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Sample records for macaque cd8aa homodimer

  1. Types of interfaces for homodimer folding and binding.

    PubMed

    Karthikraja, Velmurugan; Suresh, Abishek; Lulu, Sajitha; Kangueane, Uma; Kangueane, Pandjassarame

    2009-09-30

    Homodimers have a role in catalysis and regulation through the formation of stable interfaces. These interfaces are formed through different folding mechanisms such as 2-state without stable intermediate (2S), 3-state with monomer intermediate (3SMI) and 3-state with dimer intermediate (3SDI). Therefore, it is of interest to understand folding mechanism using structural features at the interfaces. Several studies have documented the significance of structural features for the understanding of homodimer folding mechanisms. However, the known features provide limited information for understanding homodimer folding mechanisms. Hence, we created an extended dataset of 47 homodimers (twenty eight 2S, twelve 3SMI and seven 3SDI) to examine the types of interfaces in protein homodimers. 2S are usually small sized, 3SMI are often medium sized and 3SDI often exist as large sized proteins. The ratio of interface to total (I/T) residue is large in 2S and small in 3SMI and 3SDI. Hence, we used I/T measure to group 2S, 3SMI and 3SDI into categories with large I/T (> 50%), moderate I/T (50 - 25%) and small I/T (< 25%) interfaces. The grouping is further sub-grouped based on the type of physical interaction visualized at the interface using representations in two dimensions (2D). 2D representation of the interface shows eight different forms of interactions in these homodimers. 2S homodimers frequently have large I/T and thus, utilize the entire protein structure in the formation of the interface where the individual subunits are heavily inter communicated with each other. This is not true in the case of 3SMI and 3SDI. 3SMI subunits usually interact with each other at the interface with a gentle touch-like contact and hence, they have low I/T ratio. 3SDI are often quite different in interaction compared to 3SMI and their subunits do deeply interact at the interface with only one part of the surface and hence also having low I/T ratio.

  2. Types of interfaces for homodimer folding and binding

    PubMed Central

    Karthikraja, Velmurugan; Suresh, Abishek; Lulu, Sajitha; Kangueane, Uma; Kangueane, Pandjassarame

    2009-01-01

    Homodimers have a role in catalysis and regulation through the formation of stable interfaces. These interfaces are formed through different folding mechanisms such as 2-state without stable intermediate (2S), 3-state with monomer intermediate (3SMI) and 3-state with dimer intermediate (3SDI). Therefore, it is of interest to understand folding mechanism using structural features at the interfaces. Several studies have documented the significance of structural features for the understanding of homodimer folding mechanisms. However, the known features provide limited information for understanding homodimer folding mechanisms. Hence, we created an extended dataset of 47 homodimers (twenty eight 2S, twelve 3SMI and seven 3SDI) to examine the types of interfaces in protein homodimers. 2S are usually small sized, 3SMI are often medium sized and 3SDI often exist as large sized proteins. The ratio of interface to total (I/T) residue is large in 2S and small in 3SMI and 3SDI. Hence, we used I/T measure to group 2S, 3SMI and 3SDI into categories with large I/T (≫ 50%), moderate I/T (50 - 25%) and small I/T (≪ 25%) interfaces. The grouping is further sub-grouped based on the type of physical interaction visualized at the interface using representations in two dimensions (2D). 2D representation of the interface shows eight different forms of interactions in these homodimers. 2S homodimers frequently have large I/T and thus, utilize the entire protein structure in the formation of the interface where the individual subunits are heavily inter communicated with each other. This is not true in the case of 3SMI and 3SDI. 3SMI subunits usually interact with each other at the interface with a gentle touch-like contact and hence, they have low I/T ratio. 3SDI are often quite different in interaction compared to 3SMI and their subunits do deeply interact at the interface with only one part of the surface and hence also having low I/T ratio. PMID:20198182

  3. Poster: the macaque genome.

    PubMed

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) facilitates an extraordinary range of biomedical and basic research, and the publication of the genome only makes it a more powerful model for studies of human disease; moreover, the macaque's position relative to humans and chimpanzees affords the opportunity to learn about the processes that have shaped the last 25 million years of primate evolution. To allow users to explore these themes of the macaque genome, Science has created a special interactive version of the poster published in the print edition of the 13 April 2007 issue. The interactive version includes additional text and exploration, as well as embedded video featuring seven scientists discussing the importance of the macaque and its genome sequence in studies of biomedicine and evolution. We have also created an accompanying teaching resource, including a lesson plan aimed at teachers of advanced high school life science students, for exploring what a comparison of the macaque and human genomes can tell us about human biology and evolution. These items are free to all site visitors.

  4. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition).

  5. Deprotonated Dicarboxylic Acid Homodimers: Hydrogen Bonds and Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-03-31

    Dicarboxylic acids represent an important class of water-soluble organic compounds found in the atmosphere. In this work we are studying properties of dicarboxylic acid homodimer complexes (HO2(CH2)nCO2-[HO2(CH2)nCO2H], n = 0-12), as potentially important intermediates in aerosol formation processes. Our approach is based on experimental data from negative ion photoelectron spectra of the dimer complexes combined with updated measurements of the corresponding monomer species. These results are analyzed with quantum-mechanical calculations, which provide further information about equilibrium structures, thermochemical parameters associated with the complex formation, and evaporation rates. We find that upon formation of the dimer complexes the electron binding energies increase by 1.3–1.7 eV (30.0–39.2 kcal/mol), indicating increased stability of the dimerized complexes. Calculations indicate that these dimer complexes are characterized by the presence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds with high binding energies and are thermodynamically favorable to form with low evaporation rates. Comparison with previously studied HSO4-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] complex (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 779-785) shows that HO2(CH2)2CO2-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] has very similar thermochemical properties. These results imply that dicarboxylic acids not only can contribute to the heterogeneous complexes formation involving sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic acids, but also can promote the formation of homogenous complexes by involving dicarboxylic acids themselves.

  6. Chemical shift imprint of intersubunit communication in a symmetric homodimer

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Bradley T.; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric communication is critical for protein function and cellular homeostasis, and it can be exploited as a strategy for drug design. However, unlike many protein–ligand interactions, the structural basis for the long-range communication that underlies allostery is not well understood. This lack of understanding is most evident in the case of classical allostery, in which a binding event in one protomer is sensed by a second symmetric protomer. A primary reason why study of interdomain signaling is challenging in oligomeric proteins is the difficulty in characterizing intermediate, singly bound species. Here, we use an NMR approach to isolate and characterize a singly ligated state (“lig1”) of a homodimeric enzyme that is otherwise obscured by rapid exchange with apo and saturated forms. Mixed labeled dimers were prepared that simultaneously permit full population of the lig1 state and isotopic labeling of either protomer. Direct visualization of peaks from lig1 yielded site-specific ligand-state multiplets that provide a convenient format for assessing mechanisms of intersubunit communication from a variety of NMR measurements. We demonstrate this approach on thymidylate synthase from Escherichia coli, a homodimeric enzyme known to be half-the-sites reactive. Resolving the dUMP1 state shows that active site communication occurs not upon the first dUMP binding, but upon the second. Surprisingly, for many sites, dUMP1 peaks are found beyond the limits set by apo and dUMP2 peaks, indicating that binding the first dUMP pushes the enzyme ensemble to further conformational extremes than the apo or saturated forms. The approach used here should be generally applicable to homodimers. PMID:27466406

  7. Exposure to Macaque Monkey Bite.

    PubMed

    Johnston, William F; Yeh, Jesson; Nierenberg, Richard; Procopio, Gabrielle

    2015-11-01

    The herpes B virus is a zoonotic agent that is endemic among macaque monkeys only, but can cause fatal encephalomyelitis in humans. A 26-year-old female presented to a U.S. emergency department after being bitten by a wild macaque monkey. The emergency medicine team administered rabies immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine. The team also prescribed acyclovir for prophylactic coverage against herpes B, a deadly zoonotic agent that is endemic among macaque monkeys. A discussion of background, exposure, transmission, symptoms, treatment for herpes B, including latest data available, literature, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines are included. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Zoonotic exposures can cause infectious diseases, which are unfamiliar and deadly. The emergency physician's knowledge of the association between the deadly herpes B infection and wild macaque monkey may expedite treatment and be instrumental in patient morbidity and survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Dong, Shengzhang; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Beerntsen, Brenda; Feng, Qili; Song, Qisheng

    2017-01-01

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs α and burs β), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that bursicon homodimers act in prophylactic immunity in insects, and possibly arthropods, generally, using the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. We found that burs α and burs β are expressed in larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Treating newly emerged Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster adults with recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon) heterodimer led to cuticle tanning in both species. Treating larvae and adults with r-bursicon homodimers led to up-regulation of five anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes, noting the possibility that bursicon heterodimers also lead to up-regulation of these genes can not been excluded. The induced AMPs effectively suppressed the growth of bacteria in vitro. RNAi knock-down of the transcriptional factor Relish2 abolished the influence of r-bursicon homodimers on AMP production. We infer the bursicon homodimers induce expression of AMP genes via Relish2 in Ae. aegypti, as prophylactic immunity to protect mosquitoes during the vulnerable stages of each molt. PMID:28225068

  9. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Dong, Shengzhang; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Beerntsen, Brenda; Feng, Qili; Song, Qisheng

    2017-02-22

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs α and burs β), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that bursicon homodimers act in prophylactic immunity in insects, and possibly arthropods, generally, using the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. We found that burs α and burs β are expressed in larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Treating newly emerged Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster adults with recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon) heterodimer led to cuticle tanning in both species. Treating larvae and adults with r-bursicon homodimers led to up-regulation of five anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes, noting the possibility that bursicon heterodimers also lead to up-regulation of these genes can not been excluded. The induced AMPs effectively suppressed the growth of bacteria in vitro. RNAi knock-down of the transcriptional factor Relish2 abolished the influence of r-bursicon homodimers on AMP production. We infer the bursicon homodimers induce expression of AMP genes via Relish2 in Ae. aegypti, as prophylactic immunity to protect mosquitoes during the vulnerable stages of each molt.

  10. Nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms homo-dimers stabilized by disulfide bonds

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Daniel; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Bueno, Carlos; Santos, Marco; Pando-Robles, Victoria; Batista, Cesar V.; Zimic, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant wild-pyrazinamidase from H37Rv M. tuberculosis was analyzed by gel electrophoresis under differential reducing conditions to evaluate its quaternary structure. PZAse was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography under non-reducing conditions. PZAse activity was measured and mass spectrometry analysis was performed to determine the identity of proteins by de novo sequencing and to determine the presence of disulfide bonds. This study confirmed that M. tuberculosis wild type PZAse was able to form homo-dimers in vitro. Homo-dimers showed a slightly lower specific PZAse activity compared to monomeric PZAse. PZAse dimers were dissociated into monomers in response to reducing conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the existence of disulfide bonds (C72-C138 and C138-C138) stabilizing the quaternary structure of the PZAse homo-dimer. PMID:25199451

  11. A Set of Computationally Designed Orthogonal Antiparallel Homodimers that Expands the Synthetic Coiled-Coil Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular engineering of protein assemblies, including the fabrication of nanostructures and synthetic signaling pathways, relies on the availability of modular parts that can be combined to give different structures and functions. Currently, a limited number of well-characterized protein interaction components are available. Coiled-coil interaction modules have been demonstrated to be useful for biomolecular design, and many parallel homodimers and heterodimers are available in the coiled-coil toolkit. In this work, we sought to design a set of orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils using a computational approach. There are very few antiparallel homodimers described in the literature, and none have been measured for cross-reactivity. We tested the ability of the distance-dependent statistical potential DFIRE to predict orientation preferences for coiled-coil dimers of known structure. The DFIRE model was then combined with the CLASSY multistate protein design framework to engineer sets of three orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils. Experimental measurements confirmed the successful design of three peptides that preferentially formed antiparallel homodimers that, furthermore, did not interact with one additional previously reported antiparallel homodimer. Two designed peptides that formed higher-order structures suggest how future design protocols could be improved. The successful designs represent a significant expansion of the existing protein-interaction toolbox for molecular engineers. PMID:25337788

  12. Relish2 mediates bursicon homodimer-induced prophylactic immunity in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bursicon is a neuropeptide hormone consisting of two cystine-knot proteins (burs a and burs ß), responsible for cuticle tanning and other developmental processes in insects. Recent studies show that each bursicon subunit forms homodimers that induce prophylactic immunity in Drosophila melanogaster. ...

  13. Excited states of proton-bound DNA/RNA base homodimers: pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Féraud, Géraldine; Berdakin, Matias; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Pino, Gustavo A

    2015-02-12

    We are presenting the electronic photofragment spectra of the protonated pyrimidine DNA base homodimers. Only the thymine dimer exhibits a well structured vibrational progression, while the protonated monomer shows broad vibrational bands. This shows that proton bonding can block some nonradiative processes present in the monomer.

  14. Phosphorylated Nuclear Receptor CAR Forms a Homodimer To Repress Its Constitutive Activity for Ligand Activation.

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Osabe, Makoto; Perera, Lalith; Moore, Rick; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-05-15

    The nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3) regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolism as well as cell fate. Its activation can be a critical factor in drug-induced toxicity and the development of diseases, including diabetes and tumors. CAR inactivates its constitutive activity by phosphorylation at threonine 38. Utilizing receptor for protein kinase 1 (RACK1) as the regulatory subunit, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) dephosphorylates threonine 38 to activate CAR. Here we demonstrate that CAR undergoes homodimer-monomer conversion to regulate this dephosphorylation. By coexpression of two differently tagged CAR proteins in Huh-7 cells, mouse primary hepatocytes, and mouse livers, coimmunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that CAR can form a homodimer in a configuration in which the PP2A/RACK1 binding site is buried within its dimer interface. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to stimulate CAR homodimerization, thus constraining CAR in its inactive form. The agonistic ligand CITCO binds directly to the CAR homodimer and dissociates phosphorylated CAR into its monomers, exposing the PP2A/RACK1 binding site for dephosphorylation. Phenobarbital, which is not a CAR ligand, binds the EGF receptor, reversing the EGF signal to monomerize CAR for its indirect activation. Thus, the homodimer-monomer conversion is the underlying molecular mechanism that regulates CAR activation, by placing phosphorylated threonine 38 as the common target for both direct and indirect activation of CAR. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Structures of the Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase Rnr2 and Rnr4 Homodimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerhalter, M.; Voegtli, W.C.; Perlstein, D.L.; Ge, J.; Stubbe, J.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Class I ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Eukaryotic RNRs comprise two subunits, the R1 subunit, which contains substrate and allosteric effector binding sites, and the R2 subunit, which houses a catalytically essential diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there are two variants of the R2 subunit, called Rnr2 and Rnr4. Rnr4 is unique in that it lacks three iron-binding residues conserved in all other R2s. Nevertheless, Rnr4 is required to activate Rnr2, and the functional species in vivo is believed to be a heterodimeric complex between the two proteins. The crystal structures of the Rnr2 and Rnr4 homodimers have been determined and are compared to that of the heterodimer. The homodimers are very similar to the heterodimer and to mouse R2 in overall fold, but there are several key differences. In the Rnr2 homodimer, one of the iron-binding helices, helix {alpha}B, is not well-ordered. In the heterodimer, interactions with a loop region connecting Rnr4 helices {alpha}A and {alpha}3 stabilize this Rnr2 helix, which donates iron ligand Asp 145. Sequence differences between Rnr2 and Rnr4 prevent the same interactions from occurring in the Rnr2 homodimer. These findings provide a structural rationale for why the heterodimer is the preferred complex in vivo. The active-site region in the Rnr4 homodimer reveals interactions not apparent in the heterodimer, supporting previous conclusions that this subunit does not bind iron. When taken together, these results support a model in which Rnr4 stabilizes Rnr2 for cofactor assembly and activity.

  16. From Homodimer to Heterodimer and Back: Elucidating the TonB Energy Transduction Cycle.

    PubMed

    Gresock, Michael G; Kastead, Kyle A; Postle, Kathleen

    2015-11-01

    The TonB system actively transports large, scarce, and important nutrients through outer membrane (OM) transporters of Gram-negative bacteria using the proton gradient of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). In Escherichia coli, the CM proteins ExbB and ExbD harness and transfer proton motive force energy to the CM protein TonB, which spans the periplasmic space and cyclically binds OM transporters. TonB has two activity domains: the amino-terminal transmembrane domain with residue H20 and the periplasmic carboxy terminus, through which it binds to OM transporters. TonB is inactivated by all substitutions at residue H20 except H20N. Here, we show that while TonB trapped as a homodimer through its amino-terminal domain retained full activity, trapping TonB through its carboxy terminus inactivated it by preventing conformational changes needed for interaction with OM transporters. Surprisingly, inactive TonB H20A had little effect on homodimerization through the amino terminus and instead decreased TonB carboxy-terminal homodimer formation prior to reinitiation of an energy transduction cycle. That result suggested that the TonB carboxy terminus ultimately interacts with OM transporters as a monomer. Our findings also suggested the existence of a separate equimolar pool of ExbD homodimers that are not in contact with TonB. A model is proposed where interaction of TonB homodimers with ExbD homodimers initiates the energy transduction cycle, and, ultimately, the ExbD carboxy terminus modulates interactions of a monomeric TonB carboxy terminus with OM transporters. After TonB exchanges its interaction with ExbD for interaction with a transporter, ExbD homodimers undergo a separate cycle needed to re-energize them. Canonical mechanisms of active transport across cytoplasmic membranes employ ion gradients or hydrolysis of ATP for energy. Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes lack these resources. The TonB system embodies a novel means of active transport across the outer

  17. From Homodimer to Heterodimer and Back: Elucidating the TonB Energy Transduction Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gresock, Michael G.; Kastead, Kyle A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The TonB system actively transports large, scarce, and important nutrients through outer membrane (OM) transporters of Gram-negative bacteria using the proton gradient of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). In Escherichia coli, the CM proteins ExbB and ExbD harness and transfer proton motive force energy to the CM protein TonB, which spans the periplasmic space and cyclically binds OM transporters. TonB has two activity domains: the amino-terminal transmembrane domain with residue H20 and the periplasmic carboxy terminus, through which it binds to OM transporters. TonB is inactivated by all substitutions at residue H20 except H20N. Here, we show that while TonB trapped as a homodimer through its amino-terminal domain retained full activity, trapping TonB through its carboxy terminus inactivated it by preventing conformational changes needed for interaction with OM transporters. Surprisingly, inactive TonB H20A had little effect on homodimerization through the amino terminus and instead decreased TonB carboxy-terminal homodimer formation prior to reinitiation of an energy transduction cycle. That result suggested that the TonB carboxy terminus ultimately interacts with OM transporters as a monomer. Our findings also suggested the existence of a separate equimolar pool of ExbD homodimers that are not in contact with TonB. A model is proposed where interaction of TonB homodimers with ExbD homodimers initiates the energy transduction cycle, and, ultimately, the ExbD carboxy terminus modulates interactions of a monomeric TonB carboxy terminus with OM transporters. After TonB exchanges its interaction with ExbD for interaction with a transporter, ExbD homodimers undergo a separate cycle needed to re-energize them. IMPORTANCE Canonical mechanisms of active transport across cytoplasmic membranes employ ion gradients or hydrolysis of ATP for energy. Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes lack these resources. The TonB system embodies a novel means of active transport

  18. Encapsulation and Characterization of Proton-Bound Amine Homodimers in a Water Soluble, Self-Assembled Supramolecular Host

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael; Fiedler, Dorothea; Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    Cyclic amines can be encapsulated in a water-soluble self-assembled supramolecular host upon protonation. The hydrogen bonding ability of the cyclic amines, as well as the reduced degrees of rotational freedom, allows for the formation of proton-bound homodimers inside of the assembly which are otherwise not observable in aqueous solution. The generality of homodimer formation was explored with small N-alkyl aziridines, azetidines, pyrrolidines and piperidines. Proton-bound homodimer formation is observed for N-alkylaziridines (R = methyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl), N-alkylazetidines (R = isopropyl, tertbutyl), and N-methylpyrrolidine. At high concentration, formation of a proton-bound homotrimer is observed in the case of N-methylaziridine. The homodimers stay intact inside the assembly over a large concentration range, thereby suggesting cooperative encapsulation. Both G3(MP2)B3 and G3B3 calculations of the proton-bound homodimers were used to investigate the enthalpy of the hydrogen bond in the proton-bound homodimers and suggest that the enthalpic gain upon formation of the proton-bound homodimers may drive guest encapsulation.

  19. Modulation of the FGF14:FGF14 homodimer interaction through short peptide fragments

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed; Shavkunov, Alexander; Panova, Neli; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Laezza, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) is a member of the intracellular FGF (iFGFs) family and a functionally relevant component of the neuronal voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel complex. Through a monomeric interaction with the intracellular C-terminus of neuronal Nav channels, FGF14 modulates Na+ currents in an Nav isoform-specific manner serving as a fine-tuning regulator of excitability. Previous studies based on the highly homologous FGF13 homodimer crystal structure have proposed a conserved protein:protein interaction (PPI) interface common to both Nav channel binding and iFGF homodimer formation. This interface could provide a novel target for drug design against neuronal Nav channels. Here, we provide the first in-cell reconstitution of the FGF14:FGF14 protein complex and measure the dimer interaction using the split-luciferase complementation assay (LCA). Based on the FGF14 dimer structure generated in silico, we designed short peptide fragments against the FGF14 dimer interface. One of these fragments, FLPK aligns with the pocket defined by the β12-strand and β8-β9 loop, reducing the FGF14:FGF14 dimer interaction by 25% as measured by LCA. We further compared the relative interaction strength of FGF14 wild type homodimers with FGF14 hetero- and homodimers carrying double N mutations at the Y153 and V155 residues, located at the β8-β9 loop. The Y153N/V155N double mutation counteracts the FLPK effect by increasing the strength of the dimer interaction. These data suggest that the β12 strand of FGF14 might serve as scaffold for drug design against neuronal FGF14 dimers and Nav channels. PMID:25426956

  20. HorC, a hop-resistance related protein, presumably functions in homodimer form.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Asano, Shizuka; Ogata, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2009-08-01

    To determine whether two HorC molecules coordinately form a single unit, the functional properties of covalently linked dimers of HorC encoded by tandemly fused horC genes were studied. Lactobacillus brevis introduced with the fused horC genes and a single horC gene exhibited same degree of resistance to hop compounds and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. This suggests that HorC functions as a homodimer.

  1. Organization of the mitochondrial apoptotic BAK pore: oligomerization of the BAK homodimers.

    PubMed

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-31

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX "BH3-in-groove homodimer." Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a "worm hole."

  2. α-Catenin homodimers are recruited to phosphoinositide-activated membranes to promote adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan N; Ishiyama, Noboru; Singaram, Indira; Chung, Connie M; Flozak, Annette S; Yemelyanov, Alex; Ikura, Mitsu; Cho, Wonhwa; Gottardi, Cara J

    2017-09-05

    A unique feature of α-catenin localized outside the cadherin-catenin complex is its capacity to form homodimers, but the subcellular localization and functions of this form of α-catenin remain incompletely understood. We identified a cadherin-free form of α-catenin that is recruited to the leading edge of migrating cells in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that α-catenin homodimers, but not monomers, selectively bind phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-containing lipid vesicles with high affinity, where three basic residues, K488, K493, and R496, contribute to binding. Chemical-induced dimerization of α-catenin containing a synthetic dimerization domain promotes its accumulation within lamellipodia and elaboration of protrusions with extended filopodia, which are attenuated in the α-catenin(KKR<3A) mutant. Cells restored with a full-length, natively homodimerizing form of α-catenin(KKR<3A) display reduced membrane recruitment, altered epithelial sheet migrations, and weaker cell-cell adhesion compared with WT α-catenin. These findings show that α-catenin homodimers are recruited to phosphoinositide-activated membranes to promote adhesion and migration, suggesting that phosphoinositide binding may be a defining feature of α-catenin function outside the cadherin-catenin complex. © 2017 Wood et al.

  3. Assembly of Bak homodimers into higher order homooligomers in the mitochondrial apoptotic pore

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Tirtha; Shin, Seungjin; Aluvila, Sreevidya; Chen, Hui-Chen; Grieve, Carter; Choe, Jun-Yong; Cheng, Emily H.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondrial apoptosis, Bak is activated by death signals to form pores of unknown structure on the mitochondrial outer membrane via homooligomerization. Cytochrome c and other apoptotic factors are released from the intermembrane space through these pores, initiating downstream apoptosis events. Using chemical crosslinking and double electron electron resonance (DEER)-derived distance measurements between specific structural elements in Bak, here we clarify how the Bak pore is assembled. We propose that previously described BH3-in-groove homodimers (BGH) are juxtaposed via the ‘α3/α5’ interface, in which the C-termini of helices α3 and α5 are in close proximity between two neighboring Bak homodimers. This interface is observed concomitantly with the well-known ‘α6:α6’ interface. We also mapped the contacts between Bak homodimers and the lipid bilayer based on EPR spectroscopy topology studies. Our results suggest a model for the lipidic Bak pore, whereby the mitochondrial targeting C-terminal helix does not change topology to accommodate the lining of the pore lumen by BGH. PMID:27488021

  4. Rhesus macaques are more susceptible to progressive tuberculosis than cynomolgus macaques: A quantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Maiello, Pauline; DiFazio, Robert M; Cadena, Anthony M; Rodgers, Mark A; Lin, Philana Ling; Scanga, Charles A; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2017-09-25

    In the past two decades, it has become increasingly clear that non-human primates, specifically macaques, are useful models for human tuberculosis (TB). Several macaque species have been used for TB studies, and questions remain about the similarities and differences in TB pathogenesis among macaque species, which can complicate decisions about the best species for a specific experiment. Here we provide a quantitative assessment, using serial positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging and precise quantitative determination of bacterial burdens, of low-dose M. tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques of Chinese origin, rhesus macaques of Chinese origin, and Mauritian cynomolgus macaques. This comprehensive study demonstrates that there is substantial variability in infection outcome within and among species. Overall, rhesus macaques have faster rates of disease progression, more lung, lymph node, and extrapulmonary involvement, and higher bacterial burdens than Chinese cynomolgus macaques. The small cohort of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques assessed here indicates that this species is more similar to rhesus than to "Chinese" cynomolgus macaques in terms of M. tuberculosis infection outcome. These data provide insights into the differences among species, providing valuable data to the field for assessing macaque studies of TB. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Evaluation of a technetium-99m labeled bombesin homodimer for GRPR imaging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zilin; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Ananias, Hildo J K; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Liu, Shuang; Helfrich, Wijnand; Wang, Fan; de Jong, Igle J; Elsinga, Philip H

    2013-02-01

    Multimerization of peptides can improve the binding characteristics of the tracer by increasing local ligand concentration and decreasing dissociation kinetics. In this study, a new bombesin homodimer was developed based on an ε-aminocaproic acid-bombesin(7-14) (Aca-bombesin(7-14)) fragment, which has been studied for targeting the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in prostate cancer. The bombesin homodimer was conjugated to 6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC) and labeled with (99m)Tc for SPECT imaging. The in vitro binding affinity to GRPR, cell uptake, internalization and efflux kinetics of the radiolabeled bombesin dimer were investigated in the GRPR-expressing human prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Biodistribution and the GRPR-targeting potential were evaluated in PC-3 tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. When compared with the bombesin monomer, the binding affinity of the bombesin dimer is about ten times lower. However, the (99m)Tc labeled bombesin dimer showed a three times higher cellular uptake at 4 h after incubation, but similar internalization and efflux characters in vitro. Tumor uptake and in vivo pharmacokinetics in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice were comparable. The tumor was visible on the dynamic images in the first hour and could be clearly distinguished from non-targeted tissues on the static images after 4 h. The GRPR-targeting ability of the (99m)Tc labeled bombesin dimer was proven in vitro and in vivo. This bombesin homodimer provides a good starting point for further studies on enhancing the tumor targeting activity of bombesin multimers.

  6. Muscle dimensions in the Japanese macaque hand.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Oishi, Motoharu

    2012-10-01

    Macaques have been used as an important paradigm for understanding the neural control mechanisms of human precision grip capabilities. Therefore, we dissected the forearms and hands of two male Japanese macaques to systematically record the muscle mass, fascicle length and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA). Comparisons of the mass fractions and PCSA fractions of the hand musculature among the Japanese macaque, chimpanzee, and human demonstrated that the sizes of the thenar and hypothenar eminence muscle groups are more balanced in the macaque and chimpanzee, but those of the thenar eminence group are much larger in the human, indicating that the capacity to generate force at the tip of the thumb is more restricted in macaques, despite their high manual dexterity. In the macaque, however, the extrinsic flexor muscles are much larger, possibly to facilitate weight bearing by the forelimbs in pronograde quadrupedal locomotion and forceful grasping of arboreal supports in gap-crossing movements such as leaping. Taking such anatomical differences imposed on the hand musculoskeletal system into consideration seems to be an important method of clarifying the mechanisms of precision grip in macaques.

  7. Air sacculitis in three rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and one Japanese macaque (M. fuscata).

    PubMed

    Cullin, Cassandra O; Colgin, Lois M A; Lewis, Anne D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial infection of the laryngeal air sacs (air sacculitis) is infrequently reported in nonhuman primates, where it leads to chronic respiratory disease. It is particularly uncommon in macaques; however, we report here suppurative air sacculitis with extension to adjacent cervical tissues in three rhesus macaques and one Japanese macaque. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., and an anaerobic bacterium were isolated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Macaque-human interactions and the societal perceptions of macaques in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Sha, John Chih Mun; Gumert, Michael D; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Chan, Sharon; Fuentes, Agustín

    2009-10-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human-macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human-macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows people

  9. Claudin-2 Forms Homodimers and Is a Component of a High Molecular Weight Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Mitic, Laura L.; Anderson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions are multiprotein complexes that form the fundamental physiologic and anatomic barrier between epithelial and endothelial cells, yet little information is available about their molecular organization. To begin to understand how the transmembrane proteins of the tight junction are organized into multiprotein complexes, we used blue native-PAGE (BN-PAGE) and cross-linking techniques to identify complexes extracted from MDCK II cells and mouse liver. In nonionic detergent extracts from MDCK II cells, the tight junction integral membrane protein claudin-2 was preferentially isolated as a homodimer, whereas claudin-4 was monomeric. Analysis of the interactions between chimeras of claudin-2 and -4 are consistent with the transmembrane domains of claudin-2 being responsible for dimerization, and mutational analysis followed by cross-linking indicated that the second transmembrane domains were arranged in close proximity in homodimers. BN-PAGE of mouse liver membrane identified a relatively discrete high molecular weight complex containing at least claudin-1, claudin-2, and occludin; the difference in the protein complex sizes between cultured cells and tissues may reflect differences in tight junction protein or lipid composition or post-translational modifications. Our results suggest that BN-PAGE may be a useful tool in understanding tight junction structure. PMID:21098027

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies on the uridine homodimer radical anions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeon Jae; Storoniak, Piotr; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H; Rak, Janusz

    2012-11-28

    We report the photoelectron spectrum (PES) of the homogeneous dimer anion radical of uridine, (rU)(2)(●-). It features a broad band consisting of an onset of ∼1.2 eV and a maximum at the electron binding energy (EBE) ranging from 2.0 to 2.5 eV. Calculations performed at the B3LYP∕6-31++G∗∗ level of theory suggest that the PES is dominated by dimeric radical anions in which one uridine nucleoside, hosting the excess charge on the base moiety, forms hydrogen bonds via its O8 atom with hydroxyl of the other neutral nucleoside's ribose. The calculated adiabatic electron affinities (AEAGs) and vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of the most stable homodimers show an excellent agreement with the experimental values. The anionic complexes consisting of two intermolecular uracil-uracil hydrogen bonds appeared to be substantially less stable than the uracil-ribose dimers. Despite the fact that uracil-uracil anionic homodimers are additionally stabilized by barrier-free electron-induced proton transfer, their relative thermodynamic stabilities and the calculated VDEs suggest that they do not contribute to the experimental PES spectrum of (rU)(2)(●-).

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies on the uridine homodimer radical anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jae Ko, Yeon; Storoniak, Piotr; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Rak, Janusz

    2012-11-01

    We report the photoelectron spectrum (PES) of the homogeneous dimer anion radical of uridine, (rU)2•-. It features a broad band consisting of an onset of ˜1.2 eV and a maximum at the electron binding energy (EBE) ranging from 2.0 to 2.5 eV. Calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-31++G** level of theory suggest that the PES is dominated by dimeric radical anions in which one uridine nucleoside, hosting the excess charge on the base moiety, forms hydrogen bonds via its O8 atom with hydroxyl of the other neutral nucleoside's ribose. The calculated adiabatic electron affinities (AEAGs) and vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of the most stable homodimers show an excellent agreement with the experimental values. The anionic complexes consisting of two intermolecular uracil-uracil hydrogen bonds appeared to be substantially less stable than the uracil-ribose dimers. Despite the fact that uracil-uracil anionic homodimers are additionally stabilized by barrier-free electron-induced proton transfer, their relative thermodynamic stabilities and the calculated VDEs suggest that they do not contribute to the experimental PES spectrum of (rU)2•-.

  12. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability.

  13. Tonkean macaques communicate with their right hand.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Hélène; Fizet, Jonas; Vauclair, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    There are two conflicting hypotheses to explain the origins of language. Vocal origin theory states that language results from the gradual evolution of animals' vocal communication, but gestural origin theory considers that language evolved from gestures, with the initial left-hemispheric control of manual gestures gradually encompassing vocalizations. To contribute to this debate, we investigated functional hemispheric specialization related to hand biases when grasping or showing an object through manual gesture in Tonkean macaques. The results of this study, the first quantitative study on Tonkean macaques' handedness, showed a remarkable convergence of the Tonkean macaques' handedness patterns with those of baboons and human infants, with hand preferences for manual communicative gestures significantly favoring the use of the right hand. Our findings support the hypothesis that left hemispheric lateralization for language is derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of macaques, baboons and humans.

  14. Sexual partner preference in female Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Paul L

    2002-02-01

    Whether animals ever exhibit a preference for same-sex sexual partners is a subject of debate. Japanese macaques represent excellent models for examining issues related to sexual preference in animals because females, in certain populations, routinely engage in both heterosexual and homosexual behavior over the course of their life spans. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that female homosexual behavior in Japanese macaques is a sexual behavior, not a sociosexual one. Additional evidence indicates that female Japanese macaques do not engage in homosexual behavior simply because acceptable male mates are unavailable or unmotivated to copulate. Patterns of sexual partner choice by female Japanese macaques that are the focus of intersexual competition indicate that females of this species choose same-sex sexual partners even when they are simultaneously presented with a motivated, opposite-sex alternative. Thus, in some populations of Japanese macaques, females prefer certain same-sex sexual partners relative to certain male mates, and vice versa. Taken together, this evidence suggests that female Japanese macaques are best characterized as bisexual in orientation, not preferentially homosexual or preferentially heterosexual.

  15. The ischial callosities of Sulawesi macaques.

    PubMed

    Juliandi, Berry; Suryobroto, Bambang; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah

    2009-12-01

    Sulawesi island has a high level of endemism, including the seven species of monkey from the genus Macaca (macaques). These monkeys have a pair of sitting pads, termed ischial callosities that have diverse shapes and previously were described verbally only. Although useful, these verbal descriptions cannot fully describe shape variation and are somewhat subjective, and cannot directly be used to analyze relationships among species. Here, we report a quantitative analysis of shape of Sulawesi macaque ischial callosities using geometric morphometric tools to optimally describe shape variation and objectively reconstruct general pattern of callosity shapes. By quantification of shape variation, we compare the relationships of each Sulawesi macaque species with each other and with the two geographically neighboring macaque species, M. nemestrina and M. fascicularis, by consensus coordinates of the callosity outlines. The Sulawesi macaques have a wider degree of variation compared with M. fascicularis and M. nemestrina; variation exists in the dorsal part and in the bending of the callosity. There are three general types of callosity shape in Sulawesi macaques: oval without bending (M. tonkeana and M. maurus), oval with outward bending (M. ochreata and M. brunnescens), and oval or reniform with inward bending (M. hecki, M. nigrescens, and M. nigra). These types are congruent with their geographical distribution. The pathway of shape change may have started from oval without bending in the center and the southern peninsula, to outward bending in the southeastern species, and to oval or reniform with inward bending in the northern species.

  16. Pancreatic ectasia in uremic macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, R. T.; Strauss, W.; Wheeler, W.

    1982-01-01

    Pancreatic ectasia (PE) is a common incidental finding in people dying from uremia. It has been described as dilatation of acini, inspissation of secretions, and proliferation of ductal cells. PE occurred in 17 macaques, 11 of which were known to have been uremic. The lesion was studied by light and electronmicroscopy and histochemistry and by construction of a three-dimensional model of a dilated acinar ductal system from serial semithick Epon sections. Atrophic acinar cells interspersed with clumps of centroacinar cells lined all portions of the system. There was no evidence of ductular proliferation. Fibrillar material was present in the dilated acinar lumens and associated with epithelial cells and leukocytes, but no blockage of the system was demonstrated. The lesion is similar to those induced by a variety of experimental procedures and to the pancreatic lesions of cystic fibrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6175218

  17. Spectral-luminescent and photochemical characteristics of homodimers of the styrylcyanine dye Sbt in solutions.

    PubMed

    Kurtaliev, Eldar N

    2011-10-15

    The influence of concentration, solvent nature on the intermolecular interaction and its spectroscopic manifestations in solutions of styrylcyanine dye Sbt ((E)-2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-3-ium iodide) and its homodimers, i.e. dyes with two interconnected chromophores, was studied. It was found out that, depending on the concentration, the structure of dye molecules, the nature of the solvent various forms of associated molecules are forms; each of these forms is manifested in the spectra of absorption and fluorescence in its own way. It is shown that the intensity of the main absorption band of the studied dyes in aqueous solutions and in a mixture of water+ethanol decreases in the process of light irradiation and a new band is observed in the region of shorter wavelengths; the intensity of the new band increases with increase of radiation exposure of solutions.

  18. The PRiMA-linked Cholinesterase Tetramers Are Assembled from Homodimers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Vicky P.; Xie, Heidi Q.; Chan, Wallace K. B.; Leung, K. Wing; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Bon, Suzanne; Massoulié, Jean; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is anchored onto cell membranes by the transmembrane protein PRiMA (proline-rich membrane anchor) as a tetrameric globular form that is prominently expressed in vertebrate brain. In parallel, the PRiMA-linked tetrameric butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is also found in the brain. A single type of AChE-BChE hybrid tetramer was formed in cell cultures by co-transfection of cDNAs encoding AChET and BChET with proline-rich attachment domain-containing proteins, PRiMA I, PRiMA II, or a fragment of ColQ having a C-terminal GPI addition signal (QN-GPI). Using AChE and BChE mutants, we showed that AChE-BChE hybrids linked with PRiMA or QN-GPI always consist of AChET and BChET homodimers. The dimer formation of AChET and BChET depends on the catalytic domains, and the assembly of tetramers with a proline-rich attachment domain-containing protein requires the presence of C-terminal “t-peptides” in cholinesterase subunits. Our results indicate that PRiMA- or ColQ-linked cholinesterase tetramers are assembled from AChET or BChET homodimers. Moreover, the PRiMA-linked AChE-BChE hybrids occur naturally in chicken brain, and their expression increases during development, suggesting that they might play a role in cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:20566626

  19. An aerosol challenge model of tuberculosis in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, S. A.; White, A. D.; Sibley, L.; Gleeson, F.; Hall, G. A.; Basaraba, R. J.; McIntyre, A.; Clark, S. O.; Gooch, K.; Marsh, P. D.; Williams, A.; Dennis, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background New interventions for tuberculosis are urgently needed. Non-human primate (NHP) models provide the most relevant pre-clinical models of human disease and play a critical role in vaccine development. Models utilising Asian cynomolgus macaque populations are well established but the restricted genetic diversity of the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques may be of added value. Methods Mauritian cynomolgus macaques were exposed to a range of doses of M. tuberculosis delivered by aerosol, and the outcome was assessed using clinical, imaging and pathology-based measures. Results All macaques developed characteristic clinical signs and disease features of tuberculosis (TB). Disease burden and the ability to control disease were dependent on exposure dose. Mauritian cynomolgus macaques showed less variation in pulmonary disease burden and total gross pathology scores within exposure dose groups than either Indian rhesus macaques or Chinese cynomolgus macaques Conclusions The genetic homogeneity of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques makes them a potentially useful model of human tuberculosis. PMID:28273087

  20. Unique Pattern of Enzootic Primate Viruses in Gibraltar Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A.; Pizarro, Mark; Shaw, Eric; Cortes, John; Fuentes, Agustin; Barry, Peter; Lerche, Nicholas; Grant, Richard; Cohn, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Because Gibraltar's macaques (Macaca sylvanus) have frequent contact with humans, we assayed 79 macaques for antibodies to enzootic primate viruses. All macaques were seronegative for herpesvirus B, simian T-cell lymphotropic virus, simian retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and rhesus cytomegalovirus. Seroprevalence of simian foamy virus reached 88% among adult animals. PMID:18598634

  1. NFATc2 recruits cJun homodimers to an NFAT site to synergistically activate interleukin-2 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Ryan D.; Drullinger, Linda F.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of interleukin-2 (IL-2), a pivotal cytokine in the mammalian immune response, is induced by NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional activators in stimulated T cells. NFATc2 and cJun drive high levels of synergistic human IL-2 transcription, which requires a unique interaction between the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 and cJun homodimers. Here we studied the mechanism by which this interaction contributes to synergistic activation of IL-2 transcription. We found that NFATc2 can recruit cJun homodimers to the −45 NFAT element, which lacks a neighboring AP-1 site. The bZip domain of cJun is sufficient to interact with the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 in the absence of DNA and this interaction is inhibited by AP-1 DNA. When the −45 NFAT site was replaced by either a NFAT/AP-1 composite site or a single AP-1 site the specificity for cJun homodimers in synergistically activating IL-2 transcription was lost, and cJun/cFos heterodimers strongly activated transcription. These studies support a model in which IL-2 transcriptional synergy is mediated by the unique recruitment of a cJun homodimer to the −45 NFAT site by NFATc2, where it acts as a co-activator for IL-2 transcription. PMID:23665382

  2. Heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits have different paracrine action in the modulation of luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, A.J.W.; Dahl, K.D.; Vaughan, J.; Tucker, E.; Rivier, J.; Bardin, C.W.; Vale, W.

    1987-07-01

    Inhibin, a gonadal hormone capable of preferential suppression of pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion, has recently been purified. The major form of this protein is an ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer encoded by two separate genes. In contrast to the FSH-suppressing action of the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer, the ..beta beta.. homodimer stimulates FSH secretion. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-secreting pituitary cells and gonadal androgen-producing cells have long been shown to form a closed-loop feedback axis. Based on recent studies demonstrated the FSH stimulation of inhibin biosynthesis by ovarian granulosa and testis Sertoli cells, an additional closed-loop feedback axis exists between pituitary FSH- and gonadal inhibin-producing cells. Because uncharacterized Sertoli cell factors have been suggested to either stimulate or inhibit androgen production by testicular Leydig cells, the authors have tested the intragonadal paracrine actions of heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits. In primary cultures of testis cells, the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer of inhibin enhances Leydig cell androgen biosynthesis stimulated by LH, whereas the ..beta beta.. homodimer suppresses androgen production. The data indicate that the inhibin-related gene products synthesized by Sertoli and granulosa cells may form heterodimers or homodimers to serve as intragonadal paracrine signals in the modulation of LH-stimulated androgen biosynthesis and allow cross-communication between the two feedback loops.

  3. COUP-TF II homodimers are formed in preference to heterodimers with RXR alpha or TR beta in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, A J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor (COUP-TF) represses the transcriptional activity of a number of nuclear receptors, including that of retinoid receptors (RAR and RXR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR). Since COUP-TF is capable of binding to DNA in vitro either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with RXR or TR, it has not been possible to distinguish between competitive DNA binding and heterodimer formation as a mechanism to account for the repression. Using a two-hybrid system we have investigated the dimerisation properties of COUP-TF II in intact cells. In conditions where COUP-TF II homodimers and RXR alpha-RAR alpha heterodimers were formed we were unable to detect the formation of heterodimers between COUP-TF II and RXR alpha. Moreover, we were unable to detect an interaction between COUP-TF II and RXR alpha on DNA. Similarly COUP-TF II homodimers and RXR alpha-TR beta heterodimers are favoured over COUP-TF II-TR beta heterodimers. We conclude that the formation of functionally inactive heterodimers is unlikely to represent a general mechanism by which COUP-TF represses the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors and favour a model in which repression is mediated by COUP-TF homodimers competing for binding to DNA. Images PMID:7479078

  4. A stable double-stranded DNA-ethidium homodimer complex: Application to picogram fluorescence detection of DNA in agarose gels

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA ); Peck, K. )

    1990-05-01

    The complex between double-stranded DNA and ethidium homodimer (5,5{prime}-diazadecamethylene)bis(3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridinium) cation, formed at a ratio of 1 homodimer per 4 or 5 base pairs, is stable in agarose gels under the usual conditions for electrophoresis. This unusual stability allows formation of the complex before electrophoresis and then separation and detection in the absence of background stain. Competition experiments between the performed DNA-ethidium homodimer complex and a 50-fold molar excess of unlabeled DNA show that approximately one-third of the dye is retained within the original complex independent of the duration of the competition. However, dye-extraction experiments show that these are not covalent complexes. After electrophoretic separation, detection of bands containing 25 pg of DNA was readily achieved in 1-mm thick agarose gels with laser excitation at 488 nm and a scanning confocal fluorescence imaging system. The band intensity was linear with the amount of DNA applied from 0.2 to 1.0 ng per lane and with the number of kilobase pairs (kbp) per band within a lane. Analysis of an aliquot of a polymerase-chain-reaction mixture permitted ready detection of 80 pg of a 1.6-kbp amplified fragment. The use of the ethidium homodimer complex together with laser excitation for DNA detection on gels is at least two orders of magnitude more sensitive than conventional fluorescence-based procedures. The homodimer-DNA complex exemplifies a class of fluorescent probes where the intercalation of dye chromophores in DNA forms a stable, highly fluorescent ensemble.

  5. A stable double-stranded DNA-ethidium homodimer complex: application to picogram fluorescence detection of DNA in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, A N; Peck, K; Mathies, R A

    1990-01-01

    The complex between double-stranded DNA and ethidium homodimer (5,5'-diazadecamethylene)bis(3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridini um) cation, formed at a ratio of 1 homodimer per 4 or 5 base pairs, is stable in agarose gels under the usual conditions for electrophoresis. This unusual stability allows formation of the complex before electrophoresis and then separation and detection in the absence of background stain. Competition experiments between the preformed DNA-ethidium homodimer complex and a 50-fold molar excess of unlabeled DNA show that approximately one-third of the dye is retained within the original complex independent of the duration of the competition. However, dye-extraction experiments show that these are not covalent complexes. After electrophoretic separation, detection of bands containing 25 pg of DNA was readily achieved in 1-mm thick agarose gels with laser excitation at 488 nm and a scanning confocal fluorescence imaging system. The band intensity was linear with the amount of DNA applied from 0.2 to 1.0 ng per lane and with the number of kilobase pairs (kbp) per band within a lane. Analysis of an aliquot of a polymerase-chain-reaction mixture permitted ready detection of 80 pg of a 1.6-kbp amplified fragment. The use of the ethidium homodimer complex together with laser excitation for DNA detection on gels is at least two orders of magnitude more sensitive than conventional fluorescence-based procedures. The homodimer-DNA complex exemplifies a class of fluorescent probes where the intercalation of dye chromophores in DNA forms a stable, highly fluorescent ensemble. Images PMID:2339125

  6. Faces and objects in macaque cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Knutsen, Tamara A; Mandeville, Joseph B; Tootell, Roger B H

    2003-09-01

    How are different object categories organized by the visual system? Current evidence indicates that monkeys and humans process object categories in fundamentally different ways. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that humans have a ventral temporal face area, but such evidence is lacking in macaques. Instead, face-responsive neurons in macaques seem to be scattered throughout temporal cortex, with some relative concentration in the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Here, using fMRI in alert fixating macaque monkeys and humans, we found that macaques do have discrete face-selective patches, similar in relative size and number to face patches in humans. The face patches were embedded within a large swath of object-selective cortex extending from V4 to rostral TE. This large region responded better to pictures of intact objects compared to scrambled objects, with different object categories eliciting different patterns of activity, as in the human. Overall, our results suggest that humans and macaques share a similar brain architecture for visual object processing.

  7. Insect Neuropeptide Bursicon Homodimers Induce Innate Immune and Stress Genes during Molting by Activating the NF-κB Transcription Factor Relish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Gilbert, Lawrence I.; Stanley, David; Song, Qisheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Bursicon is a heterodimer neuropeptide composed of two cystine knot proteins, bursicon α (burs α) and bursicon β (burs β), that elicits cuticle tanning (melanization and sclerotization) through the Drosophila leucine-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor 2 (DLGR2). Recent studies show that both bursicon subunits also form homodimers. However, biological functions of the homodimers have remained unknown until now. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we show in Drosophila melanogaster that both bursicon homodimers induced expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in neck-ligated adults following recombinant homodimer injection and in larvae fat body after incubation with recombinant homodimers. These AMP genes were also up-regulated in 24 h old unligated flies (when the endogenous bursicon level is low) after injection of recombinant homodimers. Up-regulation of AMP genes by the homodimers was accompanied by reduced bacterial populations in fly assay preparations. The induction of AMP expression is via activation of the NF-κB transcription factor Relish in the immune deficiency (Imd) pathway. The influence of bursicon homodimers on immune function does not appear to act through the heterodimer receptor DLGR2, i.e. novel receptors exist for the homodimers. Conclusions/Significance Our results reveal a mechanism of CNS-regulated prophylactic innate immunity during molting via induced expression of genes encoding AMPs and genes of the Turandot family. Turandot genes are also up-regulated by a broader range of extreme insults. From these data we infer that CNS-generated bursicon homodimers mediate innate prophylactic immunity to both stress and infection during the vulnerable molting cycle. PMID:22470576

  8. Comparative Pathobiology of Macaque Lymphocryptoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G

    2008-01-01

    Lymphocryptoviruses (LCVs) have been identified as naturally occurring infections of both Old and New World nonhuman primates. These viruses are closely related to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, Human herpesvirus 4) and share similar genomic organization and biological properties. Nonhuman primate LCVs have the ability to immortalize host cells and express a similar complement of viral lytic and latent genes as those found in EBV. Recent evidence indicates that nonhuman primate LCVs can immortalize B cells from genetically related species, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between these viruses and their respective hosts. Early work with EBV in tamarins and owl monkeys revealed that cross species transmission of lymphocryptoviruses from the natural to inadvertent host may be associated with oncogenesis and the development of malignant lymphoma. Moreover, simian LCVs have the ability to induce malignant lymphomas in immunodeficient hosts and have been associated with posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease in cynomolgus macaques undergoing solid organ transplantation. This review will focus on the comparative pathobiology of lymphocryptoviral infection and discuss the derivation of specific pathogen-free animals. PMID:19793458

  9. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Erin A.; Olson, Carl R.

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system. PMID:26067532

  10. Ambiguity aversion in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Benjamin Y; Heilbronner, Sarah R; Platt, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    People generally prefer risky options, which have fully specified outcome probabilities, to ambiguous options, which have unspecified probabilities. This preference, formalized in economics, is strong enough that people will reliably prefer a risky option to an ambiguous option with a greater expected value. Explanations for ambiguity aversion often invoke uniquely human faculties like language, self-justification, or a desire to avoid public embarrassment. Challenging these ideas, here we demonstrate that a preference for unambiguous options is shared with rhesus macaques. We trained four monkeys to choose between pairs of options that both offered explicitly cued probabilities of large and small juice outcomes. We then introduced occasional trials where one of the options was obscured and examined their resulting preferences; we ran humans in a parallel experiment on a nearly identical task. We found that monkeys reliably preferred risky options to ambiguous ones, even when this bias was costly, closely matching the behavior of humans in the analogous task. Notably, ambiguity aversion varied parametrically with the extent of ambiguity. As expected, ambiguity aversion gradually declined as monkeys learned the underlying probability distribution of rewards. These data indicate that ambiguity aversion reflects fundamental cognitive biases shared with other animals rather than uniquely human factors guiding decisions.

  11. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-06-14

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  12. Medical termination of pregnancy in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Micks, Elizabeth; Shekell, Taylor; Stanley, Jessica; Zelinski, Mary; Martin, Lauren Drew; Riefenberg, Serena; Adevai, Tiffany; Jensen, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Although pregnancy is expected during studies of novel contraceptives in nonhuman primates, gestation, delivery and lactation remove females from groups for prolonged intervals. Since the macaque cervix does not facilitate transcervical surgical termination of pregnancy, we sought to establish a medical termination protocol. Methods A descriptive case-series of outcomes of medical termination of pregnancy up to 32 days gestation in cynomolgus monkeys. Efficacy and time to uterine resolution were determined according to medication, dose, and route of administration. Results 37 macaques underwent 65 medical terminations. Over 80% of animals terminated after initial treatment with mifepristone 20 mg intramuscularly (IM). Intrafetal methotrexate was effective for salvage treatment. Medical termination regimens were less effective for animals receiving investigational contraceptive agents. Conclusions Medical termination for macaques is safe and effective. We recommend a protocol with mifepristone 20 mg IM and misoprostol 200 mcg buccally as initial treatment. PMID:23078537

  13. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  14. Regulation of the PI3K pathway through a p85α monomer–homodimer equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Lydia WT; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Besong, Tabot MD; Guo, Huifang; Hawke, David H; Arold, Stefan T; Mills, Gordon B

    2015-01-01

    The canonical action of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is to associate with the p110α catalytic subunit to allow stimuli-dependent activation of the PI3K pathway. We elucidate a p110α-independent role of homodimerized p85α in the positive regulation of PTEN stability and activity. p110α-free p85α homodimerizes via two intermolecular interactions (SH3:proline-rich region and BH:BH) to selectively bind unphosphorylated activated PTEN. As a consequence, homodimeric but not monomeric p85α suppresses the PI3K pathway by protecting PTEN from E3 ligase WWP2-mediated proteasomal degradation. Further, the p85α homodimer enhances the lipid phosphatase activity and membrane association of PTEN. Strikingly, we identified cancer patient-derived oncogenic p85α mutations that target the homodimerization or PTEN interaction surface. Collectively, our data suggest the equilibrium of p85α monomer–dimers regulates the PI3K pathway and disrupting this equilibrium could lead to disease development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06866.001 PMID:26222500

  15. Halogen transfer through halogen bonds in halogen-bound ammonia homodimers.

    PubMed

    Crugeiras, Juan; Ríos, Ana

    2016-11-16

    Ab initio MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out to investigate the halogen transfer between haloamines and ammonia. The results show that the formation of a halogen bond complex between ammonia and the protonated N-haloamine is a preliminary step in the halogen transfer process. The complexation energies, optimized geometries, topology of electron density and potential energy surfaces for halogen transfer in these complexes have been analysed. It has been found that halogen-bound ammonia homodimers ([H3NXNH3](+), with X = Cl, Br, I) formed by interaction between NH3 and H3NX(+) are symmetric, and energetically more stable than the corresponding complexes formed between NH3 and H2NX. Calculated potential energy surfaces for the transfer of the central halogen atom between the two NH3 units in [H3NXNH3](+) show single well and double well potentials for short and large N-N distances, respectively. The particular case of fluorine complexes has also been analysed. The results provide an explanation for some of the experimental facts observed for halogen transfer reactions between amines in aqueous solution.

  16. Optical determination of the electronic coupling and intercalation geometry of thiazole orange homodimer in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Bricker, William P.; Díaz, Sebastián A.; Medintz, Igor L.; Bathe, Mark; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2017-08-01

    Sequence-selective bis-intercalating dyes exhibit large increases in fluorescence in the presence of specific DNA sequences. This property makes this class of fluorophore of particular importance to biosensing and super-resolution imaging. Here we report ultrafast transient anisotropy measurements of resonance energy transfer (RET) between thiazole orange (TO) molecules in a complex formed between the homodimer TOTO and double-stranded (ds) DNA. Biexponential homo-RET dynamics suggest two subpopulations within the ensemble: 80% intercalated and 20% non-intercalated. Based on the application of the transition density cube method to describe the electronic coupling and Monte Carlo simulations of the TOTO/dsDNA geometry, the dihedral angle between intercalated TO molecules is estimated to be 81° ± 5°, corresponding to a coupling strength of 45 ± 22 cm-1. Dye intercalation with this geometry is found to occur independently of the underlying DNA sequence, despite the known preference of TOTO for the nucleobase sequence CTAG. The non-intercalated subpopulation is inferred to have a mean inter-dye separation distance of 19 Å, corresponding to coupling strengths between 0 and 25 cm-1. This information is important to enable the rational design of energy transfer systems that utilize TOTO as a relay dye. The approach used here is generally applicable to determining the electronic coupling strength and intercalation configuration of other dimeric bis-intercalators.

  17. ABCG2 membrane transporter in mature human erythrocytes is exclusively homodimer.

    PubMed

    Leimanis, Mara L; Georges, Elias

    2007-03-09

    The human ABCG2 protein, a member of ABC transporter family, was shown to transport anti-cancer drugs and normal cell metabolites. Earlier studies have demonstrated the expression of ABCG2 in hematopoietic stem cells and erythroid cells; however little is known about the expression and activity of ABCG2 in mature erythrocytes. In this report, we show that ABCG2 in mature human erythrocytes migrates with an apparent molecular mass of 140 kDa, under reducing conditions, on Fairbanks SDS gel system. In contrast, tumor cells expressing higher levels of ABCG2 show no detectable homodimers, when resolved under identical reducing conditions. Analysis of the same membrane extracts from tumor cells and human erythrocytes on Laemmli SDS gel system, where samples are boiled in the presence of increasing concentrations of disulfide reducing conditions and then analyzed, migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 70 kDa or a monomer. Drug transport studies using Pheophorbide A, a substrate of ABCG2, show the protein to be active in erythrocytes. Furthermore, Fumitremorgin C, a specific inhibitor of ABCG2 increases the accumulation of Pheophorbide A in erythrocytes and drug-resistant cells but not in the parental drug-sensitive cells. Given the ability of ABCG2 to transport protoprophyrin IX or heme, these findings may have implications on the normal function of erythrocytes.

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel splice variant of rhesus macaque MHC IA.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zhang, Xi-He; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2013-03-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules play a pivotal role in the immune recognition to intracellular pathogens. A number of important splice variants have already been characterized for these molecules in different species, suggesting their important roles in modulation of immune responses. In this study, we have identified and characterized a novel alternatively spliced form of rhesus macaque MHC IA (designated MHC IA-sv2) that lacks exons coding for the α2 and α3 domains. Despite lacking the α2 and α3 domains, MHC IA-sv2 is targeted to the cell surface, as a 23-kDa glycoprotein that is totally susceptible to endoglycosidase-H digestion and is reduced to 18kDa after deglycosylation with PNGase F. In contrast, the full-length MHC IA reaches the cell surface as a 43-kDa protein of form with complex-type N-glycosylation (endoglycosidase-H resistant). Moreover, we provide evidence here that MHC IA-sv2 can self-associate, forming homodimers, or associate with the fully mature MHC IA molecule, forming a heterodimeric structure in mammalian cells. These data demonstrate that the formation of heterodimers may have some functional implications in the fine tuning of MHC IA-mediated innate and adaptive immune responses.

  19. Personality structure and social style in macaques.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark James; Majolo, Bonaventura; Ostner, Julia; Schülke, Oliver; De Marco, Arianna; Thierry, Bernard; Engelhardt, Antje; Widdig, Anja; Gerald, Melissa S; Weiss, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Why regularities in personality can be described with particular dimensions is a basic question in differential psychology. Nonhuman primates can also be characterized in terms of personality structure. Comparative approaches can help reveal phylogenetic constraints and social and ecological patterns associated with the presence or absence of specific personality dimensions. We sought to determine how different personality structures are related to interspecific variation in social style. Specifically, we examined this question in 6 different species of macaques, because macaque social style is well characterized and can be categorized on a spectrum of despotic (Grade 1) versus tolerant (Grade 4) social styles. We derived personality structures from adjectival ratings of Japanese (Macaca fuscata; Grade 1), Assamese (M. assamensis; Grade 2), Barbary (M. sylvanus; Grade 3), Tonkean (M. tonkeana; Grade 4), and crested (M. nigra; Grade 4) macaques and compared these species with rhesus macaques (M. mulatta; Grade 1) whose personality was previously characterized. Using a nonparametric method, fuzzy set analysis, to identify commonalities in personality dimensions across species, we found that all but 1 species exhibited consistently defined Friendliness and Openness dimensions, but that similarities in personality dimensions capturing aggression and social competence reflect similarities in social styles. These findings suggest that social and phylogenetic relationships contribute to the origin, maintenance, and diversification of personality.

  20. Camptomelia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hopper, Kelly; Morales, Pablo; Garcia, Anapatricia; Wagner, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    An 8.5-mo-old female rhesus macaque was examined for an apparent lump on the right arm, below the elbow. The macaque showed no signs of pain or discomfort. Examination revealed that the lump was actually a bend in the forearm. Radiography demonstrated that some of the long bones of the animal were bowed. Differential diagnoses included rickets, hyperparathyroidism, pseudohyperparathyroidism, and a growth dysplasia. No other similar abnormalities in animals from that cage or any other enclosure in our large colony were observed. Blood chemistries and a complete hemogram were within normal limits for a macaque of this age. Serum was submitted for a vitamin D profile that included assays for parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and ionized calcium. Serum samples from sex- and age-matched normal controls were sent for comparison and to establish a baseline profile. The affected animal had vitamin D levels comparable to unaffected controls. Bone biopsies appeared normal for a macaque of this age. Fluorine levels in the drinking water supply were within acceptable limits. Consistent with the information available, a diagnosis of idiopathic camptomelia, or bowing of the long bones, was made. In humans, developmental camptomelia is associated with several bone dysplasias in infants and children. These conditions are thought to be caused by genetic mutations in enzymes or transcription factors that control development of the epiphyses and are almost always associated with other lethal and nonlethal developmental abnormalities.

  1. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Anders A; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2002-10-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. The receptor is believed to exist as a homodimer due to covalent and non-covalent interactions between the two amino terminal domains (ATDs). It is well established that agonist binding to family C receptors takes place at the ATD and that this causes the ATD dimer to twist. However, very little is known about the translation of the ATD dimer twist into G-protein coupling to the 7 transmembrane moieties (7TMs) of these receptor dimers. In this study we have attempted to delineate the agonist-induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations. Stable and highly receptor-specific BRET signals were obtained in tsA cells transfected with Rluc- and GFP2-tagged CaRs under basal conditions, indicating that CaR is constitutively dimerized. However, the signals were not enhanced by the presence of agonist. These results could indicate that at least parts of the two 7TMs of the CaR homodimer are in close proximity in the inactivated state of the receptor and do not move much relative to one another upon agonist activation. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the BRET technology is unable to register putative conformational changes in the CaR homodimer induced by agonist binding because of the bulk sizes of the Rluc and GFP2 molecules.

  2. Native Serotonin 5-HT2C Receptors Are Expressed as Homodimers on the Apical Surface of Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grinde, Ellinor; Lindsley, Tara; Teitler, Milt; Mancia, Filippo; Cowan, Ann; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a prominent class of plasma membrane proteins that regulate physiologic responses to a wide variety of stimuli and therapeutic agents. Although GPCR oligomerization has been studied extensively in recombinant cells, it remains uncertain whether native receptors expressed in their natural cellular environment are monomers, dimers, or oligomers. The goal of this study was to determine the monomer/oligomer status of a native GPCR endogenously expressed in its natural cellular environment. Native 5-HT2C receptors in choroid plexus epithelial cells were evaluated using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with photon counting histogram (PCH). An anti–5-HT2C fragment antigen binding protein was used to label native 5-HT2C receptors. A known monomeric receptor (CD-86) served as a control for decoding the oligomer status of native 5-HT2C receptors by molecular brightness analysis. FCS with PCH revealed molecular brightness values for native 5-HT2C receptors equivalent to the molecular brightness of a homodimer. 5-HT2C receptors displayed a diffusion coefficient of 5 × 10−9 cm2/s and were expressed at 32 receptors/μm2 on the apical surface of choroid plexus epithelial cells. The functional significance and signaling capabilities of the homodimer were investigated in human embryonic kidney 293 cells using agonists that bind in a wash-resistant manner to one or both protomers of the homodimer. Whereas agonist binding to one protomer resulted in G protein activation, maximal stimulation required occupancy of both protomers. This study is the first to demonstrate the homodimeric structure of 5-HT2C receptors endogenously expressed in their native cellular environment, and identifies the homodimer as a functional signaling unit. PMID:25609374

  3. Apelin receptor homodimer-oligomers revealed by single-molecule imaging and novel G protein-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Bai, Bo; Zhang, Rumin; Wang, Chunmei; Chen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The apelin receptor (APJ) belongs to family A of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and is a potential pharmacotherapeutic target for heart failure, hypertension, and other cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence APJ heterodimerizes with other GPCRs; however, the existence of APJ homodimers and oligomers remains to be investigated. Here, we measured APJ monomer-homodimer-oligomer interconversion by monitoring APJ dynamically on cells and compared their proportions, spatial arrangement, and mobility using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, resonance energy transfer, and proximity biotinylation. In cells with <0.3 receptor particles/μm2, approximately 60% of APJ molecules were present as dimers or oligomers. APJ dimers were present on the cell surface in a dynamic equilibrium with constant formation and dissociation of receptor complexes. Furthermore, we applied interference peptides and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to confirm APJ homo-dimer and explore the dimer-interfaces. Peptides corresponding to transmembrane domain (TMD)1, 2, 3, and 4, but not TMD5, 6, and 7, disrupted APJ dimerization. APJ mutants in TMD1 and TMD2 also decreased bioluminescence resonance energy transfer of APJ dimer. APJ dimerization resulted in novel functional characteristics, such as a distinct G-protein binding profile and cell responses after agonist stimulation. Thus, dimerization may serve as a unique mechanism for fine-tuning APJ-mediated functions. PMID:28091541

  4. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A.

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  5. Resource partitioning in tolerant and intolerant macaques.

    PubMed

    Rebout, Nancy; Desportes, Christine; Thierry, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    The clumped distribution of food resources promotes food defensibility and can lead to the monopolizing of resources by high-ranking individuals. However, the balance of power is set at different levels according to societies, meaning that resource partitioning should vary between them. This study investigates whether dominance asymmetry and resource partitioning are related in non-human primates by comparing two species with contrasting social styles, namely rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) which display strong social intolerance and a steep gradient of dominance, and Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana), which exhibit higher levels of tolerance and more balanced dominance relationships. Study groups were kept in semi-free ranging conditions. Animals were provided with fruit in three different clumped conditions during 30-min trials. We found that higher-ranking rhesus macaques had priority for the access to fruit: these individuals spent longer in the feeding area in the first 10-min period of trials, while lower-ranking individuals had diminished access to fruit under the most clumped condition; this was associated with sustained agonistic interactions. Dominance effects were weaker in Tonkean macaques. They exhibited co-feeding between high- and low-ranking individuals in the first period; there was no significant effect of dominance even in the most clumped condition; and frequencies of agonistic interactions remained moderate relative to the number of individuals present in the feeding area. These results show that food resources were more equitably distributed among group members in tolerant macaques than in their intolerant counterparts. Dominance gradient and social tolerance may be considered as two aspects of the same phenomenon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cholate-solubilized erythrocyte glucose transporters exist as a mixture of homodimers and homotetramers.

    PubMed

    Hebert, D N; Carruthers, A

    1991-05-14

    The molecular size of purified, human erythrocyte glucose transport protein (GLUT1) solubilized in cholic acid was determined by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. GLUT1 purified in the presence of dithiothreitol (GLUT1 + DTT) is resolved as a complex of average Stokes' radius 5.74 nm by SEC. This complex displays D-glucose-inhibitable cytochalasin B binding and, upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, catalyzes cytochalasin B inhibitable D-glucose transport. GLUT1 purified in the absence of dithiothreitol (GLUT1-DTT) is resolved by SEC as at least two particles of average Stokes' radii 5.74 (minor component) and 7.48 nm (major component). Solubilization of GLUT1-DTT in the presence of dithiothreitol reduces the amount of 7.48-nm complex and increases the amount of 5.74-nm complex resolved by SEC. GLUT1-DTT displays D-glucose-inhibitable cytochalasin B binding and, upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, catalyzes cytochalasin B inhibitable D-glucose transport. Sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation of GLUT1 + DTT in cholate resolves GLUT1 into two components of 4.8 and 7.6 S. The 4.8S complex is the major component of GLUT1 + DTT. The reverse profile is observed upon sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation of GLUT1-DTT. SEC of human erythrocyte membrane proteins resolves GLUT1 as a major broad peak of average Stokes' radius 7.48 nm and a minor component of 5.74 nm. Both components are characterized by D-glucose-inhibitable cytochalasin B binding. Purified GLUT1 is associated with approximately 26 tightly bound lipid molecules per monomer of transport protein. These data suggest that purified GLUT1 exists as a mixture of homodimers and homotetramers in cholate-lipid micelles and that the presence of reductant during solubilization favors dimer formation.

  7. Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Engel, Gregory A; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Schillaci, Michael A; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a "monkey forest" (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B.

  8. Human Exposure to Herpesvirus B–Seropositive Macaques, Bali, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A.; Schillaci, Michael A.; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a “monkey forest” (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B. PMID:12141963

  9. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 Å resolution to R work = 16.1% and R free = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 Å, 1.042°, and 0.071°, respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 Å. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 Å. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K+ ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  10. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2009-03-15

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 A resolution to R{sub work} = 16.1% and R{sub free} = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 A, 1.042{sup o}, and 0.071{sup o}, respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 A. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 A. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K{sup +} ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  11. Well-differentiated Liposarcoma in a Bonnet Macaque (Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    Doane, Cynthia J; Johnson, Paula J; Besselsen, David G

    2017-03-01

    Here we describe the occurrence of a subcutaneous liposarcoma in a geriatric bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata). Clinical presentation was a rapidly growing, ulcerated, subcutaneous mass in the umbilical region of a 28-y-old intact female macaque. The mass was successfully removed through excisional biopsy, and histopathology provided a morphologic diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. The macaque recovered without complication and displayed no signs of recurrence for at least 18 mo after excision. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of liposarcoma in a bonnet macaque.

  12. Well-differentiated Liposarcoma in a Bonnet Macaque (Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    J Doane Paula J Johnson And David G Besselsen, Cynthia

    2017-03-20

    Here we describe the occurrence of a subcutaneous liposarcoma in a geriatric bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata). Clinicalpresentation was a rapidly growing, ulcerated, subcutaneous mass in the umbilical region of a 28-y-old intact female macaque. The mass was successfully removed through excisional biopsy, and histopathology provided a morphologic diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. The macaque recovered without complication and displayed no signs of recurrence for at least 18 mo after excision. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of liposarcoma in a bonnet macaque.

  13. MHC class I characterization of Indonesian cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pendley, Chad J.; Becker, Ericka A.; Karl, Julie A.; Blasky, Alex J.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Hughes, Austin L.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; O’Connor, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are quickly becoming a useful model for infectious disease and transplantation research. Even though cynomolgus macaques from different geographic regions are used for these studies, there has been limited characterization of full-length Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I immunogenetics of distinct geographic populations. Here, we identified 48 MHC class I cDNA nucleotide sequences in eleven Indonesian cynomolgus macaques, including 41 novel Mafa-A and Mafa-B sequences. We found seven MHC class I sequences in Indonesian macaques that were identical to MHC class I sequences identified in Malaysian or Mauritian macaques. Sharing of nucleotide sequences between these geographically distinct populations is also consistent with the hypothesis that Indonesia was a source of the Mauritian macaque population. In addition, we found that the Indonesian cDNA sequence Mafa-B*7601 is identical throughout its peptide binding domain to Mamu-B*03, an allele that has been associated with control of SIV viremia in Indian rhesus macaques. Overall, a better understanding of the MHC class I alleles present in Indonesian cynomolgus macaques improves their value as a model for disease research and it better defines the biogeography of cynomolgus macaques throughout Southeast Asia. PMID:18504574

  14. Cooperative Signaling between Homodimers of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 1 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Sevastyanova, Tatyana N.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) function as dimers. Recent work suggests that mGluR1 and mGluR5 may physically interact, but the nature and functional consequences of this relationship have not been addressed. In this study, the functional and pharmacological consequences of this interaction were investigated. Using heterologous expression of mGluR cDNA in rat sympathetic neurons from the superior cervical ganglion and inhibition of the native calcium currents as an assay for receptor activation, a functional interdependence between mGluR1 and mGluR5 was demonstrated. In neurons coexpressing these receptors, combining a selective mGluR1 competitive antagonist with either an mGluR1- or mGluR5-selective negative allosteric modulator (NAM) BAY36-7620 [(3aS,6aS)-hexahydro-5-methylene-6a-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-1H-cyclopenta[c]furan-1-one] or MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride], respectively, strongly occluded signaling by both receptors to an approximately equal degree. By contrast, in cells coexpressing mGluR1 and mGluR2, combining the same mGluR1 competitive inhibitor with an mGluR1 or mGluR2 NAM yielded partial and full inhibition of the response, respectively, as expected for independently acting receptors. In neurons expressing mGluR1 and mGluR5, the selective NAMs each strongly inhibited the response to glutamate, suggesting that these receptors do not interact as heterodimers, which would not be inhibited by selective NAMs. Finally, evidence for a similar mGluR1/mGluR5 functional dependence is shown in medium spiny striatal neurons. Together, these data demonstrate cooperative signaling between mGluR1 and mGluR5 in a manner inconsistent with heterodimerization, and thus suggest an interaction between homodimers. PMID:25113912

  15. Development of Object Concepts in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Scott P.; Price, Tracy A.; Vance, Jayme A.; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    One of the most interesting questions in cognitive development is how we acquire and mentally represent knowledge about objects. We investigated the development of object concepts in macaque monkeys. Monkeys viewed trajectory occlusion movies in which a ball followed a linear path that was occluded for some portion of the display while their point of gaze was recorded with a corneal-reflection eye tracker. We analyzed the pattern of eye movements as an indicator of object representation. A majority of eye movements of adult monkeys were anticipatory, implying a functional internal object representation that guided oculomotor behavior. The youngest monkeys lacked this strong internal representation of objects. Longitudinal testing showed that this ability develops over time providing compelling evidence that object concepts develop similarly in monkeys and humans. Therefore, the macaque monkey provides an animal model with which to examine neural mechanisms underlying the development of object representations. PMID:18335495

  16. Gravity orientation tuning in macaque anterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Kim, Byounghoon; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2016-12-01

    Gravity may provide a ubiquitous allocentric reference to the brain's spatial orientation circuits. Here we describe neurons in the macaque anterior thalamus tuned to pitch and roll orientation relative to gravity, independently of visual landmarks. We show that individual cells exhibit two-dimensional tuning curves, with peak firing rates at a preferred vertical orientation. These results identify a thalamic pathway for gravity cues to influence perception, action and spatial cognition.

  17. Symmetry perception in humans and macaques.

    PubMed

    Beck, Diane M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    The human ability to detect symmetry has been a topic of interest to psychologists and philosophers since the 19th century, yet surprisingly little is known about the neural basis of symmetry perception. In a recent fMRI study, Sasaki and colleagues begin to remedy this situation. By identifying the neural structures that respond to symmetry in both humans and macaques, the authors lay the groundwork for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying symmetry perception.

  18. Characterization of Corynebacterium species in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Jaime; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Marini, Robert P.; Shen, Zeli; Buckley, Ellen M.; Peters, Yaicha; Taylor, Nancy; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Tondella, Maria L.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Corynebacterium are important primary and opportunistic pathogens. Many are zoonotic agents. In this report, phenotypic (API Coryne analysis), genetic (rpoB and 16S rRNA gene sequencing), and physical methods (MS) were used to distinguish the closely related diphtheroid species Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, and to definitively diagnose Corynebacterium renale from cephalic implants of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques used in cognitive neuroscience research. Throat and cephalic implant cultures yielded 85 isolates from 43 macaques. Identification by API Coryne yielded C. ulcerans (n = 74), Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (n = 2), C. renale or most closely related to C. renale (n = 3), and commensals and opportunists (n = 6). The two isolates identified as C. pseudotuberculosis by API Coryne required genetic and MS analysis for accurate characterization as C. ulcerans. Of three isolates identified as C. renale by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only one could be confirmed as such by API Coryne, rpoB gene sequencing and MS. This study emphasizes the importance of adjunct methods in identification of coryneforms and is the first isolation of C. renale from cephalic implants in macaques. PMID:22723254

  19. Serial Cognition and Personality in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Altschul, Drew M.; Terrace, Herbert S.; Weiss, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We examined the associations between serial cognition and personality in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Nine macaques were tested on a simultaneous chaining task to assess their cognitive abilities. They were also rated for personality traits and scored according to a previously extracted six component structure derived from free-ranging rhesus macaques. Friendliness and Openness were positively associated with good performance on three measures of accuracy on the serial learning task: Progress, Error, and Rewarded (i.e., correctly completed) Trials. Faster Reaction Times were associated with lower Friendliness and higher Confidence, as well as higher Openness when only correct responses were analyzed. We also used regularized exploratory factor analysis to extract two, three, four, five, and six factor structures, and found consistent associations between accuracy and single factors within each of these structures. Prior results on intelligence in other nonhuman primate species have focused on basic intelligence tests; this study demonstrates that more complex, abstract cognitive tasks can be used to assess intelligence and personality in nonhuman primates. PMID:27158661

  20. The Ability to Form Homodimers Is Essential for RDM1 to Function in RNA-Directed DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Taku; Lorković, Zdravko J.; Liang, Shih-Chieh; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-01-01

    RDM1 (RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION1) is a small plant-specific protein required for RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). RDM1 interacts with RNA polymerase II (Pol II), ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4), and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE2 (DRM2) and binds to methylated single stranded DNA. As the only protein identified so far that interacts directly with DRM2, RDM1 plays a pivotal role in the RdDM mechanism by linking the de novo DNA methyltransferase activity to AGO4, which binds short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that presumably base-pair with Pol II or Pol V scaffold transcripts synthesized at target loci. RDM1 also acts together with the chromatin remodeler DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION1 (DRD1) and the structural-maintenance-of-chromosomes solo hinge protein DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING3 (DMS3) to form the DDR complex, which facilitates synthesis of Pol V scaffold transcripts. The manner in which RDM1 acts in both the DDR complex and as a factor bridging DRM2 and AGO4 remains unclear. RDM1 contains no known protein domains but a prior structural analysis suggested distinct regions that create a hydrophobic pocket and promote homodimer formation, respectively. We have tested several mutated forms of RDM1 altered in the predicted pocket and dimerization regions for their ability to complement defects in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing, support synthesis of Pol V transcripts, form homodimers, and interact with DMS3. Our results indicate that the ability to form homodimers is essential for RDM1 to function fully in the RdDM pathway and may be particularly important during the de novo methylation step. PMID:24498436

  1. The Asymmetric Binding of PGC-1α to the ERRα and ERRγ Nuclear Receptor Homodimers Involves a Similar Recognition Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Takacs, Maria; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Atkinson, R. Andrew; Roblin, Pierre; Ogi, François-Xavier; Demeler, Borries; Potier, Noelle; Chebaro, Yassmine; Dejaegere, Annick; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Moras, Dino; Billas, Isabelle M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background PGC-1α is a crucial regulator of cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis that functionally acts together with the estrogen-related receptors (ERRα and ERRγ) in the regulation of mitochondrial and metabolic gene networks. Dimerization of the ERRs is a pre-requisite for interactions with PGC-1α and other coactivators, eventually leading to transactivation. It was suggested recently (Devarakonda et al) that PGC-1α binds in a strikingly different manner to ERRγ ligand-binding domains (LBDs) compared to its mode of binding to ERRα and other nuclear receptors (NRs), where it interacts directly with the two ERRγ homodimer subunits. Methods/Principal Findings Here, we show that PGC-1α receptor interacting domain (RID) binds in an almost identical manner to ERRα and ERRγ homodimers. Microscale thermophoresis demonstrated that the interactions between PGC-1α RID and ERR LBDs involve a single receptor subunit through high-affinity, ERR-specific L3 and low-affinity L2 interactions. NMR studies further defined the limits of PGC-1α RID that interacts with ERRs. Consistent with these findings, the solution structures of PGC-1α/ERRα LBDs and PGC-1α/ERRγ LBDs complexes share an identical architecture with an asymmetric binding of PGC-1α to homodimeric ERR. Conclusions/Significance These studies provide the molecular determinants for the specificity of interactions between PGC-1α and the ERRs, whereby negative cooperativity prevails in the binding of the coactivators to these receptors. Our work indicates that allosteric regulation may be a general mechanism controlling the binding of the coactivators to homodimers. PMID:23874451

  2. Different epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligands show distinct kinetics and biased or partial agonism for homodimer and heterodimer formation.

    PubMed

    Macdonald-Obermann, Jennifer L; Pike, Linda J

    2014-09-19

    The EGF receptor has seven different cognate ligands. Previous work has shown that these different ligands are capable of inducing different biological effects, even in the same cell. To begin to understand the molecular basis for this variation, we used luciferase fragment complementation to measure ligand-induced dimer formation and radioligand binding to study the effect of the ligands on subunit-subunit interactions in EGF receptor (EGFR) homodimers and EGFR/ErbB2 heterodimers. In luciferase fragment complementation imaging studies, amphiregulin (AREG) functioned as a partial agonist, inducing only about half as much total dimerization as the other three ligands. However, unlike the other ligands, AREG showed biphasic kinetics for dimer formation, suggesting that its path for EGF receptor activation involves binding to both monomers and preformed dimers. EGF, TGFα, and betacellulin (BTC) appear to mainly stimulate receptor activation through binding to and dimerization of receptor monomers. In radioligand binding assays, EGF and TGFα exhibited increased affinity for EGFR/ErbB2 heterodimers compared with EGFR homodimers. By contrast, BTC and AREG showed a similar affinity for both dimers. Thus, EGF and TGFα are biased agonists, whereas BTC and AREG are balanced agonists with respect to selectivity of dimer formation. These data suggest that the differences in biological response to different EGF receptor ligands may result from partial agonism for dimer formation, differences in the kinetic pathway utilized to generate activated receptor dimers, and biases in the formation of heterodimers versus homodimers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Serotonin-2A homodimers are needed for signalling via both phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C in transfected CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alba; Cimadevila, Marta; Cadavid, María Isabel; Loza, María Isabel; Brea, José

    2017-04-05

    Different ligands differentially activate phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways that are coupled to the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor, a class-A G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor has been shown to be expressed as a homodimer displaying some ligands negative cooperativity between protomers in the PLA2 signalling pathway. We hypothesized that the homodimeric complex is the minimum functional unit required for activation of the PLA2 and PLC pathways by the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor. To investigate this hypothesis, we partially blocked the serotonin 5-HT2A receptors with ritanserin and measured PLA2 and PLC activity simultaneously. We subsequently added the competitive antagonist spiperone to release the inactivator through a crosstalk mechanism and thus allow the dimer to return to a reactive state. Partial inactivation of the homodimer by ritanserin binding decreased the activity of the receptor by 59±13% and 70±4% in the PLA2 and PLC pathways respectively (P<0.001), with no difference in the potency of the serotonin (5-HT) was observed. The subsequent binding of spiperone released ritanserin due to the crosstalk between protomers and recovery of the receptor activity to 74±7% and 72±4%. Negative cooperativity between protomers in the dimer was maintained during arachidonic acid (AA) release after blocking ritanserin, as indicated by the biphasic inhibition curves for clozapine over 1μM serotonin (5-HT) in these conditions. These findings provide evidence that serotonin 5-HT2A receptors must be expressed as homodimers in order to activate both the PLA2 and PLC signalling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Juxtaarticular Myxoma in a Pigtail Macaque (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Brianna L; Johnson, Crystal H; Lacy, Shannon H

    2016-01-01

    A 10-y-old pigtail macaque presented with a subcutaneous, soft-tissue mass overlying the right stifle joint. Here we describe the clinical case and histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of this lesion. This case represents the first published report of juxtaarticular myxoma in a pigtail macaque. PMID:27780010

  5. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment

    PubMed Central

    Kroeker, R.; Bellanca, R. U.; Lee, G. H.; Thom, J. P.; Worlein, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions. PMID:24243351

  6. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, R; Bellanca, R U; Lee, G H; Thom, J P; Worlein, J M

    2014-04-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic, and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions.

  7. Comparing face patch systems in macaques and humans.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Moeller, Sebastian; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2008-12-09

    Face recognition is of central importance for primate social behavior. In both humans and macaques, the visual analysis of faces is supported by a set of specialized face areas. The precise organization of these areas and the correspondence between individual macaque and human face-selective areas are debated. Here, we examined the organization of face-selective regions across the temporal lobe in a large number of macaque and human subjects. Macaques showed 6 regions of face-selective cortex arranged in a stereotypical pattern along the temporal lobe. Human subjects showed, in addition to 3 reported face areas (the occipital, fusiform, and superior temporal sulcus face areas), a face-selective area located anterior to the fusiform face area, in the anterior collateral sulcus. These results suggest a closer anatomical correspondence between macaque and human face-processing systems than previously realized.

  8. White-cheeked macaque (Macaca leucogenys): A new macaque species from Medog, southeastern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Zhao, Chao; Fan, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-01

    We describe a newly discovered Macaca species from the Medog, in southeastern Tibet, China, Macaca leucogenys sp. nov or the "white-cheeked macaque". Based on 738 photos taken during direct observations and captured by camera traps this new species appears to be distinct from the Macaca sinica species group. Moreover, the species is distinguished from all potential sympatric macaque species (M. mulatta, M. thibetana, M. assamensis, and M. munzala) in exhibiting a suite of pelage characteristics including relatively uniform dorsal hair pattern, hairy ventral pelage, relative hairless short tail, prominent pale to white side- and chin-whiskers creating a white cheek and round facial appearance, dark facial skin on the muzzle, long and thick hairs on its neck, and a round rather than arrow-shaped male genitalia. This new macaque species was found to exploit a diverse set of habitat types from tropical forest at 1395 m, to primary and secondary evergreen broad-leaved forest at 2000 m, as well as mixed broadleaf-conifer forest at 2700 m. Its range may extend to neighboring counties in Tibet and the part of southeastern Tibet controlled by India. The white-cheeked macaque is threatened by illegal hunting and the construction of hydropower stations. Discovery of this new primate species further highlights the high value for biodiversity conservation of southeastern Tibet and calls for more intensive surveys, studies, and environmental protection in this area. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. ThWRKY4 from Tamarix hispida Can Form Homodimers and Heterodimers and Is Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liuqiang; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Chunrui; Wang, Yucheng; Lu, Mengzhu; Gao, Caiqiu

    2015-11-13

    WRKY proteins are a large family of transcription factors that are involved in diverse developmental processes and abiotic stress responses in plants. However, our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of WRKYs participation in protein-protein interactions is still fragmentary, and such protein-protein interactions are fundamental in understanding biological networks and the functions of proteins. In this study, we report that a WRKY protein from Tamarix hispida, ThWRKY4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers with ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3. In addition, ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 can both bind to W-box motif with binding affinities similar to that of ThWRKY4. Further, the expression patterns of ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 are similar to that of ThWRKY4 when plants are exposed to abscisic acid (ABA). Subcellular localization shows that these three ThWRKY proteins are nuclear proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ThWRKY4 is a dimeric protein that can form functional homodimers or heterodimers that are involved in abiotic stress responses.

  10. Crystal structure of endonuclease G in complex with DNA reveals how it nonspecifically degrades DNA as a homodimer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jason L. J.; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Yang, Wei-Zen; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is an evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial protein in eukaryotes that digests nucleus chromosomal DNA during apoptosis and paternal mitochondrial DNA during embryogenesis. Under oxidative stress, homodimeric EndoG becomes oxidized and converts to monomers with diminished nuclease activity. However, it remains unclear why EndoG has to function as a homodimer in DNA degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans EndoG homologue, CPS-6, in complex with single-stranded DNA at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Two separate DNA strands are bound at the ββα-metal motifs in the homodimer with their nucleobases pointing away from the enzyme, explaining why CPS-6 degrades DNA without sequence specificity. Two obligatory monomeric CPS-6 mutants (P207E and K131D/F132N) were constructed, and they degrade DNA with diminished activity due to poorer DNA-binding affinity as compared to wild-type CPS-6. Moreover, the P207E mutant exhibits predominantly 3′-to-5′ exonuclease activity, indicating a possible endonuclease to exonuclease activity change. Thus, the dimer conformation of CPS-6 is essential for maintaining its optimal DNA-binding and endonuclease activity. Compared to other non-specific endonucleases, which are usually monomeric enzymes, EndoG is a unique dimeric endonuclease, whose activity hence can be modulated by oxidation to induce conformational changes. PMID:27738134

  11. ThWRKY4 from Tamarix hispida Can Form Homodimers and Heterodimers and Is Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liuqiang; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Chunrui; Wang, Yucheng; Lu, Mengzhu; Gao, Caiqiu

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are a large family of transcription factors that are involved in diverse developmental processes and abiotic stress responses in plants. However, our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of WRKYs participation in protein–protein interactions is still fragmentary, and such protein–protein interactions are fundamental in understanding biological networks and the functions of proteins. In this study, we report that a WRKY protein from Tamarix hispida, ThWRKY4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers with ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3. In addition, ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 can both bind to W-box motif with binding affinities similar to that of ThWRKY4. Further, the expression patterns of ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 are similar to that of ThWRKY4 when plants are exposed to abscisic acid (ABA). Subcellular localization shows that these three ThWRKY proteins are nuclear proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ThWRKY4 is a dimeric protein that can form functional homodimers or heterodimers that are involved in abiotic stress responses. PMID:26580593

  12. The active form of the norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a homodimer with cooperative activity.

    PubMed

    Högbom, Martin; Jäger, Katrin; Robel, Ivonne; Unge, Torsten; Rohayem, Jacques

    2009-02-01

    Norovirus (NV) is a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide and a major public health concern. So far, the replication strategy of NV remains poorly understood, mainly because of the lack of a cell system to cultivate the virus. In this study, the function and the structure of a key viral enzyme of replication, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, NS7), was examined. The overall structure of the NV NS7 RdRp was determined by X-ray crystallography to a 2.3 A (0.23 nm) resolution (PDB ID 2B43), displaying a right-hand fold typical of the template-dependent polynucleotide polymerases. Biochemical analysis evidenced that NV NS7 RdRp is active as a homodimer, with an apparent K(d) of 0.649 microM and a positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient n(H)=1.86). Crystals of the NV NS7 homodimer displayed lattices containing dimeric arrangements with high shape complementarity statistics. This experimental data on the structure and function of the NV RdRp may set the cornerstone for the development of polymerase inhibitors to control the infection with NV, a medically relevant pathogen.

  13. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) genome.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Atsunori; Sakate, Ryuichi; Kameoka, Yosuke; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hirata, Makoto; Tanuma, Reiko; Masui, Tohru; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Osada, Naoki

    2012-07-02

    The genetic background of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is made complex by the high genetic diversity, population structure, and gene introgression from the closely related rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Herein we report the whole-genome sequence of a Malaysian cynomolgus macaque male with more than 40-fold coverage, which was determined using a resequencing method based on the Indian rhesus macaque genome. We identified approximately 9.7 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) between the Malaysian cynomolgus and the Indian rhesus macaque genomes. Compared with humans, a smaller nonsynonymous/synonymous SNV ratio in the cynomolgus macaque suggests more effective removal of slightly deleterious mutations. Comparison of two cynomolgus (Malaysian and Vietnamese) and two rhesus (Indian and Chinese) macaque genomes, including previously published macaque genomes, suggests that Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been more affected by gene introgression from rhesus macaques. We further identified 60 nonsynonymous SNVs that completely differentiated the cynomolgus and rhesus macaque genomes, and that could be important candidate variants for determining species-specific responses to drugs and pathogens. The demographic inference using the genome sequence data revealed that Malaysian cynomolgus macaques have experienced at least three population bottlenecks. This list of whole-genome SNVs will be useful for many future applications, such as an array-based genotyping system for macaque individuals. High-quality whole-genome sequencing of the cynomolgus macaque genome may aid studies on finding genetic differences that are responsible for phenotypic diversity in macaques and may help control genetic backgrounds among individuals.

  14. Niche separation of sympatric macaques, Macaca assamensis and M. mulatta, in limestone habitats of Nonggang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qihai; Wei, Hua; Tang, Huaxing; Huang, Zhonghao; Krzton, Ali; Huang, Chengming

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of sympatric species are essential in understanding those species' behavioral and ecological adaptations as well as the mechanisms that can reduce resource competition enough to allow coexistence. We collected data on diet, activity budget and habitat use from two sympatric macaque species, the Assamese macaque (Macaca assamensis) and the rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), in a limestone seasonal rainforest of Nonggang Nature Reserve, southwestern Guangxi, China. Our results show that the two sympatric macaques differ in diet, activity budget, and habitat use: (1) out of the 131 plant species that were used by both macaque species as food over the year, only 15 plant species (11 %) were shared. Rhesus macaques used more plant species as major foods, and had higher dietary diversity and evenness indexes than Assamese macaques. (2) Assamese macaques fed predominantly on leaves, whereas rhesus macaques fed more selectively on fruits. The rhesus macaques' diet varied according to season, and was significantly correlated to season fluctuation in fruit availability. (3) Assamese macaques devoted more time to resting, and less time to feeding than rhesus macaques (4) Assamese macaques were present mostly on the cliff, and tended to stay on the ground, whereas rhesus macaques were present mostly on the hillside, and showed preference to lower and middle canopy. The observed differences in diet and habitat use between the two macaque species represent behavioral patterns enabling their coexistence.

  15. Ulcerative cheilitis in a rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C C; Miller, A D

    2012-03-01

    A 2-year-old, female, simian immunodeficiency virus E543-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia due to a history of diarrhea, weight loss, and a small, round ulcer along the left labial commissure. Histopathologic examination of the ulcer revealed infiltration by large numbers of degenerate and nondegenerate neutrophils and macrophages admixed with syncytial epithelial cells. Rare epithelial cells contained herpetic inclusion bodies. These cells stained positive for Human herpesvirus 1 via immunohistochemistry, and DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of closely related Macacine herpesvirus 1 (B virus).

  16. Efficient Cooperative Restraint Training With Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Theil, Jacob H.; Moadab, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    It is sometimes necessary for nonhuman primates to be restrained during biomedical and psychosocial research. Such restraint is often accomplished using a “primate chair.” The present paper details a method for training adult rhesus macaques to cooperate with a chair restraint procedure using positive and negative reinforcement. Successful training was accomplished rapidly in approximately 14 training days. The success of this training technique suggests that this method represents a refinement to traditional techniques despite the behavioral heterogeneity in the animal sample (which includes animals previously deemed unfit for traditional pole-and-collar training). PMID:23544752

  17. Formation of retinoid X receptor homodimers leads to repression of T3 response: hormonal cross talk by ligand-induced squelching.

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Graupner, G; Lee, M O; Hermann, T; Hoffmann, B; Pfahl, M

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) form heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Heterodimerization is required for efficient TR DNA binding to most response elements and transcriptional activation by thyroid hormone. RXRs also function as auxiliary proteins for several other receptors. In addition, RXR alpha can be induced by specific ligands to form homodimers. Here we report that RXR-specific retinoids that induce RXR homodimers are effective repressors of the T3 response. We provide evidence that this repression by RXR-specific ligands occurs by sequestering of RXR from TR-RXR heterodimers into RXR homodimers. This ligand-induced squelching may represent an important mechanism by which RXR-specific retinoids and 9-cis retinoic acid mediate hormonal cross talk among a subfamily of nuclear receptors activated by structurally unrelated ligands. Images PMID:8246986

  18. Homodimer of p50 (NF kappa B1) does not introduce a substantial directed bend into DNA according to three different experimental assays.

    PubMed Central

    Kuprash, D V; Rice, N R; Nedospasov, S A

    1995-01-01

    Transcription factors can distort the conformation of the DNA double helix upon binding to their target sites. Previously, studies utilizing circular permutation--electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggested that the homodimer of p50 (NF kappa B1), canonical NF-kappa B (p65-p50), as well as several non-canonical NF-kappa B/Rel complexes, may induce substantial DNA bending at the binding site. Here we have applied three additional experimental approaches, helical phasing analysis, minicircle binding and cyclization kinetics, and conclude that the homodimer of p50 introduces virtually no directed bend into the consensus kappa B sequences GGGACTTTCC or GGGAATTCCC. Images PMID:7885838

  19. SHIV Susceptibility Changes during the Menstrual Cycle of Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen N.; Henning, Tara; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica; Butler, Katherine; Adams, Debra R.; Guenthner, Patricia; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, James; Radzio, Jessica; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Dobard, Charles; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormonal changes during menstrual cycling may affect susceptibility to HIV. Methods We determined the SHIV acquisition time point in 43 cycling pigtail macaques infected by repeated vaginal virus exposures initiated randomly in the cycle. Results SHIV infection was first detected in the follicular phase in 38 macaques (88%), and in the luteal phase in 5 macaques (12%), indicating a statistically significant timing difference. Assuming a 7-day eclipse phase, most infections occurred during or following a high-progesterone period associated with menstruation, vaginal epithelium thinning and suppressed mucosal immunity. Conclusions This raises questions whether other high progesterone conditions (pregnancy, hormonal contraception) similarly affect HIV risk. PMID:24779484

  20. Intracranial meningioma with ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Canfield, Don R

    2012-10-01

    A 21-y-old female rhesus macaque presented with signs of internal and external ophthamoplegia, including anisocoria and ptosis. Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or weakness of one or more intraocular or extraocular muscles that control the movement of eye; this condition can be caused by neurologic or muscle disorders. The macaque was euthanized due to progression of clinical symptoms, and postmortem gross examination revealed a mass at the base of the brain attached to the meninges. Histopathologic examination led to the diagnosis of intracranial meningioma. Here we describe a case of intracranial meningioma with internal and external ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

  1. Serum Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) Concentrations in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) and Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) with Chronic Idiopathic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Izzi, Jessica M; Beck, Sarah E; Adams, Robert J; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Hutchinson, Eric K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea poses a significant threat to the health of NHP research colonies, and its primary etiology remains unclear. In macaques, the clinical presentation of intractable diarrhea and weight loss that are accompanied by inflammatory infiltrates within the gastrointestinal tract closely resembles inflammatory bowel disease of humans, dogs, and cats, in which low serum and tissue cobalamin (vitamin B12) levels are due to intestinal malabsorption. We therefore hypothesized that macaques with chronic idiopathic diarrhea (CID) have lower serum cobalamin concentrations than do healthy macaques. Here we measured serum cobalamin concentrations in both rhesus and pigtailed macaques with CID and compared them with those of healthy controls. Serum cobalamin levels were 2.5-fold lower in pigtailed macaques with CID than control animals but did not differ between rhesus macaques with CID and their controls. This finding supports the use of serum cobalamin concentration as an adjunct diagnostic tool in pigtailed macaques that present with clinical symptoms of chronic gastrointestinal disease. This use of serum vitamin B12 levels has implications for the future use of parenteral cobalamin supplementation to improve clinical outcomes in this species. PMID:27538863

  2. Grooming reciprocity in male Tibetan macaques.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dong-Po; Li, Jin-Hua; Garber, Paul A; Matheson, Megan D; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    In several primate species, adult males are reported to compete for access to reproductive partners as well as forming affiliative and cohesive social bonds based on the exchange of goods or services. We hypothesized that among a broad set of fitness-maximizing strategies, grooming can be used by individual adult males to enhance social relationships through reciprocity and/or through the interchange of grooming for a different but equivalent good or service. We used focal animal sampling and continuously recorded dyadic grooming and agonistic interactions to test a series of predictions regarding male social interactions in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China. During the non-mating season or between males of similar rank throughout the year, grooming effort given was matched by grooming effort received. However, lower ranking males groomed higher ranking males at a greater rate and/or for a longer duration during both the mating and non-mating periods. We found that higher ranking males directed less aggression towards males with whom they formed a frequent grooming partnership, indicating that grooming received was interchanged for increased social tolerance. These data suggest that individual male Tibetan macaques employ alternative social strategies associated with grooming reciprocity or interchange depending on dominance rank and rates of aggression, and highlight the importance of both biological markets and grooming reciprocity as behavioral mechanisms used by resident adult males to form and maintain affiliative social bonds. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Stress behaviours buffer macaques from aggression.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Jamie; Micheletta, Jérôme; Waller, Bridget M

    2017-09-11

    Primates (including humans) scratch when stressed. So far, such scratching has been seen as a by-product of physiological processes associated with stress, and attributed proximate, regulatory function. However, it is possible that others could use this relationship between scratching and stress as an indication of the animal's stress state, and thus scratching could potentially have social function. As a test of this theory, we measured the production of, and social responses to scratching in a group of free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Firstly, we found that the likelihood of scratching was greater around periods of heightened social stress, such as being in proximity to high-ranking individuals, or non-friends. Secondly, when macaques scratched, subsequent interactions were less likely to be aggressive and more likely to be affiliative. Potential attackers may avoid attacking stressed individuals as stressed individuals could behave unpredictably or be weakened by their state of stress (rendering aggression risky and/or unnecessary). Observable stress behaviour could therefore have additional adaptive value by reducing the potential for escalated aggression, benefiting both senders and receivers by facilitating social cohesion. This basic ability to recognise stress in others could also be an important component in the evolution of social cognition such as empathy.

  4. The Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome.

    PubMed

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew; Polpitiya, Ashoka; Petritis, Konstantinos; Dorus, Steve; Karr, Timothy L

    2013-11-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics has facilitated sperm composition studies in several mammalian species but no studies have been undertaken in non-human primate species. Here we report the analysis of the 1247 proteins that comprise the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome (termed the MacSP). Comparative analysis with previously characterized mouse and human sperm proteomes reveals substantial levels of orthology (47% and 40% respectively) and widespread overlap of functional categories based on Gene Ontology analyses. Approximately 10% of macaque sperm genes (113/1247) are significantly under-expressed in the testis as compared with other tissues, which may reflect proteins specifically acquired during epididymal maturation. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses of three MacSP ADAMs (A-Disintegrin and Metalloprotease proteins), ADAM18-, 20- and 21-like, provides empirical support for sperm genes functioning in non-human primate taxa which have been subsequently lost in the lineages leading to humans. The MacSP contains proteasome proteins of the 20S core subunit, the 19S proteasome activator complex and an alternate proteasome activator PA200, raising the possibility that proteasome activity is present in mature sperm. Robust empirical characterization of the Rhesus sperm proteome should greatly expand the possibility for targeted molecular studies of spermatogenesis and fertilization in a commonly used model species for human infertility.

  5. The function of Barbary macaque copulation calls.

    PubMed Central

    Semple, S

    1998-01-01

    In a wide variety of animal species, females produce vocalizations specific to mating contexts. It has been proposed that these copulation calls function to incite males to compete for access to the calling female. Two separate advantages of inciting male-male competition in this way have been put forward. The first suggests that as a result of calling, females are only mated by the highest ranking male in the vicinity (indirect mate choice hypothesis). The second proposes that copulation calling results in a female being mated by many males, thus promoting competition at the level of sperm (sperm competition hypothesis). In this paper, I give results from the first experimental study to test these hypotheses. Playback was used to examine the function of copulation calls of female Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in Gibraltar. Although rank did not affect lone males' likelihood of approaching copulation calls, when playbacks were given to pairs of males only the higher ranking individual approached. Moreover, females were mated significantly sooner after playback of their copulation call than after playback of a control stimulus. These results suggest that the copulation calls of female Barbary macaques play a key role in affecting patterns of male reproductive behaviour, not only providing an indirect mechanism of female choice, but also promoting sperm competition by reducing the interval between copulations. Potential fitness benefits of inciting male-male competition at these two levels are discussed. PMID:9523431

  6. The Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Sperm Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew; Polpitiya, Ashoka; Petritis, Konstantinos; Dorus, Steve; Karr, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics has facilitated sperm composition studies in several mammalian species but no studies have been undertaken in non-human primate species. Here we report the analysis of the 1247 proteins that comprise the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome (termed the MacSP). Comparative analysis with previously characterized mouse and human sperm proteomes reveals substantial levels of orthology (47% and 40% respectively) and widespread overlap of functional categories based on Gene Ontology analyses. Approximately 10% of macaque sperm genes (113/1247) are significantly under-expressed in the testis as compared with other tissues, which may reflect proteins specifically acquired during epididymal maturation. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses of three MacSP ADAMs (A-Disintegrin and Metalloprotease proteins), ADAM18-, 20- and 21-like, provides empirical support for sperm genes functioning in non-human primate taxa which have been subsequently lost in the lineages leading to humans. The MacSP contains proteasome proteins of the 20S core subunit, the 19S proteasome activator complex and an alternate proteasome activator PA200, raising the possibility that proteasome activity is present in mature sperm. Robust empirical characterization of the Rhesus sperm proteome should greatly expand the possibility for targeted molecular studies of spermatogenesis and fertilization in a commonly used model species for human infertility. PMID:23816990

  7. Structure of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the native state at 1.9 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Pavlyuk, B. F.; Lashkov, A. A.; Seregina, T. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Vaĭnshteĭn, B. K.; Mikhaĭlov, A. M.

    2007-11-01

    Uridine phosphorylase ( UPh) belongs to pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases. This enzyme catalyzes cleavage of the C-N glycoside bond in uridine to form uracil and ribose-1’-phosphate. Uridine phosphorylase supplies cells with nucleotide precursors by catalyzing the phosphorolysis of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides. This is an alternative to de novo nucleotide synthesis. The three-dimensional structure of native uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) in a new crystal form was solved and refined at 1.90 Å resolution ( R st = 20.37%; R free = 24.69%; the rmsd of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.009 Å and 1.223°, respectively). A homodimer containing two asynchronously functioning active sites was demonstrated to be the minimum structural unit necessary for function of the hexameric StUPh molecule ( L 33 L 2). Each active site is formed by amino acid residues of both subunits.

  8. Thermal and chemical unfolding pathways of PaSdsA1 sulfatase, a homo-dimer with topologically interlinked chains.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Goto, Yuji; Costas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms as to how interlinked proteins entangle and fold is a challenge. PaSdsA1 sulfatase is a homo-dimer containing two zinc atoms per monomer. The monomer chains are interlinked in a dimerization domain. To study the unfolding pathways denaturation experiments were performed. In the native protein three forms coexist in chemical equilibrium, each with a different number of zinc atoms. In the chemical unfolding of the holo-dimers the entanglement of the chains is preserved and acts as a 'folding seed', allowing the unfolding process to be reversible. Thermal irreversible unfolding of the holo-dimers favours dissociation, producing monomers that are SDS-stabilized. The thermal unfolding of these monomers is reversible. However, it is not possible to form dimers from unfolded monomers.

  9. A novel EID family member, EID-3, inhibits differentiation and forms a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sasajima, Yuka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Satoshi; Yuasa, Yasuhito . E-mail: yuasa.monc@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    The EID family members, i.e., E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation-1 (EID-1) and EID-1-like inhibitor of differentiation-2 (EID-2), were identified as negative regulators of cellular differentiation. EID-1 seems to inhibit differentiation by blocking histone acetyltransferase activity and EID-2 possibly inhibits differentiation through binding to class I histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we report a novel inhibitor of differentiation exhibiting homology with EID-2 termed EID-3 (EID-2-like inhibitor of differentiation-3). Like EID-2, EID-3 inhibited MyoD- and GR{alpha}-dependent transcription and blocked muscle differentiation in cultured cells by binding to class I HDACs. Unlike that of EID-2, the C-terminus, but not the N-terminus, of EID-3 was required for nuclear localization. EID-3 formed a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2. These results suggest that EID-3 inhibits differentiation by blocking transcription as a complex in cells.

  10. Allosteric interactions across native adenosine-A3 receptor homodimers: quantification using single-cell ligand-binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    May, Lauren T.; Bridge, Lloyd J.; Stoddart, Leigh A.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    A growing awareness indicates that many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist as homodimers, but the extent of the cooperativity across the dimer interface has been largely unexplored. Here, measurement of the dissociation kinetics of a fluorescent agonist (ABA-X-BY630) from the human A1 or A3 adenosine receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells has provided evidence for highly cooperative interactions between protomers of the A3-receptor dimer in single living cells. In the absence of competitive ligands, the dissociation rate constants of ABA-X-BY630 from A1 and A3 receptors were 1.45 ± 0.05 and 0.57 ± 0.07 min−1, respectively. At the A3 receptor, this could be markedly increased by both orthosteric agonists and antagonists [15-, 9-, and 19-fold for xanthine amine congener (XAC), 5′-(N-ethyl carboxamido)adenosine (NECA), and adenosine, respectively] and reduced by coexpression of a nonbinding (N250A) A3-receptor mutant. The changes in ABA-X-BY630 dissociation were much lower at the A1 receptor (1.5-, 1.4-, and 1.5-fold). Analysis of the pEC50 values of XAC, NECA, and adenosine for the ABA-X-BY630-occupied A3-receptor dimer yielded values of 6.0 ± 0.1, 5.9 ± 0.1, and 5.2 ± 0.1, respectively. This study provides new insight into the spatial and temporal specificity of drug action that can be provided by allosteric modulation across a GPCR homodimeric interface.—May, L. T., Bridge, L. J., Stoddart, L. A., Briddon, S. J., Hill, S. J. Allosteric interactions across native adenosine-A3 receptor homodimers: quantification using single-cell ligand-binding kinetics. PMID:21715680

  11. Communication between the ERRalpha homodimer interface and the PGC-1alpha binding surface via the helix 8-9 loop.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Althage, Magnus; Flaig, Ralf; Sato, Yoshiteru; Chavant, Virginie; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Choulier, Laurence; Cronet, Philippe; Rochel, Natacha; Schüle, Roland; Strömstedt, Per-Erik; Moras, Dino

    2008-07-18

    Although structural studies on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) have established the general mode of nuclear receptor (NR)/coactivator interaction, determinants of binding specificity are only partially understood. The LBD of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), for example, interacts only with a region of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1alpha, which contains the canonical LXXLL motif (NR box2), whereas the LBD of estrogen-related receptor-alpha (ERRalpha) also binds efficiently an untypical, LXXYL-containing region (NR box3) of PGC-1alpha. Surprisingly, in a previous structural study, the ERalpha LBD has been observed to bind NR box3 of transcriptional intermediary factor (TIF)-2 untypically via LXXYL, whereas the ERRalpha LBD binds this region of TIF-2 only poorly. Here we present a new crystal structure of the ERRalpha LBD in complex with a PGC-1alpha box3 peptide. In this structure, residues N-terminal of the PGC-1alpha LXXYL motif formed contacts with helix 4, the loop connecting helices 8 and 9, and with the C terminus of the ERRalpha LBD. Interaction studies using wild-type and mutant PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha showed that these contacts are functionally relevant and are required for efficient ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha interaction. Furthermore, a structure comparison between ERRalpha and ERalpha and mutation analyses provided evidence that the helix 8-9 loop, which differs significantly in both nuclear receptors, is a major determinant of coactivator binding specificity. Finally, our results revealed that in ERRalpha the helix 8-9 loop allosterically links the LBD homodimer interface with the coactivator cleft, thus providing a plausible explanation for distinct PGC-1alpha binding to ERRalpha monomers and homodimers.

  12. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  13. B-virus from pet macaque monkeys: an emerging threat in the United States?

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, S. R.; Leslie, M. J.; Parrott, T.; Abelt, S.; Piercy, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    Of primary concern when evaluating macaque bites are bacterial and B-virus infections. B-virus infection is highly prevalent (80% to 90%) in adult macaques and may cause a potentially fatal meningoencephalitis in humans. We examined seven nonoccupational exposure incidents involving 24 persons and eight macaques. Six macaques were tested for herpes B; four (67%) were seropositive. A common observation was that children were more than three times as likely to be bitten than adults. The virus must be assumed to be a potential health hazard in macaque bite wounds; this risk makes macaques unsuitable as pets. PMID:9452406

  14. Development of Pattern Recognition in Infant Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Virginia M.; Sackett, Gene P.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the development of pattern recognition in infant pigtailed macaques using the familiarization novelty technique. Results indicate that by at least 200 days postconception subjects show a consistently reliable visual response to novelty. (Author/RH)

  15. Condylomatous genital lesions in cynomolgus macaques from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ariana; Wood, Charles E; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; Domaingue, Marie Claire; Elmore, David; Koenig, Patricia; Wagner, Janice D; Jennings, Ryan N; Burk, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    Genital condyloma-like lesions were observed on male and female cynomolgus macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) originating from the island of Mauritius. Cytobrush and/or biopsy samples were obtained from lesions of 57 affected macaques. Primary histologic features included eosinophilic, neutrophilic, and lymphoplasmacytic penile and vulvar inflammation, epidermal hyperplasia with acanthosis, and increased collagenous stroma. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays to amplify viral DNA revealed the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) DNA but not papillomavirus or poxvirus DNA. Subsequent DNA analyses of 3 genomic regions of LCV identified isolates associated with lesions in 19/25 (76%) biopsies and 19/57 (33%) cytology samples. Variable immunolabeling for proteins related to the human LCV Epstein Barr Virus was observed within intralesional plasma cells, stromal cells, and epithelial cells. Further work is needed to characterize the epidemiologic features of these lesions and their association with LCV infection in Mauritian-origin macaques.

  16. Disseminated Hemangiosarcoma in a Juvenile Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Amanda P; Gray, Stanton B; Chaffee, Beth K

    2016-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma is a malignant tumor of vascular endothelial origin that is sporadically reported in rhesus macaques. This report describes the clinicopathologic features of a 1-y-old rhesus macaque with spontaneous disseminated hemangiosarcoma that originally presented as a focal cutaneous mass. Histopathologic examination of multiple tumor foci revealed regions in which the neoplastic cells formed diffuse sheets, as well as the well-defined vascular channels typically associated with hemangiosarcoma. Multiple endothelial cell immunomarkers were used to confirm the diagnosis in this rhesus macaque. The tumor exhibited staining properties consistent with those seen in domestic animals and humans. In addition, to our knowledge, this animal represents the youngest case of any form of spontaneous hemangiosarcoma reported in the rhesus macaque to date. PMID:27298251

  17. Development of Pattern Recognition in Infant Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Virginia M.; Sackett, Gene P.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the development of pattern recognition in infant pigtailed macaques using the familiarization novelty technique. Results indicate that by at least 200 days postconception subjects show a consistently reliable visual response to novelty. (Author/RH)

  18. Fatty acid supplements improve hair coat condition in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Hamel, A F; Menard, M T; Novak, M A

    2017-05-02

    As captive rhesus macaques often exhibit hair loss, alopecia was quantified and behavior was recorded before, during, and after fatty acid supplementation in six macaques. Fatty acid treatment was associated with a decrease in alopecia and in self-grooming behavior. Therefore, fatty acids may be a viable treatment for alopecia in some captive primates. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Novel homodimer model of the β-adrenergic receptor in complex with free fatty acids and cholesterol: first-principles calculation studies

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuka; Watanabe, Yasuo; Ito, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Shizuo; Tokiwa, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    We propose a theoretical novel homodimer model of the β- adrenergic receptor (βAR) in complex with a heterogeneous mixture of free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol based on first-principles calculations. We used the density-functional-based tight binding with dispersion (DFTB-D) method, which accurately evaluates van der Waals interactions between FFAs and amino acid residues in the receptor. The calculations suggest that a stable homodimer of bAR can form a complex with FFAs and cholesterol by extensive van der Waals interactions in the cell membrane, and that the heterogeneous composition of the FFAs is important for the stability of the homodimer complex. The stable van der Waals interactions propagate from one of the bAR to the other through the cholesterol and FFAs in the homodimer complex. The energy propagation in the complex has the potential to enhance molecular signaling in adipocytes, because the stability of the complex can influence anti-adiposity effects after oral treatment of the FFA components. PMID:23275728

  20. Novel homodimer model of the β-adrenergic receptor in complex with free fatty acids and cholesterol: first-principles calculation studies.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yuka; Watanabe, Yasuo; Ito, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Shizuo; Tokiwa, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    We propose a theoretical novel homodimer model of the β- adrenergic receptor (βAR) in complex with a heterogeneous mixture of free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol based on first-principles calculations. We used the density-functional-based tight binding with dispersion (DFTB-D) method, which accurately evaluates van der Waals interactions between FFAs and amino acid residues in the receptor. The calculations suggest that a stable homodimer of bAR can form a complex with FFAs and cholesterol by extensive van der Waals interactions in the cell membrane, and that the heterogeneous composition of the FFAs is important for the stability of the homodimer complex. The stable van der Waals interactions propagate from one of the bAR to the other through the cholesterol and FFAs in the homodimer complex. The energy propagation in the complex has the potential to enhance molecular signaling in adipocytes, because the stability of the complex can influence anti-adiposity effects after oral treatment of the FFA components.

  1. A new quadruple hydrogen-bonding module with a DDAA array: formation of a stable homodimer without competition from undesired hydrogen-bonded dimers.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Yosuke; Shirai, Naohiro; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Odashima, Kazunori

    2009-10-01

    A new DDAA hydrogen-bonding module (UImp-2), based on a ureidoimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine structure, forms a highly stable homodimer (K(dim) > 1.1 x 10(5) M(-1) in CDCl(3)) without competition from undesired hydrogen-bonded dimers.

  2. Color vision test for dichromatic and trichromatic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koida, Kowa; Yokoi, Isao; Okazawa, Gouki; Mikami, Akichika; Widayati, Kanthi Arum; Miyachi, Shigehiro; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2013-11-01

    Dichromacy is a color vision defect in which one of the three cone photoreceptors is absent. Individuals with dichromacy are called dichromats (or sometimes "color-blind"), and their color discrimination performance has contributed significantly to our understanding of color vision. Macaque monkeys, which normally have trichromatic color vision that is nearly identical to humans, have been used extensively in neurophysiological studies of color vision. In the present study we employed two tests, a pseudoisochromatic color discrimination test and a monochromatic light detection test, to compare the color vision of genetically identified dichromatic macaques (Macaca fascicularis) with that of normal trichromatic macaques. In the color discrimination test, dichromats could not discriminate colors along the protanopic confusion line, though trichromats could. In the light detection test, the relative thresholds for longer wavelength light were higher in the dichromats than the trichromats, indicating dichromats to be less sensitive to longer wavelength light. Because the dichromatic macaque is very rare, the present study provides valuable new information on the color vision behavior of dichromatic macaques, which may be a useful animal model of human dichromacy. The behavioral tests used in the present study have been previously used to characterize the color behaviors of trichromatic as well as dichromatic new world monkeys. The present results show that comparative studies of color vision employing similar tests may be feasible to examine the difference in color behaviors between trichromatic and dichromatic individuals, although the genetic mechanisms of trichromacy/dichromacy is quite different between new world monkeys and macaques.

  3. Manual lateralization in macaques: handedness, target laterality and task complexity.

    PubMed

    Regaiolli, Barbara; Spiezio, Caterina; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates represent models to understand the evolution of handedness in humans. Despite several researches have been investigating non-human primates handedness, few studies examined the relationship between target position, hand preference and task complexity. This study aimed at investigating macaque handedness in relation to target laterality and tastiness, as well as task complexity. Seven pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) were involved in three different "two alternative choice" tests: one low-level task and two high-level tasks (HLTs). During the first and the third tests macaques could select a preferred food and a non-preferred food, whereas by modifying the design of the second test, macaques were presented with no-difference alternative per trial. Furthermore, a simple-reaching test was administered to assess hand preference in a social context. Macaques showed hand preference at individual level both in simple and complex tasks, but not in the simple-reaching test. Moreover, target position seemed to affect hand preference in retrieving an object in the low-level task, but not in the HLT. Additionally, individual hand preference seemed to be affected from the tastiness of the item to be retrieved. The results suggest that both target laterality and individual motivation might influence hand preference of macaques, especially in simple tasks.

  4. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-09-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96-704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3-4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  5. Asbestosis in a Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Tsugo, Kosuke; Kashimura, Akane; Une, Yumi

    2015-10-01

    Asbestosis is a chronic lung disease caused by inhalation of asbestos, a fibrous mineral. It is one of the most severe diseases resulting from environmental contamination. We found asbestosis in a female Japanese macaque over 25 years of age that died from senility. Clear needle-like crystals were deposited throughout the lung lobes, particularly in the perivascular areas. Asbestos bodies were observed in some of these crystals. Fibrosis without inflammation was observed in the periarterial and peribronchiolar regions. The crystals were identified as tremolite, and a total of 16,633,968 asbestos bodies and 465,334,411 tremolite fibers were observed in 1 g of dry lung tissue. No tumors or pleural adhesions were seen. This is the first report of spontaneous asbestosis in a nonhuman animal. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  6. Pooled genomic indexing of rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Harris, Ronald A.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Ken J.; Hodgson, Anne; Cree, Andrew; Dai, Weilie; Csuros, Miklos; Zhu, Baoli; de Jong, Pieter J.; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Pooled genomic indexing (PGI) is a method for mapping collections of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones between species by using a combination of clone pooling and DNA sequencing. PGI has been used to map a total of 3858 BAC clones covering ∼24% of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) genome onto 4178 homologous loci in the human genome. A number of intrachromosomal rearrangements were detected by mapping multiple segments within the individual rhesus BACs onto multiple disjoined loci in the human genome. Transversal pooling designs involving shuffled BAC arrays were employed for robust mapping even with modest DNA sequence read coverage. A further innovation, short-tag pooled genomic indexing (ST-PGI), was also introduced to further improve the economy of mapping by sequencing multiple, short, mapable tags within a single sequencing reaction. PMID:15687293

  7. Neurocysticercosis in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jessica M; Dyer, Cecilia D; Madison-Antenucci, Susan; Mergen, Kimberly AM; Veeder, Christin L; Brice, Angela K

    2016-01-01

    An 8-y-old, intact, male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was sedated to undergo MRI in preparation for the implantation of cranial hardware. During imaging, 9 focal lesions were noted in the brain and musculature of the head. The lesions were hyperechoic with hypoechoic rims. The animal was deemed inappropriate for neuroscience research, and euthanasia was elected. Gross examination revealed multiple round, thick-walled, fluid-filled cysts (diameter, approximately 0.5 cm) in multiple tissues: one each in the left caudal lung lobe, left masseter muscle, and the dura overlying the brain and 8 throughout the gray and white matter of the brain parenchyma. Formalin-fixed sections of cyst-containing brain were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic examination and molecular analysis of the COX1 (COI) gene recognized the causative organism as Taenia solium at 99.04% identity. PMID:28304255

  8. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-01-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96–704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3–4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices. PMID:12960378

  9. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  10. Vicarious reinforcement in rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chang, Steve W C; Winecoff, Amy A; Platt, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1) and/or rewards to another monkey (M2) with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in non-social control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making.

  11. Ancestry, Plasmodium cynomolgi prevalence and rhesus macaque admixture in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) bred for export in Chinese breeding farms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjun; Meng, Yuhuan; Houghton, Paul; Liu, Mingyu; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Oldt, Robert; Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Huang, Ren; Singh, Balbir; Du, Hongli; Smith, David Glenn

    2017-04-01

    Most cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used in the United States as animal models are imported from Chinese breeding farms without documented ancestry. Cynomolgus macaques with varying rhesus macaque ancestry proportions may exhibit differences, such as susceptibility to malaria, that affect their suitability as a research model. DNA of 400 cynomolgus macaques from 10 Chinese breeding farms was genotyped to characterize their regional origin and rhesus ancestry proportion. A nested PCR assay was used to detect Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in sampled individuals. All populations exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity and low levels of inbreeding and genetic subdivision. Almost all individuals exhibited an Indochinese origin and a rhesus ancestry proportion of 5%-48%. The incidence of P. cynomolgi infection in cynomolgus macaques is strongly associated with proportion of rhesus ancestry. The varying amount of rhesus ancestry in cynomolgus macaques underscores the importance of monitoring their genetic similarity in malaria research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Putative Multiple-Demand System in the Macaque Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew H.; Buckley, Mark J.; Mitchell, Anna S.; Sallet, Jerome; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, cognitively demanding tasks of many types recruit common frontoparietal brain areas. Pervasive activation of this “multiple-demand” (MD) network suggests a core function in supporting goal-oriented behavior. A similar network might therefore be predicted in nonhuman primates that readily perform similar tasks after training. However, an MD network in nonhuman primates has not been described. Single-cell recordings from macaque frontal and parietal cortex show some similar properties to human MD fMRI responses (e.g., adaptive coding of task-relevant information). Invasive recordings, however, come from limited prespecified locations, so they do not delineate a macaque homolog of the MD system and their positioning could benefit from knowledge of where MD foci lie. Challenges of scanning behaving animals mean that few macaque fMRI studies specifically contrast levels of cognitive demand, so we sought to identify a macaque counterpart to the human MD system using fMRI connectivity in 35 rhesus macaques. Putative macaque MD regions, mapped from frontoparietal MD regions defined in humans, were found to be functionally connected under anesthesia. To further refine these regions, an iterative process was used to maximize their connectivity cross-validated across animals. Finally, whole-brain connectivity analyses identified voxels that were robustly connected to MD regions, revealing seven clusters across frontoparietal and insular cortex comparable to human MD regions and one unexpected cluster in the lateral fissure. The proposed macaque MD regions can be used to guide future electrophysiological investigation of MD neural coding and in task-based fMRI to test predictions of similar functional properties to human MD cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In humans, a frontoparietal “multiple-demand” (MD) brain network is recruited during a wide range of cognitively demanding tasks. Because this suggests a fundamental function, one might expect a similar

  13. An Optimized Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Core Adopts a Functional Homodimer That Efficiently Blocks Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Kathleen; Boo, Irene; Owczarek, Catherine M; Hardy, Matthew P; Perugini, Matthew A; Fabri, Louis; Scotney, Pierre; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Drummer, Heidi E

    2017-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 is the major target of broadly neutralizing antibodies in vivo and is the focus of efforts in the rational design of a universal B cell vaccine against HCV. The E2 glycoprotein exhibits a high degree of amino acid variability which localizes to three discrete regions: hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), hypervariable region 2 (HVR2), and the intergenotypic variable region (igVR). All three variable regions contribute to immune evasion and/or isolate-specific structural variations, both important considerations for vaccine design. A high-resolution structural definition of the intact HCV envelope glycoprotein complex containing E1 and E2 remains to be elucidated, while crystallographic structures of a recombinant E2 ectodomain failed to resolve HVR1, HVR2, and a major neutralization determinant adjacent to HVR1. To obtain further information on E2, we characterized the role of all three variable regions in E2 ectodomain folding and function in the context of a recombinant ectodomain fragment (rE2). We report that removal of the variable regions accelerates binding to the major host cell receptor CD81 and that simultaneous deletion of HVR2 and the igVR is required to maintain wild-type CD81-binding characteristics. The removal of the variable regions also rescued the ability of rE2 to form a functional homodimer. We propose that the rE2 core provides novel insights into the role of the variable motifs in the higher-order assembly of the E2 ectodomain and may have implications for E1E2 structure on the virion surface. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects ∼2% of the population globally, and no vaccine is available. HCV is a highly variable virus, and understanding the presentation of key antigenic sites at the virion surface is important for the design of a universal vaccine. This study investigates the role of three surface-exposed variable regions in E2 glycoprotein folding and function in the context

  14. Seed dispersal by rhesus macaques Macaca mulatta in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Asmita; McConkey, Kim R; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2014-12-01

    Frugivorous primates are important seed dispersers and their absence from forest patches is predicted to be detrimental to tropical forest regeneration and recruitment. With the reduction of primate populations globally, ecologically resilient primate species, characterized by dietary flexibility and the ability to thrive in a variety of habitats, assume new importance as seed dispersers. The most widely distributed non-human primate, the rhesus macaque Macaca mulatta has been intensively studied but little is known about its role in maintaining ecosystem structure and functions. Due to their frugivorous diet, large group sizes, large home ranges and tolerance to disturbance, rhesus macaques may be effective seed dispersers. We studied seed dispersal by rhesus macaques at the Buxa Tiger Reserve, India, through a combination of behavioural observations and germination experiments. Rhesus macaques dispersed 84% of the 49 species they fed on either through spitting or defecation. Nearly 96% of the handled seeds were undamaged and 61% of the species for which germination tests were performed had enhanced germination. Almost 50% of the monitored seeds among those deposited in situ germinated and 22% established seedlings, suggesting that rhesus macaques are important seed dispersers in tropical forests. Due to their widespread distribution and large populations, rhesus macaques are perceived as common and are categorized as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, effectively excluding them from any conservation plans. Based on the results of our study, we argue that rhesus macaques fulfill critical ecological functions in their habitat and that this parameter must be taken into consideration when they are reviewed for conservation priorities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Risk and Resilience: Early Manipulation of Macaque Social Experience and Persistent Behavioral and Neurophysiological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Leckman, James F.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    A literature review on macaque monkeys finds that peer rearing of young macaques and rearing of young macaques by mothers that are undergoing variable foraging conditions result in emotional and neurophysiological disturbance. Certain genotypes contribute to resilience to this disturbance. The findings have implications to child mental health and…

  16. Risk and Resilience: Early Manipulation of Macaque Social Experience and Persistent Behavioral and Neurophysiological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Leckman, James F.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    A literature review on macaque monkeys finds that peer rearing of young macaques and rearing of young macaques by mothers that are undergoing variable foraging conditions result in emotional and neurophysiological disturbance. Certain genotypes contribute to resilience to this disturbance. The findings have implications to child mental health and…

  17. Therapeutic Remyelination Strategies in a Novel Model of Multiple Sclerosis: Japanese Macaque Encephalomyelitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    a novel model of multiple sclerosis: Japanese macaque encephalomyelitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry S. Sherman...AND SUBTITLE Therapeutic remyelination strategies in a novel model of 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER multiple sclerosis: Japanese macaque ...encephalomyelitis that occurs spontaneously in a colony of Japanese macaques housed at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. We determined that this

  18. Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tropak, Michael B; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Thompson, Patrick; Wakarchuk, Warren; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don

    2016-01-01

    Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA). Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM), CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels. PMID:26966698

  19. Impaired Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Homodimer Formation Triggers Development of Transplant Vasculopathy - Insights from a Murine Aortic Transplantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Oberhuber, Rupert; Riede, Gregor; Cardini, Benno; Bernhard, David; Messner, Barbara; Watschinger, Katrin; Steger, Christina; Brandacher, Gerald; Pratschke, Johann; Golderer, Georg; Werner, Ernst R.; Maglione, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Transplant vasculopathy (TV) represents a major obstacle to long-term graft survival and correlates with severity of ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Donor administration of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS) co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin has been shown to prevent IRI. Herein, we analysed whether tetrahydrobiopterin is also involved in TV development. Using a fully allogeneic mismatched (BALB/c to C57BL/6) murine aortic transplantation model grafts subjected to long cold ischemia time developed severe TV with intimal hyperplasia (α-smooth muscle actin positive cells in the neointima) and endothelial activation (increased P-selectin expression). Donor pretreatment with tetrahydrobiopterin significantly minimised these changes resulting in only marginal TV development. Severe TV observed in the non-treated group was associated with increased protein oxidation and increased occurrence of endothelial NOS monomers in the aortic grafts already during graft procurement. Tetrahydrobiopterin supplementation of the donor prevented all these early oxidative changes in the graft. Non-treated allogeneic grafts without cold ischemia time and syngeneic grafts did not develop any TV. We identified early protein oxidation and impaired endothelial NOS homodimer formation as plausible mechanistic explanation for the crucial role of IRI in triggering TV in transplanted aortic grafts. Therefore, targeting endothelial NOS in the donor represents a promising strategy to minimise TV. PMID:27883078

  20. Structure of the human NF-kappaB p52 homodimer-DNA complex at 2.1 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, P; Larson, C J; Verdine, G L; Müller, C W

    1997-01-01

    The crystal structure of human NF-kappaB p52 in its specific complex with the natural kappaB DNA binding site MHC H-2 has been solved at 2.1 A resolution. Whereas the overall structure resembles that of the NF-kappaB p50-DNA complex, pronounced differences are observed within the 'insert region'. This sequence segment differs in length between different Rel proteins. Compared with NF-kappaB p50, the compact alpha-helical insert region element is rotated away from the core of the N-terminal domain, opening up a mainly polar cleft. The insert region presents potential interaction surfaces to other proteins. The high resolution of the structure reveals many water molecules which mediate interactions in the protein-DNA interface. Additional complexity in Rel protein-DNA interaction comes from an extended interfacial water cavity that connects residues at the edge of the dimer interface to the central DNA bases. The observed water network might acount for differences in binding specificity between NF-kappaB p52 and NF-kappaB p50 homodimers. PMID:9384586

  1. Albumin Homodimers in Patients with Cirrhosis: Clinical and Prognostic Relevance of a Novel Identified Structural Alteration of the Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Domenicali, Marco; Naldi, Marina; Laggetta, Maristella; Giannone, Ferdinando A.; Biselli, Maurizio; Patrono, Daniela; Bertucci, Carlo; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Decompensated cirrhosis is associated to extensive post-transcriptional changes of human albumin (HA). This study aims to characterize the occurrence of HA homodimerization in a large cohort of patients with decompensated cirrhosis and to evaluate its association with clinical features and prognosis. HA monomeric and dimeric isoforms were identified in peripheral blood by using a HPLC-ESI-MS technique in 123 cirrhotic patients hospitalized for acute decompensation and 50 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. Clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded and patients followed up to one year. Among the monomeric isoforms identified, the N- and C-terminal truncated and the native HA underwent homodimerization. All three homodimers were significantly more abundant in patients with cirrhosis, acute-on-chronic liver failure and correlate with the prognostic scores. The homodimeric N-terminal truncated isoform was independently associated to disease complications and was able to stratify 1-year survival. As a result of all these changes, the monomeric native HA was significantly decreased in patients with cirrhosis, being also associated with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion homodimerization is a novel described structural alteration of the HA molecule in decompensated cirrhosis and contributes to the progressive reduction of the monomeric native HA, the only isoform provided of structural and functional integrity. PMID:27782157

  2. Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tropak, Michael B; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Thompson, Patrick; Wakarchuk, Warren; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don

    2016-01-01

    Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA). Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM), CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels.

  3. Oncogenic BRAF Deletions That Function as Homodimers and Are Sensitive to Inhibition by RAF Dimer Inhibitor LY3009120.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsun; Zhang, Youyan; Van Horn, Robert D; Yin, Tinggui; Buchanan, Sean; Yadav, Vipin; Mochalkin, Igor; Wong, Swee Seong; Yue, Yong Gang; Huber, Lysiane; Conti, Ilaria; Henry, James R; Starling, James J; Plowman, Gregory D; Peng, Sheng-Bin

    2016-03-01

    We have identified previously undiscovered BRAF in-frame deletions near the αC-helix region of the kinase domain in pancreatic, lung, ovarian, and thyroid cancers. These deletions are mutually exclusive with KRAS mutations and occur in 4.21% of KRAS wild-type pancreatic cancer. siRNA knockdown in cells harboring BRAF deletions showed that the MAPK activity and cell growth are BRAF dependent. Structurally, the BRAF deletions are predicted to shorten the β3/αC-helix loop and hinder its flexibility by locking the helix in the active αC-helix-in conformation that favors dimer formation. Expression of L485-P490-deleted BRAF is able to transform NIH/3T3 cells in a BRAF dimer-dependent manner. BRAF homodimer is confirmed to be the dominant RAF dimer by proximity ligation assays in BRAF deletion cells, which are resistant to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and sensitive to LY3009120, a RAF dimer inhibitor. In tumor models with BRAF deletions, LY3009120 has shown tumor growth regression, whereas vemurafenib is inactive. This study discovered oncogenic BRAF deletions with a distinct activation mechanism dependent on the BRAF dimer formation in tumor cells. LY3009120 is active against these cells and represents a potential treatment option for patients with cancer with these BRAF deletions, or other atypical BRAF mutations where BRAF functions as a dimer. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. wrwyrggrywrw is a single-chain functional analog of the Holliday junction-binding homodimer, (wrwycr)2.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Marc C; Naili, Ilham; Boldt, Jeffrey L; Flores-Fujimoto, America; Patra, Sukanya; Rostron, Jason E; Segall, Anca M

    2013-02-01

    DNA repair pathways in bacteria that use homologous recombination involve the formation and subsequent resolution of Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates. We have previously identified several hexameric peptides that bind to HJs and interfere with HJ processing enzymes in vitro. The peptide WRWYCR and its D-amino acid stereoisomer wrwycr, are potent antibacterial agents. These hexapeptides must form homodimers in order to interact stably with HJs, and inhibit bacterial growth, and this represents a potential limitation. Herein we describe a disulfide bond-independent inhibitor, WRWYRGGRYWRW and its D-stereoisomer wrwyrggrywrw. We have characterized these single-chain, linear analogs of the hexapeptides, and show that in addition to effectively binding to HJs, and inhibiting the activity of DNA repair enzymes that process HJs, they have equal or greater potency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial growth. The analogs were also shown to cause DNA damage in bacteria, and disrupt the integrity of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Finally, we found that they have little toxicity toward several eukaryotic cell types at concentrations needed to inhibit bacterial growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. wrwyrggrywrw is a single-chain functional analog of the Holliday junction-binding homodimer, (wrwycr)2

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Marc C.; Naili, Ilham; Boldt, Jeffrey L.; Flores-Fujimoto, America; Patra, Sukanya; Rostron, Jason E.; Segall, Anca M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair pathways in bacteria that use homologous recombination involve the formation and subsequent resolution of Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates. We have previously identified several hexameric peptides that bind to HJs and interfere with HJ processing enzymes in vitro. The peptide WRWYCR and its D-amino acid stereoisomer wrwycr, are potent antibacterial agents. These hexapeptides must form homodimers in order to interact stably with HJs, and inhibit bacterial growth, and this represents a potential limitation. Herein we describe a disulfide bond-independent inhibitor, WRWYRGGRYWRW and its D-stereoisomer wrwyrggrywrw. We have characterized these single-chain, linear analogs of the hexapeptides, and show that in addition to effectively binding to HJs, and inhibiting the activity of DNA repair enzymes that process HJs, they have equal or greater potency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial growth. The analogs were also shown to cause DNA damage in bacteria, and disrupt the integrity of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Finally, we found that they have little toxicity toward several eukaryotic cell types at concentrations needed to inhibit bacterial growth. PMID:23291222

  6. Sulfasalazine Treatment Suppresses the Formation of HLA-B27 Heavy Chain Homodimer in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lu, Ming-Chi; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Su-Qin; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2015-12-29

    Human leukocytic antigen-B27 heavy chain (HLA-B27 HC) has the tendency to fold slowly, in turn gradually forming a homodimer, (B27-HC)₂ via a disulfide linkage to activate killer cells and T-helper 17 cells and inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to trigger the IL-23/IL-17 axis for pro-inflammatory reactions. All these consequences lead to the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Sulfasalazine (SSA) is a common medication used for treatment of patients with AS. However, the effects of SSA treatment on (B27-HC)₂ formation and on suppression of IL-23/IL-17 axis of AS patients remain to be determined. In the current study, we examine the (B27-HC)₂ of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the mean grade of sarcoiliitis and lumbar spine Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index (BASRI) scores of 23 AS patients. The results indicated that AS patients without (B27-HC)₂ on PBMC showed the lower levels of mean grade of sarcoiliitis and the lumbar spine BASRI scores. In addition, after treatment with SSA for four months, the levels of (B27-HC)₂ on PBMCs were significantly reduced. Cytokines mRNA levels, including TNFα, IL-17A, IL-17F and IFNγ, were also significantly down-regulated in PBMCs. However, SSA treatment did not affect the levels of IL-23 and IL-23R mRNAs.

  7. PDGF A chain homodimers drive proliferation of bipotential (O-2A) glial progenitor cells in the developing rat optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, N; Collarini, E J; Mosley, M J; Heldin, C H; Westermark, B; Richardson, W D

    1989-01-01

    The bipotential glial progenitor cells (O-2A progenitors), which during development of the rat optic nerve give rise to oligodendrocytes and type 2 astrocytes, are stimulated to divide in culture by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and there is evidence that PDGF is important for development of the O-2A cell lineage in vivo. We have visualized PDGF mRNA in the rat optic nerve by in situ hybridization, and its spatial distribution is compatible with the idea that type 1 astrocytes are the major source of PDGF in the nerve. We can detect mRNA encoding the A chain, but not the B chain of PDGF in the brain and optic nerve, suggesting that the major form of PDGF in the central nervous system is a homodimer of A chains (PDGF-AA). PDGF-AA is a more potent mitogen for O-2A progenitor cells than is PDGF-BB, while the reverse is true for human or rat fibroblasts. Fibroblasts display two types of PDGF receptors, type A receptors which bind to all three dimeric isoforms of PDGF, and type B receptors which bind PDGF-BB and PDGF-AB, but have low affinity for PDGF-AA. Our results suggest that O-2A progenitor cells possess predominantly type A receptors, and proliferate during development in response to PDGF-AA secreted by type 1 astrocytes. Images PMID:2545439

  8. PDGF A chain homodimers drive proliferation of bipotential (O-2A) glial progenitor cells in the developing rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Pringle, N; Collarini, E J; Mosley, M J; Heldin, C H; Westermark, B; Richardson, W D

    1989-04-01

    The bipotential glial progenitor cells (O-2A progenitors), which during development of the rat optic nerve give rise to oligodendrocytes and type 2 astrocytes, are stimulated to divide in culture by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and there is evidence that PDGF is important for development of the O-2A cell lineage in vivo. We have visualized PDGF mRNA in the rat optic nerve by in situ hybridization, and its spatial distribution is compatible with the idea that type 1 astrocytes are the major source of PDGF in the nerve. We can detect mRNA encoding the A chain, but not the B chain of PDGF in the brain and optic nerve, suggesting that the major form of PDGF in the central nervous system is a homodimer of A chains (PDGF-AA). PDGF-AA is a more potent mitogen for O-2A progenitor cells than is PDGF-BB, while the reverse is true for human or rat fibroblasts. Fibroblasts display two types of PDGF receptors, type A receptors which bind to all three dimeric isoforms of PDGF, and type B receptors which bind PDGF-BB and PDGF-AB, but have low affinity for PDGF-AA. Our results suggest that O-2A progenitor cells possess predominantly type A receptors, and proliferate during development in response to PDGF-AA secreted by type 1 astrocytes.

  9. The Escherichia coli cell division protein ZipA forms homodimers prior to association with FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Karl; Daley, Daniel O

    2012-02-21

    ZipA is an essential component of the cell division machinery in E. coli and other closely related bacteria. It is an integral membrane protein that binds to FtsZ, tethering it to the inner membrane. ZipA also induces bundling of FtsZ protofilaments and may play a role in regulating FtsA activity; however, the molecular details behind these observations are not clear. In this study we have analyzed the oligomeric state of ZipA in vivo, by chemical cross-linking, and in vitro, by native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Our data indicate that ZipA can self-associate as a homodimer and that this self-interaction is not dependent on the FtsZ-binding domain. This observation rules out the possibility that FtsZ polymers mediate the ZipA self-interaction. Given this observation, it is possible that a certain population of ZipA is recruited to the division septum in a homodimeric form.

  10. Visual preferences for sex and status in female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Watson, Karli K; Ghodasra, Jason H; Furlong, Melissa A; Platt, Michael L

    2012-05-01

    Most primates are both highly visual and highly social. These qualities predict that visual cues to social variables, such as identity, sex, social status, and reproductive quality, would be intrinsically valuable and systematically attract attention. Supporting this idea, thirsty male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) will forego fluid reward to view images of the faces of high-ranking males and the sexual skin of females. Whether female rhesus macaques, who experience dramatically different social pressures and reproductive costs than male macaques, also systematically and spontaneously value visual cues to social information remains untested experimentally. We probed the preferences of female rhesus macaques, given the opportunity to display an image from a known class of social stimuli or touch a second target to display a blank screen. We found that females preferred faces of high-status males and also images of the perinea of both males and females, but were not motivated to display images of subordinate males or control stimuli. These findings endorse the view that both male and female rhesus macaques-and presumably other highly social primates-seek information about other individuals in a way that matches the adaptive value of that information for guiding social behavior.

  11. Do vervets and macaques respond differently to BMAA?

    PubMed

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-12-01

    Vervets with chronic dietary exposure to BMAA develop neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and sparse β-amyloid plaque-like deposits in the brain. Macaques dosed via oral gavage with BMAA developed marked neurological signs in the absence of cell death. These differences may result from increased vulnerability of macaques to BMAA, the higher effective dose they received via oral gavage, and the possibility of stable adducts due to the bicarbonate used to neutralize their BMAA dose. Confirmation of chromatolysis and cell death in macaque brains was visualized using toluidine staining. In contrast, immunological staining with AT8 and β-amyloid (1-42) antibodies and thioflavine-S stain in vervet brains suggests early stage labeling of neurites and NFT and plaque-like formation in the absence of neuronal loss. The lack of neurologic deficits reported in vervets is in keeping with early preclinical pathology observed with these immunohistochemical methods. BMAA toxicity in vervet brains causes the early events that occur in the genesis of neurofibrillary pathology. Taken together, these different studies of vervets and macaques demonstrate BMAA toxicity in the brain due to chronic exposures. The use of more sensitive immunohistochemical methods in the vervet study most likely explains the differences in neuropathology reported for vervets and macaques.

  12. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  13. Connectome-scale functional intrinsic connectivity networks in macaques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Shu; Howell, Brittany R; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Tuo; Guo, Lei; Sanchez, Mar M; Hu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianming

    2017-08-24

    There have been extensive studies of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) in the human brains using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the literature. However, the functional organization of ICNs in macaque brains has been less explored so far, despite growing interests in the field. In this work, we propose a computational framework to identify connectome-scale group-wise consistent ICNs in macaques via sparse representation of whole-brain resting-state fMRI data. Experimental results demonstrate that 70 group-wise consistent ICNs are successfully identified in macaque brains via the proposed framework. These 70 ICNs are interpreted based on two publicly available parcellation maps of macaque brains and our work significantly expand currently known macaque ICNs already reported in the literature. In general, this set of connectome-scale group-wise consistent ICNs can potentially benefit a variety of studies in the neuroscience and brain-mapping fields, and they provide a foundation to better understand brain evolution in the future. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hepatitis C Virus Infects Rhesus Macaque Hepatocytes and Simianized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Shi, Chao; de Jong, Ype P.; Gerold, Gisa; Ries, Moritz; von Schaewen, Markus; Donovan, Bridget M.; Labitt, Rachael N.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gaska, Jenna M.; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Xiao, Jing W.; Flatley, Brenna; Fung, Canny; Chiriboga, Luis; Walker, Christopher M.; Evans, David T.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    At least 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Due to the narrow host range of HCV and restricted use of chimpanzees, there is currently no suitable animal model for HCV pathogenesis studies or the development of a HCV vaccine. To identify cellular determinants of interspecies transmission and establish a novel immunocompetent model system, we examined the ability of HCV to infect hepatocytes from a small non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We show that the rhesus orthologs of critical HCV entry factors support viral glycoprotein-dependent virion uptake. Primary hepatocytes from rhesus macaques are also permissive for HCV RNA replication and particle production, which is enhanced when antiviral signaling is suppressed. We demonstrate that this may be due to the diminished capacity of HCV to antagonize MAVS-dependent innate cellular defenses. To test the ability of HCV to establish persistent replication in vivo, we engrafted primary rhesus macaque hepatocytes into immunocompromised xenorecipients. Inoculation of resulting simian liver chimeric mice with either HCV genotype 1a or 2a resulted in HCV serum viremia for up to 10 weeks. Conclusion: Together, these data indicate that rhesus macaques may be a viable model for HCV and implicate host immunity as a potential species-specific barrier to HCV infection. We conclude that suppression of host immunity or further viral adaptation may allow robust HCV infection in rhesus macaques and creation of a new animal model for studies of HCV pathogenesis, lentivirus coinfection and vaccine development. PMID:25820364

  15. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic background of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is made complex by the high genetic diversity, population structure, and gene introgression from the closely related rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Herein we report the whole-genome sequence of a Malaysian cynomolgus macaque male with more than 40-fold coverage, which was determined using a resequencing method based on the Indian rhesus macaque genome. Results We identified approximately 9.7 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) between the Malaysian cynomolgus and the Indian rhesus macaque genomes. Compared with humans, a smaller nonsynonymous/synonymous SNV ratio in the cynomolgus macaque suggests more effective removal of slightly deleterious mutations. Comparison of two cynomolgus (Malaysian and Vietnamese) and two rhesus (Indian and Chinese) macaque genomes, including previously published macaque genomes, suggests that Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been more affected by gene introgression from rhesus macaques. We further identified 60 nonsynonymous SNVs that completely differentiated the cynomolgus and rhesus macaque genomes, and that could be important candidate variants for determining species-specific responses to drugs and pathogens. The demographic inference using the genome sequence data revealed that Malaysian cynomolgus macaques have experienced at least three population bottlenecks. Conclusions This list of whole-genome SNVs will be useful for many future applications, such as an array-based genotyping system for macaque individuals. High-quality whole-genome sequencing of the cynomolgus macaque genome may aid studies on finding genetic differences that are responsible for phenotypic diversity in macaques and may help control genetic backgrounds among individuals. PMID:22747675

  16. Whole-genome sequencing of tibetan macaque (Macaca Thibetana) provides new insight into the macaque evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenxin; Zhao, Guang; Li, Peng; Osada, Naoki; Xing, Jinchuan; Yi, Yong; Du, Lianming; Silva, Pedro; Wang, Hongxing; Sakate, Ryuichi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Xu, Huailiang; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Macaques are the most widely distributed nonhuman primates and used as animal models in biomedical research. The availability of full-genome sequences from them would be essential to both biomedical and primate evolutionary studies. Previous studies have reported whole-genome sequences from rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaque (M. fascicularis, CE), both of which belong to the fascicularis group. Here, we present a 37-fold coverage genome sequence of the Tibetan macaque (M. thibetana; TM). TM is an endemic species to China belonging to the sinica group. On the basis of mapping to the rhesus macaque genome, we identified approximately 11.9 million single-nucleotide variants), of which 3.9 million were TM specific, as assessed by comparison two Chinese rhesus macaques (CR) and two CE genomes. Some genes carried TM-specific homozygous nonsynonymous variants (TSHNVs), which were scored as deleterious in human by both PolyPhen-2 and SIFT (Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant) and were enriched in the eye disease genes. In total, 273 immune response and disease-related genes carried at least one TSHNV. The heterozygosity rates of two CRs (0.002617 and 0.002612) and two CEs (0.003004 and 0.003179) were approximately three times higher than that of TM (0.000898). Polymerase chain reaction resequencing of 18 TM individuals showed that 29 TSHNVs exhibited high allele frequencies, thus confirming their low heterozygosity. Genome-wide genetic divergence analysis demonstrated that TM was more closely related to CR than to CE. We further detected unusual low divergence regions between TM and CR. In addition, after applying statistical criteria to detect putative introgression regions (PIRs) in the TM genome, up to 239,620 kb PIRs (8.84% of the genome) were identified. Given that TM and CR have overlapping geographical distributions, had the same refuge during the Middle Pleistocene, and show similar mating behaviors, it is highly likely that there was an ancient

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Tibetan Macaque (Macaca thibetana) Provides New Insight into the Macaque Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Osada, Naoki; Xing, Jinchuan; Yi, Yong; Du, Lianming; Silva, Pedro; Wang, Hongxing; Sakate, Ryuichi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Xu, Huailiang; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Macaques are the most widely distributed nonhuman primates and used as animal models in biomedical research. The availability of full-genome sequences from them would be essential to both biomedical and primate evolutionary studies. Previous studies have reported whole-genome sequences from rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaque (M. fascicularis, CE), both of which belong to the fascicularis group. Here, we present a 37-fold coverage genome sequence of the Tibetan macaque (M. thibetana; TM). TM is an endemic species to China belonging to the sinica group. On the basis of mapping to the rhesus macaque genome, we identified approximately 11.9 million single-nucleotide variants), of which 3.9 million were TM specific, as assessed by comparison two Chinese rhesus macaques (CR) and two CE genomes. Some genes carried TM-specific homozygous nonsynonymous variants (TSHNVs), which were scored as deleterious in human by both PolyPhen-2 and SIFT (Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant) and were enriched in the eye disease genes. In total, 273 immune response and disease-related genes carried at least one TSHNV. The heterozygosity rates of two CRs (0.002617 and 0.002612) and two CEs (0.003004 and 0.003179) were approximately three times higher than that of TM (0.000898). Polymerase chain reaction resequencing of 18 TM individuals showed that 29 TSHNVs exhibited high allele frequencies, thus confirming their low heterozygosity. Genome-wide genetic divergence analysis demonstrated that TM was more closely related to CR than to CE. We further detected unusual low divergence regions between TM and CR. In addition, after applying statistical criteria to detect putative introgression regions (PIRs) in the TM genome, up to 239,620 kb PIRs (8.84% of the genome) were identified. Given that TM and CR have overlapping geographical distributions, had the same refuge during the Middle Pleistocene, and show similar mating behaviors, it is highly likely that there was an ancient

  18. MaqFACS (Macaque Facial Action Coding System) can be used to document facial movements in Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus)

    PubMed Central

    Julle-Danière, Églantine; Whitehouse, Jamie; Joly, Marine; Gass, Carolin; Burrows, Anne M.; Waller, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    Human and non-human primates exhibit facial movements or displays to communicate with one another. The evolution of form and function of those displays could be better understood through multispecies comparisons. Anatomically based coding systems (Facial Action Coding Systems: FACS) are developed to enable such comparisons because they are standardized and systematic and aid identification of homologous expressions underpinned by similar muscle contractions. To date, FACS has been developed for humans, and subsequently modified for chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, orangutans, hylobatids, dogs, and cats. Here, we wanted to test whether the MaqFACS system developed in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could be used to code facial movements in Barbary macaques (M. sylvanus), a species phylogenetically close to the rhesus macaques. The findings show that the facial movement capacity of Barbary macaques can be reliably coded using the MaqFACS. We found differences in use and form of some movements, most likely due to specializations in the communicative repertoire of each species, rather than morphological differences. PMID:26401458

  19. A potential aphrodisiac for female macaques.

    PubMed

    Pertovaara, Antti; Linnankoski, Ilkka; Artchakov, Denis; Rämä, Pia; Carlson, Synnöve

    2004-09-01

    Earlier studies suggest that alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and dopamine receptor agonists may enhance sexual activity in human and nonhuman male primates. It is not known whether these compounds influence the sexual behavior of female primates. We determined whether the administration of a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist (atipamezole), a dopamine receptor agonist (apomorphine), or their combination to female Macaca arctoides (stumptail macaque) monkeys produces changes in sexual behavior of the female with a male. Following the administration of drugs to the female, the behavior of the female with a male stumptail was observed for 30 min. Atipamezole dose dependently (0.03-0.3 mg/kg im) increased short-time mounting behavior of the male and the total number of copulations. Apomorphine alone (0.125-0.25 mg/kg) or in combination with atipamezole had no significant effects on sexual behavior. The result indicates that a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist administered in the female stumptail increases sexual behavior of the male with the female. A plausible explanation for this finding is that a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist increases sexual arousal in female stumptails and this, possibly due to a change in psychosocial behavior of the female, triggers increased sexual activity in males.

  20. What Do Arabic Numerals Mean to Macaques (Macaca mulatta)?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Emily H.; Gulledge, Jonathan P.; Beran, Michael J.; Washburn, David A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past, rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) have demonstrated an ability to use Arabic numerals to facilitate performance in a variety of tasks. However, it remained unclear whether they understood the absolute and relative values of numerals. In Experiment 1, numeral-trained macaques picked the larger stimuli when presented with pairwise comparisons involving numerals and analog quantities. In Experiment 2, macaques were provided with numeral cues indicating the number of times a behavior could be performed in one location for a reward. Of the 4 monkeys, 3 performed above chance, but they often erred by performing more behaviors than indicated. The results of these studies indicate that the monkeys have knowledge of the approximate quantities represented by each numeral. PMID:20141318

  1. Three-Dimensional Digital Template Atlas of the Macaque Brain.

    PubMed

    Reveley, Colin; Gruslys, Audrunas; Ye, Frank Q; Glen, Daniel; Samaha, Jason; E Russ, Brian; Saad, Ziad; K Seth, Anil; Leopold, David A; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S

    2017-09-01

    We present a new 3D template atlas of the anatomical subdivisions of the macaque brain, which is based on and aligned to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data set and histological sections of the Saleem and Logothetis atlas. We describe the creation and validation of the atlas that, when registered with macaque structural or functional MRI scans, provides a straightforward means to estimate the boundaries between architectonic areas, either in a 3D volume with different planes of sections, or on an inflated brain surface (cortical flat map). As such, this new template atlas is intended for use as a reference standard for macaque brain research. Atlases and templates are available as both volumes and surfaces in standard NIFTI and GIFTI formats. Published by Oxford University Press 2016.

  2. Retinotopy versus face selectivity in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Rajimehr, Reza; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B H

    2014-12-01

    Retinotopic organization is a ubiquitous property of lower-tier visual cortical areas in human and nonhuman primates. In macaque visual cortex, the retinotopic maps extend to higher-order areas in the ventral visual pathway, including area TEO in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. Distinct regions within IT cortex are also selective to specific object categories such as faces. Here we tested the topographic relationship between retinotopic maps and face-selective patches in macaque visual cortex using high-resolution fMRI and retinotopic face stimuli. Distinct subregions within face-selective patches showed either (1) a coarse retinotopic map of eccentricity and polar angle, (2) a retinotopic bias to a specific location of visual field, or (3) nonretinotopic selectivity. In general, regions along the lateral convexity of IT cortex showed more overlap between retinotopic maps and face selectivity, compared with regions within the STS. Thus, face patches in macaques can be subdivided into smaller patches with distinguishable retinotopic properties.

  3. Auditory behavioral thresholds for Japanese macaques using insert earphones.

    PubMed

    Smith, D W; Olszyk, V B

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure behavioral auditory thresholds in four Japanese macaques. Animals were trained using food as a reward in an operant reinforcement paradigm. Stimuli were 1-s sinusoids with 10-ms rise/fall times delivered through insert earphones (Etymotic ER-1) having expandable foam eartips. The animals generally produced threshold contours similar in shape to those reported for other macaques species, except that the low-frequency thresholds may have been slightly higher in the present studies. At middle and high frequencies, thresholds fell at the lower extreme of the range previously reported in other macaque species. The possible difference in low-frequency thresholds may have been a result of either transducer and calibration differences between studies or true species variations, or both. Though somewhat limited at high frequencies, the insert earphones used in these studies offer more reliable calibrations, less susceptibility to changes in positioning with movement of the animal, and greater interaural attenuation.

  4. Transmission of Hepatitis E Virus from Rabbits to Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Bu, Qiu-Ning; Han, Jian; Du, Ren-Jie; Lei, Ya-Xin; Ouyang, Yu-Qing; Li, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Lu, Feng-Min; Zhuang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in rabbits in the People’s Republic of China and the United States revealed that rabbits are another noteworthy reservoir of HEV. However, whether HEV from rabbits can infect humans is unclear. To study the zoonotic potential for and pathogenesis of rabbit HEV, we infected 2 cynomolgus macaques and 2 rabbits with an HEV strain from rabbits in China. Typical hepatitis developed in both monkeys; they exhibited elevated liver enzymes, viremia, virus shedding in fecal specimens, and seroconversion. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of HEV passed in the macaques with that of the inoculum showed 99.8% nucleotide identity. Rabbit HEV RNA (positive- and negative-stranded) was detectable in various tissues from the experimentally infected rabbits, indicating that extrahepatic replication may be common. Thus, HEV is transmissible from rabbits to cynomolgus macaques, which suggests that rabbits may be a new source of human HEV infection. PMID:23628346

  5. A conserved proline residue in the leucine zipper region of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 in Arabidopsis thaliana interferes with the formation of homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Huaishun; Cao Kaiming; Wang Xiping

    2007-10-19

    Two putative Arabidopsis E group bZIP transcript factors, AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61, are nuclear-localized and their transcriptional activation domain is in their N-terminal region. By searching GenBank, we found other eight plant homologues of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61. All of them have a proline residue in the third heptad of zipper region. Yeast two-hybrid assay and EMSA showed that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could not form homodimer while their mutant forms, AtbZIP34m and AtbZIP61m, which the proline residue was replaced by an alanine residue in the zipper region, could form homodimer and bind G-box element. These results suggest that the conserved proline residue interferes with the homodimer formation. However, both AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could form heterodimers with members of I group and S group transcription factors in which some members involved in vascular development. So we speculate that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 may participate in plant development via interacting with other group bZIP transcription factors.

  6. BMP2/7 heterodimer is a stronger inducer of bone regeneration in peri-implant bone defects model than BMP2 or BMP7 homodimer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Jingxiao; Zheng, Yuanna; Fan, Yi; Gu, Zhiyuan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of bone morphogenetic protein BMP2/7 heterodimer and BMP homodimers on bone regeneration in bone defects model. Identical peri-implant bone defects model were created using proper controls on the frontal skull in 18 minipigs. Collagen sponges with low-dose (30 ng/mL) BMP2/7 heterodimer, BMP2 or BMP7 homodimer were filled in the defects. New bone formation and the expression of type I collagen (Col1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) were evaluated after 2, 3, and 6 weeks of implantation. BMP2/7 resulted in significantly higher new bone areas percentage in the defect region than BMP2 and BMP7 (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining of Col1, ALP and OCN was stronger in BMP2/7 group than BMP2, BMP7 and control group (p<0.05). These results demonstrate that BMP2/7 heterodimer is a stronger inducer of osteoblastogenesis and could be applied at low dose to reduce the cost and side effects of BMP homodimers.

  7. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  8. Definition of the surface in the thyroid hormone receptor ligand binding domain for association as homodimers and heterodimers with retinoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, R C; Feng, W; Wagner, R L; Costa, C H; Pereira, A C; Apriletti, J W; Fletterick, R J; Baxter, J D

    2001-05-04

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) bind as homodimers or heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) to DNA elements with diverse orientations of AGGTCA half-sites. We performed a comprehensive x-ray crystal structure-guided mutation analysis of the TR ligand binding domain (TR LBD) surface to map the functional interface for TR homodimers and heterodimers with RXR in the absence and/or in the presence of DNA. We also identified the molecular contacts in TR LBDs crystallized as dimers. The results show that crystal dimer contacts differ from those found in the functional studies. We found that identical TR LBD residues found in helices 10 and 11 are involved in TR homodimerization and heterodimerization with RXR. Moreover, the same TR LBD surface is operative for dimerization with direct repeats spaced by 4 base pairs (DR-4) and with the inverted palindrome spaced by 6 base pairs (F2), but not with TREpal (unspaced palindrome), where homodimers appear to be simply two monomers binding independently to DNA. We also demonstrate that interactions between the TR and RXR DNA binding domains stabilize TR-RXR heterodimers on DR-4. The dimer interface can be functional in the cell, because disruption of key residues impairs transcriptional activity of TRs mediated through association with RXR LBD linked to GAL4 DNA-binding domain.

  9. Structural Analysis of Guanylyl Cyclase-Activating Protein-2 (GCAP-2) Homodimer by Stable Isotope-Labeling, Chemical Cross-Linking, and Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettelkau, Jens; Thondorf, Iris; Theisgen, Stephan; Lilie, Hauke; Schröder, Thomas; Arlt, Christian; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The topology of the GCAP-2 homodimer was investigated by chemical cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry. Complementary conducted size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicated that GCAP-2 forms a homodimer both in the absence and in the presence of Ca2+. In-depth MS and MS/MS analysis of the cross-linked products was aided by 15 N-labeled GCAP-2. The use of isotope-labeled protein delivered reliable structural information on the GCAP-2 homodimer, enabling an unambiguous discrimination between cross-links within one monomer (intramolecular) or between two subunits (intermolecular). The limited number of cross-links obtained in the Ca2+-bound state allowed us to deduce a defined homodimeric GCAP-2 structure by a docking and molecular dynamics approach. In the Ca2+-free state, GCAP-2 is more flexible as indicated by the higher number of cross-links. We consider stable isotope-labeling to be indispensable for deriving reliable structural information from chemical cross-linking data of multi-subunit protein assemblies.

  10. Two new crystal forms of the choline-binding domain of the major pneumococcal autolysin: insights into the dynamics of the active homodimer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; García, Ernesto; López, Rubens; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2002-08-02

    Very little is known about the in vivo regulation of the catalytic activity of the major pneumococcal autolysin (LytA), a surface-exposed enzyme that rules the self-destruction of pneumococcal cells through degradation of their peptidoglycan backbone. Two new crystal forms of the cell wall anchoring domain of LytA were obtained, and their structures were solved and refined to 2.4A and 2.8A resolution. The domain is a homodimer with a boomerang-like shape in which the tertiary structure of each monomer is comprised by six independent beta hairpins arranged in a superhelical fashion. Choline molecules at the hydrophobic interface of consecutive hairpins maintain this unique structure. The C-terminal hairpin (last 13 residues of LytA) in the solenoid is responsible for the formation of the catalytically active homodimer. Although the general fold in the structures derived from both crystal forms is essentially the same, two different conformations of the basic homodimer are observed. Biochemical approaches have demonstrated the fundamental role of the 11 C-terminal residues in the catalytic activity of LytA. The studies reported here reveal the importance of some amino acid residues at the C terminus in the determination of the relative distance of the active dimeric form of the autolysin, which appears to be essential for the catalytic activity of this enzyme.

  11. Human-wildlife conflict: proximate predictors of aggression between humans and rhesus macaques in India.

    PubMed

    Beisner, Brianne A; Heagerty, Allison; Seil, Shannon K; Balasubramaniam, Krishna N; Atwill, Edward R; Gupta, Brij K; Tyagi, Praveen C; Chauhan, Netrapal P S; Bonal, B S; Sinha, P R; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    Macaques live in close contact with humans across South and Southeast Asia, and direct interaction is frequent. Aggressive contact is a concern in many locations, particularly among populations of rhesus and longtail macaques that co-inhabit urbanized cities and towns with humans. We investigated the proximate factors influencing the occurrence of macaque aggression toward humans as well as human aggression toward macaques to determine the extent to which human behavior elicits macaque aggression and vice versa. We conducted a 3-month study of four free-ranging populations of rhesus macaques in Dehradun, India from October-December 2012, using event sampling to record all instances of human-macaque interaction (N = 3120). Our results show that while human aggression was predicted by the potential for economic losses or damage, macaque aggression was influenced by aggressive or intimidating behavior by humans as well as recent rates of conspecific aggression. Further, adult female macaques participated in aggression more frequently than expected, whereas adult and subadult males participated as frequently as expected. Our analyses demonstrate that neither human nor macaque aggression is unprovoked. Rather, both humans and macaques are responding to one another's behavior. Mitigation of human-primate conflict, and indeed other types of human-wildlife conflict in such coupled systems, will require a holistic investigation of the ways in which each participant is responding to, and consequently altering, the behavior of the other. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Haplessly Hoping: Macaque Major Histocompatibility Complex Made Easy

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Roger W.; Karl, Julie A.; Bohn, Patrick S.; Nimityongskul, Francesca A.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; O'Connor, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products control the repertoire of T cell responses that an individual may create against pathogens and foreign tissues. This text will review the current understanding of MHC genetics in nonhuman primates, with a focus on Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). These closely related macaque species provide important experimental models for studies of infectious disease pathogenesis, vaccine development, and transplantation research. Recent advances resulting from the application of several cost effective, high-throughput approaches, with deep sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to perform MHC genotyping of large macaque cohorts. Pyrosequencing of cDNA amplicons with a Roche/454 GS Junior instrument, provides excellent resolution of MHC class I allelic variants with semi-quantitative estimates of relative levels of transcript abundance. Introduction of the Illumina MiSeq platform significantly increased the sample throughput, since the sample loading workflow is considerably less labor intensive, and each instrument run yields approximately 100-fold more sequence data. Extension of these sequencing methods from cDNA to genomic DNA amplicons further streamlines the experimental workflow and opened opportunities for retrospective MHC genotyping of banked DNA samples. To facilitate the reporting of MHC genotypes, and comparisons between groups of macaques, this text also introduces an intuitive series of abbreviated rhesus MHC haplotype designations based on a major Mamu-A or Mamu-B transcript characteristic for ancestral allele combinations. The authors believe that the use of MHC-defined macaques promises to improve the reproducibility, and predictability of results from pre-clinical studies for translation to humans. PMID:24174442

  13. Heterologous Protection against Asian Zika Virus Challenge in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Aliota, Matthew T; Dudley, Dawn M; Newman, Christina M; Mohr, Emma L; Gellerup, Dane D; Breitbach, Meghan E; Buechler, Connor R; Rasheed, Mustafa N; Mohns, Mariel S; Weiler, Andrea M; Barry, Gabrielle L; Weisgrau, Kim L; Eudailey, Josh A; Rakasz, Eva G; Vosler, Logan J; Post, Jennifer; Capuano, Saverio; Golos, Thaddeus G; Permar, Sallie R; Osorio, Jorge E; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, Shelby L; O'Connor, David H

    2016-12-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) was declared a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO) in February 2016, because of the evidence linking infection with ZIKV to neurological complications, such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome in adults and congenital birth defects including microcephaly in the developing fetus. Because development of a ZIKV vaccine is a top research priority and because the genetic and antigenic variability of many RNA viruses limits the effectiveness of vaccines, assessing whether immunity elicited against one ZIKV strain is sufficient to confer broad protection against all ZIKV strains is critical. Recently, in vitro studies demonstrated that ZIKV likely circulates as a single serotype. Here, we demonstrate that immunity elicited by African lineage ZIKV protects rhesus macaques against subsequent infection with Asian lineage ZIKV. Using our recently developed rhesus macaque model of ZIKV infection, we report that the prototypical ZIKV strain MR766 productively infects macaques, and that immunity elicited by MR766 protects macaques against heterologous Asian ZIKV. Furthermore, using next generation deep sequencing, we found in vivo restoration of a putative N-linked glycosylation site upon replication in macaques that is absent in numerous MR766 strains that are widely being used by the research community. This reversion highlights the importance of carefully examining the sequence composition of all viral stocks as well as understanding how passage history may alter a virus from its original form. An effective ZIKV vaccine is needed to prevent infection-associated fetal abnormalities. Macaques whose immune responses were primed by infection with East African ZIKV were completely protected from detectable viremia when subsequently rechallenged with heterologous Asian ZIKV. Therefore, these data suggest that immunogen selection is unlikely to adversely affect the breadth of vaccine protection, i

  14. Haplessly hoping: macaque major histocompatibility complex made easy.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Bohn, Patrick S; Nimityongskul, Francesca A; Starrett, Gabriel J; O'Connor, David H

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products control the repertoire of T cell responses that an individual may create against pathogens and foreign tissues. This text will review the current understanding of MHC genetics in nonhuman primates, with a focus on Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). These closely related macaque species provide important experimental models for studies of infectious disease pathogenesis, vaccine development, and transplantation research. Recent advances resulting from the application of several cost effective, high-throughput approaches, with deep sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to perform MHC genotyping of large macaque cohorts. Pyrosequencing of cDNA amplicons with a Roche/454 GS Junior instrument, provides excellent resolution of MHC class I allelic variants with semi-quantitative estimates of relative levels of transcript abundance. Introduction of the Illumina MiSeq platform significantly increased the sample throughput, since the sample loading workflow is considerably less labor intensive, and each instrument run yields approximately 100-fold more sequence data. Extension of these sequencing methods from cDNA to genomic DNA amplicons further streamlines the experimental workflow and opened opportunities for retrospective MHC genotyping of banked DNA samples. To facilitate the reporting of MHC genotypes, and comparisons between groups of macaques, this text also introduces an intuitive series of abbreviated rhesus MHC haplotype designations based on a major Mamu-A or Mamu-B transcript characteristic for ancestral allele combinations. The authors believe that the use of MHC-defined macaques promises to improve the reproducibility, and predictability of results from pre-clinical studies for translation to humans.

  15. Heterologous Protection against Asian Zika Virus Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Christina M.; Mohr, Emma L.; Gellerup, Dane D.; Breitbach, Meghan E.; Buechler, Connor R.; Rasheed, Mustafa N.; Mohns, Mariel S.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Barry, Gabrielle L.; Weisgrau, Kim L.; Eudailey, Josh A.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Vosler, Logan J.; Post, Jennifer; Capuano, Saverio; Golos, Thaddeus G.; Permar, Sallie R.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; O’Connor, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) was declared a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO) in February 2016, because of the evidence linking infection with ZIKV to neurological complications, such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome in adults and congenital birth defects including microcephaly in the developing fetus. Because development of a ZIKV vaccine is a top research priority and because the genetic and antigenic variability of many RNA viruses limits the effectiveness of vaccines, assessing whether immunity elicited against one ZIKV strain is sufficient to confer broad protection against all ZIKV strains is critical. Recently, in vitro studies demonstrated that ZIKV likely circulates as a single serotype. Here, we demonstrate that immunity elicited by African lineage ZIKV protects rhesus macaques against subsequent infection with Asian lineage ZIKV. Methodology/Principal Findings Using our recently developed rhesus macaque model of ZIKV infection, we report that the prototypical ZIKV strain MR766 productively infects macaques, and that immunity elicited by MR766 protects macaques against heterologous Asian ZIKV. Furthermore, using next generation deep sequencing, we found in vivo restoration of a putative N-linked glycosylation site upon replication in macaques that is absent in numerous MR766 strains that are widely being used by the research community. This reversion highlights the importance of carefully examining the sequence composition of all viral stocks as well as understanding how passage history may alter a virus from its original form. Conclusions/Significance An effective ZIKV vaccine is needed to prevent infection-associated fetal abnormalities. Macaques whose immune responses were primed by infection with East African ZIKV were completely protected from detectable viremia when subsequently rechallenged with heterologous Asian ZIKV. Therefore, these data suggest that immunogen selection

  16. The human peroxisomal ABC half transporter ALDP functions as a homodimer and accepts acyl-CoA esters.

    PubMed

    van Roermund, Carlo W T; Visser, Wouter F; Ijlst, Lodewijk; van Cruchten, Arno; Boek, Maxim; Kulik, Wim; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2008-12-01

    Peroxisomes play a major role in human cellular lipid metabolism, including the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The most frequent peroxisomal disorder is X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), which is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. The protein involved, called ABCD1, or alternatively ALDP, is a member of the ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter family and is located in the peroxisomal membrane. The biochemical hallmark of X-ALD is the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), due to an impaired peroxisomal beta-oxidation. Although this suggests a role of ALDP in VLCFA import, no experimental evidence is available to substantiate this. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, peroxisomes are the exclusive site of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Earlier work has shown that uptake of fatty acids into peroxisomes may occur via two routes, either as free fatty acids thus requiring intraperoxisomal activation into acyl-CoA esters or as long-chain acyl-CoA esters. The latter route involves the two peroxisomal half ABC transporters Pxa1p and Pxa2p that form a heterodimeric complex in the peroxisomal membrane. Using different strategies, including the analysis of intracellular acyl-CoA esters by tandem-MS, we show that the Pxa1p/Pxa2p heterodimer is involved in the transport of a spectrum of acyl-CoA esters. Interestingly, we found that the mutant phenotype of the pxa1/pxa2Delta mutant can be rescued, at least partially, by the sole expression of the human ABCD1 cDNA coding for ALDP, the protein that is defective in the human disease X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Our data indicate that ALDP can function as a homodimer and is involved in the transport of acyl-CoA esters across the peroxisomal membrane.

  17. Transmission of Naturally Occurring Lymphoma in Macaque Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronald D.; Blake, Beverly J.; Chalifoux, Laura V.; Sehgal, Prabhat K.; King, Norval W.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1983-08-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys.

  18. Transmission of naturally occurring lymphoma in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R D; Blake, B J; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; King, N W; Letvin, N L

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:6576377

  19. Simian Retrovirus 4 Induces Lethal Acute Thrombocytopenia in Japanese Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Nakagawa, So; Miura, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2001-2002, six of seven Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) died after developing hemorrhagic syndrome at the Kyoto University Primate Research Institute (KUPRI). While the cause of death was unknown at the time, we detected simian retrovirus 4 (SRV-4) in samples obtained from a similar outbreak in 2008-2011, during which 42 of 43 Japanese macaques died after exhibiting hemorrhagic syndrome. In this study, we isolated SRV-4 strain PRI-172 from a Japanese macaque showing severe thrombocytopenia. When inoculated into four Japanese macaques, the isolate induced severe thrombocytopenia in all within 37 days. We then constructed an infectious molecular clone of strain PRI-172, termed pSR415, and inoculated the clone-derived virus into two Japanese macaques. These animals also developed severe thrombocytopenia in just 31 days after inoculation, and the virus was reisolated from blood, bone marrow, and stool. At necropsy, we observed bleeding from the gingivae and subcutaneous bleeding in all animals. SRV-4 infected a variety of tissues, especially in digestive organs, including colon and stomach, as determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, we identified the SRV-4 receptor as ASCT2, a neutral amino acid transporter. ASCT2 mRNA was expressed in a variety of tissues, and the distribution of SRV-4 proviruses in infected Japanese macaques correlated well with the expression levels of ASCT2 mRNA. From these results, we conclude that the causative agent of hemorrhagic syndrome in KUPRI Japanese macaques was SRV-4, and its receptor is ASCT2. IMPORTANCE During two separate outbreaks at the KUPRI, in 2001-2002 and 2008-2011, 96% of Japanese macaques (JM) that developed an unknown hemorrhagic syndrome died. Here, we isolated SRV-4 from a JM developing thrombocytopenia. The SRV-4 isolate and a molecularly cloned SRV-4 induced severe thrombocytopenia in virus-inoculated JMs within 37 days. At necropsy, we

  20. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  1. Assessment and improvement of Indian-origin rhesus macaque and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaque genome annotations using deep transcriptome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinxia; Pipes, Lenore; Xiong, Hao; Green, Richard R.; Jones, Daniel C.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Schroth, Gary P.; Mason, Christopher E.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome annotations of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques, two of the most common nonhuman primate animal models, are limited. Methods We analyzed large-scale macaque RNA-based next-generation sequencing (RNAseq) data to identify un-annotated macaque transcripts. Results For both macaque species, we uncovered thousands of novel isoforms for annotated genes and thousands of un-annotated intergenic transcripts enriched with non-coding RNAs. We also identified thousands of transcript sequences which are partially or completely ‘missing’ from current macaque genome assemblies. We showed that many newly identified transcripts were differentially expressed during SIV infection of rhesus macaques or during Ebola virus infection of cynomolgus macaques. Conclusions For two important macaque species, we uncovered thousands of novel isoforms and un-annotated intergenic transcripts including coding and non-coding RNAs, polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated transcripts. This resource will greatly improve future macaque studies, as demonstrated by their applications in infectious disease studies. PMID:24810475

  2. Mimetic Muscles in a Despotic Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Differ from Those in a Closely Related Tolerant Macaque (M. nigra).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jérôme

    2016-10-01

    Facial displays (or expressions) are a primary means of visual communication among conspecifics in many mammalian orders. Macaques are an ideal model among primates for investigating the co-evolution of facial musculature, facial displays, and social group size/behavior under the umbrella of "ecomorphology". While all macaque species share some social behaviors, dietary, and ecological parameters, they display a range of social dominance styles from despotic to tolerant. A previous study found a larger repertoire of facial displays in tolerant macaque species relative to despotic species. The present study was designed to further explore this finding by comparing the gross morphological features of mimetic muscles between the Sulawesi macaque (Macaca nigra), a tolerant species, and the rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), a despotic species. Five adult M. nigra heads were dissected and mimetic musculature was compared to those from M. mulatta. Results showed that there was general similarity in muscle presence/absence between the species as well as muscle form except for musculature around the external ear. M. mulatta had more musculature around the external ear than M. nigra. In addition, M. nigra lacked a zygomaticus minor while M. mulatta is reported to have one. These morphological differences match behavioral observations documenting a limited range of ear movements used by M. nigra during facial displays. Future studies focusing on a wider phylogenetic range of macaques with varying dominance styles may further elucidate the roles of phylogeny, ecology, and social variables in the evolution of mimetic muscles within Macaca Anat Rec, 299:1317-1324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Automated chair-training of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Ponce, C R; Genecin, M P; Perez-Melara, G; Livingstone, M S

    2016-04-01

    Neuroscience research on non-human primates usually requires the animals to sit in a chair. To do this, typically monkeys are fitted with collars and trained to enter the chairs using either a pole, leash and jump cage. Animals may initially show resistance and risk injury. We have developed an automated chair-training method that minimizes restraints to ease the animals into their chairs. We developed a method to automatically train animals to enter a primate chair and stick out their heads for neckplate placement. To do this, we fitted the chairs with Arduino microcontrollers coupled to a water-reward system and touch- and proximity sensors. We found that the animals responded well to the chair, partially entering the chair within hours, sitting inside the chair within days and allowing us to manually introduce a door and neck plate, all within 14-21 sessions. Although each session could last many hours, automation meant that actual training person-hours could be as little as half an hour per day. The biggest advantage was that animals showed little resistance to entering the chair, compared to monkeys trained by leash pulling. This automated chair-training method can take longer than the standard collar-and-leash approach, but multiple macaques can be trained in parallel with fewer person-hours. It is also a promising method for animal-use refinement and in our case, it was the only effective training approach for an animal suffering from a behavioral pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing natural introgression in 2 biomedical model species, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and the long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Maxime; Cuartero, Sergi; Blancher, Antoine; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) are the 2 most commonly used primate model species in biomedical sciences. Although morphological studies have revealed a weak hybridization at the interspecific contact zone, in the north of Indochina, a molecular study has suggested an ancient introgression from rhesus to long-tailed macaque into the Indo-Chinese peninsula. However, the gene flow between these 2 taxa has never been quantified using genetic data and theoretical models. In this study, we have examined genetic variation within and between the parapatric Chinese rhesus macaque and Indo-Chinese long-tailed macaque populations, using 13 autosomal, 5 sex-linked microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA sequence data. From these data, we assessed genetic structure and estimated gene flow using a Bayesian clustering approach and the "Isolation with Migration" model. Our results reveal a weak interspecific genetic differentiation at both autosomal and sex-linked loci, suggesting large population sizes and/or gene flow between populations. According to the Bayesian clustering, Chinese rhesus macaque is a highly homogeneous gene pool that contributes strongly to the current Indo-Chinese long-tailed macaque genetic makeup, whether or not current admixture is assumed. Coalescent simulations, which integrated the characteristics of the loci, pointed out 1) a higher effective population size in rhesus macaque, 2) no mitochondrial gene flow, and 3) unilateral and male-mediated nuclear gene flow of approximately 10 migrants per generation from rhesus to long-tailed macaque. These patterns of genetic structure and gene flow suggest extensive ancient introgression from Chinese rhesus macaque into the Indo-Chinese long-tailed macaque population.

  5. Testosterone Correlates with Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus in Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-29

    19], and azoosper- mia has been associated with SIV infection in young male rhesus macaques [20]. Depressed androgen levels during physiological...Cytokine Networks in Tissue Immunity Edited by: Meltzer MS, Mantovani A. New York:Wiley-Liss; 1991:77-82. 11. Muehlenbein MP, Bribiescas RG

  6. Focal damage to macaque photoreceptors produces persistent visual loss

    PubMed Central

    Strazzeri, Jennifer M.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Masella, Benjamin D.; Yin, Lu; Fischer, William S.; DiLoreto, David A.; Libby, Richard T.; Williams, David R.; Merigan, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Insertion of light-gated channels into inner retina neurons restores neural light responses, light evoked potentials, visual optomotor responses and visually-guided maze behavior in mice blinded by retinal degeneration. This method of vision restoration bypasses damaged outer retina, providing stimulation directly to retinal ganglion cells in inner retina. The approach is similar to that of electronic visual protheses, but may offer some advantages, such as avoidance of complex surgery and direct targeting of many thousands of neurons. However, the promise of this technique for restoring human vision remains uncertain because rodent animal models, in which it has been largely developed, are not ideal for evaluating visual perception. On the other hand, psychophysical vision studies in macaque can be used to evaluate different approaches to vision restoration in humans. Furthermore, it has not been possible to test vision restoration in macaques, the optimal model for human-like vision, because there has been no macaque model of outer retina degeneration. In this study, we describe development of a macaque model of photoreceptor degeneration that can in future studies be used to test restoration of perception by visual prostheses. Our results show that perceptual deficits caused by focal light damage are restricted to locations at which photoreceptors are damaged, that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to track such lesions, and that adaptive optics retinal imaging, which we recently used for in vivo recording of ganglion cell function, can be used in future studies to examine these lesions. PMID:24316158

  7. Spatial Relational Memory in 9-Month-Old Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys ("Macaca mulatta"). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in…

  8. Heterospecific SNP diversity in humans and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2015-08-01

    Conservation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between human and other primates (i.e., heterospecific SNPs) in candidate genes can be used to assess the utility of those organisms as models for human biomedical research. A total of 59,691 heterospecific SNPs in 22 rhesus macaques and 20 humans were analyzed for human trait associations and 4207 heterospecific SNPs biallelic in both taxa were compared for genetic variation. Variation comparisons at the 4207 SNPs showed that humans were more genetically diverse than rhesus macaques with observed and expected heterozygosities of 0.337 and 0.323 vs. 0.119 and 0.102, and minor allele frequencies of 0.239 and 0.063, respectively. In total, 431 of the 59,691 heterospecific SNPs are reportedly associated with human-specific traits. While comparisons between human and rhesus macaque genomes are plausible, functional studies of heterospecific SNPs are necessary to determine whether rhesus macaque alleles are associated with the same phenotypes as their corresponding human alleles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Stepping toward a Macaque Model of HIV-1 Induced AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Jason T.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 exhibits a narrow host range, hindering the development of a robust animal model of pathogenesis. Past studies have demonstrated that the restricted host range of HIV-1 may be largely due to the inability of the virus to antagonize and evade effector molecules of the interferon response in other species. They have also guided the engineering of HIV-1 clones that can replicate in CD4 T-cells of Asian macaque species. However, while replication of these viruses in macaque hosts is persistent, it has been limited and without progression to AIDS. In a new study, Hatziioannou et al., demonstrate for the first time that adapted macaque-tropic HIV-1 can persistently replicate at high levels in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina), but only if CD8 T-cells are depleted at the time of inoculation. The infection causes rapid disease and recapitulates several aspects of AIDS in humans. Additionally, the virus undergoes genetic changes to further escape innate immunity in association with disease progression. Here, the importance of these findings is discussed, as they relate to pathogenesis and model development. PMID:25256394

  10. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina).

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Diane E; Fong, Derek L; Vogel, Keith W; Durning, W McIntyre; Torrence, Anne E; Rose, Timothy M; Staheli, Jeannette P; Baldessari, Audrey; Murnane, Robert D; Hukkannen, Renee R

    2014-06-01

    An adult, gravid, female pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) presented for facial swelling centered on the left mandible that was approximately 5 cm wide. Differential diagnoses included infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic origins. Definitive antemortem diagnosis was not possible, and the macaque's condition worsened despite supportive care. Necropsy findings included a mandibular mass that was locally invasive and expansile, encompassing approximately 80% of the left mandibular bone. The mass replaced portions of the soft palate, hard palate, sinuses, ear canal, and the caudal-rostral calvarium and masseter muscle. Histologically, the mass was a neoplasm that was poorly circumscribed, unencapsulated, and infiltrative invading regional bone and soft tissue. The mass consisted of polygonal squamous epithelial cells with intercellular bridging that breached the epithelial basement membrane and formed invasive nests, cords, and trabeculae. The mitotic rate averaged 3 per 400× field of view, with occasional bizarre mitotic figures. Epithelial cells often exhibited dyskeratosis, and the nests often contained compact lamellated keratin (keratin pearls). The neoplasm was positive via immunohistochemistry for pancytokeratin, variably positive for S100, and negative for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and desmin. The gross, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with an aggressive oral squamous cell carcinoma. The neoplasm was negative via PCR for papilloma virus. In general, neoplasia in macaques is rare. Although squamous cell carcinomas are one of the most common oral neoplasia in many species, to our knowledge this case represents the first reported oral squamous cell carcinoma in a pigtailed macaque.

  11. Phylogeny of the macaques (Cercopithecidae: Macaca) based on Alu elements

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Han, Kyudong; Xing, Jinchuan; Kim, Heui-Soo; Rogers, Jeffrey; Ryder, Oliver A.; Disotell, Todd; Yue, Bisong; Batzer, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Genus Macaca (Cercopithecidae: Papionini) is one of the most successful primate radiations. Despite previous studies on morphology and mitochondrial DNA analysis, a number of issues regarding the details of macaque evolution remain unsolved. Alu elements are a class of non-autonomous retroposons belonging to short interspersed elements that are specific to the primate lineage. Because retroposon insertions show very little homoplasy, and because the ancestral state (absence of the SINE) is known, Alu elements are useful genetic markers and have been utilized for analyzing primate phylogenentic relationships and human population genetic relationships. Using PCR display methodology, 298 new Alu insertions have been identified from ten species of macaques. Together with 60 loci reported previously, a total of 358 loci are used to infer the phylogenetic relationships of genus Macaca. With regard to earlier unresolved issues on the macaque evolution, the topology of our tree suggests that: 1) genus Macaca contains four monophyletic species groups; 2) within the Asian macaques, the silenus group diverged first, and members of the sinica and fascicularis groups share a common ancestor; 3) Macaca arctoides are classified in the sinica group. Our results provide a robust molecular phylogeny for genus Macaca with stronger statistical support than previous studies. The present study also illustrates that SINE-based approaches are a powerful tool in primate phylogenetic studies and can be used to successfully resolve evolutionary relationships between taxa at scales from the ordinal level to closely related species within one genus. PMID:19497354

  12. Personality of Wild Male Crested Macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christof; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Animal personalities, i.e. consistent differences in behavior across time and/or context, have received increased attention of behavioral biologists over the last years. Recent research shows that personalities represent traits on which natural and sexual selection work and which can have substantial fitness consequences. The aim of this study is to establish the personality structure of crested macaque (Macaca nigra) males as foundation for future studies on its adaptive value. We collected behavioral data through focal animal sampling and additionally conducted two sets of playback experiments. Results of a factor analysis on the behavioral data revealed a four factor structure with components we labeled Anxiety, Sociability, Connectedness and Aggressiveness. Results from the experiments revealed an additional and independent Boldness factor but the absence of Neophilia. Overall, this structure resembles other macaque and animal species with the exception of Connectedness, which might be a consequence of the species' tolerant social style. Our results thus not only form the basis for future studies on the adaptive value of personality in crested macaques but also contribute an important data point for investigating the evolution of personality structure from a comparative perspective by refining, for example, which personality factors characterized the last common ancestor of hominids and macaques. PMID:23940517

  13. Spatial Relational Memory in 9-Month-Old Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys ("Macaca mulatta"). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in…

  14. Is male rhesus macaque red color ornamentation attractive to females?

    PubMed Central

    Dubuc, Constance; Allen, William L.; Maestripieri, Dario; Higham, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Male sexually-selected traits can evolve through different mechanisms: conspicuous and colorful ornaments usually evolve through inter-sexual selection, while weapons usually evolve through intra-sexual selection. Male ornaments are rare among mammals in comparison to birds, leading to the notion that female mate choice generally plays little role in trait evolution in this taxon. Supporting this view, when ornaments are present in mammals they typically indicate social status and are products of male-male competition. This general mammalian pattern, however, may not apply to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Males of this species display conspicuous skin coloration, but this expression is not correlated to dominance rank, and is therefore unlikely to have evolved due to male-male competition. Here, we investigate whether male color expression influences female proceptivity towards males in the Cayo Santiago free-ranging rhesus macaque population. We collected face images of 24 adult males varying in dominance rank and age at the peak of the mating season, and modeled these to rhesus macaque visual perception. We also recorded female socio-sexual behaviors towards these males. Results show that dark red males received more sexual solicitations, by more females, than pale pink ones. Together with previous results, our study suggests that male color ornaments are more likely to be a product of inter- rather than intra-sexual selection. This may especially be the case in rhesus macaques due to the particular characteristics of male-male competition in this species. PMID:25246728

  15. Expression of cytochrome P450 regulators in cynomolgus macaque.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-09-11

    1. Cytochrome P450 (P450) regulators including nuclear receptors and transcription factors have not been fully investigated in cynomolgus macaques, an important species used in drug metabolism studies. In this study, we analyzed 17 P450 regulators by sequence and phylogenetic analysis, and tissue expression. 2. Gene and genome structures of 17 P450 regulators were similar to the human orthologs, and the deduced amino acid sequences showed high sequence identities (92-95%) and more closely clustered in a phylogenetic tree, with the human orthologs. 3. Many of the P450 regulator mRNAs were preferentially expressed in the liver, kidney, and/or jejunum. Among the P450 regulator mRNAs, PXR was most abundant in the liver and jejunum, and HNF4α in the kidney. In the liver, the expression of most P450 regulator mRNAs did not show significant differential expression (>2.5-fold) between cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia, China, and Indonesia, or rhesus macaques. 4. By correlation analysis, most of the P450 regulators were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to other P450 regulators, and many of them were also significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with P450s. 5. These results suggest that 17 P450 regulators of cynomolgus macaques had similar molecular characteristics to the human orthologs.

  16. Surgical technique for allogeneic uterus transplantation in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Hideaki; Kisu, Iori; Kato, Yojiro; Yamada, Yohei; Matsubara, Kentaro; Emoto, Katsura; Adachi, Masataka; Matoba, Yusuke; Umene, Kiyoko; Nogami, Yuya; Banno, Kouji; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Itagaki, Iori; Kawamoto, Ikuo; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Itoh, Yasushi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Saiki, Yoko; Sato, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Kenshi; Shiina, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    No study has reported an animal model of uterus transplantation (UTx) using cynomolgus macaques. We aimed to establish a surgical technique of allogeneic UTx assuming the recovery of a uterus from a deceased donor in cynomolgus macaques. Four allogeneic UTxs were performed in female cynomolgus macaques. Donor surgeries comprised en bloc recovery of organs with iliac vessels on both sides, and/or abdominal aorta/vena cava after sufficient perfusion from one femoral artery or external iliac artery. Before perfusion, 150 mL of whole blood was obtained from the donor for subsequent blood transfusion to the recipient. Four uterine grafts were orthotopically transplanted to recipients. End-to-side anastomosis was performed to the iliac vessels on one side in case 1 and iliac vessels on both sides in case 2; aorto-aorto/cavo-caval anastomosis was performed in cases 3 and 4. Arterial blood flow of the uterine grafts was determined by intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography. ICG angiography results showed sufficient blood flow to all uterine grafts, and anaemia did not progress. Under appropriate immune suppression, all recipients survived for more than 90 days post-transplantation, without any surgical complications. We describe a surgical technique for allogeneic UTx in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27786258

  17. Status of urban populations of the long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ilham, Kurnia; Rizaldi; Nurdin, Jabang; Tsuji, Yamato

    2017-04-01

    We studied long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) populations in Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia, focusing on the effect of human provisioning on their demography and dietary composition. We conducted a field survey at three sites in the city: Gunung Meru, Gunung Padang, and Gunung Panggilun. Mean troop size (range 28-68) and infant ratio (range 0.38-1.00) were greater in Gunung Meru, where the macaques have been highly provisioned, than at the other two study sites (troop size 10-15; infant ratio 0.00-0.33). The macaques at all sites consumed both natural and human foods, but dependence on the latter differed among sites: three-quarters of the diet of macaques in Gunung Meru consisted of human foods, while human foods comprised less than 5% of the macaque diet at the other sites. The ability of macaques to modify the proportion of human food is a behavioral flexibility that facilitates the survival of the long-tailed macaque in urban habitats. Without restrictions on provisioning, the degree of dependence of macaques on human foods and population size could increase, especially in Gunung Meru, and human-macaque conflict could escalate. In order to create an effective management policy for urbanized monkeys, long-term quantitative data on macaque behavior and monitoring of population parameters are required.

  18. Population dynamics of rhesus macaques and associated foamy virus in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Feeroz, Mostafa M; Soliven, Khanh; Small, Christopher T; Engel, Gregory A; Andreina Pacheco, M; Yee, JoAnn L; Wang, Xiaoxing; Kamrul Hasan, M; Oh, Gunwha; Levine, Kathryn L; Rabiul Alam, SM; Craig, Karen L; Jackson, Dana L; Lee, Eun-Gyung; Barry, Peter A; Lerche, Nicholas W; Escalante, Ananias A; Matsen IV, Frederick A; Linial, Maxine L; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Foamy viruses are complex retroviruses that have been shown to be transmitted from nonhuman primates to humans. In Bangladesh, infection with simian foamy virus (SFV) is ubiquitous among rhesus macaques, which come into contact with humans in diverse locations and contexts throughout the country. We analyzed microsatellite DNA from 126 macaques at six sites in Bangladesh in order to characterize geographic patterns of macaque population structure. We also included in this study 38 macaques owned by nomadic people who train them to perform for audiences. PCR was used to analyze a portion of the proviral gag gene from all SFV-positive macaques, and multiple clones were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis was used to infer long-term patterns of viral transmission. Analyses of SFV gag gene sequences indicated that macaque populations from different areas harbor genetically distinct strains of SFV, suggesting that geographic features such as forest cover play a role in determining the dispersal of macaques and SFV. We also found evidence suggesting that humans traveling the region with performing macaques likely play a role in the translocation of macaques and SFV. Our studies found that individual animals can harbor more than one strain of SFV and that presence of more than one SFV strain is more common among older animals. Some macaques are infected with SFV that appears to be recombinant. These findings paint a more detailed picture of how geographic and sociocultural factors influence the spectrum of simian-borne retroviruses. PMID:26038465

  19. Epigallocatechin Gallate Inhibits Macaque SEVI-Mediated Enhancement of SIV or SHIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Run-Hong; Guo, Le; Liu, Jin-Biao; Liu, Hang; Hou, Wei; Ma, Tong-Cui; Wang, Xu; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ye, Li; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2017-06-01

    Human semen contains a factor that can enhance HIV infection up to 10-fold in cultures. This factor is termed semen-derived enhancer of virus infection (SEVI) and is composed of proteolytic fragments (PAP248-286) from prostatic acid phosphatase in semen. In this study, we examined whether macaque SEVI can facilitate simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection. We also studied the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on macaque SEVI-mediated SIV or SHIV enhancement. SIV or SHIV was mixed with different concentrations of macaque SEVI in the presence or absence of EGCG. The mixture was added to cultures of TZM-bl cells or macaque PBMCs. The effect of EGCG on macaque SEVI was measured by Congo-red staining assay and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay and was visualized by a transmission electron microscope. We identified that there is one amino acid difference at the site of 277 between human PAP248-286 and macaque PAP248-286. Macaque SEVI significantly enhanced SIV or SHIV infection of TZM-bl cells and macaque PBMCs. EGCG could block macaque SEVI-mediated enhancement of SIV or SHIV infection. Mechanistically, EGCG could degrade the formation of macaque SEVI amyloid fibrils that facilitates HIV attachment to the target cells. The finding that macaque SEVI could enhance SIV or SHIV infection indicates the possibility to use the macaque SEVI in vivo studies with the macaque models. In addition, future studies are necessary to examine whether EGCG can be used as an effective microbicide for preventing SIV or SHIV mucosal transmission.

  20. Quantum process tomography of excitonic dimers from two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. I. General theory and applications to homodimers

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen-Zhou, J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Is it possible to infer the time evolving quantum state of a multichromophoric system from a sequence of two-dimensional electronic spectra (2D-ES) as a function of waiting time? Here we provide a positive answer for a tractable model system: a coupled dimer. After exhaustively enumerating the Liouville pathways associated to each peak in the 2D-ES, we argue that by judiciously combining the information from a series of experiments varying the polarization and frequency components of the pulses, detailed information at the amplitude level about the input and output quantum states at the waiting time can be obtained. This possibility yields a quantum process tomography (QPT) of the single-exciton manifold, which completely characterizes the open quantum system dynamics through the reconstruction of the process matrix. In this manuscript, we present the general theory as well as specific and numerical results for a homodimer, for which we prove that signals stemming from coherence to population transfer and vice versa vanish upon isotropic averaging, therefore, only allowing for a partial QPT in such case. However, this fact simplifies the spectra, and it follows that only two polarization controlled experiments (and no pulse-shaping requirements) suffice to yield the elements of the process matrix, which survive under isotropic averaging. Redundancies in the 2D-ES amplitudes allow for the angle between the two site transition dipole moments to be self-consistently obtained, hence simultaneously yielding structural and dynamical information of the dimer. Model calculations are presented, as well as an error analysis in terms of the angle between the dipoles and peak amplitude extraction. In the second article accompanying this study, we numerically exemplify the theory for heterodimers and carry out a detailed error analysis for such case. This investigation reveals an exciting quantum information processing (QIP) approach to spectroscopic experiments of excitonic

  1. Characterization of spontaneous malignant lymphomas in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Hirata, A; Hashimoto, K; Katoh, Y; Sakai, H; Bruce, A G; Rose, T M; Kaneko, A; Suzuki, J; Nikami, H; Yanai, T

    2015-05-01

    Lymphomas are common spontaneous tumors in nonhuman primates but remain poorly characterized in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). This study examined 5 cases of spontaneous malignant lymphoma in Japanese macaques, focusing on the immunophenotypes and presence of simian lymphocryptoviruses, which are Epstein-Barr virus-related herpesviruses in nonhuman primates. The macaques with lymphoma were 5 to 28 years old, indicating that lymphomas develop over a wide age range. The common macroscopic findings were splenomegaly and enlargement of lymph nodes. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that all cases were non-Hodgkin type and exhibited a T-cell phenotype, positive for CD3 but negative for CD20 and CD79α. The lymphomas exhibited diverse cellular morphologies and were subdivided into 3 types according to the World Health Organization classification. These included 3 cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified; 1 case of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia; and 1 case of an unclassifiable T-cell lymphoma. Positive signals were detected by in situ hybridization in 2 of the 4 examined cases using probes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA (EBER). Furthermore, the presence of M. fuscata lymphocryptovirus 2, a macaque homolog of Epstein-Barr virus, was demonstrated in EBER-positive cases by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by direct sequencing. Immunohistochemistry using antibody to the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 was negative, even in the EBER-positive cases. The present study suggests that T-cell lymphoma is more common than B-cell lymphoma in Japanese macaques and that M. fuscata lymphocryptovirus 2 is present in some cases.

  2. Experimental Inoculation of Juvenile Rhesus Macaques with Primate Enteric Caliciviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Karol; Feely, Stephanie; Fey, Brittney; Dufour, Jason; Hargitt, Edwin; Alvarez, Xavier; Pahar, Bapi; Gregoricus, Nicole; Vinjé, Jan; Farkas, Tibor

    2012-01-01

    Background Tissue culture-adapted Tulane virus (TV), a GI.1 rhesus enteric calicivirus (ReCV), and a mixture of GII.2 and GII.4 human norovirus (NoV)-containing stool sample were used to intrastomacheally inoculate juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in order to evaluate infection caused by these viruses. Methodology & Findings Two of the three TV-inoculated macaques developed diarrhea, fever, virus-shedding in stools, inflammation of duodenum and 16-fold increase of TV-neutralizing (VN) serum antibodies but no vomiting or viremia. No VN-antibody responses could be detected against a GI.2 ReCV strain FT285, suggesting that TV and FT285 represent different ReCV serotypes. Both NoV-inoculated macaques remained asymptomatic but with demonstrable virus shedding in one animal. Examination of duodenum biopsies of the TV-inoculated macaques showed lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria and villous blunting. TV antigen-positive (TV+) cells were detected in the lamina propria. In most of the TV+ cells TV co-localized perinuclearly with calnexin – an endoplasmic reticulum protein. A few CD20+TV+ double-positive B cells were also identified in duodenum. To corroborate the authenticity of CD20+TV+ B cells, in vitro cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy macaques were inoculated with TV. Multicolor flow cytometry confirmed the presence of TV antigen-containing B cells of predominantly CD20+HLA-DR+ phenotype. A 2-log increase of viral RNA by 6 days post inoculation (p<0.05) suggested active TV replication in cultured lymphocytes. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results show that ReCVs represent an alternative cell culture and animal model to study enteric calicivirus replication, pathogenesis and immunity. PMID:22666426

  3. Neonatal Amygdala Lesions Alter Responsiveness to Objects in Juvenile Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Toscano, Jessica E.; Bauman, Melissa; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is widely recognized to play a central role in emotional processing. In nonhuman primates, the amygdala appears to be critical for generating appropriate behavioral responses in emotionally salient contexts. One common finding is that macaque monkeys that receive amygdala lesions as adults are behaviorally uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. While control animals avoid these objects, amygdala-lesioned animals readily interact with them. Despite a large literature documenting the role of the amygdala in emotional processing in adult rhesus macaques, little research has assessed the role of the amygdala across the macaque neurodevelopmental trajectory. We assessed the behavioral responses of three-year-old (juvenile) rhesus macaques that received bilateral ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus at two weeks of age. Animals were presented with salient objects known to produce robust fear-related responses in macaques (e.g., snakes and reptile-like objects), mammal-like objects that included animal-like features (e.g., eyes and mouths) but not reptile-like features (e.g., scales), and non-animal objects. The visual complexity of objects was scaled to vary the objects' salience. In contrast to control and hippocampus-lesioned animals, amygdale-lesioned animals were uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. They readily retrieved food rewards placed near these objects and physically explored the objects. Furthermore, while control and hippocampus-lesioned animals differentiated between levels of object complexity, amygdala-lesioned animals did not. Taken together, these findings suggest that early damage to the amygdala, like damage during adulthood, permanently compromises emotional processing. PMID:21215794

  4. Pharmacokinetics of cefovecin in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Raabe, Brigitte M; Lovaglio, Jamie; Grover, G Scott; Brown, Scott A; Boucher, Joseph F; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R; Gillhouse, Kimberly A; Stubbs, Makeida N; Hoggatt, Amber F; Halliday, Lisa C; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 ± 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 ± 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 ± 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie.; Grover, G Scott.; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang.; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 ± 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 ± 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 ± 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage. PMID:21640036

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  7. Heading Tuning in Macaque Area V6

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Reuben H.; Liu, Sheng; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical areas, such as the dorsal subdivision of the medial superior temporal area (MSTd) and the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), have been shown to integrate visual and vestibular self-motion signals. Area V6 is interconnected with areas MSTd and VIP, allowing for the possibility that V6 also integrates visual and vestibular self-motion cues. An alternative hypothesis in the literature is that V6 does not use these sensory signals to compute heading but instead discounts self-motion signals to represent object motion. However, the responses of V6 neurons to visual and vestibular self-motion cues have never been studied, thus leaving the functional roles of V6 unclear. We used a virtual reality system to examine the 3D heading tuning of macaque V6 neurons in response to optic flow and inertial motion stimuli. We found that the majority of V6 neurons are selective for heading defined by optic flow. However, unlike areas MSTd and VIP, V6 neurons are almost universally unresponsive to inertial motion in the absence of optic flow. We also explored the spatial reference frames of heading signals in V6 by measuring heading tuning for different eye positions, and we found that the visual heading tuning of most V6 cells was eye-centered. Similar to areas MSTd and VIP, the population of V6 neurons was best able to discriminate small variations in heading around forward and backward headings. Our findings support the idea that V6 is involved primarily in processing visual motion signals and does not appear to play a role in visual–vestibular integration for self-motion perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To understand how we successfully navigate our world, it is important to understand which parts of the brain process cues used to perceive our direction of self-motion (i.e., heading). Cortical area V6 has been implicated in heading computations based on human neuroimaging data, but direct measurements of heading selectivity in individual V6 neurons have been lacking. We

  8. BMP-2/6 Heterodimer Is More Effective than BMP-2 or BMP-6 Homodimers as Inductor of Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Elvira; Isaacs, Michael J.; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Choe, Senyon

    2010-01-01

    Background Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathways are involved in differentiation of stem cells into diverse cell types, and thus BMPs can be used as main guidance molecules for in vitro differentiation of human stem cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the ability for inducing differentiation of the heterodimer BMP-2/BMP-6 (BMP-2/6) compared to the homodimers BMP-2 or BMP-6, using human embryonic stem (hES) cells H9 as model system. When incubated in a medium with high concentration of basic fibroblastic growth factor (FGF2), 100 ng/ml of human recombinant BMPs induced morphological changes and differentiation of hES cells in 24 to 48 hours. After 5 days, expression of differentiation markers was induced and quantified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and flow cytometry. BMP-2/6 exhibited stronger activity for the induction of the expression of trophectodermal (CDX2) and endodermal (SOX17, GATA4, AFP) markers than BMP-2 or BMP-6 homodimers. BMP-2/6 also induced the expression of BMPR2 gene more effectively than BMP-2 or BMP-6 when used at the same concentration and time. Moreover, the percentage of cells expressing the surface endodermal marker CXCR4 was also increased for the heterodimer when compared to both homodimers. BMP-2/6 was a more potent activator of Smad-dependent (SMAD1/5) and Smad-independent signaling (mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and p38) than BMP-2 and BMP-6, and the activation of these pathways might play a role in its increased potency for inducing hES cell differentiation. Conclusions/Significance Therefore, we conclude that BMP-2/6 is more potent than BMP-2 or BMP-6 for inducing differentiation of hES cells, and it can be used as a more powerful substitute of these BMPs in in vitro differentiation guidance. PMID:20567515

  9. BMP-2/6 heterodimer is more effective than BMP-2 or BMP-6 homodimers as inductor of differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Valera, Elvira; Isaacs, Michael J; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Choe, Senyon

    2010-06-17

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathways are involved in differentiation of stem cells into diverse cell types, and thus BMPs can be used as main guidance molecules for in vitro differentiation of human stem cells. We have analyzed the ability for inducing differentiation of the heterodimer BMP-2/BMP-6 (BMP-2/6) compared to the homodimers BMP-2 or BMP-6, using human embryonic stem (hES) cells H9 as model system. When incubated in a medium with high concentration of basic fibroblastic growth factor (FGF2), 100 ng/ml of human recombinant BMPs induced morphological changes and differentiation of hES cells in 24 to 48 hours. After 5 days, expression of differentiation markers was induced and quantified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and flow cytometry. BMP-2/6 exhibited stronger activity for the induction of the expression of trophectodermal (CDX2) and endodermal (SOX17, GATA4, AFP) markers than BMP-2 or BMP-6 homodimers. BMP-2/6 also induced the expression of BMPR2 gene more effectively than BMP-2 or BMP-6 when used at the same concentration and time. Moreover, the percentage of cells expressing the surface endodermal marker CXCR4 was also increased for the heterodimer when compared to both homodimers. BMP-2/6 was a more potent activator of Smad-dependent (SMAD1/5) and Smad-independent signaling (mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and p38) than BMP-2 and BMP-6, and the activation of these pathways might play a role in its increased potency for inducing hES cell differentiation. Therefore, we conclude that BMP-2/6 is more potent than BMP-2 or BMP-6 for inducing differentiation of hES cells, and it can be used as a more powerful substitute of these BMPs in in vitro differentiation guidance.

  10. The Same Periplasmic ExbD Residues Mediate In Vivo Interactions between ExbD Homodimers and ExbD-TonB Heterodimers ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ollis, Anne A.; Postle, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The TonB system couples cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force to TonB-gated outer membrane transporters for active transport of nutrients into the periplasm. In Escherichia coli, cytoplasmic membrane proteins ExbB and ExbD promote conformational changes in TonB, which transmits this energy to the transporters. The only known energy-dependent interaction occurs between the periplasmic domains of TonB and ExbD. This study identified sites of in vivo homodimeric interactions within ExbD periplasmic domain residues 92 to 121. ExbD was active as a homodimer (ExbD2) but not through all Cys substitution sites, suggesting the existence of conformationally dynamic regions in the ExbD periplasmic domain. A subset of homodimeric interactions could not be modeled on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure without significant distortion. Most importantly, the majority of ExbD Cys substitutions that mediated homodimer formation also mediated ExbD-TonB heterodimer formation with TonB A150C. Consistent with the implied competition, ExbD homodimer formation increased in the absence of TonB. Although ExbD D25 was not required for their formation, ExbD dimers interacted in vivo with ExbB. ExbD-TonB interactions required ExbD transmembrane domain residue D25. These results suggested a model where ExbD2 assembled with ExbB undergoes a transmembrane domain-dependent transition and exchanges partners in localized homodimeric interfaces to form an ExbD2-TonB heterotrimer. The findings here were also consistent with our previous hypothesis that ExbD guides the conformation of the TonB periplasmic domain, which itself is conformationally dynamic. PMID:21984795

  11. The same periplasmic ExbD residues mediate in vivo interactions between ExbD homodimers and ExbD-TonB heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Anne A; Postle, Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    The TonB system couples cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force to TonB-gated outer membrane transporters for active transport of nutrients into the periplasm. In Escherichia coli, cytoplasmic membrane proteins ExbB and ExbD promote conformational changes in TonB, which transmits this energy to the transporters. The only known energy-dependent interaction occurs between the periplasmic domains of TonB and ExbD. This study identified sites of in vivo homodimeric interactions within ExbD periplasmic domain residues 92 to 121. ExbD was active as a homodimer (ExbD(2)) but not through all Cys substitution sites, suggesting the existence of conformationally dynamic regions in the ExbD periplasmic domain. A subset of homodimeric interactions could not be modeled on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure without significant distortion. Most importantly, the majority of ExbD Cys substitutions that mediated homodimer formation also mediated ExbD-TonB heterodimer formation with TonB A150C. Consistent with the implied competition, ExbD homodimer formation increased in the absence of TonB. Although ExbD D25 was not required for their formation, ExbD dimers interacted in vivo with ExbB. ExbD-TonB interactions required ExbD transmembrane domain residue D25. These results suggested a model where ExbD(2) assembled with ExbB undergoes a transmembrane domain-dependent transition and exchanges partners in localized homodimeric interfaces to form an ExbD(2)-TonB heterotrimer. The findings here were also consistent with our previous hypothesis that ExbD guides the conformation of the TonB periplasmic domain, which itself is conformationally dynamic.

  12. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound homodimers determined by guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry: application to cytosine and 5-substituted cytosines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2013-11-19

    Base-pairing interactions in proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)·C) are the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Permethylation of cytosine in extended (CCG)·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats has been shown to cause fragile-X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. Oligonucleotides containing 5-bromo- or 5-fluorocytosine can bind to proteins that selectively bind methylated DNA, suggesting that halogenated cytosine damage products can potentially mimic methylation signals. However, the influence of methylation or halogenation on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of proton-bound dimers of cytosine and their impact on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations is presently unknown. To address this, proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and 5-methyl-, 5-fluoro-, 5-bromo-, and 5-iodocytosine are investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The BPEs of proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and the modified cytosines are measured by threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. 5-Methylation of cytosine is found to increase the BPE and would therefore tend to stabilize DNA i-motif conformations. In contrast, 5-halogenation lowers the BPE. However, the BPEs of the proton-bound 5-halocytosine homodimers examined here still significantly exceed that of Watson-Crick G·C base pairs, such that DNA i-motif conformations should be preserved in the presence of these modifications. Excellent agreement between TCID measured and B3LYP calculated BPEs is found, suggesting that B3LYP calculations can be used to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  13. Macaques in farms and folklore: exploring the human-nonhuman primate interface in Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riley, Erin P; Priston, Nancy E C

    2010-09-01

    The island of Sulawesi is an ecologically diverse and anthropogenically complex region in the Indonesian archipelago; it is home to multiple macaque species and a key locus of human-nonhuman primate interconnections. Here, we review the ethnoprimatology of Sulawesi by exploring two primary domains of the human-macaque interface: overlapping resource use and cultural perceptions of macaques. Crop raiding is the primary form of overlapping resource use. While the raiding of cacao plantations predominates in Central and South Sulawesi, subsistence crops (e.g., sweet potato and maize) are most vulnerable on Buton, Southeast Sulawesi. Despite this overlap levels of conflict are generally low, with farmers showing considerable tolerance. This tolerance can be explained by positive perceptions of the macaques despite their crop raiding behavior, and the finding that in some areas macaques figure prominently in local folklore, hence affording them protection. These findings provide some hope for the future management and conservation of these endemic macaques.

  14. Visual discrimination of male and female faces by infant rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Paukner, Annika; Huntsberry, Mary E.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that human infants process female faces differently from male faces. To test whether a similar preference for female faces exists in other primates, we presented nursery-reared infant rhesus macaques with photographs of macaque faces and human faces. At less than 1 month old, infant macaques preferentially oriented towards female macaque faces when faces were presented upright. No preference for female human faces was found. At 9 months old, infants failed to show a visual preference for female macaque faces or female human faces, although they showed significantly more lipsmacking responses at female human faces. Compared to human infants, macaques appear to have stronger predispositions early in life but this preference may nonetheless be amendable to experience. Understanding how innate predispositions and the social rearing environment shape infants’ understanding of faces remain important issues to be explored in order to understand facial processing abilities in humans and other primates. PMID:19937740

  15. Differential Response of the Cynomolgus Macaque Gut Microbiota to Shigella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Panda, Aruna; Rasko, David A.; Toapanta, Franklin R.; Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A.; Khan, Abdul Q.; Liu, Zhenqiu; Shipley, Steven T.; DeTolla, Louis J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of gut microbiota in response to live oral vaccines against enteric pathogens. We examined the effect of immunization with an oral live-attenuated Shigella dysenteriae 1 vaccine and challenge with wild-type S. dysenteriae 1 on the fecal microbiota of cynomolgus macaques using 16 S rRNA analysis of fecal samples. Multi-dimensional cluster analysis identified different bacterial community types within macaques from geographically distinct locations. The fecal microbiota of Mauritian macaques, observed to be genetically distinct, harbored a high-diversity community and responded differently to Shigella immunization, as well as challenge compared to the microbiota in non-Mauritian macaques. While both macaque populations exhibited anti-Shigella antibody responses, clinical shigellosis was observed only among non-Mauritian macaques. These studies highlight the importance of further investigation into the possible protective role of the microbiota against enteric pathogens and consideration of host genetic backgrounds in conducting vaccine studies. PMID:23755118

  16. Homodimers of cytosine and 1-methylcytosine. A DFT study of geometry, relative stability and H-NMR shifts in gas-phase and selected solvents.

    PubMed

    Paytakov, Guvanchmyrat; Gorb, Leonid; Stepanyugin, Andriy; Samiylenko, Svitlana; Hovorun, Dmytro; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    Dimers of cytosine and its N¹-methylated counterpart were investigated in gas-phase and in various solvents including chloroform, dimethylsulfoxide, and water. The studies were performed at DFT/M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Relative stabilities of tautomers of cytosine solvated explicitly by a small number of solvent molecules were evaluated. Further solvation effect calculations for homodimers were carried out with conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM). H-NMR shifts and IR frequencies for optimized structures were calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  17. Therapy of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Conze, Theresa; Wehrend, Axel; Exner, Cornelia; Kaminiarz, André

    2016-08-01

    A rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was presented for anuria. Examination revealed calcium oxalate concrements in the bladder. A cystotomy was performed, and a therapy with alfuzosin was conducted. Over 1 year after the treatment, the rhesus macaque had not shown any more signs of stranguria. This is the first case reporting the successful treatment of urolithiasis in a rhesus macaque. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Brain abscess in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a cephalic implant.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristy; McCort, Holly; Reuter, Jon D

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of brain abscess after craniotomy and the placement of a recording chamber for electrophysiologic records in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) enrolled in visual research. Approximately 2 wk after surgery, the macaque presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs and showed no evidence of fever, neurologic deficits, increased intracranial pressure, suggestive alterations in the CBC, or abnormal changes in the recording chamber. The macaque responded to symptomatic and antibiotic treatment and showed no behavioral or abnormal clinical signs for 3 wk before collapsing suddenly. The macaque was euthanized, and pathologic evaluation revealed a large brain abscess immediately under the original craniotomy.

  19. Brain Abscess in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a Cephalic Implant

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristy; McCort, Holly; Reuter, Jon D

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of brain abscess after craniotomy and the placement of a recording chamber for electrophysiologic records in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) enrolled in visual research. Approximately 2 wk after surgery, the macaque presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs and showed no evidence of fever, neurologic deficits, increased intracranial pressure, suggestive alterations in the CBC, or abnormal changes in the recording chamber. The macaque responded to symptomatic and antibiotic treatment and showed no behavioral or abnormal clinical signs for 3 wk before collapsing suddenly. The macaque was euthanized, and pathologic evaluation revealed a large brain abscess immediately under the original craniotomy. PMID:24209974

  20. Macaque–Human Interactions and the Societal Perceptions of Macaques in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    SHA, JOHN CHIH MUN; GUMERT, MICHAEL D.; LEE, BENJAMIN P. Y-H.; JONES-ENGEL, LISA; CHAN, SHARON; FUENTES, AGUSTÍN

    2015-01-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human–macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human–macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows

  1. 1H NMR determination of the self-association of an acridine homodimer and its complexation with ethidium bromide in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Evstigneev, V. P.; Davies, D. B.

    2006-02-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy (500 MHz) has been used to investigate the self-association in aqueous buffered solution of a bis-intercalator, acridine homodimer (AcrH), and its hetero-association with the aromatic dye, ethidium bromide (EB). The equilibrium constants and thermodynamical parameters (enthalpy and entropy) of self-association have been determined from the observed concentration and temperature dependences of chemical shifts of AcrH protons and the results are consistent with a model consisting of at least four distinct forms of AcrH molecules in solution: unfolded (U), folded (F), a dimer formed from two folded molecules (F 2) and a trimer formed from three folded molecules (F 3). It has also been shown that ethidium bromide complexes strongly to the dimer form (F 2) of the bis-acridine molecule, AcrH. Comparison of the calculated association parameters of AcrH with the previously studied ethidium homodimer (EBH) revealed a correlation between the effectiveness of complexation and the length of chain connecting the chromophores of a bis-intercalator.

  2. 1H NMR investigation of the self-association of ethidium homodimer and its complexation with propidium iodide in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, A. N.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Veselkov, D. A.; Hernandez Santiago, A. A.; Davies, D. B.

    2004-03-01

    The self-association of a bis-intercalator, ethidium homodimer (EBH), and its hetero-association with phenanthridine dye, propidium iodide (PI), have been studied by 1D and 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration and temperature. Experimental results have shown that dynamic equilibrium in solution includes different conformational states of EBH molecules: folded (F) and unfolded (U) forms, a dimer form (F 2) where an aromatic chromophore of one of EBH molecules is inserted (intercalated) between the linked chromophores of the other homodimer molecule and a trimer complex (F 3) with two partitially intercalated aromatic chromophores between the chromophores of the folded EBH molecule. It has been found that EBH associates with propidium iodide forming 1:1 complex, where PI is inserted between the chromophores of the folded form, and 1:2 complex resulting from intercalation of PI into F 2 EBH dimer. Thermodynamical parameters of EBH self-association and complexation between EBH and PI have been determined and conclusions about the nature of the physical forces responsible for the formation of intermolecular complexes have been made.

  3. Systemic Spironucleosis In Two Immunodeficient Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, C; Kramer, J; Mejia, A; MacKey, J; Mansfield, KG; Miller, AD

    2011-01-01

    Spironucleus spp. are parasites of fish and terrestrial vertebrates including mice and turkeys that rarely cause extraintestinal disease. Two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were experimentally inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIVmac251). Both progressed to simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) within one year of inoculation and, in addition to common opportunistic infections including rhesus cytomegalovirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus, and rhesus adenovirus, developed systemic protozoal infections. In the first case, the protozoa were associated with colitis, multifocal abdominal abscessation, and lymphadenitis. In the second case they one of a number of organisms associated with extensive pyogranulomatous pneumonia and colitis. Ultrastructural, molecular, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the causative organism to be a species of Spironucleus closely related to Spironucleus meleagridis of turkeys. This is the first report of extraintestinal infection with Spironucleus sp. in higher mammals and further expands the list of opportunistic infections found in immunocompromised rhesus macaques. PMID:20351359

  4. Molecular and functional aspects of menstruation in the macaque.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Robert M; Slayden, Ov D

    2012-12-01

    Much of our understanding of the molecular control of menstruation arises from laboratory models that experimentally recapitulate some, but not all, aspects of uterine bleeding observed in women. These models include: in vitro culture of endometrial explants or isolated endometrial cells, transplantation of human endometrial tissue into immunodeficient mice and the induction of endometrial breakdown in appropriately pretreated mice. Each of these models has contributed to our understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms of menstruation, but nonhuman primates, especially macaques, are the animal model of choice for evaluating therapies for menstrual disorders. In this chapter we review some basic aspects of menstruation, with special emphasis on the macaque model and its relevance to the clinical issues of irregular and heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB).

  5. Retained fetal adrenal cortex in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher; Evans, Mark

    2014-10-01

    An incidental, bilateral, retained fetal adrenal cortex was detected in a male cynomolgus macaque (age, approximately 2.4 y) used in a 4-week toxicology study. Microscopic examination of the adrenal gland cortex zone revealed the presence of additional solid sheets and columns of cells supported by vascular capillary bed and composed of large polyhedral cells with abundant eosinophilic, slightly finely vacuolated cytoplasm that surrounded the entire circumference of the medulla. Nuclei were vesicular, round to oval with prominent small nucleoli. There was no evidence for inflammation or cellular degeneration. Based on the microscopic examination, a diagnosis of retained fetal cortex of the adrenal gland was made. This morphologic change resembles fetal cortex in human infants. To our knowledge, this case description is the first report of a cynomolgus macaque with the rare entity of retained fetal cortex, which should not be misinterpreted as a test article-related change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2011-11-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans.

  7. Biomechanical implications of cortical elastic properties of the macaque mandible.

    PubMed

    Dechow, Paul C; Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Gharpure, Poorva

    2017-06-17

    Knowledge of the variation in the elastic properties of mandibular cortical bone is essential for modeling bone function. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of rhesus macaque mandibular cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties from mandibles of dentate humans and baboons. Thirty cylindrical samples were harvested from each of six adult female rhesus monkey mandibles. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived from ultrasound velocity measurements. Further velocity measurements with longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic transducers along with measurements of bone density were used to compute three-dimensional cortical elastic properties using equations based on Hooke's law. Results showed regional variations in the elastic properties of macaque mandibular cortical bone that have both similarities and differences with that of humans and baboons. So far, the biological and structural basis of these differences is poorly understood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Diet and vasectomy: effects on atherogenesis in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T B; Lombardi, D M; Alexander, N J; Lewis, J C

    1986-02-01

    We report here the effect of a moderately atherogenic diet on the progression of atherosclerosis among cynomolgus macaques that were either vasectomized or sham vasectomized. Both groups were compared to sham vasectomized monkeys fed a control Monkey Chow diet. As expected, slight hyperlipoproteinemia induced by the moderately atherogenic diet increased endothelial cell replication rates and resulted in the development of intimal lesions among sham vasectomized monkeys. Unexpectedly, vasectomy resulted in reduced leukocyte adherence to arterial surfaces, reduced endothelial cell replication rates in response to the moderately atherogenic diet, and at most arterial sites, smaller intimal lesions were produced. These data suggest that with slight hyperlipoproteinemia vasectomy may result in a small protective effect against atherosclerosis, while other studies have shown that marked hyperlipoproteinemia in cynomolgus macaques along with vasectomy results in exacerbation of atherogenesis.

  9. Gastric trichobezoars in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Mook, Deborah M

    2002-12-01

    On physical examination, a 5 x 10-cm abdominal mass was found in an eight-year-old female rhesus macaque. Radiography revealed an opaque mass in the cranial portion of the abdomen, displacing the stomach craniad. Percutaneous biopsy obtained hair with little tissue, confirming a diagnosis of trichobezoar. Initially, the hairball was medically managed by oral administration of lubricants. Medical management proved unsuccessful, the macaque began to lose weight, and two gastric trichobezoars were subsequently removed surgically. Normal appetite and activity were regained within one week. Gastric trichobezoars may lead to severe clinical illness, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for anorexia and/or weight loss in any nonhuman primate. Trichobezoars may also be detected and treated prior to development of illness.

  10. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Guzman, Roberto E; Radi, Zaher A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis characterized by multifocal follicular lymphoid cell infiltrates with germinal centers, thyroid acinar atrophy and pituitary cell hyperplasia/hypertrophy of the adenohypophysis was detected in a vehicle control, 4-year-old female Cynomolgus macaque in a routine toxicology study. Lymphoid cells of germinal centers were positive for the B-cell marker CD20 by immunohistochemistry (IHC), while remaining lymphocytes were positive for the T-cell marker CD3. Hypertrophied/hyperplastic pituitary cells were positive for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by IHC, consistent with an adaptive response due to removal of hormonal negative feedback from the diseased thyroid gland. Features of this case are similar to chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in humans, an autoimmune disorder also known as Hashimoto's disease. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with compensatory pituitary changes may occur spontaneously in young, clinically normal cynomolgus macaques and its presence in drug treated animals should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Analysing Local Sparseness in the Macaque Brain Network

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raghavendra; Nagar, Seema; Nanavati, Amit A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the network structure of long distance pathways in the brain is a necessary step towards developing an insight into the brain’s function, organization and evolution. Dense global subnetworks of these pathways have often been studied, primarily due to their functional implications. Instead we study sparse local subnetworks of the pathways to establish the role of a brain area in enabling shortest path communication between its non-adjacent topological neighbours. We propose a novel metric to measure the topological communication load on a vertex due to its immediate neighbourhood, and show that in terms of distribution of this local communication load, a network of Macaque long distance pathways is substantially different from other real world networks and random graph models. Macaque network contains the entire range of local subnetworks, from star-like networks to clique-like networks, while other networks tend to contain a relatively small range of subnetworks. Further, sparse local subnetworks in the Macaque network are not only found across topographical super-areas, e.g., lobes, but also within a super-area, arguing that there is conservation of even relatively short-distance pathways. To establish the communication role of a vertex we borrow the concept of brokerage from social science, and present the different types of brokerage roles that brain areas play, highlighting that not only the thalamus, but also cingulate gyrus and insula often act as “relays” for areas in the neocortex. These and other analysis of communication load and roles of the sparse subnetworks of the Macaque brain provide new insights into the organisation of its pathways. PMID:26437077

  12. The Human Homologue of Macaque Area V6A

    PubMed Central

    Pitzalis, S.; Sereno, M.I.; Committeri, G.; Fattori, P.; Galati, G.; Tosoni, A.; Galletti, C.

    2013-01-01

    In macaque monkeys, V6A is a visuomotor area located in the anterior bank of the POs, dorsal and anterior to retinotopically-organized extrastriate area V6 (Galletti et al 1996). Unlike V6, V6A represents both contra- and ipsilateral visual fields and is broadly retinotopically organized (Galletti et al 1999b). The contralateral lower visual field is overrepresented in V6A. The central 20°–30° of the visual field are mainly represented dorsally (V6Ad) and the periphery ventrally (V6Av), at the border with V6. Both sectors of area V6A contain arm movement-related cells, active during spatially-directed reaching movements (Gamberini et al., 2011). In humans, we previously mapped the retinotopic organization of area V6 (Pitzalis et al., 2006). Here, using phase-encoded fMRI, cortical surface-based analysis and wide-field retinotopic mapping, we define a new cortical region that borders V6 anteriorly and shows a clear over-representation of the contralateral lower visual field and of the periphery. As with macaque V6A, the eccentricity increases moving ventrally within the area. The new region contains a non-mirror-image representation of the visual field. Functional mapping reveals that, as in macaque V6A, the new region, but not the nearby area V6, responds during finger pointing and reaching movements. Based on similarity in position, retinotopic properties, functional organization and relationship with the neighbouring extrastriate visual areas, we propose that the new cortical region is the human homologue of macaque area V6A. PMID:23770406

  13. Analysing Local Sparseness in the Macaque Brain Network.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raghavendra; Nagar, Seema; Nanavati, Amit A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the network structure of long distance pathways in the brain is a necessary step towards developing an insight into the brain's function, organization and evolution. Dense global subnetworks of these pathways have often been studied, primarily due to their functional implications. Instead we study sparse local subnetworks of the pathways to establish the role of a brain area in enabling shortest path communication between its non-adjacent topological neighbours. We propose a novel metric to measure the topological communication load on a vertex due to its immediate neighbourhood, and show that in terms of distribution of this local communication load, a network of Macaque long distance pathways is substantially different from other real world networks and random graph models. Macaque network contains the entire range of local subnetworks, from star-like networks to clique-like networks, while other networks tend to contain a relatively small range of subnetworks. Further, sparse local subnetworks in the Macaque network are not only found across topographical super-areas, e.g., lobes, but also within a super-area, arguing that there is conservation of even relatively short-distance pathways. To establish the communication role of a vertex we borrow the concept of brokerage from social science, and present the different types of brokerage roles that brain areas play, highlighting that not only the thalamus, but also cingulate gyrus and insula often act as "relays" for areas in the neocortex. These and other analysis of communication load and roles of the sparse subnetworks of the Macaque brain provide new insights into the organisation of its pathways.

  14. Intersegmental Coordination in the Kinematics of Prehension Movements of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    The most popular model to explain how prehensile movements are organized assumes that they comprise two “components”, the reaching component encoding information regarding the object’s spatial location and the grasping component encoding information on the object’s intrinsic properties such as size and shape. Comparative kinematic studies on grasping behavior in the humans and in macaques have been carried out to investigate the similarities and differences existing across the two species. Although these studies seem to favor the hypothesis that macaques and humans share a number of kinematic features it remains unclear how the reaching and grasping components are coordinated during prehension movements in free-ranging macaque monkeys. Twelve hours of video footage was filmed of the monkeys as they snatched food items from one another (i.e., snatching) or collect them in the absence of competitors (i.e., unconstrained). The video samples were analyzed frame-by-frame using digitization techniques developed to perform two-dimensional post-hoc kinematic analyses of the two types of actions. The results indicate that only for the snatching condition when the reaching variability increased there was an increase in the amplitude of maximum grip aperture. Besides, the start of a break-point along the deceleration phase of the velocity profile correlated with the time at which maximum grip aperture occurred. These findings suggest that macaques can spatially and temporally couple the reaching and the grasping components when there is pressure to act quickly. They offer a substantial contribution to the debate about the nature of how prehensile actions are programmed. PMID:26176232

  15. Coccidioidomycosis in an Indoor-housed Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kundu, Mila C; Ringenberg, Michael A; d'Epagnier, Denise L; Haag, Heather L; Maguire, Sean

    2017-10-01

    Coccidioides spp. are saprophytic, dimorphic fungi that are endemic to arid climates, are capable of infecting many species, and result in diverse clinical presentations. An indoor-housed laboratory rhesus macaque presented with weight loss and decreased activity and appetite. During the diagnostic evaluation, a bronchiolar-alveolar pattern in the cranial lung lobes, consistent with bronchopneumonia, was noted on radiographs. Given the poor prognosis, the macaque was euthanized. Confirming the radiographic assessment, gross necropsy findings included multifocal to coalescing areas of consolidation in the right and left cranial lung lobes. Microscopically, the consolidated regions were consistent with a pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia and contained round, nonbudding, fungal yeast structures considered to be morphologically consistent with Coccidioides immitis. Culture and colony morphology results were confirmed through additional diagnostic testing. Sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the 28S large ribosomal subunit positively matched with a known sequence specific to C. immitis. Serology for Coccidioides spp. by both latex agglutination (IgM) and immunodiffusion (IgG) was positive. In this rhesus macaque, the concordant results from histology, culture, DNA sequencing, and serology were collectively used to confirm the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. This animal likely acquired a latent pulmonary infection with Coccidioides months prior to arrival, when housed outdoors in a Coccidioides-endemic area. The nonspecific clinical presentation in this macaque, coupled with the recent history of indoor housing and lag between clinical presentation and outdoor housing, can make similar diagnostic cases challenging and highlights the need for awareness regarding animal source when making an accurate diagnosis in an institutional laboratory setting.

  16. Vaginal Stone in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Colagross-Schouten, Angela M; Canfield, Don R

    2015-12-01

    A 20-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) housed in an indoor primate facility presented for poor appetite and acute weakness after several years of no adverse health events. Physical examination revealed a firm, ovoid mass in the caudal abdomen. Further evaluation revealed the mass to be a vaginal calculus composed of calcium carbonate, apatite, and struvite. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported description of a vaginal stone in an NHP.

  17. Axon diameters and conduction velocities in the macaque pyramidal tract

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, L.; Field, P.; Maier, M. A.; Kraskov, A.; Kirkwood, P. A.; Nakajima, K.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Small axons far outnumber larger fibers in the corticospinal tract, but the function of these small axons remains poorly understood. This is because they are difficult to identify, and therefore their physiology remains obscure. To assess the extent of the mismatch between anatomic and physiological measures, we compared conduction time and velocity in a large number of macaque corticospinal neurons with the distribution of axon diameters at the level of the medullary pyramid, using both light and electron microscopy. At the electron microscopic level, a total of 4,172 axons were sampled from 2 adult male macaque monkeys. We confirmed that there were virtually no unmyelinated fibers in the pyramidal tract. About 14% of pyramidal tract axons had a diameter smaller than 0.50 μm (including myelin sheath), most of these remaining undetected using light microscopy, and 52% were smaller than 1 μm. In the electrophysiological study, we determined the distribution of antidromic latencies of pyramidal tract neurons, recorded in primary motor cortex, ventral premotor cortex, and supplementary motor area and identified by pyramidal tract stimulation (799 pyramidal tract neurons, 7 adult awake macaques) or orthodromically from corticospinal axons recorded at the mid-cervical spinal level (192 axons, 5 adult anesthetized macaques). The distribution of antidromic and orthodromic latencies of corticospinal neurons was strongly biased toward those with large, fast-conducting axons. Axons smaller than 3 μm and with a conduction velocity below 18 m/s were grossly underrepresented in our electrophysiological recordings, and those below 1 μm (6 m/s) were probably not represented at all. The identity, location, and function of the majority of corticospinal neurons with small, slowly conducting axons remains unknown. PMID:24872533

  18. The Organization of Dorsal Frontal Cortex in Humans and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Rogier B.; Noonan, MaryAnn P.; Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Jbabdi, Saad; O'Reilly, Jill X.; Filippini, Nicola; Thomas, Adam G.; Rushworth, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    The human dorsal frontal cortex has been associated with the most sophisticated aspects of cognition, including those that are thought to be especially refined in humans. Here we used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) in humans and macaques to infer and compare the organization of dorsal frontal cortex in the two species. Using DW-MRI tractography-based parcellation, we identified 10 dorsal frontal regions lying between the human inferior frontal sulcus and cingulate cortex. Patterns of functional coupling between each area and the rest of the brain were then estimated with fMRI and compared with functional coupling patterns in macaques. Areas in human medial frontal cortex, including areas associated with high-level social cognitive processes such as theory of mind, showed a surprising degree of similarity in their functional coupling patterns with the frontal pole, medial prefrontal, and dorsal prefrontal convexity in the macaque. We failed to find evidence for “new” regions in human medial frontal cortex. On the lateral surface, comparison of functional coupling patterns suggested correspondences in anatomical organization distinct from those that are widely assumed. A human region sometimes referred to as lateral frontal pole more closely resembled area 46, rather than the frontal pole, of the macaque. Overall the pattern of results suggest important similarities in frontal cortex organization in humans and other primates, even in the case of regions thought to carry out uniquely human functions. The patterns of interspecies correspondences are not, however, always those that are widely assumed. PMID:23884933

  19. Rhesus macaque IFITM3 gene polymorphisms and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Michael; Gärtner, Sabine; Wrensch, Florian; Krawczak, Michael; Sauermann, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) have been recognized as important antiviral effectors of the innate immune system, both in cell culture and in infected humans. In particular, polymorphisms of the human IFITM3 gene have been shown to affect disease severity and progression in influenza A virus (FLUAV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, respectively. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are commonly used to model human infections and the experimental inoculation of these animals with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is one of the best models for HIV/AIDS in humans. However, information on the role of IFITM3 in SIV infection of rhesus macaques is currently lacking. We show that rhesus macaque (rh) IFITM3 inhibits SIV and FLUAV entry in cell culture, although with moderately reduced efficiency as compared to its human counterpart. We further report the identification of 16 polymorphisms in the rhIFITM3 gene, three of which were exonic and synonymous while the remainder was located in non-coding regions. Employing previously characterized samples from two cohorts of SIV-infected rhesus macaques, we investigated the relationship between these rhIFITM3 polymorphisms and both AIDS-free survival time and virus load. In cohort 1, several intronic polymorphisms were significantly associated with virus load or survival. However, an association with both parameters was not observed and significance was lost in most cases when animals were stratified for the presence of MHC allele Mamu-A1*001. Moreover, no significant genotype-phenotype associations were detected in cohort 2. These results suggest that, although IFITM3 can inhibit SIV infection in cell culture, genetic variation in rhIFITM3 might have only a minor impact on the course of SIV infection in experimentally infected animals. PMID:28257482

  20. Vaginal Stone in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Colagross-Schouten, Angela M; Canfield, Don R

    2015-01-01

    A 20-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) housed in an indoor primate facility presented for poor appetite and acute weakness after several years of no adverse health events. Physical examination revealed a firm, ovoid mass in the caudal abdomen. Further evaluation revealed the mass to be a vaginal calculus composed of calcium carbonate, apatite, and struvite. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported description of a vaginal stone in an NHP. PMID:26678372

  1. Cryotolerance of Sperm from Transgenic Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Sean P; Chi, Tim; Prucha, Melinda S; Agca, Yuksel; Chan, Anthony WS

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an important tool routinely used in preserving sperm for assisted reproductive technologies and for genetic preservation of unique animal models. Here we investigated the viability of fresh and frozen sperm from rhesus macaques on the basis of motility, membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity. Sperm motility was determined by visual evaluation; membrane and acrosome integrity were assessed simultaneously through triple staining with Hoechst 33342, propidium iodide, and fluorescein isothiocyanate–peanut agglutinin. We compared thawed semen that had been cryopreserved by using 2 different media with fresh semen from wildtype (WT) macaques; fresh semen from a model of Huntington disease (HD) with fresh WT semen; and fresh HD with cryopreserved-thawed HD semen. Our new freezing media (TEST EQ) preserved the acrosome better, with less net damage, than did traditional TEST (egg yolk extender containing TES and Tris) media. In addition, the percentage of membrane-damaged cells was similar in fresh HD semen (38.6% ± 2.9%) and WT semen (35.5% ±1.9%). Membrane and acrosomal damage were not different between HD and WT sperm after cryopreservation and subsequent thawing. Furthermore, cryopreservation had similar negative effects on the motility of HD and WT sperm. These data illustrate that semen from a rhesus macaque model of HD is similarly cryotoleratant to that from WT animals. PMID:27657705

  2. Ventricular Parasystole in a Neonatal Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Collins, Dalis E; Dozier, Brandy L; Stanton, Jeffrey J; Colgin, Lois Ma; MacAllister, Rhonda

    2016-12-01

    A 6-d-old Indian-origin female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented with bradycardia shortly after sedation with ketamine. No other cardiac abnormalities were apparent. Approximately 2 wk after the initial presentation, the macaque was again bradycardic and exhibited a regularly irregular arrhythmia on a prestudy examination. ECG, echocardiography, blood pressure measurement, SpO2 assessment, and a CBC analysis were performed. The echocardiogram and bloodwork were normal, but the infant was hypotensive at the time of echocardiogram. The ECG revealed ventricular parasystole. Ventricular parasystole is considered a benign arrhythmia caused by an ectopic pacemaker that is insulated from impulses from the sinus node. Given this abnormality, the macaque was transferred to a short-term study protocol, according to veterinary recommendation. On the final veterinary exam, a grade 3 systolic murmur and a decrease in arrhythmia frequency were noted. Gross cardiac lesions were not identified at necropsy the following day. Cardiac tissue sections were essentially normal on microscopic examination. This infant did not display signs of cardiovascular insufficiency, and a review of the medical record indicated normal growth, feed intake and activity levels. This case demonstrates the importance of appropriate screening of potential neonatal and juvenile research candidates for occult cardiovascular abnormalities. Whether the arrhythmia diagnosed in this case was truly innocuous is unclear, given the documented hypotension and the development of a systolic heart murmur.

  3. Acquisition and functional consequences of social knowledge in macaques

    PubMed Central

    di Sorrentino, Eugenia Polizzi; Fischer, Julia; Schino, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    To manoeuvre in complex societies, it is beneficial to acquire knowledge about the social relationships existing among group mates, so as to better predict their behaviour. Although such knowledge has been firmly established in a variety of animal taxa, how animals acquire such knowledge, as well as its functional significance, remains poorly understood. In order to understand how primates acquire and use their social knowledge, we studied kin-biased redirected aggression in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) relying on a large database of over 15 000 aggressive episodes. Confirming previous research, macaques redirected aggression preferentially to the kin of their aggressor. An analysis that controlled for the rate of affiliation between aggressors and targets of redirection showed that macaques identified the relatives of group mates on the basis of the frequency of their ongoing associations. By contrast, having observed group mates interact with their mother as infants did not increase the monkeys' success in correctly identifying kin relationships among third parties. Inter-individual variation in the successful identification of the kin of aggressors and in redirecting aggression accordingly translated into differences in the amount of aggression received, highlighting a selective advantage for those individuals that were better able to acquire and use social knowledge. PMID:28386423

  4. Distributed acoustic cues for caller identity in macaque vocalization.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Doyle, Alex M; Mullarkey, Matthew P; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Individual primates can be identified by the sound of their voice. Macaques have demonstrated an ability to discern conspecific identity from a harmonically structured 'coo' call. Voice recognition presumably requires the integrated perception of multiple acoustic features. However, it is unclear how this is achieved, given considerable variability across utterances. Specifically, the extent to which information about caller identity is distributed across multiple features remains elusive. We examined these issues by recording and analysing a large sample of calls from eight macaques. Single acoustic features, including fundamental frequency, duration and Weiner entropy, were informative but unreliable for the statistical classification of caller identity. A combination of multiple features, however, allowed for highly accurate caller identification. A regularized classifier that learned to identify callers from the modulation power spectrum of calls found that specific regions of spectral-temporal modulation were informative for caller identification. These ranges are related to acoustic features such as the call's fundamental frequency and FM sweep direction. We further found that the low-frequency spectrotemporal modulation component contained an indexical cue of the caller body size. Thus, cues for caller identity are distributed across identifiable spectrotemporal components corresponding to laryngeal and supralaryngeal components of vocalizations, and the integration of those cues can enable highly reliable caller identification. Our results demonstrate a clear acoustic basis by which individual macaque vocalizations can be recognized.

  5. Distributed acoustic cues for caller identity in macaque vocalization

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alex M.; Mullarkey, Matthew P.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2015-01-01

    Individual primates can be identified by the sound of their voice. Macaques have demonstrated an ability to discern conspecific identity from a harmonically structured ‘coo’ call. Voice recognition presumably requires the integrated perception of multiple acoustic features. However, it is unclear how this is achieved, given considerable variability across utterances. Specifically, the extent to which information about caller identity is distributed across multiple features remains elusive. We examined these issues by recording and analysing a large sample of calls from eight macaques. Single acoustic features, including fundamental frequency, duration and Weiner entropy, were informative but unreliable for the statistical classification of caller identity. A combination of multiple features, however, allowed for highly accurate caller identification. A regularized classifier that learned to identify callers from the modulation power spectrum of calls found that specific regions of spectral–temporal modulation were informative for caller identification. These ranges are related to acoustic features such as the call’s fundamental frequency and FM sweep direction. We further found that the low-frequency spectrotemporal modulation component contained an indexical cue of the caller body size. Thus, cues for caller identity are distributed across identifiable spectrotemporal components corresponding to laryngeal and supralaryngeal components of vocalizations, and the integration of those cues can enable highly reliable caller identification. Our results demonstrate a clear acoustic basis by which individual macaque vocalizations can be recognized. PMID:27019727

  6. Evaluation of Infrared Thermometry in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Laffins, Michael M; Mellal, Nacera; Almlie, Cynthia L; Regalia, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Recording an accurate body temperature is important to assess an animal's health status. We compared temperature data from sedated cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to evaluate differences between rectal, infrared (inguinal and chest), and implanted telemetry techniques with the objective of demonstrating the diagnostic equivalence of the infrared device with other approaches. Infrared thermometer readings are instantaneous and require no contact with the animal. Body temperature data were obtained from 205 (137 male, 68 female) cynomolgus macaques under ketamine (10 mg/kg IM) sedation over a 3-mo period during scheduled physical examinations. Infrared measurements were taken 5 cm from the chest and inguinal areas. We evaluated 10 (9 functional devices) sedated cynomolgus macaques (5 male, 5 female) implanted with telemetry units in a muscular pouch between the internal and external abdominal oblique muscles. We determined that the mean body temperature acquired by using telemetry did not differ from either the mean of inguinal and chest infrared measurements but did differ from the mean of temperature obtained rectally. In addition, the mean rectal temperature differed from the mean of the inguinal reading but not the mean of the chest temperature. The results confirm our hypothesis that the infrared thermometer can be used to replace standard rectal thermometry. PMID:28905720

  7. Acquisition and functional consequences of social knowledge in macaques.

    PubMed

    Tiddi, Barbara; di Sorrentino, Eugenia Polizzi; Fischer, Julia; Schino, Gabriele

    2017-02-01

    To manoeuvre in complex societies, it is beneficial to acquire knowledge about the social relationships existing among group mates, so as to better predict their behaviour. Although such knowledge has been firmly established in a variety of animal taxa, how animals acquire such knowledge, as well as its functional significance, remains poorly understood. In order to understand how primates acquire and use their social knowledge, we studied kin-biased redirected aggression in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) relying on a large database of over 15 000 aggressive episodes. Confirming previous research, macaques redirected aggression preferentially to the kin of their aggressor. An analysis that controlled for the rate of affiliation between aggressors and targets of redirection showed that macaques identified the relatives of group mates on the basis of the frequency of their ongoing associations. By contrast, having observed group mates interact with their mother as infants did not increase the monkeys' success in correctly identifying kin relationships among third parties. Inter-individual variation in the successful identification of the kin of aggressors and in redirecting aggression accordingly translated into differences in the amount of aggression received, highlighting a selective advantage for those individuals that were better able to acquire and use social knowledge.

  8. Auditory artificial grammar learning in macaque and marmoset monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Slater, Heather; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2013-11-27

    Artificial grammars (AG) are designed to emulate aspects of the structure of language, and AG learning (AGL) paradigms can be used to study the extent of nonhuman animals' structure-learning capabilities. However, different AG structures have been used with nonhuman animals and are difficult to compare across studies and species. We developed a simple quantitative parameter space, which we used to summarize previous nonhuman animal AGL results. This was used to highlight an under-studied AG with a forward-branching structure, designed to model certain aspects of the nondeterministic nature of word transitions in natural language and animal song. We tested whether two monkey species could learn aspects of this auditory AG. After habituating the monkeys to the AG, analysis of video recordings showed that common marmosets (New World monkeys) differentiated between well formed, correct testing sequences and those violating the AG structure based primarily on simple learning strategies. By comparison, Rhesus macaques (Old World monkeys) showed evidence for deeper levels of AGL. A novel eye-tracking approach confirmed this result in the macaques and demonstrated evidence for more complex AGL. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown level of AGL complexity in Old World monkeys that seems less evident in New World monkeys, which are more distant evolutionary relatives to humans. The findings allow for the development of both marmosets and macaques as neurobiological model systems to study different aspects of AGL at the neuronal level.

  9. Expression of the Memory Marker CD45RO on Helper T Cells in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Michael; Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A.; Mack, Heather; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Polacino, Patricia; Ho, On; Cristillo, Anthony; Kyung Chung, Hye; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Pincus, Seth H.

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans it has been reported that a major site of the latent reservoir of HIV is within CD4+ T cells expressing the memory marker CD45RO, defined by the mAb UCHL1. There are conflicting reports regarding the expression of this antigen in macaques, the most relevant animal species for studying HIV pathogenesis and testing new therapies. There is now a major effort to eradicate HIV reservoirs and cure the infection. One approach is to eliminate subsets of cells housing the latent reservoir, using UCHL1 to target these cells. So that such studies may be performed in macaques, it is essential to determine expression of CD45RO. Methods We have used immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to study cell surface expression of CD45RO on lymphocytes from PBMC, lymphoid, and GI organs of rhesus, pigtailed, and cynomolgus macaques. Both direct and indirect immunofluorescence experiments were performed. Findings CD45RO is expressed on a subset of CD4+ lymphocytes of all pigtailed, a fraction of rhesus, and neither of the cynomolgus macaques studied. The binding of UCHL1 to macaque cells was of lower avidity than to human cells. This could be overcome by forming UCHL1 multimers. Directly conjugating fluors to UCHL1 can inhibit UCHL1 binding to macaque cells. Patterns of UCHL1 expression differ somewhat in macaques and humans, and from that of other memory markers often used in macaques. Conclusions CD45RO, defined with mAb UCHL1, is well expressed on CD4+ cells in pigtailed macaques. Using tissues recovered from latently infected pigtailed macaques we are determining whether UCHL1, or other memory markers, can define the cellular locus of the reservoir. The low avidity of this interaction could limit the utility of UCHL1, in its conventional form, to eliminate cells in vivo and test this approach in macaque models of HIV infection. PMID:24023920

  10. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of Japanese Macaque Babesia-1 (JM-1) detected from a Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata fuscata).

    PubMed

    Hirata, Haruyuki; Kawai, Satoru; Maeda, Mari; Jinnai, Michio; Fujisawa, Kohei; Katakai, Yuko; Hikosaka, Kenji; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate here the identification and phylogenetic characterization of Babesia microti (B. microti)-like parasite detected from a splenectomized Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata fuscata) at a facility for laboratory animal science. On Day 133 after splenectomy, intra-erythrocytic parasites were found on light microscopic examination, and the level of parasitemia reached 0.3% on blood smear. Molecular characterization of the parasite using nested-polymerization chain reactions targeting the 18S rRNA, β-tubulin, and subunit 7 (eta) of the chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT7) genes were identified as a B. microti-like parasite, designated the Japanese Macaque Babesia-1 (JM-1).

  11. Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of Japanese Macaque Babesia-1 (JM-1) detected from a Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata fuscata)

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Haruyuki; Kawai, Satoru; Maeda, Mari; Jinnai, Michio; Fujisawa, Kohei; Katakai, Yuko; Hikosaka, Kenji; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here the identification and phylogenetic characterization of Babesia microti (B. microti)-like parasite detected from a splenectomized Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata fuscata) at a facility for laboratory animal science. On Day 133 after splenectomy, intra-erythrocytic parasites were found on light microscopic examination, and the level of parasitemia reached 0.3% on blood smear. Molecular characterization of the parasite using nested-polymerization chain reactions targeting the 18S rRNA, β-tubulin, and subunit 7 (eta) of the chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT7) genes were identified as a B. microti-like parasite, designated the Japanese Macaque Babesia-1 (JM-1). PMID:21976563

  12. Relationship of menstrual cycle and vaginal infection in female rhesus macaques challenged with repeated, low doses of SIVmac251.

    PubMed

    Morris, Monica R; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Villinger, Francois; Henning, Tara C; Butler, Katherine; Ansari, Aftab A; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-10-01

    Varying susceptibility during menstrual cycling could be a factor for S(H)IV infection risk in female rhesus macaques. We retrospectively determined vaginal SIV infection time points relative to the menstrual cycle in a group of rhesus macaques (n=11) enrolled in an HIV transmission trial. Eight of nine rhesus macaques became infected around menstruation time.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Papp, Robert; Popovic, Aleksandar; Kelly, Nancy; Tschirret-Guth, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a third-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic licensed for the treatment of skin infections in cats and dogs. The objective of our study was to assess whether its pharmacokinetic profile in squirrel monkey, rhesus macaques, and cynomolgus macaques was similar to that of dogs. Plasma levels were determined by using protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. After subcutaneous dosing at 8 mg/kg, the plasma terminal half-life of cefovecin was substantially shorter in the nonhuman primates (2.6 to 8.0 h) than in dogs (102 h). The total plasma exposure (AUC(0-96h)) was 10- to 40-fold lower in nonhuman primate species. In cynomolgus macaques, cefovecin showed a similar subcutaneous bioavailability (82% compared with 100%) and volume of distribution (0.16 compared with 0.12 L/kg) as compared to dogs; however, the plasma clearance of cefovecin was 20-fold higher. Cefovecin susceptibility testing and minimum inhibitory concentrations were not established for clinical isolates in nonhuman primates. However, if the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cefovecin for various nonhuman primates pathogens are in the same range as those observed for canine pathogens, our results suggest that cefovecin used at the same dosing regimen and frequency prescribed for the dogs will be ineffective and that increases in dose or frequency (or both) may be required.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus), Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta), and Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Robert; Popovic, Aleksandar; Kelly, Nancy; Tschirret-Guth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a third-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic licensed for the treatment of skin infections in cats and dogs. The objective of our study was to assess whether its pharmacokinetic profile in squirrel monkey, rhesus macaques, and cynomolgus macaques was similar to that of dogs. Plasma levels were determined by using protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. After subcutaneous dosing at 8 mg/kg, the plasma terminal half-life of cefovecin was substantially shorter in the nonhuman primates (2.6 to 8.0 h) than in dogs (102 h). The total plasma exposure (AUC0-96h) was 10- to 40-fold lower in nonhuman primate species. In cynomolgus macaques, cefovecin showed a similar subcutaneous bioavailability (82% compared with 100%) and volume of distribution (0.16 compared with 0.12 L/kg) as compared to dogs; however, the plasma clearance of cefovecin was 20-fold higher. Cefovecin susceptibility testing and minimum inhibitory concentrations were not established for clinical isolates in nonhuman primates. However, if the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cefovecin for various nonhuman primates pathogens are in the same range as those observed for canine pathogens, our results suggest that cefovecin used at the same dosing regimen and frequency prescribed for the dogs will be ineffective and that increases in dose or frequency (or both) may be required. PMID:21205444

  15. Infinium Monkeys: Infinium 450K Array for the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Peck Yean; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Cheong, Clara Y; Stunkel, Walter; Chan, Louiza; Gluckman, Peter D.; Chng, Keefe; Kobor, Michael S.; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2014-01-01

    The Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip Array (Infinium 450K) is a robust and cost-efficient survey of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) is an important disease model; however, its genome sequence is only recently published, and few tools exist to interrogate the molecular state of Cynomolgus macaque tissues. Although the Infinium 450K is a hybridization array designed to the human genome, the relative conservation between the macaque and human genomes makes its use in macaques feasible. Here, we used the Infinium 450K array to assay DNA methylation in 11 macaque muscle biopsies. We showed that probe hybridization efficiency was related to the degree of sequence identity between the human probes and the macaque genome sequence. Approximately 61% of the Human Infinium 450K probes could be reliably mapped to the Cynomolgus macaque genome and contain a CpG site of interest. We also compared the Infinium 450K data to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data generated on the same samples and found a high level of concordance between the two independent methodologies, which can be further improved by filtering for probe sequence identity and mismatch location. We conclude that the Infinium 450K array can be used to measure the DNA methylome of Cynomolgus macaque tissues using the provided filters. We also provide a pipeline for validation of the array in other species using a simple BLAST-based sequence identify filter. PMID:24815017

  16. Infinium monkeys: Infinium 450K array for the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Peck Yean; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Cheong, Clara Y; Stunkel, Walter; Chan, Louiza; Gluckman, Peter D; Chng, Keefe; Kobor, Michael S; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2014-05-08

    The Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip Array (Infinium 450K) is a robust and cost-efficient survey of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) is an important disease model; however, its genome sequence is only recently published, and few tools exist to interrogate the molecular state of Cynomolgus macaque tissues. Although the Infinium 450K is a hybridization array designed to the human genome, the relative conservation between the macaque and human genomes makes its use in macaques feasible. Here, we used the Infinium 450K array to assay DNA methylation in 11 macaque muscle biopsies. We showed that probe hybridization efficiency was related to the degree of sequence identity between the human probes and the macaque genome sequence. Approximately 61% of the Human Infinium 450K probes could be reliably mapped to the Cynomolgus macaque genome and contain a CpG site of interest. We also compared the Infinium 450K data to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data generated on the same samples and found a high level of concordance between the two independent methodologies, which can be further improved by filtering for probe sequence identity and mismatch location. We conclude that the Infinium 450K array can be used to measure the DNA methylome of Cynomolgus macaque tissues using the provided filters. We also provide a pipeline for validation of the array in other species using a simple BLAST-based sequence identify filter. Copyright © 2014 Ong et al.

  17. Interindividual Differences in Neonatal Imitation and the Development of Action Chains in Rhesus Macaques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Paukner, Annika; Ruggiero, Angela; Darcey, Lisa; Unbehagen, Sarah; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to imitate facial gestures is highly variable in rhesus macaques and this variability may be related to differences in specific neurobehavioral patterns of development. This study evaluated the differential neonatal imitative response of 41 macaques in relation to the development of sensory, motor, and cognitive skills throughout the…

  18. Possible use of heterospecific food-associated calls of macaques by sika deer for foraging efficiency.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hiroki

    2012-09-01

    Heterospecific communication signals sometimes convey relevant information for animal survival. For example, animals use or eavesdrop on heterospecific alarm calls concerning common predators. Indeed, most observations have been reported regarding anti-predator strategies. Use of heterospecific signals has rarely been observed as part of a foraging strategy. Here, I report empirical evidence, collected using playback experiments, showing that Japanese sika deer, Cevus nippon, use heterospecific food calls of Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata yakui, for foraging efficiency. The deer and macaques both inhabit the wild forest of Yakushima Island with high population densities and share many food items. Anecdotal observations suggest that deer often wait to browse fruit falls under the tree where a macaque group is foraging. Furthermore, macaques frequently produce food calls during their foraging. If deer effectively obtain fruit from the leftovers of macaques, browsing fruit fall would provide a potential benefit to the deer, and, further, deer are likely to associate macaque food calls with feeding activity. The results showed that playback of macaque food calls under trees gathered significantly more deer than silence control periods. These results suggest that deer can associate macaque food calls with foraging activities and use heterospecific calls for foraging efficiency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correction of refractive errors in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) involved in visual research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jude F; Boisvert, Chantal J; Reuter, Jon D; Reynolds, John H; Leblanc, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    Macaques are the most common animal model for studies in vision research, and due to their high value as research subjects, often continue to participate in studies well into old age. As is true in humans, visual acuity in macaques is susceptible to refractive errors. Here we report a case study in which an aged macaque demonstrated clear impairment in visual acuity according to performance on a demanding behavioral task. Refraction demonstrated bilateral myopia that significantly affected behavioral and visual tasks. Using corrective lenses, we were able to restore visual acuity. After correction of myopia, the macaque's performance on behavioral tasks was comparable to that of a healthy control. We screened 20 other male macaques to assess the incidence of refractive errors and ocular pathologies in a larger population. Hyperopia was the most frequent ametropia but was mild in all cases. A second macaque had mild myopia and astigmatism in one eye. There were no other pathologies observed on ocular examination. We developed a simple behavioral task that visual research laboratories could use to test visual acuity in macaques. The test was reliable and easily learned by the animals in 1 d. This case study stresses the importance of screening macaques involved in visual science for refractive errors and ocular pathologies to ensure the quality of research; we also provide simple methodology for screening visual acuity in these animals.

  20. Novel cynomolgus macaque MHC-DPB1 polymorphisms in three South-East Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Shiina, T; Kohara, S; Yanagiya, K; Hosomichi, K; Shimizu, S; Anzai, T; Watanabe, A; Ogasawara, K; Torii, R; Kulski, J K; Inoko, H

    2006-04-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis, Mafa), alias the crab-eating monkeys or long-tailed macaques, live across a vast range of South-East Asia. These non-human primates have emerged as important animal models in infectious and chronic diseases and transplantation studies, necessitating a more extensive characterization of their major histocompatibility complex polymorphic regions. The current information on the polymorphic variation or diversity of the Mafa-DPB1 locus is largely limited in comparison with the more commonly studied rhesus macaque DPB1 locus. In this article, to better elucidate the degree and types of polymorphisms and genetic differences of Mafa-DPB1 locus among three South-East Asian populations and to investigate how the allele differences between macaques and humans might affect their respective immune responses, we identified 40 alleles within exon 2 of the Mafa-DPB1 locus by DNA sequencing using 217 individuals. We also performed evolutionary and population analyses using these sequences to reveal some population-specific alleles and trans-species allelic conservation between the cynomolgus macaques and the rhesus macaques. Of the 40 new alleles, eight belong to a newly identified lineage group not previously found in the rhesus macaque species. This allele information will be useful for medical researchers using the cynomolgus macaques in disease and immunological studies.

  1. Interindividual Differences in Neonatal Imitation and the Development of Action Chains in Rhesus Macaques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Paukner, Annika; Ruggiero, Angela; Darcey, Lisa; Unbehagen, Sarah; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to imitate facial gestures is highly variable in rhesus macaques and this variability may be related to differences in specific neurobehavioral patterns of development. This study evaluated the differential neonatal imitative response of 41 macaques in relation to the development of sensory, motor, and cognitive skills throughout the…

  2. The population genomics of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) based on whole-genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Harris, R Alan; Fawcett, Gloria L; Liu, Xiaoming; White, Simon; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Rio Deiros, David; Below, Jennifer E; Salerno, William; Cox, Laura; Fan, Guoping; Ferguson, Betsy; Horvath, Julie; Johnson, Zach; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Kubisch, H Michael; Liu, Dahai; Platt, Michael; Smith, David G; Sun, Binghua; Vallender, Eric J; Wang, Feng; Wiseman, Roger W; Chen, Rui; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Yu, Fuli; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are the most widely used nonhuman primate in biomedical research, have the largest natural geographic distribution of any nonhuman primate, and have been the focus of much evolutionary and behavioral investigation. Consequently, rhesus macaques are one of the most thoroughly studied nonhuman primate species. However, little is known about genome-wide genetic variation in this species. A detailed understanding of extant genomic variation among rhesus macaques has implications for the use of this species as a model for studies of human health and disease, as well as for evolutionary population genomics. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of 133 rhesus macaques revealed more than 43.7 million single-nucleotide variants, including thousands predicted to alter protein sequences, transcript splicing, and transcription factor binding sites. Rhesus macaques exhibit 2.5-fold higher overall nucleotide diversity and slightly elevated putative functional variation compared with humans. This functional variation in macaques provides opportunities for analyses of coding and noncoding variation, and its cellular consequences. Despite modestly higher levels of nonsynonymous variation in the macaques, the estimated distribution of fitness effects and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous variants suggest that purifying selection has had stronger effects in rhesus macaques than in humans. Demographic reconstructions indicate this species has experienced a consistently large but fluctuating population size. Overall, the results presented here provide new insights into the population genomics of nonhuman primates and expand genomic information directly relevant to primate models of human disease.

  3. Comparative demography of two commensal macaques in India: implications for population status and conservation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rishi; Sinha, Anindya; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2013-01-01

    Rhesus and bonnet macaques are among the most common primates found in India and have been categorised as being of Least Concern by the IUCN. Despite the wealth of information on their ecology and behaviour, little attention has been paid to their demography or population status. We studied the demographic status of the two species along their common distribution zone in western, central and south-eastern India. Bonnet macaques were largely found in forest areas whereas rhesus macaques were observed more often in human-dominated habitats. The troop sizes of the two species also tended to be largest in different habitats, bonnet macaques in forested areas and rhesus macaques in urban areas. We suggest that the presence of large numbers of rhesus macaques in anthropogenic areas in south-eastern India is not a natural phenomenon but has been caused by human intervention. The bonnet macaque population has decreased in number in the common distribution zone, and as this species, unlike the rhesus macaque, is endemic to India, we strongly recommend the need to reassess its conservation status.

  4. Macaque-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1: breaking out of the host restriction factors

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Macaque monkeys serve as important animal models for understanding the pathogenesis of lentiviral infections. Since human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) hardly replicates in macaque cells, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or chimeric viruses between HIV-1 and SIV (SHIV) have been used as challenge viruses in this research field. These viruses, however, are genetically distant from HIV-1. Therefore, in order to evaluate the efficacy of anti-HIV-1 drugs and vaccines in macaques, the development of a macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) having the ability to replicate efficiently in macaques has long been desired. Recent studies have demonstrated that host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 family and TRIM5, impose a strong barrier against HIV-1 replication in macaque cells. By evading these restriction factors, others and we have succeeded in developing an HIV-1mt that is able to replicate in macaques. In this review, we have attempted to shed light on the role of host factors that affect the susceptibility of macaques to HIV-1mt infection, especially by focusing on TRIM5-related factors. PMID:23847610

  5. The population genomics of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) based on whole-genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Cheng; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Harris, R. Alan; Fawcett, Gloria L.; Liu, Xiaoming; White, Simon; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Rio Deiros, David; Below, Jennifer E.; Salerno, William; Cox, Laura; Fan, Guoping; Ferguson, Betsy; Horvath, Julie; Johnson, Zach; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Kubisch, H. Michael; Liu, Dahai; Platt, Michael; Smith, David G.; Sun, Binghua; Vallender, Eric J.; Wang, Feng; Wiseman, Roger W.; Chen, Rui; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Yu, Fuli; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are the most widely used nonhuman primate in biomedical research, have the largest natural geographic distribution of any nonhuman primate, and have been the focus of much evolutionary and behavioral investigation. Consequently, rhesus macaques are one of the most thoroughly studied nonhuman primate species. However, little is known about genome-wide genetic variation in this species. A detailed understanding of extant genomic variation among rhesus macaques has implications for the use of this species as a model for studies of human health and disease, as well as for evolutionary population genomics. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of 133 rhesus macaques revealed more than 43.7 million single-nucleotide variants, including thousands predicted to alter protein sequences, transcript splicing, and transcription factor binding sites. Rhesus macaques exhibit 2.5-fold higher overall nucleotide diversity and slightly elevated putative functional variation compared with humans. This functional variation in macaques provides opportunities for analyses of coding and noncoding variation, and its cellular consequences. Despite modestly higher levels of nonsynonymous variation in the macaques, the estimated distribution of fitness effects and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous variants suggest that purifying selection has had stronger effects in rhesus macaques than in humans. Demographic reconstructions indicate this species has experienced a consistently large but fluctuating population size. Overall, the results presented here provide new insights into the population genomics of nonhuman primates and expand genomic information directly relevant to primate models of human disease. PMID:27934697

  6. Correction of Refractive Errors in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Involved in Visual Research

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jude F; Boisvert, Chantal J; Reuter, Jon D; Reynolds, John H; Leblanc, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Macaques are the most common animal model for studies in vision research, and due to their high value as research subjects, often continue to participate in studies well into old age. As is true in humans, visual acuity in macaques is susceptible to refractive errors. Here we report a case study in which an aged macaque demonstrated clear impairment in visual acuity according to performance on a demanding behavioral task. Refraction demonstrated bilateral myopia that significantly affected behavioral and visual tasks. Using corrective lenses, we were able to restore visual acuity. After correction of myopia, the macaque's performance on behavioral tasks was comparable to that of a healthy control. We screened 20 other male macaques to assess the incidence of refractive errors and ocular pathologies in a larger population. Hyperopia was the most frequent ametropia but was mild in all cases. A second macaque had mild myopia and astigmatism in one eye. There were no other pathologies observed on ocular examination. We developed a simple behavioral task that visual research laboratories could use to test visual acuity in macaques. The test was reliable and easily learned by the animals in 1 d. This case study stresses the importance of screening macaques involved in visual science for refractive errors and ocular pathologies to ensure the quality of research; we also provide simple methodology for screening visual acuity in these animals. PMID:25427343

  7. Clozapine and other competitive antagonists reactivate risperidone-inactivated h5-HT7 receptors: radioligand binding and functional evidence for GPCR homodimer protomer interactions

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, Nicole; Knight, Jessica A.; Klein, Michael T.; Smith, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The h5-HT7 receptor is subject to inactivation by risperidone and 9-OH-risperidone, apparently through a pseudo-irreversible complex formed between these drugs and the receptor. Although risperidone and 9-OH-risperidone (“inactivating antagonists”) completely inactivate the receptor, only 50% of the receptors form a pseudo-irreversible complex with these drugs. Objectives This study aims to more fully determine the mechanism(s) responsible for the novel effects of risperidone and 9-OH-risperidone and to determine if the inactivation can be reversed (reactivation). Methods The ability of non-inactivating drugs (competitive antagonists) to dissociate wash-resistant [3H]risperidone binding from h5-HT7 receptors was investigated. Also, the ability of non-inactivating drugs to reactivate inactivated h5-HT7 receptors was investigated, using cAMP accumulation as a functional endpoint. Results The competitive (non-inactivating) antagonists clozapine and mesulergine released the wash-resistant [3H]risperidone binding to the h5-HT7 receptor. The competitive antagonists clozapine, SB269970, mianserin, cyproheptadine, mesulergine, and ICI169369 reactivated the risperidone-inactivated h5-HT7 receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The potencies for reactivation closely match the affinities of these drugs for the h5-HT7 receptor (r2=0.95), indicating that the reactivating antagonists are binding to and producing their effects through the orthosteric binding site of the h5-HT7 receptor. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analyses indicate that the h5-HT7 receptor forms homodimers. Conclusions The ability of the non-inactivating drugs to bind h5-HT7 orthosteric sites and reverse the wash-resistant effects of risperidone or 9-OH-risperidone, also bound to h5-HT7 orthosteric sites, is evidence for protomer–protomer interactions between h5-HT7 homodimers. This is the first demonstration of a non-mutated G-protein-coupled receptor homodimer engaging in

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly conserved in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques

    PubMed Central

    Street, Summer L; Kyes, Randall C; Grant, Richard; Ferguson, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Background Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus or longtail macaques) is the most commonly used non-human primate in biomedical research. Little is known about the genomic variation in cynomolgus macaques or how the sequence variants compare to those of the well-studied related species, Macaca mulatta (rhesus macaque). Previously we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in portions of 94 rhesus macaque genes and reported that Indian and Chinese rhesus had largely different SNPs. Here we identify SNPs from some of the same genomic regions of cynomolgus macaques (from Indochina, Indonesia, Mauritius and the Philippines) and compare them to the SNPs found in rhesus. Results We sequenced a portion of 10 genes in 20 cynomolgus macaques. We identified 69 SNPs in these regions, compared with 71 SNPs found in the same genomic regions of 20 Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques. Thirty six (52%) of the M. fascicularis SNPs were overlapping in both species. The majority (70%) of the SNPs found in both Chinese and Indian rhesus macaque populations were also present in M. fascicularis. Of the SNPs previously found in a single rhesus population, 38% (Indian) and 44% (Chinese) were also identified in cynomolgus macaques. In an alternative approach, we genotyped 100 cynomolgus DNAs using a rhesus macaque SNP array representing 53 genes and found that 51% (29/57) of the rhesus SNPs were present in M. fascicularis. Comparisons of SNP profiles from cynomolgus macaques imported from breeding centers in China (where M. fascicularis are not native) showed they were similar to those from Indochina. Conclusion This study demonstrates a surprisingly high conservation of SNPs between M. fascicularis and M. mulatta, suggesting that the relationship of these two species is closer than that suggested by morphological and mitochondrial DNA analysis alone. These findings indicate that SNP discovery efforts in either species will generate useful resources for both macaque species

  9. The genetic composition of populations of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Kanthaswamy, Sree; Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; George, Debra A.; Kou, Alexander J.; Hoffman, Lindsay N.; Doherty, Theodore B.; Houghton, Paul; Smith, David Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic composition of cynomolgus macaques used in biomedical research is not as well-characterized as that of rhesus macaques. Methods Populations of cynomolgus macaques from Sumatra, Corregidor, Mauritius, Singapore, Cambodia and Zamboanga were analyzed using 24 STRs. Results The Sumatran and Cambodian populations exhibited the highest allelic diversity while the Mauritian population exhibited the lowest. Sumatran cynomolgus macaques were the most genetically similar to all others, consistent with an Indonesian origin of the species. The high diversity among Cambodian animals may result from interbreeding with rhesus macaques. The Philippine and Mauritian samples were the most divergent from other populations, the former due to separation from the Sunda Shelf by deep water and the latter due to anthropogenic translocation and extreme founder effects. Conclusions Investigators should verify their research subjects’ origin, ancestry and pedigree to minimize risks to biomedical experimentation from genetic variance stemming from close kinship and mixed ancestry as these can obscure treatment effects. PMID:23480663

  10. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Andrew D; Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D; Miller, Lynn J; Wiley, Michael R; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C; Norris, Sarah L; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E; Shamblin, Joshua D; Kimmel, Adrienne E; Bloomfield, Holly A; Valdez, Stephanie M; Sprague, Thomas R; Principe, Lucia M; Bellanca, Stephanie A; Cinkovich, Stephanie S; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H; Pratt, William D; Palacios, Gustavo F; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-08-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present.

  11. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D.; Miller, Lynn J.; Wiley, Michael R.; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C.; Norris, Sarah L.; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Kimmel, Adrienne E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Valdez, Stephanie M.; Sprague, Thomas R.; Principe, Lucia M.; Bellanca, Stephanie A.; Cinkovich, Stephanie S.; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H.; Pratt, William D.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M. Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-01-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present. PMID:28548637

  12. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring protects high-dose depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques from multiple SHIV exposures.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Srinivasan, Priya; Teller, Ryan S; Lo, Yungtai; Dinh, Chuong T; Kiser, Patrick F; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical HIV prevention models use either a single high-dose viral challenge in depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques or repeated viral challenges in cycling macaques. We tested the efficacy of an intravaginal tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) ring in a model combining repeated 30-mg injections of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate every 6 weeks with vaginal viral challenges weekly for 12 weeks. Twelve macaques were randomized to TDF or placebo rings. All placebo macaques became infected after a median of 2 exposures, whereas only 1 TDF macaque became infected at the eighth exposure (P = 0.0012). The TDF ring provides durable protection in a stringent challenge model.

  13. Identification and characterization of macaque CD89 (immunoglobulin A Fc receptor)

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Kenneth A; Scinicariello, Franco; Attanasio, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) molecule with its specific cellular receptor is necessary to trigger a variety of effector functions able to clear IgA-opsonized antigens. The human IgA-specific Fc receptor, FcαRI or CD89, is expressed on cells of the myeloid lineage. Recently, CD89 homologues have been identified in rats and cattle. Because non-human primates represent well established models for a variety of human diseases and for the testing of immunotherapeutic strategies, we cloned and sequenced cDNAs corresponding to the CD89 gene from rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Macaque sequences of full-length CD89 consist of five exons of length identical to the corresponding human CD89 exons. The rhesus and cynomolgus macaque derived amino acid sequences are highly homologous to each other (99·3% identity) and exhibit 86·5% and 86·1% identity to the human counterpart, respectively. Transfection of HeLa cells with plasmids containing the cloned macaque cDNAs resulted in the expression of surface molecules recognized by an anti-human CD89 antibody. Five splice variants were identified in rhesus macaques. Three of the five variants are similar to described human CD89 splice variants, whereas two variants have not been described in humans. Three splice variants were identified in cynomolgus macaques. Of the three variants, one is present also in humans and rhesus macaques, whereas the other two are shared with rhesus macaques but not humans. Similarly to the human CD89, macaque CD89 is expressed on myeloid cells from peripheral blood. The characterization of macaque CD89 represents an essential step in establishing a non-human primate model for the testing of immunotherapeutic approaches based on the manipulation of the IgA/CD89 interaction. PMID:15379978

  14. An in Vitro and in Vivo Investigation of Bivalent Ligands That Display Preferential Binding and Functional Activity for Different Melanocortin Receptor Homodimers.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Cody J; Freeman, Katie T; Schnell, Sathya M; Adank, Danielle N; Speth, Robert C; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-04-14

    Pharmacological probes for the melanocortin receptors have been utilized for studying various disease states including cancer, sexual function disorders, Alzheimer's disease, social disorders, cachexia, and obesity. This study focused on the design and synthesis of bivalent ligands to target melanocortin receptor homodimers. Lead ligands increased binding affinity by 14- to 25-fold and increased cAMP signaling potency by 3- to 5-fold compared to their monovalent counterparts. Unexpectedly, different bivalent ligands showed preferences for particular melanocortin receptor subtypes depending on the linker that connected the binding scaffolds, suggesting structural differences between the various dimer subtypes. Homobivalent compound 12 possessed a functional profile that was unique from its monovalent counterpart providing evidence of the discrete effects of bivalent ligands. Lead compound 7 significantly decreased feeding in mice after intracerebroventricular administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a melanocortin bivalent ligand's in vivo physiological effects.

  15. Both JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 of Juglans regia mediate responses to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid through formation of homodimers and interaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Yi-Maer, A-Y; Zhai, M; Xu, Z

    2017-03-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to a large protein family that is involved in diverse developmental processes and abiotic stress responses. Currently, there is little understanding of the role of WRKY transcription factors in regulatory mechanisms in plants, especially in the protein-protein interactions that are essential for biological regulatory functions and networks. In the present study, yeast one-hybrid, yeast two-hybrid, transient expression and quantitative RT-PCR were applied to investigate the potential characteristics of two WRKY proteins from Juglans regia, JrWRKY2 (GenBank Accession No. KU057089) and JrWRKY7 (GenBank Accession No. KP784651). JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 can form homodimers and interact with each other. JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 can bind to W-box motifs. Similarly high levels of transcription were found for JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 under NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG) stresses, as well as at different developmental stages, e.g., the pistil or terminal leaf. JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 were transiently overexpressed in an independent manner in the terminal leaf. Analyses of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and electrolyte leakage rate showed that JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 overexpression improved plant tolerance to NaCl, PEG, abscisic acid, and cold stress. Additionally, JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 overexpression elevated transcription of SOD, POD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and MYB genes, but downregulated the expression of NAC. Overall, the results demonstrate that JrWRKY2 and JrWRKY7 are dimeric proteins that can form functional homodimers and interact with each other and that they are involved in abiotic stress responses.

  16. Latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by enhancing NF-κB p50 homodimer formation and downregulating NAPA expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zchong-Zcho; Chow, Kai-Ping N; Kuo, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2011-12-15

    Expression of the oncogenic latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus is involved in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and lymphoma. In previous studies, we found that expression of LMP1 was sufficient to transform BALB/c-3T3 cells. In contrast, other studies have shown that LMP1 induces apoptosis in a NF-κB-dependent manner and also inhibits the growth of tumors in mice, thereby indicating that LMP1 may produce various biological effects depending on the biological and cellular context. Still, the mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic activity of LMP1 remains unclear. In the present study, we found that LMP1 inhibits the expression of NAPA, an endoplasmic reticulum SNARE protein that possesses anti-apoptotic properties against the DNA-damaging drug cisplatin. Accordingly, LMP1-transformed BALB/c-3T3 cells were sensitized to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas no sensitization effect was noted following treatment with the mitotic spindle-damaging drugs vincristine and taxol. Knockdown of LMP1 with antisense oligonucleotides restored NAPA protein level and rendered the cells resistant to cisplatin. Similarly, overexpression of NAPA reduced the effect of LMP1 and induced resistance to cisplatin. LMP1 was shown to upregulate the NF-κB subunit p50, leading to formation of p50 homodimers on the NAPA promoter. These findings suggest that the viral protein LMP1 may sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin chemotherapy by downregulating NAPA and by enhancing the formation of p50 homodimers which in turn inhibit the expression of NF-κB regulated anti-apoptotic genes. These findings provide an explanatory mechanism for the pro-apoptotic activity of LMP1 as well as new therapeutic targets to control tumor growth.

  17. Use of the α-mannosidase I inhibitor kifunensine allows the crystallization of apo CTLA-4 homodimer produced in long-term cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Crispin, Max; Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.; Harvey, David J.; Chang, Veronica T.; Evans, Edward J.; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Stuart, David I.; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Davis, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycoproteins present problems for structural analysis since they often have to be glycosylated in order to fold correctly and because their chemical and conformational heterogeneity generally inhibits crystallization. It is shown that the α-mannosidase I inhibitor kifunensine, which has previously been used for the purpose of glycoprotein crystallization in short-term (3–5 d) cultures, is apparently stable enough to be used to produce highly endoglycosidase H-sensitive glycoprotein in long-term (3–4 week) cultures of stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based analysis of the extracellular region of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4; CD152) homodimer expressed in long-term CHO cell cultures in the presence of kifunensine revealed that the inhibitor restricted CTLA-4 glycan processing to Man9GlcNAc2 and Man5GlcNAc2 structures. Complex-type glycans were undetectable, suggesting that the inhibitor was active for the entire duration of the cultures. Endoglycosidase treatment of the homodimer yielded protein that readily formed orthorhombic crystals with unit-cell parameters a = 43.9, b = 51.5, c = 102.9 Å and space group P212121 that diffracted to Bragg spacings of 1.8 Å. The results indicate that kifunensine will be effective in most, if not all, transient and long-term mammalian cell-based expression systems. PMID:21795794

  18. DNA-binding affinity and transcriptional activity of the RelA homodimer of nuclear factor kappa B are not correlated.

    PubMed

    Mulero, Maria Carmen; Huang, De-Bin; Nguyen, H Thien; Wang, Vivien; Li, Yidan; Biswas, Tapan; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2017-09-21

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor family regulates genes involved in cell proliferation and inflammation. The promoters of these genes often contain NF-κB binding sites (κB sites) arranged in tandem. How NF-κB activates transcription through these multiple sites is incompletely understood. We report here an X-ray crystal structure of homodimers comprising the RelA DNA binding domain containing the Rel homology region (RHR) in NF-κB bound to an E-selectin promoter fragment with tandem κB sites. This structure revealed that two dimers bind asymmetrically to the symmetrically arranged κB sites at which multiple cognate contacts between one dimer to the corresponding DNA are broken. Since simultaneous RelA RHR dimer binding to tandem sites in solution was anti-cooperative, we inferred that asymmetric RelA RHR binding with fewer contacts likely indicates a dissociative binding mode. We found that both κB sites are essential for reporter gene activation by full-length RelA homodimer, suggesting that dimers facilitate DNA binding to each other even though their stable co-occupation is not promoted. Promoter variants with altered spacing and orientation of tandem κB sites displayed unexpected reporter activities that were not explained by solution-binding pattern of RelA RHR. Remarkably, full-length RelA bound all DNAs with a weaker affinity and specificity. Moreover, the transactivation domain (AD) played a negative role in DNA binding. These observations suggest that other nuclear factors influence full-length RelA binding to DNA by neutralizing AD negative effect. We propose that DNA binding by NF-κB dimers is highly complex and modulated by facilitated association-dissociation processes. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Carcinogenic heavy metals replace Ca{sup 2+} for DNA binding and annealing activities of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Aiko; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Fusao

    2010-10-01

    Mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was purified from rat liver nuclei. The homodimer form of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was able to unwind dsDNA in a Mg{sup 2+}- and ATP-dependent manner, and to anneal ssDNA in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. Phospholipids decreased the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} required for maximal annealing activity. Heavy metals such as As{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 6+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} substituted for Ca{sup 2+} in the ssDNA binding and annealing activities of annexin A1. While these metals inhibited the unwinding of dsDNA by nuclear annexin A1 in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and ATP, they enhanced dsDNA-dependent ATPase activity of annexin A1. Heavy metals may have produced dsDNA, a substrate for the DNA unwinding reaction, via the DNA annealing reaction. DNA synthesomes were isolated from L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells in exponential growth, and were found to contain helicase activities. The As{sup 3+}- or Cr{sup 6+}-induced increases in ssDNA binding activity of DNA synthesomes were reduced by a mono-specific anti-annexin A1 antibody, but not by anti-Ig antibody. Anti-annexin A1 antibody also blocked the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of As{sup 3+} or Cr{sup 6+} towards DNA unwinding and annealing activities of DNA synthesomes. Based on these observations, it can be concluded that the effects of heavy metals on DNA annealing and unwinding activities are mediated, at least in substantial part, through actions of the mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 homodimer.

  20. Genomic Sequencing and Characterization of Cynomolgus Macaque Cytomegalovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Ambagala, Aruna P. N.; Dzamba, Misko; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Pilon, Richard; Fournier, Jocelyn; Sandstrom, Paul; Brudno, Michael; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients or people living with HIV/AIDS, and congenital CMV is the leading viral cause of developmental disabilities in infants. Due to the highly species-specific nature of CMV, animal models that closely recapitulate human CMV (HCMV) are of growing importance for vaccine development. Here we present the genomic sequence of a novel nonhuman primate CMV from cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis; CyCMV). CyCMV (Ottawa strain) was isolated from the urine of a healthy, captive-bred, 4-year-old cynomolgus macaque of Philippine origin, and the viral genome was sequenced using next-generation Illumina sequencing to an average of 516-fold coverage. The CyCMV genome is 218,041 bp in length, with 49.5% G+C content and 84% protein-coding density. We have identified 262 putative open reading frames (ORFs) with an average coding length of 789 bp. The genomic organization of CyCMV is largely colinear with that of rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV). Of the 262 CyCMV ORFs, 137 are homologous to HCMV genes, 243 are homologous to RhCMV 68.1, and 200 are homologous to RhCMV 180.92. CyCMV encodes four ORFs that are not present in RhCMV strain 68.1 or 180.92 but have homologies with HCMV (UL30, UL74A, UL126, and UL146). Similar to HCMV, CyCMV does not produce the RhCMV-specific viral homologue of cyclooxygenase-2. This newly characterized CMV may provide a novel model in which to study CMV biology and HCMV vaccine development. PMID:21994460

  1. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection. PMID:28133458

  2. Patterns of Immune Regulation in Rhesus Macaque and Human Families

    PubMed Central

    Burlingham, William J.; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Kempton, Steve; Haynes, Lynn; Kaufman, Dixon B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naturally acquired immune regulation amongst family members can result in mutual regulation between living related renal transplant donor and recipients. Pretransplant bidirectional regulation predisposed to superior renal allograft outcome in a CAMPATH-1H protocol. We tested whether Rhesus macaques, a large animal model of choice for preclinical transplant studies, share these immunoregulatory properties. Methods Antigen-specific linked suppression was measured by trans vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity [tvDTH] response. Neutralizing antibodies to regulatory cytokines, IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-35 were coinjected to ascertain the role of these cytokines in the regulatory response. Results Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 116 Rhesus macaques in 50 families and 78 human subjects in 25 families were analyzed. Suppression of the recall response of 25% or greater was detected in 30 of 51 (59%) monkeys, and 25 of 36 (69%) human subjects when PBMC were coinjected with antigens of the mother, containing the noninherited maternal antigens. In 33% of Rhesus and 32% of human subjects, linked suppression was also seen when PBMC from the mother was assayed with antigens from offspring. Bidirectional regulation was also seen between greater than 50% of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-identical full siblings; subcellular antigens caused significant linked suppression in 7 of 10 (Rhesus) and 8 of 15 (human) cases, indicating the importance of familial minor H antigens. The lowest incidence of regulation was seen in MHC-1 haplotype mismatched siblings in both species. Linked suppression was most effectively reversed by antibodies that neutralized TGFβ1, and the 2 subunits of IL-35 (Ebi3 and IL12p35). Conclusions Rhesus macaques provide a suitable model for analyzing the impact of bidirectional regulation in living related donor-recipient pairs. PMID:27500222

  3. A critical period of progesterone withdrawal precedes menstruation in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Slayden, Ov D; Brenner, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Macaques are menstruating nonhuman primates that provide important animal models for studies of hormonal regulation in the uterus. In women and macaques the decline of progesterone (P) at the end of the cycle triggers endometrial expression of a variety of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes that participate in tissue breakdown and menstrual sloughing. To determine the minimal duration of P withdrawal required to induce menses, we assessed the effects of adding P back at various time points after P withdrawal on both frank bleeding patterns and endometrial MMP expression. Artificial menstrual cycles were induced by treating the animals sequentially with implants releasing estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P). To assess bleeding patterns, P implants were removed at the end of a cycle and then added back at 12, 24, 30, 36, 40, 48, 60, or 72 hours (h) after the initial P withdrawal. Observational analysis of frank bleeding patterns showed that P replacement at 12 and 24 h blocked menses, replacement at 36 h reduced menses but replacement after 36 h failed to block menses. These data indicate that in macaques, a critical period of P withdrawal exists and lasts approximately 36 h. In other similarly cycled animals, we withdrew P and then added P back either during (12–24 h) or after (48 h) the critical period, removed the uterus 24 h after P add back and evaluated endometrial MMP expression. Immunocytochemistry showed that replacement of P during the critical period suppressed MMP-1, -2 and -3 expression along with menses, but replacement of P at 48 h, which failed to suppress mense, suppressed MMP-1 and MMP-3 but did not block MMP-2. We concluded that upregulation of MMPs is essential to menses induction, but that after the critical period, menses will occur even if some MMPs are experimentally blocked. PMID:17118170

  4. A critical period of progesterone withdrawal precedes menstruation in macaques.

    PubMed

    Slayden, Ov D; Brenner, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Macaques are menstruating nonhuman primates that provide important animal models for studies of hormonal regulation in the uterus. In women and macaques the decline of progesterone (P) at the end of the cycle triggers endometrial expression of a variety of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes that participate in tissue breakdown and menstrual sloughing. To determine the minimal duration of P withdrawal required to induce menses, we assessed the effects of adding P back at various time points after P withdrawal on both frank bleeding patterns and endometrial MMP expression. Artificial menstrual cycles were induced by treating the animals sequentially with implants releasing estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P). To assess bleeding patterns, P implants were removed at the end of a cycle and then added back at 12, 24, 30, 36, 40, 48, 60, or 72 hours (h) after the initial P withdrawal. Observational analysis of frank bleeding patterns showed that P replacement at 12 and 24 h blocked menses, replacement at 36 h reduced menses but replacement after 36 h failed to block menses. These data indicate that in macaques, a critical period of P withdrawal exists and lasts approximately 36 h. In other similarly cycled animals, we withdrew P and then added P back either during (12-24 h) or after (48 h) the critical period, removed the uterus 24 h after P add back and evaluated endometrial MMP expression. Immunocytochemistry showed that replacement of P during the critical period suppressed MMP-1, -2 and -3 expression along with menses, but replacement of P at 48 h, which failed to suppress mense, suppressed MMP-1 and MMP-3 but did not block MMP-2. We concluded that upregulation of MMPs is essential to menses induction, but that after the critical period, menses will occur even if some MMPs are experimentally blocked.

  5. Cross-Species Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bimber, Benjamin N.; Reed, Jason S.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Bhusari, Amruta; Hammond, Katherine B.; Klug, Alex; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMV) are highly species-specific due to millennia of co-evolution and adaptation to their host, with no successful experimental cross-species infection in primates reported to date. Accordingly, full genome phylogenetic analysis of multiple new CMV field isolates derived from two closely related nonhuman primate species, Indian-origin rhesus macaques (RM) and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (MCM), revealed distinct and tight lineage clustering according to the species of origin, with MCM CMV isolates mirroring the limited genetic diversity of their primate host that underwent a population bottleneck 400 years ago. Despite the ability of Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) laboratory strain 68–1 to replicate efficiently in MCM fibroblasts and potently inhibit antigen presentation to MCM T cells in vitro, RhCMV 68–1 failed to productively infect MCM in vivo, even in the absence of host CD8+ T and NK cells. In contrast, RhCMV clone 68–1.2, genetically repaired to express the homologues of the HCMV anti-apoptosis gene UL36 and epithelial cell tropism genes UL128 and UL130 absent in 68–1, efficiently infected MCM as evidenced by the induction of transgene-specific T cells and virus shedding. Recombinant variants of RhCMV 68–1 and 68–1.2 revealed that expression of either UL36 or UL128 together with UL130 enabled productive MCM infection, indicating that multiple layers of cross-species restriction operate even between closely related hosts. Cumulatively, these results implicate cell tropism and evasion of apoptosis as critical determinants of CMV transmission across primate species barriers, and extend the macaque model of human CMV infection and immunology to MCM, a nonhuman primate species with uniquely simplified host immunogenetics. PMID:27829026

  6. Intrasulcal electrocorticography in macaque monkeys with minimally invasive neurosurgical protocols.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Keisuke; Osada, Takahiro; Sawahata, Hirohito; Suzuki, Takafumi; Shibata, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Nakahara, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Atsuhiko; Sato, Noboru; Kawai, Kensuke; Saito, Nobuhito; Hasegawa, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG), multichannel brain-surface recording and stimulation with probe electrode arrays, has become a potent methodology not only for clinical neurosurgery but also for basic neuroscience using animal models. The highly evolved primate's brain has deep cerebral sulci, and both gyral and intrasulcal cortical regions have been implicated in important functional processes. However, direct experimental access is typically limited to gyral regions, since placing probes into sulci is difficult without damaging the surrounding tissues. Here we describe a novel methodology for intrasulcal ECoG in macaque monkeys. We designed and fabricated ultra-thin flexible probes for macaques with micro-electro-mechanical systems technology. We developed minimally invasive operative protocols to implant the probes by introducing cutting-edge devices for human neurosurgery. To evaluate the feasibility of intrasulcal ECoG, we conducted electrophysiological recording and stimulation experiments. First, we inserted parts of the Parylene-C-based probe into the superior temporal sulcus to compare visually evoked ECoG responses from the ventral bank of the sulcus with those from the surface of the inferior temporal cortex. Analyses of power spectral density and signal-to-noise ratio revealed that the quality of the ECoG signal was comparable inside and outside of the sulcus. Histological examination revealed no obvious physical damage in the implanted areas. Second, we placed a modified silicone ECoG probe into the central sulcus and also on the surface of the precentral gyrus for stimulation. Thresholds for muscle twitching were significantly lower during intrasulcal stimulation compared to gyral stimulation. These results demonstrate the feasibility of intrasulcal ECoG in macaques. The novel methodology proposed here opens up a new frontier in neuroscience research, enabling the direct measurement and manipulation of electrical activity in the whole brain.

  7. Rapid Expansion of Phenylthiocarbamide Non-Tasters among Japanese Macaques.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Hayakawa, Takashi; Matsui, Atsushi; Go, Yasuhiro; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko; Hirai, Hirohisa; Satta, Yoko; Imai, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2R proteins) allow mammals to detect and avoid ingestion of toxins in food. Thus, TAS2Rs play an important role in food choice and are subject to complex natural selection pressures. In our previous study, we examined nucleotide variation in TAS2R38, a gene expressing bitter taste receptor for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), in 333 Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) from 9 local populations in Japan. We identified a PTC "non-taster" TAS2R38 allele in Japanese macaques that was caused by a loss of the start codon. This PTC non-taster allele was only found in a limited local population (the Kii area), at a frequency of 29%. In this study, we confirmed that this allele was present in only the Kii population by analyzing an additional 264 individuals from eight new populations. Using cellular and behavioral experiments, we found that this allele lost its receptor function for perceiving PTC. The nucleotide sequences of the allele including flanking regions (of about 10 kb) from 23 chromosomes were identical, suggesting that a non-taster allele arose and expanded in the Kii population during the last 13,000 years. Genetic analyses of non-coding regions in Kii individuals and neighboring populations indicated that the high allele frequency in the Kii population could not be explained by demographic history, suggesting that positive selection resulted in a rapid increase in PTC non-tasters in the Kii population. The loss-of-function that occurred at the TAS2R38 locus presumably provided a fitness advantage to Japanese macaques in the Kii population. Because TAS2R38 ligands are often found in plants, this functional change in fitness is perhaps related to feeding habit specificity. These findings should provide valuable insights for elucidating adaptive evolutionary changes with respect to various environments in wild mammals.

  8. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-Yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection.

  9. Selective reaching in macaques: evidence for action-centred attention.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Maria; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Straulino, Elisa; Sartori, Luisa; D'Amico, Enrico; Castiello, Umberto

    2017-03-01

    When a monkey selects a piece of food lying on the ground from among other viable objects in the near vicinity, only the desired item governs the particular pattern and direction of the animal's reaching action. It would seem then that selection is an important component controlling the animal's action. But, we may ask, is the selection process in such cases impervious to the presence of other objects that could constitute potential obstacles to or constraints on movement execution? And if it is, in fact, pervious to other objects, do they have a direct influence on the organization of the response? The kinematics of macaques' reaching movements were examined by the current study that analysed some exemplars as they selectively reached to grasp a food item in the absence as well as in the presence of potential obstacles (i.e., stones) that could affect the arm trajectory. Changes in movement parameterization were noted in temporal measures, such as movement time, as well as in spatial ones, such as paths of trajectory. Generally speaking, the presence of stones in the vicinity of the acting hand stalled the reaching movement and affected the arm trajectory as the hand veered away from the stone even when it was not a physical obstacle. We concluded that nearby objects evoke a motor response in macaques, and the attentional mechanisms that allow for a successful action selection are revealed in the reaching path. The data outlined here concur with human studies indicating that potential obstacles are internally represented, a finding implying basic cognitive operations allowing for action selection in macaques.

  10. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive amacrine cells of macaque retina

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kathryn E.; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of authors have observed amacrine cells containing high levels of immunoreactive parvalbumin in primate retinas. The experiments described here were designed to identify these cells morphologically, to determine their neurotransmitter, to record their light responses, and to describe the other cells that they contact. Macaque retinas were fixed in paraformaldehyde and labeled with antibodies to parvalbumin and one or two other markers, and this double- and triple-labeled material was analyzed by confocal microscopy. In their morphology and dendritic stratification patterns, the parvalbumin-positive cells closely resembled the knotty type 2 amacrine cells described using the Golgi method in macaques. They contained immunoreactive glycine transporter, but not immunoreactive γ-aminobutyric acid, and therefore, they use glycine as their neurotransmitter. Their spatial density was relatively high, roughly half that of AII amacrine cells. They contacted lobular dendrites of AII cells, and they are expected to be presynaptic to AII cells based on earlier ultrastructural studies. They also made extensive contacts with axon terminals of OFF midget bipolar cells whose polarity cannot be predicted with certainty. A macaque amacrine cell of the same morphological type depolarized at the onset of increments in light intensity, and it was well coupled to other amacrine cells. Previously, we described amacrine cells like these that contacted OFF parasol ganglion cells and OFF starburst amacrine cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that one function of these amacrine cells is to inhibit the transmission of signals from rods to OFF bipolar cells via AII amacrine cells. Another function may be inhibition of the OFF pathway following increments in light intensity. PMID:19435546

  11. Video-induced yawning in stumptail macaques (Macaca arctoides)

    PubMed Central

    Paukner, Annika; Anderson, James R

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the first experimental exploration of possible contagious yawning in monkeys. Twenty-two stumptail macaques (Macaca arctoides) were presented with video clips of either yawns or control mouth movements by conspecifics. At a group level, monkeys yawned significantly more often during and just after the yawn tape than the control tape. Supplementary analysis revealed that the yawn tape also elicited significantly more self-directed scratching responses than the control tape, which suggests that yawning might have been caused by tension arising from viewing the yawn tape. Understanding to what extent the observed effect resembles contagious yawning as found in humans and chimpanzees requires more detailed experimentation. PMID:17148320

  12. Seroconversion to HCoV-NL63 in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Dijkman, Ronald; Mulder, H Lie; Rumping, Lynne; Kraaijvanger, Ilse; Deijs, Martin; Jebbink, Maarten F; Verschoor, Ernst J; van der Hoek, Lia

    2009-12-01

    HCoV-NL63 is a recently identified respiratory virus. Its pathogenesis has not been fully unraveled because an animal model is currently lacking. Here we examined whether rhesus macaques encounter HCoV-NL63 infections during life, by examining the levels of antibodies to HCoV-NL63 in time. The animals were followed for 7 up till 19 years, and in three animals we observed a steep rise in antibodies during follow up, indicative of a natural infection with HCoV-NL63.

  13. Genetic diversity of Bartonella quintana in macaques suggests zoonotic origin of trench fever.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Bai, Jie-Ying; Wang, Li-Yuan; Zeng, Lin; Shi, Yan-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Liang; Ye, Hua-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Lu, Qing-Bin; Kosoy, Michael; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2013-04-01

    Bartonella quintana is a bacterium that causes a broad spectrum of diseases in humans including trench fever. Humans were previously considered to be the primary, if not the only, reservoir hosts for B. quintana. To identify the animal reservoir and extend our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary history of B. quintana, we examined blood samples from macaques and performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. We demonstrated the prevalence of B. quintana infection was common in macaques from main primate centres in mainland China. Overall, 18.0% (59/328) of rhesus macaques and 12.7% (39/308) of cynomolgus macaques were found to be infected with B. quintana by blood culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. The infection was more frequently identified in juvenile and young monkeys compared with adult animals. In contrast with the relatively low level of sequence divergence of B. quintana reported in humans, our investigation revealed much higher genetic diversity in nonhuman primates. We identified 44 new nucleotide variable sites and 14 novel sequence types (STs) among the B. quintana isolates by MLST analysis. Some STs were found only in cynomolgus macaques, while some others were detected only in rhesus macaques, suggesting evidence of host-cospeciation, which were further confirmed by phylogenetic analysis and Splits decomposition analysis. Our findings suggest that trench fever may primarily be a zoonotic disease with macaques as the natural hosts.

  14. Forest seasonality shapes diet of limestone-living rhesus macaques at Nonggang, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuangbin; Huang, Libin; Huang, Zhonghao; Krzton, Ali; Lu, Changhu; Zhou, Qihai

    2016-01-01

    Limestone forests are an unusual habitat for primates, but little information is available for the genus Macaca in such habitats, making a comparative understanding of extant limestone primates' behavioral adaptation incomplete. We collected data on the diet of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in a limestone habitat at Nonggang Nature Reserve, southwestern Guangxi, China, and examined the effects of forest seasonality on their diet. Our results indicated that a total of 114 species of plants are consumed by macaques. Young leaves are a preferred food, accounting for 48.9 and 56.9% of the overall diets. One group significantly increased young leaf consumption in response to availability. Fruits contributed to only 27.3 and 28.7% of overall diet. The macaque diet varied according to season. They fed on more fruits in the rainy season. Consumption of mature leaves increased when the availability of young leaves and fruits declined in the dry season, indicating that mature leaves are a fallback food for macaques in a limestone habitat. Similar to sympatric Assamese macaques, Bonia saxatilis, a shrubby, karst-endemic bamboo was consumed by rhesus macaques throughout the year, and was the top food species through most of the year, suggesting that bamboo consumption represents a key factor in the macaque's dietary adaptation to limestone habitat.

  15. Transmission of Chagas Disease via Blood Transfusions in 2 Immunosuppressed Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Derek L; Torrence, Annie E; Vogel, Keith W; Stockinger, Diane E; Nelson, Veronica; Murnane, Robert D; Baldessari, Audrey; Kuller, LaRene; Agy, Michael; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E

    2014-01-01

    A 2.25-y-old male pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) was experimentally irradiated and received a bone marrow transplant. After transplantation and engraftment, the macaque had unexpected recurring pancytopenia and dependent edema of the prepuce, scrotum, and legs. The diagnostic work-up included a blood smear, which revealed a trypomastigote consistent with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). We initially hypothesized that the macaque had acquired the infection when it lived in Georgia. However, because the animal had received multiple blood transfusions, all blood donors were screened for CD. One male pigtailed macaque blood donor, which was previously housed in Louisiana, was positive for T. cruzi antibodies via serology. Due to the low prevalence of infection in Georgia, the blood transfusion was hypothesized to be the source of T. cruzi infection. The transfusion was confirmed as the mechanism of transmission when screening of archived serum revealed seroconversion after blood transfusion from the seropositive blood donor. The macaque made a full clinical recovery, and further follow-up including thoracic radiography, echocardiography, and gross necropsy did not show any abnormalities associated with CD. Other animals that received blood transfusions from the positive blood donor were tested, and one additional pigtailed macaque on the same research protocol was positive for T. cruzi. Although CD has been reported to occur in many nonhuman primate species, especially pigtailed macaques, the transmission of CD via blood transfusion in nonhuman primates has not been reported previously. PMID:24512963

  16. Preference for facial averageness: Evidence for a common mechanism in human and macaque infants

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Fabrice; Méary, David; Quinn, Paul C.; Lee, Kang; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J.; Pascalis, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Human adults and infants show a preference for average faces, which could stem from a general processing mechanism and may be shared among primates. However, little is known about preference for facial averageness in monkeys. We used a comparative developmental approach and eye-tracking methodology to assess visual attention in human and macaque infants to faces naturally varying in their distance from a prototypical face. In Experiment 1, we examined the preference for faces relatively close to or far from the prototype in 12-month-old human infants with human adult female faces. Infants preferred faces closer to the average than faces farther from it. In Experiment 2, we measured the looking time of 3-month-old rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) viewing macaque faces varying in their distance from the prototype. Like human infants, macaque infants looked longer to faces closer to the average. In Experiments 3 and 4, both species were presented with unfamiliar categories of faces (i.e., macaque infants tested with adult macaque faces; human infants and adults tested with infant macaque faces) and showed no prototype preferences, suggesting that the prototypicality effect is experience-dependent. Overall, the findings suggest a common processing mechanism across species, leading to averageness preferences in primates. PMID:28406237

  17. Focused-ultrasound termination of an early pregnancy in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong-Hong; Zou, Jian-Zhong; Bai, Jin; Zhan, Yang; Wu, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Biao

    2012-12-01

    We explored the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of focused ultrasound in terminating undesired pregnancy. A high-intensity focused ultrasound therapeutic unit was employed to terminate early pregnancies in rhesus macaques. B-mode ultrasound incorporated within the system was used to locate and study the gestational sacs of 6 rhesus macaques with gestation ages of 37 to 66 days, and varying modes of ultrasound exposure were adopted in the termination of the early pregnancies of the rhesus macaques. After focused ultrasound exposure, B-mode ultrasound of the gestational sacs showed significant lethal changes. Of the 6 rhesus macaques, 5 underwent complete abortions whereas 1 rhesus macaque underwent an incomplete abortion. The rhesus macaques resumed their menstrual cycles 50 days after focused-ultrasound treatment. The results suggested that focused ultrasound could be safe, feasible, and effective in terminating early pregnancies in rhesus macaques. As a novel physical method, it may be a promising ablation for a potentially clinical application. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization and allelic polymorphisms of rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) IgG Fc receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Doan C; Scinicariello, Franco; Attanasio, Roberta

    2011-06-01

    Macaque models are invaluable for AIDS research. Indeed, initial development of HIV-1 vaccines relies heavily on simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques. Neutralizing antibodies, a major component of anti-HIV protective responses, ultimately interact with Fc receptors on phagocytic and natural killer cells to eliminate the pathogen. Despite the major role that Fc receptors play in protective responses, there is very limited information available on these molecules in rhesus macaques. Therefore, in this study, rhesus macaque CD32 (FcγRII) and CD64 (FcγRI) homologues were genetically characterized. In addition, presence of CD16 (FcγRIII), CD32, and CD64 allelic polymorphisms were determined in a group of nine animals. Results from this study show that the predicted structures of macaque CD32 and CD64 are highly similar to their human counterparts. Macaque and human CD32 and CD64 extracellular domains are 88-90% and 94-95% homologous, respectively. Although all cysteines are conserved between the two species, macaque CD32 exhibits two additional N-linked glycosylation sites, whereas CD64 lacks three of them when compared to humans. Five CD32, three CD64, and three CD16 distinct allelic sequences were indentified in the nine animals examined, indicating a relatively high level of polymorphism in macaque Fcγ receptors. Together, these results validate rhesus macaques as models for vaccine development and antibody responses, while at the same time, underscoring the need to take into account the high degree of genetic heterogeneity present in this species when designing experimental protocols.

  19. The enigmatic Arunachal macaque: its biogeography, biology and taxonomy in Northeastern India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Jihosuo; Borah, Dhiraj K; Das, Abhijit; Das, Jayanta; Bhattacharjee, P C; Mohnot, S M; Horwich, Robert H

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the taxonomic status of an unidentified enigmatic macaque seen by scientists since the late 1990s in Arunachal Pradesh, India. We surveyed 49 troops of enigmatic macaques in four districts of Arunachal Pradesh. The population studied is from the macaque sinica-group as defined by the reproductive organs. The main species-separating trait in the sinica-group is tail length to head and body length ratio that decreases with latitude and elevation. We gathered data on morphology, pelage descriptions, tail to head and body ratios and tail to hind foot ratios from photos and live animals (43 individuals from 36 areas) within the range of and between the two subspecies of the Assamese macaque (Macaca assamensis). We compared the data to six western Assamese macaques and studies of Assamese macaques and related species. We found great variability in tail length, pelage color, facial skin color, and facial and hair patterns. The tail/head-body and tail/foot ratios, although varied, supported the hypothesis that these enigmatic forms were part of a population of Assamese macaques found in the gap between the two subspecies ranges and were not a new species as described earlier. Instead, we found evidence that darker pelage, larger body size, and shorter tails occur at higher elevations and latitudes similar to the general trend in the sinica-group's adaptations to colder climates. Thus, the population may be important for its variation, throwing light on the speciation process and how the northern species of Tibetan macaques evolved from an ancestor similar to the Assamese macaques as adaptations to a colder climate. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Macaques immunized with HLA-DR are protected from challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Bess, J W; Urban, R G; Strominger, J L; Morton, W R; Mann, D L; Henderson, L E; Benveniste, R E

    1995-01-01

    Macaques immunized with uninfected human cells have been shown to be protected from challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) propagated in human cells. To identify the potential antigens involved in this protection, macaques were immunized with uninfected human cells, sucrose density gradient-purified culture fluid from uninfected human cells (mock virus), beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2M), immunoaffinity-purified HLA class I and class II proteins from these human cells, and adjuvant. Although all macaques immunized with beta 2M and HLA class I developed high antibody titers to beta 2M, these animals were not protected from a subsequent challenge with infectious SIV grown in human cells. In contrast, the macaques immunized with class II protein (HLA-DR) and mock virus developed antibodies to class II protein and were protected from the intravenous infectious virus challenge. The class II protein- and mock virus-immunized animals which were protected from challenge were given boosters of the appropriate antigen and challenged with the same SIV propagated in macaque cells. All animals became infected, indicating that the protection seen with human class II protein did not extend to protection from infection with SIV containing macaque class II proteins. Since the virus released from SIV-infected macaque cells would contain macaque class II proteins, our results suggest that the initial SIV infected was completely prevented. In addition, the lack of protection from challenge with SIV propagated in macaque cells provided strong evidence that the protection was due to an immune response to the cellular proteins and not to epitopes cross-reactive between class II proteins and the viral proteins, since the identical virus proteins were present in both challenge stocks. These results are the first demonstration that immunization with a purified cellular protein can protect from virus infection. PMID:7707540

  1. Estimation of Shear Wave Speed in the Rhesus Macaques Uterine Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Drehfal, Lindsey C.; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Guerrero, Quinton W.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Simmons, Heather A.; Feltovich, Helen; Hall, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical softness is a critical parameter in pregnancy. Clinically, preterm birth is associated with premature cervical softening and post-dates birth is associated with delayed cervical softening. In practice, the assessment of softness is subjective, based on digital examination. Fortunately, objective, quantitative techniques to assess softness and other parameters associated with microstructural cervical change are emerging. One of these is shear wave speed (SWS) estimation. In principle, this allows objective characterization of stiffness because waves travel more slowly in softer tissue. We are studying SWS in humans and rhesus macaques, the latter in order to accelerate translation from bench to bedside. For the current study, we estimated SWS in ex vivo cervices of rhesus macaques, n=24 nulliparous (never given birth) and n=9 multiparous (delivered at least 1 baby). Misoprostol (a prostaglandin used to soften human cervices prior to gynecological procedures) was administered to 13 macaques prior to necropsy (nulliparous: 7, multiparous: 6). SWS measurements were made at predetermined locations from the distal to proximal end of the cervix on both the anterior and posterior cervix, with 5 repeat measures at each location. The intent was to explore macaque cervical microstructure, including biological and spatial variability, to elucidate the similarities and differences between the macaque and the human cervix in order to facilitate future in vivo studies. We found that SWS is dependent on location in the normal nonpregnant macaque cervix, as in the human cervix. Unlike the human cervix, we detected no difference between ripened and unripened rhesus macaque cervix samples, nor nulliparous versus multiparous samples, although we observed a trend toward stiffer tissue in nulliparous samples. We found rhesus macaque cervix to be much stiffer than human, which is important for technique refinement. These findings are useful for guiding study of cervical

  2. High Infection Rates in Adult Macaques Following Intravaginal or Intrarectal Zika Virus Inoculation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-07

    variety of factors such as seminal 235 viral load, number of sex acts, and/or co-infection (48, 49) – likely the case for ZIKV. Similar to 236 other...response in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques following intravaginal inoculation of Zika virus. Macaque Sex Viremia* (log10 PFU/mL) DPI Serological...virus. Macaque Sex Viremia* (log10 PFU/mL) DPI Serological response† (PRNT80) DPI ≤ 2 3 4 5 6 7 ≥ 9 7 15 21 28 Rhesus 5 M – – 3.8

  3. Molecular identification of Oesophagostomum and Trichuris eggs isolated from wild Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Arizono, Naoki; Yamada, Minoru; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Onishi, Kotaro

    2012-09-01

    Natural habitat fragmentation and reducing habitat quality have resulted in an increased appearance of Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata (Gray, 1870), in suburban areas in Japan. To investigate the risk of zoonotic infections, a coprological survey of helminth eggs passed by wild Japanese macaques was carried out in 2009 and 2010 in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Microscopic examination found helminth eggs in high prevalence, and nucleotide sequencing of DNA extracted from the eggs identified Oesophagostomum cf. aculeatum and Trichuris trichiura. A fecal culture also detected infective larvae of Strongyloides fuelleborni. These zoonotic nematodes pose a potential health issue to local people in areas frequented by Japanese macaques.

  4. Molecular Identification of Oesophagostomum and Trichuris Eggs Isolated from Wild Japanese Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Minoru; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Onishi, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    Natural habitat fragmentation and reducing habitat quality have resulted in an increased appearance of Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata (Gray, 1870), in suburban areas in Japan. To investigate the risk of zoonotic infections, a coprological survey of helminth eggs passed by wild Japanese macaques was carried out in 2009 and 2010 in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Microscopic examination found helminth eggs in high prevalence, and nucleotide sequencing of DNA extracted from the eggs identified Oesophagostomum cf. aculeatum and Trichuris trichiura. A fecal culture also detected infective larvae of Strongyloides fuelleborni. These zoonotic nematodes pose a potential health issue to local people in areas frequented by Japanese macaques. PMID:22949756

  5. Response properties of macaque monkey chorda tympani fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Many of the chorda tympani fibers of crab-eating monkeys respond to more than one of the four basic stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, HCl, and quinine hydrochloride) as well as cooling or warming of the tongue. Fibers could be classified into four categories depending on their best sensitivity to any one of the four basic stimuli. Sucrose-best and quinine-best fibers are rather specifically sensitive to sucrose and quinine, respectively, while salt-best and acid-best fibers respond relatively well to HCl and NaCl, respectively. Saccharin, dulcin, and Pb acetate produce a good response in sucrose-best fibers, but quinine- best and salt-best fibers also respond to saccharin. Highly significant positive correlations exist between amounts of responses to sucrose and those to saccharin, dulcin, and Pb acetate, indicating that these substances produce in the monkey a taste quality similar to that produced by sucrose. Compared with chroda tympani fibers of rats, hamsters, and squirrel monkeys, macaque monkey taste fibers are more narrowly tuned to one of the four basic taste stimuli and more highly developed in sensitivity to various sweet-tasting substances. Also LiCl and NaCl are more effective stimuli for gustatory receptors in macaque monkeys than NH4Cl and KCl. This contrasts with a higher sensitivity to KCl and NH4Cl than to NaCl in chorda tympani fibers of squirrel monkeys. PMID:811758

  6. Cooperation in wild Barbary macaques: factors affecting free partner choice.

    PubMed

    Molesti, Sandra; Majolo, Bonaventura

    2016-01-01

    A key aspect of cooperation is partner choice: choosing the best available partner improves the chances of a successful cooperative interaction and decreases the likelihood of being exploited. However, in studies on cooperation subjects are rarely allowed to freely choose their partners. Group-living animals live in a complex social environment where they can choose among several social partners differing in, for example, sex, age, temperament, or dominance status. Our study investigated whether wild Barbary macaques succeed to cooperate using an experimental apparatus, and whether individual and social factors affect their choice of partners and the degree of cooperation. We used the string pulling task that requires two monkeys to manipulate simultaneously a rope in order to receive a food reward. The monkeys were free to interact with the apparatus or not and to choose their partner. The results showed that Barbary macaques are able to pair up with a partner to cooperate using the apparatus. High level of tolerance between monkeys was necessary for the initiation of successful cooperation, while strong social bond positively affected the maintenance of cooperative interactions. Dominance status, sex, age, and temperament of the subjects also affected their choice and performance. These factors thus need to be taken into account in cooperative experiment on animals. Tolerance between social partners is likely to be a prerequisite for the evolution of cooperation.

  7. Giant Thoracic Schwannoma in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Derron A; Bell, Todd M; Benton, Carrie; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Stevens, Edward L

    2010-01-01

    A 15-y-old male rhesus macaque with a 3-d history of labored breathing, was culled from a nonhuman primate research colony after thoracic radiographs and exploratory surgery revealed a 10-cm, well-circumscribed space-occupying mass in the posterior thoracic cavity. The multilobulated cystic and necrotic neoplasm was composed of interlacing streams and fascicles of neoplastic spindle cells arranged in Antoni A, and less commonly, Antoni B patterns. Verocay bodies were present also. The neoplasm was encapsulated mostly, and histomorphologic features were benign. Immunohistochemistry indicated that neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, S100, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and nerve growth factor receptor. Reticulin histochemical staining and immunohistochemical stains for collagen IV and laminin showed a prominent basal lamina surrounding the neoplastic cells. The histologic features and results of the immunohistochemical stains confirmed peripheral nerve origin and were consistent with schwannoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of thoracic schwannoma in a rhesus macaque and the second reported case of schwannoma in a nonhuman primate. PMID:21205456

  8. Social determinants of eyeblinks in adult male macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ballesta, Sébastien; Mosher, Clayton P.; Szep, Jeno; Fischl, Kate D.; Gothard, Katalin M.

    2016-01-01

    Videos with rich social and emotional content elicit natural social behaviors in primates. Indeed, while watching videos of conspecifics, monkeys engage in eye contact, gaze follow, and reciprocate facial expressions. We hypothesized that the frequency and timing of eyeblinks also depends on the social signals contained in videos. We monitored the eyeblinks of four male adult macaques while they watched videos of conspecifics displaying facial expressions with direct or averted gaze. The instantaneous blink rate of all four animals decreased during videos. The temporal synchrony of blinking, however, increased in response to segments depicting appeasing or aggressive facial expressions directed at the viewer. Two of the four monkeys, who systematically reciprocated the direct gaze of the stimulus monkeys, also showed eyeblink entrainment, a temporal coordination of blinking between social partners engaged in dyadic interactions. Together, our results suggest that in macaques, as in humans, blinking depends not only on the physiological imperative to protect the eyes and spread a film of tears over the cornea, but also on several socio-emotional factors. PMID:27922101

  9. Distinctive Leukocyte Subpopulations According to Organ Type in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zitsman, Jonah S; Alonso-Guallart, Paula; Ovanez, Christopher; Kato, Yojiro; Rosen, Joanna F; Weiner, Joshua I; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (CYNO; Macaca fascicularis) are a well-established NHP model used for studies in immunology. To provide reference values on the baseline cell distributions in the hematopoietic and lymphoid organs (HLO) of these animals, we used flow cytometry to analyze the peripheral blood, bone marrow, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus of a cohort of male, adult, research-naïve, Mauritian CYNO. Our findings demonstrate that several cell distribution patterns differ between CYNO and humans. First, the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio is lower in CYNO compared with humans. Second, the peripheral blood of CYNO contains a population of CD4+CD8+ T cells. Third, the CD31 level was elevated in all organs studied, suggesting that CD31 may not be an accurate marker of recent thymic emigrants within the CD4+ T cells of CYNO. Finally the B-cell population is lower in CYNO compared with humans. In summary, although the majority of immune cell populations are similar between cynomolgus macaques and humans, several important differences should be considered when using CYNO in immunologic studies. Our current findings provide valuable information to not only researchers but also veterinarians working with CYNO at research centers, in zoos, or in the wild. PMID:27538862

  10. Visual Field Map Clusters in Macaque Extrastriate Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kolster, Hauke; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Arsenault, John T.; Ekstrom, Leeland B.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Vanduffel, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The macaque visual cortex contains more than 30 different functional visual areas, yet surprisingly little is known about the underlying organizational principles that structure its components into a complete ‘visual’ unit. A recent model of visual cortical organization in humans suggests that visual field maps are organized as clusters. Clusters minimize axonal connections between individual field maps that represent common visual percepts, with different clusters thought to carry out different functions. Experimental support for this hypothesis, however, is lacking in macaques, leaving open the question of whether it is unique to humans or a more general model for primate vision. Here we show, using high-resolution BOLD fMRI data in the awake monkey at 7 Tesla, that area MT/V5 and its neighbors are organized as a cluster with a common foveal representation and a circular eccentricity map. This novel view on the functional topography of area MT/V5 and satellites indicates that field map clusters are evolutionarily preserved and may be a fundamental organizational principle of the old world primate visual cortex. PMID:19474330

  11. Rudimentary empathy in macaques' social decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, Sebastien; Duhamel, Jean-René

    2015-12-15

    Primates live in highly social environments, where prosocial behaviors promote social bonds and cohesion and contribute to group members' fitness. Despite a growing interest in the biological basis of nonhuman primates' social interactions, their underlying motivations remain a matter of debate. We report that macaque monkeys take into account the welfare of their peers when making behavioral choices bringing about pleasant or unpleasant outcomes to a monkey partner. Two macaques took turns in making decisions that could impact their own welfare or their partner's. Most monkeys were inclined to refrain from delivering a mildly aversive airpuff and to grant juice rewards to their partner. Choice consistency between these two types of outcome suggests that monkeys display coherent motivations in different social interactions. Furthermore, spontaneous affilitative group interactions in the home environment were mostly consistent with the measured social decisions, thus emphasizing the impact of preexisting social bonds on decision-making. Interestingly, unique behavioral markers predicted these decisions: benevolence was associated with enhanced mutual gaze and empathic eye blinking, whereas indifference or malevolence was associated with lower or suppressed such responses. Together our results suggest that prosocial decision-making is sustained by an intrinsic motivation for social affiliation and controlled through positive and negative vicarious reinforcements.

  12. Gonadectomy increases neurogenesis in the male adolescent rhesus macaque hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Allen, K M; Fung, S J; Rothmond, D A; Noble, P L; Weickert, C Shannon

    2014-02-01

    New neurons are continuously produced in the subgranular zone of the adult hippocampus and can modulate hippocampal plasticity across life. Adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes in sex hormone levels, and social and emotional behaviors. It is also an age for increased risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, which may involve altered hippocampal neurogenesis. The extent to which testosterone and other testicular hormones modulate hippocampal neurogenesis and adolescent behavioral development is unclear. This study aimed to determine if removal of testicular hormones during adolescence alters neurogenesis in the male rhesus macaque hippocampus. We used stereology to examine levels of cell proliferation, cell survival and neuronal differentiation in late adolescent male rhesus macaques (4.6-yrs old) that had previously been gonadectomized or sham operated prior to puberty (2.4-yrs old). While the absence of adolescent testicular hormones had no effect on cell proliferation, cell survival was increased by 65% and indices of immature neuronal differentiation were increased by 56% in gonadectomized monkeys compared to intact monkeys. We show for the first time that presence of circulating testicular hormones, including testosterone, may decrease neuronal survival in the primate hippocampus during adolescence. Our findings are in contrast to existing studies in adults where testosterone tends to be a pro-survival factor and demonstrate that testicular hormones may reduce hippocampal neurogenesis during the age typical of schizophrenia onset.

  13. Determinants of immigration strategies in male crested macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Pascal R.; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into a new group can produce substantial costs due to resistance from residents, but also reproductive benefits. Whether or not individuals base their immigration strategy on prospective cost-benefit ratios remains unknown. We investigated individual immigration decisions in crested macaques, a primate species with a high reproductive skew in favour of high-ranking males. We found two different strategies. Males who achieved low rank in the new group usually immigrated after another male had immigrated within the previous 25 days and achieved high rank. They never got injured but also had low prospective reproductive success. We assume that these males benefitted from immigrating into a destabilized male hierarchy. Males who achieved high rank in the new group usually immigrated independent of previous immigrations. They recieved injuries more frequently and therefore bore immigration costs. They, however, also had higher reproductive success prospects. We conclude that male crested macaques base their immigration strategy on relative fighting ability and thus potential rank in the new group i.e. potential reproductive benefits, as well as potential costs of injury. PMID:27535622

  14. Bilateral dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Sato, Kenichi

    2010-06-01

    The authors describe a case in which well-circumscribed, expansile, and nonencapsulated nodular masses with missing digits were detected on the right and left feet in a 6-year-old female cynomolgus macaque from a routine toxicology study. Grossly, these masses were composed of variably sized and firm nodules containing white, chalklike material in the subcutaneous tissue on cross section. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of irregular lobules containing amorphous to granular, light to dark basophilic material that was surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells and separated by fibrous connective tissue. The nodule's contents were von Kossa and Alizarin red S positive. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels of this monkey were within normal ranges. Based on the gross pathology, histopathology, serum chemistry, and histochemistry, a diagnosis of dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta was made. Dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta is an uncommon syndrome of mineralization that occurs following tissue damage, without abnormalities in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and it is characterized by deposition of calcium salts in soft tissues. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta in a cynomolgus macaque.

  15. Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Cassondra; Dunn, Betty G; Brothman, Arthur R; Jr, Edward J Dick; Christensen, Chris; Voges, Andra; Moore, Charleen M

    2012-01-01

    A 2.3-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) presented with a broken right tibia and fibula. Radiographs showed multiple cyst-like defects in all long bones. We suspected that both fractures were pathologic because they occurred through these defects. Ultrasonography, MRI, and dual X-ray absorptiometry revealed that the defects were filled with soft tissue. Grossly, the bones were abnormal in shape, and a gelatinous material filled the defects and the surrounding marrow cavity. Histologically, the gelatinous material was composed of fibrin and cartilage; few normal bone cells were seen. Genetic testing revealed extra material on the short arm of chromosome 8 in all tissues examined, but no copy number alterations of likely clinical significance were observed, and no abnormalities were found that were unique to the lesions. In light of the clinical signs and radiographic and pathologic findings, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed. This report represents the first documented case of fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus macaque. PMID:22546922

  16. A Motion Direction Map in Macaque V2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haidong D.; Chen, Gang; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Roe, Anna W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, the perception of motion starts with direction-selective neurons in the visual cortex. Despite numerous studies in monkey V1 and V2 (primary and second visual cortex), there has been no evidence of direction maps in these areas. In the present study, we used optical imaging methods to study the organization of motion response in Macaque monkey V1 and V2. In contrast to the findings in other mammals (e.g. cats and ferrets), we found no direction maps in macaque V1. Robust direction maps, however, were found in V2 thick/pale stripes and avoided thin stripes. In many cases direction maps were located within thick stripes and exhibited pinwheel or linear organizations. The presence of motion maps in V2 points to a new found prominence of V2 in motion processing, either for contributing to motion perception in the dorsal pathway and/or for motion-cue dependent form perception in the ventral pathway. PMID:21145011

  17. High color-vision sensitivity in macaque and humans.

    PubMed

    Loop, M S; Crossman, D K

    2000-01-01

    Psychophysical (behavioral) detection thresholds and color-discrimination thresholds were determined in a macaque using a two-alternative forced-choice procedure. On a white background, detection thresholds were determined for a white increment and three spectral increments: 618, 516, and 456 nm. Intermixed with detection threshold determinations, color-discrimination thresholds were determined by presenting the white increment, and one of the spectral increments, at 1.0 log units above their respective detection thresholds and dimming both until discrimination performance fell to threshold. The monkey could discriminate the color of the increments at detection threshold because the average color-discrimination threshold was 0.98+/-0.14 log attenuation. Because the monkey was much more sensitive to the spectral increments than the white increment, we performed an unconventional experiment. We determined the monkey's detection threshold for the white increment alone, and with broadband color filters in the white light path without adjusting the light's intensity. Insertion of several color filters in the light path lowered detection thresholds of both the macaque and six human trichromats. We believe that this improvement in detection thresholds produced by simply inserting color filters in a white light path is a threshold manifestation of the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch effect and suggests that one of color vision's important evolutionary advantages may be improved detection sensitivity.

  18. A chronic neural interface to the macaque dorsal column nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Pauline K.; Sritharan, Srihari Y.; Lucas, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal column nuclei (DCN) of the brain stem contain secondary afferent neurons, which process ascending somatosensory information. Most of the known physiology of the DCN in primates has been acquired in acute experiments with anesthetized animals. Here, we developed a technique to implant a multielectrode array (MEA) chronically in the DCN of macaque monkeys to enable experiments with the animals awake. Two monkeys were implanted with brain-stem MEAs for 2–5 mo with no major adverse effects. Responses of the cuneate and gracile nuclei were quantified at the level of both field potentials and single units. Tactile receptive fields (RFs) were identified for 315 single units. A subset of these units had very regular spiking patterns with spike frequencies predominantly in the alpha band (8–14 Hz). The stability of the neuronal recordings was assessed with a novel analysis that identified units by their mean spike waveform and by the spike-triggered average of activity on all other electrodes in the array. Fifty-six identified neurons were observed over two or more sessions and in a few cases for as long as 1 mo. RFs of stable neurons were largely consistent across days. The results demonstrate that a chronic DCN implant in a macaque can be safe and effective, yielding high-quality unit recording for several months. The unprecedented access to these nuclei in awake primates should lead to a better understanding of their role in sensorimotor behavior. PMID:26912601

  19. Palmoplantar nonpustular psoriasiform dermatitis in a rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Piedras, María José G M; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Sendagorta, Elena; Miró-Murillo, Marta; Cavada, Carmen

    2011-04-01

    A case of psoriasiform dermatitis in an adult male rhesus macaque is reported. Appearing spontaneously, the condition presented the clinical and histopathological features of human palmoplantar nonpustular psoriasis. The animal developed multiple scaly plaques on his palms and soles, as well as nail hyperkeratosis and widening of the nail root. Microscopically, the skin lesions showed epidermal hyperkeratosis with multifocal parakeratosis, neutrophil microabscesses in the stratum corneum, a loss of granule cell layer under the microabscesses, acanthosis, and elongation of the rete ridges; the superficial dermis showed a dense inflammatory infiltrate containing lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils, as well as dilated and tortuous blood vessels. The lesions improved for 15 days after intramuscular corticosteroid depot therapy and worsened slightly afterwards. Later, a spontaneous, progressive remission coincided with the beginning of spring and lasted until the end of summer; the skin lesions practically disappeared during this period, and the nails looked nearly normal. During the next autumn and winter only nail hyperkeratosis was present. Serum analyses showed hyperproteinaemia and hyperglobulinaemia during the outbreak phase and normal values during remission. The clinical and histopathological features of this case, as well as its evolution, are compared with the three other reported cases of psoriasiform skin lesions in nonhuman primates. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a definite palmoplantar nonpustular psoriasiform dermatitis in a rhesus macaque.

  20. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Cassondra; Dunn, Betty G; Brothman, Arthur R; Dick, Edward J; Christensen, Chris; Voges, Andra; Moore, Charleen M

    2012-04-01

    A 2.3-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) presented with a broken right tibia and fibula. Radiographs showed multiple cyst-like defects in all long bones. We suspected that both fractures were pathologic because they occurred through these defects. Ultrasonography, MRI, and dual X-ray absorptiometry revealed that the defects were filled with soft tissue. Grossly, the bones were abnormal in shape, and a gelatinous material filled the defects and the surrounding marrow cavity. Histologically, the gelatinous material was composed of fibrin and cartilage; few normal bone cells were seen. Genetic testing revealed extra material on the short arm of chromosome 8 in all tissues examined, but no copy number alterations of likely clinical significance were observed, and no abnormalities were found that were unique to the lesions. In light of the clinical signs and radiographic and pathologic findings, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed. This report represents the first documented case of fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus macaque.

  1. MHC and KIR Polymorphisms in Rhesus Macaque SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Lutz; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer lymphocytes are essentially involved as the first line of defense against agents such as viruses and malignant cells. The activity of these cells is regulated via interaction of specific and diverse killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with the highly polymorphic cognate MHC class I proteins on target cells. Genetic variability of both KIR and MHC-I ligands has been shown to be associated with resistance to many diseases, including infection with the immunodeficiency virus. Disease course and progression to AIDS after infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is essentially influenced by the presence of the stimulatory KIR3DS1 receptor in combination with HLA-Bw4. Knowledge of such genetic interactions that contribute to not only disease resistance but also susceptibility are just as important. Such combined genetic factors were recently reported in the rhesus macaque AIDS model. Here, we review the rhesus macaque MHC class I and KIR gene systems and the role of their polymorphisms in the SIV infection model. PMID:26557119

  2. Advantages of an Improved Rhesus Macaque Genome for Evolutionary Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gradnigo, Julien S.; Majumdar, Abhishek; Norgren, Robert B.; Moriyama, Etsuko N.

    2016-01-01

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is widely used in molecular evolutionary analyses, particularly to identify genes under adaptive or unique evolution in the human lineage. For such studies, it is necessary to align nucleotide sequences of homologous protein-coding genes among multiple species. The validity of these analyses is dependent on high quality genomic data. However, for most mammalian species (other than humans and mice), only draft genomes are available. There has been concern that some results obtained from evolutionary analyses using draft genomes may not be correct. The rhesus macaque provides a unique opportunity to determine whether an improved genome (MacaM) yields better results than a draft genome (rheMac2) for evolutionary studies. We compared protein-coding genes annotated in the rheMac2 and MacaM genomes with their human orthologs. We found many genes annotated in rheMac2 had apparently spurious sequences not present in genes derived from MacaM. The rheMac2 annotations also appeared to inflate a frequently used evolutionary index, ω (the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates). Genes with these spurious sequences must be filtered out from evolutionary analyses to obtain correct results. With the MacaM genome, improved sequence information means many more genes can be examined for indications of selection. These results indicate how upgrading genomes from draft status to a higher level of quality can improve interpretation of evolutionary patterns. PMID:27911958

  3. Familiar and unfamiliar face recognition in crested macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Micheletta, Jérôme; Whitehouse, Jamie; Parr, Lisa A.; Marshman, Paul; Engelhardt, Antje; Waller, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    Many species use facial features to identify conspecifics, which is necessary to navigate a complex social environment. The fundamental mechanisms underlying face processing are starting to be well understood in a variety of primate species. However, most studies focus on a limited subset of species tested with unfamiliar faces. As well as limiting our understanding of how widely distributed across species these skills are, this also limits our understanding of how primates process faces of individuals they know, and whether social factors (e.g. dominance and social bonds) influence how readily they recognize others. In this study, socially housed crested macaques voluntarily participated in a series of computerized matching-to-sample tasks investigating their ability to discriminate (i) unfamiliar individuals and (ii) members of their own social group. The macaques performed above chance on all tasks. Familiar faces were not easier to discriminate than unfamiliar faces. However, the subjects were better at discriminating higher ranking familiar individuals, but not unfamiliar ones. This suggests that our subjects applied their knowledge of their dominance hierarchies to the pictorial representation of their group mates. Faces of high-ranking individuals garner more social attention, and therefore might be more deeply encoded than other individuals. Our results extend the study of face recognition to a novel species, and consequently provide valuable data for future comparative studies. PMID:26064665

  4. Grooming reciprocity in female tibetan macaques macaca thibetana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dongpo; Li, Jinhua; Garber, Paul A; Sun, Lixing; Zhu, Yong; Sun, Binghua

    2012-06-01

    Grooming among nonhuman primates is widespread and may represent an important service commodity that is exchanged within a biological marketplace. In this study, using focal animal sampling methods, we recorded grooming relationships among 12 adult females in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China, to determine the influence of rank and kinship on grooming relationships, and whether females act as reciprocal traders (exchange grooming received for grooming given) or interchange traders (interchange grooming for social tolerance or other commodities). The results showed that: (1) grooming given was positively correlated with grooming received; (2) kinship did not exert a significant influence on grooming reciprocity; and (3) grooming reciprocity occurred principally between individuals of adjacent rank; however, when females of different rank groomed, females tended to groom up the hierarchy (lower ranking individuals groomed higher ranking individuals more than vice versa). Our results support the contention that both grooming reciprocity and the interchange of grooming for tolerance represent important social tactics used by female Tibetan macaques. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Risk Factors for Dystocia in Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Stockinger, Diane E; Torrence, Anne E; Hukkanen, Renee R; Vogel, Keith W; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E; Ha, James C

    2011-01-01

    Dystocia (difficult labor) is an important component of the management of nonhuman primates and results in significant fetal and maternal morbidity and increased use of veterinary resources. Dystocias can arise from abnormalities of the maternal pelvis or fetus or uncoordinated uterine activity. Although risk factors for stillbirths have been established in nonhuman primates, risk factors for dystocias have not. The objective of this study was to determine maternal and fetal risk factors for dystocia in macaques. Retrospective data were collected from 83 pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) diagnosed with dystocia. The diagnosis of dystocia was made based on clinical or pathologic evidence. Maternal records of age, reproductive history, experimental history, clinical records, and fetal birth weight and any applicable fetal necropsy reports were reviewed. The gestational age of the fetus, the infant's birth weight, total previous births by the dam, and the proportions of both viable delivery (inverse effect) and surgical pregnancy interventions (direct effect) in the dam's history generated a model that maximized the experimental variance for predicting dystocia in the current pregnancy and explained 24% of the dystocia deliveries. The number of total previous births and proportion of previous cesarean sections accounted for the greatest effect. This model can identify individual dams within a colony that are at risk for dystocias and allow for changes in breeding colony management, more intense monitoring of dams at risk, or allocation of additional resources. PMID:21535929

  6. Visceral and Neural Larva Migrans in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Alfonso S; Maximova, Olga A; StClaire, Marisa C; Montali, Richard J; Ward, Jerrold M; Cheng, Lily I; Elkins, William R; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2008-01-01

    Large ascarid larvae within granulomas were noted histologically in the mesenteric and pancreatic lymph nodes of 13 of 21 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) euthanized as part of an experimental viral pathogenesis study. In addition, 7 of the 13 monkeys had cerebral granulomas, which in 4 animals contained nematode larvae similar to those within the lymph nodes. Despite the lesions, the animals did not show clinical signs associated with the parasitic infections. Characteristics of the larvae included, on cross-section, a midbody diameter of approximately 60 to 80 µm, a centrally located and slightly compressed intestine flanked on either side by large triangular excretory columns, and prominent single lateral cuticular alae. The morphology of the larvae was compatible with Baylisascaris spp. Baylisascariasis is a well-described infection of animals and humans that is caused by migrating larvae of the raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis. A similar species, B. columnaris, is found in skunks and can cause cerebrospinal nematodiasis, but most reported cases of baylisascariasis have been due to B. procyonis. Our macaques were born free-ranging on an island in the southeastern United States where raccoons, but not skunks, were found to be common inhabitants, indicating that B. procyonis was the most likely parasite involved. These cases are similar to the low-level or covert cases of Baylisascaris infection described to occur in humans and provide further evidence of the existence of this parasite in the southeastern United States. PMID:18702454

  7. Collective arousal when reuniting after temporary separation in Tonkean macaques.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Arianna; Cozzolino, Roberto; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco; Thierry, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Celebrations and bursts of communal joy can occur spontaneously in human communities based on mechanisms of emotional contagion. Some examples of similar collective excitement have been reported in animals when they reunite or anticipate rewards, but little is known about the processes and meaning of these multiple interactions. We experimentally studied such collective arousals in two captive groups of Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana) within the context of reunions following the temporary separation of two subgroups. We compared the behaviors of individuals after separation periods of 2 and 48 h with a control period with no separation. This study showed that it is possible to reproducibly induce bursts of friendly interactions in which groupmates run around over a period of several minutes, embracing and grasping one another while displaying numerous affiliative vocalizations and facial expressions. The longer the period of separation, the higher and longer-lasting the rates of affiliative interactions were. Individuals affiliated more frequently with groupmates from a previously separated subgroup than with those having stayed in their own subgroup. Collective arousal was followed by a quieter period characterized by high rates of contact-sitting and social grooming. These results point at the role of collective arousals in social cohesion; they could resolve social tension and renew social relationships. We propose that the emotional state experienced by Tonkean macaques during such events represents a disposition similar to that giving rise to what we humans call "shared joy."

  8. Growth rates in a captive population of Tonkean macaques.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Andrea; De Marco, Arianna; Thierry, Bernard; Cozzolino, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Measuring variations in body mass is necessary to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of life-history patterns, and it provides information on the timing of sexual maturity and the development of sexual dimorphism. In this study, we collected longitudinal data on body mass from infancy to adulthood in a captive population of Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana). Tests to evaluate whether social group, maternal age, and dominance rank influenced growth rates showed that they had no significant effect. We investigated the timing and magnitude of breaking points in the growth paths of males and females, and checked whether these breaking points could correspond to specific reproductive and morphological developmental events. We found that male and female Tonkean macaques have roughly equivalent body masses until around the age of four, when males go through an adolescent growth spurt and females continue to grow at a constant rate. Males not only grow faster than females, but they also continue to grow for nearly one and a half years after females have attained their full body mass. Growth rate differences account for approximately two-thirds of the body mass sexual dimorphism; only the remaining third results from continued male growth beyond the age where full body mass is reached in females. We also discovered remarkable correspondences between the timing of testicular enlargement and the adolescent growth spurt in males, and between dental development and slowdown breaking points in both sexes.

  9. Spatial relational memory in 9-month-old macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in one of two sets of three distinct locations. Monkeys were tested in two different conditions: (1) when local visual cues marked the two sets of potentially baited locations, so that monkeys could use both local and spatial information to discriminate these locations from never-baited locations; and (2) when no local visual cues marked the two sets of potentially baited locations, so that monkeys had to rely on a spatial relational representation of the environment to discriminate these locations. No 9-mo-old or adult monkey associated the presence of the proximal landmarks, at the center of the arena, with the presence of food in one set of three distinct locations. All monkeys, however, discriminated the potentially baited locations in the presence of local visual cues, thus providing evidence of visual discrimination learning. More importantly, all 9-mo-old monkeys tested discriminated the potentially baited locations in absence of the local visual cues, thus exhibiting evidence of spatial relational learning. These findings indicate that spatial memory processes characterized by a relational representation of the environment are present as early as 9 mo of age in macaque monkeys.

  10. [Epidemiological survey of a captive Chinese rhesus macaque breeding colony in Yunnan for SRV, STLV and BV].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Han, Jian-Bao; Zhang, Xi-He; Ma, Jian-Ping; Lv, Long-Bao; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2012-02-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical resources for biomedical research. Rhesus macaque is a popularly used laboratory nonhuman primate that share many characteristics with humans. However, rhesus macaques are the natural host of two exogenous retroviruses, SRV (simian type D retrovirus) and STLV (simian T lymphotropic virus). SRV and STLV may introduce potentially significant confounding factors into the study of AIDS model. Moreover, B virus (ceropithecine herpesvirus 1) is likely to harm not only rhesus macaque but also humans in experiments involving rhesus macaque. Yunnan province has large-scale breeding colonies of Chinese rhesus macaque. Therefore there is an urgent need for SPF Chinese rhesus macaque colonies. Here we investigated SRV, STLV and BV infections in 411 Chinese rhesus macaque by PCR technique. The results showed that the prevalence of SRV, STLV and BV among Chinese rhesus macaque breeding colony was 19.71% (81/411), 13.38% (55/411) and 23.11% (95/411), respectively. Comparison of viruses infection in different age-groups and male/female of Chinese rhesus macaque was also analyzed. This study will contribute to establishment of SPF Chinese rhesus macaque breeding colony.

  11. Proton-bound dimers of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules: Substituent effects on the structures and binding energies of homodimers of diazine, triazine, and fluoropyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Attah, Isaac K.; Platt, Sean P.; Meot-Ner, Michael; El-Shall, M. S.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.

    2014-03-21

    The bonding energies of proton-bound homodimers BH{sup +}B were measured by ion mobility equilibrium studies and calculated at the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G{sup **} level, for a series of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules (B) with electron-withdrawing in-ring N and on-ring F substituents. The binding energies (ΔH°{sub dissoc}) of the proton-bound dimers (BH{sup +}B) vary significantly, from 29.7 to 18.1 kcal/mol, decreasing linearly with decreasing the proton affinity of the monomer (B). This trend differs significantly from the constant binding energies of most homodimers of other organic nitrogen and oxygen bases. The experimentally measured ΔH°{sub dissoc} for (1,3-diazine){sub 2}H{sup +}, i.e., (pyrimidine){sub 2}H{sup +} and (3-F-pyridine){sub 2}H{sup +} are 22.7 and 23.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The measured ΔH°{sub dissoc} for the pyrimidine{sup ·+}(3-F-pyridine) radical cation dimer (19.2 kcal/mol) is signifcantly lower than that of the proton-bound homodimers of pyrimidine and 3-F-pyridine, reflecting the stronger interaction in the ionic H-bond of the protonated dimers. The calculated binding energies for (1,2-diazine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (pyridine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (2-F-pyridine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (3-F-pyridine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (2,6-di-F-pyridine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (4-F-pyridine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (1,3-diazine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (1,4-diazine){sub 2}H{sup +}, (1,3,5-triazine){sub 2}H{sup +}, and (pentafluoropyridine){sub 2}H{sup +} are 29.7, 24.9, 24.8, 23.3, 23.2, 23.0, 22.4, 21.9, 19.3, and 18.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The electron-withdrawing substituents form internal dipoles whose electrostatic interactions contribute to both the decreased proton affinities of (B) and the decreased binding energies of the protonated dimers BH{sup +}B. The bonding energies also vary with rotation about the hydrogen bond, and they decrease in rotamers where the internal dipoles of the components are aligned efficiently for inter-ring repulsion. For compounds substituted at the 3 or 4

  12. Proton-bound dimers of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules: Substituent effects on the structures and binding energies of homodimers of diazine, triazine, and fluoropyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attah, Isaac K.; Platt, Sean P.; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; El-Shall, M. S.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.

    2014-03-01

    The bonding energies of proton-bound homodimers BH+B were measured by ion mobility equilibrium studies and calculated at the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G** level, for a series of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules (B) with electron-withdrawing in-ring N and on-ring F substituents. The binding energies (ΔH°dissoc) of the proton-bound dimers (BH+B) vary significantly, from 29.7 to 18.1 kcal/mol, decreasing linearly with decreasing the proton affinity of the monomer (B). This trend differs significantly from the constant binding energies of most homodimers of other organic nitrogen and oxygen bases. The experimentally measured ΔH°dissoc for (1,3-diazine)2H+, i.e., (pyrimidine)2H+ and (3-F-pyridine)2H+ are 22.7 and 23.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The measured ΔH°dissoc for the pyrimidine.+(3-F-pyridine) radical cation dimer (19.2 kcal/mol) is signifcantly lower than that of the proton-bound homodimers of pyrimidine and 3-F-pyridine, reflecting the stronger interaction in the ionic H-bond of the protonated dimers. The calculated binding energies for (1,2-diazine)2H+, (pyridine)2H+, (2-F-pyridine)2H+, (3-F-pyridine)2H+, (2,6-di-F-pyridine)2H+, (4-F-pyridine)2H+, (1,3-diazine)2H+, (1,4-diazine)2H+, (1,3,5-triazine)2H+, and (pentafluoropyridine)2H+ are 29.7, 24.9, 24.8, 23.3, 23.2, 23.0, 22.4, 21.9, 19.3, and 18.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The electron-withdrawing substituents form internal dipoles whose electrostatic interactions contribute to both the decreased proton affinities of (B) and the decreased binding energies of the protonated dimers BH+B. The bonding energies also vary with rotation about the hydrogen bond, and they decrease in rotamers where the internal dipoles of the components are aligned efficiently for inter-ring repulsion. For compounds substituted at the 3 or 4 (meta or para) positions, the lowest energy rotamers are T-shaped with the planes of the two rings rotated by 90° about the hydrogen bond, while the planar rotamers are weakened by repulsion between the

  13. CYP1B1 is polymorphic in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Akinori; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 is involved in the metabolic activation of various procarcinogens, and some CYP1B1 genetic variants alter CYP1B1-dependent procarcinogen metabolism. Cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in toxicity tests due to their evolutionary closeness to humans. In this study, we attempted to identify CYP1B1 genetic variants in 13 cynomolgus and 4 rhesus macaques. A total of 17 genetic variants were identified, including 8 non-synonymous genetic variants, indicating that, similar to humans, CYP1B1 is polymorphic in macaques. These CYP1B1 genetic variants could be the basis for understanding potential inter-animal differences in macaque CYP1B1-dependent metabolism of promutagens.

  14. A simple multiplex polymerase chain reaction to determine ABO blood types of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S; Satkoski, J; Smith, D G

    2011-06-01

    Rhesus macaques are the most common nonhuman primate model organism used in biomedical research. Their increasingly frequent use as subjects in studies involving transplantation requires that blood and other tissue antigens of donors and recipients be compatible. We report here an easy and rapid multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine the ABO blood group phenotypes of rhesus macaques that can be performed with only small amounts of DNA. We phenotyped 78 individuals and found this species to exhibit the A, B and AB phenotypes in frequencies that vary by geographic region. The probability of randomly pairing rhesus macaque donors and recipients that exhibit major ABO phenotype incompatibility is approximately 0.35 and 0.45 for Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques, respectively.

  15. Alopecia in Rhesus macaques correlates with immunophenotypic alterations in dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with hypersensitivity etiology.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Joshua; Fahey, Michele; Santos, Rosemary; Carville, Angela; Wachtman, Lynn; Mansfield, Keith

    2010-04-01

    Although alopecia is a commonly recognized problem affecting many captive Rhesus macaque colonies, there is no consensus as to the underlying etiology or appropriate course of management. We performed skin biopsies to assess underlying pathology in alopecic Rhesus macaques and performed immunohistochemical and metachromatic staining of these biopsies to assess the cellular infiltrates. Alopecia is associated with superficial dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates and skin pathology consistent with chronic hypersensitivity dermatitis. The inflammation is primarily composed of CD4+ cells admixed with histiocytes and mast cells. Inflammation is correlated with degree of alopecia. Further analysis in different groups of macaques revealed that animals born outdoors or infected with lung mites had reduced dermal inflammatory cell infiltrates and a lower incidence of alopecia. These findings support a hypothesis that an altered housing status resulting in decreased pathogen burden in Rhesus macaque colonies may contribute to dermal immunophenotypic alterations and subsequent development of dermatitis with resultant alopecia.

  16. Effects of Ketamine on Metabolomics of Serum and Urine in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xueying; Zeng, Xiancheng; Hong, Jiehua; Yuan, Congli; Cui, Li; Ma, Jing; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a metabolomics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and pertinent multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the effect of ketamine on metabolic markers in cynomolgus macaques. Principal component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis showed that ketamine (10 mg/kg) induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, ketamine-treated macaques had lower serum levels of α-glucose, myoinositol, lactate and succinate and lower urine levels of pyruvate and lactate. In contrast, the levels of leucine in serum and arginine in urine were significantly higher in the ketamine group. Our results also demonstrated that a single injection of ketamine influenced the major energy and amino acid metabolic pathways in cynomolgus macaques. Our study suggests that these influences should be considered in the design of experiments and the interpretation related blood and urine data from ketamine-sedated cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27657710

  17. Monkeying around with HIV vaccines: using rhesus macaques to define 'gatekeepers' for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Devon J; Silvestri, Guido; Weiner, David B

    2009-10-01

    Rhesus macaques are an important animal model for the study of human disease and the development of vaccines against HIV and AIDS. HIV vaccines have been benchmarked in rhesus macaque preclinical challenge studies using chimeric viruses made up of parts of HIV and simian immunodeficiency viruses. However, the lack of efficacy in a recent clinical trial calls for a re-evaluation of the scientific assumptions regarding the predictive value of using data generated from rhesus macaques as a 'gatekeeper' for the advancement of candidate vaccines into the clinic. In this context, there is significant consensus among HIV vaccinologists that next-generation HIV vaccines must generate 'better' immunity in rhesus macaques than clinically unsuccessful vaccines generated using validated assays. Defining better immunity is the core challenge of HIV vaccine development in this system and is the focus of this Review.

  18. Hematological and serum biochemical indices in healthy bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata)

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Peter J.; Sequeira, Marlon K.; Corcoran, Christopher A.; Blevins, Maria W.; Gee, Melaney; Laudenslager, Mark L.; Bennett, Allyson J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood reference values for bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata) are limited. The goal of this study was to determine reference ranges for hematological and serum biochemical indices in healthy, socially housed bonnet macaques for males and females over a range of ages. Methods Blood hematological and serum biochemical values were obtained from 50 healthy bonnet macaques of both sexes and aged 10-234 months. Results Age and sex differences were present in a number of measures. Globulins, total protein, and creatinine (CREAT) values were highest among older subjects, while alkaline phophatase, albumin, and phosphorus values were higher in juveniles. Sex differences were present in concentrations of red blood cells and CREAT, with higher values in males. Conclusion The blood parameter data reported here as age-specific reference values for laboratory-housed, healthy bonnet macaques may be used to inform clinical care and laboratory primate research. PMID:21366603

  19. A Chinese rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model for vaginal Lactobacillus colonization and live microbicide development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosa R.; Cheng, Andrew T.; Lagenaur, Laurel A.; Huang, Wenjun; Weiss, Deborah E.; Treece, Jim; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E.; Hamer, Dean H.; Lee, Peter P.; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to establish a nonhuman primate model of vaginal Lactobacillus colonization suitable for evaluating live microbial microbicide candidates. Methods Vaginal and rectal microflora in Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were analyzed, with cultivable bacteria identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Live lactobacilli were intravaginally administered to evaluate bacterial colonization. Results Chinese rhesus macaques harbored abundant vaginal Lactobacillus, with Lactobacillus johnsonii as the predominant species. Like humans, most examined macaques harbored only one vaginal Lactobacillus species. Vaginal and rectal Lactobacillus isolates from the same animal exhibited different genetic and biochemical profiles. Vaginal Lactobacillus was cleared by a vaginal suppository of azithromycin, and endogenous L. johnsonii was subsequently restored by intravaginal inoculation. Importantly, prolonged colonization of a human vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii was established in these animals. Conclusions The Chinese rhesus macaque harbors vaginal Lactobacillus and is a potentially useful model to support the pre-clinical evaluation of Lactobacillus-based topical microbicides. PMID:19367737

  20. Faces in Motion: Selectivity of Macaque and Human Face Processing Areas for Dynamic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Polosecki, Pablo; Moeller, Sebastian; Schweers, Nicole; Romanski, Lizabeth M.; Tsao, Doris Y.

    2013-01-01

    Face recognition mechanisms need to extract information from static and dynamic faces. It has been hypothesized that the analysis of dynamic face attributes is performed by different face areas than the analysis of static facial attributes. To date, there is no evidence for such a division of labor in macaque monkeys. We used fMRI to determine specializations of macaque face areas for motion. Face areas in the fundus of the superior temporal sulcus responded to general object motion; face areas outside of the superior temporal sulcus fundus responded more to facial motion than general object motion. Thus, the macaque face-processing system exhibits regional specialization for facial motion. Human face areas, processing the same stimuli, exhibited specializations for facial motion as well. Yet the spatial patterns of facial motion selectivity differed across species, suggesting that facial dynamics are analyzed differently in humans and macaques. PMID:23864665

  1. Faces in motion: selectivity of macaque and human face processing areas for dynamic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Polosecki, Pablo; Moeller, Sebastian; Schweers, Nicole; Romanski, Lizabeth M; Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2013-07-17

    Face recognition mechanisms need to extract information from static and dynamic faces. It has been hypothesized that the analysis of dynamic face attributes is performed by different face areas than the analysis of static facial attributes. To date, there is no evidence for such a division of labor in macaque monkeys. We used fMRI to determine specializations of macaque face areas for motion. Face areas in the fundus of the superior temporal sulcus responded to general object motion; face areas outside of the superior temporal sulcus fundus responded more to facial motion than general object motion. Thus, the macaque face-processing system exhibits regional specialization for facial motion. Human face areas, processing the same stimuli, exhibited specializations for facial motion as well. Yet the spatial patterns of facial motion selectivity differed across species, suggesting that facial dynamics are analyzed differently in humans and macaques.

  2. Alopecia in Rhesus macaques correlates with immunophenotypic alterations in dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with hypersensitivity etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joshua; Fahey, Michele; Santos, Rosemary; Carville, Angela; Wachtman, Lynn; Mansfield, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background Although alopecia is a commonly recognized problem affecting many captive Rhesus macaque colonies, there is no consensus as to the underlying etiology or appropriate course of management. Methods and Results We performed skin biopsies on a group of Rhesus macaques and demonstrate that alopecia is associated with superficial dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates and skin pathology consistent with chronic hypersensitivity dermatitis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the inflammation is primarily composed of CD4+ cells admixed with histiocytes and mast cells. Inflammation is correlated with degree of alopecia. Further analysis in different groups of macaques revealed that animals born outdoors or infected with lung mites had reduced dermal inflammatory cell infiltrates and a lower incidence of alopecia. Conclusions These findings support a hypothesis that an altered housing status resulting in decreased pathogen burden in Rhesus macaque colonies may contribute to dermal immunophenotypic alterations and subsequent development of dermatitis with resultant alopecia. PMID:20102458

  3. A high-resolution radiation hybrid map of rhesus macaque chromosome 5 identifies rearrangements in the genome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Karere, Genesio M.; Froenicke, Lutz; Millon, Lee; Womack, James E.; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2008-01-01

    A 10,000-rad radiation hybrid cell panel of the rhesus macaque was generated to construct a comprehensive RH map of chromosome 5. The map represents 218 markers typed in 185 RH clones. The 4,846 cR length map has an average marker spacing of 798 kb. Alignments of the RH map to macaque and human genome sequences confirm a large inversion and reveal a previously unreported telomeric inversion. The macaque genome sequence indicates small translocations from the ancestral homolog of macaque chromosome 5 to macaque chromosome 1 and 6. The RH map suggests that these are likely assembly artifacts. Unlike the genome sequence, the RH mapping data indicate the conservation of synteny between macaque chromosome 5 and human chromosome 4. This study shows that the 10,000-rad panel is appropriate for the generation of a high-resolution whole genome RH map suitable for the verification of the rhesus genome assembly. PMID:18601997

  4. Emergence of infectious malignant thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by SRV-4 after transmission to a novel host

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Munehiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Ono, Fumiko; Nakamura, Shota; Sato, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakai, Kouji; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagata, Noriyo; Takano, Jun-ichiro; Okabayashi, Sachi; Hamano, Masataka; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakaya, Takaaki; Iida, Tetsuya; Horii, Toshihiro; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Watanabe, Akino; Kaneko, Akihisa; Saito, Akatsuki; Matsui, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Juri; Akari, Hirofumi; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a lethal hemorrhagic syndrome arising from severe thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques kept at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Extensive investigation identified that simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4) was the causative agent of the disease. SRV-4 had previously been isolated only from cynomolgus macaques in which it is usually asymptomatic. We consider that the SRV-4 crossed the so-called species barrier between cynomolgus and Japanese macaques, leading to extremely severe acute symptoms in the latter. Infectious agents that cross the species barrier occasionally amplify in virulence, which is not observed in the original hosts. In such cases, the new hosts are usually distantly related to the original hosts. However, Japanese macaques are closely related to cynomolgus macaques, and can even hybridize when given the opportunity. This lethal outbreak of a novel pathogen in Japanese macaques highlights the need to modify our expectations about virulence with regards crossing species barriers. PMID:25743183

  5. Genome-wide mining and comparative analysis of microsatellites in three macaque species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanxu; Hou, Wei; Sun, Tianlin; Xu, Yongtao; Li, Peng; Yue, Bisong; Fan, Zhenxin; Li, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Microsatellites are found in taxonomically different organisms, and such repeats are related with genomic structure, function and certain diseases. To characterize microsatellites for macaques, we searched and compared SSRs with 1-6 bp nucleotide motifs in rhesus, cynomolgus and pigtailed macaque. A total of 1395671, 1284929 and 1266348 perfect SSRs were mined, respectively. The most frequent perfect SSRs were mononucleotide SSRs. The most GC-content was in dinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs. Chromosome size was positively correlated with SSR number and negatively correlated with the relative frequency and density of SSRs. The GC content of chromosome SSRs were negatively correlated with relative frequency of SSRs and GC content of chromosome sequences. The features of microsatellite distribution in assembled genomes of the three species were greatly similar, which revealed that the distributional pattern of microsatellites is probably conservative in genus Macaca. The degenerated number of repeat motifs was found to be different in pentanucleotide and hexanucleotide repeats. Species-specific motifs for each macaque were significantly underrepresented. Overall, SSR frequencies of each chromosome in rhesus macaque were higher than in cynomolgus macaque. The maximum repeat times of mono- to pentanucleotide repeats in cynomolgus macaque was more than other two macaques. These results emphasize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of genus Macaca species. Our data will be beneficial for comparative genome mapping, understanding the distribution of SSRs and genome structure between these animal models, and provide a foundation for further development and identification of more macaque-specific SSRs.

  6. Expression of prokineticin 2 and its receptor in the Macaque monkey brain

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Katherine J.; Li, Xiaohan; Li, Baoan; Cheng, Michelle Y.; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Zhou, Qun-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2) has been indicated as an output signaling molecule for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian clock. Most of these studies were performed with nocturnal animals, particularly mice and rats. In the current study, the PK2 and its receptor, PKR2, was cloned from a species of diurnal macaque monkey. The macaque monkey PK2 and PKR2 were found to be highly homologous to that of other mammalian species. The mRNA expression of PK2 and PKR2 in the macaque brain was examined by in situ hybridization. The expression patterns of PK2 and PKR2 in the macaque brain were found to be quite similar to that of the mouse brain. Particularly, PK2 mRNA was shown to oscillate in the SCN of the macaque brain in the same phase and with similar amplitude with that of nocturnal mouse brain. PKR2 expression was also detected in known primary SCN targets, including the midline thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei. However, the PKR2 expression was only detected in the dorsal SCN of the macaque brain, in contrast to the broad expression of PKR2 in the dorsal and ventral segments of the mouse SCN. The likely functional importance of this differential expression of PKR2 in the SCN segments in the diurnal monkey vs nocturnal mouse remains to be explored. In addition, we detected the expression of PKR2 mRNA in the dorsal raphe nucleus of both macaque and mouse brains. As a likely SCN to dorsal raphe projection has previously been indicated, the expression of PKR2 in the raphe nuclei of both macaque and mouse brain signifies a possible role of dorsal raphe nucleus as a previously unrecognized primary SCN projection target. PMID:26818846

  7. A novel paraplegia model in awake behaving macaques.

    PubMed

    Krucoff, Max O; Zhuang, Katie; MacLeod, David; Yin, Allen; Byun, Yoon Woo; Manson, Roberto Jose; Turner, Dennis A; Oliveira, Laura; Lebedev, Mikhail A

    2017-09-01

    Lower limb paralysis from spinal cord injury (SCI) or neurological disease carries a poor prognosis for recovery and remains a large societal burden. Neurophysiological and neuroprosthetic research have the potential to improve quality of life for these patients; however, the lack of an ethical and sustainable nonhuman primate model for paraplegia hinders their advancement. Therefore, our multidisciplinary team developed a way to induce temporary paralysis in awake behaving macaques by creating a fully implantable lumbar epidural catheter-subcutaneous port system that enables easy and reliable targeted drug delivery for sensorimotor blockade. During treadmill walking, aliquots of 1.5% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine were percutaneously injected into the ports of three rhesus macaques while surface electromyography (EMG) recorded muscle activity from their quadriceps and gastrocnemii. Diminution of EMG amplitude, loss of voluntary leg movement, and inability to bear weight were achieved for 60-90 min in each animal, followed by a complete recovery of function. The monkeys remained alert and cooperative during the paralysis trials and continued to take food rewards, and the ports remained functional after several months. This technique will enable recording from the cortex and/or spinal cord in awake behaving nonhuman primates during the onset, maintenance, and resolution of paraplegia for the first time, thus opening the door to answering basic neurophysiological questions about the acute neurological response to spinal cord injury and recovery. It will also negate the need to permanently injure otherwise high-value research animals for certain experimental paradigms aimed at developing and testing neural interface decoding algorithms for patients with lower extremity dysfunction.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A novel implantable lumbar epidural catheter-subcutaneous port system enables targeted drug delivery and induction of temporary paraplegia in awake, behaving nonhuman

  8. Homo-Dimers of Vanillin and Apocynin Decrease Metastatic Potential of Human Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the FAK/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jantaree, Phatcharida; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Kaewsri, Wilailak; Thongsornkleeb, Charnsak; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Atjanasuppat, Korakot; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2017-03-01

    The spread of cancer cells to distant organs, in a process called metastasis, is the main factor that contributes to most death in cancer patients. Vanillin, the vanilla flavoring agent, has been shown to suppress metastasis in a mouse model. Here, we evaluated the anti-metastatic potential of the food additive divanillin, the homo-dimer of vanillin, and their structurally related compounds, apocynin and diapocynin, in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The Transwell invasion assay showed that the dimeric forms exhibited higher potency than vanillin and apocynin in inhibiting invasion, with IC50 values of 23.3±7.4 to 41.3±4.2 μM for the dimers, which are 26-34 fold lower than IC50 values of vanillin and apocynin (p<0.05). Both monomeric and dimeric forms target regulation of the invasion process, by inhibiting phosphorylation of FAK and Akt. Molecular docking studies suggested that the dimers should bind more tightly than vanillin and apocynin to the Y397 pocket of FAK FERM domain. Thus, the food additive divanillin has greater anti-metastatic potential than the flavoring agent vanillin.

  9. Liquid-phase electron microscopy of molecular drug response in breast cancer cells reveals irresponsive cell subpopulations related to lack of HER2 homodimers.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Korf, Ulrike; Wiemann, Stefan; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-08-09

    The development of drug resistance in cancer poses a major clinical problem. An example is human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpressing breast cancer often treated with anti-HER2 antibody therapies, such as trastuzumab. Since drug resistance is rooted mainly in tumor cell heterogeneity, we examined the drug effect in different subpopulations of SKBR3 breast cancer cells, and compared the results with a drug resistant cell line, HCC1954. Correlative light microscopy and liquid-phase scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to quantitatively analyze HER2 responses upon drug binding, whereby many tens of whole cells were imaged. Trastuzumab was found to selectively cross-link and down regulate HER2 homodimers from the plasma membranes of bulk cancer cells. In contrast, HER2 resided mainly as monomers in rare subpopulations of resting- and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and these monomers were not internalized after drug binding. The HER2 distribution was hardly influenced by trastuzumab for the HCC1954 cells. These findings show that resting cells and CSCs are irresponsive to the drug, and thus point towards a molecular explanation behind the origin of drug resistance. This analytical method is broadly applicable to study membrane protein interactions in the intact plasma membrane, while accounting for cell heterogeneity. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  10. The APC/C subunit Cdc16/Cut9 is a contiguous tetratricopeptide repeat superhelix with a homo-dimer interface similar to Cdc27

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziguo; Kulkarni, Kiran; Hanrahan, Sarah J; Thompson, Andrew J; Barford, David

    2010-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), an E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for controlling cell cycle transitions, is a multisubunit complex assembled from 13 different proteins. Numerous APC/C subunits incorporate multiple copies of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR). Here, we report the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cut9 (Cdc16/Apc6) in complex with Hcn1 (Cdc26), showing that Cdc16/Cut9 is a contiguous TPR superhelix of 14 TPR units. A C-terminal block of TPR motifs interacts with Hcn1, whereas an N-terminal TPR block mediates Cdc16/Cut9 self-association through a homotypic interface. This dimer interface is structurally related to the N-terminal dimerization domain of Cdc27, demonstrating that both Cdc16/Cut9 and Cdc27 form homo-dimers through a conserved mechanism. The acetylated N-terminal Met residue of Hcn1 is enclosed within a chamber created from the Cut9 TPR superhelix. Thus, in complex with Cdc16/Cut9, the N-acetyl-Met residue of Hcn1, a putative degron for the Doa10 E3 ubiquitin ligase, is inaccessible for Doa10 recognition, protecting Hcn1/Cdc26 from ubiquitin-dependent degradation. This finding may provide a structural explanation for a mechanism to control the stoichiometry of proteins participating in multisubunit complexes. PMID:20924356

  11. A Binuclear Zinc Interaction Fold Discovered in the Homodimer of Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Fragment with Taiwanese Mutation D7H.

    PubMed

    Polshakov, Vladimir I; Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Kozin, Sergey A; Adzhubei, Alexei A; Zhokhov, Sergey S; van Beek, Wouter; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Indeykina, Maria I; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Makarov, Alexander A

    2017-06-01

    Zinc-induced oligomerization of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) produces potentially pathogenic agents of Alzheimer's disease. Mutations and modifications in the metal binding domain 1-16 of Aβ peptide crucially affect its zinc-induced oligomerization by changing intermolecular zinc mediated interface. The 3D structure of this interface appearing in a range of Aβ species is a prospective drug target for disease modifying therapy. Using NMR spectroscopy, EXAFS spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and isothermal titration calorimetry the interaction of zinc ions with Aβ fragments 1-7 and 1-10 carrying familial Taiwanese mutation D7H was studied. Zinc ions induce formation of a stable homodimer formed by the two peptide chains fastened by two zinc ions and stacking interactions of imidazole rings. A binuclear zinc interaction fold in the dimer structure was discovered. It can be used for designing zinc-regulated proteins and zinc-mediated self-assembling peptides. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Replication-specific conversion of the Staphylococcus aureus pT181 initiator protein from an active homodimer to an inactive heterodimer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, A; Wang, P Z; Novick, R P

    1994-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus rolling circle plasmid pT181 regulates its replication by controlling the synthesis of its initiator protein RepC. RepC is inactivated during pT181 replication by the addition of an oligodeoxynucleotide, giving rise to a new form, RepC*. We analyzed RepC and RepC* in four classes of mutants: plasmid copy number mutants, two classes of RepC mutants affecting different portions of the protein and oriC (origin) mutants. We have found that in the cell with wild-type RepC there are similar relative amounts of RepC and RepC*, regardless of copy number, and that the conversion of RepC to RepC* is replication dependent. Genetic and biochemical evidence is presented that RepC functions as a dimer and that during replication the RepC homodimer is converted to the RepC/RepC* heterodimer. Images PMID:7957090

  13. Preliminary study on eye colour in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in their natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Watanabe, Kunio

    2007-04-01

    Eye colour in Japanese macaques shows apparent differences between individuals, continuously ranging from orange (bright), through shades of yellow and hazel-blue to dark blue (dark). We arbitrarily classified them into either 'yellow' eyes or 'blue' eyes based on the yellow area occupying in the iris' peripupillary ring. Most Japanese macaques have yellow eyes after infant phase, whilst 19, 17, 12, and 15% of monkeys (>6 months, sexes combined) have blue-eye in studied two groups of Shodoshima and two groups of Takasakiyama, respectively. Frequency of eye colour did not differ between males and females, but significantly differed in each age class. Blue eyes significantly more frequently occurred in newborns, infants and aged monkeys than in juveniles and prime adults. Data from mother-infant pairs indicated eye colour could be inherited from their parents. A case of asymmetric eye colour in Japanese macaques was found from a sample of 1962 individuals. Eye colour variation of Japanese macaques was discussed in relation to those of humans and rhesus macaques. A possible evolutionary model of eye colour in Japanese macaques was discussed.

  14. Admixture in Humans of Two Divergent Plasmodium knowlesi Populations Associated with Different Macaque Host Species.

    PubMed

    Divis, Paul C S; Singh, Balbir; Anderios, Fread; Hisam, Shamilah; Matusop, Asmad; Kocken, Clemens H; Assefa, Samuel A; Duffy, Craig W; Conway, David J

    2015-05-01

    Human malaria parasite species were originally acquired from other primate hosts and subsequently became endemic, then spread throughout large parts of the world. A major zoonosis is now occurring with Plasmodium knowlesi from macaques in Southeast Asia, with a recent acceleration in numbers of reported cases particularly in Malaysia. To investigate the parasite population genetics, we developed sensitive and species-specific microsatellite genotyping protocols and applied these to analysis of samples from 10 sites covering a range of >1,600 km within which most cases have occurred. Genotypic analyses of 599 P. knowlesi infections (552 in humans and 47 in wild macaques) at 10 highly polymorphic loci provide radical new insights on the emergence. Parasites from sympatric long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and pig-tailed macaques (M. nemestrina) were very highly differentiated (FST = 0.22, and K-means clustering confirmed two host-associated subpopulations). Approximately two thirds of human P. knowlesi infections were of the long-tailed macaque type (Cluster 1), and one third were of the pig-tailed-macaque type (Cluster 2), with relative proportions varying across the different sites. Among the samples from humans, there was significant indication of genetic isolation by geographical distance overall and within Cluster 1 alone. Across the different sites, the level of multi-locus linkage disequilibrium correlated with the degree of local admixture of the two different clusters. The widespread occurrence of both types of P. knowlesi in humans enhances the potential for parasite adaptation in this zoonotic system.

  15. Mycobacterium kansasii Isolated from Tuberculinpositive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the Absence of Disease.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Steven T; Johnson, David K; Roodgar, Morteza; Smith, David Glenn; Montgomery, Charles A; Lloyd, Steven M; Higgins, James A; Kriel, Edwin H; Klein, Hilton J; Porter, William P; Nazareno, Jerome B; Houghton, Paul W; Panda, Aruna; DeTolla, Louis J

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterial infections are of primary health concern in NHP colonies in biomedical research. NHP are constantly monitored and screened for Mycobacterium spp. We report 6 Chinese-origin rhesus macaques infected with Mycobacterium kansasii that exhibited positive tuberculin skin tests in the absence of disease. Two of these macaques were being used for research purposes; the remaining 4 macaques were residing at the contract quarantine company. Histopathology and acid-fast staining of fixed tissues from all macaques showed that all were free of disease. Thoracic radiographs were negative for any signs of disease or infection. Samples from bronchial lavage and tissues including lung, spleen, hilar and mesenteric lymph nodes tested negative by PCR assay for Mycobacterium spp. One of the research macaques tested culture-positive for M. kansasii and a poorly characterized M. avium complex organism. One macaque from the contract quarantine facility tested culture positive for M. kansasii. Genomic testing and target gene RNA expression analysis of the 2 M. kansasii isolates were performed to evaluate possible kinship and affected genes that might contribute to susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. Genotyping of the 2 isolates revealed 2 genetically distinct strains (strains 1 and 4). The presence of positive tuberculin skin tests in the absence of disease raises serious concerns regarding diagnostic methods used for infected NHP.

  16. An MRI based average macaque monkey stereotaxic atlas and space (MNI monkey space).

    PubMed

    Frey, Stephen; Pandya, Deepak N; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Bailey, Lara; Petrides, Michael; Collins, D Louis

    2011-04-15

    In studies of the human brain, a standard stereotaxic space such as the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI space) is widely used to provide a common reference for the three-dimensional localization of functional activation foci and anatomical structures, enabling the comparison of results obtained across different studies. Here we present a standard macaque monkey brain MRI template that offers a common stereotaxic reference frame to localize anatomical and functional information in an organized and reliable way for comparison across individual monkeys and studies. We have used MRI volumes from a group of 25 normal adult macaque monkeys (18 cynomolgus and 7 rhesus) to create a common standard macaque monkey brain as well as atlases for each of these species separately. In addition, the digital macaque monkey volume was subjected to 3D volumetric analysis and comparison of brain structures between the individual brains and the average atlas. Furthermore, we provide a means of transforming any macaque MRI volume into MNI monkey space coordinates in 3D using simple web based tools. Coordinates in MNI monkey space can also be transformed into the coordinate system of a detailed neuroanatomical paper atlas (Paxinos et al., 2008), enabling researchers to identify and delineate cortical and subcortical structures in their individual macaque monkey brains.

  17. Cervical carotid and circle of willis arterial anatomy of macaque monkeys: a comparative anatomy study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishant; Lee, John J; Perlmutter, Joel S; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2009-07-01

    Macaque monkeys are used in many research applications, including cerebrovascular investigations. However, detailed catalogs of the relevant vascular anatomy are scarce. We present our experience with macaque vessel patterns as determined by digital subtraction angiography of 34 different monkeys. We retrospectively analyzed digital subtraction angiograms obtained during experimental internal carotid artery (ICA) catheterization and subsequent injection of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Results were catalogued according to vascular distribution and variants observed. Macaque monkeys have a bovine aortic arch. The carotid vessels generally bifurcate, but are occasionally observed to divide into three vessels. The external carotid gives rise primarily to two trunks: an occipital branch and a common vessel that subsequently gives off the lingual, facial, and superior thyroid arteries. The internal maxillary artery may be present as a terminal branch of the external carotid or as a branch of the occipital artery. The ICA is similar in course to that of the human. The anterior circle of Willis was intact in all monkeys in our study. Its primary difference from that of the human is the union of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries as a single (azygous) median vessel. Macaque cervical carotid and circle of Willis arterial anatomy differs from humans in a couple of specific patterns. Knowledge of these differences and similarities between human and macaque anatomy is important in developing endovascular macaque models of human diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  18. Chagas Disease in 2 Geriatric Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Housed in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Mary F; Astorga, Nestor Gerardo; Astorga, Nestor Rodrigo; Lewis, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is endemic in Latin America but also is found in the southern United States, particularly Texas and along the Gulf Coast. Typical clinical manifestations of Chagas disease are not well-characterized in rhesus macaques, but conduction abnormalities, myocarditis, and encephalitis and megaesophagus have been described. Here we report 2 cases of Chagas disease in rhesus macaques housed in the northwestern United States. The first case involved a geriatric male macaque with cardiomegaly, diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy on ultrasonographic examination. Postmortem findings included myocarditis as well as ganglioneuritis in the esophagus, stomach, and colon. The second case affected a geriatric female macaque experimentally infected with SIV. She was euthanized for a protocol-related time point. Microscopic examination revealed chronic myocarditis with amastigotes present in the cardiomyocytes, ganglioneuritis, and opportunistic infections attributed to her immunocompromised status. Banked serum samples from both macaques had positive titers for T. cruzi. T. cruzi DNA was amplified by conventional PCR from multiple tissues from both animals. Review of their histories revealed that both animals had been obtained from facilities in South Texas more than 12 y earlier. Given the long period of clinical latency, Chagas disease may be more prevalent in rhesus macaques than typically has been reported. T. cruzi infection should be considered for animals with unexplained cardiac or gastrointestinal pathology and that originated from areas known to have a high risk for disease transmission. PMID:25296019

  19. Dietary adaptations of Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis) in limestone forests in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhonghao; Huang, Chengming; Tang, Chuangbin; Huang, Libin; Tang, Huaxing; Ma, Guangzhi; Zhou, Qihai

    2015-02-01

    Limestone hills are an unusual habitat for primates, prompting them to evolve specific behavioral adaptations to the component karst habitat. From September 2012 to August 2013, we collected data on the diet of one group of Assamese macaques living in limestone forests at Nonggang National Nature Reserve, Guangxi Province, China, using instantaneous scan sampling. Assamese macaques were primarily folivorous, young leaves accounting for 75.5% and mature leaves an additional 1.8% of their diet. In contrast, fruit accounted for only 20.1%. The young leaves of Bonia saxatilis, a shrubby, karst-endemic bamboo that is superabundant in limestone hills, comprised the bulk of the average monthly diet. Moreover, macaques consumed significantly more bamboo leaves during the season when the availability of fruit declined, suggesting that bamboo leaves are an important fallback food for Assamese macaques in limestone forests. In addition, diet composition varied seasonally. The monkeys consumed significantly more fruit and fewer young leaves in the fruit-rich season than in the fruit-lean season. Fruit consumption was positively correlated with fruit availability, indicating that fruit is a preferred food for Assamese macaques. Of seventy-eight food species, only nine contributed >0.5% of the annual diet, and together these nine foods accounted for 90.7% of the annual diet. Our results suggest that bamboo consumption represents a key factor in the Assamese macaque's dietary adaptation to limestone habitat.

  20. Small intestine CD4+ cell reduction and enteropathy in simian/human immunodeficiency virus KS661-infected rhesus macaques in the presence of low viral load.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Katsuhisa; Fukazawa, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Kenta; Himeno, Ai; Matsuyama, Megumi; Ibuki, Kentaro; Miura, Yoshiharu; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Nakajima, Atsushi; Blumberg, Richard S; Takahashi, Hidemi; Hayami, Masanori; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2010-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, simian immunodeficiency virus and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection generally lead to death of the host accompanied by high viraemia and profound CD4(+) T-cell depletion. SHIV clone KS661-infected rhesus macaques with a high viral load set point (HVL) ultimately experience diarrhoea and wasting at 6-12 months after infection. In contrast, infected macaques with a low viral load set point (LVL) usually live asymptomatically throughout the observation period, and are therefore referred to as asymptomatic LVL (Asym LVL) macaques. Interestingly, some LVL macaques exhibit diarrhoea and wasting similar to the symptoms of HVL macaques and are termed symptomatic LVL (Sym LVL) macaques. This study tested the hypothesis that Sym LVL macaques have the same degree of intestinal abnormalities as HVL macaques. The proviral DNA loads in lymphoid tissue and the intestines of Sym LVL and Asym LVL macaques were comparable and all infected monkeys showed villous atrophy. Notably, the CD4(+) cell frequencies of lymphoid tissues and intestines in Sym LVL macaques were remarkably lower than those in Asym LVL and uninfected macaques. Furthermore, Sym LVL and HVL macaques exhibited an increased number of activated macrophages. In conclusion, intestinal disorders including CD4(+) cell reduction and abnormal immune activation can be observed in SHIV-KS661-infected macaques independent of virus replication levels.

  1. Variation in Clitoral Length in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Beatriz; Cabello, Pedro H; Kugelmeier, Tatiana; Pereira, Barbara B; Lopes, Claudia A; Fasano, Daniele M; Andrade, Marcia C; Santos, Joice S; Marinho, Antonio M

    2009-01-01

    Clitoromegaly in the neonatal period is an important morphologic sign that can be useful for sexual determination in aberrant cases. In rhesus monkeys, differentiation of the external genitalia occurs early during gestation (at 55 to 60 d) and is complete by approximately 80 d. Most of the critical steps in genital differentiation in primates occur prenatally. We sought to determine clitoral size in normal rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and possible effects of age and inheritance. Clitoral length was highly variable and had no relationship to fertility. Statistical evaluation revealed no association in the distribution of daughters with and without clitoris between mothers with and without clitoris. However, even when mated with several female monkeys, some male macaques produced primarily daughters without clitoris. PMID:19807967

  2. Cerebral Baylisascaris larva migrans in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shoieb, Ahmed; Radi, Zaher A

    2014-08-01

    An incidental, asymptomatic, focal inflammatory lesion was detected in brain cerebrum of an approximately 6-year-old, female cynomolgus macaque from a chronic toxicology study. No gross lesions were noted at necropsy. Microscopically, the lesion contained a cross-section of larvae approximately 70-80 μm in diameter, a centrally located intestine flanked on either side by large triangular excretory columns, and prominent single lateral cuticular alae. Mixed inflammatory cells of eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with abundant connective tissue stroma and necrosis surrounded the larvae. Histochemical stains for trichrome revealed significant amount of fibrous connective tissue. The morphology of the larvae was compatible with Baylisascaris spp. Based on the microscopic and histochemical examination, a diagnosis of neural Baylisascaris spp. larva migrans was made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Yun; Murks, Aleksandra; Perc, Matjaž; Lu, Qi-Shao

    2011-04-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh—Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchronization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain. Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed by different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  4. Spatial and temporal vision of macaques after central retinal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Pasternak, T.; Zehl, D.

    1981-07-01

    Spatial contrast and temporal modulation sensitivity of two macaque monkeys were measured at three luminance levels before and after binocular laser coagulation of the fovea. The radius of the lesions ranged from 1.6 to 2.2 degree from the center of the fovea. After placement of the lesions, the visibility of high spatial frequencies was greatly reduced, although sensitivity at middle and low spatial frequencies was unaffected. No loss of spatial resolution was found at the lowest luminance tested. When temporal modulation sensitivity was tested with 4 deg targets, foveal lesions had no effect at any temporal frequency or luminance. However, with a 0.57 degree target, sensitivity to lower temporal frequencies was impaired. Thus visual loss after destruction of the fovea is limited to high luminance, small targets, and the resolution of fine detail.

  5. State dependence of noise correlations in macaque primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Alexander S.; Berens, Philipp; Cotton, R. James; Subramaniyan, Manivannan; Denfield, George H.; Cadwell, Cathryn R.; Smirnakis, Stelios M.; Bethge, Matthias; Tolias, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    Shared, trial-to-trial variability in neuronal populations has a strong impact on the accuracy of information processing in the brain. Estimates of the level of such noise correlations are diverse, ranging from 0.01 to 0.4, with little consensus on which factors account for these differences. Here we addressed one important factor that varied across studies, asking how anesthesia affects the population activity structure in macaque primary visual cortex. We found that under opioid anesthesia, activity was dominated by strong coordinated fluctuations on a timescale of 1–2 Hz, which were mostly absent in awake, fixating monkeys. Accounting for these global fluctuations markedly reduced correlations under anesthesia, matching those observed during wakefulness and reconciling earlier studies conducted under anesthesia and in awake animals. Our results show that internal signals, such as brain state transitions under anesthesia, can induce noise correlations, but can also be estimated and accounted for based on neuronal population activity. PMID:24698278

  6. Measles vaccination of macaques by dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Rik L; LiCalsi, Cynthia; Quirk, Alan V; van Amerongen, Geert; Nodelman, Vladislav; Alcock, Robert; Yüksel, Selma; Ward, Gary H; Hardy, John G; Vos, Helma; Witham, Clyde L; Grainger, Christopher I; Kuiken, Thijs; Greenspan, Bernard J; Gard, Trevor G; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2007-01-26

    Measles vaccination via the aerosol route has proven effective under field conditions, using vaccine reconstituted prior to nebulization. Inhalation of a dry powder aerosol vaccine would have additional benefits, including easier logistics of administration, reduced cold chain dependence and the potential of single dose administration. We have evaluated two candidate dry powder measles vaccine formulations in macaques. Specific immune responses were demonstrated, but levels of immunity were lower than in animals vaccinated by injection or by nebulized aerosol. These studies provide proof of principle that dry powder inhalation is a possible route for measles vaccination, but suggest that either the vaccine formulation or the method of delivery need to be improved for a better immune response.

  7. Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) recognize when they are being imitated.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Annika; Anderson, James R; Borelli, Eleonora; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Ferrari, Pier F

    2005-06-22

    This study investigated whether monkeys recognize when a human experimenter imitates their actions towards an object. Two experimenters faced 10 pigtailed macaques, who were given access to an interesting object. One experimenter imitated the monkeys' object-directed actions, the other performed temporally contingent but structurally different object-directed actions. Results show a significant visual preference for the imitator during manual object manipulations, but not mouthing actions. We argue that the ability to match actions could be based on both visual-visual and kinaesthetic-visual matching skills, and that mirror neurons, which have both visual and motor properties, could serve as a neural basis for recognizing imitation. However, imitation recognition as assessed by visual preference does not necessarily imply the capacity to attribute imitative intentionality to the imitator. The monkeys might implicitly recognize when they are being imitated without deeper insight into the mental processes of others.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra).

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Shi, Fang-Lei; Liu, Zhi-Jin; Zhou, Qi-Hai

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial sequence of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra) has been determined by mapping the raw data to previously published mitochondrial assemblies of the corresponding species. The total sequence length is 16,564 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 D-loop control region. The base composition of mtDNA genome is 31.76% A, 25.27% T, 30.17% C, and 12.80% G, with an AT content of 57.03%. The arrangement of genes in M. nigra is identical to that of M. mulatta. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of M. nigra presented here will contribute to a better understanding of the population genetics, help to protect its genetic diversity and resolve phylogenetic relationships within the family.

  9. Neurologic melioidosis in an imported pigtail macaque (Macaca nemestrina).

    PubMed

    Ritter, J M; Sanchez, S; Jones, T L; Zaki, S R; Drew, C P

    2013-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis in humans and other animals. Disease occurs predominately in Asia and Australia. It is rare in North America, and affected people and animals typically have a history of travel to (in human cases) or importation from (in animal cases) endemic areas. We describe the gross and histopathologic features and the microbiologic, molecular, and immunohistochemical diagnoses of a case of acute meningoencephalomyelitis and focal pneumonia caused by B. pseudomallei infection in a pigtail macaque that was imported from Indonesia to the United States for research purposes. This bacterium has been classified as a Tier 1 overlap select agent and toxin; therefore, recognition of pathologic features, along with accurate and timely confirmatory diagnostic testing, in naturally infected research animals is imperative to protect animals and personnel in the laboratory animal setting.

  10. Genetic origins of social networks in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Lauren J. N.; Heilbronner, Sarah R.; Horvath, Julie E.; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Robinson, Athy G.; Skene, J. H. Pate; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Sociality is believed to have evolved as a strategy for animals to cope with their environments. Yet the genetic basis of sociality remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that social network tendencies are heritable in a gregarious primate. The tendency for rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta, to be tied affiliatively to others via connections mediated by their social partners - analogous to friends of friends in people - demonstrated additive genetic variance. Affiliative tendencies were predicted by genetic variation at two loci involved in serotonergic signalling, although this result did not withstand correction for multiple tests. Aggressive tendencies were also heritable and were related to reproductive output, a fitness proxy. Our findings suggest that, like humans, the skills and temperaments that shape the formation of multi-agent relationships have a genetic basis in nonhuman primates, and, as such, begin to fill the gaps in our understanding of the genetic basis of sociality. PMID:23304433

  11. Histopathologic changes in macaques with an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    King, N. W.; Hunt, R. D.; Letvin, N. L.

    1983-01-01

    The authors recently described the clinical course of an Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in a colony of macaque monkeys. In the present study, they have reviewed the histopathology of tissues obtained from a cohort of 16 animals with this clinical syndrome at necropsy. They found evidence in these animals of several opportunistic infections, including cytomegalovirus (CMV), simian virus 40 (SV-40), and noma. Furthermore, a number of other unusual pathologic processes were noted. In 4 animals an array of lymphoproliferative disorders was observed, ranging from multiple nodules of lymphocytes in the kidney, liver, and bone marrow, to frank lymphoma. Evidence of retroperitoneal fibrosis was found in 3 of the animals. Finally, amyloidosis was observed in several animals; in two instances it was present only in the mucosa of the small intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:6316791

  12. Behavioral observations of sensory substitution in neonate macaques (Macaca arctoides).

    PubMed

    Strelow, E R; Warren, D H; Sonnier, B J; Riesen, A H; Kay, L; Sinton, J

    1987-10-01

    The ability of neonate macaque monkeys to learn to respond to artificial spatial sensory information was studied through the use of compact, head-worn, electronic spatial sonars with audible displays, which translate spatial information into auditory dimensions specifying distance, direction, and surface characteristics. Three animals were born in the dark and raised without vision for 1 to 3 months while wearing either the Binaural Sensory Aid (Animal 1; Kay, 1974) or the Trisensor (Animals 2 and 3; Easton & Jackson, 1983) airborne sonars. Each animal demonstrated alertness to information transmitted by the devices in spontaneous reaching or reinforced discrimination tasks, and more device-related, perceptual-motor activities were observed when the sensors were switched on than when they were switched off. The results show that neonate monkeys can learn effective use of information obtained from sensory substitution devices through unstructured interaction with the environment.

  13. A face feature space in the macaque temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2009-09-01

    The ability of primates to effortlessly recognize faces has been attributed to the existence of specialized face areas. One such area, the macaque middle face patch, consists almost entirely of cells that are selective for faces, but the principles by which these cells analyze faces are unknown. We found that middle face patch neurons detect and differentiate faces using a strategy that is both part based and holistic. Cells detected distinct constellations of face parts. Furthermore, cells were tuned to the geometry of facial features. Tuning was most often ramp-shaped, with a one-to-one mapping of feature magnitude to firing rate. Tuning amplitude depended on the presence of a whole, upright face and features were interpreted according to their position in a whole, upright face. Thus, cells in the middle face patch encode axes of a face space specialized for whole, upright faces.

  14. Comparative Pathology of Smallpox and Monkeypox in Man and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cann, J. A.; Jahrling, P. B.; Hensley, L. E.; Wahl-Jensen, V.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In the three decades since the eradication of smallpox and cessation of routine vaccination, the collective memory of the devastating epidemics caused by this orthopoxvirus has waned, and the human population has become increasingly susceptible to a disease that remains high on the list of possible bioterrorism agents. Research using surrogate orthopoxviruses in their natural hosts, as well as limited variola virus research in animal models, continues worldwide; however, interpretation of findings is often limited by our relative lack of knowledge about the naturally occurring disease. For modern comparative pathologists, many of whom have no first-hand knowledge of naturally occurring smallpox, this work provides a contemporary review of this historical disease, as well as discussion of how it compares with human monkeypox and the corresponding diseases in macaques. PMID:22884034

  15. Measurement of Blood Volume in Adult Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Theodore R; Blue, Steven W; Park, Byung S; Greisel, Jennifer J; Conn, P Michael; Pau, Francis K-Y

    2015-01-01

    Most biomedical facilities that use rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) limit the amount of blood that may be collected for experimental purposes. These limits typically are expressed as a percentage of blood volume (BV), estimated by using a fixed ratio of blood (mL) per body weight (kg). BV estimation ratios vary widely among facilities and typically do not factor in variables known to influence BV in humans: sex, age, and body condition. We used indicator dilution methodology to determine the BV of 20 adult rhesus macaques (10 male, 10 female) that varied widely in body condition. We measured body composition by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, weight, crown-to-rump length, and body condition score. Two indicators, FITC-labeled hydroxyethyl starch (FITC–HES) and radioiodinated rhesus serum albumin (125I-RhSA), were injected simultaneously, followed by serial blood collection. Plasma volume at time 0 was determined by linear regression. BV was calculated from the plasma volume and Hct. We found that BV calculated by using FITC–HES was consistently lower than BV calculated by using 125I-RhSA. Sex and age did not significantly affect BV. Percentage body fat was significantly associated with BV. Subjects categorized as having ‘optimal’ body condition score had 18% body fat and 62.1 mL/kg BV (by FITC–HES; 74.5 mL/kg by 125I-RhSA). Each 1% increase in body fat corresponded to approximately 1 mL/kg decrease in BV. Body condition score correlated with the body fat percentage (R2 = 0.7469). We provide an equation for calculating BV from weight and body condition score. PMID:26632777

  16. Acoustic characteristics used by Japanese macaques for individual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Takafumi; Kobayasi, Kohta I; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    The vocalizations of primates contain information about speaker individuality. Many primates, including humans, are able to distinguish conspecifics based solely on vocalizations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acoustic characteristics used by Japanese macaques in individual vocal discrimination. Furthermore, we tested human subjects using monkey vocalizations to evaluate species specificity with respect to such discriminations. Two monkeys and five humans were trained to discriminate the coo calls of two unfamiliar monkeys. We created a stimulus continuum between the vocalizations of the two monkeys as a set of probe stimuli (whole morph). We also created two sets of continua in which only one acoustic parameter, fundamental frequency (f0) or vocal tract characteristic (VTC), was changed from the coo call of one monkey to that of another while the other acoustic feature remained the same (f0 morph and VTC morph, respectively). According to the results, the reaction times both of monkeys and humans were correlated with the morph proportion under the whole morph and f0 morph conditions. The reaction time to the VTC morph was correlated with the morph proportion in both monkeys, whereas the reaction time in humans, on average, was not correlated with morph proportion. Japanese monkeys relied more consistently on VTC than did humans for discriminating monkey vocalizations. Our results support the idea that the auditory system of primates is specialized for processing conspecific vocalizations and suggest that VTC is a significant acoustic feature used by Japanese macaques to discriminate conspecific vocalizations. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Development of a Zika Virus Infection Model in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Fusataka; Goebel, Scott; Snyder, Beth; Walters, Kevin B.; Gast, Alison; Hagelin, Kimberly; Kalkeri, Raj; Rayner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Limited availability of Indian rhesus macaques (IRM) is a bottleneck to study Zika virus (ZIKV) pathogenesis and evaluation of appropriate control measures in non-human primates. To address these issues, we report here the Mauritian cynomolgus macaque (MCM) model for ZIKV infection. In brief, six MCMs (seronegative for Dengue and ZIKV) were subdivided into three cohorts with a male and female each and challenged with different doses of Asian [PRVABC59 (Puerto Rico) or FSS13025 (Cambodia)] or African (IBH30656) lineage ZIKV isolates. Clinical signs were monitored; and biological fluids (serum, saliva, and urine) and tissues (testes and brain) were assessed for viral load by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and neutralizing antibodies (Nab) by 50% Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT50) at various times post-infection (p.i). PRVABC59 induced viremia detectable up to day 10, with peak viral load at 2–3 days p.i. An intermittent viremia spike was observed on day 30 with titers reaching 2.5 × 103 genomes/mL. Moderate viral load was observed in testes, urine and saliva. In contrast, FSS13025 induced viremia lasting only up to 6 days and detectable viral loads in testes but not in urine and saliva. Recurrent viremia was detected but at lower titers compare to PRVABC59. Challenge with either PRVABC59 or FSS13025 resulted in 100% seroconversion; with mean PRNT50 titers ranging from 597 to 5179. IBH30656 failed to establish infection in MCM suggesting that MCM are susceptible to infection with ZIKV isolates of the Asian lineage but not from Africa. Due to the similarity of biphasic viremia and Nab responses between MCM and IRM models, MCM could be a suitable alternative for evaluation of ZIKV vaccine and therapeutic candidates. PMID:28066354

  18. Predictors of insubordinate aggression among captive female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Seil, Shannon K; Hannibal, Darcy L; Beisner, Brianne A; McCowan, Brenda

    2017-08-21

    Cercopithicine primates tend to have nepotistic hierarchies characterized by predictable, kinship-based dominance. Although aggression is typically directed down the hierarchy, insubordinate aggression does occur. Insubordination is important to understand because it can precipitate social upheaval and undermine group stability; however, the factors underlying it are not well understood. We test whether key social and demographic variables predict insubordination among captive female rhesus macaques. To identify factors influencing insubordination, multivariate analyses of 10,821 dyadic conflicts among rhesus macaque females were conducted, using data from six captive groups. A segmented regression analysis was used to identify dyads with insubordination. Negative binomial regression analyses and an information theoretic approach were used to assess predictors of insubordination among dyads. In the best models, weight difference (w = 1.0; IRR = 0.930), age (dominant: w = 1.0, IRR = 0.681; subordinate: w = 1.0, IRR = 1.069), the subordinate's total number of allies (w = 0.727, IRR = 1.060) or non-kin allies (w = 0.273, IRR = 1.165), the interaction of the dominant's kin allies and weight difference (w = 0.938, IRR = 1.046), violation of youngest ascendancy (w = 1.0; IRR = 2.727), and the subordinate's maternal support (w = 1.0; IRR = 2.928), are important predictors of insubordination. These results show that both intrinsic and social factors influence insubordinate behavior. This adds to evidence of the importance of intrinsic factors and flexibility in a social structure thought to be rigid and predetermined by external factors. Further, because insubordination can precipitate social overthrow, determining predictors of insubordination will shed light on mechanisms underlying stability in nepotistic societies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neural correlates for task switching in the macaque superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason L; Koval, Michael J; Johnston, Kevin; Everling, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Successful task switching requires a network of brain areas to select, maintain, implement, and execute the appropriate task. Although frontoparietal brain areas are thought to play a critical role in task switching by selecting and encoding task rules and exerting top-down control, how brain areas closer to the execution of tasks participate in task switching is unclear. The superior colliculus (SC) integrates information from various brain areas to generate saccades and is likely influenced by task switching. Here, we investigated switch costs in nonhuman primates and their neural correlates in the activity of SC saccade-related neurons in monkeys performing cued, randomly interleaved pro- and anti-saccade trials. We predicted that behavioral switch costs would be associated with differential modulations of SC activity in trials on which the task was switched vs. repeated, with activity on the current trial resembling that associated with the task set of the previous trial when a switch occurred. We observed both error rate and reaction time switch costs and changes in the discharge rate and timing of activity in SC neurons between switch and repeat trials. These changes were present later in the task only after fixation on the cue stimuli but before saccade onset. These results further establish switch costs in macaque monkeys and suggest that SC activity is modulated by task-switching processes in a manner inconsistent with the concept of task set inertia.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Task-switching behavior and superior colliculus (SC) activity were investigated in nonhuman primates performing randomly interleaved pro- and anti-saccade tasks. Here, we report error rate and reaction time switch costs in macaque monkeys and associated differences in stimulus-related activity of saccade-related neurons in the SC. These results provide a neural correlate for task switching and suggest that the SC is modulated by task-switching processes and may reflect the completion of task

  20. Discovery of a secular trend in Cayo Santiago macaque reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Kessler, Matthew J; Delgado, Diana L; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Sabat, Alberto M

    2016-02-01

    Reproductive synchrony and the consequent clustering of births are hypothesized to be regulated by seasonal changes in rainfall and food availability. Such climate-related seasonality is, however, questionable in tropical populations occupying temporally invariant habitats year round. Using the long-term data of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques from 1973 to 2013, this study distinguishes synchrony (a greater than chance clustering of births) from seasonality (a cluster of births during a period of the year when abiotic conditions are favorable) and shows that females are highly synchronized (>72% of births in a 3-month period) but the effects of environmental zeitgebers on reproduction are overridden by biological factors. Specifically, biotic and abiotic factors including (i) loss of immature offspring; (ii) population density; (iii) age at delivery; (iv) rainfall; and (v) changes in colony management were modeled in relation to the annual onset of births and the median birth date. Females experiencing loss of immature offspring had an interbirth interval of <365 days in average and the proportion of these females increased up to 48% due to changes in colony management overtime, although reproductive synchrony increased with increasing population density. A secular trend in both the onset of births and the median date of birth is documented and the model predicts that the median birth date will advance across all calendar-based seasons by 2050. The secular trend in reproduction appears to be triggered by changes in the age at delivery of females, the absence of physiological constraints from maternal investment due to offspring loss, shorter interbirth interval, and a higher degree of coordination due to increasing population density. This study challenges the reproductive phenology previously described for rhesus macaques highlighting the importance of long-term studies in addressing the ultimate causes of reproductive synchrony.

  1. Depth perception from moving cast shadow in macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Usui, Nobuo; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Taira, Masato; Katsuyama, Narumi

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, we investigate whether the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow. To accomplish this, we conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, an adult Japanese monkey was trained in a motion discrimination task in depth by binocular disparity. A square was presented on the display so that it appeared with a binocular disparity of 0.12 degrees (initial position), and moved toward (approaching) or away from (receding) the monkey for 1s. The monkey was trained to discriminate the approaching and receding motion of the square by GO/delayed GO-type responses. The monkey showed a significantly high accuracy rate in the task, and the performance was maintained when the position, color, and shape of the moving object were changed. In the next experiment, the change in the disparity was gradually decreased in the motion discrimination task. The results showed that the performance of the monkey declined as the distance of the approaching and receding motion of the square decreased from the initial position. However, when a moving cast shadow was added to the stimulus, the monkey responded to the motion in depth induced by the cast shadow in the same way as by binocular disparity; the reward was delivered randomly or given in all trials to prevent the learning of the 2D motion of the shadow in the frontal plane. These results suggest that the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow as well as using binocular disparity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathology of experimental aerosol Zaire ebolavirus infection in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Twenhafel, N A; Mattix, M E; Johnson, J C; Robinson, C G; Pratt, W D; Cashman, K A; Wahl-Jensen, V; Terry, C; Olinger, G G; Hensley, L E; Honko, A N

    2013-05-01

    There is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of human ebolavirus infections and no reported human cases acquired by the aerosol route. There is a threat of ebolavirus as an aerosolized biological weapon, and this study evaluated the pathogenesis of aerosol infection in 18 rhesus macaques. Important and unique findings include early infection of the respiratory lymphoid tissues, early fibrin deposition in the splenic white pulp, and perivasculitis and vasculitis in superficial dermal blood vessels of haired skin with rash. Initial infection occurred in the respiratory lymphoid tissues, fibroblastic reticular cells, dendritic cells, alveolar macrophages, and blood monocytes. Virus spread to regional lymph nodes, where significant viral replication occurred. Virus secondarily infected many additional blood monocytes and spread from the respiratory tissues to multiple organs, including the liver and spleen. Viremia, increased temperature, lymphocytopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and increased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, total bilirubin, serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, and hypoalbuminemia were measurable mid to late infection. Infection progressed rapidly with whole-body destruction of lymphoid tissues, hepatic necrosis, vasculitis, hemorrhage, and extravascular fibrin accumulation. Hypothermia and thrombocytopenia were noted in late stages with the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation and shock. This study provides unprecedented insight into pathogenesis of human aerosol Zaire ebolavirus infection and suggests development of a medical countermeasure to aerosol infection will be a great challenge due to massive early infection of respiratory lymphoid tissues. Rhesus macaques may be used as a model of aerosol infection that will allow the development of lifesaving medical countermeasures under the Food and Drug Administration's animal rule.

  3. Risperidone-Induced Inactivation and Clozapine-Induced Reactivation of Rat Cortical Astrocyte 5-Hydroxytryptamine7 Receptors: Evidence for In Situ G Protein-Coupled Receptor Homodimer Protomer Cross-Talk

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carol; Toohey, Nicole; Knight, Jessica A.; Klein, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    We have reported previously novel drug-induced inactivation and reactivation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine7 (5-HT7) receptors in a recombinant cell line. To explain these novel observations, a homodimer structure displaying protomer-protomer cross-talk was proposed. To determine whether these novel observations and interpretations are due to an artifactual G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mechanism unique to the recombinant cell line, we explored the properties of r5-HT7 receptors expressed by cortical astrocytes in primary culture. As in the recombinant cell line, risperidone, 9-OH-risperidone, methiothepin, and bromocriptine were found to potently inactivate r5-HT7 receptors. As in the recombinant cell line, exposure of risperidone-inactivated astrocyte r5-HT7 receptors to competitive antagonists resulted in the reactivation of r5-HT7 receptors. The potencies of the reactivating drugs closely correlated with their affinities for h5-HT7 receptors. These results indicate the novel inactivating and reactivating property of drugs is not due to an artifact of the recombinant cell line expressing h5-HT7 receptors but is an intrinsic property of 5-HT7 receptors in vitro and ex vivo. This evidence suggests that a native (nonmutated) GPCR, in its native membrane environment (cortical astrocyte primary culture), can function as a homodimer with protomer-protomer cross-talk. Homodimers may be a common GPCR structure. The experimental design used in our studies can be used to explore the properties of other GPCRs in their native forms in recombinant cells, primary cultures expressing the endogenous GPCRs, and possibly in vivo. The homodimer structure and protomer-protomer cross-talk offer new avenues of research into receptor dysfunction in disease states and the development of novel drugs. PMID:21062995

  4. Cloning, sequencing, and polymorphism analysis of novel classical MHC class I alleles in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been confirmed to be an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group of Old World monkey. We have previously reported that the northern pig-tailed macaques were also susceptible to HIV-1. Here, to make this animal a potential HIV/AIDS model and to discover the mechanism of virus control, we attempted to assess the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted immune responses to HIV-1 infection, which was associated with viral replication and disease progression. As an initial step, we first cloned and characterized the classical MHC class I gene of northern pig-tailed macaques. In this study, we identified 39 MHC class I alleles including 17 MHC-A and 22 MHC-B alleles. Out of these identified alleles, 30 were novel and 9 were identical to alleles previously reported from other macaque species. The MHC-A and MHC-B loci were both duplicates as rhesus macaques and southern pig-tailed macaques. In addition, we also detected the patterns of positive selection in northern pig-tailed macaques and revealed the existence of balance selection with 20 positive selection sites in the peptide binding region. The analysis of B and F peptide binding pockets in northern and southern pig-tailed macaques and rhesus macaques suggested that they were likely to share a few common peptides to present. Thus, this study provides important MHC immunogenetics information and adds values to northern pig-tailed macaques as a promising HIV/AIDS model.

  5. Plasmodium knowlesi: Reservoir Hosts and Tracking the Emergence in Humans and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim-Sung; Divis, Paul C. S.; Zakaria, Siti Khatijah; Matusop, Asmad; Julin, Roynston A.; Conway, David J.; Cox-Singh, Janet; Singh, Balbir

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite originally thought to be restricted to macaques in Southeast Asia, has recently been recognized as a significant cause of human malaria. Unlike the benign and morphologically similar P. malariae, these parasites can lead to fatal infections. Malaria parasites, including P. knowlesi, have not yet been detected in macaques of the Kapit Division of Malaysian Borneo, where the majority of human knowlesi malaria cases have been reported. In order to extend our understanding of the epidemiology and evolutionary history of P. knowlesi, we examined 108 wild macaques for malaria parasites and sequenced the circumsporozoite protein (csp) gene and mitochondrial (mt) DNA of P. knowlesi isolates derived from macaques and humans. We detected five species of Plasmodium (P. knowlesi, P. inui, P. cynomolgi, P. fieldi and P. coatneyi) in the long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques, and an extremely high prevalence of P. inui and P. knowlesi. Macaques had a higher number of P. knowlesi genotypes per infection than humans, and some diverse alleles of the P. knowlesi csp gene and certain mtDNA haplotypes were shared between both hosts. Analyses of DNA sequence data indicate that there are no mtDNA lineages associated exclusively with either host. Furthermore, our analyses of the mtDNA data reveal that P. knowlesi is derived from an ancestral parasite population that existed prior to human settlement in Southeast Asia, and underwent significant population expansion approximately 30,000–40,000 years ago. Our results indicate that human infections with P. knowlesi are not newly emergent in Southeast Asia and that knowlesi malaria is primarily a zoonosis with wild macaques as the reservoir hosts. However, ongoing ecological changes resulting from deforestation, with an associated increase in the human population, could enable this pathogenic species of Plasmodium to switch to humans as the preferred host. PMID:21490952

  6. Plasmodium knowlesi: reservoir hosts and tracking the emergence in humans and macaques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Sung; Divis, Paul C S; Zakaria, Siti Khatijah; Matusop, Asmad; Julin, Roynston A; Conway, David J; Cox-Singh, Janet; Singh, Balbir

    2011-04-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite originally thought to be restricted to macaques in Southeast Asia, has recently been recognized as a significant cause of human malaria. Unlike the benign and morphologically similar P. malariae, these parasites can lead to fatal infections. Malaria parasites, including P. knowlesi, have not yet been detected in macaques of the Kapit Division of Malaysian Borneo, where the majority of human knowlesi malaria cases have been reported. In order to extend our understanding of the epidemiology and evolutionary history of P. knowlesi, we examined 108 wild macaques for malaria parasites and sequenced the circumsporozoite protein (csp) gene and mitochondrial (mt) DNA of P. knowlesi isolates derived from macaques and humans. We detected five species of Plasmodium (P. knowlesi, P. inui, P. cynomolgi, P. fieldi and P. coatneyi) in the long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques, and an extremely high prevalence of P. inui and P. knowlesi. Macaques had a higher number of P. knowlesi genotypes per infection than humans, and some diverse alleles of the P. knowlesi csp gene and certain mtDNA haplotypes were shared between both hosts. Analyses of DNA sequence data indicate that there are no mtDNA lineages associated exclusively with either host. Furthermore, our analyses of the mtDNA data reveal that P. knowlesi is derived from an ancestral parasite population that existed prior to human settlement in Southeast Asia, and underwent significant population expansion approximately 30,000-40,000 years ago. Our results indicate that human infections with P. knowlesi are not newly emergent in Southeast Asia and that knowlesi malaria is primarily a zoonosis with wild macaques as the reservoir hosts. However, ongoing ecological changes resulting from deforestation, with an associated increase in the human population, could enable this pathogenic species of Plasmodium to switch to humans as the preferred host.

  7. Diversity and molecular phylogeny of mitochondrial DNA of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2014-11-01

    While studies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the eastern (e.g., China) and western (e.g., India) parts of their geographic range have revealed major genetic differences that warrant the recognition of two different subspecies, little is known about genetic characteristics of rhesus macaques in the transitional zone extending from eastern India and Bangladesh through the northern part of Indo-China, the probable original homeland of the species. We analyzed genetic variation of 762 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 86 fecal swab samples and 19 blood samples from 25 local populations of rhesus macaque in Bangladesh collected from January 2010 to August 2012. These sequences were compared with those of rhesus macaques from India, China, and Myanmar. Forty-six haplotypes defined by 200 (26%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected. Estimates of gene diversity, expected heterozygosity, and nucleotide diversity for the total population were 0.9599 ± 0.0097, 0.0193 ± 0.0582, and 0.0196 ± 0.0098, respectively. A mismatch distribution of paired nucleotide differences yielded a statistically significantly negative value of Tajima's D, reflecting a population that rapidly expanded after the terminal Pleistocene. Most haplotypes throughout regions of Bangladesh, including an isolated region in the southwestern area (Sundarbans), clustered with haplotypes assigned to the minor haplogroup Ind-2 from India reflecting an east to west dispersal of rhesus macaques to India. Haplotypes from the southeast region of Bangladesh formed a cluster with those from Myanmar, and represent the oldest rhesus macaque haplotypes of Bangladesh. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus macaques first entered Bangladesh from the southeast, probably from Indo-China, then dispersed westward throughout eastern and central India.

  8. Diversity and Molecular Phylogeny of Mitochondrial DNA of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    HASAN, M. KAMRUL; FEEROZ, M. MOSTAFA; JONES-ENGEL, LISA; ENGEL, GREGORY A.; KANTHASWAMY, SREE; SMITH, DAVID GLENN

    2015-01-01

    While studies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the eastern (e.g., China) and western (e.g., India) parts of their geographic range have revealed major genetic differences that warrant the recognition of two different subspecies, little is known about genetic characteristics of rhesus macaques in the transitional zone extending from eastern India and Bangladesh through the northern part of Indo-China, the probable original homeland of the species. We analyzed genetic variation of 762 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 86 fecal swab samples and 19 blood samples from 25 local populations of rhesus macaque in Bangladesh collected from January 2010 to August 2012. These sequences were compared with those of rhesus macaques from India, China, and Myanmar. Forty-six haplotypes defined by 200 (26%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected. Estimates of gene diversity, expected heterozygosity, and nucleotide diversity for the total population were 0.9599 ± 0.0097, 0.0193 ± 0.0582, and 0.0196 ± 0.0098, respectively. A mismatch distribution of paired nucleotide differences yielded a statistically significantly negative value of Tajima's D, reflecting a population that rapidly expanded after the terminal Pleistocene. Most haplotypes throughout regions of Bangladesh, including an isolated region in the southwestern area (Sundarbans), clustered with haplotypes assigned to the minor haplogroup Ind-2 from India reflecting an east to west dispersal of rhesus macaques to India. Haplotypes from the southeast region of Bangladesh formed a cluster with those from Myanmar, and represent the oldest rhesus macaque haplotypes of Bangladesh. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus macaques first entered Bangladesh from the southeast, probably from Indo-China, then dispersed westward throughout eastern and central India. PMID:24810278

  9. Diversity of Human and Macaque Airway Immune Cells at Baseline and during Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Silver, Richard F; Myers, Amy J; Jarvela, Jessica; Flynn, JoAnne; Rutledge, Tara; Bonfield, Tracey; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-12-01

    Immune cells of the distal airways serve as "first responders" of host immunity to the airborne pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb infection of cynomolgus macaques recapitulates the range of human outcomes from clinically silent latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) to active tuberculosis of various degrees of severity. To further advance the application of this model to human studies, we compared profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells of humans and cynomolgus macaques before and after Mtb infection. A simple gating strategy effectively defined BAL T-cell and phagocyte populations in both species. BAL from Mtb-naive humans and macaques showed similar differential cell counts. BAL T cells of macaques were composed of fewer CD4(+)cells but more CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive cells than were BAL T cells of humans. The most common mononuclear phagocyte population in BAL of both species displayed coexpression of HLA-DR, CD206, CD11b, and CD11c; however, multiple phagocyte subsets displaying only some of these markers were observed as well. Macaques with LTBI displayed a marked BAL lymphocytosis that was not observed in humans with LTBI. In macaques, the prevalence of specific mononuclear phagocyte subsets in baseline BAL correlated with ultimate outcomes of Mtb infection (i.e., LTBI versus active disease). Overall, these findings demonstrate the comparability of studies of pulmonary immunity to Mtb in humans and macaques. They also indicate a previously undescribed complexity of airway mononuclear phagocyte populations that suggests further lines of investigation relevant to understanding the mechanisms of both protection from and susceptibility to the development of active tuberculosis within the lung.

  10. Effector-repressor interactions, binding of a single effector molecule to the operator-bound TtgR homodimer mediates derepression.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2006-03-17

    The RND family transporter TtgABC and its cognate repressor TtgR from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E were both shown to possess multidrug recognition properties. Structurally unrelated molecules such as chloramphenicol, butyl paraben, 1,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and several flavonoids are substrates of TtgABC and activate pump expression by binding to the TtgR-operator complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of these molecules to TtgR. Dissociation constants were in the range from 1 to 150 microm, the binding stoichiometry was one effector molecule per dimer of TtgR, and the process was driven by favorable enthalpy changes. Although TtgR exhibits a large multidrug binding profile, the plant-derived compounds phloretin and quercetin were shown to bind with the highest affinity (K(D) of around 1 microm), in contrast to other effectors (chloramphenicol and aromatic solvents) for which exhibited a more reduced affinity. Structure-function studies of effectors indicate that the presence of aromatic rings as well as hydroxyl groups are determinants for TtgR binding. The binding of TtgR to its operator DNA does not alter the protein effector profile nor the effector binding stoichiometry. Moreover, we demonstrate here for the first time that the binding of a single effector molecule to the DNA-bound TtgR homodimer induces the dissociation of the repressor-operator complex. This provides important insight into the molecular mechanism of effector-mediated derepression.

  11. CD8 Raft localization is induced by its assembly into CD8alpha beta heterodimers, Not CD8alpha alpha homodimers.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dick John; Hayday, Adrian C; Bijlmakers, Marie-José

    2007-05-04

    The coreceptor CD8 is expressed as a CD8alphabeta heterodimer on major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted TCRalphabeta T cells, and as a CD8alphaalpha homodimer on subsets of memory T cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells. Although the role of CD8alphaalpha is not well understood, it is increasingly clear that this protein is not a functional homologue of CD8alphabeta. On major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cells, CD8alphabeta is a more efficient TCR coreceptor than CD8alphaalpha. This property has for the mouse protein been attributed to the recruitment of CD8alphabeta into lipid rafts, which is dependent on CD8beta palmitoylation. Here, these divergent distributions of CD8alphabeta and CD8alphaalpha are demonstrated for the human CD8 proteins as well. However, although palmitoylation of both CD8alpha and CD8beta chains was detected, this modification did not contribute to raft localization. In contrast, arginines in the cytoplasmic domain are crucial for raft localization of CD8betabeta. Most strikingly, the assembly of a non-raft localized CD8beta chain with a non-raft localized CD8alpha chain resulted in raft-localized CD8alphabeta heterodimers. Using chimeric CD8 proteins, this property of the heterodimer was found to be determined by the assembly of CD8alpha and CD8beta extracellular regions. The presence of two CD8alpha extracellular regions, on the other hand, appears to preclude raft localization. Thus, heterodimer formation and raft association are intimately linked for CD8alphabeta. These results emphasize that lipid raft localization is a key feature of human CD8alphabeta that clearly distinguishes it from CD8alphaalpha.

  12. 16 kDa heat shock protein from heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a homodimer - suitability for diagnostic applications with specific llama VHH monoclonals.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh K; Ruigrok, Vincent J B; Thompson, Natalie J; Trilling, Anke K; Heck, Albert J R; van Rijn, Cees; Beekwilder, Jules; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2013-01-01

    The 16 kDa heat shock protein (HSP) is an immuno-dominant antigen, used in diagnosis of infectious Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.) causing tuberculosis (TB). Its use in serum-based diagnostics is limited, but for the direct identification of M.tb. bacteria in sputum or cultures it may represent a useful tool. Recently, a broad set of twelve 16 kDa specific heavy chain llama antibodies (VHH) has been isolated, and their utility for diagnostic applications was explored. To identify the epitopes recognized by the nine (randomly selected from a set of twelve 16 kDa specific VHH antibodies) distinct VHH antibodies, 14 overlapping linear epitopes (each 20 amino acid long) were characterized using direct and sandwich ELISA techniques. Seven out of 14 epitopes were recognized by 8 out of 9 VHH antibodies. The two highest affinity binders B-F10 and A-23 were found to bind distinct epitopes. Sandwich ELISA and SPR experiments showed that only B-F10 was suitable as secondary antibody with both B-F10 and A-23 as anchoring antibodies. To explain this behavior, the epitopes were matched to the putative 3D structure model. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine the higher order conformation. A homodimer model best explained the differential immunological reactivity of A-23 and B-F10 against heat-treated M.tb. lysates. The concentrations of secreted antigens of M.tb. in sputum are too low for immunological detection and existing kits are only used for identifying M.tb. in cultures. Here we describe how specific combinations of VHH domains could be used to detect the intracellular HSP antigen. Linked to methods of pre-concentrating M.tb. cells prior to lysis, HSP detection may enable the development of protein-based diagnostics of sputum samples and earlier diagnosis of diseases.

  13. Biophysical characterization of the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax, an alternatively spliced isoform of Max found in tumor cells: Towards the validation of a tumor suppressor role for the Max homodimers

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, Loïka; Montagne, Martin; Bédard, Mikaël; Tremblay, Cynthia; Soucek, Laura

    2017-01-01

    It is classically recognized that the physiological and oncogenic functions of Myc proteins depend on specific DNA binding enabled by the dimerization of its C-terminal basic-region-Helix-Loop-Helix-Leucine Zipper (b-HLH-LZ) domain with that of Max. However, a new paradigm is emerging, where the binding of the c-Myc/Max heterodimer to non-specific sequences in enhancers and promoters drives the transcription of genes involved in diverse oncogenic programs. Importantly, Max can form a stable homodimer even in the presence of c-Myc and bind DNA (specific and non-specific) with comparable affinity to the c-Myc/Max heterodimer. Intriguingly, alterations in the Max gene by germline and somatic mutations or changes in the gene product by alternative splicing (e.g. ΔMax) were recently associated with pheochromocytoma and glioblastoma, respectively. This has led to the proposition that Max is, by itself, a tumor suppressor. However, the actual mechanism through which it exerts such an activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that contrary to the WT motif, the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax does not homodimerize in the absence of DNA. In addition, although ΔMax can still bind the E-box sequence as a homodimer, it cannot bind non-specific DNA in that form, while it can heterodimerize with c-Myc and bind E-box and non-specific DNA as a heterodimer with high affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that the WT Max homodimer is important for attenuating the binding of c-Myc to specific and non-specific DNA, whereas ΔMax is unable to do so. Conversely, the splicing of Max into ΔMax could provoke an increase in overall chromatin bound c-Myc. According to the new emerging paradigm, the splicing event and the stark reduction in homodimer stability and DNA binding should promote tumorigenesis impairing the tumor suppressor activity of the WT homodimer of Max. PMID:28350847

  14. Biophysical characterization of the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax, an alternatively spliced isoform of Max found in tumor cells: Towards the validation of a tumor suppressor role for the Max homodimers.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Loïka; Montagne, Martin; Bédard, Mikaël; Tremblay, Cynthia; Soucek, Laura; Lavigne, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    It is classically recognized that the physiological and oncogenic functions of Myc proteins depend on specific DNA binding enabled by the dimerization of its C-terminal basic-region-Helix-Loop-Helix-Leucine Zipper (b-HLH-LZ) domain with that of Max. However, a new paradigm is emerging, where the binding of the c-Myc/Max heterodimer to non-specific sequences in enhancers and promoters drives the transcription of genes involved in diverse oncogenic programs. Importantly, Max can form a stable homodimer even in the presence of c-Myc and bind DNA (specific and non-specific) with comparable affinity to the c-Myc/Max heterodimer. Intriguingly, alterations in the Max gene by germline and somatic mutations or changes in the gene product by alternative splicing (e.g. ΔMax) were recently associated with pheochromocytoma and glioblastoma, respectively. This has led to the proposition that Max is, by itself, a tumor suppressor. However, the actual mechanism through which it exerts such an activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that contrary to the WT motif, the b-HLH-LZ of ΔMax does not homodimerize in the absence of DNA. In addition, although ΔMax can still bind the E-box sequence as a homodimer, it cannot bind non-specific DNA in that form, while it can heterodimerize with c-Myc and bind E-box and non-specific DNA as a heterodimer with high affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that the WT Max homodimer is important for attenuating the binding of c-Myc to specific and non-specific DNA, whereas ΔMax is unable to do so. Conversely, the splicing of Max into ΔMax could provoke an increase in overall chromatin bound c-Myc. According to the new emerging paradigm, the splicing event and the stark reduction in homodimer stability and DNA binding should promote tumorigenesis impairing the tumor suppressor activity of the WT homodimer of Max.

  15. Induction of asymmetry into homodimers.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, B; Cho, Y R; Westwell, M S; Williams, D H

    1998-01-01

    The self-regulation of biological signalling receptors via homodimerization is discussed in relation to the symmetry changes occurring when these receptors bind their target ligand. The idea of positive and negative cooperativity between dimerization and ligand binding, mediated by changes in the symmetry of the system as a source of signalling control is considered; an analogy made with the homodimerization of a glycopeptide antibiotic, ristocetin A, which displays negative cooperativity. Finally, the regulation of the bacterial aspartate receptor and the human growth hormone receptor is discussed as a function of ligand-induced asymmetry.

  16. Serologic host response to Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni in socially housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kienesberger, Sabine; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Rivera-Correa, Juan L; Tosado-Acevedo, Rafael; Li, Huilin; Dubois, Andre; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis A; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-08-24

    Helicobacter pylori are successful colonizers of the human gastric mucosa. Colonization increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease and adenocarcinoma. However, potential benefits of H. pylori colonization include protection against early-onset asthma and against gastrointestinal infections. Campylobacter jejuni are a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea and complications include Guillain-Barré syndrome. Here, we describe the development of reliable serological assays to detect antibodies against those two bacteria in Rhesus macaques and investigated their distribution within a social group of monkeys. Two cohorts of monkeys were analyzed. The first cohort consisted of 30 monkeys and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for H. pylori antibodies detection. To evaluate colonization of those macaques, stomach biopsies were collected and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by histology and culture. C. jejuni ELISAs were established using human serum with known C. jejuni antibody status. Next, plasma samples of the 89 macaques (Cohort 2) were assayed for antibodies and then statistically analyzed. An H. pylori IgG ELISA, which was 100% specific and 93% sensitive, was established. In contrast, the IgA ELISA was only 82% specific and 61% sensitive. The CagA IgG assay was 100% sensitive and 61% of the macaques were positive. In cohort 2, 62% macaques were H. pylori sero-positive and 52% were CagA positive. The prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG increased with monkey age as described for humans. Of the 89 macaques 52% showed IgG against C. jejuni but in contrast to H. pylori, the sero-prevalence was not associated with increasing age. However, there was a drop in the IgG (but not in IgA) mean values between infant and juvenile macaques, similar to trends described in humans. Rhesus macaques have widespread exposure to H. pylori and C. jejuni, reflecting their social conditions and implying that Rhesus macaques might provide a model to

  17. Serologic host response to Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni in socially housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori are successful colonizers of the human gastric mucosa. Colonization increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease and adenocarcinoma. However, potential benefits of H. pylori colonization include protection against early-onset asthma and against gastrointestinal infections. Campylobacter jejuni are a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea and complications include Guillain-Barré syndrome. Here, we describe the development of reliable serological assays to detect antibodies against those two bacteria in Rhesus macaques and investigated their distribution within a social group of monkeys. Methods Two cohorts of monkeys were analyzed. The first cohort consisted of 30 monkeys and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for H. pylori antibodies detection. To evaluate colonization of those macaques, stomach biopsies were collected and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by histology and culture. C. jejuni ELISAs were established using human serum with known C. jejuni antibody status. Next, plasma samples of the 89 macaques (Cohort 2) were assayed for antibodies and then statistically analyzed. Results An H. pylori IgG ELISA, which was 100% specific and 93% sensitive, was established. In contrast, the IgA ELISA was only 82% specific and 61% sensitive. The CagA IgG assay was 100% sensitive and 61% of the macaques were positive. In cohort 2, 62% macaques were H. pylori sero-positive and 52% were CagA positive. The prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG increased with monkey age as described for humans. Of the 89 macaques 52% showed IgG against C. jejuni but in contrast to H. pylori, the sero-prevalence was not associated with increasing age. However, there was a drop in the IgG (but not in IgA) mean values between infant and juvenile macaques, similar to trends described in humans. Conclusions Rhesus macaques have widespread exposure to H. pylori and C. jejuni, reflecting their social conditions and implying that

  18. Coprophagy-related interspecific nocturnal interactions between Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) and sika deer (Cervus nippon yakushimae).

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Mari; Mochida, Koji

    2010-04-01

    The influence of sympatric large animals on the sleeping behavior of primates in the wild is still largely unknown. In this study, we observed behaviors of wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) at their sleeping sites, using a highly sensitive video camera. We found evidence of nocturnal interspecific interactions, such as agonistic interactions, between Japanese macaques and sika deer (Cervus nippon yakushimae). Deer approached sleeping clusters of macaques, which slept on the ground, to eat their feces or unidentified materials near the sleeping clusters, and as a result, the macaques were often quickly displaced from their sleeping site. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of macaque-deer agonistic interactions between seasons. Our results suggested that the size of the sleeping cluster, the number of adult macaques in the cluster, and the existence of adult males in the cluster did not influence the occurrence of the agonistic interactions. Finally, we discuss the influence of this interaction on macaques and speculate on the influential factors leading to nocturnal coprophagy of macaques' feces by deer.

  19. Regulation of PI3K/Akt dependent apoptotic markers during b virus infection of human and macaque fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vasireddi, Mugdha; Hilliard, Julia K

    2017-01-01

    B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1), a simplex virus endemic in macaques, causes encephalitis, encephalomyelitis, and death in 80% of untreated zoonotically infected humans with delayed or no treatment. Here we report a significant difference in PI3K/Akt-dependent apoptosis between B virus infected human and macaque dermal fibroblasts. Our data show that B virus infection in either human or macaque fibroblasts results in activation of Akt via PI3K and this activation does not require viral de novo protein synthesis. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 results in a significant reduction of viral titers in B virus infected macaque and human fibroblasts with only a modest difference in the reduction of virus titers between the two cell types. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that B virus results in the phosphorylation of Akt (S473), which prevents apoptosis, enhancing virus replication in B virus infected macaque dermal fibroblasts. We observed markers of intrinsic apoptosis when PI3K activation of Akt was inhibited in B virus infected macaque cells, while, these apoptotic markers were absent in B virus infected human fibroblasts under the same conditions. From these data we suggest that PI3K activates Akt in B virus infected macaque and human fibroblasts, but this enhances virus replication in macaque fibroblast cells by blocking apoptosis.

  20. Longitudinal assessment of pigtailed macaque lower genital tract microbiota by pyrosequencing reveals dissimilarity to the genital microbiota of healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Spear, Gregory T; Kersh, Ellen; Guenthner, Patricia; Vishwanathan, Sundaram Ajay; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Landay, Alan; Zheng, Luyang; Gillevet, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Vaginal bacterial communities play an important role in human health and have been shown to influence HIV infection. Pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) are used as an animal model of HIV vaginal infection of women. Since the bacterial microbiota could influence retrovirus infection of pigtailed macaques, the genital microbiota in 10 cycling macaques was determined by pyrosequencing. The microbiota of all macaques was polymicrobial with a median of 13 distinct genera. Strikingly, the genera Sneathia and Fusobacterium, both in the phylum Fusobacteria, accounted for 18.9% and 13.3% of sequences while the next most frequent were Prevotella (5.6%), Porphyromonas (4.1%), Atopobium (3.6%), and Parvimonas (2.6%). Sequences corresponding to Lactobacillus comprised only 2.2% of sequences on average and were essentially all L. amylovorus. Longitudinal sampling of the 10 macaques over an 8-week period, which spanned at least one full ovulatory cycle, showed a generally stable presence of the major types of bacteria with some exceptions. These studies show that the microbiota of the pigtailed macaques is substantially dissimilar to that found in most healthy humans, where the genital microbiota is usually dominated by Lactobacillus sp. The polymicrobial makeup of the macaque bacterial populations, the paucity of lactobacilli, and the specific types of bacteria present suggest that the pigtailed macaque microbiota could influence vaginal retrovirus infection.

  1. Longitudinal Assessment of Pigtailed Macaque Lower Genital Tract Microbiota by Pyrosequencing Reveals Dissimilarity to the Genital Microbiota of Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen; Guenthner, Patricia; Vishwanathan, Sundaram Ajay; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M. Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Landay, Alan; Zheng, Luyang; Gillevet, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vaginal bacterial communities play an important role in human health and have been shown to influence HIV infection. Pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) are used as an animal model of HIV vaginal infection of women. Since the bacterial microbiota could influence retrovirus infection of pigtailed macaques, the genital microbiota in 10 cycling macaques was determined by pyrosequencing. The microbiota of all macaques was polymicrobial with a median of 13 distinct genera. Strikingly, the genera Sneathia and Fusobacterium, both in the phylum Fusobacteria, accounted for 18.9% and 13.3% of sequences while the next most frequent were Prevotella (5.6%), Porphyromonas (4.1%), Atopobium (3.6%), and Parvimonas (2.6%). Sequences corresponding to Lactobacillus comprised only 2.2% of sequences on average and were essentially all L. amylovorus. Longitudinal sampling of the 10 macaques over an 8-week period, which spanned at least one full ovulatory cycle, showed a generally stable presence of the major types of bacteria with some exceptions. These studies show that the microbiota of the pigtailed macaques is substantially dissimilar to that found in most healthy humans, where the genital microbiota is usually dominated by Lactobacillus sp. The polymicrobial makeup of the macaque bacterial populations, the paucity of lactobacilli, and the specific types of bacteria present suggest that the pigtailed macaque microbiota could influence vaginal retrovirus infection. PMID:22264029

  2. Expression of Kv3.1b potassium channel is widespread in macaque motor cortex pyramidal cells: A histological comparison between rat and macaque.

    PubMed

    Soares, David; Goldrick, Isabelle; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander; Greensmith, Linda; Kalmar, Bernadett

    2017-02-18

    There are substantial differences across species in the organisation and function of the motor pathways. These differences extend to basic electrophysiological properties. Thus, in rat motor cortex, pyramidal cells have long duration action potentials, while in the macaque, some pyramidal neurons exhibit short duration 'thin' spikes. These differences may be related to the expression of the fast potassium channel Kv3.1b, which in rat interneurons is associated with generation of thin spikes. Rat pyramidal cells typically lack these channels, while there are reports that they are present in macaque pyramids. Here we made a systematic, quantitative comparison of the expression of Kv3.1b in sections from macaque and rat motor cortex, using two different antibodies (NeuroMab, Millipore). As our standard reference, we examined, in the same sections, Kv3.1b staining in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, which show strong Kv3.1b immunoreactivity. In macaque motor cortex, a large sample of pyramidal neurons were nearly all found to express Kv3.1b in their soma membranes. These labelled neurons were identified as pyramidal based either by expression of SMI32 (a pyramidal marker), or by their shape and size, lack of expression of parvalbumin (a marker for some classes of interneuron). Large (Betz cells), medium and small pyramidal neurons all expressed Kv3.1b. In rat motor cortex, SMI32-postive pyramidal neurons expressing Kv3.1b were very rare and weakly stained. Thus, there is a marked species difference in the immunoreactivity of Kv3.1b in pyramidal neurons, and this may be one of the factors explaining the pronounced electrophysiological differences between rat and macaque pyramidal neurons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Buton macaques (Macaca ochreata brunnescens): crops, conflict, and behavior on farms.

    PubMed

    Priston, Nancy E C; Wyper, Rebecca M; Lee, Phyllis C

    2012-01-01

    One consequence of anthropogenic habitat alteration is that many nonhuman primates are forced into conflict interactions with humans and their livelihood activities, especially through crop raiding. These problems are particularly acute for the endemic and threatened Buton Island macaque (Macaca ochreata brunnescens), in southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Our study investigated the crop raiding behavior of this species over time. Foods eaten and the behavioral repertoire exhibited by macaques during crop raiding at and inside farm perimeters were observed over a period of 8 years (2002-2009). Storage organ crops (e.g. sweet potato) were abundant and most frequently raided by macaques. Individual macaques were most commonly observed to raid close (0-10 m) to farm perimeters. Activities such as feeding, resting, moving, and social interaction varied significantly as a function of penetration distance into the farm, but only marginally between age-sex classes. The annual average raid frequency per farm decreased over the latter years of the study period, raising questions about changes in macaque foraging and ranging behavior over time and their response to farm management and mitigation strategies.

  4. Breaking Barriers to an AIDS Model with Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Ruan, Hongmei; Kimata, Jason T

    2012-05-12

    The development of an animal model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)/AIDS that is suitable for preclinical testing of antiretroviral therapy, vaccines, curative strategies, and studies of pathogenesis has been hampered by the human-specific tropism of HIV-1. Although simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or HIV-1/SIV chimeric viruses (SHIVs)-rhesus macaque models are excellent surrogates for AIDS research, the genetic differences between SIV or SHIV and HIV-1 limit their utility as model systems. The identification of innate retro viral restriction factors has increased our understanding about blockades to HIV-1 replication in macaques and provided a guide for the construction of macaque-tropic HIV-1 clones. However, while these viruses replicate in macaque cells in vitro, they are easily controlled and have not caused AIDS in host animals, indicating that we may not fully understand the restrictive barriers of innate immunity. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding HIV-1 restriction factors, particularly as they apply to cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses and the development of a macaque model of HIV-1/AIDS.

  5. Possible shift in macaque trophic level following a century of biodiversity loss in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Luke

    2011-07-01

    Biodiversity loss in tropical forests is a major problem in conservation biology, and nowhere is this more dire than in Southeast Asia. Deforestation and the associated loss of species may trigger shifts in habitat and feeding preferences of persisting species. In this study, I compared the habitat use and diet of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) populations in Singapore from two time periods: museum specimens originally collected between 1893 and 1944, and living macaques sampled in 2009. I collected hair and used stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis to identify temporal changes in dietary source and trophic position, respectively. δ(13)C ratios were virtually identical, suggesting that macaques foraged in similar habitats during both time periods. However, δ(15)N ratios decreased considerably over time, suggesting that macaques today feed at a lower trophic level than previously. This decline in trophic level may be because of the disappearance or decline of other species that compete with macaques for fruit. This study highlights the effect of biodiversity loss on persisting species in degraded habitats of Southeast Asia, and improves our understanding of how species will adapt to further human-driven changes in tropical forest habitats.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the ileocolic junction and multifocal hepatic sarcomas in an aged rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lang, Cynthia D; Daviau, Judith S; Merton, Daniel A; Caraker, Susan M

    2013-08-01

    An aged male rhesus macaque in our colony had decreased appetite and a loss of interest in behavioral testing. CBC analysis revealed a regenerative, microcytic, hypochromic anemia with thrombocytosis, consistent with iron deficiency. A fecal occult blood test was positive. Ultrasound imaging revealed numerous, vascularized focal liver lesions that suggested metastases. The macaque's appetite continued to decrease, and he became more lethargic. At this point, the investigator elected to euthanize the macaque. At necropsy, the ileocolic junction was white and abnormally thickened, and the liver was pale tan with approximately 18 discrete white masses randomly scattered throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Histologically, the mass at the ileocolic junction was identified as an intestinal adenocarcinoma, whereas the liver masses were confirmed to be undifferentiated hepatic sarcomas. This case report describes a rhesus macaque that had 2 unrelated primary neoplasms. A review of the literature indicates that this rhesus macaque is the first reported to have an adenocarcinoma of the ileocolic junction and multiple hepatic sarcomas simultaneously.

  7. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  8. An analysis of leg joint synergy during bipedal walking in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Kaichida, Shoko; Hashizume, Yoshimitsu; Ogihara, Naomichi; Nishii, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed bipedal locomotion of Japanese macaques from the view point of leg joint synergy by the UCM (Uncontrolled manifold) analysis in order to examine how and when hip, knee and ankle joints cooperate so as to suppress the variances of the toe position relative to the hip position. Our results showed that joint synergy is exploited at some moments during walking. For instance, the variance of the vertical toe position was suppressed by joint synergy when the tip of the finger passes its lowest position from the ground. Some characteristics of the synergy pattern of macaques have been also reported in human walking, on the other hand, some differences between humans and macaques were found. For instance, high degree of joint synergy that suppresses the variance of hip height was observed around the end of stance phase in human walking, but such synergy was weak in macaques. The results suggest that different control strategies are used in bipedal walking of macaques and humans.

  9. Effects of age and sex on the hematology and blood chemistry of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yi, Yong; Sun, Fei; Zhou, Liang; Yang, Feng; Wang, Hongxing; Zhang, Guodong; Zhang, Yu Alex; Yue, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana), also known as Chinese stump-tailed macaques, are a threatened primate species. Although Tibetan macaques are Old World monkeys in the genus of Macaca, limited age- and sex-related physiologic data are available for this particular species. We used 69 apparently healthy Tibetan male and female macaques to explore the effect of age and sex on physiologic parameters. Somatometric measurements, biochemistry, and hematologic parameters were analyzed. Significant age-related differences were found for weight, BMI, RBC count, Hgb, Hct, neutrophils, eosinophil count, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, creatine kinase (muscle and brain subtypes), LDH, α-amylase, creatinine, apolipoprotein A1, total protein, albumin, cholesterol, HDL, and potassium. Significant differences by sex were noted for weight, BMI, ALT, total bilirubin, and indirect bilirubin. An interaction between age and sex accounted for statistically significant differences in the values for weight, BMI, and lymphocyte and eosinophil counts. These physiologic data will provide veterinarians and researchers with important age- and sex-specific reference ranges for evaluating experimental results from Tibetan macaques.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Oxymorphone in Titi Monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R; Pypendop, Bruno H; Grayson, J Kevin; Stanley, Scott D; Christe, Kari L; Summers, Laura M; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2011-01-01

    Oxymorphone is a pure μ-opioid receptor agonist that is commonly used in nonhuman primate medicine and surgery to minimize pain ranging in intensity from moderate to severe. We compared pharmacokinetic profiles and physiologic and behavioral responses to oxymorphone between titi monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Titi monkeys (n = 4) and rhesus macaques (n = 4) were injected intravenously with either a bolus of 0.075 mg/kg oxymorphone or placebo on multiple occasions, with a minimal washout period of 14 d between trials. Blood collection was limited to no more than 3 samples per trial, with samples collected at multiple time points until 10 h after injection. Collection periods, animal order, and testing day were randomized. In addition, macaques underwent a single serial collection at all time points to validate study design. A 2-compartment model best described the disposition of oxymorphone in both species. Clearance was faster in macaques than titi monkeys, in which terminal half-life was longer. Statistically significant physiologic differences were found between species and between treatments within species. Apart from these effects, oxymorphone did not significantly change physiologic parameters over time. After oxymorphone treatment, macaques demonstrated behaviors reflecting pruritis, whereas titi monkeys exhibited sedation. Despite its mild side effects, we recommend the consideration of oxymorphone for pain management protocols in both Old and New World nonhuman primates. PMID:21439215

  11. Training rhesus macaques for venipuncture using positive reinforcement techniques: a comparison with chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kristine; Pranger, Lindsay; Maier, Adriane; Lambeth, Susan P; Perlman, Jaine E; Thiele, Erica; Schapiro, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    As more emphasis is placed on enhancing the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates, many research facilities have started using positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques to train primates to voluntarily participate in husbandry and research procedures. PRT increases the animal's control over its environment and desensitizes the animal to stressful stimuli. Blood draw is a common husbandry and research procedure that can be particularly stressful for nonhuman primate subjects. Although studies have demonstrated that chimpanzees can be trained for in-cage venipuncture using PRT only, fewer studies have demonstrated success using similar techniques to train macaques. It is often assumed that macaques cannot be trained in the same manner as apes. In this study, we compare PRT data from singly housed adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 8) with data from group-housed adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 4). All subjects were trained to place an arm in a 'blood sleeve' and remain stationary for venipuncture. Both facilities used similar PRT techniques. We were able to obtain repeated blood samples from 75% of the macaques and all of the chimpanzees. The training time did not differ significantly between the 2 species. These data demonstrate that macaques can be trained for venipuncture in a manner similar to that used for chimpanzees.

  12. Minor contributions of the maxillary sinus to the air-conditioning performance in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Teruo; Nishimura, Takeshi D

    2015-08-01

    The nasal passages mainly adjust the temperature and humidity of inhaled air to reach the alveolar condition required in the lungs. By contrast to most other non-human primates, macaque monkeys are distributed widely among tropical, temperate and subarctic regions, and thus some species need to condition the inhaled air in cool and dry ambient atmospheric areas. The internal nasal anatomy is believed to have undergone adaptive modifications to improve the air-conditioning performance. Furthermore, the maxillary sinus (MS), an accessory hollow communicating with the nasal cavity, is found in macaques, whereas it is absent in most other extant Old World monkeys, including savanna monkeys. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics simulations to simulate the airflow and heat and water exchange over the mucosal surface in the nasal passage. Using the topology models of the nasal cavity with and without the MS, we demonstrated that the MS makes little contribution to the airflow pattern and the air-conditioning performance within the nasal cavity in macaques. Instead, the inhaled air is conditioned well in the anterior portion of the nasal cavity before reaching the MS in both macaques and savanna monkeys. These findings suggest that the evolutionary modifications and coetaneous variations in the nasal anatomy are rather independent of transitions and variations in the climate and atmospheric environment found in the habitats of macaques. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Comparison of physiologic and pharmacologic parameters in Asian and mauritius cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kozlosky, John C; Mysore, Jagannatha; Clark, Shawn P; Burr, Holly N; Li, Jinze; Aranibar, Nelly; Vuppugalla, Ragini; West, Ronald C; Mangipudy, Raja S; Graziano, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    This comparative study was conducted to assess background physiologic and pharmacologic parameters of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Cambodia, from a mixed Asian source (Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia), and from Mauritius. This evaluation provides a comprehensive assessment of several of these parameters in a single study. Ten male and 10 female captive-bred, age-matched macaques from each source were evaluated. Criteria for evaluation included weight gain, assessment of drug metabolizing enzyme activity, metabolomic analysis, immunologic assessments (lymphocyte subsets, TDAR, and serum Ig isotyping), clinical pathology evaluations, physical (respiratory, neurologic, cardiovascular, and ophthalmologic) examinations, pathogen screening, organ weights, and gross and microscopic pathology analyses. The results of this evaluation indicate that, compared to macaques of Asian origin, macaques from Mauritius had the lowest incidence and/or severity of spontaneous pathologic findings in several organs and tissues (lymphoid organs, stomach, kidney, urothelium, heart, arteries and lung) and better testicular maturity at a given age with minimal variability in organ weights. Although slight differences were observed in other parameters, none were considered detrimental to the use of macaques of Asian or Mauritius origin in pharmaceutical candidate safety studies with the use of a consistent source, concomitant controls, and appropriate background knowledge and screening.

  14. Genome sequence variation among isolates of monkey B virus (Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1) from captive macaques.

    PubMed

    Eberle, R; Maxwell, L K; Nicholson, S; Black, D; Jones-Engel, L

    2017-08-01

    Complete genome sequences of 19 strains of monkey B virus (Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1; BV) isolated from several macaque species were determined. A low level of sequence variation was present among BV isolates from rhesus macaques. Most variation among BV strains isolated from rhesus macaques was located in regions of repetitive or quasi-repetitive sequence. Variation in coding sequences (polypeptides and miRNAs) was minor compared to regions of non-coding sequences. Non-coding sequences in the long and short repeat regions of the genome did however exhibit islands of conserved sequence. Oral and genital isolates from a single monkey were identical in sequence and varied only in the number of iterations of repeat units in several areas of repeats. Sequence variation between BV isolates from different macaque species (different BV genotypes) was much greater and was spread across the entire genome, confirming the existence of different genotypes of BV in different macaque species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensitivity to first-order relations of facial elements in infant rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Paukner, Annika; Bower, Seth; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Faces are visually attractive to both human and nonhuman primates. Human neonates are thought to have a broad template for faces at birth and prefer face-like to non-face-like stimuli. To better compare developmental trajectories of face processing phylogenetically, here we investigated preferences for face-like stimuli in infant rhesus macaques using photographs of real faces. We presented infant macaques aged 15–25days with human, macaque, and abstract faces with both normal and linear arrangements of facial features, and measured infants’ gaze durations, number of fixations, and latency to look to each face using eye-tracking technology. There was an overall preference for normal over linear facial arrangements for abstract and monkey faces, but not human faces. Moreover, infant macaques looked less at monkey faces than at abstract or human faces. These results suggest that species and facial configurations affect face processing in infant macaques, and we discuss potential explanations for these findings. Further, carefully controlled studies are required to ascertain whether infant macaques’ face template can be considered as broad as human infants’ face template. PMID:23997657

  16. Psychogenic Alopecia in Rhesus Macaques Presenting as Focally Extensive Alopecia of the Distal Limb

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joshua A; Mansfield, Keith G; Simmons, Joe H; Bernstein, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Focally extensive alopecia affecting the distal limbs is a common clinical finding in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) colonies and is both a regulatory and colony-health concern. We performed diagnostic examinations including physical exams, bloodwork, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and surface bacterial–fungal cultures on 17 rhesus macaques with this presentation of alopecia. Skin biopsies from alopecic skin obtained from each macaque were compared with those of normal skin from the same animal. Immunohistochemistry and metachromatic staining for inflammatory cells were performed to compare alopecic and normal skin. In addition, we compared these biopsies with those previously obtained from macaques with generalized alopecia and dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with cutaneous hypersensitivity disorders and with those from animals with normal haircoats. Bacterial and fungal cultures, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and bloodwork were unremarkable. Affected skin showed only mild histologic alteration, with rare evidence of trichomalacia and follicular loss. Numbers of mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes did not differ between alopecic and normally haired skin from the same animal. The number of mast cells in alopecic skin from animals in the current cohort was significantly lower than that in skin of animals previously diagnosed with a cutaneous hypersensitivity disorder. Numbers of both mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes in alopecic skin from the current cohort were similar to those from biopsies of animals with normal haircoats. Together, the clinical findings and pathology are consistent with a psychogenic origin for this pattern of alopecia in rhesus macaques. PMID:21819697

  17. Noninvasive Temporal Artery Thermometry as an Alternative to Rectal Thermometry in Research Macaques (Macaca spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Stephanie E; Marini, Robert P; Patterson, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining an animal's body temperature is essential for the assessment of its clinical status. For many species, rectal thermometry is the technique used most often; however, this method in macaques typically requires sedation or considerable physical restraint. A noninvasive and inexpensive temporal artery (TA) thermometer was evaluated as an alternative method for collecting body temperature measurements from macaques used in neuroscience research. Rectal and arterial temperatures were obtained from 86 macaques (mean age, 10.2 y) that had received ketamine (10 mg/kg IM) or Telazol (5 mg/kg IM); the arterial measurements were taken from behind the right ear. In addition, arterial temperatures were measured behind both ears in a cohort of awake, chaired macaques with cephalic restraint pedestals only (n = 8) or with cephalic restraint pedestals and recording chambers (n = 14). Within-subject repeatability for TA thermometry and agreement between rectal and arterial temperature measurements were assessed by using the Bland–Altman method. Temperature measurements indicated that values from TA thermometry were lower than those from rectal thermometry by 1.57 °C with a 95% agreement limit of ± 1.27 °C. Results show satisfactory repeatability with TA thermometry and agreement between arterial and rectal temperatures, demonstrating that TA thermometry can be a valuable tool in conscious, chaired macaques with restrained heads. PMID:23849413

  18. Survey of prevalence of overweight body condition in laboratory-housed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sharon A; Leslie, Ken E; Pearl, David L; Fournier, Jocelyn; Turner, Patricia V

    2010-07-01

    Excessive weight gain has been reported to occur in captive cynomolgus macaques with little to no change in diet. Overweight body condition can result in development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes and should be avoided. The purpose of this survey was to assess the prevalence of overweight cynomolgus macaques in North American research facilities, including breeding colonies and short-term and long-term facilities, and to describe current methods used to assess body condition. The survey consisted of 51 questions covering animal population demographics, body weight and body condition scoring, feeding, and behavior. Voluntary participants included veterinarians and animal care managers. Respondents from 13 facilities completed the survey, and information was collected on 17,500 cynomolgus macaques. The majority of surveyed facilities housed juvenile and young adult macaques. The reported prevalence of overweight (greater than 10% of ideal body weight) animals ranged between 0% and 20% and reportedly was more frequent in animals younger than 10 y. Most facilities had weight reduction strategies in place. Despite these programs, a significant proportion of animals were reported as being overweight. The results of this survey demonstrate that most North American facilities housing cynomolgus macaques recognize the importance of tracking body condition regularly. However, implementing effective weight reduction programs may be difficult in captive housing environments. Because of the potential for adverse health effects, facilities should have a means of regularly tracking body weight as well as an action plan for managing overweight animals.

  19. Allele frequency of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in wild-caught cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Higashino, Atsunori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ikoma, Tomoko; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ami, Yasushi; Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A recent study showed that the frequency of an antiretroviral factor TRIM5 gene-derived isoform, TRIMCyp, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) varies widely according to the particular habitat examined. However, whether the findings actually reflect the prevalence of TRIMCyp in wild cynomolgus macaques is still uncertain because the previous data were obtained with captive monkeys in breeding and rearing facilities. Here, we characterized the TRIM5 gene in cynomolgus macaques captured in the wild, and found that the frequency of the TRIMCyp allele was comparable to those in captive monkeys. This suggests that the previous results with captive monkeys do indeed reflect the natural allele frequency and that breeding and rearing facilities may not affect the frequency of TRIM5 alleles. Interestingly, the prevalence of a minor haplotype of TRIMCyp in wild macaques from the Philippines was significantly lower than in captive ones, suggesting that it is advantageous for wild monkeys to possess the major haplotype of TRIMCyp. Overall, our results add to our understanding of the geographic and genetic prevalence of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp. PMID:22969754

  20. Influence of heavy snow on the feeding behavior of Japanese macaques (macaca fuscata) in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Enari, Hiroto; Sakamaki-Enari, Haruka

    2013-06-01

    Natural disasters can degrade primate habitat and alter feeding behavior. Here, we examined the influence of unusually heavy snow on diet and feeding-site use by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in northern Japan. To compare the winter-feeding behavior under different snow conditions, we recorded the plant species foraged on by macaques in multiple transects of the Shirakami Mountains from 2008 to 2012 (excluding 2011). We used cluster analysis to describe foraged plant assemblages, and applied multiple dimensional scaling and decision tree modeling to evaluate annual variation in feeding-site use by macaques. Our cluster analysis revealed five types of foraged plant assemblages. The proportion of each type present in transects varied considerably across the years, indicating that the diet of macaques in heavy snow conditions was influenced more by resource accessibility than by preference. Multiple dimensional scaling and decision tree modeling demonstrated that heavy snow conditions restricted feeding-site use. Moreover, the distribution of refuges relative to severe external ambient environments was a stronger limiting factor for feeding-site use than was the availability of food resources. While most primate species facing unexpected starvation employ risk-prone foraging tactics (i.e., choosing the option with higher pay-off by accepting risk), Japanese macaques have a tendency to adopt risk-averse foraging behavior (i.e., minimizing energy loss when searching for preferred diet items under long-lasting heavy snow conditions), because winters with temperatures below freezing have higher thermoregulatory costs.

  1. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation.

  2. Retinotopic Organization of Scene Areas in Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Primates have specialized domains in inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are responsive to particular image categories. Though IT traditionally has been regarded as lacking retinotopy, several recent studies in monkeys have shown that retinotopic maps extend to face patches along the lower bank of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and neighboring regions of IT cortex. Here, we used fMRI to map the retinotopic organization of medial ventral temporal cortex in four monkeys (2 male and 2 female). We confirm the presence of visual field maps within and around the lower bank of the STS and extend these prior findings to scene-selective cortex in the ventral-most regions of IT. Within the occipitotemporal sulcus (OTS), we identified two retinotopic areas, OTS1 and OTS2. The polar angle representation of OTS2 was a mirror reversal of the OTS1 representation. These regions contained representations of the contralateral periphery and were selectively active for scene versus face, body, or object images. The extent of this retinotopy parallels that in humans and shows that the organization of the scene network is preserved across primate species. In addition retinotopic maps were identified in dorsal extrastriate, posterior parietal, and frontal cortex as well as the thalamus, including both the lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar. Together, it appears that most, if not all, of the macaque visual system contains organized representations of visual space. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Primates have specialized domains in inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are responsive to particular image categories. Though retinotopic maps are considered a fundamental organizing principle of posterior visual cortex, IT traditionally has been regarded as lacking retinotopy. Recent imaging studies have demonstrated the presence of several visual field maps within the lateral IT. Using neuroimaging, we found multiple representations of visual space within ventral IT cortex of macaques that

  3. Investigation of cadmium contamination using hair of the Japanese macaque, Macaca fuscata, from Shimokita Peninsula, Aomori Prefecture in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Mariko; Anahara, Reiko; Mano, Tomoki; Nakayama, Yuri; Kobori, Mutsumi; Omi, Toshinori; Matsuoka, Shiro; Ueda, Fukiko

    2012-09-01

    The cadmium (Cd) contents in hair of macaques (n = 45, Macaca fuscata) living on the Shimokita Peninsula were investigated. The mean Cd contents in the hair of Japanese (n = 34, 5.01 μg/g) and macaques (3.05 μg/g) tendency to be higher than those of animals living other areas. The Cd contents of hair of wild macaques were significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that of humans, although three were no significant difference between Cd contents of humans and that of the macaque in captivity. The hair of the macaque was suggested as a useful sample for measurement of Cd contamination in the environment.

  4. The TB-specific CD4+ T cell immune repertoire in both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques largely overlap with humans

    PubMed Central

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Dow, Courtney; Dillon, Myles B.C.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Bohn, Patrick; Karl, Julie; Golden, Nadia A.; Gilpin, Trey; Foreman, Taylor W.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Mehra, Smriti; Scriba, Thomas J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kaushal, Deepak; O’Connor, David H.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Non-human primate (NHP) models of tuberculosis (TB) immunity and pathogenesis, especially rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, are particularly attractive because of the high similarity of the human and macaque immune systems. However, little is known about the MHC class II epitopes recognized in macaques, thus hindering the establishment of immune correlates of immunopathology and protective vaccination. We characterized immune responses in rhesus macaques vaccinated against and/or infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), to a panel of antigens currently in human vaccine trials. We defined 54 new immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes, and noted that antigens immunodominant in humans are also immunodominant in rhesus macaques, including Rv3875 (ESAT-6) and Rv3874 (CFP10). Pedigree and inferred restriction analysis demonstrated that this phenomenon was not due to common ancestry or inbreeding, but rather presentation by common alleles, as well as, promiscuous binding. Experiments using a second cohort of rhesus macaques demonstrated that a pool of epitopes defined in the previous experiments can be used to detect T cell responses in over 75% of individual monkeys. Additionally, 100% of cynomolgus macaques, irrespective of their latent or active TB status, responded to rhesus and human defined epitope pools. Thus, these findings reveal an unexpected general repertoire overlap between MHC class II epitopes recognized in both species of macaques and in humans, showing that epitope pools defined in humans can also be used to characterize macaque responses, despite differences in species and antigen exposure. The results have general implications for the evaluation of new vaccines and diagnostics in NHPs, and immediate applicability in the setting of macaque models of TB. PMID:26526557

  5. Seasonal changes in the structure of rhesus macaque social networks.

    PubMed

    Brent, Lauren J N; Maclarnon, Ann; Platt, Michael L; Semple, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Social structure emerges from the patterning of interactions between individuals and plays a critical role in shaping some of the main characteristics of animal populations. The topological features of social structure, such as the extent to which individuals interact in clusters, can influence many biologically important factors, including the persistence of cooperation, and the rate of spread of disease. Yet the extent to which social structure topology fluctuates over relatively short periods of time in relation to social, demographic or environmental events remains unclear. Here, we use social network analysis to examine seasonal changes in the topology of social structures that emerge from socio-positive associations in adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Behavioral data for two different association types (grooming, spatial proximity) were collected for females in two free-ranging groups during two seasons: the mating and birth seasons. Stronger dyadic bonds resulted in social structures that were more tightly connected (i.e. of greater density) in the mating season compared to the birth season. Social structures were also more centralized around a subset of individuals, and were more clustered in the mating season than the birth season, although the latter differences were mostly driven by differences in density alone. Our results suggest a degree of temporal variation in the topological features of social structure in this population. Such variation may feed back on interactions, hence affecting the behaviors of individuals, and may therefore be important to take into account in studies of animal behavior.

  6. Inexpensive outdoor enclosure for Japanese macaques used in biobehavioral research.

    PubMed

    Crowley, T J; Goebel, A; Nesbitt, T

    1989-09-01

    For studies of alcohol self-administration in a monkey social group, we effectively and humanely enclosed nine Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in an ellipse 32 x 40m, with a 1 m high chain-link fence surmounted by a 3 m curtain of electrically conductive nylon net. High-voltage brief-pulse charges prevent climbing on the net. Materials for this fence cost less than $14.50 per running meter. Weeds and grass grew freely within the ellipse, and seven dead trees interconnected with ropes permitted climbing and swinging. An open, roofed gazebo provided sun and rain shelter, and its single wall blocked the prevailing wind. Mouth activated drinkometer spouts in the corral supplied solutions for voluntary alcohol self-administration. Automatic counters informed an observer of exact doses consumed by each subject. Another observer recorded the frequency of occurrence of various social behaviors. A small kennel run, roofed over with chain-link fencing, connected the corral with a paddock-like, partially heated building, to and from which the monkeys usually had free access. It contained three interconnected chain-link pens. A raceway opening from the pens incorporated a squeeze cage used for weighing animals, drawing blood samples, or administering medications. This unique facility promotes the psychological well-being of research primates, which is being mandated by federal law.

  7. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  8. Transient Inactivation of Orbitofrontal Cortex Blocks Reinforcer Devaluation in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    West, Elizabeth A.; DesJardin, Jacqueline T.; Gale, Karen; Malkova, Ludise

    2011-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and its interactions with the basolateral amygdala (BLA) are critical for goal-directed behavior, especially for adapting to changes in reward value. Here we used a reinforcer devaluation paradigm to investigate the contribution of OFC to this behavior in four macaques. Subjects that had formed associations between objects and two different primary reinforcers (foods) were presented with choices of objects overlying the two different foods. When one of the two foods was devalued by selective satiation, the subjects shifted their choices toward the objects that represented the nonsated food reward (devaluation effect). Transient inactivation of OFC by infusions of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into area 13 blocked the devaluation effect: the monkeys did not reduce their selection of objects associated with the devalued food. This effect was observed when OFC was inactivated during both satiation and the choice test, and during the choice test only. This supports our hypothesis that OFC activity is required during the postsatiety object choice period to guide the selection of objects. This finding sharply contrasts with the role of BLA in the same devaluation process (Wellman et al., 2005). Whereas activity in BLA was required during the selective satiation procedure, it was not necessary for guiding the subsequent object choice. Our results are the first to demonstrate that transient inactivation of OFC is sufficient to disrupt the devaluation effect, and to document a role for OFC distinct from that of BLA for the conditioned reinforcer devaluation process in monkeys. PMID:22016546

  9. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  10. Neural correlates of reward and attention in macaque area LIP.

    PubMed

    Bendiksby, Michael S; Platt, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    Saccade reaction times decrease and the frequency of target choices increases with the size of rewards delivered for orienting to a particular visual target. Similarly, increasing rewards for orienting to a visual target enhances neuronal responses in the macaque lateral intraparietal area (LIP), as well as other brain areas. These observations raise several questions. First, are reward-related modulations in neuronal activity in LIP, as well as other areas, spatially specific or more global in nature? Second, to what extent does reward modulation of neuronal activity in area LIP reflect changes in visual rather than motor processing? And third, to what degree are reward-related modulations in LIP activity independent of performance-related modulations thought to reflect changes in attention? Here we show that increasing the size of fluid rewards in blocks reduced saccade reaction times and improved performance in monkeys performing a peripherally-cued saccade task. LIP neurons responded to visual cues spatially segregated from the saccade target, and for many neurons visual responses were systematically modulated by expected reward size. Neuronal responses also were positively correlated with reaction times independent of reward size, consistent with re-orienting of attention to the saccade target. These observations suggest that motivation and attention independently contribute to the strength of sustained visual responses in LIP. Our data thus implicate LIP in the integration of the sensory, motor, and motivational variables that guide orienting.

  11. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism. PMID:25027164

  12. Births in captive stump-tailed macaques (Macaca arctoides).

    PubMed

    Solanki, G S; Zothansiama

    2013-01-01

    In this report, nighttime births of 3 stump-tailed macaques observed at the Aizawl Zoological Park, India, are described. Continuous focal observations were collected a long with video and still photographs, on the 3 parturitions, from the first observed onset of labour. The average time taken for infant birth, beginning with visibility of the head at the vaginal opening, was 45 s. The births observed were similar in many respects, regardless of parity and social context. The average time taken for consuming the placenta was 4 min 4 s and the average number of contractions was 6.3. In all cases births occurred with the infant emerging in the occiput posterior position, assisted by the mother. Individual variations existed in the number of contractions, intercontraction intervals, self-examination of the anogenital region, duration of labour and the interval between infant birth and the delivery of the placenta. Each mother ingested the placenta completely, while holding her neonate, but without paying much attention to the neonate during placentophagia. Placentophagia appears to provide nutrition to the mothers. Detailed data on parturition in non-human primates, and particularly for Macacaarctoides , are still scarce. Data, such as those presented here, contribute to our understanding of primate birth and the adaptive pressures that shape parturition behaviour and reproductive success.

  13. The whole mitochondrial genome of the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilei; Wang, Huawei; Yang, Liqin; Zhang, Baoming; Li, Yijiang; Hu, Jiansheng; Kong, Qingpeng

    2015-04-01

    Macaca fascicularis, known as the long-tailed macaque, is widely distributed in southern of East Asia and Southeast Asia. It was one of the most commonly used non-human primates in biomedical research. Thus, to illustrate the maternal phylogenetic status of M. fascicularis in primates based on the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome and determine a reference sequence for future population genetic studies by taking mtDNA as molecular marker, in this study, the high quality whole mtDNA genome of M. fascicularis was amplified and sequenced. Our data showed that the whole mtDNA genome of M. fascicularis includes 16,571 base pairs (bps). Further phylogenetic analyses of M. fascicularis were performed by incorporating the 83 available whole mtDNA genomes belonging to 77 primate species with Tupaia belangeri as out-group. Our result supported that M. fascicularis belongs to Macaca. Cercopithecinae. Cercopithecidae. Anthropoidea. Primates, which has the closest genetic affinity with Macaca mulatta. In addition, the ancestral divergence between the tarsier and other primate species was supported with evidence from the whole mtDNA genomes.

  14. Macaque accessory optic system: II. Connections with the pretectum

    SciTech Connect

    Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M.; Cooper, H.M. )

    1990-12-08

    Connections of the accessory optic system (AOS) with the pretectum are described in the macaque monkey. Injections of tritiated amino acids in the pretectum demonstrate a major contralateral projection to the dorsal (DTN), lateral (LTN), and medial (MTN) terminal nuclei of the AOS and a sparser projection to the ipsilateral LTN. Injections of retrograde tracers, Fast Blue (FB), or wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) plus nonconjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the LTN show that the pretectal-LTN projection originates from two nuclei. The main source of pretectal efferents to the LTN is from the pretectal olivary nucleus (OPN) and is entirely contralateral. This projection, which appears unique to primates, originates from the large multipolar cells of the OPN. In addition to this projection, the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) projects to the ipsilateral LTN, as in nonprimates. Injection of WGA-HRP in the pretectum shows a reciprocal predominantely ipsilateral projection from the LTN to the pretectum. Retinas were observed after injection of FB in the LTN. The retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are mainly distributed near the fovea and in the nasal region of the contralateral eye, suggesting a nasotemporal pattern of decussation. The demonstration of a direct connection between LTN and OPN forces to a reconsideration of the functional role of the AOS. Previous descriptions of luminance responsive cells in the LTN support a possible participation of this nucleus in the control of the pupillary light reflex.

  15. Response inhibition during perceptual decision making in humans and macaques

    PubMed Central

    Middlebrooks, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Response inhibition in stop signal tasks has been explained as the outcome of a race between GO and STOP processes (e.g., Logan, 1981). Response choice in two-alternative perceptual categorization tasks has been explained as the outcome of an accumulation of evidence for the alternative responses. To begin unifying these two powerful investigation frameworks, we obtained data from humans and macaque monkeys performing a stop signal task with responses guided by perceptual categorization and variable degrees of difficulty, ranging from low to high accuracy. Comparable results across species reinforced the validity of this animal model. Response times and errors increased with categorization difficulty. The probability of failing to inhibit responses on stop signal trials increased with stop signal delay, and the response times for failed stop signal trials were shorter than those for trials with no stop signal. Thus, the Logan race model could be applied to estimate the duration of the stopping process. We found that the duration of the STOP process did not vary across a wide range of discrimination accuracies. This is consistent with the functional, and possibly mechanistic, independence of choice and inhibition mechanisms. PMID:24306985

  16. State dependence of noise correlations in macaque primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Alexander S; Berens, Philipp; Cotton, R James; Subramaniyan, Manivannan; Denfield, George H; Cadwell, Cathryn R; Smirnakis, Stelios M; Bethge, Matthias; Tolias, Andreas S

    2014-04-02

    Shared, trial-to-trial variability in neuronal populations has a strong impact on the accuracy of information processing in the brain. Estimates of the level of such noise correlations are diverse, ranging from 0.01 to 0.4, with little consensus on which factors account for these differences. Here we addressed one important factor that varied across studies, asking how anesthesia affects the population activity structure in macaque primary visual cortex. We found that under opioid anesthesia, activity was dominated by strong coordinated fluctuations on a timescale of 1-2 Hz, which were mostly absent in awake, fixating monkeys. Accounting for these global fluctuations markedly reduced correlations under anesthesia, matching those observed during wakefulness and reconciling earlier studies conducted under anesthesia and in awake animals. Our results show that internal signals, such as brain state transitions under anesthesia, can induce noise correlations but can also be estimated and accounted for based on neuronal population activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Multimodal convergence within the intraparietal sulcus of the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Guipponi, Olivier; Wardak, Claire; Ibarrola, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Pinède, Serge; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2013-02-27

    The parietal cortex is highly multimodal and plays a key role in the processing of objects and actions in space, both in human and nonhuman primates. Despite the accumulated knowledge in both species, we lack the following: (1) a general description of the multisensory convergence in this cortical region to situate sparser lesion and electrophysiological recording studies; and (2) a way to compare and extrapolate monkey data to human results. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the monkey to provide a bridge between human and monkey studies. We focus on the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and specifically probe its involvement in the processing of visual, tactile, and auditory moving stimuli around and toward the face. We describe three major findings: (1) the visual and tactile modalities are strongly represented and activate mostly nonoverlapping sectors within the IPS. The visual domain occupies its posterior two-thirds and the tactile modality its anterior one-third. The auditory modality is much less represented, mostly on the medial IPS bank. (2) Processing of the movement component of sensory stimuli is specific to the fundus of the IPS and coincides with the anatomical definition of monkey ventral intraparietal area (VIP). (3) A cortical sector within VIP processes movement around and toward the face independently of the sensory modality. This amodal representation of movement may be a key component in the construction of peripersonal space. Overall, our observations highlight strong homologies between macaque and human VIP organization.

  18. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing.

  19. Attention and normalization circuits in macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Sanayei, M; Herrero, J L; Distler, C; Thiele, A

    2015-01-01

    Attention affects neuronal processing and improves behavioural performance. In extrastriate visual cortex these effects have been explained by normalization models, which assume that attention influences the circuit that mediates surround suppression. While normalization models have been able to explain attentional effects, their validity has rarely been tested against alternative models. Here we investigate how attention and surround/mask stimuli affect neuronal firing rates and orientation tuning in macaque V1. Surround/mask stimuli provide an estimate to what extent V1 neurons are affected by normalization, which was compared against effects of spatial top down attention. For some attention/surround effect comparisons, the strength of attentional modulation was correlated with the strength of surround modulation, suggesting that attention and surround/mask stimulation (i.e. normalization) might use a common mechanism. To explore this in detail, we fitted multiplicative and additive models of attention to our data. In one class of models, attention contributed to normalization mechanisms, whereas in a different class of models it did not. Model selection based on Akaike's and on Bayesian information criteria demonstrated that in most cells the effects of attention were best described by models where attention did not contribute to normalization mechanisms. This demonstrates that attentional influences on neuronal responses in primary visual cortex often bypass normalization mechanisms. PMID:25757941

  20. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2016-12-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  1. Copying hierarchical leaders’ voices? Acoustic plasticity in female Japanese macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, Alban; Jubin, Ronan; Masataka, Nobuo; Arlet, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    It has been historically claimed that call production in nonhuman primates has been shaped by genetic factors, although, recently socially-guided plasticity and cortical control during vocal exchanges have been observed. In humans, context-dependent vocal convergence with relatives, friends or leaders’ voices can be found. Comparative studies with monkeys and apes presenting tolerant social organizations have demonstrated that affiliative bonding is the determining factor of convergence. We tested whether vocal copying could also exist in a primate species with a despotic social organization. We compared the degree of inter-individual similarity of contact calls in two groups of Japanese macaques as a function of age, dominance rank, maternal kin and affiliative bonds. We found a positive relationship between dyadic acoustic similarity and female rank differences. Since most call exchanges were initiated by dominant females and since this species is known for the ability of responders to acoustically match initiators’ calls, we conclude that high social status may motivate vocal convergence in this despotic society. Accordingly, intra-individual comparisons showed that isolated calls were more stereotyped than exchanged calls, and that dominants had more stereotyped voices than subordinates. This opens new lines of research with regard to social motivation guiding acoustic plasticity in primates. PMID:26880673

  2. Habituation Reveals Fundamental Chromatic Mechanisms in Striate Cortex of Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Tailby, Chris; Solomon, Samuel G.; Dhruv, Neel T.; Lennie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged viewing of a chromatically modulated stimulus usually leads to changes in its appearance, and that of similar stimuli. These aftereffects of habituation have been thought to reflect the activity of two populations of neurons in visual cortex that have particular importance in color vision, one sensitive to red– green modulation, the other to blue–yellow, but they have not been identified. We show here, in recordings from macaque primary visual cortex (V1), that prolonged exposure to chromatic modulation reveals two fundamental mechanisms with distinctive chromatic signatures that match those of the mechanisms identified by perceptual observations. In nearly all neurons, these mechanisms contribute to both excitation and to regulatory gain controls, and as a result their habituation can have paradoxical effects on response. The mechanisms must be located near the input layers of V1, before their distinct chromatic signatures diffuse. Our observations suggest that the fundamental mechanisms do not give rise to two distinct L–M and S chromatic pathways. Rather, the mechanisms are better understood as stages in the elaboration of chromatic tuning, expressed in varying proportions in all cells in V1 (and beyond), and made accessible to physiological and perceptual investigation only through habituation. PMID:18234891

  3. Subcortical connections of area V4 in the macaque

    PubMed Central

    Gattass, Ricardo; Galkin, Thelma W; Desimone, Robert; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Area V4 has numerous, topographically organized connections with multiple cortical areas, some of which are important for spatially organized visual processing, and others which seem important for spatial attention. Although the topographic organization of V4’s connections with other cortical areas has been established, the detailed topography of its connections with subcortical areas is unclear. We therefore injected retrograde and anterograde tracers in different topographical regions of V4 in nine macaques to determine the organization of its subcortical connections. The injection sites included representations ranging from the fovea to far peripheral eccentricities in both the upper and lower visual fields. The topographically organized connections of V4 included bidirectional connections with four subdivisions of the pulvinar, two subdivisions of the claustrum, and the interlaminar portions of the lateral geniculate nucleus, and efferent projections to the superficial and intermediate layers of the superior colliculus, the thalamic reticular nucleus, and the caudate nucleus. All of these structures have a possible role in spatial attention. The nontopographic, or converging, connections included bidirectional connections with the lateral nucleus of the amygdala, afferent inputs from the dorsal raphe, median raphe, locus coeruleus, ventral tegmentum and nucleus basalis of Meynert, and efferent projections to the putamen. Any role of these structures in attention may be less spatially specific. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1941–1965, 2014. PMID:24288173

  4. You Mate, I Mate: Macaque Females Synchronize Sex not Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Fürtbauer, Ines; Mundry, Roger; Heistermann, Michael; Schülke, Oliver; Ostner, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Extended female sexuality in species living in multimale-multifemale groups appears to enhance benefits from multiple males. Mating with many males, however, requires a low female monopolizability, which is affected by the spatiotemporal distribution of receptive females. Ovarian cycle synchrony potentially promotes overlapping receptivity if fertile and receptive periods are tightly linked. In primates, however, mating is often decoupled from hormonal control, hence reducing the need for synchronizing ovarian events. Here, we test the alternative hypothesis that females behaviorally coordinate their receptivity while simultaneously investigating ovarian cycle synchrony in wild, seasonal Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis), a promiscuous species with extremely extended female sexuality. Using fecal hormone analysis to assess ovarian activity we show that fertile phases are randomly distributed, and that dyadic spatial proximity does not affect their distribution. We present evidence for mating synchrony, i.e., the occurrence of the females' receptivity was significantly associated with the proportion of other females mating on a given day. Our results suggest social facilitation of mating synchrony, which explains (i) the high number of simultaneously receptive females, and (ii) the low male mating skew in this species. Active mating synchronization may serve to enhance the benefits of extended female sexuality, and may proximately explain its patterning and maintenance. PMID:22022541

  5. Social and ecological factors influencing offspring survival in wild macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kerhoas, Daphne; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Premature loss of offspring decreases direct fitness of parents. In gregarious mammals, both ecological and social variables impact offspring survival and may interact with each other in this regard. Although a number of studies have investigated factors influencing offspring loss in mammals, we still know very little on how different factors interact with one another. We therefore investigated fetal and infant mortality in 3 large groups of wild crested macaques (Macaca nigra) over a period of up to 5 years by including potential social causes such as maternal dominance rank, male immigration, between group encounters, and ecological conditions such as rainfall in a multivariate survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards model. Infant but not fetal survival was most impaired after a recent takeover of the alpha-male position by an immigrant male. Furthermore, infant survival probability increased when there was an increase in number of group adult females and rainfall. Fetal survival probability also increased with an increase of these 2 factors, but more in high-ranking than low-ranking females. Fetal survival, unlike that of infants, was also improved by an increase of intergroup encounter rates. Our study thus stresses the importance of survival analyses using a multivariate approach and encompassing more than a single offspring stage to investigate the determinants of female direct fitness. We further provide evidence for fitness costs and benefits of group living, possibly deriving from high pressures of both within- and between-group competition, in a wild primate population. PMID:25214754

  6. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  7. Economic Choices Reveal Probability Distortion in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing. PMID:25698750

  8. Subcortical Projections of Area V2 in the Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.; Galkin, Thelma W.; Desimone, Robert; Gattass, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the subcortical efferent connections of visual area V2, we injected tritiated amino acids under electrophysiological control into 15 V2 sites in 14 macaques. The injection sites included the fovea representation as well as representations ranging from central to far peripheral eccentricities in both the upper and lower visual fields. The results indicated that V2 projects topographically to different portions of the inferior and lateral pulvinar and to the superficial and intermediate layers of the superior colliculus. Within the pulvinar, the V2 projections terminated in fields P1, P2, and P4, with the strongest projection being in P2. Central visual field injections in V2 labeled projection zones in P1 and P2, whereas peripheral field injections labeled P1, P2, and P4. No projections were found in P3. Both central and peripheral field injections in V2 projected topographically to the superficial and intermediate layers of the superior colliculus. Projections from V2 to the pulvinar and the superior colliculus constituted cortical–subcortical loops through which circuits serving spatial attention are activated. PMID:24456395

  9. Selectivity and tolerance for visual texture in macaque V2

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Corey M.; Freeman, Jeremy; Movshon, J. Anthony; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2016-01-01

    As information propagates along the ventral visual hierarchy, neuronal responses become both more specific for particular image features and more tolerant of image transformations that preserve those features. Here, we present evidence that neurons in area V2 are selective for local statistics that occur in natural visual textures, and tolerant of manipulations that preserve these statistics. Texture stimuli were generated by sampling from a statistical model, with parameters chosen to match the parameters of a set of visually distinct natural texture images. Stimuli generated with the same statistics are perceptually similar to each other despite differences, arising from the sampling process, in the precise spatial location of features. We assessed the accuracy with which these textures could be classified based on the responses of V1 and V2 neurons recorded individually in anesthetized macaque monkeys. We also assessed the accuracy with which particular samples could be identified, relative to other statistically matched samples. For populations of up to 100 cells, V1 neurons supported better performance in the sample identification task, whereas V2 neurons exhibited better performance in texture classification. Relative to V1, the responses of V2 show greater selectivity and tolerance for the representation of texture statistics. PMID:27173899

  10. Gain Modulation by Nicotine in Macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Anita A.; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetylcholine is a ubiquitous cortical neuromodulator implicated in cognition. In order to understand the potential for acetylcholine to play a role in visual attention, we studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization and function in area V1 of the macaque. We found nAChRs presynaptically at thalamic synapses onto excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurons in the primary thalamorecipient layer 4c. Furthermore, consistent with the release enhancement suggested by this localization, we discovered that nicotine increases responsiveness and lowers contrast threshold in layer 4c neurons. We also found that nAChRs are expressed by GABAergic interneurons in V1 but rarely by pyramidal neurons, and that nicotine suppresses visual responses outside layer 4c. All sensory systems incorporate gain control mechanisms, or processes which dynamically alter input/output relationships. We demonstrate that at the site of thalamic input to visual cortex, the effect of this nAChR-mediated gain is an enhancement of the detection of visual stimuli. PMID:18031686

  11. Serial memory strategies in macaque monkeys: behavioral and theoretical aspects.

    PubMed

    Orlov, Tanya; Yakovlev, Volodya; Amit, Daniel; Hochstein, Shaul; Zohary, Ehud

    2002-03-01

    Serial memory is the ability to encode and retrieve a list of items in their correct temporal order. To study nonverbal strategies involved in serial memory, we trained four macaque monkeys on a novel delayed sequence-recall task and analysed the mechanisms underlying their performance in terms of a neural network model. Thirty fractal images, divided into 10 triplets, were presented repeatedly in fixed temporal order. On each trial the monkeys viewed three sequentially presented sample images, followed by a test stimulus consisting of the same triplet of images and a distractor image (chosen randomly from the remaining 27). The task was to touch the three images in their original order, avoiding the distractor. The monkeys' most common error was touching the distractor when it had the same ordinal position (in its own triplet) as the correct image. This finding suggests that monkeys naturally categorize images by their ordinal number. Additional, secondary strategies were eventually used to avoid distractor images. These include memory of the sample images (working memory) and associations between triplet members. Further direct evidence for ordinal number categorization was provided by a transfer of learning to untrained images of the same ordinal category, following reassignment of image categories within each triplet. We propose a generic three-tier neuronal framework that can explain the components and complex set of characteristics of the observed behavior. This framework, with its intermediate level representing ordinal categories, can also explain the transfer of learning following category reassignment.

  12. Transient inactivation of orbitofrontal cortex blocks reinforcer devaluation in macaques.

    PubMed

    West, Elizabeth A; DesJardin, Jacqueline T; Gale, Karen; Malkova, Ludise

    2011-10-19

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and its interactions with the basolateral amygdala (BLA) are critical for goal-directed behavior, especially for adapting to changes in reward value. Here we used a reinforcer devaluation paradigm to investigate the contribution of OFC to this behavior in four macaques. Subjects that had formed associations between objects and two different primary reinforcers (foods) were presented with choices of objects overlying the two different foods. When one of the two foods was devalued by selective satiation, the subjects shifted their choices toward the objects that represented the nonsated food reward (devaluation effect). Transient inactivation of OFC by infusions of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol into area 13 blocked the devaluation effect: the monkeys did not reduce their selection of objects associated with the devalued food. This effect was observed when OFC was inactivated during both satiation and the choice test, and during the choice test only. This supports our hypothesis that OFC activity is required during the postsatiety object choice period to guide the selection of objects. This finding sharply contrasts with the role of BLA in the same devaluation process (Wellman et al., 2005). Whereas activity in BLA was required during the selective satiation procedure, it was not necessary for guiding the subsequent object choice. Our results are the first to demonstrate that transient inactivation of OFC is sufficient to disrupt the devaluation effect, and to document a role for OFC distinct from that of BLA for the conditioned reinforcer devaluation process in monkeys.

  13. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; ...

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection wasmore » cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.« less

  14. Spatial choices of macaque monkeys based on abstract visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Nekovarova, Tereza; Nedvidek, Jan; Bures, Jan

    2006-11-01

    Our study investigates whether macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are able to make spatial choices in a real space according to abstract visual stimuli presented on a computer screen. We tested whether there was a difference in the processing of stimuli reflecting the configuration of a response space ("spatial stimuli") and stimuli of simple geometrical patterns lacking implicit spatial information. We trained two monkeys to choose one of nine touch-holes on a transparent panel attached to a computer monitor according to one of four visual stimuli successively displayed on the screen. The first monkey followed the visual stimuli designed as a representation of the response space ("configurations"), the second monkey observed geometrical patterns or pictures without information about the response space. In the first phase the position or the size of the stimuli varied but the shapes remained the same. In the second phase we changed the stimuli - "configurations" represented the response space in a similar way as in the previous phase, but marked different touch-holes - the patterns were changed entirely. The comparison of these two monkeys using different stimuli was expected to reveal potential differences between pattern discrimination and using configuration information included in the stimuli. The results of this experiment showed that both monkeys were able to use visual stimuli in phase 1 effectively (independently on their position on the screen), but only the monkey that obtained configuration information learnt an effective strategy after the change of stimuli in phase 2.

  15. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-07-15

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism.

  16. Characterization of the Cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori from naturally infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Emma C; Deck, Samuel L; Entwistle, Hasan D; Hansen, Lori M; Solnick, Jay V

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori commonly infects the epithelial layer of the human stomach and in some individuals causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric lymphoma. Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse species, and the most important bacterial virulence factor that increases the risk of developing disease, versus asymptomatic colonization, is the cytotoxin associated gene pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Socially housed rhesus macaques are often naturally infected with H. pylori similar to that which colonizes humans, but little is known about the cagPAI. Here we show that H. pylori strains isolated from naturally infected rhesus macaques have a cagPAI very similar to that found in human clinical isolates, and like human isolates, it encodes a functional type IV secretion system. These results provide further support for the relevance of rhesus macaques as a valid experimental model for H. pylori infection in humans. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Somatometric measurements, and clinical chemistry and hematology parameters in Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Jiang, W Y; Yang, F; Wei, S Y; Zhou, L; Yi, Y; Wang, H X; Zhang, Y A; Yue, F

    2013-12-01

    Limited physiological data for Tibetan macaques are available at present. This study will provide more rationale for evaluating this species. Thirty-seven Tibetan macaques (15 males and 22 females) were used in this study. Somatometric measurements, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, insulin, and C-peptide were analyzed. Females had higher values of waist and waist hip ratio (WHR) than males in somatometric measurements. There were no significant differences between the two genders in hematology. Significant differences between males and females were only found for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in biochemistry testing. In addition, females had higher fasting insulin and C-peptide than males. There was a strongly positive correlation between age and some somatometric parameters. These physiological data will provide veterinarians and researchers with baseline values to evaluate experimental results using Tibetan macaques. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sleep duration is affected by social relationships among sleeping partners in wild Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Koji; Nishikawa, Mari

    2014-03-01

    Co-sleeping behaviour, such as sharing a sleeping site or bed, should play an important role in determining sleep structure in mammals by mitigating predation pressure and harsh abiotic conditions during sleep. Although environmental factors surrounding sleeping sites have been studied, there is very little information on the effects of the social environment within the site on sleep in animals other than humans. Here, we quantified the duration of nighttime sleep of wild primates during behavioural observations. Wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) form clusters at sleeping sites, where they huddle with group members. Macaques slept for longer when huddled in sleeping clusters with natal members than in those with non-natal members. A high degree of synchronisation of wakefulness in pairs of macaques huddling in non-natal clusters suggested that their sleep was often interrupted by the wakefulness of huddling members at night. Our results suggest that familiarity and closeness to huddling partners influence sleep duration.

  19. Characterization and distribution of Mhc-DPB1 alleles in chimpanzee and rhesus macaque populations.

    PubMed

    Otting, N; Doxiadis, G G; Versluis, L; de Groot, N G; Anholts, J; Verduin, W; Rozemuller, E; Claas, F; Tilanus, M G; Bontrop, R E

    1998-10-01

    Allelic diversity at the nonhuman primate Mhc-DPB1 locus was studied by determining exon 2 nucleotide sequences. This resulted in the detection of 17 chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), 2 orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and 16 rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) alleles. These were compiled with primate Mhc-DPB1 nucleotide sequences that were published previously. Based upon the results, a sequence specific oligotyping method was developed allowing us to investigate the distribution of Mhc-DPB1 alleles in distinct chimpanzee and rhesus macaque colonies. Like found in humans, chimpanzee and rhesus macaque populations originating from different geographic backgrounds appear to be characterized by the presence of a few dominant Mhc-DPB1 alleles.

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Macroscale Structural Connectivity in the Macaque and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bezgin, Gleb; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Roebroeck, Alard; Stiers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The macaque brain serves as a model for the human brain, but its suitability is challenged by unique human features, including connectivity reconfigurations, which emerged during primate evolution. We perform a quantitative comparative analysis of the whole brain macroscale structural connectivity of the two species. Our findings suggest that the human and macaque brain as a whole are similarly wired. A region-wise analysis reveals many interspecies similarities of connectivity patterns, but also lack thereof, primarily involving cingulate regions. We unravel a common structural backbone in both species involving a highly overlapping set of regions. This structural backbone, important for mediating information across the brain, seems to constitute a feature of the primate brain persevering evolution. Our findings illustrate novel evolutionary aspects at the macroscale connectivity level and offer a quantitative translational bridge between macaque and human research. PMID:24676052

  1. Cortical Parcellations of the Macaque Monkey Analyzed on Surface-Based Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Matthew F.; Dierker, Donna L.; Harwell, John

    2012-01-01

    Surface-based atlases provide a valuable way to analyze and visualize the functional organization of cerebral cortex. Surface-based registration (SBR) is a primary method for aligning individual hemispheres to a surface-based atlas. We used landmark-constrained SBR to register many published parcellation schemes to the macaque F99 surface-based atlas. This enables objective comparison of both similarities and differences across parcellations. Cortical areas in the macaque vary in surface area by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Based on a composite parcellation derived from 3 major sources, the total number of macaque neocortical and transitional cortical areas is estimated to be about 130–140 in each hemisphere. PMID:22052704

  2. Characterization of the Genital Microenvironment of Female Rhesus Macaques Prior to and After SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Whitney A.; Birke, Leslie; Dufour, Jason; Loganantharaj, Nisha; Bagby, Gregory J.; Nelson, Steve; Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Problem HIV infection among women is frequently modeled in female rhesus macaques. Longitudinal studies on genital compartment and hormonal factors that can influence susceptibility to SIV infection are lacking in this animal model. Methods of Study Genital specimens and menstruation of indoor-housed female rhesus macaques were analyzed prior to and after SIV-infection. Results Median menstrual cycle length averaged 27 days, although highly variable cycle lengths and frequent periods of amenorrhea were observed during summer months. The vaginal microbiota, characterized by adapted Nugent scoring, showed predominance of small gram-variable rods and gram-positive cocci. Highly variable vaginal cytokine levels were observed pre- and post-SIV infection. Vaginal viral loads correlated with plasma viral loads, but were not associated with progesterone levels. Conclusion These results provide an integrated characterization of important factors in the vaginal microenvironment that are relevant to the experimental design of HIV prevention and transmission studies in female rhesus macaques. PMID:26290147

  3. The Human Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter (hSGLT1) Is a Disulfide-Bridged Homodimer with a Re-Entrant C-Terminal Loop

    PubMed Central

    Sasseville, Louis J.; Morin, Michael; Coady, Michael J.; Blunck, Rikard; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Na-coupled cotransporters are proteins that use the trans-membrane electrochemical gradient of Na to activate the transport of a second solute. The sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) constitutes a well-studied prototype of this transport mechanism but essential molecular characteristics, namely its quaternary structure and the exact arrangement of the C-terminal transmembrane segments, are still debated. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, human SGLT1 molecules (hSGLT1) were labelled on an externally accessible cysteine residue with a thiol-reactive fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine-C5-maleimide, TMR). Addition of dipicrylamine (DPA, a negatively-charged amphiphatic fluorescence “quencher”) to the fluorescently-labelled oocytes is used to quench the fluorescence originating from hSGLT1 in a voltage-dependent manner. Using this arrangement with a cysteine residue introduced at position 624 in the loop between transmembrane segments 12 and 13, the voltage-dependent fluorescence signal clearly indicated that this portion of the 12–13 loop is located on the external side of the membrane. As the 12–13 loop begins on the intracellular side of the membrane, this suggests that the 12–13 loop is re-entrant. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we observed that different hSGLT1 molecules are within molecular distances from each other suggesting a multimeric complex arrangement. In agreement with this conclusion, a western blot analysis showed that hSGLT1 migrates as either a monomer or a dimer in reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively. A systematic mutational study of endogenous cysteine residues in hSGLT1 showed that a disulfide bridge is formed between the C355 residues of two neighbouring hSGLT1 molecules. It is concluded that, 1) hSGLT1 is expressed as a disulfide bridged homodimer via C355 and that 2) a portion of the intracellular 12–13 loop is re-entrant and readily accessible from the extracellular milieu. PMID:27137918

  4. The Human Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter (hSGLT1) Is a Disulfide-Bridged Homodimer with a Re-Entrant C-Terminal Loop.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Louis J; Morin, Michael; Coady, Michael J; Blunck, Rikard; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Na-coupled cotransporters are proteins that use the trans-membrane electrochemical gradient of Na to activate the transport of a second solute. The sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) constitutes a well-studied prototype of this transport mechanism but essential molecular characteristics, namely its quaternary structure and the exact arrangement of the C-terminal transmembrane segments, are still debated. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, human SGLT1 molecules (hSGLT1) were labelled on an externally accessible cysteine residue with a thiol-reactive fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine-C5-maleimide, TMR). Addition of dipicrylamine (DPA, a negatively-charged amphiphatic fluorescence "quencher") to the fluorescently-labelled oocytes is used to quench the fluorescence originating from hSGLT1 in a voltage-dependent manner. Using this arrangement with a cysteine residue introduced at position 624 in the loop between transmembrane segments 12 and 13, the voltage-dependent fluorescence signal clearly indicated that this portion of the 12-13 loop is located on the external side of the membrane. As the 12-13 loop begins on the intracellular side of the membrane, this suggests that the 12-13 loop is re-entrant. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we observed that different hSGLT1 molecules are within molecular distances from each other suggesting a multimeric complex arrangement. In agreement with this conclusion, a western blot analysis showed that hSGLT1 migrates as either a monomer or a dimer in reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively. A systematic mutational stud