infection exhibited equivalent responses to Fc-mediated activation. Collectively, our results show that early SIV-infection impairs the natural cytotoxic capacity of circulatory NK cells without affecting Fc-mediated or cytokine-producing function.

  17. Using porches to decrease feces painting in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Daniel H; O'Connor, Jillann Rawlins; Coleman, Kristine

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the efficacy of a porch in decreasing feces painting in captive rhesus macaques. The porch is a small extension that is hung on the outside of a monkey's primary home cage. Porches provide many potential benefits to indoor-housed macaques, including opportunities to perch above the ground, additional space, and increased field of view. Rates of feces painting, an abnormal behavior in which the animal smears or rubs feces on a surface, were compared in 3 situations: with porch enrichment, with 'smear board' enrichment (a foraging device commonly used to decrease feces painting), and without either enrichment item. Feces painting was evaluated daily by using a 5-point scale that ranged from 0, no feces present, to 4, multiple large areas of feces. We found that subjects received significantly lower feces painting scores when given porch enrichment or smear board enrichment compared with baseline. Furthermore, subjects received significantly lower feces painting scores with porch enrichment than smear board enrichment. These results demonstrate that the porch is an effective tool to decrease feces painting in captive macaques.

  18. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets.

  19. The macaque lateral grasping network: A neural substrate for generating purposeful hand actions.

    PubMed

    Borra, Elena; Gerbella, Marzio; Rozzi, Stefano; Luppino, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    In primates, neural mechanisms for controlling skilled hand actions primarily rely on sensorimotor transformations. These transformations are mediated by circuits linking specific inferior parietal with ventral premotor areas in which sensory coding of objects' features automatically triggers appropriate hand motor programs. Recently, connectional studies in macaques showed that these parietal and premotor areas are nodes of a large-scale cortical network, designated as "lateral grasping network," including specific temporal and prefrontal sectors involved in object recognition and executive functions, respectively. These data extend grasping models so far proposed in providing a possible substrate for interfacing perceptual, cognitive, and hand-related sensorimotor processes for controlling hand actions based on object identity, goals, and memory-based or contextual information and for the contribution of motor signals to cognitive motor functions. Human studies provided evidence for a possible counterpart of the macaque lateral grasping network, suggesting that in primate evolution the neural mechanisms for controlling hand actions described in the macaque have been retained and exploited for the emergence of human-specific motor and cognitive motor capacities.

  20. Renal pigmentation due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A.L.; Blaine, E.T.; Lewis, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal pigmentation due to the administration of exogenous compounds is an uncommon finding in most species. This report describes renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions of the proximal convoluted tubules due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque. An 11 year old Indian-origin rhesus macaque with a medical history of chronic intermittent vomiting had been treated with bismuth subsalicylate (BSS), famotidine, and omeprazole singly or in combination over the course of 8 years. At necropsy, the renal cortices were diffusely dark green to black. Light and electron microscopy revealed intranuclear inclusions within the majority of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. These inclusions appeared magenta to brown when stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and were negative by the Ziehl-Neelsen acid fast stain. Elemental analysis performed on frozen kidney measured bismuth levels to be markedly elevated at 110.6 ppm, approximately 500-1000 times acceptable limits. To our knowledge this is the first report of renal bismuth deposition in a rhesus macaque resulting in renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions. PMID:24990482

  1. Pharmacokinetics of tramadol following intravenous and oral administration in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R.; Pypendop, Bruno H.; Christe, Kari L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, tramadol and its active metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), have been studied as analgesic agents in various traditional veterinary species (e.g. dogs, cats, etc.). This study explores the pharmacokinetics of tramadol and M1 after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a nontraditional veterinary species. Rhesus macaques are Old World monkeys that are commonly used in biomedical research. Effects of tramadol administration to monkeys are unknown, and research veterinarians may avoid inclusion of this drug into pain management programs due to this limited knowledge. Four healthy, socially-housed, adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were used in this study. Blood samples were collected prior to, and up to 10 h post tramadol administration. Serum tramadol and M1 were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Tramadol clearance was 24.5 (23.4-32.7) mL/min/kg. Terminal half-life of tramadol was 111 (106-127) min IV and 133 (84.9-198) min PO. Bioavailability of tramadol was poor [3.47% (2.14-5.96%)]. Maximum serum concentration of M1 was 2.28 (1.88-2.73) ng/mL IV and 11.2 (9.37-14.9) ng/mL PO. Sedation and pruritus were observed after IV administration (180 words). PMID:25488714

  2. Early short-term treatment with neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies halts SHIV infection in newborn macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hessell, Ann J.; Jaworski, J. Pablo; Epson, Erin; Matsuda, Kenta; Pandey, Shilpi; Kahl, Christoph; Reed, Jason; Sutton, William F.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Cheever, Tracy A.; Barnette, Philip T.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Planer, Shannon; Stanton, Jeffrey J.; Pegu, Amarendra; Chen, Xuejun; Wang, Keyun; Siess, Don; Burke, David; Park, Byung S.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Lewis, Anne; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Graham, Barney S.; Mascola, John R.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a major objective where antenatal care is not readily accessible. We tested anti-HIV-1 human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NmAb) as post-exposure therapy in an infant macaque model for intrapartum MTCT. One-month-old rhesus macaques were inoculated orally with SHIVSF162P3. On days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after virus exposure, we injected animals subcutaneously with NmAbs and quantified systemic distribution of NmAbs in multiple tissues within 24 h following administration. Replicating virus was found in multiple tissues by day 1 in animals without treatment. All NmAb-treated macaques were free of virus in blood and tissues at 6 months post-exposure. We detected no anti-SHIV T cell responses in blood or tissues at necropsy, and no virus emerged following CD8+ T cell depletion. These results suggest early passive immunotherapy can eliminate early viral foci and thereby prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs. PMID:26998834

  3. Progression of pathogenic events in cynomolgus macaques infected with variola virus.

    PubMed

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Cann, Jennifer A; Rubins, Kathleen H; Huggins, John W; Fisher, Robert W; Johnson, Anthony J; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Larsen, Thomas; Raymond, Jo Lynne; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Smallpox, caused by variola virus (VARV), is a devastating human disease that affected millions worldwide until the virus was eradicated in the 1970 s. Subsequent cessation of vaccination has resulted in an immunologically naive human population that would be at risk should VARV be used as an agent of bioterrorism. The development of antivirals and improved vaccines to counter this threat would be facilitated by the development of animal models using authentic VARV. Towards this end, cynomolgus macaques were identified as adequate hosts for VARV, developing ordinary or hemorrhagic smallpox in a dose-dependent fashion. To further refine this model, we performed a serial sampling study on macaques exposed to doses of VARV strain Harper calibrated to induce ordinary or hemorrhagic disease. Several key differences were noted between these models. In the ordinary smallpox model, lymphoid and myeloid hyperplasias were consistently found whereas lymphocytolysis and hematopoietic necrosis developed in hemorrhagic smallpox. Viral antigen accumulation, as assessed immunohistochemically, was mild and transient in the ordinary smallpox model. In contrast, in the hemorrhagic model antigen distribution was widespread and included tissues and cells not involved in the ordinary model. Hemorrhagic smallpox developed only in the presence of secondary bacterial infections - an observation also commonly noted in historical reports of human smallpox. Together, our results support the macaque model as an excellent surrogate for human smallpox in terms of disease onset, acute disease course, and gross and histopathological lesions.

  4. Role of vocal tract characteristics in individual discrimination by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

    PubMed Central

    Furuyama, Takafumi; Kobayasi, Kohta I.; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) exhibits a species-specific communication sound called the “coo call” to locate group members and maintain within-group contact. Monkeys have been demonstrated to be capable of discriminating between individuals based only on their voices, but there is still debate regarding how the fundamental frequencies (F0) and filter properties of the vocal tract characteristics (VTC) contribute to individual discrimination in nonhuman primates. This study was performed to investigate the acoustic keys used by Japanese macaques in individual discrimination. Two animals were trained with standard Go/NoGo operant conditioning to distinguish the coo calls of two unfamiliar monkeys. The subjects were required to continue depressing a lever until the stimulus changed from one monkey to the other. The test stimuli were synthesized by combining the F0s and VTC from each individual. Both subjects released the lever when the VTC changed, whereas they did not when the F0 changed. The reaction times to the test stimuli were not significantly different from that to the training stimuli that shared the same VTC. Our data suggest that vocal tract characteristics are important for the identification of individuals by Japanese macaques. PMID:27550840

  5. Extensive sharing of MHC class II alleles between rhesus and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Rouweler, Annemiek J M; de Groot, Natasja G; Louwerse, Annet; Otting, Nel; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2006-05-01

    In contrast to rhesus monkeys, substantial knowledge on cynomolgus monkey major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotypes is lacking. Therefore, 17 animals, including one pedigreed family, were thoroughly characterized for polymorphic Mhc class II region genes as well as their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Different cynomolgus macaque populations appear to exhibit unique mtDNA profiles reflecting their geographic origin. Within the present panel, 10 Mafa-DPB1, 14 Mafa-DQA1, 12 Mafa-DQB1, and 35 Mafa-DRB exon 2 sequences were identified. All of these alleles cluster into lineages that were previously described for rhesus macaques. Moreover, about half of the Mafa-DPB1, Mafa-DQA1, and Mafa-DQB1 alleles and one third of the Mafa-DRB exon 2 sequences are identical to rhesus macaque orthologues. Such a high level of Mhc class II allele sharing has not been reported for primate species. Pedigree analysis allowed the characterization of nine distinct Mafa class II haplotypes, and seven additional ones could be deduced. Two of these haplotypes harbor a duplication of the Mafa-DQB1 locus. Despite extensive allele sharing, rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys do not appear to possess identical Mhc class II haplotypes, thus illustrating that new haplotypes were generated after speciation by recombination-like processes.

  6. Contrasting specializations for facial motion within the macaque face-processing system.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Clark; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2015-01-19

    Facial motion transmits rich and ethologically vital information, but how the brain interprets this complex signal is poorly understood. Facial form is analyzed by anatomically distinct face patches in the macaque brain, and facial motion activates these patches and surrounding areas. Yet, it is not known whether facial motion is processed by its own distinct and specialized neural machinery, and if so, what that machinery's organization might be. To address these questions, we used fMRI to monitor the brain activity of macaque monkeys while they viewed low- and high-level motion and form stimuli. We found that, beyond classical motion areas and the known face patch system, moving faces recruited a heretofore unrecognized face patch. Although all face patches displayed distinctive selectivity for face motion over object motion, only two face patches preferred naturally moving faces, while three others preferred randomized, rapidly varying sequences of facial form. This functional divide was anatomically specific, segregating dorsal from ventral face patches, thereby revealing a new organizational principle of the macaque face-processing system.

  7. Contrasting Specializations for Facial Motion Within the Macaque Face-Processing System

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Clark; Freiwald, Winrich A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Facial motion transmits rich and ethologically vital information [1, 2], but how the brain interprets this complex signal is poorly understood. Facial form is analyzed by anatomically distinct face patches in the macaque brain [3, 4], and facial motion activates these patches and surrounding areas [5, 6]. Yet it is not known whether facial motion is processed by its own distinct and specialized neural machinery, and if so, what that machinery’s organization might be. To address these questions, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to monitor the brain activity of macaque monkeys while they viewed low- and high-level motion and form stimuli. We found that, beyond classical motion areas and the known face patch system, moving faces recruited a heretofore-unrecognized face patch. Although all face patches displayed distinctive selectivity for face motion over object motion, only two face patches preferred naturally moving faces, while three others preferred randomized, rapidly varying sequences of facial form. This functional divide was anatomically specific, segregating dorsal from ventral face patches, thereby revealing a new organizational principle of the macaque face-processing system. PMID:25578903

  8. Effects of age on clock gene expression in the rhesus macaque pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Sitzmann, Brandon D.; Lemos, Dario R.; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Urbanski, Henryk F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that circadian clock genes are expressed in various peripheral tissues, raising the possibility that multiple clocks regulate circadian physiology. To study clock gene expression in the rhesus macaque pituitary gland we used gene microarray data and found that the pituitary glands of young and old adult males express several components of the circadian clock (Per1, Per2, Cry1, Bmal1, Clock, Rev-erbα and Csnk1ε). Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (sqRT-PCR) confirmed the presence of these core-clock genes and detected significant age-related differences in expression of Per2. sqRT-PCR also showed differential expression of core-clock genes at two opposing time-points over the 24 hour day, with greater expression of Per2 and Bmal1 (P<0.05) at 1300 h as compared to 0100 h. Immunohistochemistry revealed rhythmic expression of REV-ERBα in the pituitary glands of female macaques. These data provide evidence that the rhesus macaque pituitary gland expresses core-clock genes and their associated protein products in a 24-hour rhythmic pattern, and that their expression is moderately impacted by aging processes. PMID:18614257

  9. Cortical Sulci Asymmetries in Chimpanzees and Macaques: A New Look at an Old Idea

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Stephanie L.; Mangin, Jean-François; Schapiro, Steven J.; Reamer, Lisa; Bennett, Allyson J; Pierre, Peter J.; Hopkins, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Functional and neuroanatomical asymmetries are an important characteristic of the human brain. The evolution of such specializations in the human cortex has provoked great interest in primate brain evolution. Most research on cortical sulci has revolved around linear measurements, which represent only one dimension of sulci organization. Here, we used a software program (BrainVISA) to quantify asymmetries in cortical depth and surface area from magnetic resonance images in a sample of 127 chimpanzees and 49 macaques. Population brain asymmetries were determined from 11 sulci in chimpanzees and seven sulci in macaques. Sulci were taken from the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. Population-level asymmetries were evident in chimpanzees for several sulci, including the fronto-orbital, superior precentral, and sylvian fissure sulci. The macaque population did not reveal significant population-level asymmetries, except for surface area of the superior temporal sulcus. The overall results are discussed within the context of the evolution of higher order cognition and motor functions. PMID:22504765

  10. Pharmacokinetics of tramadol following intravenous and oral administration in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kelly, K R; Pypendop, B H; Christe, K L

    2015-08-01

    Recently, tramadol and its active metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), have been studied as analgesic agents in various traditional veterinary species (e.g., dogs, cats, etc.). This study explores the pharmacokinetics of tramadol and M1 after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a nontraditional veterinary species. Rhesus macaques are Old World monkeys that are commonly used in biomedical research. Effects of tramadol administration to monkeys are unknown, and research veterinarians may avoid inclusion of this drug into pain management programs due to this limited knowledge. Four healthy, socially housed, adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were used in this study. Blood samples were collected prior to, and up to 10 h post-tramadol administration. Serum tramadol and M1 were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Tramadol clearance was 24.5 (23.4-32.7) mL/min/kg. Terminal half-life of tramadol was 111 (106-127) min IV and 133 (84.9-198) min PO. Bioavailability of tramadol was poor [3.47% (2.14-5.96%)]. Maximum serum concentration of M1 was 2.28 (1.88-2.73) ng/mL IV and 11.2 (9.37-14.9) ng/mL PO. Sedation and pruritus were observed after IV administration.

  11. Use-Wear Patterns on Wild Macaque Stone Tools Reveal Their Behavioural History

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Michael; Gumert, Michael D.; Biro, Dora; Carvalho, Susana; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2013-01-01

    Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) are one of a limited number of wild animal species to use stone tools, with their tool use focused on pounding shelled marine invertebrates foraged from intertidal habitats. These monkeys exhibit two main styles of tool use: axe hammering of oysters, and pound hammering of unattached encased foods. In this study, we examined macroscopic use-wear patterns on a sample of 60 wild macaque stone tools from Piak Nam Yai Island, Thailand, that had been collected following behavioural observation, in order to (i) quantify the wear patterns in terms of the types and distribution of use-damage on the stones, and (ii) develop a Use-Action Index (UAI) to differentiate axe hammers from pound hammers by wear patterns alone. We used the intensity of crushing damage on differing surface zones of the stones, as well as stone weight, to produce a UAI that had 92% concordance when compared to how the stones had been used by macaques, as observed independently prior to collection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative archaeological use-wear techniques can accurately reconstruct the behavioural histories of non-human primate stone tools. PMID:23977365

  12. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Denise F.; Kieu, Hung T.; Castillo, Luis D.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease. PMID:28095513

  13. Fading Perceptual Resemblance: A Path for Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) to Conceptual Matching?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. David; Flemming, Timothy M.; Boomer, Joseph; Beran, Michael J.; Church, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive, comparative, and developmental psychologists have long been intrigued by humans’ and animals’ capacity to respond to abstract relations like sameness and difference, because this capacity may underlie crucial aspects of cognition like analogical reasoning. Recently, this capacity has been explored in higher-order, relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) tasks in which humans and animals try to complete analogies of sameness and difference between disparate groups of items. The authors introduced a new paradigm to this area, by yoking the relational-matching cue to a perceptual-matching cue. Then, using established algorithms for shape distortion, the perceptual cue was weakened and eliminated. Humans’ RMTS performance easily transcended the elimination of perceptual support. In contrast, RMTS performance by six macaques faltered as they were weaned from perceptual support. No macaque showed evidence of mature RMTS performance, even given more than 260,000 training trials during which we tried to coax a relational-matching performance from them. It is an important species difference that macaques show so hesitant a response to conceptual relations when humans respond to them so effortlessly. It raises theoretical questions about the emergence of this crucial capacity during humans’ cognitive evolution and during humans’ cognitive development. PMID:24076537

  14. Cortical Correspondence via Sulcal Curve-Constrained Spherical Registration with Application to Macaque Studies.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ilwoo; Kim, Sun Hyung; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Yoo, Sang Wook; Evans, Alan C; Shi, Yundi; Sanchez, Mar; Niethammer, Marc; Styner, Martin

    2013-03-13

    In this work, we present a novel cortical correspondence method with application to the macaque brain. The correspondence method is based on sulcal curve constraints on a spherical deformable registration using spherical harmonics to parameterize the spherical deformation. Starting from structural MR images, we first apply existing preprocessing steps: brain tissue segmentation using the Automatic Brain Classification tool (ABC), as well as cortical surface reconstruction and spherical parametrization of the cortical surface via Constrained Laplacian-based Automated Segmentation with Proximities (CLASP). Then, initial correspondence between two cortical surfaces is automatically determined by a curve labeling method using sulcal landmarks extracted along sulcal fundic regions. Since the initial correspondence is limited to sulcal regions, we use spherical harmonics to extrapolate and regularize this correspondence to the entire cortical surface. To further improve the correspondence, we compute a spherical registration that optimizes the spherical harmonic parameterized deformation using a metric that incorporates the error over the sulcal landmarks as well as the normalized cross correlation of sulcal depth maps over the whole cortical surface. For evaluation, a normal 18-months-old macaque brain (for both left and right hemispheres) was matched to a prior macaque brain template with 9 manually labeled, major sulcal curves. The results show successful registration using the proposed registration approach. Evaluation results for optimal parameter settings are presented as well.

  15. Postexposure protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV infection by topical integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Parikh, Urvi M; West, Rolieria; Taylor, Andrew; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis; Hazuda, Daria; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2014-03-12

    Coitally delivered microbicide gels containing antiretroviral drugs are important for HIV prevention. However, to date, microbicides have contained entry or reverse transcriptase inhibitors that block early steps in virus infection and thus need to be given as a preexposure dose that interferes with sexual practices and may limit compliance. Integrase inhibitors block late steps after virus infection and therefore are more suitable for post-coital dosing. We first determined the kinetics of strand transfer in vitro and confirmed that integration begins about 6 hours after infection. We then used a repeat-challenge macaque model to assess efficacy of vaginal gels containing integrase strand transfer inhibitors when applied before or after simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We showed that gel containing the strand transfer inhibitor L-870812 protected two of three macaques when applied 30 min before SHIV challenge. We next evaluated the efficacy of 1% raltegravir gel and demonstrated its ability to protect macaques when applied 3 hours after SHIV exposure (five of six protected; P < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Breakthrough infections showed no evidence of drug resistance in plasma or vaginal secretions despite continued gel dosing after infection. We documented rapid vaginal absorption reflecting a short pharmacological lag time and noted that vaginal, but not plasma, virus load was substantially reduced in the breakthrough infection after raltegravir gel treatment. We provide a proof of concept that topically applied integrase inhibitors protect against vaginal SHIV infection when administered shortly before or 3 hours after virus exposure.

  16. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women.

  17. Novel Methodology for Creating Macaque Retinas with Sortable Photoreceptors and Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Shreyasi; Strang, Christianne E.; Alexander, John J.; Scalabrino, Miranda L.; Lynch Hill, Julie; Kasuga, Daniel T.; Witherspoon, C. Douglas; Boye, Sanford L.; Gamlin, Paul D.; Boye, Shannon E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to generate macaque retinas with sortable cell populations would be of great benefit to both basic and translational studies of the primate retina. The purpose of our study was therefore to develop methods to achieve this goal by selectively labeling, in life, photoreceptors (PRs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with separate fluorescent markers. Methods: Labeling of macaque (Macaca fascicularis) PRs and RGCs was accomplished by subretinal delivery of AAV5-hGRK1-GFP, and retrograde transport of micro-ruby™ from the lateral geniculate nucleus, respectively. Retinas were anatomically separated into different regions. Dissociation conditions were optimized, and cells from each region underwent fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS). Expression of retinal cell type- specific genes was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR to characterize isolated cell populations. Results: We show that macaque PRs and RGCs can be simultaneously labeled in-life and enriched populations isolated by FACS. Recovery from different retinal regions indicated efficient isolation/enrichment for PRs and RGCs, with the macula being particularly amendable to this technique. Conclusions: The methods and materials presented here allow for the identification of novel reagents designed to target RGCs and/or photoreceptors in a species that is phylogenetically and anatomically similar to human. These techniques will enable screening of intravitreally-delivered AAV capsid libraries for variants with increased tropism for PRs and/or RGCs and the evaluation of vector tropism and/or cellular promoter activity of gene therapy vectors in a clinically relevant species. PMID:27990105

  18. Quantitative stability of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell clonal output in rhesus macaques receiving transplants.

    PubMed

    Koelle, Samson J; Espinoza, Diego A; Wu, Chuanfeng; Xu, Jason; Lu, Rong; Li, Brian; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2017-03-16

    Autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells lentivirally labeled with unique oligonucleotide barcodes flanked by sequencing primer targets enables quantitative assessment of the self-renewal and differentiation patterns of these cells in a myeloablative rhesus macaque model. Compared with other approaches to clonal tracking, this approach is highly quantitative and reproducible. We documented stable multipotent long-term hematopoietic clonal output of monocytes, granulocytes, B cells, and T cells from a polyclonal pool of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in 4 macaques observed for up to 49 months posttransplantation. A broad range of clonal behaviors characterized by contribution level and biases toward certain cell types were extremely stable over time. Correlations between granulocyte and monocyte clonalities were greatest, followed by correlations between these cell types and B cells. We also detected quantitative expansion of T cell-biased clones consistent with an adaptive immune response. In contrast to recent data from a nonquantitative murine model, there was little evidence for clonal succession after initial hematopoietic reconstitution. These findings have important implications for human hematopoiesis, given the similarities between macaque and human physiologies.

  19. Renal pigmentation due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L; Blaine, E T; Lewis, A D

    2015-05-01

    Renal pigmentation due to the administration of exogenous compounds is an uncommon finding in most species. This report describes renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions of the proximal convoluted tubules due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque. An 11-year-old Indian-origin rhesus macaque with a medical history of chronic intermittent vomiting had been treated with bismuth subsalicylate, famotidine, and omeprazole singly or in combination over the course of 8 years. At necropsy, the renal cortices were diffusely dark green to black. Light and electron microscopy revealed intranuclear inclusions within the majority of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. These inclusions appeared magenta to brown when stained with hematoxylin and eosin and were negative by the Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain. Elemental analysis performed on frozen kidney measured bismuth levels to be markedly elevated at 110.6 ppm, approximately 500 to 1000 times acceptable limits. To our knowledge, this is the first report of renal bismuth deposition in a rhesus macaque resulting in renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions.

  20. Effects of Human Management Events on Conspecific Aggression in Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Theil, Jacob; Beisner, Brianne; Hill, Ashley; McCowan, Brenda

    2017-03-02

    Conspecific aggression in outdoor-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at primate research facilities is a leadingsource of trauma and can potentially influence animal wellbeing and research quality. Although aggression between macaquesis a normal part of daily social interactions, human presence might affect the frequency of various behaviors and instigateincreases in conspecific aggression. We sought to determine how and which human management events affect conspecificaggression both immediately after an event and throughout the course of a day. From June 2008 through December 2009, werecorded agonistic encounters among macaques living in 7 social groups in large outdoor field cages. Behavioral data werethen synchronized with specific management events (for example, feeding, enclosure cleaning, animal catching) that occurredwithin or near the enclosure. By using an Information Theoretical approach, 2 generalized linear mixed models were developedto estimate the effects of human management events on 1) aggression after individual management events and 2) dailylevels of aggression. Univariate analysis revealed an increase in the rate of aggression after a management event occurred.The best predictor of aggression in a cage was the type of management event that occurred. Various factors including thenumber of daily management events, the total time of management events, the technicians involved, reproductive season,and their interactions also showed significant associations with daily aggression levels. Our findings demonstrate that humanmanagement events are associated with an increase in conspecific aggression between rhesus macaques and thus haveimplications regarding how humans manage primates in research facilities.

  1. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  2. Macrophage accumulation in gut mucosa differentiates AIDS from chronic SIV infection in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Swan, Zachary D; Wonderlich, Elizabeth R; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes to lymphoid and gut tissues and disease in HIV and SIV infection remains unclear. To address this question, we conducted cross-sectional analyses of dendritic cell (DC) subsets and CD163(+) macrophages in lymph nodes (LNs) and ileum of rhesus macaques with acute and chronic SIV infection and AIDS. In LNs significant differences were only evident when comparing uninfected and AIDS groups, with loss of myeloid DCs and CD103(+) DCs from peripheral and mesenteric LNs, respectively, and accumulation of plasmacytoid DCs and macrophages in mesenteric LNs. In contrast, there were fourfold more macrophages in ileum lamina propria in macaques with AIDS compared with chronic infection, and this increased to 40-fold in Peyer's patches. Gut macrophages exceeded plasmacytoid DCs and CD103(+) DCs by ten- to 17-fold in monkeys with AIDS but were at similar low frequencies as DCs in chronic infection. Gut macrophages in macaques with AIDS expressed IFN-α and TNF-α consistent with cell activation. CD163(+) macrophages also accumulated in gut mucosa in acute infection but lacked expression of IFN-α and TNF-α. These data reveal a relationship between inflammatory macrophage accumulation in gut mucosa and disease and suggest a role for macrophages in AIDS pathogenesis.

  3. Repetition suppression for visual actions in the macaque superior temporal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Kuravi, Pradeep; Caggiano, Vittorio; Giese, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In many brain areas, repetition of a stimulus usually weakens the neural response. This “adaptation” or repetition suppression effect has been observed with mass potential measures such as event-related potentials (ERPs), in fMRI BOLD responses, and locally with local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity. Recently, it has been reported that macaque F5 mirror neurons do not show repetition suppression of their spiking activity for single repetitions of hand actions, which disagrees with human fMRI adaptation studies. This finding also contrasts with numerous studies showing repetition suppression in macaque inferior temporal cortex, including the rostral superior temporal sulcus (STS). Since the latter studies employed static stimuli, we assessed here whether the use of dynamic action stimuli abolishes repetition suppression in the awake macaque STS. To assess adaptation effects in the STS, we employed the same hand action movies as used when examining adaptation in F5. The upper bank STS neurons showed repetition suppression during the approaching phase of the hand action, which corresponded to the phase of the action for which these neurons responded overall the strongest. The repetition suppression was present for the spiking activity measured in independent single-unit and multiunit recordings as well as for the LFP power at frequencies > 50 Hz. Together with previous data in F5, these findings suggest that adaptation effects differ between F5 mirror neurons and the STS neurons. PMID:26745246

  4. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  5. Park Rangers’ Behaviors and Their Effects on Tourists and Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Sheeran, Lori K.; Li, Jin-hua; Sun, Lixing; Wang, Xi; Pritchard, Alexander J.; DuVall-Lash, Alexander S.; Wagner, R. Steve

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Conflict between macaques and humans is a commonly reported problem in Asian tourism. However, without understanding how macaques are managed, the establishment of an effective management design is impracticable. This study explored how monkeys were managed and tourists were regulated at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys in Mt. Huangshan, Anhui Province, China, through a field observation. Two teams of park rangers alternated monthly and managed a group of macaques. The results suggested that undesired tourists’ interactions with monkeys were not regularly intervened by park rangers, and park rangers established dominance over the monkeys by using physical threats to manage them. Abstract Previous studies have reported the negative impacts of tourism on nonhuman primates (NHPs) and tourists and advocated the improvement of tourism management, yet what constitutes good quality management remains unclear. We explored whether rates of macaque aggression and self-directed behaviors (SDBs) differed under the supervision of two park ranger teams at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys (VWM) in Mt. Huangshan, Anhui Province, China. The two ranger teams provisioned and managed a group of macaques on an alternating monthly basis. Monkey, tourist and ranger behaviors were collected from August 16–September 30, 2012. Macaque aggression and SDB rates did not differ significantly under the management of the two teams. Overall, there was little intervention in tourist-macaque interactions by park rangers, and even when rangers discouraged tourists’ undesirable behaviors, tourist interactions with monkeys persisted. Furthermore, only one or sometimes two park rangers managed monkeys and tourists, and rangers established dominance over the monkeys to control them. In order to effectively manage tourists and monkeys by a single park ranger, we recommend that rangers: (1) prohibit tourists from feeding; (2) move around the viewing platform more frequently; and (3) limit

  6. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to α/β proteins, and its topology is a three-layer α/β/α sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% β strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli ( EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  7. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A. Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to {alpha}/{beta} proteins, and its topology is a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% {beta} strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli (EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  8. Unveiling the non-covalent interactions of molecular homodimers by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations and collision-induced broadening of ro-vibrational transitions: application to (CH2F2)2 and (SO2)2.

    PubMed

    Tasinato, Nicola; Grimme, Stefan

    2015-02-28

    Thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of molecular complexes featuring non-covalent interactions, such as van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, are of fundamental interest in many fields, ranging from chemistry and biology to nanotechnology. In the present work the homodimers of difluoromethane (CH2F2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are investigated theoretically using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3) and experimentally by tunable diode laser (TDL) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The dissociation energies of (CH2F2)2 and (SO2)2 are determined experimentally from the broadening of the ro-vibrational transitions of the corresponding monomers collisionally perturbed by a range of damping gases. The resulting dissociation energies are 2.79 ± 0.32 and 2.62 ± 0.16 kcal mol(-1) for the CH2F2 and SO2 dimers, respectively. Six to nine different stationary points on the PES of the two complexes are investigated theoretically at the DFT-D3 level, retrieving the corresponding dissociation energies, structures and rotational constants. Computations are carried out by employing six different density functionals (BLYP, TPSS, B3LYP, PBE0, TPSSh, and PW6B95) in conjunction with def2-TZVP and in a few cases def2-QZVP basis sets. DFT-D3 dissociation energies are benchmarked against reference values from CCSD(T)/CBS computations, and furthermore compared to experimental ones. A very good agreement between theory and experiment is attained, showing that DFT-D3 provides a significant improvement over standard DFT. This work shows that dissociation energies of homodimers can be consistently derived from collisional broadening cross sections and that interaction energies at various DFT-D3 levels (nearly) reach the accuracy of highly correlated wavefunction methods.

  9. The human parasite Leishmania amazonensis downregulates iNOS expression via NF-κB p50/p50 homodimer: role of the PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Calegari-Silva, Teresa C.; Vivarini, Áislan C.; Miqueline, Marina; Dos Santos, Guilherme R. R. M.; Teixeira, Karina Luiza; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Nunes de Carvalho, Simone; de Carvalho, Laís; Lopes, Ulisses G.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis activates the NF-κB transcriptional repressor homodimer (p50/p50) and promotes nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) downregulation. We investigated the role of PI3K/Akt in p50/p50 NF-κB activation and the effect on iNOS expression in L. amazonensis infection. The increased occupancy of p50/p50 on the iNOS promoter of infected macrophages was observed and we demonstrated that both p50/p50 NF-κB induction and iNOS downregulation in infected macrophages depended on PI3K/Akt activation. Importantly, the intracellular growth of the parasite was also impaired during PI3K/Akt signalling inhibition and in macrophages knocked-down for Akt 1 expression. It was also observed that the increased nuclear levels of p50/p50 in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages were associated with reduced phosphorylation of 907 Ser p105, the precursor of p50. Corroborating these data, we demonstrated the increased levels of phospho-9 Ser GSK3β in infected macrophages, which is associated with GSK3β inhibition and, consequently, its inability to phosphorylate p105. Remarkably, we found that the levels of pPTEN 370 Ser, a negative regulator of PI3K, increased due to L. amazonensis infection. Our data support the notion that PI3K/Akt activity is sustained during the parasite infection, leading to NF-κB 105 phosphorylation and further processing to originate p50/p50 homodimers and the consequent downregulation of iNOS expression. PMID:26400473

  10. Quantitative analyses of cross-sectional shape of the distal radius in three species of macaques.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro

    2004-04-01

    I conducted quantitative analyses of the cross-sectional shape of the distal radial shaft in three species of macaques, which differ in locomotor behavior: semi-terrestrial Japanese macaques ( Macaca fuscata), arboreal long tailed macaques ( M. fascicularis), and relatively terrestrial rhesus macaques ( M. mulatta). I took CT scans of the distal radial shafts of a total of 180 specimens at the level of the inferior radio-ulnar articulation. From each CT image, the periosteal outline of the radius was traced automatically by a digital imaging technique. I determined five points (landmarks) on the outline by developing a standardized morphometric technique. Bone surface lengths were measured by using these landmarks and their soft tissue correlates were investigated. The results of this study were as follows: (1) Semi-terrestrial M. fuscata has features that are approximately intermediate between those of the other two species. M. fuscata has a relatively small groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a large groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. These characters resemble those of M. fascicularis. On the other hand, the ulnar notch of M. fuscata is relatively large, a character which is similar to that of M. mulatta. Moreover, compared to the other two macaques, the surface of the flexor muscles of M. fuscata is intermediate in size. (2) The more terrestrial M. mulatta has a relatively large groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a small groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. Moreover, M. mulatta has a relatively large ulnar notch and a small surface for the flexor muscles. (3) The arboreal M. fascicularis has similar features to those of M. fuscata for the first and second relative size index. However, in the ulnar notch, M. fascicularis has a peculiar character and the surface for the flexor muscles is relatively large compared to those of the other two species. These results can be interpreted in terms of positional

  11. Specific anti-glycan antibodies are sustained during and after parasite clearance in Schistosoma japonicum-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. Y. Michelle; Li, Xiao Hong; Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Wilson, R. Alan; van Diepen, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Background Human immunity to Schistosoma infection requires many years of exposure, and multiple infections and treatments to develop. Unlike humans, rhesus macaques clear an established schistosome infection naturally at the same time acquiring immunity towards re-infection. In macaques, schistosome egg production decreases after 8 weeks post-infection and by week 22, physiological impairment of the worm caused by unclarified antibody-mediated processes is observed. Since strong antibody responses have been observed against schistosome glycan antigens in human and animal infections, we here investigate if anti-glycan antibodies are associated with immunity against schistosome infections in macaques. Methods We used a microarray containing a large repertoire of glycoprotein- and glycolipid-derived glycans from different schistosome life stages to analyse anti-glycan serum IgG and IgM from S. japonicum-infected macaques during the course of infection and self-cure. We also used an in vitro schistosomula assay to investigate whether macaque sera containing anti-glycan antibodies can kill schistosomula. Conclusions/significance Antibody responses towards schistosome glycans at week 4 post-infection were dominated by IgM while IgG was high at week 8. The profound increase in IgG was observed mainly for antibodies towards a large subset of glycans that contain (multi-)fucosylated terminal GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN), and Galβ1-4(Fucα1–3)GlcNAc (LeX) motifs. In general, glycans with a higher degree of fucosylation gave rise to stronger antibody responses than non-fucosylated glycans. Interestingly, even though many IgG and IgM responses had declined by week 22 post-infection, IgG towards O-glycans with highly fucosylated LDN motifs remained. When incubating macaque serum with schistosomula in vitro, schistosomula death was positively correlated with the duration of infection of macaques; macaque serum taken 22 weeks post-infection caused most schistosomula to die

  12. Visual cortex and auditory cortex activation in early binocularly blind macaques: A BOLD-fMRI study using auditory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Wu, Lingjie; Tang, Zuohua; Sun, Xinghuai; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Tang, Weijun; Qian, Wen; Wang, Jie; Jin, Lixin; Zhong, Yufeng; Xiao, Zebin

    2017-04-15

    Cross-modal plasticity within the visual and auditory cortices of early binocularly blind macaques is not well studied. In this study, four healthy neonatal macaques were assigned to group A (control group) or group B (binocularly blind group). Sixteen months later, blood oxygenation level-dependent functional imaging (BOLD-fMRI) was conducted to examine the activation in the visual and auditory cortices of each macaque while being tested using pure tones as auditory stimuli. The changes in the BOLD response in the visual and auditory cortices of all macaques were compared with immunofluorescence staining findings. Compared with group A, greater BOLD activity was observed in the bilateral visual cortices of group B, and this effect was particularly obvious in the right visual cortex. In addition, more activated volumes were found in the bilateral auditory cortices of group B than of group A, especially in the right auditory cortex. These findings were consistent with the fact that there were more c-Fos-positive cells in the bilateral visual and auditory cortices of group B compared with group A (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the bilateral visual cortices of binocularly blind macaques can be reorganized to process auditory stimuli after visual deprivation, and this effect is more obvious in the right than the left visual cortex. These results indicate the establishment of cross-modal plasticity within the visual and auditory cortices.

  13. Fatal Baylisascaris larva migrans in a colony of Japanese macaques kept by a safari-style zoo in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Une, Yumi; Kawakami, Shigehisa; Saito, Eriko; Kamiya, Haruo; Akao, Nobuaki; Furuoka, Hidefumi

    2005-06-01

    A colony of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) kept by a safari-style zoo in Japan experienced 9 sporadic cases of fatal neurological diseases, such as epilepsy and posterior paralysis, during the 12 yr from 1989 to 2001. This macaque colony consisted of approximately 30 animals, on average, during this period, and the macaques shared their living space with II American black bears (Ursus americanus) harboring zoonotic roundworms (Baylisascaris transfuga). Close to this enclosure, a cote for 2-3 raccoons (Procyon lotor) was placed, and raw sewage from this cote ran into a shallow drain in the area for macaques and bears. However, fecal examinations in recent years did not detect the infection of raccoons with zoonotic roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis). Postmortem histological examination of the latest 2 ill macaques detected multifocal malacia in the brain; 2 ascarid larvae of 60 microm maximum width were encapsulated in the cerebrum and lungs of 1 of the animals. To determine the causative ascarid species of the fatal larva migrans, we analyzed 2 additional encapsulated Baylisascaris larvae collected from formalin-fixed lungs by morphological and molecular approaches. This sporadic outbreak is the second record of Baylisascaris larva migrans in animals in Japan.

  14. Social rank versus affiliation: Which is more closely related to leadership of group movements in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana)?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Sun, Lixing; Sheeran, Lori K; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhang, Qi-Xin; Zhang, Dao; Xia, Dong-Po; Li, Jin-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Research on leadership is a critical step for understanding collective decision making. However, only 4 of the 22 extant macaque species have been examined for the impact of social rank and affiliation on the initiation of collective movement. It is far from clear whether such impact exists and, if so, how it works among other macaques. To answer these questions, we investigated free-ranging, Tibetan macaques' (Macaca thibetana) group departures from a provisioning area and tested two alternative hypotheses: personal versus distributed leadership. Personal leadership predicts that a single, highest ranking individual initiates the most group movements, whereas distributed leadership predicts that different members lead the group on different occasions and affiliative individuals have more initiations. We recorded how often and how successfully adults initiated group movements from a provisioning area into the forest, and related these variables to the duration of interindividual proximity and grooming time in the forest. All adults initiated group movements, but did so variably. Social rank was related neither to the number of successful initiations nor to the success ratio of initiations. By contrast, eigenvector centrality based on proximity relations was positively correlated with the number and ratio of successful initiations. Moreover, successful initiations were positively correlated with social grooming. Overall, Tibetan macaques showed a pattern of distributed leadership. Our study demonstrated the relationship between social affiliation and individual leadership in a macaque society. Am. J. Primatol. 78:816-824, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Causes of obesity in captive cynomolgus macaques: influence of body condition, social and management factors on behaviour around feeding.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S A; Pearl, D L; Leslie, K E; Fournier, J; Turner, P V

    2012-07-01

    Similar to other primate species, captive cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are prone to becoming overweight. The relationship between body condition and feeding behaviour in group-housed animals has not been reported. This study evaluated the effect of daily feeding routines on behaviour patterns in cynomolgus macaques to determine whether overweight macaques displayed different behaviours and activity levels. In this prospective observational study, 16 macaques (m = 4, f = 12) from four separate troops (n = 4 per troop) were selected from a colony of 165 animals. Observational data were collected over six months during morning and afternoon feedings by scan sampling. Behaviours of interest included foraging, eating, aggressive and positive social interactions, inactivity and physical activities. Multivariable mixed logistic regression modelling was used for data analysis. Results indicated that overweight animals were more likely to be inactive, dominant animals had increased probabilities of eating compared with non-dominants, and aggressive behaviours were more likely to occur in the morning and before feeding, suggesting feeding anticipation. Positive social interaction before feeding was seen and may be a strategy used to avoid aggressive encounters around food resources. Individual animal caregivers had an unintentional impact on behaviour, as decreased eating and an increase in inactivity were noted when certain individuals fed animals. These findings illustrate the complexities of feeding group-housed cynomolgus macaques to avoid overweight body condition. Feeding routines may require more care and attention to distribute food in a way that ensures equitable food intake among troop animals, while not disturbing group cohesion.

  16. Postnatal development of the hippocampus in the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta): a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Scott, Julia A; Bauman, Melissa D; Schumann, Cynthia M; Amaral, David G

    2014-07-01

    Nonhuman primates are widely used models to investigate the neural substrates of human behavior, including the development of higher cognitive and affective function. Due to their neuroanatomical and behavioral homologies with humans, the rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta) provides an excellent animal model in which to characterize the maturation of brain structures from birth through adulthood and into senescence. To evaluate hippocampal development in rhesus macaques, structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained longitudinally at 9 time points between 1 week and 260 weeks (5 years) of age on 24 rhesus macaque monkeys (12 males, 12 females). In our sample, the hippocampus reaches 50% of its adult volume by 13 weeks of age and reaches an adult volume by 52 weeks in both males and females. The hippocampus appears to be slightly larger at 3 years than at 5 years of age. Male rhesus macaques have larger hippocampi than females from 8 weeks onward by approximately 5%. Interestingly, there was increased variability in hemispheric asymmetry for hippocampus volumes at younger ages than at later ages. These data provide a comprehensive evaluation of the longitudinal development of male and female rhesus macaque hippocampus across development from 1 week to 5 years of age.

  17. Effect of photoperiod on characteristics of semen obtained by electroejaculation in stump-tailed macaques (Macaca arctoides).

    PubMed

    García Granados, Mónica Dafne; Hernández López, Leonor Estela; Córdoba Aguilar, Alejandro; Cerda Molina, Ana Lilia; Pérez-Ramírez, Olivia; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    Some environmental variables determining seasonal reproduction in mammals are temperature, humidity, food availability, and photoperiod. Among these, photoperiod is considered the main regulator of primates' seasonal reproduction, thus the latitudinal distribution of primate populations is a key factor determining the appearance of seasonal reproduction. The present work presents supporting discrete seasonality in male stump-tailed macaques (Macaca arctoides). We investigated whether semen quality and testosterone covaried with Mexico City's photoperiod and relative humidity by analyzing variations in the portions that form the ejaculate: the seminal liquid, the seminal coagulum, and the copulatory plug. Five male adult stump-tailed macaques were electroejaculated once a month, obtaining three semen samples per male, from August 2011 to July 2012 (except for December 2011) (n = 165). Our results showed that stump-tailed macaque sperm counts were significantly different between the portions of the ejaculate. The seminal coagulum contained the significantly largest number of spermatozoids, followed by the copulatory plug and the seminal fluid. Photoperiod and relative humidity had major influence on the sperm count in the seminal coagulum and the testosterone concentrations. Testosterone reached its highest values around the time when days and nights lasted the same hours, decreasing when days either grew longer or became shorter. Concerning relative humidity, sperm counts in the seminal coagulum were highly variable on dry days, but decreased as the relative humidity increased. We conclude that stump-tailed macaques have a discrete seasonality, occurring in spring and fall when macaques' reproductive condition and readiness for postcopulatory intrasexual competition increase.

  18. Variation in hair δ13C and δ15N values in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Singapore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schillaci, Michael A.; Castellini, J. Margaret; Stricker, Craig A.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Lee, Benjamin P.Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the primatology literature on stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) has focused on African and New World species, with comparatively little research published on Asian primates. Here we present hair δ13C and δ15N isotope values for a sample of 33 long-tailed macaques from Singapore. We evaluate the suggestion by a previous researcher that forest degradation and biodiversity loss in Singapore have led to a decline in macaque trophic level. The results of our analysis indicated significant spatial variability in δ13C but not δ15N. The range of variation in δ13C was consistent with a diet based on C3 resources, with one group exhibiting low values consistent with a closed canopy environment. Relative to other macaque species from Europe and Asia, the macaques from Singapore exhibited a low mean δ13C value but mid-range mean δ15N value. Previous research suggesting a decline in macaque trophic level is not supported by the results of our study.

  19. Circulating natural killer and gammadelta T cells decrease soon after infection of rhesus macaques with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Juan D; Cairo, Cristiana; Djavani, Mahmoud; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Ruckwardt, Tracy; Bryant, Joseph; Pauza, C David; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2009-07-01

    Rhesus macaques infected with the WE strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV-WE) serve as a model for human infection with Lassa fever virus. To identify the earliest events of acute infection, rhesus macaques were monitored immediately after lethal infection for changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Changes in CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD20 subsets did not vary outside the normal fluctuations of these blood cell populations; however, natural killer (NK) and gammadelta T cells increased slightly on day 1 and then decreased significantly after two days. The NK subsets responsible for the decrease were primarily CD3-CD8+ or CD3-CD16+ and not the NKT (primarily CD3+CD56+) subset. Macaques infected with a non-virulent arenavirus, LCMV-Armstrong, showed a similar drop in circulating NK and gammadelta T cells, indicating that this is not a pathogenic event. V(3)9 T cells, representing the majority of circulating gammadelta T cells in rhesus macaques, displayed significant apoptosis when incubated with LCMV in cell culture; however, the low amount of cell death for virus-co-cultured NK cells was insufficient to account for the observed disappearance of this subset. Our observations in primates are similar to those seen in LCMV-infected mice, where decreased circulating NK cells were attributed to margination and cell death. Thus, the disappearance of these cells during acute hemorrhagic fever in rhesus macaques may be a cytokine-induced lymphopenia common to many virus infections.

  20. Identification of rhesus macaque genital microbiota by 16S pyrosequencing shows similarities to human bacterial vaginosis: implications for use as an animal model for HIV vaginal infection.

    PubMed

    Spear, Gregory T; Gilbert, Douglas; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Doyle, Lara; Green, Linda; Gillevet, Patrick M; Landay, Alan L; Veazey, Ronald S

    2010-02-01

    The composition of the lower genital tract microbiota in women is believed to affect the risk of sexually acquiring HIV. Since macaque genital microbiota could similarly impact vaginal infection with SIV we identified microbiota in 11 rhesus macaques using multitag pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The microbiota was polymicrobial with a median of nine distinct bacterial taxa per macaque (range 3-16 taxa, each constituting 1% or more of the sequences). Taxa frequently found included Peptoniphilus, Sneathia, Porphyromonas, Mobiluncus, Atopobacter, Dialister, Thioreductor, Prevotella, and Streptococcus, many of which are also frequently found in women with bacterial vaginosis. Lactobacillus sequences (mostly L. johnsonii) were found in only four macaques but were not predominant in any (median of 0% of sequences, range 0-39%). All macaques were resampled 6 months after the first time point to determine the stability of the microbiota. The microbiota remained polymicrobial with a median of 10 taxa (range 6-18). Microbial patterns remained similar for six of the macaques, changed substantially in two, and had a mixed pattern in three. Significant sialidase enzyme activity, a marker of bacteria vaginosis in women, was detected in genital fluid from 9/11 and 8/11 macaques from the first and second time points, respectively. These results show that the macaque lower genital microbiota resembled a bacteria vaginosis-type microbiota in women and suggest that the microbiota of macaques in captivity promote rather than protect against vaginal infection with SIV. These results also suggest macaques could be used as an animal model to study some aspects of bacterial vaginosis.

  1. Differences in compact bone tissue microscopic structure between adult humans (Homo sapiens) and Assam macaques (Macaca assamensis).

    PubMed

    Nganvongpanit, Korakot; Phatsara, Manussabhorn; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the osteon structure of adult humans and Assam macaques, which served as a nonhuman primate model, to find an adequate key for species identification. Samples of compact bone from humans (n=5) and Assam macaques (n=5) - including humerus (n=20), radius (n=20), ulna (n=20), femur (n=20), tibia (n=20) and fibula (n=20) - were processed using conventional histological techniques. 100 secondary osteons from each sample were evaluated under light microscopy. Parameter measurements included: diameter, perimeter and area of Haversian canal and osteon; distance between centers of Haversian canals; and ratio between diameter of Haversian canal and osteon. Four parameters, including diameters and areas of Haversian canal and osteon, demonstrated significantly higher (P<0.05) values in humans than in Assam macaques. Therefore, compact bone microstructure could thus be used as a potential tool to differentiate human and nonhuman primates.

  2. Food resources, distribution and seasonal variations in ranging in lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus in the Western Ghats, India.

    PubMed

    Erinjery, Joseph J; Kavana, T S; Singh, Mewa

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and availability of food was examined to see how it influenced ranging patterns and sleeping site selection in a group of lion-tailed macaques. The home range and core area were 130.48 ha (95% kernel) and 26.68 ha (50% kernel) respectively. The lion-tailed macaques had a longer day range, had a greater number of sleeping sites and used more core areas in the summer as compared to the monsoon and the post-monsoon seasons. The ranging patterns and sleeping site use were influenced by the major food resources used in a particular season. The ranging was mainly influenced by Artocarpus heterophyllus in monsoon, Cullenia exarillata and Toona ciliata in post- monsoon, and Artocarpus heterophyllus and Ficus amplissima in summer. The distribution of these four plant species is, therefore, critical to ranging, and thus to conservation of the lion-tailed macaque.

  3. A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Heather A; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy; Rawlings, Stephanie; Manoharan, Minsha; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Dickerson, Mary F; Lewis, Anne D; Colgin, Lois M A; Axthelm, Michael K; Pecotte, Jerilyn K; Baric, Ralph S; Wong, Scott W; Brinton, Margo A

    2015-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100-1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages had a high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques.

  4. Use of Femoral Head and Neck Ostectomy and Physical Therapy to Manage Osteoarthritis in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Hampel, Joseph A; Nemzek, Jean A; Saccone, Phillip A; Eaton, Kathryn A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is associated with pain and immobility in both humans and animals. However, available resources for osteoarthritis management in captive NHP are limited. This case report describes a novel management strategy for a 10-y-old male macaque with unilateral hindlimb lameness, prominent muscle wasting, and severely limited range of motion. Radiographs of the affected limb showed lytic lesions of the femoral head. To relieve pain and improve mobility, femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHO) was performed, and multiple pharmacotherapies were initiated. The macaque also received a unique method of physical therapy that required no sedation, acted as enrichment, and was implemented by using a conventional caging system. The response to therapy was monitored by measuring thigh circumference in the operated and nonoperated limbs, which demonstrated improvement in both legs. The unique physical therapy in conjunction with surgery and pharmacotherapy benefited the macaque with osteoarthritis by reducing discomfort and improving mobility.

  5. Food-neophobia in semi-free ranging rhesus macaques: effects of food limitation and food source.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E

    2000-01-01

    This study characterizes food neophobia in semi-free ranging rhesus macaques. In experiment one, monkeys received novel and familiar foods during periods of normal provisioning and when provisioning was suspended. The monkeys did discriminate between novel and familiar foods and continued to exhibit neophobia when provisioning was suspended. In experiment two, food was either tossed to subjects or placed in the habitat so that monkeys discovered food without the observer in close proximity. Rhesus macaques were more likely to eat a novel food that was hand-tossed to them compared to food they discovered in their habitat. This study suggests that food neophobia is a robust trait in rhesus macaques and that a history of provisioning may affect the expression of the trait.

  6. Evaluation of pigtail macaques as a model for the effects of copper intrauterine devices (IUDs) on HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Robyn M.; Morris, Monica; Henning, Tara; Ritter, Jana M.; Jones, Tara L.; Dietz, Sharon; Ayers, Jessica; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Jenkins, Leecresia; Zaki, Sherif; Wildemeersch, Dirk; Garber, David; Powell, Nathaniel; Hendry, R. Michael; McNicholl, Janet; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-acting, hormonal contraception may increase HIV risk. Copper intrauterine devices (IUDs) could serve as non-hormonal alternatives. We pilot a pigtail macaque model for evaluating HIV susceptibility factors during copper IUD use. Methods Frameless and flexible GyneFix® copper IUDs were surgically implanted into three SHIVSF162p3-positive macaques via hysterotomy and monitored for up to four months. Four macaques served as no-IUD controls. Results All animals retained the devices without complications. No consistent change in vaginal viral RNA or inflammatory cytokines was seen. Two animals had altered menstrual cycles and experienced marked thinning of vaginal epithelium after IUD insertion. Histological examination of uterine tissue at necropsy revealed endometrial ulceration and lymphocytic inflammation with glandular loss at sites of direct IUD contact. Conclusions Although the need for insertion surgery could limit its usefulness, this model will allow studies on copper IUDs and SHIV shedding, disease progression, and HIV susceptibility factors. PMID:24372425

  7. Antibody-dependent enhancement of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in vitro by plasma from SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, D C; Robinson, W E; Hirsch, V M; Modliszewski, A; Mitchell, W M; Johnson, P R

    1990-01-01

    Plasma from two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) experimentally infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV; isolate SIVmac251) enhanced SIVmac infection of a human CD4+ lymphoblastoid cell line, MT-2. Prechallenge plasma samples from these animals and serum from SIV-negative macaques did not enhance infection. Compared with controls, infection enhancement was characterized by the rapid appearance of syncytium formation (3 to 4 days sooner), reverse transcriptase release (10-fold increase), and cytopathic effect (60% cell killing). Enhancement of activity was dependent on the presence of diluted, fresh SIV-negative macaque serum as a source of complement. A requirement for complement was shown by the absence of enhancement in heat-inactivated serum and by dose-dependent inhibition of enhancement in the presence of polyclonal antibody to monkey complement component C3. Monoclonal antibody to CD4 (OKT4a) blocked enhancement completely, while monoclonal antibody to the human complement component C3d receptor CR2 (OKB7) reduced enhancement by greater than 50%, indicating a requirement for CD4 and CR2 in mediating this phenomenon. SIV infection-enhancing activity appeared in macaques soon after experimental inoculation (28 days). The titer increased over time and peaked just prior to the death of both macaques from opportunistic infections and lymphoma. In vitro SIV infection enhancement is nearly identical to the in vitro complement-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancing (C'-ADE) activity observed in human immunodeficiency virus-positive human sera (Robinson et al., Lancet i:790-794, 1988; Robinson et al., J. Acq. Immun. Def. Synd. 2:33-42, 1989). These observations validate the macaque-SIV model for studies of C'-ADE. Images PMID:2152808

  8. Facial musculature in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta): evolutionary and functional contexts with comparisons to chimpanzees and humans

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Parr, Lisa A

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression is a common mode of visual communication in mammals but especially so in primates. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) have a well-documented facial expression repertoire that is controlled by the facial/mimetic musculature as in all mammals. However, little is known about the musculature itself and how it compares with those of other primates. Here we present a detailed description of the facial musculature in rhesus macaques in behavioral, evolutionary and comparative contexts. Formalin-fixed faces from six adult male specimens were dissected using a novel technique. The morphology, attachments, three-dimensional relationships and variability of muscles were noted and compared with chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and with humans. The results showed that there was a greater number of facial muscles in rhesus macaques than previously described (24 muscles), including variably present (and previously unmentioned) zygomaticus minor, levator labii superioris alaeque nasi, depressor septi, anterior auricularis, inferior auricularis and depressor supercilii muscles. The facial muscles of the rhesus macaque were very similar to those in chimpanzees and humans but M. mulatta did not possess a risorius muscle. These results support previous studies that describe a highly graded and intricate facial expression repertoire in rhesus macaques. Furthermore, these results indicate that phylogenetic position is not the primary factor governing the structure of primate facial musculature and that other factors such as social behavior are probably more important. The results from the present study may provide valuable input to both biomedical studies that use rhesus macaques as a model for human disease and disorder that includes assessment of facial movement and studies into the evolution of primate societies and communication. PMID:19563473

  9. Effect of Uveal Melanocytes on Choroidal Morphology in Rhesus Macaques and Humans on Enhanced-Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Glenn; Vuong, Vivian S.; Oltjen, Sharon; Cunefare, David; Farsiu, Sina; Garzel, Laura; Roberts, Jeffrey; Thomasy, Sara M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare cross-sectional choroidal morphology in rhesus macaque and human eyes using enhanced-depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) and histologic analysis. Methods Enhanced-depth imaging–OCT images from 25 rhesus macaque and 30 human eyes were evaluated for choriocapillaris and choroidal–scleral junction (CSJ) visibility in the central macula based on OCT reflectivity profiles, and compared with age-matched histologic sections. Semiautomated segmentation of the choriocapillaris and CSJ was used to measure choriocapillary and choroidal thickness, respectively. Multivariate regression was performed to determine the association of age, refractive error, and race with choriocapillaris and CSJ visibility. Results Rhesus macaques exhibit a distinct hyporeflective choriocapillaris layer on EDI-OCT, while the CSJ cannot be visualized. In contrast, humans show variable reflectivities of the choriocapillaris, with a distinct CSJ seen in many subjects. Histologic sections demonstrate large, darkly pigmented melanocytes that are densely distributed in the macaque choroid, while melanocytes in humans are smaller, less pigmented, and variably distributed. Optical coherence tomography reflectivity patterns of the choroid appear to correspond to the density, size, and pigmentation of choroidal melanocytes. Mean choriocapillary thickness was similar between the two species (19.3 ± 3.4 vs. 19.8 ± 3.4 μm, P = 0.615), but choroidal thickness may be lower in macaques than in humans (191.2 ± 43.0 vs. 266.8 ± 78.0 μm, P < 0.001). Racial differences in uveal pigmentation also appear to affect the visibility of the choriocapillaris and CSJ on EDI-OCT. Conclusions Pigmented uveal melanocytes affect choroidal morphology on EDI-OCT in rhesus macaque and human eyes. Racial differences in pigmentation may affect choriocapillaris and CSJ visibility, and may influence the accuracy of choroidal thickness measurements. PMID:27792810

  10. Use of photogrammetry as a means to assess hybrids of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed (M. fascicularis) macaques.

    PubMed

    Jadejaroen, Janya; Hamada, Yuzuru; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed (M. fascicularis) macaques are the most commonly used non-human primate models for biomedical research, but it is difficult to identify these two species in the hybrid zone (15-20°N). In this work, we used morphological values obtained via photogrammetry to assess hybrids of rhesus and long-tailed macaques at Khao Khieow Open Zoo (KKZ; 13°21'N, 101°06'E), eastern Thailand. Long-tailed and rhesus macaques have species-specific tail lengths and contrasts of their yellowish pelages. The accuracy and precision of the relative tail length (%RTL) and the contrast of the yellow hue (Cb*) of the pelage, as obtained from photographs, were compared with the corresponding direct measurements (morphometrics). The photogrammetric and morphometric measurements of %RTL and Cb* were highly significantly correlated (r = 0.989 and 0.980, p < 0.001), and there were no significant differences between the two datasets (t test, p = 0.13 and 0.41; n = 42 and 17 for %RTL and Cb*, respectively). The reproducibilities of the %RTL and Cb* measurements (calculated in the photogrammetric case by taking photographs of the same macaques in two different environments) were significantly correlated between the datasets (r = 0.983 and 0.914, p < 0.001 and 0.005), and there were no significant differences between the datasets (t test, p = 0.539 and 0.344; n = 30 each for %RTL and Cb*, respectively). The %RTL and Cb* data were combined with data on the crown and cheek hair patterns and sex skin reddening of the macaques, and this combined data set was then analyzed by multiple correspondence analysis and agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis, leading to the categorization of the rhesus macaques, long-tailed macaques, and hybrids at KKZ into five groups. Thus, photogrammetry can be utilized to identify macaque species or hybrids when species identification relies mainly on tail length and pelage color.

  11. Effects of the macrolide drug tylosin on chronic diarrhea in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Rebecca S; Tarara, Ross P; Christe, Kari L; Spinner, Abigail; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2008-02-01

    Diarrhea is the gastrointestinal disease most frequently encountered in captive rhesus macaques. The precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying chronic diarrhea in nonhuman primates are not well understood, but a persistent inflammatory component has been implicated strongly. This study evaluated the inflammatory changes in the colon of macaques with diarrhea and assessed the efficacy of a 10-d course of tylosin in a cohort of 21 animals with chronic diarrhea. Stool quality was evaluated daily, and fecal consistency was scored. Colonoscopies were performed; biopsy samples were characterized histologically and assayed for expression of TNFalpha mRNA. Blood samples collected pre-, mid-, and post-treatment were assayed for C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicated that 63% of the animals receiving tylosin showed improvement in stool quality, compared with 10% in the sham-treated group. Histologically, 82% of animals in the tylosin-treated group had a reduction in the severity of colonic lesions post-treatment, compared with 40% of animals in the sham group. The amount of TNFalpha mRNA before treatment did not differ from that afterward in either tylosin- or sham-treated animals. CRP levels serially decreased in tylosin-treated monkeys; the average post-treatment CRP value for tylosin-treated animals was 11.96 +/- 3.86 microg/ml compared with 26.48 +/- 4.86 microg/ml for sham-treated controls. In conclusion, tylosin significantly improved the fecal consistency score, significantly decreased colonic inflammation, and significantly decreased serum CRP levels post-treatment in rhesus macaques with chronic diarrhea.

  12. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  13. An HSV-2 Trivalent Vaccine Is Immunogenic in Rhesus Macaques and Highly Efficacious in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Lauren M.; Shaw, Carolyn E.; Pahar, Bapi; Liu, David; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    A genital herpes vaccine is urgently needed to prevent pain and suffering, reduce the incidence of neonatal herpes, and decrease the risk of HIV acquisition and transmission that accompanies genital infection. We evaluated a trivalent HSV-2 subunit antigen vaccine administered with CpG and alum in rhesus macaques and guinea pigs. The vaccine contains glycoproteins C, D and E (gC2, gD2, gE2) to block virus entry by gD2 and immune evasion by gC2 and gE2. In rhesus macaques, the trivalent vaccine induced plasma and mucosa neutralizing antibodies, antibodies that block gC2 and gE2 immune evasion activities, and stimulated CD4 T cell responses. After intravaginal challenge, a self-limited vaginal infection of brief duration was detected by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in naïve, but not in trivalent immunized macaques. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in female guinea pigs. Animals were mock immunized, or immunized with gD2, the trivalent vaccine or the trivalent vaccine followed by a booster dose of gD2 (trivalent + gD2). The trivalent and trivalent + gD2 groups were 97% and 99% efficacious, respectively in preventing genital lesions and both outperformed gD2 alone. As a marker of transmission risk, vaginal swabs were evaluated daily for HSV-2 DNA and replication competent virus between five and seven weeks after challenge. HSV-2 DNA shedding was reduced in all groups compared with mock. Shedding of replication competent virus occurred on fewer days in the trivalent than gD2 immunized animals while the trivalent + gD2 group had no shedding of replication competent virus. Overall, the trivalent group had genital lesions on < 1% days and shedding of replication competent virus on 0.2% days. The vaccine has outstanding potential for prevention of genital herpes in humans. PMID:28103319

  14. Influence of dominance rank and affiliation relationships on selfdirected behavior in female Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Qi-Xin; LI, Jin-Hua; XIA, Dong-Po; ZHU, Yong; WANG, Xi; ZHANG, Dao

    2014-01-01

    Self-directed behavior (SDB) is characterized as an indicator of anxiety, frustration and stress in nonhuman primates. In this study, we collected self-directed behavior data from one group of free-ranging Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China (September 2012–May 2013) using a combination of behavioral sampling methods including focal animal sampling, behavioral sampling, continuous sampling and instantaneous sampling. Our results showed that females engaged in significantly higher rates of self-directed behavior when they were in proximity to dominant individuals compared to subordinate ones. Conflict losers significantly increased their SDB rates after agonistic episodes, indicating that SDB might also serve as an index of anxiety in M. thibetana. We further found that females significantly increased their SDB rates when focal individual was proximity to weakly affiliation relationship higher rank members than to strongly affiliation relationship higher rank members. If conflicts were not reconciled, the postconflict SDB rates of losers were higher when they stayed with strongly affiliation opponents; if conflicts were reconciled, victims of strongly affiliation relationships opponents engaged in more SDB rates before reconciliation than after reconciliation, while victims of moderately affiliation relationships opponents did not engaged in more SDB rates before reconciliation than after reconciliation. We conclude that both of dominance rank and affiliation relationships might both influence the SDB rates of female Tibetan macaques significantly, suggesting that SDB is not only an index of anxiety in Tibetan macaques, but also can provide a new insight into evaluation of social relationships between individuals. PMID:24866492

  15. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Didier, Peter J; Baker, Kate C; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-11-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors.

  16. Reduced representation genome sequencing suggests low diversity on the sex chromosomes of tonkean macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ben J; Zeng, Kai; Esselstyn, Jacob A; Charlesworth, Brian; Melnick, Don J

    2014-09-01

    In species with separate sexes, social systems can differ in the relative variances of male versus female reproductive success. Papionin monkeys (macaques, mangabeys, mandrills, drills, baboons, and geladas) exhibit hallmarks of a high variance in male reproductive success, including a female-biased adult sex ratio and prominent sexual dimorphism. To explore the potential genomic consequences of such sex differences, we used a reduced representation genome sequencing approach to quantifying polymorphism at sites on autosomes and sex chromosomes of the tonkean macaque (Macaca tonkeana), a species endemic to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. The ratio of nucleotide diversity of the X chromosome to that of the autosomes was less than the value (0.75) expected with a 1:1 sex ratio and no sex differences in the variance in reproductive success. However, the significance of this difference was dependent on which outgroup was used to standardize diversity levels. Using a new model that includes the effects of varying population size, sex differences in mutation rate between the autosomes and X chromosome, and GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) or selection on GC content, we found that the maximum-likelihood estimate of the ratio of effective population size of the X chromosome to that of the autosomes was 0.68, which did not differ significantly from 0.75. We also found evidence for 1) a higher level of purifying selection on genic than nongenic regions, 2) gBGC or natural selection favoring increased GC content, 3) a dynamic demography characterized by population growth and contraction, 4) a higher mutation rate in males than females, and 5) a very low polymorphism level on the Y chromosome. These findings shed light on the population genomic consequences of sex differences in the variance in reproductive success, which appear to be modest in the tonkean macaque; they also suggest the occurrence of hitchhiking on the Y chromosome.

  17. Changes in DTI parameters in the optic tracts of macaque monkeys with monocular blindness.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu-Feng; Tang, Zuo-Hua; Qiang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Ling-Jie; Wang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Jin, Li-Xin; Xiao, Ze-Bin

    2017-01-01

    For humans and non-human primates, the alteration of the visual pathway's white matter fibers after visual deprivation has been partially explored. However, the changes in the optic tracts after the transection of the optic nerve have not been well characterized. In the current study, we attempted to investigate the differences in optic tracts between normal and unilateral optic nerve transected macaque monkeys using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Four healthy neonatal macaque monkeys were randomly divided into 2 groups, with 2 in each group. Group A served as a control group, and Group B underwent unilateral (right eye) optic nerve transection to produce monocular blindness. Sixteen months (Group B(16M)) and thirty-two months (Group B(32M)) after optic nerve transection, diffusion tensor imaging was performed on all monkeys. Then, we compared fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) in bilateral optic tracts between Group A and Group B and between Group B(16M) and Group B(32M). In both Group B(16M) and Group B(32M), when compared with normal monkeys in Group A, FA was decreased and MD, AD and RD were increased in the bilateral optic tracts of monkeys with monocular blindness. Furthermore, compared with Group B(16M), FA was reduced and MD, AD, RD were more obviously increased in the bilateral optic tracts of Group B(32M), and noticeable differences in MD, AD and RD were found between the left and right optic tracts in group B(32M). We believe that the results of this study would be helpful in investigation of the histological abnormalities of the integrity damage, axonal degeneration and demyelination of optic tracts in macaque monkeys with monocular blindness by DTI parameters in noninvasively and quantitatively.

  18. Intramuscular administration of AAV overcomes pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Calcedo, Roberto; Grant, Rebecca L; Peng, Hui; Medina-Jaszek, C Angelica; Ahonkhai, Omua; Qin, Qiuyue; Roy, Soumitra; Tretiakova, Anna P; Wilson, James M

    2016-12-07

    The seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector capsids may preclude a percentage of the population from receiving gene therapy, particularly following systemic vector administration. We hypothesized that the use of intramuscular (IM) administration of AAV vectors might circumvent this issue. IM injections were used to administer AAV8 vectors expressing either secreted or non-secreted transgenes into mice and the influence of NAbs supplied by pre-administration of pooled human IgG on transgene expression was evaluated. We then studied the impact of naturally occurring pre-existing AAV8 NAbs on expression of a secreted transgene following IM vector delivery in rhesus macaques. Finally, we evaluated the ability to readminister AAV vectors via IM injections in rhesus macaques. In mice, the presence of AAV8 NAbs had no effect on gene expression in the injected skeletal muscle. However, liver transgene expression following hepatic distribution of the vector was ablated. In rhesus macaques, naturally occurring pre-existing AAV8 NAb titers of ⩽1:160 had no effect on expression levels of a secreted transgene after IM delivery of the vector. Additionally, readministration of AAV vectors was possible by IM injection into the previously injected muscle groups, with no effect on transgene expression by the original vector. Therefore, the presence of pre-existing NAbs in the human population should not preclude subjects from receiving gene therapy by IM administration of the vector so long as sufficient levels of secreted transgene expression can be produced without the involvement of liver.

  19. In Vivo Binding and Retention of CD4-Specific DARPin 57.2 in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Krarup, Anders; Gettie, Agegnehu; Kuroda, Marcelo; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Trkola, Alexandra; Robbiani, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background The recently described Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin) technology can produce highly selective ligands to a variety of biological targets at a low production cost. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the in vivo use of DARPins for future application to novel anti-HIV strategies, we identified potent CD4-specific DARPins that recognize rhesus CD4 and followed the fate of intravenously injected CD4-specific DARPin 57.2 in rhesus macaques. The human CD4-specific DARPin 57.2 bound macaque CD4+ cells and exhibited potent inhibitory activity against SIV infection in vitro. DARPin 57.2 or the control E3_5 DARPin was injected into rhesus macaques and the fate of cell-free and cell-bound CD4-specific DARPin was evaluated. DARPin-bound CD4+ cells were detected in the peripheral blood as early as 30 minutes after the injection, decreasing within 6 hours and being almost undetectable within 24 hours. The amount of DARPin bound was dependent on the amount of DARPin injected. CD4-specific DARPin was also detected on CD4+ cells in the lymph nodes within 30 minutes, which persisted with similar kinetics to blood. More extensive analysis using blood revealed that DARPin 57.2 bound to all CD4+ cell types (T cells, monocytes, dendritic cells) in vivo and in vitro with the amount of binding directly proportional to the amount of CD4 on the cell surface. Cell-free DARPins were also detected in the plasma, but were rapidly cleared from circulation. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that the CD4-specific DARPin can rapidly and selectively bind its target cells in vivo, warranting further studies on possible clinical use of the DARPin technology. PMID:20805996

  20. Pharmacokinetics of tenofovir following intravaginal and intrarectal administration of tenofovir gel to rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Jeremy; Kashuba, Angela; Wang, Ruili; White, Nicole; Allen, Philip; Roberts, Jeffrey; Romano, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Tenofovir gel (1%) is being developed as a microbicide for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and has been shown to reduce transmission to women by 39%. The gel also prevents infection in macaques when applied intravaginally or intrarectally prior to challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), but very little pharmacokinetic information for macaques is available to help extrapolate the data to humans and thus inform future development activities. We have determined the pharmacokinetics of tenofovir in macaques following intravaginal and intrarectal administration of 0.2, 1, and 5% gels. Plasma and vaginal and rectal fluid samples were collected up to 24 h after dosing, and at 24 h postdosing biopsy specimens were taken from the vaginal wall, cervix, and rectum. Following vaginal and rectal administration, tenofovir rapidly distributed to the matrices distal to the site of administration. In all matrices, exposure increased with increasing dose, and with the 1% and 5% formulations, concentrations remained detectable in most animals 24 h after dosing. At all doses, concentrations at the dosing site were typically 1 to 2 log units higher than those in the opposite compartment and 4 to 5 log units higher than those in plasma. Exposure in vaginal fluid after vaginal dosing was 58 to 82% lower than that in rectal fluid after rectal dosing, but plasma exposure was 1- to 2-fold greater after vaginal dosing than after rectal dosing. These data suggest that a tenofovir-based microbicide may have the potential to protect when exposure is via vaginal or anal intercourse, regardless of whether the microbicide is applied vaginally or rectally.

  1. Whole-scalp EEG mapping of somatosensory evoked potentials in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gindrat, Anne-Dominique; Quairiaux, Charles; Britz, Juliane; Brunet, Denis; Lanz, Florian; Michel, Christoph M; Rouiller, Eric M

    2015-07-01

    High-density scalp EEG recordings are widely used to study whole-brain neuronal networks in humans non-invasively. Here, we validate EEG mapping of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) for the long-term investigation of large-scale neuronal networks and their reorganisation after lesions requiring a craniotomy. SSEPs were acquired from 33 scalp electrodes in five adult anaesthetized animals after electrical median or tibial nerve stimulation. SSEP scalp potential maps were identified by cluster analysis and identified in individual recordings. A distributed, linear inverse solution was used to estimate the intracortical sources of the scalp potentials. SSEPs were characterised by a sequence of components with unique scalp topographies. Source analysis confirmed that median nerve SSEP component maps were in accordance with the somatotopic organisation of the sensorimotor cortex. Most importantly, SSEP recordings were stable both intra- and interindividually. We aim to apply this method to the study of recovery and reorganisation of large-scale neuronal networks following a focal cortical lesion requiring a craniotomy. As a prerequisite, the present study demonstrated that a 300-mm(2) unilateral craniotomy over the sensorimotor cortex necessary to induce a cortical lesion, followed by bone flap repositioning, suture and gap plugging with calcium phosphate cement, did not induce major distortions of the SSEPs. In conclusion, SSEPs can be successfully and reproducibly recorded from high-density EEG caps in macaque monkeys before and after a craniotomy, opening new possibilities for the long-term follow-up of the cortical reorganisation of large-scale networks in macaque monkeys after a cortical lesion.

  2. Lack of prophylactic efficacy of oral maraviroc in macaques despite high drug concentrations in rectal tissues.

    PubMed

    Massud, Ivana; Aung, Wutyi; Martin, Amy; Bachman, Shanon; Mitchell, James; Aubert, Rachael; Solomon Tsegaye, Theodros; Kersh, Ellen; Pau, Chou-Pong; Heneine, Walid; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2013-08-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is a potent CCR5 coreceptor antagonist that is in clinical testing for daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. We used a macaque model consisting of weekly SHIV162p3 exposures to evaluate the efficacy of oral MVC in preventing rectal SHIV transmission. MVC dosing was informed by the pharmacokinetic profile seen in blood and rectal tissues and consisted of a human-equivalent dose given 24 h before virus exposure, followed by a booster postexposure dose. In rectal secretions, MVC peaked at 24 h (10,242 ng/ml) with concentrations at 48 h that were about 40 times those required to block SHIV infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. Median MVC concentrations in rectal tissues at 24 h (1,404 ng/g) were 30 and 10 times those achieved in vaginal or lymphoid tissues, respectively. MVC significantly reduced macrophage inflammatory protein 1β-induced CCR5 internalization in rectal mononuclear cells, an indication of efficient binding to CCR5 in rectal lymphocytes. The half-life of CCR5-bound MVC in PBMCs was 2.6 days. Despite this favorable profile, 5/6 treated macaques were infected during five rectal SHIV exposures as were 3/4 controls. MVC treatment was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of CD3(+)/CCR5(+) cells in blood. We show that high and durable MVC concentrations in rectal tissues are not sufficient to prevent SHIV infection in macaques. The increases in CD3(+)/CCR5(+) cells seen during MVC treatment point to unique immunological effects of CCR5 inhibition by MVC. The implications of these immunological effects on PrEP with MVC require further evaluation.

  3. Visuotopic organization of macaque posterior parietal cortex: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Arcaro, Michael J; Pinsk, Mark A; Li, Xin; Kastner, Sabine

    2011-02-09

    Macaque anatomy and physiology studies have revealed multiple visual areas in posterior parietal cortex (PPC). While many response properties of PPC neurons have been probed, little is known about PPC's large-scale functional topography-specifically related to visuotopic organization. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T with a phase-encoded retinotopic mapping paradigm in the awake macaque, a large-scale visuotopic organization along lateral portions of PPC anterior to area V3a and extending into the lateral intraparietal sulcus (LIP) was found. We identify two new visual field maps anterior to V3a within caudal PPC, referred to as caudal intraparietal-1 (CIP-1) and CIP-2. The polar angle representation in CIP-1 extends from regions near the upper vertical meridian (that is the shared border with V3a and dorsal prelunate) to those within the lower visual field (that is the shared border with CIP-2). The polar angle representation in CIP-2 is a mirror reversal of the CIP-1 representation. CIP-1 and CIP-2 share a representation of central space on the lateral border. Anterior to CIP-2, a third polar angle representation was found within LIP, referred to as visuotopic LIP. The polar angle representation in LIP extends from regions near the upper vertical meridian (that is the shared border with CIP-2) to those near the lower vertical meridian. Representations of central visual space were identified within dorsal portions of LIP with peripheral representations in ventral portions. We also consider the topographic large-scale organization found within macaque PPC relative to that observed in human PPC.

  4. Visuotopic organization of macaque posterior parietal cortex: An fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Michael J.; Pinsk, Mark A.; Li, Xin; Kastner, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Macaque anatomy and physiology studies have revealed multiple visual areas in posterior parietal cortex (PPC). While many response properties of PPC neurons have been probed, little is known about PPC’s large-scale functional topography — specifically related to visuotopic organization. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3T with a phase–encoded retinotopic mapping paradigm in the awake macaque, a large-scale visuotopic organization along lateral portions of PPC anterior to area V3a and extending into the lateral intraparietal sulcus (LIP) was found. We identify two new visual field maps anterior to V3a within caudal PPC, referred to as CIP-1 and CIP-2. The polar angle representation in CIP-1 extends from regions near the upper vertical meridian (that is the shared border with V3a and DP) to those within the lower visual field (that is the shared border with CIP-2). The polar angle representation in CIP-2 is a mirror reversal of the CIP-1 representation. CIP-1 and CIP-2 share a representation of central space on the lateral border. Anterior to CIP-2, a third polar angle representation was found within LIP, referred to as visuotopic LIP (LIPvt). The polar angle representation in LIP extends from regions near the upper vertical meridian (that is the shared border with CIP-2) to those near the lower vertical meridian. Representations of central visual space were identified within dorsal portions of LIP with peripheral representations in ventral portions. We also consider the topographic large-scale organization found within macaque PPC relative to that observed in human PPC. PMID:21307244

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-primaquine and (-)-primaquine enantiomers in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Saunders, David; Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Imerbsin, Rawiwan; Khemawoot, Phisit; Siripokasupkul, Raveewan; Tekwani, Babu L; Sampath, Aruna; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Ohrt, Colin; Lanteri, Charlotte; Gettyacamin, Montip; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Walker, Larry

    2014-12-01

    Primaquine (PQ) remains the sole available drug to prevent relapse of Plasmodium vivax malaria more than 60 years after licensure. While this drug was administered as a racemic mixture, prior studies suggested a pharmacodynamic advantage based on differential antirelapse activity and/or toxicities of its enantiomers. Oral primaquine enantiomers prepared using a novel, easily scalable method were given for 7 days to healthy rhesus macaques in a dose-rising fashion to evaluate their effects on the blood, liver, and kidneys. The enantiomers were then administered to Plasmodium cynomolgi-infected rhesus macaques at doses of 1.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of body weight/day in combination with chloroquine. The (-)-PQ enantiomer had higher clearance and apparent volume of distribution than did (+)-PQ and was more extensively converted to the carboxy metabolite. There is evidence for differential oxidative stress with a concentration-dependent rise in methemoglobin (MetHgb) with increasing doses of (+)-PQ greater than that seen for (-)-PQ. There was a marked, reversible hepatotoxicity in 2 of 3 animals dosed with (-)-PQ at 4.5 mg/kg. (-)-PQ in combination with chloroquine was successful in preventing P. cynomolgi disease relapse at doses of 0.6 and 1.3 mg/kg/day, while 1 of 2 animals receiving (+)-PQ at 0.6 mg/kg/day relapsed. While (-)-PQ was also associated with hepatotoxicity at higher doses as seen previously, this has not been identified as a clinical concern in humans during >60 years of use. Limited evidence for increased MetHgb generation with the (+) form in the rhesus macaque model suggests that it may be possible to improve the therapeutic window for hematologic toxicity in the clinic by separating primaquine into its enantiomers.

  6. Abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-10-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque.

  7. Abdominal Lipomatosis with Secondary Self-Strangulation of Masses in an Adult Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque. PMID:25402181

  8. Double Virus Vector Infection to the Prefrontal Network of the Macaque Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shingo; Koizumi, Masashi; Kikusui, Takefumi; Ichihara, Nobutsune; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Sakagami, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    To precisely understand how higher cognitive functions are implemented in the prefrontal network of the brain, optogenetic and pharmacogenetic methods to manipulate the signal transmission of a specific neural pathway are required. The application of these methods, however, has been mostly restricted to animals other than the primate, which is the best animal model to investigate higher cognitive functions. In this study, we used a double viral vector infection method in the prefrontal network of the macaque brain. This enabled us to express specific constructs into specific neurons that constitute a target pathway without use of germline genetic manipulation. The double-infection technique utilizes two different virus vectors in two monosynaptically connected areas. One is a vector which can locally infect cell bodies of projection neurons (local vector) and the other can retrogradely infect from axon terminals of the same projection neurons (retrograde vector). The retrograde vector incorporates the sequence which encodes Cre recombinase and the local vector incorporates the “Cre-On” FLEX double-floxed sequence in which a reporter protein (mCherry) was encoded. mCherry thus came to be expressed only in doubly infected projection neurons with these vectors. We applied this method to two macaque monkeys and targeted two different pathways in the prefrontal network: The pathway from the lateral prefrontal cortex to the caudate nucleus and the pathway from the lateral prefrontal cortex to the frontal eye field. As a result, mCherry-positive cells were observed in the lateral prefrontal cortex in all of the four injected hemispheres, indicating that the double virus vector transfection is workable in the prefrontal network of the macaque brain. PMID:26193102

  9. Septicemia in an Indian Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) associated with Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Liu, David X; Didier, Peter J; Plauche, Gail; Pahar, Bapi

    2016-07-28

    Providencia stuartii (P. stuartii) is an opportunistic pathogen and major concern in urinary catheter-related infections in human medicine. Here we report P. stuartii-induced septicemia in an eighteen-year-old, female India-origin Rhesus macaque with multiple traumatic wounds. The animal had neutrophilic leukocytosis, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis, hypophysitis and bronchopneumonia with vasculitis, thrombosis, and clusters of extracellular Gram-negative bacilli. P. stuartii was isolated from the lesions of the brain and lung and confirmed by PCR and sequencing. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of septicemia associated with P. stuartii in a non-human primate.

  10. Cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Amino, Y; Kyuhou, S; Matsuzaki, R; Gemba, H

    2001-08-17

    The cerebello-thalamo-posterior parietal cortical projections were investigated electrophysiologically and morphologically in macaque monkeys. In anesthetized monkeys, electrical stimulation of every cerebellar nucleus evoked marked surface-positive, depth-negative (s-P, d-N) cortical field potentials in the superior parietal lobule and the cortical bank of the intraparietal sulcus, but no responses in the inferior parietal lobule. Tract-tracing experiments combining the anterograde method with the retrograde one indicated that the interposed and lateral cerebellar nuclei projected to the posterior parietal cortex mainly through the nucleus ventral lateralis caudalis of the thalamus. The significance of the projections is discussed in connection with cognitive functions.

  11. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome James V. Lawler 1¤a , Timothy P. Endy 2¤b , Lisa E. Hensley 2 , Aura...model for severe acute respiratory syndrome . PLoS Med 3(5): e149. Received: July 5, 2005 Accepted: January 10, 2006 Published: April 18, 2006 DOI...United States of America A B S T R A C T Background The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and

  12. Patches with links: a unified system for processing faces in the macaque temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Sebastian; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2008-06-06

    The brain processes objects through a series of regions along the ventral visual pathway, but the circuitry subserving the analysis of specific complex forms remains unknown. One complex form category, faces, selectively activates six patches of cortex in the macaque ventral pathway. To identify the connectivity of these face patches, we used electrical microstimulation combined with simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging. Stimulation of each of four targeted face patches produced strong activation, specifically within a subset of the other face patches. Stimulation outside the face patches produced an activation pattern that spared the face patches. These results suggest that the face patches form a strongly and specifically interconnected hierarchical network.

  13. Immune responses to HTLV-I(ACH) during acute infection of pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Therese M; Wei, Qing; Stallworth, Jackie; Fultz, Patricia N

    2004-04-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is causally linked to adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a chronic progressive neurological disease, HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A nonhuman primate model that reproduces disease symptoms seen in HTLV-I-infected humans might facilitate identification of initial immune responses to the virus and an understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in HTLV-I-related disease. Previously, we showed that infection of pig-tailed macaques with HTLV-I(ACH) is associated with multiple signs of disease characteristic of both HAM/TSP and ATL. We report here that within the first few weeks after HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques, serum concentrations of interferon (IFN)-alpha increased and interleukin-12 decreased transiently, levels of nitric oxide were elevated, and activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes and CD16(+) natural killer cells in peripheral blood were observed. HTLV-I(ACH) infection elicited virus-specific antibodies in all four animals within 4 to 6 weeks; however, Tax-specific lymphoproliferative responses were not detected until 25-29 weeks after infection in all four macaques. IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood cells stimulated with a Tax or Gag peptide was detected to varying degrees in all four animals by ELISPOT assay. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from one animal that developed only a marginal antigen-specific cellular response were unresponsive to mitogen stimulation during the last few weeks preceding its death from a rapidly progressive disease syndrome associated with HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques. The results show that during the first few months after HTLV-I(ACH) infection, activation of both innate and adaptive immunity, limited virus-specific cellular responses, sustained immune system activation, and, in some cases, immunodeficiency were evident. Thus, this animal model might be valuable for understanding early stages of infection

  14. Prevention of vaginal SHIV transmission in rhesus macaques through inhibition of CCR5.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Michael M; Veazey, Ronald S; Offord, Robin; Mosier, Donald E; Dufour, Jason; Mefford, Megan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Salkowitz, Janelle R; Rodriguez, Benigno; Blauvelt, Andrew; Hartley, Oliver

    2004-10-15

    Topical agents, such as microbicides, that can protect against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission are urgently needed. Using a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV SF162), which is tropic for the chemokine receptor CCR5, we report that topical application of high doses of PSC-RANTES, an amino terminus-modified analog of the chemokine RANTES, provided potent protection against vaginal challenge in rhesus macaques. These experimental findings have potentially important implications for understanding vaginal transmission of HIV and the design of strategies for its prevention.

  15. Macaque homologs of EBV and KSHV show uniquely different associations with simian AIDS-related lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bruce, A Gregory; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Barcy, Serge; Bakke, Angela M; Lewis, Patrick; Tsai, Che-Chung; Murnane, Robert D; Rose, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Two gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (Lymphocryptovirus genus) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (Rhadinovirus genus) have been implicated in the etiology of AIDS-associated lymphomas. Homologs of these viruses have been identified in macaques and other non-human primates. In order to assess the association of these viruses with non-human primate disease, archived lymphoma samples were screened for the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) homologs of EBV, and macaque rhadinoviruses belonging to the RV1 lineage of KSHV homologs or the more distant RV2 lineage of Old World primate rhadinoviruses. Viral loads were determined by QPCR and infected cells were identified by immunolabeling for different viral proteins. The lymphomas segregated into three groups. The first group (n = 6) was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of LCV (1-25 genomes/cell) and expressed the B-cell antigens CD20 or BLA.36. A strong EBNA-2 signal was detected in the nuclei of the neoplastic cells in one of the LCV-high lymphomas, indicative of a type III latency stage. None of the lymphomas in this group stained for the LCV viral capsid antigen (VCA) lytic marker. The second group (n = 5) was associated with D-type simian retrovirus-2 (SRV-2) infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (9-790 genomes/cell) and expressed the CD3 T-cell marker. The third group (n = 3) was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (2-260 genomes/cell) and was negative for both CD20 and CD3. In both the CD3-positive and CD3/CD20-negative lymphomas, the neoplastic cells stained strongly for markers of RV2 lytic replication. None of the lymphomas had detectable levels of retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV), the macaque RV1 homolog of KSHV. Our data suggest etiological roles for both lymphocryptoviruses and RV2 rhadinoviruses in the development of simian AIDS-associated lymphomas and indicate that the

  16. An adenovirus-simian immunodeficiency virus env vaccine elicits humoral, cellular, a