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Sample records for macaque cynomolgus doses

  1. An aerosol challenge model of tuberculosis in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, S. A.; White, A. D.; Sibley, L.; Gleeson, F.; Hall, G. A.; Basaraba, R. J.; McIntyre, A.; Clark, S. O.; Gooch, K.; Marsh, P. D.; Williams, A.; Dennis, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background New interventions for tuberculosis are urgently needed. Non-human primate (NHP) models provide the most relevant pre-clinical models of human disease and play a critical role in vaccine development. Models utilising Asian cynomolgus macaque populations are well established but the restricted genetic diversity of the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques may be of added value. Methods Mauritian cynomolgus macaques were exposed to a range of doses of M. tuberculosis delivered by aerosol, and the outcome was assessed using clinical, imaging and pathology-based measures. Results All macaques developed characteristic clinical signs and disease features of tuberculosis (TB). Disease burden and the ability to control disease were dependent on exposure dose. Mauritian cynomolgus macaques showed less variation in pulmonary disease burden and total gross pathology scores within exposure dose groups than either Indian rhesus macaques or Chinese cynomolgus macaques Conclusions The genetic homogeneity of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques makes them a potentially useful model of human tuberculosis. PMID:28273087

  2. Dose Response of MARV/Angola Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques following IM or Aerosol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sara C.; Lin, Kenny L.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Raymond, Jo Lynne W.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Wlazlowski, Carly B.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Botto, Miriam A.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus infection in humans causes a hemorrhagic disease with a high case fatality rate. Countermeasure development requires the use of well-characterized animal models that mimic human disease. To further characterize the cynomolgus macaque model of MARV/Angola, two independent dose response studies were performed using the intramuscular or aerosol routes of exposure. All animals succumbed at the lowest target dose; therefore, a dose effect could not be determined. For intramuscular-exposed animals, 100 PFU was the first target dose that was not significantly different than higher target doses in terms of time to disposition, clinical pathology, and histopathology. Although a significant difference was not observed between aerosol-exposed animals in the 10 PFU and 100 PFU target dose groups, 100 PFU was determined to be the lowest target dose that could be consistently obtained and accurately titrated in aerosol studies. PMID:26413900

  3. Rhesus macaques are more susceptible to progressive tuberculosis than cynomolgus macaques: A quantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Maiello, Pauline; DiFazio, Robert M; Cadena, Anthony M; Rodgers, Mark A; Lin, Philana Ling; Scanga, Charles A; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2017-09-25

    In the past two decades, it has become increasingly clear that non-human primates, specifically macaques, are useful models for human tuberculosis (TB). Several macaque species have been used for TB studies, and questions remain about the similarities and differences in TB pathogenesis among macaque species, which can complicate decisions about the best species for a specific experiment. Here we provide a quantitative assessment, using serial positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging and precise quantitative determination of bacterial burdens, of low-dose M. tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques of Chinese origin, rhesus macaques of Chinese origin, and Mauritian cynomolgus macaques. This comprehensive study demonstrates that there is substantial variability in infection outcome within and among species. Overall, rhesus macaques have faster rates of disease progression, more lung, lymph node, and extrapulmonary involvement, and higher bacterial burdens than Chinese cynomolgus macaques. The small cohort of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques assessed here indicates that this species is more similar to rhesus than to "Chinese" cynomolgus macaques in terms of M. tuberculosis infection outcome. These data provide insights into the differences among species, providing valuable data to the field for assessing macaque studies of TB. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Medical termination of pregnancy in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Micks, Elizabeth; Shekell, Taylor; Stanley, Jessica; Zelinski, Mary; Martin, Lauren Drew; Riefenberg, Serena; Adevai, Tiffany; Jensen, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Although pregnancy is expected during studies of novel contraceptives in nonhuman primates, gestation, delivery and lactation remove females from groups for prolonged intervals. Since the macaque cervix does not facilitate transcervical surgical termination of pregnancy, we sought to establish a medical termination protocol. Methods A descriptive case-series of outcomes of medical termination of pregnancy up to 32 days gestation in cynomolgus monkeys. Efficacy and time to uterine resolution were determined according to medication, dose, and route of administration. Results 37 macaques underwent 65 medical terminations. Over 80% of animals terminated after initial treatment with mifepristone 20 mg intramuscularly (IM). Intrafetal methotrexate was effective for salvage treatment. Medical termination regimens were less effective for animals receiving investigational contraceptive agents. Conclusions Medical termination for macaques is safe and effective. We recommend a protocol with mifepristone 20 mg IM and misoprostol 200 mcg buccally as initial treatment. PMID:23078537

  5. Functional and Anatomic Consequences of Subretinal Dosing in the Cynomolgus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Nork, T. Michael; Murphy, Christopher J.; Kim, Charlene B. Y.; Hoeve, James N. Ver; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Miller, Paul E.; Wabers, Hugh D.; Neider, Michael W.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; McCulloh, Ryan J.; Christian, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To characterize functional and anatomic sequelae of a bleb induced by subretinal injection. Methods Subretinal injections (100 μl) of balance salt solution (BSS) were placed in the superotemporal macula of one eye in 3 cynomolgus macaques. Fellow eyes received intravitreal injections (100 μl) of BSS. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography (OCT) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) were obtained before and immediately after injection and again at intervals up to 3 months post injection. Histopathologic analyses included transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), rhodopsin, M/L-cone opsin and S-cone opsin. Results Retinas were re-attached by 2 days post-injection (by OCT). mfERG was suppressed post-subretinal injection within the subretinal injection bleb and surprisingly, also in regions far peripheral to this region. mfERG amplitudes were nearly completely recovered by 90 days. The spectral domain (SD)-OCT inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) line had decreased reflectivity at 92 days. GFAP and S-cone staining were unaffected. Rhodopsin and M/L-cone opsins were partially displaced into the inner segments. TEM revealed disorganization of the outer segment rod (but not cone) disks. At all post-injection intervals, eyes with intravitreal injection were similar to baseline. Conclusions Subretinal injection is a promising route for drug delivery to the eye. Three months post subretinal injection, retinal function was nearly recovered, although reorganization of the outer segment rod disk remained disrupted. Understanding the functional and anatomic effects of subretinal injection per se is important for interpretation of the effects of compounds delivered to the subretinal space. Clinical relevance Subretinal injection is a new potential route for drug delivery to the eye. Separating drug effects from the procedural effects per se is critical. PMID:21911651

  6. MHC class I characterization of Indonesian cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pendley, Chad J.; Becker, Ericka A.; Karl, Julie A.; Blasky, Alex J.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Hughes, Austin L.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; O’Connor, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are quickly becoming a useful model for infectious disease and transplantation research. Even though cynomolgus macaques from different geographic regions are used for these studies, there has been limited characterization of full-length Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I immunogenetics of distinct geographic populations. Here, we identified 48 MHC class I cDNA nucleotide sequences in eleven Indonesian cynomolgus macaques, including 41 novel Mafa-A and Mafa-B sequences. We found seven MHC class I sequences in Indonesian macaques that were identical to MHC class I sequences identified in Malaysian or Mauritian macaques. Sharing of nucleotide sequences between these geographically distinct populations is also consistent with the hypothesis that Indonesia was a source of the Mauritian macaque population. In addition, we found that the Indonesian cDNA sequence Mafa-B*7601 is identical throughout its peptide binding domain to Mamu-B*03, an allele that has been associated with control of SIV viremia in Indian rhesus macaques. Overall, a better understanding of the MHC class I alleles present in Indonesian cynomolgus macaques improves their value as a model for disease research and it better defines the biogeography of cynomolgus macaques throughout Southeast Asia. PMID:18504574

  7. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  8. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) genome.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Atsunori; Sakate, Ryuichi; Kameoka, Yosuke; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hirata, Makoto; Tanuma, Reiko; Masui, Tohru; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Osada, Naoki

    2012-07-02

    The genetic background of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is made complex by the high genetic diversity, population structure, and gene introgression from the closely related rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Herein we report the whole-genome sequence of a Malaysian cynomolgus macaque male with more than 40-fold coverage, which was determined using a resequencing method based on the Indian rhesus macaque genome. We identified approximately 9.7 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) between the Malaysian cynomolgus and the Indian rhesus macaque genomes. Compared with humans, a smaller nonsynonymous/synonymous SNV ratio in the cynomolgus macaque suggests more effective removal of slightly deleterious mutations. Comparison of two cynomolgus (Malaysian and Vietnamese) and two rhesus (Indian and Chinese) macaque genomes, including previously published macaque genomes, suggests that Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been more affected by gene introgression from rhesus macaques. We further identified 60 nonsynonymous SNVs that completely differentiated the cynomolgus and rhesus macaque genomes, and that could be important candidate variants for determining species-specific responses to drugs and pathogens. The demographic inference using the genome sequence data revealed that Malaysian cynomolgus macaques have experienced at least three population bottlenecks. This list of whole-genome SNVs will be useful for many future applications, such as an array-based genotyping system for macaque individuals. High-quality whole-genome sequencing of the cynomolgus macaque genome may aid studies on finding genetic differences that are responsible for phenotypic diversity in macaques and may help control genetic backgrounds among individuals.

  9. Transmission of Hepatitis E Virus from Rabbits to Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Bu, Qiu-Ning; Han, Jian; Du, Ren-Jie; Lei, Ya-Xin; Ouyang, Yu-Qing; Li, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Lu, Feng-Min; Zhuang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in rabbits in the People’s Republic of China and the United States revealed that rabbits are another noteworthy reservoir of HEV. However, whether HEV from rabbits can infect humans is unclear. To study the zoonotic potential for and pathogenesis of rabbit HEV, we infected 2 cynomolgus macaques and 2 rabbits with an HEV strain from rabbits in China. Typical hepatitis developed in both monkeys; they exhibited elevated liver enzymes, viremia, virus shedding in fecal specimens, and seroconversion. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of HEV passed in the macaques with that of the inoculum showed 99.8% nucleotide identity. Rabbit HEV RNA (positive- and negative-stranded) was detectable in various tissues from the experimentally infected rabbits, indicating that extrahepatic replication may be common. Thus, HEV is transmissible from rabbits to cynomolgus macaques, which suggests that rabbits may be a new source of human HEV infection. PMID:23628346

  10. Expression of cytochrome P450 regulators in cynomolgus macaque.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-09-11

    1. Cytochrome P450 (P450) regulators including nuclear receptors and transcription factors have not been fully investigated in cynomolgus macaques, an important species used in drug metabolism studies. In this study, we analyzed 17 P450 regulators by sequence and phylogenetic analysis, and tissue expression. 2. Gene and genome structures of 17 P450 regulators were similar to the human orthologs, and the deduced amino acid sequences showed high sequence identities (92-95%) and more closely clustered in a phylogenetic tree, with the human orthologs. 3. Many of the P450 regulator mRNAs were preferentially expressed in the liver, kidney, and/or jejunum. Among the P450 regulator mRNAs, PXR was most abundant in the liver and jejunum, and HNF4α in the kidney. In the liver, the expression of most P450 regulator mRNAs did not show significant differential expression (>2.5-fold) between cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia, China, and Indonesia, or rhesus macaques. 4. By correlation analysis, most of the P450 regulators were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to other P450 regulators, and many of them were also significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with P450s. 5. These results suggest that 17 P450 regulators of cynomolgus macaques had similar molecular characteristics to the human orthologs.

  11. Condylomatous genital lesions in cynomolgus macaques from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ariana; Wood, Charles E; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; Domaingue, Marie Claire; Elmore, David; Koenig, Patricia; Wagner, Janice D; Jennings, Ryan N; Burk, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    Genital condyloma-like lesions were observed on male and female cynomolgus macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) originating from the island of Mauritius. Cytobrush and/or biopsy samples were obtained from lesions of 57 affected macaques. Primary histologic features included eosinophilic, neutrophilic, and lymphoplasmacytic penile and vulvar inflammation, epidermal hyperplasia with acanthosis, and increased collagenous stroma. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays to amplify viral DNA revealed the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) DNA but not papillomavirus or poxvirus DNA. Subsequent DNA analyses of 3 genomic regions of LCV identified isolates associated with lesions in 19/25 (76%) biopsies and 19/57 (33%) cytology samples. Variable immunolabeling for proteins related to the human LCV Epstein Barr Virus was observed within intralesional plasma cells, stromal cells, and epithelial cells. Further work is needed to characterize the epidemiologic features of these lesions and their association with LCV infection in Mauritian-origin macaques.

  12. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic background of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is made complex by the high genetic diversity, population structure, and gene introgression from the closely related rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Herein we report the whole-genome sequence of a Malaysian cynomolgus macaque male with more than 40-fold coverage, which was determined using a resequencing method based on the Indian rhesus macaque genome. Results We identified approximately 9.7 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) between the Malaysian cynomolgus and the Indian rhesus macaque genomes. Compared with humans, a smaller nonsynonymous/synonymous SNV ratio in the cynomolgus macaque suggests more effective removal of slightly deleterious mutations. Comparison of two cynomolgus (Malaysian and Vietnamese) and two rhesus (Indian and Chinese) macaque genomes, including previously published macaque genomes, suggests that Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been more affected by gene introgression from rhesus macaques. We further identified 60 nonsynonymous SNVs that completely differentiated the cynomolgus and rhesus macaque genomes, and that could be important candidate variants for determining species-specific responses to drugs and pathogens. The demographic inference using the genome sequence data revealed that Malaysian cynomolgus macaques have experienced at least three population bottlenecks. Conclusions This list of whole-genome SNVs will be useful for many future applications, such as an array-based genotyping system for macaque individuals. High-quality whole-genome sequencing of the cynomolgus macaque genome may aid studies on finding genetic differences that are responsible for phenotypic diversity in macaques and may help control genetic backgrounds among individuals. PMID:22747675

  13. Retained fetal adrenal cortex in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher; Evans, Mark

    2014-10-01

    An incidental, bilateral, retained fetal adrenal cortex was detected in a male cynomolgus macaque (age, approximately 2.4 y) used in a 4-week toxicology study. Microscopic examination of the adrenal gland cortex zone revealed the presence of additional solid sheets and columns of cells supported by vascular capillary bed and composed of large polyhedral cells with abundant eosinophilic, slightly finely vacuolated cytoplasm that surrounded the entire circumference of the medulla. Nuclei were vesicular, round to oval with prominent small nucleoli. There was no evidence for inflammation or cellular degeneration. Based on the microscopic examination, a diagnosis of retained fetal cortex of the adrenal gland was made. This morphologic change resembles fetal cortex in human infants. To our knowledge, this case description is the first report of a cynomolgus macaque with the rare entity of retained fetal cortex, which should not be misinterpreted as a test article-related change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Diet and vasectomy: effects on atherogenesis in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T B; Lombardi, D M; Alexander, N J; Lewis, J C

    1986-02-01

    We report here the effect of a moderately atherogenic diet on the progression of atherosclerosis among cynomolgus macaques that were either vasectomized or sham vasectomized. Both groups were compared to sham vasectomized monkeys fed a control Monkey Chow diet. As expected, slight hyperlipoproteinemia induced by the moderately atherogenic diet increased endothelial cell replication rates and resulted in the development of intimal lesions among sham vasectomized monkeys. Unexpectedly, vasectomy resulted in reduced leukocyte adherence to arterial surfaces, reduced endothelial cell replication rates in response to the moderately atherogenic diet, and at most arterial sites, smaller intimal lesions were produced. These data suggest that with slight hyperlipoproteinemia vasectomy may result in a small protective effect against atherosclerosis, while other studies have shown that marked hyperlipoproteinemia in cynomolgus macaques along with vasectomy results in exacerbation of atherogenesis.

  15. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Guzman, Roberto E; Radi, Zaher A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis characterized by multifocal follicular lymphoid cell infiltrates with germinal centers, thyroid acinar atrophy and pituitary cell hyperplasia/hypertrophy of the adenohypophysis was detected in a vehicle control, 4-year-old female Cynomolgus macaque in a routine toxicology study. Lymphoid cells of germinal centers were positive for the B-cell marker CD20 by immunohistochemistry (IHC), while remaining lymphocytes were positive for the T-cell marker CD3. Hypertrophied/hyperplastic pituitary cells were positive for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by IHC, consistent with an adaptive response due to removal of hormonal negative feedback from the diseased thyroid gland. Features of this case are similar to chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in humans, an autoimmune disorder also known as Hashimoto's disease. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with compensatory pituitary changes may occur spontaneously in young, clinically normal cynomolgus macaques and its presence in drug treated animals should be interpreted with caution.

  16. Vaginal Stone in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Colagross-Schouten, Angela M; Canfield, Don R

    2015-12-01

    A 20-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) housed in an indoor primate facility presented for poor appetite and acute weakness after several years of no adverse health events. Physical examination revealed a firm, ovoid mass in the caudal abdomen. Further evaluation revealed the mass to be a vaginal calculus composed of calcium carbonate, apatite, and struvite. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported description of a vaginal stone in an NHP.

  17. Vaginal Stone in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Colagross-Schouten, Angela M; Canfield, Don R

    2015-01-01

    A 20-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) housed in an indoor primate facility presented for poor appetite and acute weakness after several years of no adverse health events. Physical examination revealed a firm, ovoid mass in the caudal abdomen. Further evaluation revealed the mass to be a vaginal calculus composed of calcium carbonate, apatite, and struvite. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported description of a vaginal stone in an NHP. PMID:26678372

  18. Evaluation of Infrared Thermometry in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Laffins, Michael M; Mellal, Nacera; Almlie, Cynthia L; Regalia, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Recording an accurate body temperature is important to assess an animal's health status. We compared temperature data from sedated cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to evaluate differences between rectal, infrared (inguinal and chest), and implanted telemetry techniques with the objective of demonstrating the diagnostic equivalence of the infrared device with other approaches. Infrared thermometer readings are instantaneous and require no contact with the animal. Body temperature data were obtained from 205 (137 male, 68 female) cynomolgus macaques under ketamine (10 mg/kg IM) sedation over a 3-mo period during scheduled physical examinations. Infrared measurements were taken 5 cm from the chest and inguinal areas. We evaluated 10 (9 functional devices) sedated cynomolgus macaques (5 male, 5 female) implanted with telemetry units in a muscular pouch between the internal and external abdominal oblique muscles. We determined that the mean body temperature acquired by using telemetry did not differ from either the mean of inguinal and chest infrared measurements but did differ from the mean of temperature obtained rectally. In addition, the mean rectal temperature differed from the mean of the inguinal reading but not the mean of the chest temperature. The results confirm our hypothesis that the infrared thermometer can be used to replace standard rectal thermometry. PMID:28905720

  19. Pharmacokinetics of cefovecin in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Raabe, Brigitte M; Lovaglio, Jamie; Grover, G Scott; Brown, Scott A; Boucher, Joseph F; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R; Gillhouse, Kimberly A; Stubbs, Makeida N; Hoggatt, Amber F; Halliday, Lisa C; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 ± 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 ± 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 ± 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie.; Grover, G Scott.; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang.; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 ± 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 ± 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 ± 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage. PMID:21640036

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  2. Development of a Zika Virus Infection Model in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Fusataka; Goebel, Scott; Snyder, Beth; Walters, Kevin B.; Gast, Alison; Hagelin, Kimberly; Kalkeri, Raj; Rayner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Limited availability of Indian rhesus macaques (IRM) is a bottleneck to study Zika virus (ZIKV) pathogenesis and evaluation of appropriate control measures in non-human primates. To address these issues, we report here the Mauritian cynomolgus macaque (MCM) model for ZIKV infection. In brief, six MCMs (seronegative for Dengue and ZIKV) were subdivided into three cohorts with a male and female each and challenged with different doses of Asian [PRVABC59 (Puerto Rico) or FSS13025 (Cambodia)] or African (IBH30656) lineage ZIKV isolates. Clinical signs were monitored; and biological fluids (serum, saliva, and urine) and tissues (testes and brain) were assessed for viral load by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and neutralizing antibodies (Nab) by 50% Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT50) at various times post-infection (p.i). PRVABC59 induced viremia detectable up to day 10, with peak viral load at 2–3 days p.i. An intermittent viremia spike was observed on day 30 with titers reaching 2.5 × 103 genomes/mL. Moderate viral load was observed in testes, urine and saliva. In contrast, FSS13025 induced viremia lasting only up to 6 days and detectable viral loads in testes but not in urine and saliva. Recurrent viremia was detected but at lower titers compare to PRVABC59. Challenge with either PRVABC59 or FSS13025 resulted in 100% seroconversion; with mean PRNT50 titers ranging from 597 to 5179. IBH30656 failed to establish infection in MCM suggesting that MCM are susceptible to infection with ZIKV isolates of the Asian lineage but not from Africa. Due to the similarity of biphasic viremia and Nab responses between MCM and IRM models, MCM could be a suitable alternative for evaluation of ZIKV vaccine and therapeutic candidates. PMID:28066354

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Papp, Robert; Popovic, Aleksandar; Kelly, Nancy; Tschirret-Guth, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a third-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic licensed for the treatment of skin infections in cats and dogs. The objective of our study was to assess whether its pharmacokinetic profile in squirrel monkey, rhesus macaques, and cynomolgus macaques was similar to that of dogs. Plasma levels were determined by using protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. After subcutaneous dosing at 8 mg/kg, the plasma terminal half-life of cefovecin was substantially shorter in the nonhuman primates (2.6 to 8.0 h) than in dogs (102 h). The total plasma exposure (AUC(0-96h)) was 10- to 40-fold lower in nonhuman primate species. In cynomolgus macaques, cefovecin showed a similar subcutaneous bioavailability (82% compared with 100%) and volume of distribution (0.16 compared with 0.12 L/kg) as compared to dogs; however, the plasma clearance of cefovecin was 20-fold higher. Cefovecin susceptibility testing and minimum inhibitory concentrations were not established for clinical isolates in nonhuman primates. However, if the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cefovecin for various nonhuman primates pathogens are in the same range as those observed for canine pathogens, our results suggest that cefovecin used at the same dosing regimen and frequency prescribed for the dogs will be ineffective and that increases in dose or frequency (or both) may be required.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus), Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta), and Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Robert; Popovic, Aleksandar; Kelly, Nancy; Tschirret-Guth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a third-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic licensed for the treatment of skin infections in cats and dogs. The objective of our study was to assess whether its pharmacokinetic profile in squirrel monkey, rhesus macaques, and cynomolgus macaques was similar to that of dogs. Plasma levels were determined by using protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. After subcutaneous dosing at 8 mg/kg, the plasma terminal half-life of cefovecin was substantially shorter in the nonhuman primates (2.6 to 8.0 h) than in dogs (102 h). The total plasma exposure (AUC0-96h) was 10- to 40-fold lower in nonhuman primate species. In cynomolgus macaques, cefovecin showed a similar subcutaneous bioavailability (82% compared with 100%) and volume of distribution (0.16 compared with 0.12 L/kg) as compared to dogs; however, the plasma clearance of cefovecin was 20-fold higher. Cefovecin susceptibility testing and minimum inhibitory concentrations were not established for clinical isolates in nonhuman primates. However, if the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cefovecin for various nonhuman primates pathogens are in the same range as those observed for canine pathogens, our results suggest that cefovecin used at the same dosing regimen and frequency prescribed for the dogs will be ineffective and that increases in dose or frequency (or both) may be required. PMID:21205444

  5. Pathogenesis of lassa fever in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) infection causes an acute and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of Lassa fever. Here, we performed a pilot study to begin to understand the progression of LASV infection in nonhuman primates. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with LASV. Tissues from three animals were examined at an early- to mid-stage of disease and compared with tissues from three animals collected at terminal stages of disease. Results Dendritic cells were identified as a prominent target of LASV infection in a variety of tissues in all animals at day 7 while Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, adrenal cortical cells, and endothelial cells were more frequently infected with LASV in tissues of terminal animals (days 13.5-17). Meningoencephalitis and neuronal necrosis were noteworthy findings in terminal animals. Evidence of coagulopathy was noted; however, the degree of fibrin deposition in tissues was less prominent than has been reported in other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Conclusion The sequence of pathogenic events identified in this study begins to shed light on the development of disease processes during Lassa fever and also may provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:21548931

  6. Distinctive Leukocyte Subpopulations According to Organ Type in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zitsman, Jonah S; Alonso-Guallart, Paula; Ovanez, Christopher; Kato, Yojiro; Rosen, Joanna F; Weiner, Joshua I; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (CYNO; Macaca fascicularis) are a well-established NHP model used for studies in immunology. To provide reference values on the baseline cell distributions in the hematopoietic and lymphoid organs (HLO) of these animals, we used flow cytometry to analyze the peripheral blood, bone marrow, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus of a cohort of male, adult, research-naïve, Mauritian CYNO. Our findings demonstrate that several cell distribution patterns differ between CYNO and humans. First, the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio is lower in CYNO compared with humans. Second, the peripheral blood of CYNO contains a population of CD4+CD8+ T cells. Third, the CD31 level was elevated in all organs studied, suggesting that CD31 may not be an accurate marker of recent thymic emigrants within the CD4+ T cells of CYNO. Finally the B-cell population is lower in CYNO compared with humans. In summary, although the majority of immune cell populations are similar between cynomolgus macaques and humans, several important differences should be considered when using CYNO in immunologic studies. Our current findings provide valuable information to not only researchers but also veterinarians working with CYNO at research centers, in zoos, or in the wild. PMID:27538862

  7. Bilateral dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Sato, Kenichi

    2010-06-01

    The authors describe a case in which well-circumscribed, expansile, and nonencapsulated nodular masses with missing digits were detected on the right and left feet in a 6-year-old female cynomolgus macaque from a routine toxicology study. Grossly, these masses were composed of variably sized and firm nodules containing white, chalklike material in the subcutaneous tissue on cross section. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of irregular lobules containing amorphous to granular, light to dark basophilic material that was surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells and separated by fibrous connective tissue. The nodule's contents were von Kossa and Alizarin red S positive. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels of this monkey were within normal ranges. Based on the gross pathology, histopathology, serum chemistry, and histochemistry, a diagnosis of dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta was made. Dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta is an uncommon syndrome of mineralization that occurs following tissue damage, without abnormalities in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and it is characterized by deposition of calcium salts in soft tissues. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of dystrophic calcinosis circumscripta in a cynomolgus macaque.

  8. Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Cassondra; Dunn, Betty G; Brothman, Arthur R; Jr, Edward J Dick; Christensen, Chris; Voges, Andra; Moore, Charleen M

    2012-01-01

    A 2.3-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) presented with a broken right tibia and fibula. Radiographs showed multiple cyst-like defects in all long bones. We suspected that both fractures were pathologic because they occurred through these defects. Ultrasonography, MRI, and dual X-ray absorptiometry revealed that the defects were filled with soft tissue. Grossly, the bones were abnormal in shape, and a gelatinous material filled the defects and the surrounding marrow cavity. Histologically, the gelatinous material was composed of fibrin and cartilage; few normal bone cells were seen. Genetic testing revealed extra material on the short arm of chromosome 8 in all tissues examined, but no copy number alterations of likely clinical significance were observed, and no abnormalities were found that were unique to the lesions. In light of the clinical signs and radiographic and pathologic findings, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed. This report represents the first documented case of fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus macaque. PMID:22546922

  9. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Cassondra; Dunn, Betty G; Brothman, Arthur R; Dick, Edward J; Christensen, Chris; Voges, Andra; Moore, Charleen M

    2012-04-01

    A 2.3-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) presented with a broken right tibia and fibula. Radiographs showed multiple cyst-like defects in all long bones. We suspected that both fractures were pathologic because they occurred through these defects. Ultrasonography, MRI, and dual X-ray absorptiometry revealed that the defects were filled with soft tissue. Grossly, the bones were abnormal in shape, and a gelatinous material filled the defects and the surrounding marrow cavity. Histologically, the gelatinous material was composed of fibrin and cartilage; few normal bone cells were seen. Genetic testing revealed extra material on the short arm of chromosome 8 in all tissues examined, but no copy number alterations of likely clinical significance were observed, and no abnormalities were found that were unique to the lesions. In light of the clinical signs and radiographic and pathologic findings, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed. This report represents the first documented case of fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus macaque.

  10. Genomic Sequencing and Characterization of Cynomolgus Macaque Cytomegalovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Ambagala, Aruna P. N.; Dzamba, Misko; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Pilon, Richard; Fournier, Jocelyn; Sandstrom, Paul; Brudno, Michael; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients or people living with HIV/AIDS, and congenital CMV is the leading viral cause of developmental disabilities in infants. Due to the highly species-specific nature of CMV, animal models that closely recapitulate human CMV (HCMV) are of growing importance for vaccine development. Here we present the genomic sequence of a novel nonhuman primate CMV from cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis; CyCMV). CyCMV (Ottawa strain) was isolated from the urine of a healthy, captive-bred, 4-year-old cynomolgus macaque of Philippine origin, and the viral genome was sequenced using next-generation Illumina sequencing to an average of 516-fold coverage. The CyCMV genome is 218,041 bp in length, with 49.5% G+C content and 84% protein-coding density. We have identified 262 putative open reading frames (ORFs) with an average coding length of 789 bp. The genomic organization of CyCMV is largely colinear with that of rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV). Of the 262 CyCMV ORFs, 137 are homologous to HCMV genes, 243 are homologous to RhCMV 68.1, and 200 are homologous to RhCMV 180.92. CyCMV encodes four ORFs that are not present in RhCMV strain 68.1 or 180.92 but have homologies with HCMV (UL30, UL74A, UL126, and UL146). Similar to HCMV, CyCMV does not produce the RhCMV-specific viral homologue of cyclooxygenase-2. This newly characterized CMV may provide a novel model in which to study CMV biology and HCMV vaccine development. PMID:21994460

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly conserved in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques

    PubMed Central

    Street, Summer L; Kyes, Randall C; Grant, Richard; Ferguson, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Background Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus or longtail macaques) is the most commonly used non-human primate in biomedical research. Little is known about the genomic variation in cynomolgus macaques or how the sequence variants compare to those of the well-studied related species, Macaca mulatta (rhesus macaque). Previously we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in portions of 94 rhesus macaque genes and reported that Indian and Chinese rhesus had largely different SNPs. Here we identify SNPs from some of the same genomic regions of cynomolgus macaques (from Indochina, Indonesia, Mauritius and the Philippines) and compare them to the SNPs found in rhesus. Results We sequenced a portion of 10 genes in 20 cynomolgus macaques. We identified 69 SNPs in these regions, compared with 71 SNPs found in the same genomic regions of 20 Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques. Thirty six (52%) of the M. fascicularis SNPs were overlapping in both species. The majority (70%) of the SNPs found in both Chinese and Indian rhesus macaque populations were also present in M. fascicularis. Of the SNPs previously found in a single rhesus population, 38% (Indian) and 44% (Chinese) were also identified in cynomolgus macaques. In an alternative approach, we genotyped 100 cynomolgus DNAs using a rhesus macaque SNP array representing 53 genes and found that 51% (29/57) of the rhesus SNPs were present in M. fascicularis. Comparisons of SNP profiles from cynomolgus macaques imported from breeding centers in China (where M. fascicularis are not native) showed they were similar to those from Indochina. Conclusion This study demonstrates a surprisingly high conservation of SNPs between M. fascicularis and M. mulatta, suggesting that the relationship of these two species is closer than that suggested by morphological and mitochondrial DNA analysis alone. These findings indicate that SNP discovery efforts in either species will generate useful resources for both macaque species

  12. Ancestry, Plasmodium cynomolgi prevalence and rhesus macaque admixture in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) bred for export in Chinese breeding farms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjun; Meng, Yuhuan; Houghton, Paul; Liu, Mingyu; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Oldt, Robert; Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Huang, Ren; Singh, Balbir; Du, Hongli; Smith, David Glenn

    2017-04-01

    Most cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used in the United States as animal models are imported from Chinese breeding farms without documented ancestry. Cynomolgus macaques with varying rhesus macaque ancestry proportions may exhibit differences, such as susceptibility to malaria, that affect their suitability as a research model. DNA of 400 cynomolgus macaques from 10 Chinese breeding farms was genotyped to characterize their regional origin and rhesus ancestry proportion. A nested PCR assay was used to detect Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in sampled individuals. All populations exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity and low levels of inbreeding and genetic subdivision. Almost all individuals exhibited an Indochinese origin and a rhesus ancestry proportion of 5%-48%. The incidence of P. cynomolgi infection in cynomolgus macaques is strongly associated with proportion of rhesus ancestry. The varying amount of rhesus ancestry in cynomolgus macaques underscores the importance of monitoring their genetic similarity in malaria research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The genetic composition of populations of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Kanthaswamy, Sree; Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; George, Debra A.; Kou, Alexander J.; Hoffman, Lindsay N.; Doherty, Theodore B.; Houghton, Paul; Smith, David Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic composition of cynomolgus macaques used in biomedical research is not as well-characterized as that of rhesus macaques. Methods Populations of cynomolgus macaques from Sumatra, Corregidor, Mauritius, Singapore, Cambodia and Zamboanga were analyzed using 24 STRs. Results The Sumatran and Cambodian populations exhibited the highest allelic diversity while the Mauritian population exhibited the lowest. Sumatran cynomolgus macaques were the most genetically similar to all others, consistent with an Indonesian origin of the species. The high diversity among Cambodian animals may result from interbreeding with rhesus macaques. The Philippine and Mauritian samples were the most divergent from other populations, the former due to separation from the Sunda Shelf by deep water and the latter due to anthropogenic translocation and extreme founder effects. Conclusions Investigators should verify their research subjects’ origin, ancestry and pedigree to minimize risks to biomedical experimentation from genetic variance stemming from close kinship and mixed ancestry as these can obscure treatment effects. PMID:23480663

  14. Cerebral Baylisascaris larva migrans in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shoieb, Ahmed; Radi, Zaher A

    2014-08-01

    An incidental, asymptomatic, focal inflammatory lesion was detected in brain cerebrum of an approximately 6-year-old, female cynomolgus macaque from a chronic toxicology study. No gross lesions were noted at necropsy. Microscopically, the lesion contained a cross-section of larvae approximately 70-80 μm in diameter, a centrally located intestine flanked on either side by large triangular excretory columns, and prominent single lateral cuticular alae. Mixed inflammatory cells of eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with abundant connective tissue stroma and necrosis surrounded the larvae. Histochemical stains for trichrome revealed significant amount of fibrous connective tissue. The morphology of the larvae was compatible with Baylisascaris spp. Based on the microscopic and histochemical examination, a diagnosis of neural Baylisascaris spp. larva migrans was made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Infinium Monkeys: Infinium 450K Array for the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Peck Yean; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Cheong, Clara Y; Stunkel, Walter; Chan, Louiza; Gluckman, Peter D.; Chng, Keefe; Kobor, Michael S.; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2014-01-01

    The Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip Array (Infinium 450K) is a robust and cost-efficient survey of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) is an important disease model; however, its genome sequence is only recently published, and few tools exist to interrogate the molecular state of Cynomolgus macaque tissues. Although the Infinium 450K is a hybridization array designed to the human genome, the relative conservation between the macaque and human genomes makes its use in macaques feasible. Here, we used the Infinium 450K array to assay DNA methylation in 11 macaque muscle biopsies. We showed that probe hybridization efficiency was related to the degree of sequence identity between the human probes and the macaque genome sequence. Approximately 61% of the Human Infinium 450K probes could be reliably mapped to the Cynomolgus macaque genome and contain a CpG site of interest. We also compared the Infinium 450K data to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data generated on the same samples and found a high level of concordance between the two independent methodologies, which can be further improved by filtering for probe sequence identity and mismatch location. We conclude that the Infinium 450K array can be used to measure the DNA methylome of Cynomolgus macaque tissues using the provided filters. We also provide a pipeline for validation of the array in other species using a simple BLAST-based sequence identify filter. PMID:24815017

  16. Infinium monkeys: Infinium 450K array for the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Peck Yean; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Cheong, Clara Y; Stunkel, Walter; Chan, Louiza; Gluckman, Peter D; Chng, Keefe; Kobor, Michael S; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2014-05-08

    The Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip Array (Infinium 450K) is a robust and cost-efficient survey of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) is an important disease model; however, its genome sequence is only recently published, and few tools exist to interrogate the molecular state of Cynomolgus macaque tissues. Although the Infinium 450K is a hybridization array designed to the human genome, the relative conservation between the macaque and human genomes makes its use in macaques feasible. Here, we used the Infinium 450K array to assay DNA methylation in 11 macaque muscle biopsies. We showed that probe hybridization efficiency was related to the degree of sequence identity between the human probes and the macaque genome sequence. Approximately 61% of the Human Infinium 450K probes could be reliably mapped to the Cynomolgus macaque genome and contain a CpG site of interest. We also compared the Infinium 450K data to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data generated on the same samples and found a high level of concordance between the two independent methodologies, which can be further improved by filtering for probe sequence identity and mismatch location. We conclude that the Infinium 450K array can be used to measure the DNA methylome of Cynomolgus macaque tissues using the provided filters. We also provide a pipeline for validation of the array in other species using a simple BLAST-based sequence identify filter. Copyright © 2014 Ong et al.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Transdermal Fentanyl in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Amy M; Kelly, Richard; Fetterer, David P; Rico, Pedro J; Bailey, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is a μ-opioid agonist that often is used as the analgesic component for balanced anesthesia in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing, and the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl are unknown in NHP. The pharmacokinetic properties of 2 transdermal fentanyl delivery methods, a solution (2.6 and 1.95 mg/kg) and a patch (25 µg/h), were determined when applied topically to the dorsal scapular area of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Serum fentanyl concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Compared with the patch, the transdermal fentanyl solution generated higher drug concentrations over longer time. Adverse reactions occurred in the macaques that received the transdermal fentanyl solution at 2.6 mg/kg. Both preparations showed significant interanimal variability in the maximal serum drug levels, time to achieve maximal fentanyl levels, elimination half-life, and AUC values. Both the maximal concentration and the time at which this concentration occurred were increased in macaques compared with most other species after application of the transdermal fentanyl patch and compared with dogs after application of the transdermal fentanyl solution. The pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal fentanyl in macaques are markedly different from those in other veterinary species and preclude its use as a long-acting analgesic drug in NHP. PMID:27423151

  18. Cross-Species Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bimber, Benjamin N.; Reed, Jason S.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Bhusari, Amruta; Hammond, Katherine B.; Klug, Alex; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMV) are highly species-specific due to millennia of co-evolution and adaptation to their host, with no successful experimental cross-species infection in primates reported to date. Accordingly, full genome phylogenetic analysis of multiple new CMV field isolates derived from two closely related nonhuman primate species, Indian-origin rhesus macaques (RM) and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (MCM), revealed distinct and tight lineage clustering according to the species of origin, with MCM CMV isolates mirroring the limited genetic diversity of their primate host that underwent a population bottleneck 400 years ago. Despite the ability of Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) laboratory strain 68–1 to replicate efficiently in MCM fibroblasts and potently inhibit antigen presentation to MCM T cells in vitro, RhCMV 68–1 failed to productively infect MCM in vivo, even in the absence of host CD8+ T and NK cells. In contrast, RhCMV clone 68–1.2, genetically repaired to express the homologues of the HCMV anti-apoptosis gene UL36 and epithelial cell tropism genes UL128 and UL130 absent in 68–1, efficiently infected MCM as evidenced by the induction of transgene-specific T cells and virus shedding. Recombinant variants of RhCMV 68–1 and 68–1.2 revealed that expression of either UL36 or UL128 together with UL130 enabled productive MCM infection, indicating that multiple layers of cross-species restriction operate even between closely related hosts. Cumulatively, these results implicate cell tropism and evasion of apoptosis as critical determinants of CMV transmission across primate species barriers, and extend the macaque model of human CMV infection and immunology to MCM, a nonhuman primate species with uniquely simplified host immunogenetics. PMID:27829026

  19. Effects of Ketamine on Metabolomics of Serum and Urine in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xueying; Zeng, Xiancheng; Hong, Jiehua; Yuan, Congli; Cui, Li; Ma, Jing; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a metabolomics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and pertinent multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the effect of ketamine on metabolic markers in cynomolgus macaques. Principal component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis showed that ketamine (10 mg/kg) induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, ketamine-treated macaques had lower serum levels of α-glucose, myoinositol, lactate and succinate and lower urine levels of pyruvate and lactate. In contrast, the levels of leucine in serum and arginine in urine were significantly higher in the ketamine group. Our results also demonstrated that a single injection of ketamine influenced the major energy and amino acid metabolic pathways in cynomolgus macaques. Our study suggests that these influences should be considered in the design of experiments and the interpretation related blood and urine data from ketamine-sedated cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27657710

  20. Progression of Pathogenic Events in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rubins, Kathleen H.; Huggins, John W.; Fisher, Robert W.; Johnson, Anthony J.; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Larsen, Thomas; Raymond, Jo Lynne; Hensley, Lisa E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Smallpox, caused by variola virus (VARV), is a devastating human disease that affected millions worldwide until the virus was eradicated in the 1970 s. Subsequent cessation of vaccination has resulted in an immunologically naive human population that would be at risk should VARV be used as an agent of bioterrorism. The development of antivirals and improved vaccines to counter this threat would be facilitated by the development of animal models using authentic VARV. Towards this end, cynomolgus macaques were identified as adequate hosts for VARV, developing ordinary or hemorrhagic smallpox in a dose-dependent fashion. To further refine this model, we performed a serial sampling study on macaques exposed to doses of VARV strain Harper calibrated to induce ordinary or hemorrhagic disease. Several key differences were noted between these models. In the ordinary smallpox model, lymphoid and myeloid hyperplasias were consistently found whereas lymphocytolysis and hematopoietic necrosis developed in hemorrhagic smallpox. Viral antigen accumulation, as assessed immunohistochemically, was mild and transient in the ordinary smallpox model. In contrast, in the hemorrhagic model antigen distribution was widespread and included tissues and cells not involved in the ordinary model. Hemorrhagic smallpox developed only in the presence of secondary bacterial infections – an observation also commonly noted in historical reports of human smallpox. Together, our results support the macaque model as an excellent surrogate for human smallpox in terms of disease onset, acute disease course, and gross and histopathological lesions. PMID:21998632

  1. Progression of pathogenic events in cynomolgus macaques infected with variola virus.

    PubMed

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Cann, Jennifer A; Rubins, Kathleen H; Huggins, John W; Fisher, Robert W; Johnson, Anthony J; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Larsen, Thomas; Raymond, Jo Lynne; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Smallpox, caused by variola virus (VARV), is a devastating human disease that affected millions worldwide until the virus was eradicated in the 1970 s. Subsequent cessation of vaccination has resulted in an immunologically naive human population that would be at risk should VARV be used as an agent of bioterrorism. The development of antivirals and improved vaccines to counter this threat would be facilitated by the development of animal models using authentic VARV. Towards this end, cynomolgus macaques were identified as adequate hosts for VARV, developing ordinary or hemorrhagic smallpox in a dose-dependent fashion. To further refine this model, we performed a serial sampling study on macaques exposed to doses of VARV strain Harper calibrated to induce ordinary or hemorrhagic disease. Several key differences were noted between these models. In the ordinary smallpox model, lymphoid and myeloid hyperplasias were consistently found whereas lymphocytolysis and hematopoietic necrosis developed in hemorrhagic smallpox. Viral antigen accumulation, as assessed immunohistochemically, was mild and transient in the ordinary smallpox model. In contrast, in the hemorrhagic model antigen distribution was widespread and included tissues and cells not involved in the ordinary model. Hemorrhagic smallpox developed only in the presence of secondary bacterial infections - an observation also commonly noted in historical reports of human smallpox. Together, our results support the macaque model as an excellent surrogate for human smallpox in terms of disease onset, acute disease course, and gross and histopathological lesions.

  2. Novel cynomolgus macaque MHC-DPB1 polymorphisms in three South-East Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Shiina, T; Kohara, S; Yanagiya, K; Hosomichi, K; Shimizu, S; Anzai, T; Watanabe, A; Ogasawara, K; Torii, R; Kulski, J K; Inoko, H

    2006-04-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis, Mafa), alias the crab-eating monkeys or long-tailed macaques, live across a vast range of South-East Asia. These non-human primates have emerged as important animal models in infectious and chronic diseases and transplantation studies, necessitating a more extensive characterization of their major histocompatibility complex polymorphic regions. The current information on the polymorphic variation or diversity of the Mafa-DPB1 locus is largely limited in comparison with the more commonly studied rhesus macaque DPB1 locus. In this article, to better elucidate the degree and types of polymorphisms and genetic differences of Mafa-DPB1 locus among three South-East Asian populations and to investigate how the allele differences between macaques and humans might affect their respective immune responses, we identified 40 alleles within exon 2 of the Mafa-DPB1 locus by DNA sequencing using 217 individuals. We also performed evolutionary and population analyses using these sequences to reveal some population-specific alleles and trans-species allelic conservation between the cynomolgus macaques and the rhesus macaques. Of the 40 new alleles, eight belong to a newly identified lineage group not previously found in the rhesus macaque species. This allele information will be useful for medical researchers using the cynomolgus macaques in disease and immunological studies.

  3. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  4. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  5. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2016-12-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  6. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  7. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; ...

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection wasmore » cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.« less

  8. Effects of Transportation on Antioxidant Status in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Pan, Xueying; Lu, Liang; Zeng, Xiancheng; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of transportation on oxidative stress in cynomolgus monkeys, we measured serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (PC) and the activities of total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase in cynomolgus macaques before transportation (day 0), on the day of arrival (day 1), and on days 7, 14, and 21 after transportation. Compared with that on day 0, TAOC and catalase activities on days 1, 7, and 14 after transportation were significantly decreased, reached their nadirs on day 7, and increased thereafter to reach their pretransportation levels by day 21 after transportation. Compared with day 0 levels, mean SOD activity and GSH concentration were decreased significantly on day 1; they thereafter increased to reach their pretransportation measures by day 7 after transportation. In contrast, PC and malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and the activity of GSH-Px were increased on day 1 compared with day 0 and thereafter decreased to reach their pretransportation levels by day 14 after transportation. In summary, GSH, TAOC, catalase, and SOD levels decreased and malondialdehyde, PC, and GSH-Px concentrations increased in cynomolgus macaques after transportation. These results suggest that transportation might imbalance oxidant and antioxidant levels to create excess oxidative stress in cynomolgus macaques. Therefore, cynomolgus macaques should have at least 21 d to recover after transportation and regain their healthy status.

  9. Effects of Transportation on Antioxidant Status in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xueying; Lu, Liang; Zeng, Xiancheng; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of transportation on oxidative stress in cynomolgus monkeys, we measured serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (PC) and the activities of total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase in cynomolgus macaques before transportation (day 0), on the day of arrival (day 1), and on days 7, 14, and 21 after transportation. Compared with that on day 0, TAOC and catalase activities on days 1, 7, and 14 after transportation were significantly decreased, reached their nadirs on day 7, and increased thereafter to reach their pretransportation levels by day 21 after transportation. Compared with day 0 levels, mean SOD activity and GSH concentration were decreased significantly on day 1; they thereafter increased to reach their pretransportation measures by day 7 after transportation. In contrast, PC and malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and the activity of GSH-Px were increased on day 1 compared with day 0 and thereafter decreased to reach their pretransportation levels by day 14 after transportation. In summary, GSH, TAOC, catalase, and SOD levels decreased and malondialdehyde, PC, and GSH-Px concentrations increased in cynomolgus macaques after transportation. These results suggest that transportation might imbalance oxidant and antioxidant levels to create excess oxidative stress in cynomolgus macaques. Therefore, cynomolgus macaques should have at least 21 d to recover after transportation and regain their healthy status. PMID:27657707

  10. Survey of prevalence of overweight body condition in laboratory-housed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sharon A; Leslie, Ken E; Pearl, David L; Fournier, Jocelyn; Turner, Patricia V

    2010-07-01

    Excessive weight gain has been reported to occur in captive cynomolgus macaques with little to no change in diet. Overweight body condition can result in development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes and should be avoided. The purpose of this survey was to assess the prevalence of overweight cynomolgus macaques in North American research facilities, including breeding colonies and short-term and long-term facilities, and to describe current methods used to assess body condition. The survey consisted of 51 questions covering animal population demographics, body weight and body condition scoring, feeding, and behavior. Voluntary participants included veterinarians and animal care managers. Respondents from 13 facilities completed the survey, and information was collected on 17,500 cynomolgus macaques. The majority of surveyed facilities housed juvenile and young adult macaques. The reported prevalence of overweight (greater than 10% of ideal body weight) animals ranged between 0% and 20% and reportedly was more frequent in animals younger than 10 y. Most facilities had weight reduction strategies in place. Despite these programs, a significant proportion of animals were reported as being overweight. The results of this survey demonstrate that most North American facilities housing cynomolgus macaques recognize the importance of tracking body condition regularly. However, implementing effective weight reduction programs may be difficult in captive housing environments. Because of the potential for adverse health effects, facilities should have a means of regularly tracking body weight as well as an action plan for managing overweight animals.

  11. Allele frequency of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in wild-caught cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Higashino, Atsunori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ikoma, Tomoko; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ami, Yasushi; Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A recent study showed that the frequency of an antiretroviral factor TRIM5 gene-derived isoform, TRIMCyp, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) varies widely according to the particular habitat examined. However, whether the findings actually reflect the prevalence of TRIMCyp in wild cynomolgus macaques is still uncertain because the previous data were obtained with captive monkeys in breeding and rearing facilities. Here, we characterized the TRIM5 gene in cynomolgus macaques captured in the wild, and found that the frequency of the TRIMCyp allele was comparable to those in captive monkeys. This suggests that the previous results with captive monkeys do indeed reflect the natural allele frequency and that breeding and rearing facilities may not affect the frequency of TRIM5 alleles. Interestingly, the prevalence of a minor haplotype of TRIMCyp in wild macaques from the Philippines was significantly lower than in captive ones, suggesting that it is advantageous for wild monkeys to possess the major haplotype of TRIMCyp. Overall, our results add to our understanding of the geographic and genetic prevalence of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp. PMID:22969754

  12. CYP1B1 is polymorphic in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Akinori; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 is involved in the metabolic activation of various procarcinogens, and some CYP1B1 genetic variants alter CYP1B1-dependent procarcinogen metabolism. Cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in toxicity tests due to their evolutionary closeness to humans. In this study, we attempted to identify CYP1B1 genetic variants in 13 cynomolgus and 4 rhesus macaques. A total of 17 genetic variants were identified, including 8 non-synonymous genetic variants, indicating that, similar to humans, CYP1B1 is polymorphic in macaques. These CYP1B1 genetic variants could be the basis for understanding potential inter-animal differences in macaque CYP1B1-dependent metabolism of promutagens.

  13. Geographical, genetic and functional diversity of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kono, Ken; Nomaguchi, Masako; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Akio; Shioda, Tatsuo; Akari, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Emi E

    2012-03-01

    The antiretroviral factor tripartite motif protein 5 (TRIM5) gene-derived isoform (TRIMCyp) has been found in at least three species of Old World monkey: rhesus (Macaca mulatta), pig-tailed (Macaca nemestrina) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Although the frequency of TRIMCyp has been well studied in rhesus and pig-tailed macaques, the frequency and prevalence of TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques remain to be definitively elucidated. Here, the geographical and genetic diversity of TRIM5α/TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques was studied in comparison with their anti-lentiviral activity. It was found that the frequency of TRIMCyp in a population in the Philippines was significantly higher than those in Indonesian and Malaysian populations. Major and minor haplotypes of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclophilin A domain were also found. The functional significance of the polymorphism in TRIMCyp was examined, and it was demonstrated that the major haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but not HIV-2, whilst the minor haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed HIV-2 but not HIV-1. The major haplotype of TRIMCyp did not restrict a monkey-tropic HIV-1 clone, NL-DT5R, which contains a capsid with the simian immunodeficiency virus-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 and the entire vif gene. These results indicate that polymorphisms of TRIMCyp affect its anti-lentiviral activity. Overall, the results of this study will help our understanding of the genetic background of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp, as well as the host factors composing species barriers of primate lentiviruses.

  14. Geographical, genetic and functional diversity of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kono, Ken; Nomaguchi, Masako; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Shioda, Tatsuo; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    The antiretroviral factor tripartite motif protein 5 (TRIM5) gene-derived isoform (TRIMCyp) has been found in at least three species of Old World monkey: rhesus (Macaca mulatta), pig-tailed (Macaca nemestrina) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Although the frequency of TRIMCyp has been well studied in rhesus and pig-tailed macaques, the frequency and prevalence of TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques remain to be definitively elucidated. Here, the geographical and genetic diversity of TRIM5α/TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques was studied in comparison with their anti-lentiviral activity. It was found that the frequency of TRIMCyp in a population in the Philippines was significantly higher than those in Indonesian and Malaysian populations. Major and minor haplotypes of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclophilin A domain were also found. The functional significance of the polymorphism in TRIMCyp was examined, and it was demonstrated that the major haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but not HIV-2, whilst the minor haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed HIV-2 but not HIV-1. The major haplotype of TRIMCyp did not restrict a monkey-tropic HIV-1 clone, NL-DT5R, which contains a capsid with the simian immunodeficiency virus-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 and the entire vif gene. These results indicate that polymorphisms of TRIMCyp affect its anti-lentiviral activity. Overall, the results of this study will help our understanding of the genetic background of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp, as well as the host factors composing species barriers of primate lentiviruses. PMID:22113010

  15. Differential Response of the Cynomolgus Macaque Gut Microbiota to Shigella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Panda, Aruna; Rasko, David A.; Toapanta, Franklin R.; Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A.; Khan, Abdul Q.; Liu, Zhenqiu; Shipley, Steven T.; DeTolla, Louis J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of gut microbiota in response to live oral vaccines against enteric pathogens. We examined the effect of immunization with an oral live-attenuated Shigella dysenteriae 1 vaccine and challenge with wild-type S. dysenteriae 1 on the fecal microbiota of cynomolgus macaques using 16 S rRNA analysis of fecal samples. Multi-dimensional cluster analysis identified different bacterial community types within macaques from geographically distinct locations. The fecal microbiota of Mauritian macaques, observed to be genetically distinct, harbored a high-diversity community and responded differently to Shigella immunization, as well as challenge compared to the microbiota in non-Mauritian macaques. While both macaque populations exhibited anti-Shigella antibody responses, clinical shigellosis was observed only among non-Mauritian macaques. These studies highlight the importance of further investigation into the possible protective role of the microbiota against enteric pathogens and consideration of host genetic backgrounds in conducting vaccine studies. PMID:23755118

  16. Pharmacokinetics of 3 Formulations of Meloxicam in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Cassondra; Frost, Patrice; Kirschner, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Meloxicam is a commonly used COX2-preferential NSAID in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing in nonhuman primates. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic parameters of 3 formulations of meloxicam in cynomolgus macaques. A single dose of meloxicam SR, an extended-release formulation purported to provide therapeutic levels for as long as 72 h, was compared with the intramuscular and oral formulations dosed for 3 consecutive days and as a single dose. The oral formulation, both over 3 d and as a single dose, yielded lower plasma levels and a shorter duration than did intramuscular and sustained-release subcutaneous formulations. The intramuscular formulation, both over 3 d and as a single dose, provided lower plasma levels and a shorter duration than did a sustained-release subcutaneous formulation. The sustained-release formulations generated the highest plasma concentrations for the longest periods of time. None of the formulations caused significant effects on kidney or liver function. Our results indicate that the sustained-release formulation of meloxicam can achieve an adequate steady-state plasma concentration for 2 to 3 d in nonhuman primates. The standard intramuscular formulation provides adequate plasma concentrations for 12 to 24 h, with waxing and waning levels associated with daily dosing. The oral formulation has limited utility in nonhuman primates because of low circulating levels of drug. PMID:25255073

  17. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Simian Foamy Virus Isolate from a Cynomolgus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koji; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete proviral genome sequence (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession no. LC094267) of a simian foamy virus, SFVmfa/Cy5061, isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). This proviral genome consists of 12,965 nucleotides and has five open reading frames, gag, pol, env, tas, and bet, as with other foamy viruses. PMID:27908992

  18. Indocyanine green fluorescence imaging for evaluation of uterine blood flow in cynomolgus macaque.

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Banno, Kouji; Mihara, Makoto; Lin, Li-Yu; Tsuji, Kosuke; Yanokura, Megumi; Hara, Hisako; Araki, Jun; Iida, Takuya; Abe, Takayuki; Kouyama, Keisuke; Suganuma, Nobuhiko; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Uterine blood flow is an important factor in uterine viability, but the number of blood vessels required to maintain viability is uncertain. In this study, indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence imaging was used to examine uterine hemodynamics and vessels associated with uterine blood flow in cynomolgus macaque. The uterus of a female cynomolgus macaque was cut from the vaginal canal to mimic a situation during trachelectomy or uterine transplantation surgery in which uterine perfusion is maintained only with uterine and ovarian vessels. Intraoperative uterine hemodynamics was observed using ICG fluorescence imaging under conditions in which various nutrient vessels were selected by clamping of blood vessels. A time-intensity curve was plotted using imaging analysis software to measure the T(max) of uterine perfusion for selected blood vessel patterns. Open surgery was performed with the uterus receiving nutritional support only from uterine vessels on one side. The size of the uterus after surgery was monitored using transabdominal ultrasonography. The resulting time-intensity curves displayed the average intensity in the regions of the uterine corpus and uterine cervix, and in the entire uterus. Analyses of the uterine hemodynamics in the cynomolgus macaque showed that uterine vessels were significantly related to uterine perfusion (P=0.008), whereas ovarian vessels did not have a significant relationship (P=0.588). When uterine vessels were clamped, ovarian vessels prolonged the time needed to reach perfusion maximum. Postoperative transabdominal ultrasonography showed that the size of the uterus was not changed 2 months after surgery, with recovery of periodic menstruation. The cynomolgus macaque has got pregnant with favorable fetus well-being. Uterine vessels may be responsible for uterine blood flow, and even one uterine vessel may be sufficient to maintain uterine viability in cynomolgus macaque. Our results show that ICG fluorescence imaging is useful for

  19. Estrogen/isoflavone interactions in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Cline, J Mark; Wood, Charles E

    2009-09-01

    Soy isoflavones are phytoestrogenic components of dietary soy, which are widely consumed for their potential health benefits. Soy isoflavones appear to decrease breast and endometrial cancer risk in human observational studies, but paradoxically stimulate growth of breast cancer cells in culture and uterine enlargement in rodents. We have shown that these compounds are not estrogenic in cynomolgus monkeys even at relatively high doses, but that they reduce estrogen-induced proliferative responses of the breast and endometrium. This effect may be mediated through estrogen receptor interactions and/or modulation of endogenous estrogen metabolism. Interindividual variation in isoflavone absorption and metabolism contributes to the degree of estrogen antagonistic effect. Our recent studies have also shown that individual isoflavone metabolites such as glyceollins may have unique selective estrogen receptor modulator-like activity, acting as tissue-specific antagonists without agonist activity. Rodent studies and human epidemiologic data suggest that timing of exposure and dose relative to endogenous estrogen concentrations are important determinants of effect, and studies of dietary soy on breast development and pubertal maturation are under way. Because soy isoflavones are both abundant in standard monkey chow diets and widely available as dietary supplements for human beings, these findings have broad relevance to the health of human and nonhuman primates.

  20. Impact of menstruation on select hematology and clinical chemistry variables in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Perigard, Christopher J; Parrula, M Cecilia M; Larkin, Matthew H; Gleason, Carol R

    2016-06-01

    In preclinical studies with cynomolgus macaques, it is common to have one or more females presenting with menses. Published literature indicates that the blood lost during menses causes decreases in red blood cell mass variables (RBC, HGB, and HCT), which would be a confounding factor in the interpretation of drug-related effects on clinical pathology data, but no scientific data have been published to support this claim. This investigation was conducted to determine if the amount of blood lost during menses in cynomolgus macaques has an effect on routine hematology and serum chemistry variables. Ten female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), 5 to 6.5 years old, were observed daily during approximately 3 months (97 days) for the presence of menses. Hematology and serum chemistry variables were evaluated twice weekly. The results indicated that menstruation affects the erythrogram including RBC, HGB, HCT, MCHC, MCV, reticulocyte count, RDW, the leukogram including neutrophil, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts, and chemistry variables, including GGT activity, and the concentrations of total proteins, albumin, globulins, and calcium. The magnitude of the effect of menstruation on susceptible variables is dependent on the duration of the menstrual phase. Macaques with menstrual phases lasting ≥ 7 days are more likely to develop changes in variables related to chronic blood loss. In preclinical toxicology studies with cynomolgus macaques, interpretation of changes in several commonly evaluated hematology and serum chemistry variables requires adequate clinical observation and documentation concerning presence and duration of menses. There is a concern that macaques with long menstrual cycles can develop iron deficiency anemia due to chronic menstrual blood loss. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  1. Novel H-shunt Venovenous Bypass for Liver Transplantation in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yojiro; Griesemer, Adam D; Wu, Anette; Sondermeijer, Hugo P; Weiner, Joshua I; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Martinez, Mercedes; Slate, Andrea R; Romanov, Alexander; Lefkowitch, Jay H; Sykes, Megan; Kato, Tomoaki

    2017-10-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are often used in preclinical transplantation research. Performing liver transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys is challenging because they poorly tolerate portal vein clamping during the anhepatic phase. Finding an alternative to portal vein clamping is necessary before preclinical liver transplant models can be performed with reliable outcomes. We used 3 different techniques to perform 5 liver transplants in male cynomolgus macaques (weight, 7.4-10.8 kg; mismatched for MHC I and II; matched for ABO). In procedure A, we clamped the portal vein briefly, as in human transplants, as well as the superior mesentery artery to minimize congestion at the expense of temporary ischemia (n = 2). In procedure B, we performed a temporary portocaval shunt with extracorporeal venovenous bypass (n = 1). For procedure C, we developed an H-shunt system (modified portocaval shunt) with extracorporeal bypass (n = 2). Postoperative immunosuppression comprised cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. Recipients in procedure A developed hemodynamic instability and were euthanized within 2 d. The recipient that underwent procedure B was euthanized within 11 d due to inferior vena caval thrombosis. The H-shunt in procedure C led to minimal PV congestion during the anhepatic phase, and both recipients reached the 21-d survival endpoint with good graft function. Our novel H-shunt bypass system resulted in successful liver transplantation in cynomolgus macaques, with long-term posttransplant survival possible. This technical innovation makes possible the use of cynomolgus monkeys for preclinical liver transplant tolerance models.

  2. A critical analysis of the cynomolgus macaque, Macaca fascicularis, as a model to test HIV-1/SIV vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Antony, Joseph M; MacDonald, Kelly S

    2015-06-17

    The use of a number of non-rhesus macaque species, but especially cynomolgus macaques as a model for HIV-1 vaccine development has increased in recent years. Cynomolgus macaques have been used in the United Kingdom, Europe, Canada and Australia as a model for HIV vaccine development for many years. Unlike rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques infected with SIV show a pattern of disease pathogenesis that more closely resembles that of human HIV-1 infection, exhibiting lower peak and set-point viral loads and slower progression to disease with more typical AIDS defining illnesses. Several advances have been made recently in the use of the cynomolgus macaque SIV challenge model that allow the demonstration of vaccine efficacy using attenuated viruses and vectors that are both viral and non-viral in origin. This review aims to probe the details of various vaccination trials carried out in cynomolgus macaques in the context of our modern understanding of the highly diverse immunogenetics of this species with a view to understanding the species-specific immune correlates of protection and the efficacy of vectors that have been used to design vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Characterization of a Cynomolgus Macaque Model of Pneumonic Plague for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Patricia; Price, Jessica; Martin, Shannon; Metcalfe, Karen; Krile, Robert; Barnewall, Roy; Hart, Mary Kate; Lockman, Hank

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of a recombinant plague vaccine (rF1V) was evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (CMs) to establish the relationship among vaccine doses, antibody titers, and survival following an aerosol challenge with a lethal dose of Yersinia pestis strain Colorado 92. CMs were vaccinated with a range of rF1V doses on a three-dose schedule (days 0, 56, and 121) to provide a range of survival outcomes. The humoral immune response following vaccination was evaluated with anti-rF1, anti-rV, and anti-rF1V bridge enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Animals were challenged via aerosol exposure on day 149. Vaccine doses and antibody responses were each significantly associated with the probability of CM survival (P < 0.0001). Vaccination also decreased signs of pneumonic plague in a dose-dependent manner. There were statistically significant correlations between the vaccine dose and the time to onset of fever (P < 0.0001), the time from onset of fever to death (P < 0.0001), the time to onset of elevated respiratory rate (P = 0.0003), and the time to onset of decreased activity (P = 0.0251) postinfection in animals exhibiting these clinical signs. Delays in the onset of these clinical signs of disease were associated with larger doses of rF1V. Immunization with ≥ 12 μg of rF1V resulted in 100% CM survival. Since both the vaccine dose and anti-rF1V antibody titers correlate with survival, rF1V bridge ELISA titers can be used as a correlate of protection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Characterization of a Cynomolgus Macaque Model of Pneumonic Plague for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jessica; Martin, Shannon; Metcalfe, Karen; Krile, Robert; Barnewall, Roy; Hart, Mary Kate; Lockman, Hank

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a recombinant plague vaccine (rF1V) was evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (CMs) to establish the relationship among vaccine doses, antibody titers, and survival following an aerosol challenge with a lethal dose of Yersinia pestis strain Colorado 92. CMs were vaccinated with a range of rF1V doses on a three-dose schedule (days 0, 56, and 121) to provide a range of survival outcomes. The humoral immune response following vaccination was evaluated with anti-rF1, anti-rV, and anti-rF1V bridge enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Animals were challenged via aerosol exposure on day 149. Vaccine doses and antibody responses were each significantly associated with the probability of CM survival (P < 0.0001). Vaccination also decreased signs of pneumonic plague in a dose-dependent manner. There were statistically significant correlations between the vaccine dose and the time to onset of fever (P < 0.0001), the time from onset of fever to death (P < 0.0001), the time to onset of elevated respiratory rate (P = 0.0003), and the time to onset of decreased activity (P = 0.0251) postinfection in animals exhibiting these clinical signs. Delays in the onset of these clinical signs of disease were associated with larger doses of rF1V. Immunization with ≥12 μg of rF1V resulted in 100% CM survival. Since both the vaccine dose and anti-rF1V antibody titers correlate with survival, rF1V bridge ELISA titers can be used as a correlate of protection. PMID:26224691

  5. Characterization and phylogenetic epitope mapping of CD38 ADPR cyclase in the cynomolgus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Enza; Orciani, Monia; Vacca, Paola; Ortolan, Erika; Crovella, Sergio; Titti, Fausto; Saccucci, Franca; Malavasi, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Background The CD38 transmembrane glycoprotein is an ADP-ribosyl cyclase that moonlights as a receptor in cells of the immune system. Both functions are independently implicated in numerous areas related to human health. This study originated from an inherent interest in studying CD38 in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), a species closely related to humans that also represents a cogent animal model for the biomedical analysis of CD38. Results A cDNA was isolated from cynomolgus macaque peripheral blood leukocytes and is predicted to encode a type II membrane protein of 301 amino acids with 92% identity to human CD38. Both RT-PCR-mediated cDNA cloning and genomic DNA PCR surveying were possible with heterologous human CD38 primers, demonstrating the striking conservation of CD38 in these primates. Transfection of the cDNA coincided with: (i) surface expression of cynomolgus macaque CD38 by immunofluorescence; (ii) detection of ~42 and 84 kDa proteins by Western blot and (iii) the appearance of ecto-enzymatic activity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against the cynomolgus CD38 ectodomain and were either species-specific or cross-reactive with human CD38, in which case they were directed against a common disulfide-requiring conformational epitope that was mapped to the C-terminal disulfide loop. Conclusion This multi-faceted characterization of CD38 from cynomolgus macaque demonstrates its high genetic and biochemical similarities with human CD38 while the immunological comparison adds new insights into the dominant epitopes of the primate CD38 ectodomain. These results open new prospects for the biomedical and pharmacological investigations of this receptor-enzyme. PMID:15383153

  6. Emergence of Oseltamivir-Resistant H7N9 Influenza Viruses in Immunosuppressed Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Maki; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Uraki, Ryuta; Ito, Mutsumi; Nakajima, Noriko; Yamada, Shinya; Imai, Masaki; Kawakami, Eiryo; Tomita, Yuriko; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Itoh, Yasushi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Lopes, Tiago J S; Watanabe, Tokiko; Moncla, Louise H; Hasegawa, Hideki; Friedrich, Thomas C; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-09-01

    Antiviral compounds (eg, the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir) are invaluable for the treatment of individuals infected with influenza A viruses of the H7N9 subtype (A[H7N9]), which have infected and killed hundreds of persons. However, oseltamivir treatment often leads to the emergence of resistant viruses in immunocompromised individuals. To better understand the emergence and properties of oseltamivir-resistant A(H7N9) viruses in immunosuppressed individuals, we infected immunosuppressed cynomolgus macaques with an A(H7N9) virus and treated them with oseltamivir. Disease severity and mortality were higher in immunosuppressed than in immunocompetent animals. Oseltamivir treatment at 2 different doses reduced A(H7N9) viral titers in infected animals, but even high-dose oseltamivir did not block viral replication sufficiently to suppress the emergence of resistant variants. Some resistant variants were not appreciably attenuated in cultured cells, but an oseltamivir-resistant A(H7N9) virus did not transmit among ferrets. These findings are useful for the control of A(H7N9) virus infections in clinical settings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor and Bleeding in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Marnie G; El-Amin, Colette Kirk; Shively, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are associated with an increased bleeding risk in humans. This report describes a bleeding event in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) treated with the SSRI sertraline HCl (Zoloft). During the treatment course, the subject presented with a maculopapular rash, cutaneous bleeding, epistaxis, bleeding from the eye, melena, and a severe thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of an SSRI-related adverse event in a nonhuman primate. This report demonstrates that the clinical presentation of SSRI-associated bleeding in cynomolgus macaques is consistent with that reported in humans and that complications from SSRI treatment should be considered as a differential diagnosis for maculopapular dermatitis or spontaneous bleeding in this species. PMID:24956214

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and bleeding in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Marnie G; El-Amin, Colette Kirk; Shively, Carol A

    2014-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are associated with an increased bleeding risk in humans. This report describes a bleeding event in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) treated with the SSRI sertraline HCl (Zoloft). During the treatment course, the subject presented with a maculopapular rash, cutaneous bleeding, epistaxis, bleeding from the eye, melena, and a severe thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of an SSRI-related adverse event in a nonhuman primate. This report demonstrates that the clinical presentation of SSRI-associated bleeding in cynomolgus macaques is consistent with that reported in humans and that complications from SSRI treatment should be considered as a differential diagnosis for maculopapular dermatitis or spontaneous bleeding in this species.

  9. Lip salivary-gland hamartoma in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Morton, Daniel G

    2014-02-01

    An incidental, asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, solitary, submucosal nodular mass was detected on the mucosal surface of the inner lower lip in a female cynomolgus macaque (age, approximately 2.4 y) during a juvenile chronic toxicology study. Grossly, the nodule was soft with brown to tan discoloration and measured approximately 4 mm in diameter. Microscopically, the nodule was covered by normal stratified squamous epithelium and composed of well-circumscribed irregular lobules containing hyperplastic and normal-appearing mucinous salivary gland acini and ducts, which were separated by thick connective tissue septae. In light of the gross pathology and results of microscopic examination, salivary gland hamartoma was diagnosed. This lesion resembles adenomatoid hyperplasia of mucous salivary glands in humans, which is a rare nonneoplastic swelling. To our knowledge, this case description is the first report of a cynomolgus macaque with the rare entity of lip salivary gland hamartoma, which likely represents adenomatous hyperplasia in humans.

  10. Natural and cross-inducible anti-SIV antibodies in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhao; Nykoluk, Mikaela; Li, Lin; Liu, Lewis R; Omange, Robert W; Soule, Geoff; Schroeder, Lukas T; Toledo, Nikki; Kashem, Mohammad Abul; Correia-Pinto, Jorge F; Liang, Binhua; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Alonso, Maria J; Whitney, James B; Plummer, Francis A; Luo, Ma

    2017-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques are an increasingly important nonhuman primate model for HIV vaccine research. SIV-free animals without pre-existing anti-SIV immune responses are generally needed to evaluate the effect of vaccine-induced immune responses against the vaccine epitopes. Here, in order to select such animals for vaccine studies, we screened 108 naïve female Mauritian cynomolgus macaques for natural (baseline) antibodies to SIV antigens using a Bio-Plex multiplex system. The antigens included twelve 20mer peptides overlapping the twelve SIV protease cleavage sites (-10/+10), respectively (PCS peptides), and three non-PCS Gag or Env peptides. Natural antibodies to SIV antigens were detected in subsets of monkeys. The antibody reactivity to SIV was further confirmed by Western blot using purified recombinant SIV Gag and Env proteins. As expected, the immunization of monkeys with PCS antigens elicited anti-PCS antibodies. However, unexpectedly, antibodies to non-PCS peptides were also induced, as shown by both Bio-Plex and Western blot analyses, while the non-PCS peptides do not share sequence homology with PCS peptides. The presence of natural and vaccine cross-inducible SIV antibodies in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques should be considered in animal selection, experimental design and result interpretation, for their best use in HIV vaccine research.

  11. Extensive sharing of MHC class II alleles between rhesus and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Rouweler, Annemiek J M; de Groot, Natasja G; Louwerse, Annet; Otting, Nel; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2006-05-01

    In contrast to rhesus monkeys, substantial knowledge on cynomolgus monkey major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotypes is lacking. Therefore, 17 animals, including one pedigreed family, were thoroughly characterized for polymorphic Mhc class II region genes as well as their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Different cynomolgus macaque populations appear to exhibit unique mtDNA profiles reflecting their geographic origin. Within the present panel, 10 Mafa-DPB1, 14 Mafa-DQA1, 12 Mafa-DQB1, and 35 Mafa-DRB exon 2 sequences were identified. All of these alleles cluster into lineages that were previously described for rhesus macaques. Moreover, about half of the Mafa-DPB1, Mafa-DQA1, and Mafa-DQB1 alleles and one third of the Mafa-DRB exon 2 sequences are identical to rhesus macaque orthologues. Such a high level of Mhc class II allele sharing has not been reported for primate species. Pedigree analysis allowed the characterization of nine distinct Mafa class II haplotypes, and seven additional ones could be deduced. Two of these haplotypes harbor a duplication of the Mafa-DQB1 locus. Despite extensive allele sharing, rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys do not appear to possess identical Mhc class II haplotypes, thus illustrating that new haplotypes were generated after speciation by recombination-like processes.

  12. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Transplantation in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fasicularis).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kristin A; Tonsho, Makoto; Madsen, Joren C

    2015-08-01

    A 5.5-y-old intact male cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fasicularis) presented with inappetence and weight loss 57 d after heterotopic heart and thymus transplantation while receiving an immunosuppressant regimen consisting of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone to prevent graft rejection. A serum chemistry panel, a glycated hemoglobin test, and urinalysis performed at presentation revealed elevated blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (727 mg/dL and 10.1%, respectively), glucosuria, and ketonuria. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed, and insulin therapy was initiated immediately. The macaque was weaned off the immunosuppressive therapy as his clinical condition improved and stabilized. Approximately 74 d after discontinuation of the immunosuppressants, the blood glucose normalized, and the insulin therapy was stopped. The animal's blood glucose and HbA1c values have remained within normal limits since this time. We suspect that our macaque experienced new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation, a condition that is commonly observed in human transplant patients but not well described in NHP. To our knowledge, this report represents the first documented case of new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  13. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Anthony C.; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A.; Gooch, Karen E.; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J.; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A.; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J.; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J.; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Stewart, James P.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  14. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections.

  15. An HIV gp120-CD4 Immunogen Does Not Elicit Autoimmune Antibody Responses in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer A; Prado, Ilia; Misamore, Johnathan; Weiss, Deborah; Francis, Jesse; Pal, Ranajit; Huaman, Maria; Cristillo, Anthony; Lewis, George K; Gallo, Robert C; DeVico, Anthony L; Fouts, Timothy R

    2016-07-01

    A promising concept for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines focuses immunity on the highly conserved transition state structures and epitopes that appear when the HIV glycoprotein gp120 binds to its receptor, CD4. We are developing chimeric antigens (full-length single chain, or FLSC) in which gp120 and CD4 sequences are flexibly linked to allow stable intrachain complex formation between the two moieties (A. DeVico et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:17477-17482, 2007, doi:10.1073/pnas.0707399104; T. R. Fouts et al., J Virol 74:11427-11436, 2000, doi:10.1128/JVI.74.24.11427-11436.2000). Proof of concept studies with nonhuman primates show that FLSC elicited heterologous protection against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (T. R. Fouts et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112:E992-E999, 2016, doi:10.1073/pnas.1423669112), which correlated with antibodies against transition state gp120 epitopes. Nevertheless, advancement of any vaccine that comprises gp120-CD4 complexes must consider whether the CD4 component breaks tolerance and becomes immunogenic in the autologous host. To address this, we performed an immunotoxicology study with cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with either FLSC or a rhesus variant of FLSC containing macaque CD4 sequences (rhFLSC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) binding titers, primary CD3(+) T cell staining, and temporal trends in T cell subset frequencies served to assess whether anti-CD4 autoantibody responses were elicited by vaccination. We find that immunization with multiple high doses of rhFLSC did not elicit detectable antibody titers despite robust responses to rhFLSC. In accordance with these findings, immunized animals had no changes in circulating CD4(+) T cell counts or evidence of autoantibody reactivity with cell surface CD4 on primary naive macaque T cells. Collectively, these studies show that antigens using CD4 sequences to stabilize transition state gp120 structures

  16. An HIV gp120-CD4 Immunogen Does Not Elicit Autoimmune Antibody Responses in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer A.; Prado, Ilia; Misamore, Johnathan; Weiss, Deborah; Francis, Jesse; Pal, Ranajit; Huaman, Maria; Cristillo, Anthony; Lewis, George K.; Gallo, Robert C.; DeVico, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    A promising concept for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines focuses immunity on the highly conserved transition state structures and epitopes that appear when the HIV glycoprotein gp120 binds to its receptor, CD4. We are developing chimeric antigens (full-length single chain, or FLSC) in which gp120 and CD4 sequences are flexibly linked to allow stable intrachain complex formation between the two moieties (A. DeVico et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:17477–17482, 2007, doi:10.1073/pnas.0707399104; T. R. Fouts et al., J Virol 74:11427–11436, 2000, doi:10.1128/JVI.74.24.11427-11436.2000). Proof of concept studies with nonhuman primates show that FLSC elicited heterologous protection against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (T. R. Fouts et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112:E992–E999, 2016, doi:10.1073/pnas.1423669112), which correlated with antibodies against transition state gp120 epitopes. Nevertheless, advancement of any vaccine that comprises gp120-CD4 complexes must consider whether the CD4 component breaks tolerance and becomes immunogenic in the autologous host. To address this, we performed an immunotoxicology study with cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with either FLSC or a rhesus variant of FLSC containing macaque CD4 sequences (rhFLSC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) binding titers, primary CD3+ T cell staining, and temporal trends in T cell subset frequencies served to assess whether anti-CD4 autoantibody responses were elicited by vaccination. We find that immunization with multiple high doses of rhFLSC did not elicit detectable antibody titers despite robust responses to rhFLSC. In accordance with these findings, immunized animals had no changes in circulating CD4+ T cell counts or evidence of autoantibody reactivity with cell surface CD4 on primary naive macaque T cells. Collectively, these studies show that antigens using CD4 sequences to stabilize transition state gp120 structures

  17. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine

  18. Preclinical Development of Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Combination Immunotherapy: Mouse Tumor Models, In Vitro Functional Studies, and Cynomolgus Macaque Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Mark J.; Engelhardt, John J.; Johnston, Robert J.; Lu, Li-Sheng; Han, Minhua; Thudium, Kent; Yao, Dapeng; Quigley, Michael; Valle, Jose; Wang, Changyu; Chen, Bing; Cardarelli, Pina M.; Blanset, Diann; Korman, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) and nivolumab (anti-PD-1) have shown remarkable antitumor activity in an increasing number of cancers. When combined, ipilimumab and nivolumab have demonstrated superior activity in patients with metastatic melanoma (CHECKMATE-067). Here we describe the preclinical development strategy that predicted these clinical results. Synergistic antitumor activity in mouse MC38 and CT26 colorectal tumor models was observed with concurrent, but not sequential CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade. Significant antitumor activity was maintained using a fixed dose of anti-CTLA-4 antibody with decreasing doses of anti-PD-1 antibody in the MC38 model. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses confirmed that CD3+ T cells accumulated at the tumor margin and infiltrated the tumor mass in response to the combination therapy, resulting in favorable effector and regulatory T-cell ratios, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and activation of tumor-specific T cells. Similarly, in vitro studies with combined ipilimumab and nivolumab showed enhanced cytokine secretion in superantigen stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and in mixed lymphocyte response assays. In a cynomolgus macaque toxicology study, dose-dependent immune-related gastrointestinal inflammation was observed with the combination therapy; this response had not been observed in previous single agent cynomolgus studies. Together, these in vitro assays and in vivo models comprise a preclinical strategy for the identification and development of highly effective antitumor combination immunotherapies. PMID:27610613

  19. Severe Acquired Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia in a Female Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Parrula, Cecilia M; Mysore, Jagannatha; Burr, Holly; Freebern, Wendy; Neef, Natasha

    2015-06-01

    A 4-y-old female cynomolgus macaque presented for veterinary evaluation prior to placement in a preclinical study showed markedly low platelet counts that continued to decrease over time. Physical examination over the next several days showed areas of pale red discoloration in forelimbs, anterior thorax, and inguinal area and multifocal pinpoint areas of erythema or scabs. An area of dark red discoloration approximately 2 cm in diameter on the dorsal surface of the tongue was discovered on day 9. The macaque was euthanized, and histopathologic evaluation showed multifocal, ulcerative or erosive, hemorrhagic, lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic glossitis and tonsillitis. The lesions on the tongue were associated with opportunistic fungi consistent with Candida albicans. The bone marrow showed megakaryocytic hyperplasia. There was no evidence of increased consumption of platelets, sequestration of platelets, or bone marrow suppression. The monkey was serologically negative for simian retrovirus, SIV, and simian T-lymphotropic virus. In light of cases reported in humans, immune-mediated destruction of platelets due to autoantibodies secondary to Candida albicans infection was considered. However, we were unable to detect antiplatelet antibodies on the platelet surface or in serum to support this etiology; therefore idiopathic thrombocytopenia was diagnosed. To our knowledge, this case represents the second reported observation of acquired thrombocytopenia in a nonhuman primate and the first reported observation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  20. Exploring the potential of variola virus infection of cynomolgus macaques as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E; Martinez, Mark J; Leduc, James W; Rubins, Kathleen H; Relman, David A; Huggins, John W

    2004-10-19

    Smallpox virus (variola) poses a significant threat as an agent of bioterrorism. To mitigate this risk, antiviral drugs and an improved vaccine are urgently needed. Satisfactory demonstration of protective efficacy against authentic variola will require development of an animal model in which variola produces a disease course with features consistent with human smallpox. Toward this end, cynomolgus macaques were exposed to several variola strains through aerosol and/or i.v. routes. Two strains, Harper and India 7124, produced uniform acute lethality when inoculated i.v. in high doses (10(9) plaque-forming units). Lower doses resulted in less fulminant, systemic disease and lower mortality. Animals that died had profound leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum creatinine levels. After inoculation, variola was disseminated by means of a monocytic cell-associated viremia. Distribution of viral antigens by immunohistochemistry correlated with the presence of replicating viral particles demonstrated by electron microscopy and pathology in the lymphoid tissues, skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, reproductive system, and liver. These particles resembled those seen in human smallpox. High viral burdens in target tissues were associated with organ dysfunction and multisystem failure. Evidence of coagulation cascade activation (D dimers) corroborated histologic evidence of hemorrhagic diathesis. Depletion of T cell-dependent areas of lymphoid tissues occurred, probably as a consequence of bystander apoptotic mechanisms initiated by infected macrophages. Elaboration of cytokines, including IL-6 and IFN-gamma, contribute to a cytokine storm formerly known as "toxemia." A more precise understanding of disease pathogenesis should provide targets for therapeutic intervention, to be used alone or in combination with inhibitors of variola virus replication.

  1. Assessment and improvement of Indian-origin rhesus macaque and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaque genome annotations using deep transcriptome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinxia; Pipes, Lenore; Xiong, Hao; Green, Richard R.; Jones, Daniel C.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Schroth, Gary P.; Mason, Christopher E.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome annotations of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques, two of the most common nonhuman primate animal models, are limited. Methods We analyzed large-scale macaque RNA-based next-generation sequencing (RNAseq) data to identify un-annotated macaque transcripts. Results For both macaque species, we uncovered thousands of novel isoforms for annotated genes and thousands of un-annotated intergenic transcripts enriched with non-coding RNAs. We also identified thousands of transcript sequences which are partially or completely ‘missing’ from current macaque genome assemblies. We showed that many newly identified transcripts were differentially expressed during SIV infection of rhesus macaques or during Ebola virus infection of cynomolgus macaques. Conclusions For two important macaque species, we uncovered thousands of novel isoforms and un-annotated intergenic transcripts including coding and non-coding RNAs, polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated transcripts. This resource will greatly improve future macaque studies, as demonstrated by their applications in infectious disease studies. PMID:24810475

  2. Comparison of physiologic and pharmacologic parameters in Asian and mauritius cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kozlosky, John C; Mysore, Jagannatha; Clark, Shawn P; Burr, Holly N; Li, Jinze; Aranibar, Nelly; Vuppugalla, Ragini; West, Ronald C; Mangipudy, Raja S; Graziano, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    This comparative study was conducted to assess background physiologic and pharmacologic parameters of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Cambodia, from a mixed Asian source (Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia), and from Mauritius. This evaluation provides a comprehensive assessment of several of these parameters in a single study. Ten male and 10 female captive-bred, age-matched macaques from each source were evaluated. Criteria for evaluation included weight gain, assessment of drug metabolizing enzyme activity, metabolomic analysis, immunologic assessments (lymphocyte subsets, TDAR, and serum Ig isotyping), clinical pathology evaluations, physical (respiratory, neurologic, cardiovascular, and ophthalmologic) examinations, pathogen screening, organ weights, and gross and microscopic pathology analyses. The results of this evaluation indicate that, compared to macaques of Asian origin, macaques from Mauritius had the lowest incidence and/or severity of spontaneous pathologic findings in several organs and tissues (lymphoid organs, stomach, kidney, urothelium, heart, arteries and lung) and better testicular maturity at a given age with minimal variability in organ weights. Although slight differences were observed in other parameters, none were considered detrimental to the use of macaques of Asian or Mauritius origin in pharmaceutical candidate safety studies with the use of a consistent source, concomitant controls, and appropriate background knowledge and screening.

  3. Quantitative Comparison of Active and Latent Tuberculosis in the Cynomolgus Macaque Model▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Rodgers, Mark; Smith, Le'kneitah; Bigbee, Matthew; Myers, Amy; Bigbee, Carolyn; Chiosea, Ion; Capuano, Saverio V.; Fuhrman, Carl; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2009-01-01

    We previously described that low-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques results in a spectrum of disease similar to that of human infection: primary disease, latent infection, and reactivation tuberculosis (S. V. Capuano III, D. A. Croix, S. Pawar, A. Zinovik, A. Myers, P. L. Lin, S. Bissel, C. Fuhrman, E. Klein, and J. L. Flynn, Infect. Immun. 71:5831-5844, 2003). This is the only established model of latent infection, and it provides a unique opportunity to understand host and pathogen differences across of range of disease states. Here, we provide a more extensive and detailed characterization of the gross pathology, microscopic histopathology, and immunologic characteristics of monkeys in each clinical disease category. The data underscore the similarities between human and nonhuman primate M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, we describe novel methods of quantifying gross pathology and bacterial burden that distinguish between active disease and latent infection, and we extend the usefulness of this model for comparative studies. Early in infection, an abnormal chest X ray, M. tuberculosis growth by gastric aspirate, and increased mycobacterium-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were associated with the development of active disease. At necropsy, disease was quantified with respect to pathology and bacterial numbers. Microscopically, a spectrum of granuloma types are seen and differ with disease type. At necropsy, monkeys with active disease had more lung T cells and more IFN-γ from PBMC, BAL, and mediastinal lymph nodes than monkeys with latent infection. Finally, we have observed a spectrum of disease not only in monkeys with active disease but also in those with latent infection that provides insight into human latent tuberculosis. PMID:19620341

  4. Development of an Inhalational Bacillus anthracis Exposure Therapeutic Model in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jason E.; Stark, Gregory V.; Ray, Bryan D.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Knostman, Katherine A. B.; Meister, Gabriel T.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate animal models are required to test medical countermeasures to bioterrorist threats. To that end, we characterized a nonhuman primate (NHP) inhalational anthrax therapeutic model for use in testing anthrax therapeutic medical countermeasures according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule. A clinical profile was recorded for each NHP exposed to a lethal dose of Bacillus anthracis Ames spores. Specific diagnostic parameters were detected relatively early in disease progression, i.e., by blood culture (∼37 h postchallenge) and the presence of circulating protective antigen (PA) detected by electrochemiluminescence (ECL) ∼38 h postchallenge, whereas nonspecific clinical signs of disease, i.e., changes in body temperature, hematologic parameters (ca. 52 to 66 h), and clinical observations, were delayed. To determine whether the presentation of antigenemia (PA in the blood) was an appropriate trigger for therapeutic intervention, a monoclonal antibody specific for PA was administered to 12 additional animals after the circulating levels of PA were detected by ECL. Seventy-five percent of the monoclonal antibody-treated animals survived compared to 17% of the untreated controls, suggesting that intervention at the onset of antigenemia is an appropriate treatment trigger for this model. Moreover, the onset of antigenemia correlated with bacteremia, and NHPs were treated in a therapeutic manner. Interestingly, brain lesions were observed by histopathology in the treated nonsurviving animals, whereas this observation was absent from 90% of the nonsurviving untreated animals. Our results support the use of the cynomolgus macaque as an appropriate therapeutic animal model for assessing the efficacy of medical countermeasures developed against anthrax when administered after a confirmation of infection. PMID:22956657

  5. Pathogenesis of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Geisbert, Thomas W.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Larsen, Tom; Young, Howard A.; Reed, Douglas S.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Scott, Dana P.; Kagan, Elliott; Jahrling, Peter B.; Davis, Kelly J.

    2003-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infection causes a severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease that in many ways appears to be similar in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of EBOV hemorrhagic fever. In the present study, 21 cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with EBOV and examined sequentially over a 6-day period to investigate the pathological events of EBOV infection that lead to death. Importantly, dendritic cells in lymphoid tissues were identified as early and sustained targets of EBOV, implicating their important role in the immunosuppression characteristic of EBOV infections. Bystander lymphocyte apoptosis, previously described in end-stage tissues, occurred early in the disease-course in intravascular and extravascular locations. Of note, apoptosis and loss of NK cells was a prominent finding, suggesting the importance of innate immunity in determining the fate of the host. Analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression showed temporal increases in tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and Fas transcripts, revealing a possible mechanism for the observed bystander apoptosis, while up-regulation of NAIP and cIAP2 mRNA suggest that EBOV has evolved additional mechanisms to resist host defenses by inducing protective transcripts in cells that it infects. The sequence of pathogenetic events identified in this study should provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:14633608

  6. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Lower respiratory tract infection in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) infected with group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Randall J; Ashraf, Madiha; Gonulal, Vedia E; Ayeras, Ara A; Cantu, Concepcion; Shea, Patrick R; Carroll, Ronan K; Humbird, Tammy; Greaver, Jamieson L; Swain, Jody L; Chang, Ellen; Ragasa, Willie; Jenkins, Leslie; Lally, Kevin P; Blasdel, Terry; Cagle, Philip; Musser, James M

    2010-12-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a human-specific pathogen, is best known for causing pharyngitis ("strep-throat") and necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating disease"). However, the organism is also an uncommon but important cause of community-acquired bronchopneumonia, an infection with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Inasmuch as little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of GAS lower respiratory tract infection, we sought to develop a relevant human infection model. Nine cynomolgus macaques were infected by intra-bronchial instillation of either sterile saline or GAS (10(5) or 10(7) CFU). Animals were continuously monitored and sacrificed at five days post-inoculation. Serial bronchial alveolar lavage specimens and tissues collected at necropsy were used for histologic and immunohistochemical examination, quantitative microbial culture, lung and blood biomarker analysis, and in vivo GAS gene expression studies. The lower respiratory tract disease observed in cynomolgus macaques mimicked the clinical and pathological features of severe GAS bronchopneumonia in humans. This new monkey model will be useful for testing hypotheses bearing on the molecular pathogenesis of GAS in the lower respiratory tract. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression profile of early estradiol-responsive genes in cynomolgus macaque liver: implications for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Kito, Go; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen plays important roles in estrogen-responsive tissues, such as mammary glands, ovaries, and the uterus. In the liver, the major drug metabolizing organ, estrogen is known to regulate expression of some drug-metabolizing enzymes. Due to the lack of information on the role of estrogen in hepatic gene expression in primate species, we previously investigated the late response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol in cynomolgus macaques. To understand the early response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol, in this study, microarray analysis was conducted using cynomolgus macaque liver samples collected at 1 h and 5 h after estradiol injection. Comparison of expression profiles in estradiol and solvent (control)-treated ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques revealed 27 differentially expressed genes (>2.0-fold), including 18 at 1 h and 9 at 5 h after estradiol injection. As indicated by Gene Ontology analysis, these genes were related to oxidoreductase activity and transferase activity, partly representing important aspects of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Further analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that estradiol down-regulated CYP2A24, CYP2C76, and CYP2E1 (>2.0-fold) at 1 h and up-regulated GSTM5 (>2.0-fold) at 5 h after estradiol injection. These results suggest that the short-term estradiol treatment influenced expression of hepatic genes, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes, in cynomolgus macaque liver.

  9. The whole mitochondrial genome of the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilei; Wang, Huawei; Yang, Liqin; Zhang, Baoming; Li, Yijiang; Hu, Jiansheng; Kong, Qingpeng

    2015-04-01

    Macaca fascicularis, known as the long-tailed macaque, is widely distributed in southern of East Asia and Southeast Asia. It was one of the most commonly used non-human primates in biomedical research. Thus, to illustrate the maternal phylogenetic status of M. fascicularis in primates based on the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome and determine a reference sequence for future population genetic studies by taking mtDNA as molecular marker, in this study, the high quality whole mtDNA genome of M. fascicularis was amplified and sequenced. Our data showed that the whole mtDNA genome of M. fascicularis includes 16,571 base pairs (bps). Further phylogenetic analyses of M. fascicularis were performed by incorporating the 83 available whole mtDNA genomes belonging to 77 primate species with Tupaia belangeri as out-group. Our result supported that M. fascicularis belongs to Macaca. Cercopithecinae. Cercopithecidae. Anthropoidea. Primates, which has the closest genetic affinity with Macaca mulatta. In addition, the ancestral divergence between the tarsier and other primate species was supported with evidence from the whole mtDNA genomes.

  10. Particle-to-PFU ratio of Ebola virus influences disease course and survival in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Alfson, Kendra J; Avena, Laura E; Beadles, Michael W; Staples, Hilary; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Ticer, Anysha; Dick, Edward J; Owston, Michael A; Reed, Christopher; Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony

    2015-07-01

    This study addresses the role of Ebola virus (EBOV) specific infectivity in virulence. Filoviruses are highly lethal, enveloped, single-stranded negative-sense RNA viruses that can cause hemorrhagic fever. No approved vaccines or therapies exist for filovirus infections, and infectious virus must be handled in maximum containment. Efficacy testing of countermeasures, in addition to investigations of pathogenicity and immune response, often requires a well-characterized animal model. For EBOV, an obstacle in performing accurate disease modeling is a poor understanding of what constitutes an infectious dose in animal models. One well-recognized consequence of viral passage in cell culture is a change in specific infectivity, often measured as a particle-to-PFU ratio. Here, we report that serial passages of EBOV in cell culture resulted in a decrease in particle-to-PFU ratio. Notably, this correlated with decreased potency in a lethal cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of infection; animals were infected with the same viral dose as determined by plaque assay, but animals that received more virus particles exhibited increased disease. This suggests that some particles are unable to form a plaque in a cell culture assay but are able to result in lethal disease in vivo. These results have a significant impact on how future studies are designed to model EBOV disease and test countermeasures. Ebola virus (EBOV) can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with a high case-fatality rate, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Specific infectivity can be considered the total number of viral particles per PFU, and its impact on disease is poorly understood. In stocks of most mammalian viruses, there are particles that are unable to complete an infectious cycle or unable to cause cell pathology in cultured cells. We asked if these particles cause disease in nonhuman primates by infecting monkeys with equal infectious doses of genetically identical stocks

  11. Particle-to-PFU Ratio of Ebola Virus Influences Disease Course and Survival in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Alfson, Kendra J.; Avena, Laura E.; Beadles, Michael W.; Staples, Hilary; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Ticer, Anysha; Dick, Edward J.; Owston, Michael A.; Reed, Christopher; Patterson, Jean L.; Carrion, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study addresses the role of Ebola virus (EBOV) specific infectivity in virulence. Filoviruses are highly lethal, enveloped, single-stranded negative-sense RNA viruses that can cause hemorrhagic fever. No approved vaccines or therapies exist for filovirus infections, and infectious virus must be handled in maximum containment. Efficacy testing of countermeasures, in addition to investigations of pathogenicity and immune response, often requires a well-characterized animal model. For EBOV, an obstacle in performing accurate disease modeling is a poor understanding of what constitutes an infectious dose in animal models. One well-recognized consequence of viral passage in cell culture is a change in specific infectivity, often measured as a particle-to-PFU ratio. Here, we report that serial passages of EBOV in cell culture resulted in a decrease in particle-to-PFU ratio. Notably, this correlated with decreased potency in a lethal cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of infection; animals were infected with the same viral dose as determined by plaque assay, but animals that received more virus particles exhibited increased disease. This suggests that some particles are unable to form a plaque in a cell culture assay but are able to result in lethal disease in vivo. These results have a significant impact on how future studies are designed to model EBOV disease and test countermeasures. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus (EBOV) can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with a high case-fatality rate, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Specific infectivity can be considered the total number of viral particles per PFU, and its impact on disease is poorly understood. In stocks of most mammalian viruses, there are particles that are unable to complete an infectious cycle or unable to cause cell pathology in cultured cells. We asked if these particles cause disease in nonhuman primates by infecting monkeys with equal infectious doses of genetically

  12. Causes of obesity in captive cynomolgus macaques: influence of body condition, social and management factors on behaviour around feeding.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S A; Pearl, D L; Leslie, K E; Fournier, J; Turner, P V

    2012-07-01

    Similar to other primate species, captive cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are prone to becoming overweight. The relationship between body condition and feeding behaviour in group-housed animals has not been reported. This study evaluated the effect of daily feeding routines on behaviour patterns in cynomolgus macaques to determine whether overweight macaques displayed different behaviours and activity levels. In this prospective observational study, 16 macaques (m = 4, f = 12) from four separate troops (n = 4 per troop) were selected from a colony of 165 animals. Observational data were collected over six months during morning and afternoon feedings by scan sampling. Behaviours of interest included foraging, eating, aggressive and positive social interactions, inactivity and physical activities. Multivariable mixed logistic regression modelling was used for data analysis. Results indicated that overweight animals were more likely to be inactive, dominant animals had increased probabilities of eating compared with non-dominants, and aggressive behaviours were more likely to occur in the morning and before feeding, suggesting feeding anticipation. Positive social interaction before feeding was seen and may be a strategy used to avoid aggressive encounters around food resources. Individual animal caregivers had an unintentional impact on behaviour, as decreased eating and an increase in inactivity were noted when certain individuals fed animals. These findings illustrate the complexities of feeding group-housed cynomolgus macaques to avoid overweight body condition. Feeding routines may require more care and attention to distribute food in a way that ensures equitable food intake among troop animals, while not disturbing group cohesion.

  13. Experimental Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) with Human Varicella-Zoster Virus

    PubMed Central

    Willer, David O.; Ambagala, Aruna P. N.; Pilon, Richard; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Fournier, Jocelyn; Brooks, James; Sandstrom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the alphaherpesvirus family and the causative agent of chickenpox and shingles. To determine the utility of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) as a nonhuman primate model to evaluate VZV-based simian immunodeficiency virus/human immunodeficiency virus (SIV/HIV) vaccines, we experimentally inoculated 10 animals with the parental Oka (Oka-P) strain of VZV derived from MeWo or Telo-RF cells. VZV DNA could be detected in the lungs as late as 4 days postinfection, with replicating virus detected by shell vial culture assay in one case. Infection did not result in any overt clinical symptoms but was characterized by humoral and cell-mediated immunity in a time frame and at a magnitude similar to those observed following VZV vaccination in humans. The cell line source of VZV inoculum influenced both the magnitude and polyfunctionality of cell-mediated immunity. Animals mounted a vigorous anamnestic antibody response following a second inoculation 12 weeks later. Inoculations resulted in transient increases in CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as a sustained increase in CD4+ T cells coexpressing CCR5 and α4β7 integrin. In contrast to previous failed attempts to successfully utilize attenuated VZV-Oka as an SIV vaccine vector in rhesus macaques due to suboptimal infectivity and cellular immunogenicity, the ability to infect cynomolgus macaques with Oka-P VZV should provide a valuable tool for evaluating VZV-vectored SIV/HIV vaccines. PMID:22258257

  14. The TB-specific CD4+ T cell immune repertoire in both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques largely overlap with humans

    PubMed Central

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Dow, Courtney; Dillon, Myles B.C.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Bohn, Patrick; Karl, Julie; Golden, Nadia A.; Gilpin, Trey; Foreman, Taylor W.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Mehra, Smriti; Scriba, Thomas J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kaushal, Deepak; O’Connor, David H.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Non-human primate (NHP) models of tuberculosis (TB) immunity and pathogenesis, especially rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, are particularly attractive because of the high similarity of the human and macaque immune systems. However, little is known about the MHC class II epitopes recognized in macaques, thus hindering the establishment of immune correlates of immunopathology and protective vaccination. We characterized immune responses in rhesus macaques vaccinated against and/or infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), to a panel of antigens currently in human vaccine trials. We defined 54 new immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes, and noted that antigens immunodominant in humans are also immunodominant in rhesus macaques, including Rv3875 (ESAT-6) and Rv3874 (CFP10). Pedigree and inferred restriction analysis demonstrated that this phenomenon was not due to common ancestry or inbreeding, but rather presentation by common alleles, as well as, promiscuous binding. Experiments using a second cohort of rhesus macaques demonstrated that a pool of epitopes defined in the previous experiments can be used to detect T cell responses in over 75% of individual monkeys. Additionally, 100% of cynomolgus macaques, irrespective of their latent or active TB status, responded to rhesus and human defined epitope pools. Thus, these findings reveal an unexpected general repertoire overlap between MHC class II epitopes recognized in both species of macaques and in humans, showing that epitope pools defined in humans can also be used to characterize macaque responses, despite differences in species and antigen exposure. The results have general implications for the evaluation of new vaccines and diagnostics in NHPs, and immediate applicability in the setting of macaque models of TB. PMID:26526557

  15. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Killeen, Stephanie Z; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C; Roy, Chad J

    2015-05-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine's ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype.

  16. Delayed Disease Progression in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Ebola Virus Makona Strain.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Günther, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-10-01

    In late 2013, the largest documented outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever started in Guinea and has since spread to neighboring countries, resulting in almost 27,000 cases and >11,000 deaths in humans. In March 2014, Ebola virus (EBOV) was identified as the causative agent. This study compares the pathogenesis of a new EBOV strain, Makona, which was isolated in Guinea in 2014 with the prototype strain from the 1976 EBOV outbreak in the former Zaire. Both strains cause lethal disease in cynomolgus macaques with similar pathologic changes and hallmark features of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. However, disease progression was delayed in EBOV-Makona-infected animals, suggesting decreased rather than increased virulence of this most recent EBOV strain.

  17. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine’s ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype. PMID:26020513

  18. A simple and safe technique for longitudinal bone marrow aspiration in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Spångberg, Mats; Martinez, Paola; Fredlund, Helene; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Sundling, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Longitudinal bone marrow aspirates were obtained aseptically from the humerus of 36 rhesus and 6 cynomolgus macaques by using a 20G spinal needle, introduced through the bone close to the greater tuberosity. All samplings were performed without complications, and the animals showed no signs of pain or infections. The amount of total bone marrow cells obtained from each aspiration varied, in part due to animal-to-animal variation, but the yields were not affected by the sampling frequency or the length of time between each aspiration. The frequency of plasma cells in the bone marrow of each animal was also fairly stable over several longitudinal samplings while a greater, age-dependent, variation was observed between different animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Maiello, Pauline; Gideon, Hannah P.; Cadena, Anthony M.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Gregg, Robert; O’Malley, Melanie; Fillmore, Daniel; Frye, L. James; Rutledge, Tara; DiFazio, Robert M.; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Andersen, Peter L.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT) of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26) before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25). Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection. PMID:27379816

  20. Effects of B Cell Depletion on Early Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Jiayao; Wong, Eileen A.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Maiello, Pauline; Coleman, M. Teresa; Hendricks, Matthew R.; Ruden, Rachel; Cirrincione, Lauren R.; Chan, John; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies in mice have shown that components of B cell and humoral immunity can modulate the immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the roles of these components in human and nonhuman primate infections are unknown. The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of M. tuberculosis infection closely mirrors the infection outcomes and pathology in human tuberculosis (TB). The present study used rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to deplete B cells in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques to examine the contribution of B cells and humoral immunity to the control of TB in nonhuman primates during the acute phase of infection. While there was no difference in the overall pathology, disease profession, and clinical outcome between the rituximab-treated and untreated macaques in acute infection, analyzing individual granulomas revealed that B cell depletion resulted in altered local T cell and cytokine responses, increased bacterial burden, and lower levels of inflammation. There were elevated frequencies of T cells producing interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, and IL-17 and decreased IL-6 and IL-10 levels within granulomas from B cell-depleted animals. The effects of B cell depletion varied among granulomas in an individual animal, as well as among animals, underscoring the previously reported heterogeneity of local immunologic characteristics of tuberculous granulomas in nonhuman primates. Taken together, our data clearly showed that B cells can modulate the local granulomatous response in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques during acute infection. The impact of these alterations on disease progression and outcome in the chronic phase remains to be determined. PMID:26883591

  1. Expression of cytochromes p450 in fetal, infant, and juvenile liver of cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Kondo, Satoshi; Kato, Hiroto; Imai, Noritaka; Akiyama, Hideo; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical data of fetal, infant, and juvenile animals are important for the prediction of drug toxicity in fetuses and children. However, expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochromes P450 (CYPs), have not been fully investigated in fetal, infant, or juvenile liver of the cynomolgus macaque, an animal species important for preclinical studies. In this study, hepatic expression of 20 cynomolgus macaque CYPs (mfCYPs) in the CYP1-4 subfamilies that are relevant to drug metabolism was measured in fetuses, infants, and juveniles using DNA microarrays. Expression of most mfCYPs, including those moderately or abundantly expressed in postnatal livers such as mfCYP2A23, mfCYP2A24, mfCYP2B6, mfCYP2C9, mfCYP2C19, mfCYP2C76, mfCYP2D17, mfCYP2E1 mfCYP3A4, and mfCYP3A5, was much less abundant in fetal livers, but increased substantially after birth. In contrast, expression of mfCYP2C8 in fetal livers was not substantially different from postnatal livers. Since human CYP3A7 is expressed more abundantly in fetal livers than in adult livers, mfCYP3A7, an ortholog of human CYP3A7, was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of mfCYP3A7 in fetal livers was much lower than that in postnatal livers, and greatly increased after birth, unlike the expression of human CYP3A7. These results indicate that expression of most mfCYPs examined was low in fetal livers, but increased greatly in postnatal livers, with a few exceptions such as mfCYP2C8.

  2. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed.

  3. Comparison of pathogenicities of H7 avian influenza viruses via intranasal and conjunctival inoculation in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Shichinohe, Shintaro; Itoh, Yasushi; Nakayama, Misako; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Soda, Kosuke; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2016-06-01

    The outbreak of H7N9 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in China has attracted attention to H7 influenza virus infection in humans. Since we have shown that the pathogenicity of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza viruses in macaques was almost the same as that in humans, we compared the pathogenicities of H7 avian influenza viruses in cynomolgus macaques via intranasal and conjunctival inoculation, which mimics natural infection in humans. H7N9 virus, as well as H7N7 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, showed more efficient replication and higher pathogenicity in macaques than did H7N1 and H7N3 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. These results are different from pathogenicity in chickens as reported previously. Therefore, our results obtained in macaques help to estimate the pathogenicity of H7 avian influenza viruses in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme Ml; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge.

  5. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme ML; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge. PMID:27933307

  6. Reproductive success of wild-caught and captive-bred cynomolgus macaques at a breeding facility.

    PubMed

    Levallois, Laurent; de Marigny, Sandra Desvaux

    2015-10-01

    The revised European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes encourages the scientific community to consider the feasibility of transitioning from the use of wild-caught breeders toward the exclusive use of captive-born breeders in non-human primate breeding centers. Little is known about how such a transition will affect animal health, productivity and accompanying husbandry practices. These concerns are important both for the efficient operation of a breeding facility and for the optimal welfare of the animals in its care. The authors analyzed records of wild-caught and captive-born female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used for breeding at a facility between 2006 and 2011. Productivity was measured by proportional birth rate and interbirth interval; perinatal mortality was quantified by cause and type of death; and body condition was estimated using recorded visual assessments. Captive-born breeders generally showed lower productivity, higher perinatal mortality and poorer body condition than wild-caught breeders in the same husbandry conditions. These findings indicate that facilities transitioning to the use of captive-born macaques in breeding might need to explore new and revised husbandry strategies that address potential developmental and behavioral differences of captive-born breeders.

  7. Definition of Mafa-A and -B haplotypes in pedigreed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Otting, Nel; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2009-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I B gene/allelic repertoire was investigated in a pedigreed population of cynomolgus macaques of mixed Indonesian/Malaysian origin. The Mafa-B alleles detected in this cohort are mostly specific for a given geographic area, and only a small number of alleles appears to be shared with other populations. This suggests the fast evolution of Mafa-B alleles due to adaptation to new environments. In contrast to humans, the B locus in Old World monkeys displays extensive copy number variation. The Mafa-B and previously defined -A gene combinations segregate in families and thus allowed the definition of extended haplotypes. In many cases it was possible to assign a particular Mafa-I allele to one of these Mafa-A/B haplotypes as well. The presence of a large number of stable haplotypes in this cohort of animals, which was pedigreed for up to eight generations, looks promising for developing discriminative MHC typing tools that are less cumbersome. Furthermore, the discovery of 53 unreported Mafa-B sequences expands the lexicon of alleles significantly, and may help in understanding the complex organisation of the macaque B region.

  8. Expression profile of hepatic genes in cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia, China, and Indonesia: implications for cytochrome P450 genes.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Nakanishi, Yasuharu; Kohara, Sakae; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Nagata, Ryoichi; Fukuzaki, Koichiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Nakamura, Chika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques, frequently used in drug metabolism studies, are bred mainly in the countries of Asia; however, comparative studies of drug metabolism between cynomolgus macaques bred in these countries have not been conducted. In this study, hepatic gene expression profiles of cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia (mfCAM), China (mfCHN), and Indonesia (mfIDN) were analyzed. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of most hepatic genes, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes, was not substantially different between mfCAM, mfCHN, and mfIDN; only 1.1% and 3.0% of all the gene probes detected differential expression (>2.5-fold) in mfCAM compared with mfCHN and mfIDN, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression levels of 14 cytochromes P450 (P450s) important for drug metabolism did not differ (>2.5-fold) in mfCAM, mfCHN, and mfIDN, validating the microarray data. In contrast, expression of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 differed (>2.5-fold, p < 0.05) between cynomolgus (mfCAM, mfCHN, or mfIDN) and rhesus macaques, indicating greater differences in expression of P450 genes between the two lineages. Moreover, metabolic activities measured using 14 P450 substrates did not differ substantially (<1.5-fold) between mfCAM and mfCHN. These results suggest that gene expression profiles, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes such as P450 genes, are similar in mfCAM, mfCHN, and mfIDN.

  9. Characterization of T Cells Specific for CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mauritian Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Amy; Balgeman, Alexis; Rodgers, Mark; Updike, Cassaundra; Tomko, Jaime; Maiello, Pauline; Scanga, Charles A; O'Connor, Shelby L

    2017-04-01

    Nonhuman primates can be used to study host immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mauritian cynomolgus macaques (MCMs) are a unique group of animals that have limited major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genetic diversity, such that MHC-identical animals can be infected with M. tuberculosis Two MCMs homozygous for the relatively common M1 MHC haplotype were bronchoscopically infected with 41 CFU of the M. tuberculosis Erdman strain. Four other MCMs, which had at least one copy of the M1 MHC haplotype, were infected with a lower dose of 3 CFU M. tuberculosis All animals mounted similar T-cell responses to CFP-10 and ESAT-6. Two epitopes in CFP-10 were characterized, and the MHC class II alleles restricting them were determined. A third epitope in CFP-10 was identified but exhibited promiscuous restriction. The CFP-10 and ESAT-6 antigenic regions targeted by T cells in MCMs were comparable to those seen in cases of human M. tuberculosis infection. Our data lay the foundation for generating tetrameric molecules to study epitope-specific CD4 T cells in M. tuberculosis-infected MCMs, which may guide future testing of tuberculosis vaccines in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. A chimeric Sindbis-based vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against a lethal aerosol challenge of eastern equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Adams, A. Paige; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Seymour, Robert L.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Mega, William; Frolov, Ilya; Didier, Peter J.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes sporadic, often fatal disease outbreaks in humans and equids, and is also a biological threat agent. Two chimeric vaccine candidates were constructed using a cDNA clone with a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone and structural protein genes from either a North (SIN/NAEEEV) or South American (SIN/SAEEEV) strain of EEEV. The vaccine candidates were tested in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). Cynomolgus macaques were either sham-vaccinated, or vaccinated with a single dose of either SIN/NAEEEV or SIN/SAEEEV. After vaccination, animals were challenged by aerosol with a virulent North American strain of EEEV (NA EEEV). The SIN/NAEEEV vaccine provided significant protection, and most vaccinated animals survived EEEV challenge (82%) with little evidence of disease, whereas most SIN/SAEEEV-vaccinated (83%) and control (100%) animals died. Protected animals exhibited minimal changes in temperature and cardiovascular rhythm, whereas unprotected animals showed profound hyperthermia and changes in heart rate post-exposure. Acute inflammation and neuronal necrosis were consistent with EEEV-induced encephalitis in unprotected animals, whereas no encephalitis-related histopathologic changes were observed in the SIN/NAEEEV-vaccinated animals. These results demonstrate that the chimeric SIN/NAEEEV vaccine candidate protects against an aerosol EEEV exposure. PMID:23333212

  11. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of lymph node, spleen, and thymus transcriptome from wild Peninsular Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Ee Uli, Joey; Yong, Christina Seok Yien; Yeap, Swee Keong; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J.; Mat Isa, Nurulfiza; Tan, Soon Guan

    2017-01-01

    The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is an extensively utilised nonhuman primate model for biomedical research due to its biological, behavioural, and genetic similarities to humans. Genomic information of cynomolgus macaque is vital for research in various fields; however, there is presently a shortage of genomic information on the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque. This study aimed to sequence, assemble, annotate, and profile the Peninsular Malaysian cynomolgus macaque transcriptome derived from three tissues (lymph node, spleen, and thymus) using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. A total of 174,208,078 paired end 70 base pair sequencing reads were obtained from the Illumina Hi-Seq 2500 sequencer. The overall mapping percentage of the sequencing reads to the M. fascicularis reference genome ranged from 53–63%. Categorisation of expressed genes to Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway categories revealed that GO terms with the highest number of associated expressed genes include Cellular process, Catalytic activity, and Cell part, while for pathway categorisation, the majority of expressed genes in lymph node, spleen, and thymus fall under the Global overview and maps pathway category, while 266, 221, and 138 genes from lymph node, spleen, and thymus were respectively enriched in the Immune system category. Enriched Immune system pathways include Platelet activation pathway, Antigen processing and presentation, B cell receptor signalling pathway, and Intestinal immune network for IgA production. Differential gene expression analysis among the three tissues revealed 574 differentially expressed genes (DEG) between lymph and spleen, 5402 DEGs between lymph and thymus, and 7008 DEGs between spleen and thymus. Venn diagram analysis of expressed genes revealed a total of 2,630, 253, and 279 tissue-specific genes respectively for lymph node, spleen, and thymus tissues. This is the first time the lymph node, spleen, and thymus transcriptome of the Peninsular

  12. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of lymph node, spleen, and thymus transcriptome from wild Peninsular Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Ee Uli, Joey; Yong, Christina Seok Yien; Yeap, Swee Keong; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J; Mat Isa, Nurulfiza; Tan, Soon Guan; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2017-01-01

    The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is an extensively utilised nonhuman primate model for biomedical research due to its biological, behavioural, and genetic similarities to humans. Genomic information of cynomolgus macaque is vital for research in various fields; however, there is presently a shortage of genomic information on the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque. This study aimed to sequence, assemble, annotate, and profile the Peninsular Malaysian cynomolgus macaque transcriptome derived from three tissues (lymph node, spleen, and thymus) using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. A total of 174,208,078 paired end 70 base pair sequencing reads were obtained from the Illumina Hi-Seq 2500 sequencer. The overall mapping percentage of the sequencing reads to the M. fascicularis reference genome ranged from 53-63%. Categorisation of expressed genes to Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway categories revealed that GO terms with the highest number of associated expressed genes include Cellular process, Catalytic activity, and Cell part, while for pathway categorisation, the majority of expressed genes in lymph node, spleen, and thymus fall under the Global overview and maps pathway category, while 266, 221, and 138 genes from lymph node, spleen, and thymus were respectively enriched in the Immune system category. Enriched Immune system pathways include Platelet activation pathway, Antigen processing and presentation, B cell receptor signalling pathway, and Intestinal immune network for IgA production. Differential gene expression analysis among the three tissues revealed 574 differentially expressed genes (DEG) between lymph and spleen, 5402 DEGs between lymph and thymus, and 7008 DEGs between spleen and thymus. Venn diagram analysis of expressed genes revealed a total of 2,630, 253, and 279 tissue-specific genes respectively for lymph node, spleen, and thymus tissues. This is the first time the lymph node, spleen, and thymus transcriptome of the Peninsular

  13. Optimization of HIV-1 Envelope DNA Vaccine Candidates within Three Different Animal Models, Guinea Pigs, Rabbits and Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Vinner, Lasse; Andresen, Betina Skovgaard; Grevstad, Berit; Repits, Johanna; Melchers, Mark; Elvang, Tara Laura; Sanders, Rogier W; Martinon, Frédéric; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Bowles, Emma Joanne; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Biswas, Priscilla; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Heyndrickx, Leo; Le Grand, Roger; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 DNA vaccines have many advantageous features. Evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates often starts in small animal models before macaque and human trials. Here, we selected and optimized DNA vaccine candidates through systematic testing in rabbits for the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb). We compared three different animal models: guinea pigs, rabbits and cynomolgus macaques. Envelope genes from the prototype isolate HIV-1 Bx08 and two elite neutralizers were included. Codon-optimized genes, encoded secreted gp140 or membrane bound gp150, were modified for expression of stabilized soluble trimer gene products, and delivered individually or mixed. Specific IgG after repeated i.d. inoculations with electroporation confirmed in vivo expression and immunogenicity. Evaluations of rabbits and guinea pigs displayed similar results. The superior DNA construct in rabbits was a trivalent mix of non-modified codon-optimized gp140 envelope genes. Despite NAb responses with some potency and breadth in guinea pigs and rabbits, the DNA vaccinated macaques displayed less bNAb activity. It was concluded that a trivalent mix of non-modified gp140 genes from rationally selected clinical isolates was, in this study, the best option to induce high and broad NAb in the rabbit model, but this optimization does not directly translate into similar responses in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:26344115

  14. Longitudinal analysis of the group A Streptococcus transcriptome in experimental pharyngitis in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Virtaneva, Kimmo; Porcella, Stephen F.; Graham, Morag R.; Ireland, Robin M.; Johnson, Claire A.; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Babar, Imran; Parkins, Larye D.; Romero, Romina A.; Corn, G. Judson; Gardner, Don J.; Bailey, John R.; Parnell, Michael J.; Musser, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Identification of the genetic events that contribute to host–pathogen interactions is important for understanding the natural history of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics. Transcriptome studies conducted on pathogens have been central to this goal in recent years. However, most of these investigations have focused on specific end points or disease phases, rather than analysis of the entire time course of infection. To gain a more complete understanding of how bacterial gene expression changes over time in a primate host, the transcriptome of group A Streptococcus (GAS) was analyzed during an 86-day infection protocol in 20 cynomolgus macaques with experimental pharyngitis. The study used 260 custom Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) chips, and data were confirmed by TaqMan analysis. Colonization, acute, and asymptomatic phases of disease were identified. Successful colonization and severe inflammation were significantly correlated with an early onset of superantigen gene expression. The differential expression of two-component regulators covR and spy0680 (M1_spy0874) was significantly associated with GAS colony-forming units, inflammation, and phases of disease. Prophage virulence gene expression and prophage induction occurred predominantly during high pathogen cell densities and acute inflammation. We discovered that temporal changes in the GAS transcriptome were integrally linked to the phase of clinical disease and host-defense response. Knowledge of the gene expression patterns characterizing each phase of pathogen–host interaction provides avenues for targeted investigation of proven and putative virulence factors and genes of unknown function and will assist vaccine research. PMID:15956184

  15. Nonsurgical repair of a pseudoaneurysm in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Daviau, Judith S; Merton, Daniel A

    2010-09-01

    A cynomolgus macaque presented with an ecchymotic and edematous left leg approximately 1 wk after a blood sample had been collected from the left femoral vein. Ecchymosis was noted in the femoral triangle, prepuce, and scrotum. The animal was not febrile or exhibiting signs of pain or distress. Duplex Doppler ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate the area. An arteriovenous fistula between the femoral artery and vein, accompanied by a pseudoaneurysm arising from the femoral artery, was identified. Various invasive and noninvasive treatment options for the pseudoaneurysm, including surgical repair, thrombin injection, stent placement, and ultrasound-guided compression repair (UGCR), were considered. UGCR was chosen as the first option for treatment. After a total of 20 min of UGCR at the neck of the pseudoaneurysm, complete thrombosis was achieved. Subsequent imaging of the lesion revealed resolution of the pseudoaneurysm. Because of the risks involved with invasive management techniques for this vascular lesion, UGCR is a valuable noninvasive treatment option for the repair of pseudoaneurysms.

  16. Gene expression profiling in the Cynomolgus macaque Macaca fascicularis shows variation within the normal birth range.

    PubMed

    Emerald, Bright Starling; Chng, Keefe; Masuda, Shinya; Sloboda, Deborah M; Vickers, Mark H; Kambadur, Ravi; Gluckman, Peter D

    2011-10-16

    Although an adverse early-life environment has been linked to an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered disease susceptibility as well as their relevance to humans are largely unknown. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that these effects operate within the normal range of birth weights and involve mechanisms of developmental palsticity rather than pathology. To explore this further, we utilised a non-human primate model Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) which shares with humans the same progressive history of the metabolic syndrome. Using microarray we compared tissues from neonates in the average birth weight (50-75th centile) to those of lower birth weight (5-25th centile) and studied the effect of different growth trajectories within the normal range on gene expression levels in the umbilical cord, neonatal liver and skeletal muscle. We identified 1973 genes which were differentially expressed in the three tissue types between average and low birth weight animals (P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis identified that these genes were involved in metabolic processes including cellular lipid metabolism, cellular biosynthesis, cellular macromolecule synthesis, cellular nitrogen metabolism, cellular carbohydrate metabolism, cellular catabolism, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, regulation of molecular functions, biological adhesion and development. These differences in gene expression levels between animals in the upper and lower percentiles of the normal birth weight range may point towards early life metabolic adaptations that in later life result in differences in disease risk.

  17. Gene expression profiling in the Cynomolgus macaque Macaca fascicularis shows variation within the normal birth range

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although an adverse early-life environment has been linked to an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered disease susceptibility as well as their relevance to humans are largely unknown. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that these effects operate within the normal range of birth weights and involve mechanisms of developmental palsticity rather than pathology. Method To explore this further, we utilised a non-human primate model Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) which shares with humans the same progressive history of the metabolic syndrome. Using microarray we compared tissues from neonates in the average birth weight (50-75th centile) to those of lower birth weight (5-25th centile) and studied the effect of different growth trajectories within the normal range on gene expression levels in the umbilical cord, neonatal liver and skeletal muscle. Results We identified 1973 genes which were differentially expressed in the three tissue types between average and low birth weight animals (P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis identified that these genes were involved in metabolic processes including cellular lipid metabolism, cellular biosynthesis, cellular macromolecule synthesis, cellular nitrogen metabolism, cellular carbohydrate metabolism, cellular catabolism, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, regulation of molecular functions, biological adhesion and development. Conclusion These differences in gene expression levels between animals in the upper and lower percentiles of the normal birth weight range may point towards early life metabolic adaptations that in later life result in differences in disease risk. PMID:21999700

  18. Nonsurgical Repair of a Pseudoaneurysm in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Daviau, Judith S; Merton, Daniel A

    2010-01-01

    A cynomolgus macaque presented with an ecchymotic and edematous left leg approximately 1 wk after a blood sample had been collected from the left femoral vein. Ecchymosis was noted in the femoral triangle, prepuce, and scrotum. The animal was not febrile or exhibiting signs of pain or distress. Duplex Doppler ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate the area. An arteriovenous fistula between the femoral artery and vein, accompanied by a pseudoaneurysm arising from the femoral artery, was identified. Various invasive and noninvasive treatment options for the pseudoaneurysm, including surgical repair, thrombin injection, stent placement, and ultrasound-guided compression repair (UGCR), were considered. UGCR was chosen as the first option for treatment. After a total of 20 min of UGCR at the neck of the pseudoaneurysm, complete thrombosis was achieved. Subsequent imaging of the lesion revealed resolution of the pseudoaneurysm. Because of the risks involved with invasive management techniques for this vascular lesion, UGCR is a valuable noninvasive treatment option for the repair of pseudoaneurysms. PMID:20858370

  19. Pulmonary Embolization of Fat and Bone Marrow in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Derek L.; Murnane, Robert D.; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E.; Green, Damian J.; Hukkanen, Renee R.

    2011-01-01

    Fat embolization (FE), the introduction of bone marrow elements into circulation, is a known complication of bone fractures. Although FE has been described in other animal models, this study represents the first reported cases of FE and bone marrow embolism in nonhuman primates. Histopathologic findings from cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) indicated that in all 5 cases, fat and bone marrow embolization occurred subsequent to multiple bone marrow biopsies. In the most severe case, extensive embolization was associated pulmonary damage consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is an infrequent clinical outcome of FE and is triggered by systemic biochemical and mechanical responses to fat in circulation. Although clinical criteria diagnostic of FES were not investigated at the time of death, this severe case may represent the fulminant form of FES, which occurs within 12 h after trauma. Bone marrow biopsy as an etiology of FES has been reported only once in humans. In addition, the association of embolization with bone marrow biopsies suggests that nonhuman primates may be a useful animal model of FE. FE and FES represent important research confounders and FES should be considered as a differential diagnosis for clinical complications subsequent to skeletal trauma. PMID:21819686

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence phylogeny of 4 populations of the widely distributed cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Blancher, Antoine; Bonhomme, Maxime; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Terao, Keiji; Kitano, Takashi; Saitou, Naruya

    2008-01-01

    We studied the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism of 304 Macaca fascicularis fascicularis (M. f. fascicularis) individuals, representative of 4 cynomolgus macaque populations (Indochina, Indonesia, Philippines, and Mauritius). By sequencing a 590-bp fragment in the hypervariable II region of the D-loop region, we defined 70 haplotypes. The homologous region was also characterized in 22 Chinese Macaca mulatta and 2 Macaca sylvanus. The phylogenetic analysis confirms the monophyly of M. f. fascicularis and defines 2 haplotype groups inside the M. f. fascicularis clade: one "insular," encompassing 6 Philippines, 2 Mauritius, and 31 Indonesian haplotypes, the other "continental" that contains all Indochinese and 6 Indonesian haplotypes. Continental and insular group divergence time was estimated to be approximately 10(6) years before present (BP). Among Indonesian haplotypes, some have a continental origin. This suggests either direct migration from mainland to Indonesia or that remnant lineages from an ancient population genetically close to the mainland (i.e., in the Sunda Shelf, <550 000 years BP) were subsequently brought southward to Indonesia. The low nucleotide diversity in the Philippines population suggests a bottleneck following colonization by Indonesian individuals, around 110 000 years BP. mtDNA and further observations of nuclear genetic data corroborate the mixed origin (Indonesian/continental) hypothesis of Mauritius individuals and a population bottleneck.

  1. Systemic gene delivery transduces the enteric nervous system of guinea pigs and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gombash, S E; Cowley, C J; Fitzgerald, J A; Lepak, C A; Neides, M G; Hook, K; Todd, L J; Wang, G-D; Mueller, C; Kaspar, B K; Bielefeld, E C; Fischer, A J; Wood, J D; Foust, K D

    2017-08-03

    Characterization of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated gene delivery to the enteric nervous system (ENS) was recently described in mice and rats. In these proof-of-concept experiments, we show that intravenous injections of clinically relevant AAVs can transduce the ENS in guinea pigs and non-human primates. Neonatal guinea pigs were given intravenous injections of either AAV8 or AAV9 vectors that contained a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression cassette or PBS. Piglets were euthanized three weeks post-injection and tissues were harvested for immunofluorescent analysis. GFP expression was detected in myenteric and submucosal neurons along the length of the gastrointestinal tract in AAV8 injected guinea pigs. GFP positive neurons were found in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and dorsal root ganglia. Less transduction occurred in AAV9 treated tissues. Gastrointestinal tissues were analyzed from young cynomolgus macaques that received systemic injection of AAV9 GFP. GFP expression was detected in myenteric neurons of the stomach, small and large intestine. These data demonstrate that ENS gene delivery translates to larger species. This work develops tools for the field of neurogastroenterology to explore gut physiology and anatomy using emerging technologies such as optogenetics and gene editing. It also provides a basis to develop novel therapies for chronic gut disorders.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 03 August 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.72.

  2. Comparison of Saliva Collection Methods for the Determination of Salivary Cortisol Levels in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta), Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), and African Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops).

    PubMed

    Rapp-Santos, Kamala J; Altamura, Louis A; Norris, Sarah L; Lugo-Roman, Luis A; Rico, Pedro J; Hofer, Christian C

    2017-03-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately determine cortisol as a biomarker for stress is a valuable tool in assessing the wellbeing of NHP. In this study, 2 methods of collecting saliva (a commercial collection device and passive drool) and the resulting free salivary cortisol levels were compared with total serum cortisol concentration in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) at 2 collection time points. Serum and salivary cortisol levels were determined using a competitive quantitative ELISA. In addition, both saliva collection methods were evaluated for volume collected and ease of use. Compared with passive drool, the experimental collection device was more reliable in collecting sufficient volumes of saliva, and the resulting salivary cortisol values demonstrated stronger correlation with serum cortisol concentration in all species and collection days except cynomolgus macaques on day 1. This saliva collection device allows quick and reliable sample collection for the determination of salivary cortisol levels. In addition, the results might provide a useful tool for evaluating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity or the physiologic stress reaction in NHP as well as a biomarker of psychologic stress states in a variety of situations.

  3. Identification and analysis of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are important for not only drug metabolism and toxicity, but also biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, and steroid synthesis. In cynomolgus macaques, widely used in biomedical research, we have characterized P450 cDNAs, which were isolated as expressed sequence tags of cynomolgus macaque liver. In this study, cynomolgus CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 cDNAs were characterized by sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis and tissue expression pattern. By sequence analysis, these five cynomolgus P450s had high sequence identities (94-99%) to the human orthologs in amino acids. By phylogenetic analysis, each cynomolgus P450 was more closely related to the human ortholog as compared with the dog or rat ortholog. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, among the 10 tissue types, CYP7A1 and CYP17A1 mRNAs were preferentially expressed in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 mRNAs were most abundantly expressed in liver and testis, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP20A1 mRNA was expressed in all the tissues, including brain and liver. Tissue expression patterns of each cynomolgus P450 were generally similar to that of the human ortholog. These results suggest the molecular similarities of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 between cynomolgus macaques and humans.

  4. Severe Encephalitis in Cynomolgus Macaques Exposed to Aerosolized Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    the illness. The onset of illness was dose dependent, but once a febrile response was observed, macaques were moribund within 36 h. Simultaneously, a...high mortality caused by a group of arboviruses found in the eastern half of North America and por- tions of Central and South America [1]. EEE viruses...encepha- litis (VEE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE) viruses, EEE viruses are mosquito transmitted and circulate through a natural reservoir

  5. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Six Mauritian Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) Reveals a Genome-Wide Pattern of Polymorphisms under Extreme Population Bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Naoki; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Saitou, Naruya; Blancher, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were introduced to the island of Mauritius by humans around the 16th century. The unique demographic history of the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques provides the opportunity to not only examine the genetic background of well-established nonhuman primates for biomedical research but also understand the effect of an extreme population bottleneck on the pattern of polymorphisms in genomes. We sequenced the whole genomes of six Mauritian cynomolgus macaques and obtained an average of 20-fold coverage of the genome sequences for each individual. The overall level of nucleotide diversity was 23% smaller than that of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaques, and a reduction of low-frequency polymorphisms was observed. In addition, we also confirmed that the Mauritian cynomolgus macaques were genetically closer to a representative of the Malaysian population than to a representative of the Indochinese population. Excess of nonsynonymous polymorphisms in low frequency, which has been observed in many other species, was not very strong in the Mauritian samples, and the proportion of heterozygous nonsynonymous polymorphisms relative to synonymous polymorphisms is higher within individuals in Mauritian than Malaysian cynomolgus macaques. Those patterns indicate that the extreme population bottleneck made purifying selection overwhelmed by the power of genetic drift in the population. Finally, we estimated the number of founding individuals by using the genome-wide site frequency spectrum of the six samples. Assuming a simple demographic scenario with a single bottleneck followed by exponential growth, the estimated number of founders (∼20 individuals) is largely consistent with previous estimates. PMID:25805843

  6. Pathology of experimental Machupo virus infection, Chicava strain, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by intramuscular and aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Robinson, C G; Wilkinson, E R; Hensley, L E; Cashman, K A

    2015-01-01

    Machupo virus, the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever of which little is known and for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics are available. This study evaluated the cynomolgus macaque as an animal model using the Machupo virus, Chicava strain, via intramuscular and aerosol challenge. The incubation period was 6 to 10 days with initial signs of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, mild fever, and a petechial skin rash. These were often followed by neurologic signs and death within an average of 18 days. Complete blood counts revealed leukopenia as well as marked thrombocytopenia. Serum chemistry values identified a decrease in total protein, marked increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and moderate increases in alkaline phosphatase. Gross pathology findings included a macular rash extending across the axillary and inguinal regions beginning at approximately 10 days postexposure as well as enlarged lymph nodes and spleen, enlarged and friable liver, and sporadic hemorrhages along the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and necrosis/apoptosis in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system (nonsuppurative encephalitis) was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection in cynomolgus macaques and supports the usefulness of cynomolgus macaques as a viable model of human Machupo virus infection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Effects of pubertal exposure to dietary soy on estrogen receptor activity in the breast of cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Fitriya N.; Wood, Charles E.; Willson, Cynthia J.; Register, Thomas C.; Lees, Cynthia J.; Howard, Timothy D.; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K.; Tooze, Janet A.; Chou, Jeff W.; Miller, Lance D.; Cline, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous estrogens influence mammary gland development during puberty and breast cancer risk during adulthood. Early-life exposure to dietary or environmental estrogens may alter estrogen-mediated processes. Soy foods contain phytoestrogenic isoflavones (IFs), which have mixed estrogen agonist/antagonist properties. Here, we evaluated mammary gland responses over time in pubertal female cynomolgus macaques fed diets containing either casein/lactalbumin (n=12) or soy protein containing a human-equivalent dose of 120 mg IF/day (n=17) for ~4.5 years spanning menarche. We assessed estrogen receptor (ER) expression and activity, promoter methylation of ERs and their downstream targets, and markers of estrogen metabolism. Expression of ERα and classical ERα response genes (TFF1, PGR and GREB1) decreased with maturity, independent of diet. A significant inverse correlation was observed between TFF1 mRNA and methylation of CpG sites within the TFF1 promoter. Soy effects included lower ERβ expression before menarche and lower mRNA for ERα and GREB1 after menarche. Expression of GATA-3, an epithelial differentiation marker that regulates ERα-mediated transcription, was elevated before menarche and decreased after menarche in soy-fed animals. Soy did not significantly alter expression of other ER activity markers, estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, or promoter methylation for ERs or ER-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate greater ER expression and activity during the pubertal transition, supporting the idea that this life stage is a critical window for phenotypic modulation by estrogenic compounds. Pubertal soy exposure decreases mammary ERα expression after menarche and exerts subtle effects on receptor activity and mammary gland differentiation. PMID:27006379

  8. Sequence of Pathogenic Events in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Aerosolized Monkeypox Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G.; Pearson, G.; Rayner, E.; Graham, V. A.; Steeds, K.; Bewley, K. R.; Hatch, G. J.; Dennis, M.; Taylor, I.; Roberts, A. D.; Funnell, S. G. P.; Vipond, J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To evaluate new vaccines when human efficacy studies are not possible, the FDA's “Animal Rule” requires well-characterized models of infection. Thus, in the present study, the early pathogenic events of monkeypox infection in nonhuman primates, a surrogate for variola virus infection, were characterized. Cynomolgus macaques were exposed to aerosolized monkeypox virus (105 PFU). Clinical observations, viral loads, immune responses, and pathological changes were examined on days 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 postchallenge. Viral DNA (vDNA) was detected in the lungs on day 2 postchallenge, and viral antigen was detected, by immunostaining, in the epithelium of bronchi, bronchioles, and alveolar walls. Lesions comprised rare foci of dysplastic and sloughed cells in respiratory bronchioles. By day 4, vDNA was detected in the throat, tonsil, and spleen, and monkeypox antigen was detected in the lung, hilar and submandibular lymph nodes, spleen, and colon. Lung lesions comprised focal epithelial necrosis and inflammation. Body temperature peaked on day 6, pox lesions appeared on the skin, and lesions, with positive immunostaining, were present in the lung, tonsil, spleen, lymph nodes, and colon. By day 8, vDNA was present in 9/13 tissues. Blood concentrations of interleukin 1ra (IL-1ra), IL-6, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) increased markedly. By day 10, circulating IgG antibody concentrations increased, and on day 12, animals showed early signs of recovery. These results define early events occurring in an inhalational macaque monkeypox infection model, supporting its use as a surrogate model for human smallpox. IMPORTANCE Bioterrorism poses a major threat to public health, as the deliberate release of infectious agents, such smallpox or a related virus, monkeypox, would have catastrophic consequences. The development and testing of new medical countermeasures, e.g., vaccines, are thus priorities; however, tests for efficacy in humans cannot be performed because it

  9. Depressive-like behavioral profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine M. J.; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD), the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament, or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored. Methods: Behavioral data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances, and locations in the cage) were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys. Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g., inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall) among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles. Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a “spontaneous” model of depressive disorders. PMID:24600363

  10. Depressive-like behavioral profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison.

    PubMed

    Camus, Sandrine M J; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD), the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament, or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored. Behavioral data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances, and locations in the cage) were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys. Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g., inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall) among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles. Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a "spontaneous" model of depressive disorders.

  11. The Fluorocycline TP-271 Is Efficacious in Models of Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Infection in BALB/c Mice and Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H; Anderson, Michael S; Drabek, Lindsay; Gooldy, Melanie; Heine, Henry S; Henning, Lisa N; Lin, Winston; Newman, Joseph V; Nevarez, Rene; Siefkas-Patterson, Kaylyn; Radcliff, Anne K; Sutcliffe, Joyce A

    2017-10-01

    The fluorocycline TP-271 was evaluated in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of inhalational anthrax. BALB/c mice were exposed by nose-only aerosol to Bacillus anthracis Ames spores at a level of 18 to 88 lethal doses sufficient to kill 50% of exposed individuals (LD50). When 21 days of once-daily dosing was initiated at 24 h postchallenge (the postexposure prophylaxis [PEP] study), the rates of survival for the groups treated with TP-271 at 3, 6, 12, and 18 mg/kg of body weight were 90%, 95%, 95%, and 84%, respectively. When 21 days of dosing was initiated at 48 h postchallenge (the treatment [Tx] study), the rates of survival for the groups treated with TP-271 at 6, 12, and 18 mg/kg TP-271 were 100%, 91%, and 81%, respectively. No deaths of TP-271-treated mice occurred during the 39-day posttreatment observation period. In the NHP model, cynomolgus macaques received an average dose of 197 LD50 of B. anthracis Ames spore equivalents using a head-only inhalation exposure chamber, and once-daily treatment of 1 mg/kg TP-271 lasting for 14 or 21 days was initiated within 3 h of detection of protective antigen (PA) in the blood. No (0/8) animals in the vehicle control-treated group survived, whereas all 8 infected macaques treated for 21 days and 4 of 6 macaques in the 14-day treatment group survived to the end of the study (56 days postchallenge). All survivors developed toxin-neutralizing and anti-PA IgG antibodies, indicating an immunologic response. On the basis of the results obtained with the mouse and NHP models, TP-271 shows promise as a countermeasure for the treatment of inhalational anthrax. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Behavioural Profiles in Captive-Bred Cynomolgus Macaques: Towards Monkey Models of Mental Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine M. J.; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    Background To date, experimental and preclinical studies on neuropsychiatric conditions have almost exclusively been performed in experimentally-induced animal models and have only rarely relied upon an ethological approach where animals have been observed in more naturalistic settings. The laboratory species of choice has been the rodent while the potential of more closely-related non-human primates have remained largely underexplored. Methods The present study, therefore, aimed at investigating the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 cynomolgus macaques in captive conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence analysis and a hierarchical clustering. Results The study identified five distinct profiles (groups A to E) that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, gaze directions and locations in the cage environment. We suggest that animals from the low n groups (D and E) present depressive-like and anxious-like symptoms, reminiscent of depressive and generalized anxiety disorders. Inter-individual differences were highlighted through unbiased ethological observations of spontaneous behaviours and associated parameters, although these were not associated with differences in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid levels of either stress-related hormones or monoamines, i.e. in accordance with the human situation. Conclusions No interventional behavioural testing was required to discriminate between 3 typical and 2 atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like and anxiety-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might, thus, allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups. PMID:23658620

  13. Improvements of Vaginal Atrophy without Systemic Side Effects after Topical Application of Pueraria mirifica, a Phytoestrogen-rich Herb, in Postmenopausal Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    JAROENPORN, Sukanya; URASOPON, Nontakorn; WATANABE, Gen; MALAIVIJITNOND, Suchinda

    2014-01-01

    The estrogenic efficacy of topical vaginal application of Pueraria mirifica extract (PM) on the restoration of vaginal atrophy, and the presence of any systemic side effects, were investigated in postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques. Twelve postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques, with complete cessation of menstruation for at least 5 years before start of this experiment, were divided into three groups. They received a topical vaginal application daily of 0.1 or 1% (w/w) PM cream or a conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) cream (a mixture of estrone, equilin, 17β-dihydroequilin, 17α-estradiol and 17α-dihydroequilin at 0.625 mg total estrogen/g cream) for 28 days. Estrogenic efficacy was assessed weekly by vaginal cytology assay and vaginal pH measurement, whilst the plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex skin coloration levels were determined at the end of each treatment period to evaluate the systemic side effects. PM significantly increased the proportion of superficial cells in a dose-dependent manner, with a similar efficacy between 1% (w/w) PM and CEE. Together with increased vaginal maturation, PM decreased the vaginal pH to acidic levels, as observed in the CEE group. PM induced no detected systemic side effects, whilst CEE decreased the plasma LH level and increased the reddish color of the sex skin during the posttreatment period. Topical vaginal treatment with PM stimulated the maturation of the vaginal epithelium without causing systemic side effects in postmenopausal monkeys. The implication is that PM could be a safer alternative to treat vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. PMID:24748397

  14. Improvements of vaginal atrophy without systemic side effects after topical application of Pueraria mirifica, a phytoestrogen-rich herb, in postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Jaroenporn, Sukanya; Urasopon, Nontakorn; Watanabe, Gen; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2014-01-01

    The estrogenic efficacy of topical vaginal application of Pueraria mirifica extract (PM) on the restoration of vaginal atrophy, and the presence of any systemic side effects, were investigated in postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques. Twelve postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques, with complete cessation of menstruation for at least 5 years before start of this experiment, were divided into three groups. They received a topical vaginal application daily of 0.1 or 1% (w/w) PM cream or a conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) cream (a mixture of estrone, equilin, 17β-dihydroequilin, 17α-estradiol and 17α-dihydroequilin at 0.625 mg total estrogen/g cream) for 28 days. Estrogenic efficacy was assessed weekly by vaginal cytology assay and vaginal pH measurement, whilst the plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex skin coloration levels were determined at the end of each treatment period to evaluate the systemic side effects. PM significantly increased the proportion of superficial cells in a dose-dependent manner, with a similar efficacy between 1% (w/w) PM and CEE. Together with increased vaginal maturation, PM decreased the vaginal pH to acidic levels, as observed in the CEE group. PM induced no detected systemic side effects, whilst CEE decreased the plasma LH level and increased the reddish color of the sex skin during the posttreatment period. Topical vaginal treatment with PM stimulated the maturation of the vaginal epithelium without causing systemic side effects in postmenopausal monkeys. The implication is that PM could be a safer alternative to treat vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.

  15. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges

    PubMed Central

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  16. A recently isolated Lassa virus from Mali demonstrates atypical clinical disease manifestations and decreased virulence in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Sogoba, Nafomon; Brining, Douglas; Geisbert, Thomas W; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-04-15

    The virulence of Soromba-R, a Lassa virus strain recently isolated from southern Mali, was assessed in 2 animal models of Lassa fever: inbred strain 13 guinea pigs and cynomolgus macaques. In both models, the Malian isolate demonstrated tissue tropism and viral titers similar to those of historical Lassa virus isolates from Sierra Leone (Josiah) and Liberia (Z-132); however, the Soromba-R isolate was found to be less pathogenic, as determined by decreased mortality and prolonged time to euthanasia in macaques. Interestingly, in addition to the classic indicators of Lassa fever, Soromba-R infection presented with moderate to severe pulmonary manifestations in the macaque model. Analysis of host responses demonstrated increased immune activation in Soromba-R-infected macaques, particularly in neutrophil-activating or -potentiating proinflammatory cytokines or growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, interleukin 1β, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as interleukin 5, which may be responsible for the decreased lethality and uncharacteristic clinical presentation. These results suggest that the strain of Lassa virus circulating in Mali might be less pathogenic than strains circulating in the historical region of endemicity and may result in an atypical presentation for Lassa fever, which could complicate clinical diagnosis.

  17. A Recently Isolated Lassa Virus From Mali Demonstrates Atypical Clinical Disease Manifestations and Decreased Virulence in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Strong, James E.; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Sogoba, Nafomon; Brining, Douglas; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of Soromba-R, a Lassa virus strain recently isolated from southern Mali, was assessed in 2 animal models of Lassa fever: inbred strain 13 guinea pigs and cynomolgus macaques. In both models, the Malian isolate demonstrated tissue tropism and viral titers similar to those of historical Lassa virus isolates from Sierra Leone (Josiah) and Liberia (Z-132); however, the Soromba-R isolate was found to be less pathogenic, as determined by decreased mortality and prolonged time to euthanasia in macaques. Interestingly, in addition to the classic indicators of Lassa fever, Soromba-R infection presented with moderate to severe pulmonary manifestations in the macaque model. Analysis of host responses demonstrated increased immune activation in Soromba-R–infected macaques, particularly in neutrophil-activating or -potentiating proinflammatory cytokines or growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, interleukin 1β, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as interleukin 5, which may be responsible for the decreased lethality and uncharacteristic clinical presentation. These results suggest that the strain of Lassa virus circulating in Mali might be less pathogenic than strains circulating in the historical region of endemicity and may result in an atypical presentation for Lassa fever, which could complicate clinical diagnosis. PMID:23303805

  18. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3–6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  19. Genome Sequence of a Cynomolgus Macaque Adenovirus (CynAdV-1) Isolate from a Primate Colony in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Bofill-Mas, Silvia; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-11-03

    The genome sequence of a simian adenovirus from a cynomolgus macaque, denoted CynAdV-1, is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis supports CynAdV-1 in an independent clade, comprising a new simian adenovirus (SAdV) species. These genome data are critical for understanding the evolution and relationships of primate adenoviruses, including zoonosis and emergent human pathogens.

  20. The effects of TRIM5α polymorphism on HIV-2ROD and SIVmac239 replication in PBMCs from Chinese rhesus macaques and Vietnamese-origin cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Feng-Liang; Jin, Ya-Bin; Deng, Qing; Liu, Bei-Lei; Zhuo, Min; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Ling, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Because of the difficulty of obtaining Indian-origin rhesus macaques, Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (CR) and Vietnamese-origin cynomolgus macaques (CM) are now used frequently in HIV/AIDS research. Nonetheless, the effects of TRIM5α polymorphism on viral replication in both CR and CM are unclear. To address these questions, we recruited 70 unrelated CR and 40 unrelated CM and studied the effect of TRIM5α polymorphism on HIV-2ROD and SIVmac239 replication in PBMCs. We found that 3 polymorphisms, located in the B30.2 domain of CR TRIM5α formed a haplotype and affected HIV-2ROD replication. In addition, we found that the variant Y178H, located in the Coiled-coil domain of CM TRIM5α, affected TRIM5α-mediated HIV-2ROD restriction. Finally, two polymorphisms, located in the Coiled-coil domain, altered anti-SIVmac239 activity in CR. We concluded that, CM TRIM5α polymorphism could alter HIV-2ROD infection; however, a different domain of CR TRIM5α was responsible for restricting different virus replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Obesity in Rhesus and Cynomolgus Macaques: A Comparative Review of the Condition and Its Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Sharon A; Arndt, Tara P; Leslie, Ken E; Pearl, David L; Turner, Patricia V

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly important health issue in both humans and animals and has been highly correlated as a risk factor for hyperglycemic conditions in humans. Naturally occurring obesity has been extensively studied in nonhuman primates with a focus on the development of biomarkers for characterizing overweight individuals and tracking the progression of obesity to conditions such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. Animal models have provided a basic understanding of metabolism and carbohydrate physiology, and continue to contribute to ongoing research of obesity and its adverse health effects. This review focuses on spontaneous obesity in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques as a model for human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, including associated risk factors for the development of obesity and obesity-related health conditions. Little is known about preventive measures to minimize obesity while maintaining a healthy colony of macaques, and numerous complexities such as social status, feeding behaviors, timing of feeding, food distribution, and stress have been identified as contributing factors to overweight body condition in both single and group housed nonhuman primates. As in humans, increased body weight and obesity in macaques affect their overall health status. These conditions may interfere with the suitability of some animals in various studies unrelated to obesity. PMID:22330579

  2. A heterologous DNA prime-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle boost dengue vaccine regimen affords complete protection from virus challenge in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Ewing, Dan; Subramanian, Hemavathy; Block, Karla; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kimberly D; Sedegah, Martha; Hayes, Curtis; Porter, Kevin; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2007-11-01

    A candidate vaccine (D1ME-VRP) expressing dengue virus type 1 premembrane and envelope proteins in a Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon particle (VRP) system was constructed and tested in conjunction with a plasmid DNA vaccine (D1ME-DNA) expressing identical dengue virus sequences. Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with three doses of DNA (DDD), three doses of VRP (VVV group), or a heterologous DNA prime-VRP boost regimen (DDV) using two doses of DNA vaccine and a third dose of VRP vaccine. Four weeks after the final immunization, the DDV group produced the highest dengue virus type 1-specific immunoglobulin G antibody responses and virus-neutralizing antibody titers. Moderate T-cell responses were demonstrated only in DDD- and DDV-vaccinated animals. When vaccinated animals were challenged with live virus, all vaccination regimens showed significant protection from viremia. DDV-immunized animals were completely protected from viremia (mean time of viremia = 0 days), whereas DDD- and VVV-vaccinated animals had mean times of viremia of 0.66 and 0.75 day, respectively, compared to 6.33 days for the control group of animals.

  3. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  4. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-12-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma.

  5. Drug-induced Skin Lesions in Cynomolgus Macaques Treated with Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGluR5) Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Gopinath S; Marcek, John M; Cappon, Gregg D; Whritenour, Jessica; Shaffer, Christopher L; Brady, Joseph T; Houle, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Three orally administered metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators caused skin lesions consistent with delayed type-IV hypersensitivity in cynomolgus macaques in 2- and 12-week toxicity studies. Several monkeys developed macroscopic skin lesions in multiple locations after 8 to 9 days of dosing; the most prominent effects involved the genital region of males and generalized erythema occurred in both sexes. Microscopic lesions occurred in both clinically affected and unaffected areas and were characterized by lymphocytic interface inflammation, subepidermal bullae, and individual keratinocyte vacuolation/necrosis. In the 12-week study, clinical effects in 2 animals resolved with continued dosing, whereas in others the inflammatory process progressed with 1 female exhibiting systemic lymphocytic inflammation in multiple tissues. The inflammatory infiltrate consisted of CD3 and CD4 positive T lymphocytes with minimal CD68 positive macrophages and only rare CD8 positive T lymphocytes. A subset of animals given a dosing holiday was subsequently rechallenged with similar lesions developing but with a more rapid clinical onset. These skin lesions were consistent with type-IV delayed hypersensitivity with some features comparable to bullous drug eruptions in humans. A relationship between these findings and the intended mode of action for these compounds could not be ruled out, given the occurrence across different chemotypes.

  6. Cryopreservation of Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) Sperm by Using a Commercial Egg-YolkFree Freezing Medium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yaping; Ao, Lei; Wang, Hong; Duan, Yanchao; Chang, Shaohui; Chen, Bingbing; Zhi, Dalong; Li, Sujuan; Niu, Yuyu; Ji, Weizhi; Si, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Conventional TRISegg yolk (TEY) freezing medium for the cryopreservation of NHP sperm has the risk of contamination due to widespread zoonotic diseases. This study was aimed at determining the optimal glycerol concentration, freezing rate, and holding time in liquid N2 vapor for the cryopreservation of cynomolgus macaque sperm by using a commercial egg-yolkfree freezing medium (SC medium) designed for human sperm cryopreservation. Sperm motility and acrosomal integrity after freezing were assessed. Sperm in SC medium (dilution ratio, 3:1) frozen at cooling rates of 67 and 183C/min in liquid N2 vapor showed higher post-thaw motility than did samples frozen at 435C/min. At the cooling rate of 183C/min and dilution in SC medium at a 3:1 ratio, post-thaw motility was higher after a holding time of 10 min than after 30 min (recommended by the manufacturer). In addition, post-thaw motility of sperm frozen in SC medium was higher with dilution ratios of 3:1, 4.5:1, and 6:1 compared with 9:1, 10.5:1, and 12:1, and the sample diluted 12:1 showed the lowest percentage of thawed sperm with intact acrosomes. Sperm showed higher post-thaw motility after freezing in TEY than in SC medium; acrosomal integrity did not differ between the 2 media. Our results indicated that cynomolgus macaque sperm can be cryopreserved successfully by using a commercial egg-yolkfree freezing medium, which provides an option for genetic preservation with decreased zoonotic risk in this important NHP species.

  7. Translational Repression of a Splice Variant of Cynomolgus Macaque CXCL1L by Its C-Terminal Sequence.

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Osada, Naoki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Terao, Keiji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Yoshie, Osamu

    2017-03-01

    We previously isolated a cDNA clone from cynomolgus macaque encoding a novel CXC chemokine that we termed CXCL1L from its close similarity to CXCL1. However, the cDNA consisted of 3 exons instead of 4 exons that were typically seen in other CXC chemokines. Here, we isolated a cDNA encoding the full-length variant of CXCL1L that we termed CXCL1Lβ. CXCL1Lβ is 50 amino acids longer than the original CXCL1L, which we now term CXCL1Lα. The CXCL1Lβ mRNA is much more abundantly expressed in the cynomolgus macaque tissues than CXCL1Lα mRNA. However, CXCL1Lβ protein was poorly produced by transfected cells compared with that of CXCL1Lα. When the coding region of the fourth exon was fused to the C-terminus of CXCL1 or even to a nonsecretory protein firefly luciferase, the fused proteins were also barely produced, although the mRNAs were abundantly expressed. The polysome profiling analysis suggested that the inhibition was mainly at the translational level. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the C-terminal 5 amino acids of CXCL1Lβ were critical for the translational repression. The present study, thus, reveals a unique translational regulation controlling the production of a splicing variant of CXCL1L. Since the CXCL1L gene is functional only in the Old World monkeys, we also discuss possible reasons for the conservation of the active CXCL1L gene in these monkeys during the primate evolution.

  8. Early Changes by (18)Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography coregistered with computed tomography predict outcome after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M Teresa; Maiello, Pauline; Tomko, Jaime; Frye, Lonnie James; Fillmore, Daniel; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Lin, Philana Ling

    2014-06-01

    Cynomolgus macaques infected with low-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop both active tuberculosis and latent infection similar to those of humans, providing an opportunity to study the clinically silent early events in infection. (18)Fluorodeoxyglucose radiotracer with positron emission tomography coregistered with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) provides a noninvasive method to measure disease progression. We sought to determine temporal patterns of granuloma evolution that distinguished active-disease and latent outcomes. Macaques (n = 10) were infected with low-dose M. tuberculosis with FDG PET/CT performed during infection. At 24 weeks postinfection, animals were classified as having active disease (n = 3) or latent infection (n = 6), with one "percolator" monkey. Imaging characteristics (e.g., lesion number, metabolic activity, size, mineralization, and distribution of lesions) were compared among active and latent groups. As early as 3 weeks postinfection, more pulmonary granulomas were observed in animals that would later develop active disease than in those that would develop latent infection. Over time, new lesions developed in active-disease animals but not in latent animals. Granulomas and mediastinal lymph nodes from active-disease but not latent animals consistently increased in metabolic activity at early time points. The presence of fewer lesions at 3 weeks and the lack of new lesion development in animals with latent infection suggest that innate and rapid adaptive responses are critical to preventing active tuberculosis. A greater emphasis on innate responses and/or rapid recruitment of adaptive responses, especially in the airway, should be emphasized in newer vaccine strategies.

  9. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhenhua; Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin; Chen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Y. Alex

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  10. [TRIMCyp frequency of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in captivity in China].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shuai; Meng, Yu-Huan; Liu, Ming-Yu; Sun, Fei; Chen, Jun-Hui; Du, Hong-Li; Wang, Xiao-Ning

    2013-04-01

    In most Old world monkey species, TRIM5α plays a role in combating retroviruses and restricting HIV-1. Alongside TRIM5α, the TRIMCyp fusion gene formed by the retrotransposition of a CypA pseudogene cDNA to 3' terminal or 3'-UTR of TRIM5 gene in these monkeys has become a key research area in anti HIV-1 factors. The regional differences, gene frequencies, genotypes, and retrovirus restrictive activities of TRIMCyp vary among different primate species. While the frequencies of cynomolgus TRIMCyp have been studied in several areas of Southeast Asia, the frequency and prevalence of cynomolgus TRIMCyp in China remains unclear. In this study, we screened 1, 594 cynomolgus samples from 11 monkey manufacturers located across 5 provinces in China. Our results showed that the frequencies of TRIMCyp range from 7.65% to 19.79%, markedly lower than the frequencies found in monkey species in the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia (ranging from 34.85% to 100%). We speculate that potentially the latter were isolated groups established since 1978. The NE haplotype frequencies of cynomolgus TRIMCyp were 4.93% in China, also significantly lower than those found in species in the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia (from 11.1% to 14.3%). Our research provides interesting findings that contribute towards a more firm basis of further studies of HIV-1 animal models and relevant pathogenesis.

  11. Group-housing subadult male cynomolgus macaques in a pharmaceutical environment.

    PubMed

    Hartner, M; Hall, J; Penderghest, J; Clark, L P

    2001-09-01

    The authors describe the preliminary results of a program to group-house male cynomolgus monkeys. Using a unique cage design, they were able to achieve environmental enhancement and enrichment that led to easier handling of the animals used in protocols for pharmacological research.

  12. Comparison of Methods for Determining ABO Blood Type in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae M; Park, Hyojun; Cho, Kahee; Kim, Jong S; Park, Mi K; Choi, Ju Y; Park, Jae B; Park, Wan J; Kim, Sung J

    2015-05-01

    Thorough examination of ABO blood type in cynomolgus monkeys is an essential experimental step to prevent humoral rejection during transplantation research. In the present study, we evaluated current methods of ABO blood-antigen typing in cynomolgus monkeys by comparing the outcomes obtained by reverse hemagglutination, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, and buccal mucosal immunohistochemistry. Among 21 animals, 5 were type A regardless of the method. However, of 8 serologically type B animals, 3 had a heterozygous type AB SNP profile, among which 2 failed to express A antigen, as shown by immunohistochemical analysis. Among 8 serologically type AB animals, 2 appeared to be type A by SNP analysis and immunohistochemistry. None of the methods identified any type O subjects. We conclude that the expression of ABO blood-group antigens is regulated by an incompletely understood process and that using both SNP and immunohistochemistry might minimize the risk of incorrect results obtained from the conventional hemagglutination assay.

  13. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques elicited an HIV-specific antibody

  14. Early Potent Protection against Heterologous SIVsmE660 Challenge Following Live Attenuated SIV Vaccination in Mauritian Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Neil; Ham, Claire; Mee, Edward T.; Rose, Nicola J.; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Jenkins, Adrian; Page, Mark; Elsley, William; Robinson, Mark; Smith, Deborah; Ferguson, Deborah; Towers, Greg; Almond, Neil; Stebbings, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccines represent the most effective means of vaccinating macaques against pathogenic SIV challenge. However, thus far, protection has been demonstrated to be more effective against homologous than heterologous strains. Immune correlates of vaccine-induced protection have also been difficult to identify, particularly those measurable in the peripheral circulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe potent protection in 6 out of 8 Mauritian-derived cynomolgus macaques (MCM) against heterologous virus challenge with the pathogenic, uncloned SIVsmE660 viral stock following vaccination with live attenuated SIVmac251/C8. MCM provided a characterised host genetic background with limited Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and TRIM5α allelic diversity. Early protection, observed as soon as 3 weeks post-vaccination, was comparable to that of 20 weeks vaccination. Recrudescence of vaccine virus was most pronounced in breakthrough cases where simultaneous identification of vaccine and challenge viruses by virus-specific PCR was indicative of active co-infection. Persistence of the vaccine virus in a range of lymphoid tissues was typified by a consistent level of SIV RNA positive cells in protected vaccinates. However, no association between MHC class I /II haplotype or TRIM5α polymorphism and study outcome was identified. Conclusion/Significance This SIV vaccine study, conducted in MHC-characterised MCM, demonstrated potent protection against the pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenge stock after only 3 weeks vaccination. This level of protection against this viral stock by intravenous challenge has not been hitherto observed. The mechanism(s) of protection by vaccination with live attenuated SIV must account for the heterologous and early protection data described in this study, including those which relate to the innate immune system. PMID:21853072

  15. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Retinoschisin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Howard, Kellie; Knop, David R; Neuringer, Martha; McGill, Trevor; Stoddard, Jonathan; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation is developing rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector for treatment of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), an inherited retinal disease characterized by splitting (schisis) of retinal layers causing poor vision. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in normal cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of male animals (n = 6 per group) received an intravitreal injection in one eye of either vehicle, or rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 at one of two dose levels (4 × 10(10) or 4 × 10(11) vg/eye). Half the animals were sacrificed after 14 days and the others after 91 or 115 days. The intravitreal injection procedure was well tolerated in all groups. Serial ophthalmic examinations demonstrated a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that improved over time. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, electroretinography, visual evoked potential, hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal or moderate mononuclear infiltrates in 6 of 12 vector-injected eyes. Immunohistochemical staining showed RS1 labeling of the ganglion cell layer at the foveal slope in vector-injected eyes at both dose levels. Serum anti-AAV antibodies were detected in 4 of 6 vector-injected animals at the day 15 sacrifice and all vector-injected animals at later time points. No animals developed antibodies to RS1. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in clinical studies in patients with XLRS.

  16. Delayed Time-to-Treatment of an Antisense Morpholino Oligomer Is Effective against Lethal Marburg Virus Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Warren, Travis K; Whitehouse, Chris A; Wells, Jay; Welch, Lisa; Charleston, Jay S; Heald, Alison; Nichols, Donald K; Mattix, Marc E; Palacios, Gustavo; Kugleman, Jeffrey R; Iversen, Patrick L; Bavari, Sina

    2016-02-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) is an Ebola-like virus in the family Filovirdae that causes sporadic outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever with a case fatality rate as high as 90%. AVI-7288, a positively charged antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMOplus) targeting the viral nucleoprotein gene, was evaluated as a potential therapeutic intervention for MARV infection following delayed treatment of 1, 24, 48, and 96 h post-infection (PI) in a nonhuman primate lethal challenge model. A total of 30 cynomolgus macaques were divided into 5 groups of 6 and infected with 1,830 plaque forming units of MARV subcutaneously. AVI-7288 was administered by bolus infusion daily for 14 days at 15 mg/kg body weight. Survival was the primary endpoint of the study. While none (0 of 6) of the saline group survived, 83-100% of infected monkeys survived when treatment was initiated 1, 24, 48, or 96 h post-infection (PI). The antisense treatment also reduced serum viremia and inflammatory cytokines in all treatment groups compared to vehicle controls. The antibody immune response to virus was preserved and tissue viral antigen was cleared in AVI-7288 treated animals. These data show that AVI-7288 protects NHPs against an otherwise lethal MARV infection when treatment is initiated up to 96 h PI.

  17. Use of Operant Performance to Guide and Evaluate Medical Treatment in an Adult Male Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lindsey R; Cox, David M; Myers, Todd M

    2011-01-01

    A 6-y-old male cynomolgus macaque presented with noticeable swelling of the left forearm and signs of discomfort, as indicated by nonuse of the arm even in a behavioral task that he previously had been well-motivated to perform. Examination under anesthesia revealed lacerations to the arm. Radiography of the forearm showed no fractures, indicating that the damage was limited to soft tissue. The daily operant behavioral session assessed the amount of force the monkey emitted when touching the screen with the affected arm and how long each touch was sustained. We then used these parameters (force and duration of touch) as objective measures of putative pain relief and recovery of function to guide the medical treatment. The affected monkey received ketoprofen, buprenorphine, or their combination but continued to perform poorly during daily operant behavioral sessions. Only after treatment with dexamethasone did performance return to preinjury levels, suggesting inflammation near the radial or ulnar nerve. These findings indicate that performance of a trained operant task performance can be useful in guiding medical treatment, evaluating pain relief, and objectively monitoring health in laboratory animals. PMID:22330792

  18. Lethal Factor, but Not Edema Factor, Is Required to Cause Fatal Anthrax in Cynomolgus Macaques after Pulmonary Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Julie A.; Lovchik, Julie A.; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L.; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F.; Lyons, C. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti–protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores. PMID:25285720

  19. Lethal factor, but not edema factor, is required to cause fatal anthrax in cynomolgus macaques after pulmonary spore challenge.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Julie A; Lovchik, Julie A; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F; Lyons, C Rick

    2014-12-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti-protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores.

  20. A 52-week safety study in cynomolgus macaques for genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac protein.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jie; Sun, Xing; Cheng, Jian-Hua; Shi, Yong-Jie; Wang, Xin-Zheng; Qin, Jun-Jie; Sang, Zhi-Hong; He, Kun; Xia, Qing

    2016-09-01

    A 52-week feeding study in cynomolgus macaques was carried out to evaluate the safety of Bt rice Huahui 1 (HH1), a transgenic rice line expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac protein. Monkeys were fed a diet with 20% or 60% HH1 rice, 20% or 60% parental rice (Minghui 63, MH63), normal diet, normal diet spiked with purified recombinant Cry1Ab/1Ac fusion protein or bovine serum albumin (BSA) respectively. During the feeding trail, clinical observations were conducted daily, and multiple parameters, including body weight, body temperature, electrocardiogram, hematology, blood biochemistry, serum metabolome and gut microbiome were examined at regular intervals. Upon sacrifice, the organs were weighted, and the macroscopic, microscopic and electron microscopic examinations were performed. The results show no adverse or toxic effects of Bt rice HH1 or Cry1Ab/1Ac fusion protein on monkeys. Therefore, the present 52-week primate feeding study suggests that the transgenic rice containing Cry 1Ab/1Ac is equivalent to its parental rice line MH63.

  1. Ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus macaque regulatory T cells are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dons, E.M.; Raimondi, G.; Zhang, H.; Zahorchak, A.F.; Bhama, J.K.; Lu, L.; Ezzelarab, M.; Ijzermans, J.N.M.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Thomson, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (Ab) directed against CD52 that depletes lymphocytes and other leukocytes, mainly by complement-dependent mechanisms. We investigated the influence of alemtuzumab (i) on ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus monkeys regulatory T cells (Treg) generated for prospective use in adoptive cell therapy and (ii) on naturally-occurring Treg following alemtuzumab infusion. Treg were isolated from PBMC and lymph nodes and expanded for two rounds. CD52 expression, binding of alemtuzumab, and both complement-mediated killing and Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were compared between freshly-isolated and expanded Treg and effector T cells. Monkeys undergoing allogeneic heart transplantation given alemtuzumab were monitored for Treg and serum alemtuzumab activity. Ex vivo-expanded Treg showed progressive downregulation of CD52 expression, absence of alemtuzumab binding, minimal change in complement inhibitory protein (CD46) expression and no complement-dependent killing or ADCC. Infusion of alemtuzumab caused potent depletion of all lymphocytes, but a transient increase in the incidence of circulating Treg. After infusion of alemtuzumab, monkey serum killed fresh PBMC, but not expanded Treg. Thus, expanded cynomolgus monkey Treg are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated, complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, our data suggest that these expanded monkey Treg can be infused into graft recipients given alemtuzumab without risk of complement-mediated killing. PMID:23635093

  2. Ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus macaque regulatory T cells are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dons, E M; Raimondi, G; Zhang, H; Zahorchak, A F; Bhama, J K; Lu, L; Ezzelarab, M; Ijzermans, J N M; Cooper, D K C; Thomson, A W

    2013-08-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (Ab) directed against CD52 that depletes lymphocytes and other leukocytes, mainly by complement-dependent mechanisms. We investigated the influence of alemtuzumab (i) on ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells (Treg) generated for prospective use in adoptive cell therapy and (ii) on naturally occurring Treg following alemtuzumab infusion. Treg were isolated from PBMC and lymph nodes and expanded for two rounds. CD52 expression, binding of alemtuzumab and both complement-mediated killing and Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were compared between freshly isolated and expanded Treg and effector T cells. Monkeys undergoing allogeneic heart transplantation given alemtuzumab were monitored for Treg and serum alemtuzumab activity. Ex vivo-expanded Treg showed progressive downregulation of CD52 expression, absence of alemtuzumab binding, minimal change in complement inhibitory protein (CD46) expression and no complement-dependent killing or ADCC. Infusion of alemtuzumab caused potent depletion of all lymphocytes, but a transient increase in the incidence of circulating Treg. After infusion of alemtuzumab, monkey serum killed fresh PBMC, but not expanded Treg. Thus, expanded cynomolgus monkey Treg are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated, complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, our data suggest that these expanded monkey Treg can be infused into graft recipients given alemtuzumab without risk of complement-mediated killing. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  3. The Fluorocycline TP-271 Is Efficacious in Models of Aerosolized Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 Infection in BALB/c Mice and Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H; Anderson, Michael S; Christ, David; Gooldy, Melanie; Henning, Lisa N; Heine, Henry S; Kindt, M Victoria; Lin, Winston; Siefkas-Patterson, Kaylyn; Radcliff, Anne K; Tam, Vincent H; Sutcliffe, Joyce A

    2017-08-01

    TP-271 is a novel, fully synthetic fluorocycline in development for complicated bacterial respiratory infections. TP-271 was active in vitro against a panel of 29 Francisella tularensis isolates, showing MICs against 50% and 90% of isolates of 0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. In a mouse model of inhalational tularemia, animals were exposed by aerosol to 91 to 283 50% lethal doses (LD50)/mouse of F. tularensis SCHU S4. Following 21 days of once-daily intraperitoneal dosing with TP-271 at 3, 6, 12, and 18 mg/kg of body weight/day, initiating at 24 h postchallenge, survival was 80%, 100%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. When treatment was initiated at 72 h postchallenge, survival was 89%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-mg/kg/day TP-271 groups, respectively. No mice treated with the vehicle control survived. Surviving mice treated with TP-271 showed little to no relapse during 14 days posttreatment. In a nonhuman primate model of inhalational tularemia, cynomolgus macaques received an average aerosol exposure of 1,144 CFU of F. tularensis SCHU S4. Once-daily intravenous infusion with 1 or 3 mg/kg TP-271, or vehicle control, for 21 days was initiated within 6 h of confirmed fever. All animals treated with TP-271 survived to the end of the study, with no relapse during 14 days after the last treatment, whereas no vehicle control-treated animals survived. The protection and low relapse afforded by TP-271 treatment in these studies support continued investigation of TP-271 for use in the event of aerosolized exposure to F. tularensis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Influenza Virus A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) Replicates Efficiently in the Upper and Lower Respiratory Tracts of Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Emmie; Rasmussen, Angela L.; Feldmann, Friederike; Bushmaker, Trenton; Martellaro, Cynthia; Haddock, Elaine; Okumura, Atsushi; Proll, Sean C.; Chang, Jean; Gardner, Don; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In March 2013, three fatal human cases of infection with influenza A virus (H7N9) were reported in China. Since then, human cases have been accumulating. Given the public health importance of this virus, we performed a pathogenicity study of the H7N9 virus in the cynomolgus macaque model, focusing on clinical aspects of disease, radiographic, histological, and gene expression profile changes in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and changes in systemic cytokine and chemokine profiles during infection. Cynomolgus macaques developed transient, mild to severe disease with radiographic evidence of pulmonary infiltration. Virus replicated in the upper as well as lower respiratory tract, with sustained replication in the upper respiratory tract until the end of the experiment at 6 days after inoculation. Virus shedding occurred mainly via the throat. Histopathological changes in the lungs were similar to those observed in humans, albeit less severe, with diffuse alveolar damage, infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells, formation of hyaline membranes, pneumocyte hyperplasia, and fibroproliferative changes. Analysis of gene expression profiles in lung lesions identified pathways involved in tissue damage during H7N9 infection as well as leads for development of therapeutics targeting host responses rather than virus replication. Overall, H7N9 infection was not as severe in cynomolgus macaques as in humans, supporting the possible role of underlying medical complications in disease severity as discussed for human H7N9 infection (H. N. Gao et al., N. Engl. J. Med. 368:2277–2285, 2013, doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1305584). PMID:25118237

  5. Evidence for an intranasal immune response to human respiratory syncytial virus infection in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Clément; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Clavel, Marine; Taborik, Fabrice; Vabret, Astrid; Tangy, Frédéric; Contamin, Hugues; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2015-04-01

    There is no large-scale therapy available against human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), a major pathogen responsible for acute respiratory diseases. Macaques represent an interesting animal model to evaluate potential treatments because of their genetic, anatomical and immunological proximity with humans. However, the parameters that influence hRSV growth and control in this model are still poorly understood. We have documented in the following study the influence of age as well as repeated infections on the virological, clinical and immunological parameters of this animal model. Following intranasal inoculation, hRSV replicated in the upper respiratory tract for less than 15 days with no clinical signs regardless of age. Interestingly, we observed the induction of a local immune response at the nasal mucosa as assessed by expression profiles of inflammatory and IFN-stimulated genes. Animals also developed specific antibodies and were immune to reinfection. Thus, we showed that even in infant macaques, intranasal hRSV infection induced both local and systemic immune responses to efficiently control the virus.

  6. Generation of Neutralizing Antibodies and Divergence of SIVmac239 in Cynomolgus Macaques Following Short-Term Early Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joe; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Taylor, Stephen; Pybus, Oliver G.; Mäkitalo, Barbro; Walther-Jallow, Lilian; Spångberg, Mats; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Achour, Adnane; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Spetz, Anna-Lena

    2010-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) able to react to heterologous viruses are generated during natural HIV-1 infection in some individuals. Further knowledge is required in order to understand the factors contributing to induction of cross-reactive NAb responses. Here a well-established model of experimental pathogenic infection in cynomolgus macaques, which reproduces long-lasting HIV-1 infection, was used to study the NAb response as well as the viral evolution of the highly neutralization-resistant SIVmac239. Twelve animals were infected intravenously with SIVmac239. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was initiated ten days post-inoculation and administered daily for four months. Viral load, CD4+ T-cell counts, total IgG levels, and breadth as well as strength of NAb in plasma were compared simultaneously over 14 months. In addition, envs from plasma samples were sequenced at three time points in all animals in order to assess viral evolution. We report here that seven of the 12 animals controlled viremia to below 104 copies/ml of plasma after discontinuation of ART and that this control was associated with a low level of evolutionary divergence. Macaques that controlled viral load developed broader NAb responses early on. Furthermore, escape mutations, such as V67M and R751G, were identified in virus sequenced from all animals with uncontrolled viremia. Bayesian estimation of ancestral population genetic diversity (PGD) showed an increase in this value in non-controlling or transient-controlling animals during the first 5.5 months of infection, in contrast to virus-controlling animals. Similarly, non- or transient controllers displayed more positively-selected amino-acid substitutions. An early increase in PGD, resulting in the generation of positively-selected amino-acid substitutions, greater divergence and relative high viral load after ART withdrawal, may have contributed to the generation of potent NAb in several animals after SIVmac239 infection. However, early broad

  7. Structural and Functional Effects of Hemiretinal Endodiathermy Axotomy in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Dashek, Ryan J.; Kim, Charlene B. Y.; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Hennes-Beean, Elizabeth A.; VerHoeve, James N.; Nork, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Outer retinal injury has been well described in glaucoma. To better understand the source of this injury, we wanted to develop a reliable model of partial retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axotomy. Methods. Endodiathermy spots were placed along the inferior 180° adjacent to the optic nerve margin in the right eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys. Fluorescein angiography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed at various intervals. Two animals were sacrificed at 3 months. Two animals were sacrificed at 4 months, at which time they underwent an injection of fluorescent microspheres to measure regional choroidal blood flow. Retinal immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), rhodopsin, S-cone opsin, and M/L-cone opsin were performed, as were axon counts of the optic nerves. Results. At 3 months, there was marked thinning of the inferior nerve fiber layer on SD-OCT. The mfERG waveforms were consistent with inner but not outer retinal injury. Greater than 95% reduction in axons was seen in the inferior optic nerves but no secondary degeneration superiorly. There was marked thinning of the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers in the inferior retinas. However, the photoreceptor histology was similar in the axotomized and nonaxotomized areas. Regional choroidal blood flow was not affected by the axotomy. Conclusions. Unlike experimental glaucoma, hemiretinal endodiathermy axotomy (HEA) of the RGCs produces no apparent anatomic, functional, or blood flow effects on the outer retina and choroid. PMID:23620427

  8. Cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi-I exhibit an overall mixed pro-inflammatory/modulated cytokine signature characteristic of human Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattoso-Barbosa, Armanda Moreira; Gouin, Nicolas; Perdigão-de-Oliveira, Marcelo; Valério-dos-Reis, Leydiane; Costa, Ronaldo Peres; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; do Amaral, Laurence Rodrigues; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Dick, Edward J.; Hubbard, Gene B.; VandeBerg, Jane F.; VandeBerg, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-human primates have been shown to be useful models for Chagas disease. We previously reported that natural T. cruzi infection of cynomolgus macaques triggers clinical features and immunophenotypic changes of peripheral blood leukocytes resembling those observed in human Chagas disease. In the present study, we further characterize the cytokine-mediated microenvironment to provide supportive evidence of the utility of cynomolgus macaques as a model for drug development for human Chagas disease. Methods and findings In this cross-sectional study design, flow cytometry and systems biology approaches were used to characterize the ex vivo and in vitro T. cruzi-specific functional cytokine signature of circulating leukocytes from TcI-T. cruzi naturally infected cynomolgus macaques (CH). Results showed that CH presented an overall CD4+-derived IFN-γ pattern regulated by IL-10-derived from CD4+ T-cells and B-cells, contrasting with the baseline profile observed in non-infected hosts (NI). Homologous TcI-T. cruzi-antigen recall in vitro induced a broad pro-inflammatory cytokine response in CH, mediated by TNF from innate/adaptive cells, counterbalanced by monocyte/B-cell-derived IL-10. TcIV-antigen triggered a more selective cytokine signature mediated by NK and T-cell-derived IFN-γ with modest regulation by IL-10 from T-cells. While NI presented a cytokine network comprised of small number of neighborhood connections, CH displayed a complex cross-talk amongst network elements. Noteworthy, was the ability of TcI-antigen to drive a complex global pro-inflammatory network mediated by TNF and IFN-γ from NK-cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, regulated by IL-10+CD8+ T-cells, in contrast to the TcIV-antigens that trigger a modest network, with moderate connecting edges. Conclusions Altogether, our findings demonstrated that CH present a pro-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine signature similar to that observed in human Chagas disease. These data bring additional

  9. Cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi-I exhibit an overall mixed pro-inflammatory/modulated cytokine signature characteristic of human Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Vitelli-Avelar, Danielle Marquete; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Mattoso-Barbosa, Armanda Moreira; Gouin, Nicolas; Perdigão-de-Oliveira, Marcelo; Valério-Dos-Reis, Leydiane; Costa, Ronaldo Peres; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Amaral, Laurence Rodrigues do; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Dick, Edward J; Hubbard, Gene B; VandeBerg, Jane F; VandeBerg, John L

    2017-02-01

    Non-human primates have been shown to be useful models for Chagas disease. We previously reported that natural T. cruzi infection of cynomolgus macaques triggers clinical features and immunophenotypic changes of peripheral blood leukocytes resembling those observed in human Chagas disease. In the present study, we further characterize the cytokine-mediated microenvironment to provide supportive evidence of the utility of cynomolgus macaques as a model for drug development for human Chagas disease. In this cross-sectional study design, flow cytometry and systems biology approaches were used to characterize the ex vivo and in vitro T. cruzi-specific functional cytokine signature of circulating leukocytes from TcI-T. cruzi naturally infected cynomolgus macaques (CH). Results showed that CH presented an overall CD4+-derived IFN-γ pattern regulated by IL-10-derived from CD4+ T-cells and B-cells, contrasting with the baseline profile observed in non-infected hosts (NI). Homologous TcI-T. cruzi-antigen recall in vitro induced a broad pro-inflammatory cytokine response in CH, mediated by TNF from innate/adaptive cells, counterbalanced by monocyte/B-cell-derived IL-10. TcIV-antigen triggered a more selective cytokine signature mediated by NK and T-cell-derived IFN-γ with modest regulation by IL-10 from T-cells. While NI presented a cytokine network comprised of small number of neighborhood connections, CH displayed a complex cross-talk amongst network elements. Noteworthy, was the ability of TcI-antigen to drive a complex global pro-inflammatory network mediated by TNF and IFN-γ from NK-cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, regulated by IL-10+CD8+ T-cells, in contrast to the TcIV-antigens that trigger a modest network, with moderate connecting edges. Altogether, our findings demonstrated that CH present a pro-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine signature similar to that observed in human Chagas disease. These data bring additional insights that further validate these non

  10. Characterizing the induction of diabetes in juvenile cynomolgus monkeys with different doses of streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Zou, ChunLin; Wang, JiaYin; Wang, ShuYan; Huang, Fen; Ren, ZhenHua; Chen, ZhiGuo; Zhang, Yu

    2012-03-01

    Juvenile (2-23 years old) cynomolgus monkeys are frequently used as recipients in non-human primate islet transplantation studies. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of different doses of streptozotocin (STZ), and find the optimal dose for inducing diabetes in these monkeys. Fifteen juvenile (2-3 years old) cynomolgus monkeys were separated into three groups and administered with different doses of STZ (100, 68 or 60 mg kg(-1)). Basal and glucose-stimulated blood glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels, as well as body weights were monitored. Hepatic and renal function tests and pancreatic immunohistochemistry were performed before and after STZ treatment. Monkeys treated with both 100 and 68 mg kg(-1) of STZ exhibited continuous hyperglycemia, which coincided with a nearly complete loss of islet β-cells. Two monkeys received 60 mg kg(-1) of STZ, but only one became completely diabetic. During the first week following STZ treatment, hepatic and renal function slightly increased in these three groups. However, 24 hours post-STZ, serum total bile acid levels were significantly increased in monkeys treated with 100 mg kg(-1) than those treated with 68 mg kg(-1) of STZ (P<0.05). These data suggest that 100 mg kg(-1) and 68 mg kg(-1) of STZ can safely induce diabetes in cynomolgus monkeys aged 2-3 years, but 68 mg kg(-1) of STZ, rather than 100 mg kg(-1) of STZ, may be more appropriate for inducing diabetes in these monkeys. Furthermore, body surface area, rather than body weight, was a more reliable determinant of dosage, where 700 mg m(-2) of STZ should be the lower limit for inducing diabetes in juvenile monkeys.

  11. Dose-Dependent Changes in Auditory Sensory Gating in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Cynomolgus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Ya, Jinrong; Wu, Zhe; Wen, Chunmei; Zheng, Suyue; Tian, Chaoyang; Ren, Hui; Carlson, Synnöve; Yu, Hualin; Chen, Feng; Wang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensory gating, often described as the ability to filter out irrelevant information that is repeated in close temporal proximity, is essential for the selection, processing, and storage of more salient information. This study aimed to test the effect of sensory gating under anesthesia in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys following injection of bromocriptine, haloperidol, and phencyclidine (PCP). Material/Methods We used an auditory evoked potential that can be elicited by sound to examine sensory gating during treatment with haloperidol, bromocriptine, and PCP in the PFC in the cynomolgus monkey. Scalp electrodes were located in the bilateral PFC and bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, and occipital lobes. Administration of bromocriptine (0.313 mg/kg, 0.625 mg/kg, and 1.25 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.001 mg/kg, 0.01 mg/kg, and 0.05 mg/kg), and the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist PCP (0.3 mg/kg) influenced sensory gating. Results We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex. Mid-dose haloperidol disrupted sensory gating in left occipital lobe. High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe. Conclusions Our studies showed that information processing was regulated by the dopaminergic system, which might play an important role in the PFC. The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information. PMID:27218151

  12. Effect of P/S ratio (0. 5 vs 0. 9) on hepatic LDL transport at three levels of dietary cholesterol in cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.E.; Funk, G.M.; Turley, S.D.; Spady, D.K.; Dietschy, J.M. )

    1990-02-26

    Interaction between dietary polyunsaturated to saturated (P/S) fatty acid ratio and cholesterol (C) was studied in 6 groups of male cynomolgus macaques fed diets (oleic acid constant) for 72 weeks as follows (C mg/Cal-P/S): (1), 0.06 - 0.5; (2), 0.06-0.9, (3), 0.28-0.5; (4), 0.28-0.9; (5), 2,35-0.5; (6), 2,35-0.9. Plasma C was proportional to dietary C and was affected significantly by P/S in 1 and 2 only. Mean plasma C (mg/dl) at 72 weeks was: (1) 158; (2) 117; (3) 320; (4) 284; (5) 602; (6) 601. LDL-C was significantly higher in (1) than in (2) (90 vs 65 mg/dl). In vivo LDL turnover studies showed that LDL clearance was suppressed by excess dietary C and by saturated fats in low C diets. Receptor-independent clearance was relatively constant. Hepatic LDL transport was determined after injection of 125I-cellobiose-LDL. Hepatic LDL-C uptake was greater in (2) than in (1). LDL-C synthesis was reduced in (4) and (6) compared to (3) and (5), respectively. The authors conclude that (i) hepatic LDL receptor activity is altered by degree of saturation in dietary triglycerides when dietary C is minimal and (ii) saturated triglycerides enhance LDL-C synthesis when dietary C is ample in this model.

  13. Next-generation sequencing reveals a controlled immune response to Zaire Ebola virus challenge in cynomolgus macaques immunized with vesicular stomatitis virus expressing Zaire Ebola virus glycoprotein (VSVΔG/EBOVgp).

    PubMed

    Barrenas, Fredrik; Green, Richard R; Thomas, Matthew J; Law, G Lynn; Proll, Sean C; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2015-03-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing Zaire Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (VSVΔG/EBOVgp) could be used as a vaccine to meet the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak. To characterize the host response to this vaccine, we used mRNA sequencing to analyze peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cynomolgus macaques after VSVΔG/EBOVgp immunization and subsequent EBOV challenge. We found a controlled transcriptional response that transitioned to immune regulation as the EBOV was cleared. This observation supports the safety of the vaccine. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Variability of the env gene in cynomolgus macaques persistently infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 strain ben.

    PubMed Central

    Tolle, T; Petry, H; Bachmann, B; Hunsmann, G; Lüke, W

    1994-01-01

    The sequence variability of distinct regions of the proviral env gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 strain ben (HIV-2ben) isolated sequentially over 3 to 4 years from six experimentally infected macaques was studied. The regions investigated were homologous to the V1, V2, V3, V4, V5, and V7 hypervariable regions identified in the env genes of HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac, respectively. In contrast to findings with HIV-1 and SIVmac, the V1- and V2-homologous regions were found to be highly conserved during the course of the HIV-2ben infection in macaques. The V3-homologous region showed a degree of variation comparable to that of HIV-1 but not of SIV. In the V4-, V5-, and V7-homologous regions, mutation hot spots were detected in most reisolates of the infected monkeys. Most of these mutations occurred during the first 10 weeks after infection. After 50 weeks, new mutations were rarely detected. At most mutation sites, a dynamic equilibrium between the mutated viral isotype and the infecting predominant wild type was present. This equilibrium might prevent an accumulation of mutations in isolates later in the course of infection. PMID:8139054

  15. Widespread gene transfer in the central nervous system of cynomolgus macaques following delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna

    PubMed Central

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Vite, Charles H; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Grant, Rebecca; Bote, Erin; Yu, Hongwei; Pukenas, Bryan; Hurst, Robert; Wilson, James M

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors have recently been shown to transduce cells throughout the central nervous system of nonhuman primates when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a finding which could lead to a minimally invasive approach to treat genetic and acquired diseases affecting the entire CNS. We characterized the transduction efficiency of two routes of vector administration into the CSF of cynomolgus macaques—lumbar puncture, which is typically used in clinical practice, and suboccipital puncture, which is more commonly used in veterinary medicine. We found that delivery of vector into the cisterna magna via suboccipital puncture is up to 100-fold more efficient for achieving gene transfer to the brain. In addition, we evaluated the inflammatory response to AAV9-mediated GFP expression in the nonhuman primate CNS. We found that while CSF lymphocyte counts increased following gene transfer, there were no clinical or histological signs of immune toxicity. Together these data indicate that delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna is an effective method for achieving gene transfer in the CNS, and suggest that adapting this uncommon injection method for human trials could vastly increase the efficiency of gene delivery. PMID:26052519

  16. Measuring T-cell responses against LCV and CMV in cynomolgus macaques using ELISPOT: potential application to non-clinical testing of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kamperschroer, Cris; O'Donnell, Lynn M; Schneider, Patricia A; Li, Dingzhou; Roy, Marc; Coskran, Timothy M; Kawabata, Thomas T

    2014-01-01

    A number of immunomodulatory therapeutics increase the risk of disease associated with latent herpesviruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of the lymphocryptovirus (LCV) family that infects humans. The diseases associated with loss of immunity to these viruses can have major impacts on patients as well as on the commercial viability of the immunomodulatory therapeutics. In an effort to develop non-clinical methods for measuring effects on anti-viral immunity, we have developed an interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay to quantify the number of CMV or LCV-reactive T-cells in peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques. After optimization of various parameters, the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay was characterized for specificity, intra-assay, monkey-to-monkey, and longitudinal variability and sensitivity to immunosuppression. The results show that nearly all animals have detectable responses against both CMV and LCV and responses were derived from T-cells specific to the virus of interest. Analyses of variability show assay reproducibility (≤23% CV), and that variability over time in anti-viral responses in individual animals (larger for LCV than for CMV) was ∼2-fold in most animals over a 3-month time period, which is predicted to allow for detection of drug-induced changes when using group sizes typical of non-clinical studies. In addition, the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay was capable of detecting decreases in the numbers of CMV and LCV reactive T-cells induced by immunosuppressive drugs in vitro. This assay may allow for non-clinical assessment of the effects of immunomodulatory therapeutics on anti-viral T-cell immunity in monkeys, and may help determine if therapeutics increase the risk of reactivating latent viral infections.

  17. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P.; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M.; Sherman, David R.; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Andersen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress–induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56. PMID:22133873

  18. Enhanced immunogenicity of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F subunit vaccine formulated with the adjuvant GLA-SE in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Patton, Kathryn; Aslam, Shahin; Shambaugh, Cindy; Lin, Rui; Heeke, Darren; Frantz, Chris; Zuo, Fengrong; Esser, Mark T; Paliard, Xavier; Lambert, Stacie L

    2015-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes significant disease in elderly adults, but an effective vaccine is not yet available. We have previously reported that vaccines consisting of engineered respiratory syncytial virus soluble fusion protein (RSV sF) adjuvanted with glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) in an oil-in-water emulsion (stable emulsion [SE]) induce RSV F-specific T and B cell responses in mice and rats that protect from viral challenge. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF vs unadjuvanted RSV sF vaccines in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). RSV F-specific IgG, RSV neutralizing antibodies, and RSV F-specific T cell IFNγ ELISPOT responses induced by GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF peaked at week 6 at significantly higher levels than achieved by unadjuvanted RSV sF and remained detectable through week 24, demonstrating response longevity. Two weeks after a week 24 booster immunization, humoral and cellular responses reached levels similar to those seen at the earlier peak response. Importantly, the GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF vaccine induced cross-neutralizing antibodies to other RSV A and B strains as well as F-specific IgA and IgG memory B cells. GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF was also demonstrated to drive a Th1-biased response characterized by more IFNγ than IL-4. This study indicates that a GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF vaccine induces robust humoral and Th1-biased cellular immunity in non-human primates and may benefit human populations at risk for RSV disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M; Sherman, David R; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L; Andersen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress-induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56.

  20. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring protects high-dose depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques from multiple SHIV exposures.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Srinivasan, Priya; Teller, Ryan S; Lo, Yungtai; Dinh, Chuong T; Kiser, Patrick F; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical HIV prevention models use either a single high-dose viral challenge in depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques or repeated viral challenges in cycling macaques. We tested the efficacy of an intravaginal tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) ring in a model combining repeated 30-mg injections of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate every 6 weeks with vaginal viral challenges weekly for 12 weeks. Twelve macaques were randomized to TDF or placebo rings. All placebo macaques became infected after a median of 2 exposures, whereas only 1 TDF macaque became infected at the eighth exposure (P = 0.0012). The TDF ring provides durable protection in a stringent challenge model.

  1. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 10(11) or 4 × 10(12) vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  2. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey David

    2016-03-08

    AGTC is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n=2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 µL containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 1011 or 4 × 1012 vg/mL) and were evaluated over a 3 month period prior to being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on Study Day 5 based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  3. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T. Michael; Miller, Paul E.; Sharma, Alok K.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Smith, Leia M.; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M.; Knop, David R.; Hauswirth, William W.; Chulay, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 1011 or 4 × 1012 vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations. PMID:27003753

  4. Attenuated NYCBH vaccinia virus deleted for the E3L gene confers partial protection against lethal monkeypox virus disease in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Karen L; Babas, Tahar; Rippeon, Amy; Huynh, Trung; Fukushima, Nobuko; Rhodes, Lowrey; Silvera, Peter M; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2013-01-01

    The New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) vaccinia virus is the currently licensed vaccine for use in the US against smallpox. The vaccine under investigation in this study has been attenuated by deletion of the innate immune evasion gene, E3L, and shown to be protective in homologous virus mouse challenge and heterologous virus mouse and rabbit challenge models. In this study we compared NYCBH deleted for the E3L gene (NYCBHΔE3L) to NYCBH for the ability to induce phosphorylation of proinflammatory signaling proteins and the ability to protect cynomolgous macaques from heterologous challenge with monkeypox virus (MPXV). NYCBHΔE3L induced phosphorylation of PKR and eIF2α as well as p38, SAPK/JNK, and IRF3 which can lead to induction of proinflammatory gene transcription. Vaccination of macaques with two doses of NYCBHΔE3L resulted in negligible pock formation at the site of scarification in comparison to vaccination using a single dose of NYCBH, but still elicited neutralizing antibodies and protected 75% of the animals from mortality after challenge with MPXV. However, NYCBHΔE3L-vaccinated animals developed a high number of secondary skin lesions and blood viral load similar to that seen in unvaccinated controls. The NYCBHΔE3L-vaccinated animals that survived MPXV challenge were able to show resolution of blood viral load, a decrease in number of skin lesions, and an improved clinical score by three weeks post challenge. These results suggest that although the highly attenuated NYCBHΔE3L allows proinflammatory signal transduction to occur, it does not provide full protection against monkeypox challenge. PMID:22001879

  5. Development of real-time PCR assays for the detection of Moraxella macacae associated with bloody nose syndrome in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Chris A.; Chase, Kitty; Embers, Monica E.; Kulesh, David A.; Ladner, Jason T.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Moraxella macacae is a recently described bacterial pathogen that causes epistaxis or so-called bloody nose syndrome in captive macaques. The aim of this study was to develop specific molecular diagnostic assays for M. macacae and to determine their performance characteristics. Methods We developed six real-time PCR assays on the Roche LightCycler. The accuracy, precision, selectivity, and limit of detection (LOD) were determined for each assay, in addition to further validation by testing nasal swabs from macaques presenting with epistaxis at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Results All assays exhibited 100% specificity and were highly sensitive with an LOD of 10 fg for chromosomal assays and 1 fg for the plasmid assay. Testing of nasal swabs from 10 symptomatic macaques confirmed the presence of M. macacae in these animals. Conclusions We developed several accurate, sensitive, and species-specific real-time PCR assays for the detection of M. macacae in captive macaques. PMID:26365904

  6. A Long-Acting Integrase Inhibitor Protects Female Macaques from Repeated High-Dose Intravaginal SHIV Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Chasity D.; Yueh, Yun Lan; Spreen, William R.; St. Bernard, Leslie; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Rodriguez, Kristina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Ford, Susan; Mohri, Hiroshi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Ho, David D.; Markowitz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 long-acting (GSK744 LA) is a strand-transfer inhibitor of HIV/SIV integrase and was shown to be an effective pre-exposure prophylaxis agent in a low-dose intrarectal SHIV rhesus macaque challenge model. Here, we examined the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of GSK744 LA as PrEP against repeat high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge in female rhesus macaques treated with Depo-Provera which promotes viral transmission vaginally. When Depo-Provera-treated female rhesus macaques were dosed with 50 mg/kg of GSK744 LA monthly, systemic and tissue drug concentrations were lower than previously observed in male rhesus macaques. GSK744 concentrations were 5-fold lower on average in cervical tissues than rectal tissues. Eight female rhesus macaques were treated with GSK744 LA at week 0, and four female rhesus macaques served as controls. All animals received a high dose challenge of SHIV162P3 at week 1. No infection was detected in GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques, whereas viremia was detected 1 to 2 weeks after SHIV challenge in all control animals. The GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques were given a second administration of drug at week 4 and further challenged at weeks 5 and 7. GSK744 LA treatment protected 6 of 8 female rhesus macaques against three high-dose SHIV challenges, whereas all control animals became infected after the first challenge (P = 0.0003, log-rank test). These results support further clinical development of GSK744 LA for pre-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:25589630

  7. A long-acting integrase inhibitor protects female macaques from repeated high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Chasity D; Yueh, Yun Lan; Spreen, William R; St Bernard, Leslie; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Rodriguez, Kristina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Ford, Susan; Mohri, Hiroshi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Ho, David D; Markowitz, Martin

    2015-01-14

    Long-acting GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) is a strand transfer inhibitor of the HIV/SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) integrase and was shown to be an effective preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) agent in a low-dose intrarectal SHIV (simian-human immunodeficiency virus) rhesus macaque challenge model. We examined the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of GSK744 LA as PrEP against repeat high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge in female rhesus macaques treated with Depo-Provera (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate), which promotes viral transmission vaginally. When Depo-Provera-treated female rhesus macaques were dosed with GSK744 LA (50 mg/kg) monthly, systemic and tissue drug concentrations were lower than previously observed in male rhesus macaques. GSK744 concentrations were fivefold lower on average in cervical tissues than in rectal tissues. Eight female rhesus macaques were treated with GSK744 LA at week 0, and four female rhesus macaques served as controls. All animals received a high-dose challenge of SHIV162P3 at week 1. No infection was detected in GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques, whereas viremia was detected 1 to 2 weeks after SHIV challenge in all control animals. The GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques were given a second administration of drug at week 4 and further challenged at weeks 5 and 7. GSK744 LA treatment protected six of eight female rhesus macaques against three high-dose SHIV challenges, whereas all control animals became infected after the first challenge (P = 0.0003, log-rank test). These results support further clinical development of GSK744 LA for PrEP.

  8. Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Pawar, Santosh; Myers, Amy; Pegu, Amarenda; Fuhrman, Carl; Reinhart, Todd A.; Capuano, Saverio V.; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the early events of infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cynomolgus macaque is a useful model of tuberculosis, with strong similarities to human tuberculosis. In this study, eight cynomolgus macaques were infected bronchoscopically with low-dose M. tuberculosis; clinical, immunologic, microbiologic, and pathologic events were assessed 3 to 6 weeks postinfection. Gross pathological abnormalities were observed as early as 3 weeks, including Ghon complex formation by 5 weeks postinfection. Caseous granulomas were observed in the lung as early as 4 weeks postinfection. Only caseous granulomas were observed in the lungs at these early time points, reflecting a rigorous initial response. T-cell activation (CD29 and CD69) and chemokine receptor (CXCR3 and CCR5) expression appeared localized to different anatomic sites. Activation markers were increased on cells from airways and only at modest levels on cells in peripheral blood. The priming of mycobacterium-specific T cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon occurred slowly, with responses seen only after 4 weeks of infection. These responses were observed from T lymphocytes in blood, airways, and hilar lymph node, with responses predominantly localized to the site of infection. From these studies, we conclude that immune responses to M. tuberculosis are relatively slow in the local and peripheral compartments and that necrosis occurs surprisingly quickly during granuloma formation. PMID:16790751

  9. Comment to: "Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro" by Z. Ren et al. Exp. Cell Res. 317 (2011) 2950-2957: spontaneous transformation of mesenchymal stem cells in culture: facts or fiction?

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Anja; Røsland, Gro V; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2012-03-10

    There is at present a controversy in the literature whether MSCs are susceptible to spontaneous in vitro transformation or not. Several groups have reported spontaneous transformation of MSCs from various species. However, some of these reports were not true transformations and later proven to be due to cross-contaminating cancer cells. To date there is no solid evidence that MSCs can undergo spontaneous transformation in culture. Only two groups used DNA fingerprinting to authenticate their transformed cells, and both groups later showed cross-contamination of cancer cells in their cultures. In this commentary, we address the paper "Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro" by Z. Ren et al. Exp. Cell Res. 317 (2011) 2950-2957. In this article the authors characterize the transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) and claim to have verified their origin. We question the authentication of the TMCs made by the authors and we also believe it is in the interest of the scientific community, that a highly controversial finding, such as spontaneous transformation of MSCs, should be properly verified by stringent methods, preferably DNA fingerprinting, in order to validate if an actual transformation event has occurred.

  10. Evaluation of the cynomolgus monkey stomach: recommendations for standard sampling procedures in nonclinical safety studies.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Justin D; Mirabile, Rosanna C; Thomas, Heath C

    2008-02-01

    The cynomolgus macaque is the most commonly used nonhuman primate in nonclinical toxicity testing, but the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the stomach in the cynomolgus macaque is poorly described. To develop a reliable sampling method for histologic evaluation of the cynomolgus macaque stomach in regulatory toxicity studies, the stomachs of control animals were prospectively evaluated using an extensive sectioning pattern. The stomach of the cynomolgus macaque differs from that described for the human stomach and has a prominent fundus that lacks parietal cells. A description of the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy is presented along with a recommended sectioning pattern for nonclinical toxicity studies and discussion of species differences. A thorough understanding of normal anatomy and species comparisons are critical to interpretation of potential toxicity findings and assessment of risk in humans.

  11. Milestones in Progression of Primary Pneumonic Plague in Cynomolgus Macaques▿

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Frederick; Perlin, David S.; Park, Steven; Brasel, Trevor; Gigliotti, Andrew; Barr, Edward; Myers, Leslie; Layton, Robert C.; Sherwood, Robert; Lyons, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccines against primary pneumonic plague, a potential bioweapon, must be tested for efficacy in well-characterized nonhuman primate models. Telemetered cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were challenged by the aerosol route with doses equivalent to approximately 100 50% effective doses of Yersinia pestis strain CO92 and necropsied at 24-h intervals postexposure (p.e.). Data for telemetered heart rates, respiratory rates, and increases in the temperature greater than the diurnal baseline values identified the onset of the systemic response at 55 to 60 h p.e. in all animals observed for at least 70 h p.e. Bacteremia was detected at 72 h p.e. by a Yersinia 16S rRNA-specific quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and was detected later by the culture method at the time of moribund necropsy. By 72 h p.e. multilobar pneumonia with diffuse septal inflammation consistent with early bacteremia was established, and all lung tissues had a high bacterial burden. The levels of cytokines or chemokines in serum were not significantly elevated at any time, and only the interleukin-1β, CCL2, and CCL3 levels were elevated in lung tissue. Inhalational plague in the cynomolgus macaque inoculated by the aerosol route produces most clinical features of the human disease, and in addition the disease progression mimics the disease progression from the anti-inflammatory phase to the proinflammatory phase described for the murine model. Defined milestones of disease progression, particularly the onset of fever, tachypnea, and bacteremia, should be useful for evaluating the efficacy of candidate vaccines. PMID:20385751

  12. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges)

    PubMed Central

    Dye, John M.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Wells, Jay B.; Unfer, Robert C.; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Nichols, Donald K.; Aman, M. Javad; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ) challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV. PMID:27070636

  13. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges).

    PubMed

    Dye, John M; Warfield, Kelly L; Wells, Jay B; Unfer, Robert C; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Nichols, Donald K; Aman, M Javad; Bavari, Sina

    2016-04-08

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ) challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  14. The delayed pulmonary syndrome following acute high-dose irradiation: a rhesus macaque model.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Michael; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; Harper, Jamie; Ward, Amanda; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Cui, Wanchang; Gibbs, Allison; Lasio, Giovanni; Jackson, William; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Several radiation dose- and time-dependent tissue sequelae develop following acute high-dose radiation exposure. One of the recognized delayed effects of such exposures is lung injury, characterized by respiratory failure as a result of pneumonitis that may subsequently develop into lung fibrosis. Since this pulmonary subsyndrome may be associated with high morbidity and mortality, comprehensive treatment following high-dose irradiation will ideally include treatments that mitigate both the acute hematologic and gastrointestinal subsyndromes as well as the delayed pulmonary syndrome. Currently, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to counteract the effects of acute radiation exposure. Moreover, there are no relevant large animal models of radiation-induced lung injury that permit efficacy testing of new generation medical countermeasures in combination with medical management protocols under the FDA animal rule criteria. Herein is described a nonhuman primate model of delayed lung injury resulting from whole thorax lung irradiation. Rhesus macaques were exposed to 6 MV photon radiation over a dose range of 9.0-12.0 Gy and medical management administered according to a standardized treatment protocol. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 180 d. A comparative multiparameter analysis is provided, focusing on the lethal dose response relationship characterized by a lethal dose50/180 of 10.27 Gy [9.88, 10.66] and slope of 1.112 probits per linear dose. Latency, incidence, and severity of lung injury were evaluated through clinical and radiographic parameters including respiratory rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen, corticosteroid requirements, and serial computed tomography. Gross anatomical and histological analyses were performed to assess radiation-induced injury. The model defines the dose response relationship and time course of the delayed pulmonary sequelae and consequent morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it may provide

  15. Repeat-dose toxicology evaluation in cynomolgus monkeys of AVI-4658, a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug for the treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sazani, Peter; Ness, Kirk P Van; Weller, Doreen L; Poage, Duane W; Palyada, Kiran; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2011-05-01

    AVI-4658 is a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug designed to restore dystrophin expression in a subset of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Previous reports demonstrated this clinical proof-of-principle in patients with DMD following intramuscular injection of AVI-4658. This preclinical study evaluated the toxicity and toxicokinetic profile of AVI-4658 when administered either intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SC) to cynomolgus monkeys once weekly over 12 weeks, at doses up to the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg per injection. No drug-related effects were noted on survival, clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, opthalmoscopic or electrocardiographic evaluations, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, and macroscopic evaluations. Drug-related microscopic renal effects were dose-dependent, apparently reversible, and included basophilic granules (minimal), basophilic tubules (minimal to moderate), and tubular vacuolation (minimal to mild). These data establish the tolerability of AVI-4658 at doses up to and including the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg by IV bolus or SC injection.

  16. Pathology of lethal and sublethal doses of aerosolized ricin in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Manoj; Didier, Peter J; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Doyle, Lara A; Holley, Jane; Roy, Chad J

    2014-01-01

    Ricin toxin, a type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein and a category B bioterrorism agent, is produced from the seeds of castor oil plant (Ricinus communis). Chronic pathological changes in survivors of aerosolized ricin exposure have not been reported in primates. Here we compare and contrast the pathological changes manifested between rhesus macaques (RM) that succumbed to lethal dose of ricin (group I) and survivor RM exposed to low dose of ricin (group II). All animals in group I exhibited severe diffuse, necrotizing bronchiolitis and alveolitis with fibrinopurulent bronchointerstitial pneumonia, massive alveolar, perivascular and peribronchial/bronchiolar edema with hemorrhage, and necropurulent and hemorrhagic tracheobronchial lymphadenitis. All animals from group II had multifocal, fibrosing interstitial pneumonia with prominent alveolar histiocytosis and type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. Subacute changes like infiltration by lymphocytes and plasma cells and persistence of edematous fluid were occasionally present in lung and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. The changes appear to be a continuum wherein the inflammatory response shifts from an acute to subacute/chronic reparative process if the animals can survive the initial insult.

  17. Comparative reactivity of human IgE to cynomolgus monkey and human effector cells and effects on IgE effector cell potency

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Louise; Saul, Louise; Josephs, Debra H; Josephs, Debra H; Cutler, Keith; Cutler, Keith; Bradwell, Andrew; Bradwell, Andrew; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Selkirk, Chris; Selkirk, Chris; Gould, Hannah J; Gould, Hannah J; Jones, Paul; Jones, Paul; Spicer, James F; Spicer, James F; Karagiannis, Sophia N; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to genetic similarities with humans, primates of the macaque genus such as the cynomolgus monkey are often chosen as models for toxicology studies of antibody therapies. IgE therapeutics in development depend upon engagement with the FcεRI and FcεRII receptors on immune effector cells for their function. Only limited knowledge of the primate IgE immune system is available to inform the choice of models for mechanistic and safety evaluations.   Methods: The recognition of human IgE by peripheral blood lymphocytes from cynomolgus monkey and man was compared. We used effector cells from each species in ex vivo affinity, dose-response, antibody-receptor dissociation and potency assays. Results: We report cross-reactivity of human IgE Fc with cynomolgus monkey cells, and comparable binding kinetics to peripheral blood lymphocytes from both species. In competition and dissociation assays, however, human IgE dissociated faster from cynomolgus monkey compared with human effector cells. Differences in association and dissociation kinetics were reflected in effector cell potency assays of IgE-mediated target cell killing, with higher concentrations of human IgE needed to elicit effector response in the cynomolgus monkey system. Additionally, human IgE binding on immune effector cells yielded significantly different cytokine release profiles in each species. Conclusion: These data suggest that human IgE binds with different characteristics to human and cynomolgus monkey IgE effector cells. This is likely to affect the potency of IgE effector functions in these two species, and so has relevance for the selection of biologically-relevant model systems when designing pre-clinical toxicology and functional studies. PMID:24492303

  18. Spontaneous obesity-linked type 2 diabetes in the absence of islet amyloid in a cynomolgus monkey infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Strom, A; Yutzy, B; Kruip, C; Völker, I; Schloot, N C; Roden, M; Scott, F W; Löwer, J; Holznagel, E

    2013-09-01

    A 9-year-old cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) infected orally with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia 4 years post infection (p.i.). This macaque R984 was exposed to a BSE dose that causes a simian form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) within 5 years p.i. in other macaques. All orally BSE-infected macaques developed a significant weight gain within the first 2 years p.i. compared with non-BSE-infected age- and sex-matched control animals, suggesting increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In contrast, macaque R984 developed rapid weight loss, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria and had to be euthanatized 4 years p.i. before clinical signs of vCJD. Pancreas histopathological evaluation revealed severe islet degeneration but, remarkably, no islet amyloid deposits were present. Immunostaining of pancreas sections for insulin and glucagon confirmed the loss of endocrine cells. In addition, prions were present in the adenohypophysis but not in other areas of the brain, indicating centripetal prion spread from the gut during the preclinical phase of BSE infection. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations of macaque R984 became abnormal with age and resembled T2D. This unusual case of spontaneous T2D in the absence of islet amyloid deposits could have been due to early prion spread from the periphery to the endocrine system or could have occurred spontaneously.

  19. A biosafety evaluation of synchrotron radiation X-ray to skin and bone marrow: single dose irradiation study of rats and macaques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yifan; Tang, Guanghui; Lin, Hui; Lin, Xiaojie; Jiang, Lu; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Wang, Yongting

    2017-06-01

    Very limited experimental data is available regarding the safe dosages related to synchrotron radiation (SR) procedures. We used young rats and macaques to address bone marrow and skin tolerance to various doses of synchrotron radiation. Rats were subjected to 0, 0.5, 2.5, 5, 25 or 100 Gy local SR X-ray irradiation at left hind limb. Rat blood samples were analyzed at 2-90 days after irradiation. The SR X-ray irradiated skin and tibia were sectioned for morphological examination. For non-human primate study, three male macaques were subjected to 0.5 or 2.5 Gy SR X-ray on crus. Skin responses of macaques were observed. All rats that received SR X-ray irradiation doses greater than 2.5 Gy experienced hair loss and bone-growth inhibition, which were accompanied by decreased number of follicles, thickened epidermal layer, and decreased density of bone marrow cells (p < 0.05). Macaque skin could tolerate 0.5 Gy SR X-ray but showed significant hair loss when the dose was raised above 2.5 Gy. The safety threshold doses of SR X-ray for rat skin, bone marrow and macaque skin are between 0.5 and 2.5 Gy. Our study provided essential information regarding the biosafety of SR X-ray irradiation.

  20. Evaluation of Serum Lipid, Thyroid, and Hepatic Clinical Chemistries in Association With Serum Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) in Cynomolgus Monkeys After Oral Dosing With Potassium PFOS

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bruce C.; Andres, Kara L.; Ehresman, David J.; Falvo, Ria; Provencher, Anne; Olsen, Geary W.; Butenhoff, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An oral dose study with perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was undertaken to identify potential associations between serum PFOS and changes in serum clinical chemistry parameters in purpose-bred young adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). In this study, control group (n = 6/sex) was sham-dosed with vehicle (0.5% Tween 20 and 5% ethanol in water), low-dose group (n = 6/sex) received 1 single K+PFOS dose (9 mg/kg), and high-dose group (n = 4–6/sex) received 3 separate K+ PFOS doses (11–17.2 mg/kg). Monkeys were given routine checkups and observed carefully for health problems on a daily basis. Scheduled blood samples were drawn from all monkeys prior to, during, and after K+PFOS administration for up to 1 year and they were analyzed for PFOS concentrations and clinical chemistry markers for coagulation, lipids, hepatic, renal, electrolytes, and thyroid-related hormones. No mortality occurred during the study. All the monkeys were healthy, gained weight, and were released back to the colony at the end of the study. The highest serum PFOS achieved was approximately 165 μg/ml. When compared with time-matched controls, administration of K+PFOS to monkeys did not result in any toxicologically meaningful or clinically relevant changes in serum clinical measurements for coagulation, lipids, hepatic, renal, electrolytes, and thyroid-related hormones. A slight reduction in serum cholesterol (primarily the high-density lipoprotein fraction), although not toxicologically significant, was observed. The corresponding lower-bound fifth percentile benchmark concentrations (BMCL1sd) were 74 and 76 μg/ml for male and female monkeys, respectively. Compared to the 2013–2014 geometric mean serum PFOS level of 4.99 ng/ml (0.00499 μg/ml) in US general population reported by CDC NHANES, this represents 4 orders of magnitude for margin of exposure. PMID:28115654

  1. Activation of innate immunity in healthy Macaca mulatta macaques by a single subcutaneous dose of GMP CpG 7909: safety data and interferon-inducible protein-10 kinetics for humans and macaques.

    PubMed

    Stewart, V Ann; McGrath, Shannon; Krieg, Arthur M; Larson, Noelle S; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Christopher L; Brewer, Thomas G; Heppner, D Gray

    2008-02-01

    Following a demonstration that mouse-optimized cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides stimulated innate immune protection against intracellular pathogens, we tested the ability of CpG 7909, a primate-optimized Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, to stimulate rhesus macaques to produce interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), a biomarker of immune activation. This study was performed prior to a similar trial with humans in order to facilitate the development of CpG 7909 as an immunomodulator for biodefense. A single subcutaneous dose of clinical-grade CpG 7909 was given to four groups of healthy adult rhesus macaques (0-mg dose [n = 5], 0.75-mg dose [n = 9], 1.5-mg dose [n = 9], and 3.0-mg dose [n = 9]). Directed physical examination findings, clinical laboratory values, and serum IP-10 concentrations were collected at scheduled intervals for 28 days. All three dose levels of CpG 7909 were safe and not associated with significant clinical or laboratory abnormality. The time to peak serum IP-10 concentration was 1.0 days at the 0.75-mg dose and 0.5 days at the 1.5- and 3.0-mg doses. A dose-dependent response was observed for the magnitude and duration of IP-10 concentrations, which remained significantly above baseline for 3 days for the 3.0-mg and 1.5-mg dose groups but above baseline for only 2 days for the 0.75-mg dose group. There were no nonresponders to CpG 7909. These rhesus macaque safety and IP-10 response data closely parallel a subsequent phase 1 human study of subcutaneously administered CpG 7909. A single dose of clinical-grade CpG 7909 induced a rapid, sustained IP-10 response, a biomarker for activation of the innate immune system. Given the similar susceptibilities of humans and rhesus macaques to infectious diseases, the rhesus macaque appears to be a suitable model to evaluate the potential of CpG 7909-mediated innate immune activation to protect humans against pathogens.

  2. Emergence of infectious malignant thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by SRV-4 after transmission to a novel host

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Munehiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Ono, Fumiko; Nakamura, Shota; Sato, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakai, Kouji; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagata, Noriyo; Takano, Jun-ichiro; Okabayashi, Sachi; Hamano, Masataka; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakaya, Takaaki; Iida, Tetsuya; Horii, Toshihiro; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Watanabe, Akino; Kaneko, Akihisa; Saito, Akatsuki; Matsui, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Juri; Akari, Hirofumi; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a lethal hemorrhagic syndrome arising from severe thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques kept at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Extensive investigation identified that simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4) was the causative agent of the disease. SRV-4 had previously been isolated only from cynomolgus macaques in which it is usually asymptomatic. We consider that the SRV-4 crossed the so-called species barrier between cynomolgus and Japanese macaques, leading to extremely severe acute symptoms in the latter. Infectious agents that cross the species barrier occasionally amplify in virulence, which is not observed in the original hosts. In such cases, the new hosts are usually distantly related to the original hosts. However, Japanese macaques are closely related to cynomolgus macaques, and can even hybridize when given the opportunity. This lethal outbreak of a novel pathogen in Japanese macaques highlights the need to modify our expectations about virulence with regards crossing species barriers. PMID:25743183

  3. Relationship of menstrual cycle and vaginal infection in female rhesus macaques challenged with repeated, low doses of SIVmac251.

    PubMed

    Morris, Monica R; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Villinger, Francois; Henning, Tara C; Butler, Katherine; Ansari, Aftab A; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-10-01

    Varying susceptibility during menstrual cycling could be a factor for S(H)IV infection risk in female rhesus macaques. We retrospectively determined vaginal SIV infection time points relative to the menstrual cycle in a group of rhesus macaques (n=11) enrolled in an HIV transmission trial. Eight of nine rhesus macaques became infected around menstruation time.

  4. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  5. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of recombinant human erythropoietin after intravenous and subcutaneous dose administration in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Rohini; Cheung, Wing K; Farrell, Francis; Joffee, Linda; Jusko, William J

    2003-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) were investigated in monkeys. A two-compartment model with dual input and nonlinear disposition could adequately characterize the PK of rHuEpo upon three intravenous and six s.c. administrations. The kinetic model suggests rapid zero-order absorption of part of the s.c. dose (35%) followed by a slow first-order entry through the lymphatics. The s.c. treatments caused a delayed dose-dependent rise in reticulocyte numbers peaking between 100 and 200 h and returning to baseline by 300 to 400 h. This was followed by steady rises in red blood cell (RBC) and hemoglobin counts. A physiological catenary model based on a life span concept with rHuEpo stimulating the production of two cell populations (progenitor cells and erythroblasts) was applied. The model could adequately describe the reticulocyte responses upon the various s.c. treatments, giving estimates of maturation times for cells in the various stages of differentiation including the early progenitor cells (70.4 h), erythroblasts (15.0 h), and reticulocytes (141.6 h) that are close to the literature reported values. An Smax of 3.13 was estimated indicating a moderate maximum stimulation of erythropoiesis, whereas the SC50 was 842 IU/l. The model was used to effectively predict the increases in RBC and hemoglobin counts as well. In conclusion, the physiological PK/PD model developed could adequately describe the time course of rHuEpo effects, yielding realistic estimates of cell life span parameters.

  6. In Vitro Neutralization of Low Dose Inocula at Physiological Concentrations of a Monoclonal Antibody Which Protects Macaques against SHIV Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Davis, David; Koornstra, Wim; Fagrouch, Zahra; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Passive transfer of antibodies can be protective in the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) – rhesus macaque challenge model. The human monoclonal antibody IgG1 b12 neutralizes human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) in vitro and protects against challenge by SHIV. Our hypothesis is that neutralizing antibodies can only completely inactivate a relatively small number of infectious virus. Methods And Findings We have used GHOST cell assays to quantify individual infectious events with HIV-1SF162 and its SHIV derivatives: the relatively neutralization sensitive SHIVSF162P4 isolate and the more resistant SHIVSF162P3. A plot of the number of fluorescent GHOST cells with increasing HIV-1SF162 dose is not linear. It is likely that with high-dose inocula, infection with multiple virus produces additive fluorescence in individual cells. In studies of the neutralization kinetics of IgG1 b12 against these isolates, events during the absorption phase of the assay, as well as the incubation phase, determine the level of neutralization. It is possible that complete inactivation of a virus is limited to the time it is exposed on the cell surface. Assays can be modified so that neutralization of these very low doses of virus can be quantified. A higher concentration of antibody is required to neutralize the same dose of resistant SHIVSF162P3 than the sensitive SHIVSF162P4. In the absence of selection during passage, the density of the CCR5 co-receptor on the GHOST cell surface is reduced. Changes in the CD4 : CCR5 density ratio influence neutralization. Conclusions Low concentrations of IgG1 b12 completely inactivate small doses of the neutralization resistant SHIV SF162P3. Assays need to be modified to quantify this effect. Results from modified assays may predict protection following repeated low-dose shiv challenges in rhesus macaques. It should be possible to induce this level of antibody by vaccination so that modified assays could predict the outcome of

  7. In vitro neutralization of low dose inocula at physiological concentrations of a monoclonal antibody which protects macaques against SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Davis, David; Koornstra, Wim; Fagrouch, Zahra; Verschoor, Ernst J; Heeney, Jonathan L; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2013-01-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies can be protective in the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)--rhesus macaque challenge model. The human monoclonal antibody IgG1 b12 neutralizes human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) in vitro and protects against challenge by SHIV. Our hypothesis is that neutralizing antibodies can only completely inactivate a relatively small number of infectious virus. We have used GHOST cell assays to quantify individual infectious events with HIV-1SF162 and its SHIV derivatives: the relatively neutralization sensitive SHIV(SF162P4) isolate and the more resistant SHIV(SF162P3). A plot of the number of fluorescent GHOST cells with increasing HIV-1SF162 dose is not linear. It is likely that with high-dose inocula, infection with multiple virus produces additive fluorescence in individual cells. In studies of the neutralization kinetics of IgG1 b12 against these isolates, events during the absorption phase of the assay, as well as the incubation phase, determine the level of neutralization. It is possible that complete inactivation of a virus is limited to the time it is exposed on the cell surface. Assays can be modified so that neutralization of these very low doses of virus can be quantified. A higher concentration of antibody is required to neutralize the same dose of resistant SHIV(SF162P3) than the sensitive SHIV(SF162P4). In the absence of selection during passage, the density of the CCR5 co-receptor on the GHOST cell surface is reduced. Changes in the CD4 : CCR5 density ratio influence neutralization. Low concentrations of IgG1 b12 completely inactivate small doses of the neutralization resistant SHIV(SF162P3). Assays need to be modified to quantify this effect. Results from modified assays may predict protection following repeated low-dose shiv challenges in rhesus macaques. It should be possible to induce this level of antibody by vaccination so that modified assays could predict the outcome of human trials.

  8. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment

    PubMed Central

    Kroeker, R.; Bellanca, R. U.; Lee, G. H.; Thom, J. P.; Worlein, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions. PMID:24243351

  9. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, R; Bellanca, R U; Lee, G H; Thom, J P; Worlein, J M

    2014-04-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic, and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions.

  10. Surgical technique for allogeneic uterus transplantation in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Hideaki; Kisu, Iori; Kato, Yojiro; Yamada, Yohei; Matsubara, Kentaro; Emoto, Katsura; Adachi, Masataka; Matoba, Yusuke; Umene, Kiyoko; Nogami, Yuya; Banno, Kouji; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Itagaki, Iori; Kawamoto, Ikuo; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Itoh, Yasushi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Saiki, Yoko; Sato, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Kenshi; Shiina, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    No study has reported an animal model of uterus transplantation (UTx) using cynomolgus macaques. We aimed to establish a surgical technique of allogeneic UTx assuming the recovery of a uterus from a deceased donor in cynomolgus macaques. Four allogeneic UTxs were performed in female cynomolgus macaques. Donor surgeries comprised en bloc recovery of organs with iliac vessels on both sides, and/or abdominal aorta/vena cava after sufficient perfusion from one femoral artery or external iliac artery. Before perfusion, 150 mL of whole blood was obtained from the donor for subsequent blood transfusion to the recipient. Four uterine grafts were orthotopically transplanted to recipients. End-to-side anastomosis was performed to the iliac vessels on one side in case 1 and iliac vessels on both sides in case 2; aorto-aorto/cavo-caval anastomosis was performed in cases 3 and 4. Arterial blood flow of the uterine grafts was determined by intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography. ICG angiography results showed sufficient blood flow to all uterine grafts, and anaemia did not progress. Under appropriate immune suppression, all recipients survived for more than 90 days post-transplantation, without any surgical complications. We describe a surgical technique for allogeneic UTx in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27786258

  11. High susceptibility to repeated, low-dose, vaginal SHIV exposure late in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle of pigtail macaques.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Guenthner, Patricia C; Lin, Carol Y; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Adams, Debra R; Otten, Ron A; Heneine, Walid; Hendry, R Michael; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in susceptibility to HIV or SHIV during the menstrual cycle are currently not fully documented. To address this, the time point of infection was determined in 19 adult female pigtail macaques vaginally challenged during their undisturbed menstrual cycles with repeated, low-dose SHIV(SF162P3) exposures. Eighteen macaques (95%) first displayed viremia in the follicular phase, as compared with 1 macaque (5%) in the luteal phase (P < 0.0001). Due to a viral eclipse phase, we estimated a window of most frequent virus transmission between days 24 and 31 of the menstrual cycle, in the late luteal phase. Thus, susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection is significantly elevated in the second half of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are high and when local immunity may be low. Such susceptibility windows have been postulated before but not definitively documented. Our data support the findings of higher susceptibility to HIV in women during progesterone-dominated periods including pregnancy and contraceptive use.

  12. Molecular Evolution Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope in Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques: Implications for Challenge Dose Selection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Mariana; Landskron, Lisa; Lai, Rachel P. J.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Bogers, Willy M.; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Dubbes, Rob; Barnett, Susan W.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Since the demonstration that almost 80% of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections result from the transmission of a single variant from the donor, biological features similar to those of HIV mucosal transmission have been reported for macaques inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Here we describe the early diversification events and the impact of challenge doses on viral kinetics and on the number of variants transmitted in macaques infected with the chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIVsf162p4. We show that there is a correlation between the dose administered and the number of variants transmitted and that certain inoculum variants are preferentially transmitted. This could provide insight into the viral determinants of transmission and could aid in vaccine development. Challenge through the mucosal route with high doses results in the transmission of multiple variants in all the animals. Such an unrealistic scenario could underestimate potential intervention measures. We thus propose the use of molecular evolution analysis to aid in the determination of challenge doses that better mimic the transmission dynamics seen in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:21795341

  13. Multi-dose Romidepsin Reactivates Replication Competent SIV in Post-antiretroviral Rhesus Macaque Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Policicchio, Benjamin B.; Xu, Cuiling; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Raehtz, Kevin D.; He, Tianyu; Ma, Dongzhu; Li, Hui; Haret-Richter, George S.; Dunsmore, Tammy; Trichel, Anita; Mellors, John W.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Viruses that persist despite seemingly effective antiretroviral treatment (ART) and can reinitiate infection if treatment is stopped preclude definitive treatment of HIV-1 infected individuals, requiring lifelong ART. Among strategies proposed for targeting these viral reservoirs, the premise of the “shock and kill” strategy is to induce expression of latent proviruses [for example with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis)] resulting in elimination of the affected cells through viral cytolysis or immune clearance mechanisms. Yet, ex vivo studies reported that HDACis have variable efficacy for reactivating latent proviruses, and hinder immune functions. We developed a nonhuman primate model of post-treatment control of SIV through early and prolonged administration of ART and performed in vivo reactivation experiments in controller RMs, evaluating the ability of the HDACi romidepsin (RMD) to reactivate SIV and the impact of RMD treatment on SIV-specific T cell responses. Ten RMs were IV-infected with a SIVsmmFTq transmitted-founder infectious molecular clone. Four RMs received conventional ART for >9 months, starting from 65 days post-infection. SIVsmmFTq plasma viremia was robustly controlled to <10 SIV RNA copies/mL with ART, without viral blips. At ART cessation, initial rebound viremia to ~106 copies/mL was followed by a decline to < 10 copies/mL, suggesting effective immune control. Three post-treatment controller RMs received three doses of RMD every 35–50 days, followed by in vivo experimental depletion of CD8+ cells using monoclonal antibody M-T807R1. RMD was well-tolerated and resulted in a rapid and massive surge in T cell activation, as well as significant virus rebounds (~104 copies/ml) peaking at 5–12 days post-treatment. CD8+ cell depletion resulted in a more robust viral rebound (107 copies/ml) that was controlled upon CD8+ T cell recovery. Our results show that RMD can reactivate SIV in vivo in the setting of post-ART viral control

  14. Identification and characterization of macaque CD89 (immunoglobulin A Fc receptor)

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Kenneth A; Scinicariello, Franco; Attanasio, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) molecule with its specific cellular receptor is necessary to trigger a variety of effector functions able to clear IgA-opsonized antigens. The human IgA-specific Fc receptor, FcαRI or CD89, is expressed on cells of the myeloid lineage. Recently, CD89 homologues have been identified in rats and cattle. Because non-human primates represent well established models for a variety of human diseases and for the testing of immunotherapeutic strategies, we cloned and sequenced cDNAs corresponding to the CD89 gene from rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Macaque sequences of full-length CD89 consist of five exons of length identical to the corresponding human CD89 exons. The rhesus and cynomolgus macaque derived amino acid sequences are highly homologous to each other (99·3% identity) and exhibit 86·5% and 86·1% identity to the human counterpart, respectively. Transfection of HeLa cells with plasmids containing the cloned macaque cDNAs resulted in the expression of surface molecules recognized by an anti-human CD89 antibody. Five splice variants were identified in rhesus macaques. Three of the five variants are similar to described human CD89 splice variants, whereas two variants have not been described in humans. Three splice variants were identified in cynomolgus macaques. Of the three variants, one is present also in humans and rhesus macaques, whereas the other two are shared with rhesus macaques but not humans. Similarly to the human CD89, macaque CD89 is expressed on myeloid cells from peripheral blood. The characterization of macaque CD89 represents an essential step in establishing a non-human primate model for the testing of immunotherapeutic approaches based on the manipulation of the IgA/CD89 interaction. PMID:15379978

  15. Correlation between Virus Replication and Antibody Responses in Macaques following Infection with Pandemic Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Gerrit; Dekking, Liesbeth; Mortier, Daniëlla; Nieuwenhuis, Ivonne G.; van Heteren, Melanie; Kuipers, Harmjan; Remarque, Edmond J.; Radošević, Katarina; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infection of nonhuman primates is a well-established animal model for studying pathogenesis and for evaluating prophylactic and therapeutic intervention strategies. However, usually a standard dose is used for the infection, and there is no information on the relation between challenge dose and virus replication or the induction of immune responses. Such information is also very scarce for humans and largely confined to evaluation of attenuated virus strains. Here, we have compared the effect of a commonly used dose (4 × 106 50% tissue culture infective doses) versus a 100-fold-higher dose, administered by intrabronchial installation, to two groups of 6 cynomolgus macaques. Animals infected with the high virus dose showed more fever and had higher peak levels of gamma interferon in the blood. However, virus replication in the trachea was not significantly different between the groups, although in 2 out of 6 animals from the high-dose group it was present at higher levels and for a longer duration. The virus-specific antibody response was not significantly different between the groups. However, antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, virus neutralization, and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers correlated with cumulative virus production in the trachea. In conclusion, using influenza virus infection in cynomolgus macaques as a model, we demonstrated a relationship between the level of virus production upon infection and induction of functional antibody responses against the virus. IMPORTANCE There is only very limited information on the effect of virus inoculation dose on the level of virus production and the induction of adaptive immune responses in humans or nonhuman primates. We found only a marginal and variable effect of virus dose on virus production in the trachea but a significant effect on body temperature. The induction of functional antibody responses, including virus neutralization titer, hemagglutination inhibition

  16. Toxicokinetics of T-2 Mycotoxin and Its Metabolites in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-30

    species differences in the elimination of T-2 mycotoxin and its slow elimination in primates might be extended to humans. The amount of residual dose (pmol...Security Classification) Toxicokinetics of T-2 Mycotoxin and Its Metabolitec in Cynomolgus Monkeys 12, PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) K.A. Mereish, J.C. Pace, S.M...Toxicokinetics of T-2 Mycotoxin and Its Metabolites in Cynomolgus Monkeys. MEREIS , K. A., PACE, J. G., NASEEM, S. M.. DINTERMAN, R. E., WANNEMACHER, R. W

  17. High Infection Rates in Adult Macaques Following Intravaginal or Intrarectal Zika Virus Inoculation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-07

    variety of factors such as seminal 235 viral load, number of sex acts, and/or co-infection (48, 49) – likely the case for ZIKV. Similar to 236 other...response in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques following intravaginal inoculation of Zika virus. Macaque Sex Viremia* (log10 PFU/mL) DPI Serological...virus. Macaque Sex Viremia* (log10 PFU/mL) DPI Serological response† (PRNT80) DPI ≤ 2 3 4 5 6 7 ≥ 9 7 15 21 28 Rhesus 5 M – – 3.8

  18. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV smE660 or SIVmac251 recapitulates

    SciTech Connect

    Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena E; Keele, Brandon; Li, Hui; Learn, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    We recently developed a novel strategy to identify transmitted HIV-1 genomes in acutely infected humans using single-genome amplification and a model of random virus evolution. Here, we used this approach to determine the molecular features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission in 18 experimentally infected Indian rhesus macaques. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (i.r.) or intravenously (i.v.) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV-1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA 1--5 wk after infection. i.r. inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or a few viruses (median 1; range 1--5) that diversified randomly with near starlike phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or a few nucleotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder viruses. i.v. infection was >2,000-fold more efficient than i.r. infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV-1, and thus validate the SIV-macaque mucosal infection model for HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research.

  19. Pathogenesis of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever in Cynomolgus Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    Vol. 163, No. 6 dritiform cells in the cortical sinuses of the left inguinal lymph node of 1 of 4 animals. Rare immunopositive mac- rophages and...dendritiform cells were seen in cortical sinuses of the right inguinal node, and axillary and mes- enteric nodes of this animal. Although no single marker...noted at day 4. The subcapsular, cortical, and medullary sinuses contained extravasated red blood cells with ev- idence of erythrophagocytosis (3 of 4

  20. Clinical Characterization of Aerosolized Francisella tularensis Infection in Cynomolgus macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-21

    Frederick, MD 21702, United States. Tel: +1 301-619-8495; E-mail address: aysegul.nalca.civ@mail.mil Current Address: @ Division of Animal and Food...Running Head: Aerosolized Francisella tularensis Keywords: Francisella tularensis, tularemia, aerosol, animal model Disclaimer: Opinions...tularemia, the CM was the most appropriate animal species to develop an animal model to test potential medical countermeasures against inhalational

  1. Expression of the Memory Marker CD45RO on Helper T Cells in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Michael; Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A.; Mack, Heather; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Polacino, Patricia; Ho, On; Cristillo, Anthony; Kyung Chung, Hye; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Pincus, Seth H.

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans it has been reported that a major site of the latent reservoir of HIV is within CD4+ T cells expressing the memory marker CD45RO, defined by the mAb UCHL1. There are conflicting reports regarding the expression of this antigen in macaques, the most relevant animal species for studying HIV pathogenesis and testing new therapies. There is now a major effort to eradicate HIV reservoirs and cure the infection. One approach is to eliminate subsets of cells housing the latent reservoir, using UCHL1 to target these cells. So that such studies may be performed in macaques, it is essential to determine expression of CD45RO. Methods We have used immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to study cell surface expression of CD45RO on lymphocytes from PBMC, lymphoid, and GI organs of rhesus, pigtailed, and cynomolgus macaques. Both direct and indirect immunofluorescence experiments were performed. Findings CD45RO is expressed on a subset of CD4+ lymphocytes of all pigtailed, a fraction of rhesus, and neither of the cynomolgus macaques studied. The binding of UCHL1 to macaque cells was of lower avidity than to human cells. This could be overcome by forming UCHL1 multimers. Directly conjugating fluors to UCHL1 can inhibit UCHL1 binding to macaque cells. Patterns of UCHL1 expression differ somewhat in macaques and humans, and from that of other memory markers often used in macaques. Conclusions CD45RO, defined with mAb UCHL1, is well expressed on CD4+ cells in pigtailed macaques. Using tissues recovered from latently infected pigtailed macaques we are determining whether UCHL1, or other memory markers, can define the cellular locus of the reservoir. The low avidity of this interaction could limit the utility of UCHL1, in its conventional form, to eliminate cells in vivo and test this approach in macaque models of HIV infection. PMID:24023920

  2. Genetic diversity of Bartonella quintana in macaques suggests zoonotic origin of trench fever.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Bai, Jie-Ying; Wang, Li-Yuan; Zeng, Lin; Shi, Yan-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Liang; Ye, Hua-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Lu, Qing-Bin; Kosoy, Michael; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2013-04-01

    Bartonella quintana is a bacterium that causes a broad spectrum of diseases in humans including trench fever. Humans were previously considered to be the primary, if not the only, reservoir hosts for B. quintana. To identify the animal reservoir and extend our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary history of B. quintana, we examined blood samples from macaques and performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. We demonstrated the prevalence of B. quintana infection was common in macaques from main primate centres in mainland China. Overall, 18.0% (59/328) of rhesus macaques and 12.7% (39/308) of cynomolgus macaques were found to be infected with B. quintana by blood culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. The infection was more frequently identified in juvenile and young monkeys compared with adult animals. In contrast with the relatively low level of sequence divergence of B. quintana reported in humans, our investigation revealed much higher genetic diversity in nonhuman primates. We identified 44 new nucleotide variable sites and 14 novel sequence types (STs) among the B. quintana isolates by MLST analysis. Some STs were found only in cynomolgus macaques, while some others were detected only in rhesus macaques, suggesting evidence of host-cospeciation, which were further confirmed by phylogenetic analysis and Splits decomposition analysis. Our findings suggest that trench fever may primarily be a zoonotic disease with macaques as the natural hosts.

  3. Genome-wide mining and comparative analysis of microsatellites in three macaque species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanxu; Hou, Wei; Sun, Tianlin; Xu, Yongtao; Li, Peng; Yue, Bisong; Fan, Zhenxin; Li, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Microsatellites are found in taxonomically different organisms, and such repeats are related with genomic structure, function and certain diseases. To characterize microsatellites for macaques, we searched and compared SSRs with 1-6 bp nucleotide motifs in rhesus, cynomolgus and pigtailed macaque. A total of 1395671, 1284929 and 1266348 perfect SSRs were mined, respectively. The most frequent perfect SSRs were mononucleotide SSRs. The most GC-content was in dinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs. Chromosome size was positively correlated with SSR number and negatively correlated with the relative frequency and density of SSRs. The GC content of chromosome SSRs were negatively correlated with relative frequency of SSRs and GC content of chromosome sequences. The features of microsatellite distribution in assembled genomes of the three species were greatly similar, which revealed that the distributional pattern of microsatellites is probably conservative in genus Macaca. The degenerated number of repeat motifs was found to be different in pentanucleotide and hexanucleotide repeats. Species-specific motifs for each macaque were significantly underrepresented. Overall, SSR frequencies of each chromosome in rhesus macaque were higher than in cynomolgus macaque. The maximum repeat times of mono- to pentanucleotide repeats in cynomolgus macaque was more than other two macaques. These results emphasize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of genus Macaca species. Our data will be beneficial for comparative genome mapping, understanding the distribution of SSRs and genome structure between these animal models, and provide a foundation for further development and identification of more macaque-specific SSRs.

  4. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Andrew D; Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D; Miller, Lynn J; Wiley, Michael R; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C; Norris, Sarah L; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E; Shamblin, Joshua D; Kimmel, Adrienne E; Bloomfield, Holly A; Valdez, Stephanie M; Sprague, Thomas R; Principe, Lucia M; Bellanca, Stephanie A; Cinkovich, Stephanie S; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H; Pratt, William D; Palacios, Gustavo F; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-08-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present.

  5. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D.; Miller, Lynn J.; Wiley, Michael R.; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C.; Norris, Sarah L.; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Kimmel, Adrienne E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Valdez, Stephanie M.; Sprague, Thomas R.; Principe, Lucia M.; Bellanca, Stephanie A.; Cinkovich, Stephanie S.; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H.; Pratt, William D.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M. Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-01-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present. PMID:28548637

  6. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi.

  7. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J.; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi. PMID:25946071

  8. Glucocorticoid treatment at moderate doses of SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques decreases the frequency of circulating CD14+CD16++ monocytes but does not alter the tissue virus reservoir.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, Marcin; Liyanage, Namal P M; Doster, Melvin N; Parks, Robyn Washington; Grubczak, Kamil; Lipinska, Danuta; McKinnon, Katherine; Brown, Charles; Hirsch, Vanessa; Vaccari, Monica; Gordon, Shari; Pegu, Poonam; Fenizia, Claudio; Flisiak, Robert; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Dabrowska, Milena; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Silvestri, Guido; Stevenson, Mario; McCune, Joseph; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2015-01-01

    Subsets of CD16-positive monocytes produce proinflammatory cytokines and expand during chronic infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). HIV-infected macrophage in tissues may be long lived and contribute to the establishment and maintenance of the HIV reservoir. We found that the (intermediate) CD14(++)CD16(+) and (nonclassical) CD14(+)CD16(++) monocyte subsets are significantly expanded during infection of Rhesus macaques with pathogenic SIV(mac251) but not during infection of sooty mangabeys with the nonpathogenic isolate SIVSM. In vitro glucocorticoid (GC) treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from uninfected or SIV(mac251)-infected Rhesus macaques and HIV-infected patients treated or not with antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulted in a significant decrease in the frequency of both CD16-positive monocyte subsets. Short-term in vivo treatment with high doses of GC of chronically SIV(mac251)-infected macaques resulted in a significant decrease in the CD14(+)CD16(++) population and, to a lesser extent, in the CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes, as well as a significant decrease in the number of macrophages in tissues. Surprisingly, treatment of SIV(mac251)-infected macaques with ART significantly increased the CD14(++)CD16(+) population and the addition of GC resulted in a significant decrease in only the CD14(+)CD16(++) subset. No difference in SIV DNA levels in blood, lymph nodes, gut, and spleen was found between the groups treated with ART or ART plus GC. Thus, it appears that high doses of GC treatment in the absence of ART could affect both CD16-positive populations in vivo. Whether the efficacy of this treatment at higher doses to decrease virus levels outweighs its risks remains to be determined.

  9. Characterization of Corynebacterium species in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Jaime; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Marini, Robert P.; Shen, Zeli; Buckley, Ellen M.; Peters, Yaicha; Taylor, Nancy; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Tondella, Maria L.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Corynebacterium are important primary and opportunistic pathogens. Many are zoonotic agents. In this report, phenotypic (API Coryne analysis), genetic (rpoB and 16S rRNA gene sequencing), and physical methods (MS) were used to distinguish the closely related diphtheroid species Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, and to definitively diagnose Corynebacterium renale from cephalic implants of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques used in cognitive neuroscience research. Throat and cephalic implant cultures yielded 85 isolates from 43 macaques. Identification by API Coryne yielded C. ulcerans (n = 74), Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (n = 2), C. renale or most closely related to C. renale (n = 3), and commensals and opportunists (n = 6). The two isolates identified as C. pseudotuberculosis by API Coryne required genetic and MS analysis for accurate characterization as C. ulcerans. Of three isolates identified as C. renale by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only one could be confirmed as such by API Coryne, rpoB gene sequencing and MS. This study emphasizes the importance of adjunct methods in identification of coryneforms and is the first isolation of C. renale from cephalic implants in macaques. PMID:22723254

  10. Aerosol vaccination with AERAS-402 elicits robust cellular immune responses in the lungs of rhesus macaques but fails to protect against high-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Patricia A; Bolton, Diane L; Lackner, Andrew A; Kaushal, Deepak; Aye, Pyone Pyone; Mehra, Smriti; Blanchard, James L; Didier, Peter J; Roy, Chad J; Rao, Srinivas S; Hokey, David A; Scanga, Charles A; Sizemore, Donata R; Sadoff, Jerald C; Roederer, Mario; Seder, Robert A

    2014-08-15

    Development of a vaccine against pulmonary tuberculosis may require immunization strategies that induce a high frequency of Ag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in the lung. The nonhuman primate model is essential for testing such approaches because it has predictive value for how vaccines elicit responses in humans. In this study, we used an aerosol vaccination strategy to administer AERAS-402, a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus (rAd) type 35 expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ags Ag85A, Ag85B, and TB10.4, in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed or unprimed rhesus macaques. Immunization with BCG generated low purified protein derivative-specific CD4 T cell responses in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage. In contrast, aerosolized AERAS-402 alone or following BCG induced potent and stable Ag85A/b-specific CD4 and CD8 effector T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage that largely produced IFN-γ, as well as TNF and IL-2. Such responses induced by BCG, AERAS-402, or both failed to confer overall protection following challenge with 275 CFUs M. tuberculosis Erdman, although vaccine-induced responses associated with reduced pathology were observed in some animals. Anamnestic T cell responses to Ag85A/b were not detected in blood of immunized animals after challenge. Overall, our data suggest that a high M. tuberculosis challenge dose may be a critical factor in limiting vaccine efficacy in this model. However, the ability of aerosol rAd immunization to generate potent cellular immunity in the lung suggests that using different or more immunogens, alternative rAd serotypes with enhanced immunogenicity, and a physiological challenge dose may achieve protection against M. tuberculosis.

  11. Reproductive toxicity of denosumab in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bussiere, Jeanine L; Pyrah, Ian; Boyce, Rogely; Branstetter, Dan; Loomis, Mark; Andrews-Cleavenger, Dina; Farman, Cynthia; Elliott, Glenn; Chellman, Gary

    2013-12-01

    Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits bone resorption by targeting RANKL, an essential mediator of osteoclast formation, function, and survival. Reproductive toxicity of denosumab was assessed in cynomolgus monkeys in an embryofetal development study (dosing GD20-50) and a pre-postnatal toxicity study (dosing GD20-parturition). In the embryofetal toxicity study, denosumab did not elicit maternal toxicity, fetal harm or teratogenicity. In the pre-postnatal toxicity study, there were increased stillbirths, and one maternal death due to dystocia. There was no effect on maternal mammary gland histomorphology, lactation, or fetal growth. In infants exposed in utero, there was increased postnatal mortality, decreased body weight gain, and decreased growth/development. Denosumab-related effects in infants were present in bones and lymph nodes. There was full recovery at 6 months of age from most bone-related changes observed earlier postpartum. The effects observed in mothers and infants were consistent with the pharmacological action of denosumab. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using Data from Macaques To Predict Gamma Interferon Responses after Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination in Humans: a Proof-of-Concept Study of Immunostimulation/Immunodynamic Modeling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sarfas, Charlotte; Knight, Gwenan M.; White, Andrew; Pathan, Ansar A.; McShane, Helen; Evans, Thomas G.; Sharpe, Sally; White, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macaques play a central role in the development of human tuberculosis (TB) vaccines. Immune and challenge responses differ across macaque and human subpopulations. We used novel immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling methods in a proof-of-concept study to determine which macaque subpopulations best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations. Data on gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4+ T cells over time after recent Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination were available for 55 humans and 81 macaques. Human population covariates were baseline BCG vaccination status, time since BCG vaccination, gender, and the monocyte/lymphocyte cell count ratio. The macaque population covariate was the colony of origin. A two-compartment mathematical model describing the dynamics of the IFN-γ T cell response after BCG vaccination was calibrated to these data using nonlinear mixed-effects methods. The model was calibrated to macaque and human data separately. The association between subpopulations and the BCG immune response in each species was assessed. The macaque subpopulations that best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations were identified using Bayesian information criteria. We found that the macaque colony and the human baseline BCG status were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with the BCG-induced immune response. For humans who were BCG naïve at baseline, Indonesian cynomolgus macaques and Indian rhesus macaques best predicted the immune response. For humans who had already been BCG vaccinated at baseline, Mauritian cynomolgus macaques best predicted the immune response. This work suggests that the immune responses of different human populations may be best modeled by different macaque colonies, and it demonstrates the potential utility of immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling to accelerate TB vaccine development. PMID:28077441

  13. Using Data from Macaques To Predict Gamma Interferon Responses after Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination in Humans: a Proof-of-Concept Study of Immunostimulation/Immunodynamic Modeling Methods.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Sophie J; Sarfas, Charlotte; Knight, Gwenan M; White, Andrew; Pathan, Ansar A; McShane, Helen; Evans, Thomas G; Fletcher, Helen; Sharpe, Sally; White, Richard G

    2017-03-01

    Macaques play a central role in the development of human tuberculosis (TB) vaccines. Immune and challenge responses differ across macaque and human subpopulations. We used novel immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling methods in a proof-of-concept study to determine which macaque subpopulations best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations. Data on gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4(+) T cells over time after recent Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination were available for 55 humans and 81 macaques. Human population covariates were baseline BCG vaccination status, time since BCG vaccination, gender, and the monocyte/lymphocyte cell count ratio. The macaque population covariate was the colony of origin. A two-compartment mathematical model describing the dynamics of the IFN-γ T cell response after BCG vaccination was calibrated to these data using nonlinear mixed-effects methods. The model was calibrated to macaque and human data separately. The association between subpopulations and the BCG immune response in each species was assessed. The macaque subpopulations that best predicted immune responses in different human subpopulations were identified using Bayesian information criteria. We found that the macaque colony and the human baseline BCG status were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with the BCG-induced immune response. For humans who were BCG naïve at baseline, Indonesian cynomolgus macaques and Indian rhesus macaques best predicted the immune response. For humans who had already been BCG vaccinated at baseline, Mauritian cynomolgus macaques best predicted the immune response. This work suggests that the immune responses of different human populations may be best modeled by different macaque colonies, and it demonstrates the potential utility of immunostimulation/immunodynamic modeling to accelerate TB vaccine development.

  14. Comparative Pathobiology of Macaque Lymphocryptoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G

    2008-01-01

    Lymphocryptoviruses (LCVs) have been identified as naturally occurring infections of both Old and New World nonhuman primates. These viruses are closely related to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, Human herpesvirus 4) and share similar genomic organization and biological properties. Nonhuman primate LCVs have the ability to immortalize host cells and express a similar complement of viral lytic and latent genes as those found in EBV. Recent evidence indicates that nonhuman primate LCVs can immortalize B cells from genetically related species, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between these viruses and their respective hosts. Early work with EBV in tamarins and owl monkeys revealed that cross species transmission of lymphocryptoviruses from the natural to inadvertent host may be associated with oncogenesis and the development of malignant lymphoma. Moreover, simian LCVs have the ability to induce malignant lymphomas in immunodeficient hosts and have been associated with posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease in cynomolgus macaques undergoing solid organ transplantation. This review will focus on the comparative pathobiology of lymphocryptoviral infection and discuss the derivation of specific pathogen-free animals. PMID:19793458

  15. Factors influencing reproduction in captive-bred cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Naiken, Sandiren; Griffiths, Mary-Ann; Edouard, Lindsay; Padayatchy, Nada

    2015-12-01

    The cynomolgus monkey is widely used in reproductive research. However, the effects on their reproductive parameters of infant and maternal factors such as birth order, sex of infants, twin births, maternal age and lactation status have not been fully examined. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine how such infant and maternal factors impact on infant birth weight, birth viability, neonatal loss and retained placenta in cynomolgus monkeys. The study was based on birth data from a cohort of 789 females over an eight-year period. Consistent with reports made in other macaque species, female offspring had lower birth weight compared with males. Birth weights of firstborn infants were lower compared with birth weights of higher birth order infants. Results from the logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of non-viable births was increased by advancing maternal age and retained placenta. As in other non-human primates, maternal age had predictive value for non-viable births in cynomolgus monkeys. The risk of neonatal loss decreased with advancing maternal age but was not affected by birth order. Firstborn offspring did not have an increased risk for neonatal loss, possibly from the practice of retaining mothers in their natal groups, which improved maternal skills in primiparous females. However, infant low birth weight and non-lactating females increased the risk of neonatal loss, and the delivery of low birth weight infants was associated with retained placenta. The results from this study can be useful for scientists conducting reproductive studies and for colony managers in maximizing fertility and infant survival of cynomolgus monkeys.

  16. High Doses of GM-CSF Inhibit Antibody Responses in Rectal Secretions and Diminish Modified Vaccinia Ankara/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Protection in TRIM5α-Restrictive Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kannanganat, Sunil; Wyatt, Linda S; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Chamcha, Venkatesarlu; Chea, Lynette S; Kozlowski, Pamela A; LaBranche, Celia C; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Lawson, Benton; Reddy, Pradeep B J; Styles, Tiffany M; Vanderford, Thomas H; Montefiori, David C; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-11-01

    We tested, in rhesus macaques, the effects of a 500-fold range of an admixed recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing rhesus GM-CSF (MVA/GM-CSF) on the immunogenicity and protection elicited by an MVA/SIV macaque 239 vaccine. High doses of MVA/GM-CSF did not affect the levels of systemic envelope (Env)-specific Ab, but it did decrease the expression of the gut-homing receptor α4β7 on plasmacytoid dendritic cells (p < 0.01) and the magnitudes of Env-specific IgA (p = 0.01) and IgG (p < 0.05) in rectal secretions. The protective effect of the vaccine was evaluated using 12 weekly rectal challenges in rhesus macaques subgrouped by tripartite motif-containing protein 5α (TRIM5α) genotypes that are restrictive or permissive for infection by the challenge virus SIVsmE660. Eight of nine TRIM5α-restrictive animals receiving no or the lowest dose (1 × 10(5) PFU) of MVA/GM-CSF resisted all 12 challenges. In the comparable TRIM5α-permissive group, only 1 of 12 animals resisted all 12 challenges. In the TRIM5α-restrictive animals, but not in the TRIM5α-permissive animals, the number of challenges to infection directly correlated with the magnitudes of Env-specific rectal IgG (r = +0.6) and IgA (r = +0.6), the avidity of Env-specific serum IgG (r = +0.5), and Ab dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (r = +0.6). Titers of neutralizing Ab did not correlate with protection. We conclude that 1) protection elicited by MVA/SIVmac239 is strongly dependent on the presence of TRIM5α restriction, 2) nonneutralizing Ab responses contribute to protection against SIVsmE660 in TRIM5α-restrictive animals, and 3) high doses of codelivered MVA/GM-CSF inhibit mucosal Ab responses and the protection elicited by MVA expressing noninfectious SIV macaque 239 virus-like particles.

  17. Diversity of Human and Macaque Airway Immune Cells at Baseline and during Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Silver, Richard F; Myers, Amy J; Jarvela, Jessica; Flynn, JoAnne; Rutledge, Tara; Bonfield, Tracey; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-12-01

    Immune cells of the distal airways serve as "first responders" of host immunity to the airborne pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb infection of cynomolgus macaques recapitulates the range of human outcomes from clinically silent latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) to active tuberculosis of various degrees of severity. To further advance the application of this model to human studies, we compared profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells of humans and cynomolgus macaques before and after Mtb infection. A simple gating strategy effectively defined BAL T-cell and phagocyte populations in both species. BAL from Mtb-naive humans and macaques showed similar differential cell counts. BAL T cells of macaques were composed of fewer CD4(+)cells but more CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive cells than were BAL T cells of humans. The most common mononuclear phagocyte population in BAL of both species displayed coexpression of HLA-DR, CD206, CD11b, and CD11c; however, multiple phagocyte subsets displaying only some of these markers were observed as well. Macaques with LTBI displayed a marked BAL lymphocytosis that was not observed in humans with LTBI. In macaques, the prevalence of specific mononuclear phagocyte subsets in baseline BAL correlated with ultimate outcomes of Mtb infection (i.e., LTBI versus active disease). Overall, these findings demonstrate the comparability of studies of pulmonary immunity to Mtb in humans and macaques. They also indicate a previously undescribed complexity of airway mononuclear phagocyte populations that suggests further lines of investigation relevant to understanding the mechanisms of both protection from and susceptibility to the development of active tuberculosis within the lung.

  18. Haplessly Hoping: Macaque Major Histocompatibility Complex Made Easy

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Roger W.; Karl, Julie A.; Bohn, Patrick S.; Nimityongskul, Francesca A.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; O'Connor, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products control the repertoire of T cell responses that an individual may create against pathogens and foreign tissues. This text will review the current understanding of MHC genetics in nonhuman primates, with a focus on Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). These closely related macaque species provide important experimental models for studies of infectious disease pathogenesis, vaccine development, and transplantation research. Recent advances resulting from the application of several cost effective, high-throughput approaches, with deep sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to perform MHC genotyping of large macaque cohorts. Pyrosequencing of cDNA amplicons with a Roche/454 GS Junior instrument, provides excellent resolution of MHC class I allelic variants with semi-quantitative estimates of relative levels of transcript abundance. Introduction of the Illumina MiSeq platform significantly increased the sample throughput, since the sample loading workflow is considerably less labor intensive, and each instrument run yields approximately 100-fold more sequence data. Extension of these sequencing methods from cDNA to genomic DNA amplicons further streamlines the experimental workflow and opened opportunities for retrospective MHC genotyping of banked DNA samples. To facilitate the reporting of MHC genotypes, and comparisons between groups of macaques, this text also introduces an intuitive series of abbreviated rhesus MHC haplotype designations based on a major Mamu-A or Mamu-B transcript characteristic for ancestral allele combinations. The authors believe that the use of MHC-defined macaques promises to improve the reproducibility, and predictability of results from pre-clinical studies for translation to humans. PMID:24174442

  19. Haplessly hoping: macaque major histocompatibility complex made easy.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Bohn, Patrick S; Nimityongskul, Francesca A; Starrett, Gabriel J; O'Connor, David H

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products control the repertoire of T cell responses that an individual may create against pathogens and foreign tissues. This text will review the current understanding of MHC genetics in nonhuman primates, with a focus on Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). These closely related macaque species provide important experimental models for studies of infectious disease pathogenesis, vaccine development, and transplantation research. Recent advances resulting from the application of several cost effective, high-throughput approaches, with deep sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to perform MHC genotyping of large macaque cohorts. Pyrosequencing of cDNA amplicons with a Roche/454 GS Junior instrument, provides excellent resolution of MHC class I allelic variants with semi-quantitative estimates of relative levels of transcript abundance. Introduction of the Illumina MiSeq platform significantly increased the sample throughput, since the sample loading workflow is considerably less labor intensive, and each instrument run yields approximately 100-fold more sequence data. Extension of these sequencing methods from cDNA to genomic DNA amplicons further streamlines the experimental workflow and opened opportunities for retrospective MHC genotyping of banked DNA samples. To facilitate the reporting of MHC genotypes, and comparisons between groups of macaques, this text also introduces an intuitive series of abbreviated rhesus MHC haplotype designations based on a major Mamu-A or Mamu-B transcript characteristic for ancestral allele combinations. The authors believe that the use of MHC-defined macaques promises to improve the reproducibility, and predictability of results from pre-clinical studies for translation to humans.

  20. Identification of a novel CXCL1-like chemokine gene in macaques and its inactivation in hominids.

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Otsuka-Ono, Kaori; Miura, Retsu; Osada, Naoki; Terao, Keiji; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusuda, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are a rapidly evolving cytokine gene family. Because of various genome rearrangements after divergence of primates and rodents, humans and mice have different sets of chemokine genes, with humans having members outnumbering those of mice. Here, we report the occurrence of lineage-specific chemokine gene generation or inactivation events within primates. By using human chemokine sequences as queries, we isolated a novel cynomolgus macaque CXC chemokine cDNA. The encoded chemokine, termed CXCL1L (from CXCL1-like) showed the highest similarity to human CXCL1. A highly homologous gene was also found in the rhesus macaque genome. By comparing the genome organization of the major CXC chemokine clusters among the primates, we found that one copy of the duplicated CXCL1 genes turned into a pseudogene in the hominids, whereas the gene in macaques has been maintained as a functionally active CXCL1L. In addition, cynomolgus macaque was found to contain an additional CXC chemokine highly homologous to CXCL3, termed CXCL3L (from CXCL3-like). These results demonstrate the birth-and-death process of a new gene in association with gene duplication within the primates.

  1. A combination microbicide gel protects macaques against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase infection, but only partially reduces herpes simplex virus-2 infection after a single high-dose cochallenge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides.

  2. A Combination Microbicide Gel Protects Macaques Against Vaginal Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Reverse Transcriptase Infection, But Only Partially Reduces Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Infection After a Single High-Dose Cochallenge

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernández-Romero, Jose A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides. PMID:24117013

  3. Whole-genome sequencing of tibetan macaque (Macaca Thibetana) provides new insight into the macaque evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenxin; Zhao, Guang; Li, Peng; Osada, Naoki; Xing, Jinchuan; Yi, Yong; Du, Lianming; Silva, Pedro; Wang, Hongxing; Sakate, Ryuichi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Xu, Huailiang; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Macaques are the most widely distributed nonhuman primates and used as animal models in biomedical research. The availability of full-genome sequences from them would be essential to both biomedical and primate evolutionary studies. Previous studies have reported whole-genome sequences from rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaque (M. fascicularis, CE), both of which belong to the fascicularis group. Here, we present a 37-fold coverage genome sequence of the Tibetan macaque (M. thibetana; TM). TM is an endemic species to China belonging to the sinica group. On the basis of mapping to the rhesus macaque genome, we identified approximately 11.9 million single-nucleotide variants), of which 3.9 million were TM specific, as assessed by comparison two Chinese rhesus macaques (CR) and two CE genomes. Some genes carried TM-specific homozygous nonsynonymous variants (TSHNVs), which were scored as deleterious in human by both PolyPhen-2 and SIFT (Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant) and were enriched in the eye disease genes. In total, 273 immune response and disease-related genes carried at least one TSHNV. The heterozygosity rates of two CRs (0.002617 and 0.002612) and two CEs (0.003004 and 0.003179) were approximately three times higher than that of TM (0.000898). Polymerase chain reaction resequencing of 18 TM individuals showed that 29 TSHNVs exhibited high allele frequencies, thus confirming their low heterozygosity. Genome-wide genetic divergence analysis demonstrated that TM was more closely related to CR than to CE. We further detected unusual low divergence regions between TM and CR. In addition, after applying statistical criteria to detect putative introgression regions (PIRs) in the TM genome, up to 239,620 kb PIRs (8.84% of the genome) were identified. Given that TM and CR have overlapping geographical distributions, had the same refuge during the Middle Pleistocene, and show similar mating behaviors, it is highly likely that there was an ancient

  4. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Tibetan Macaque (Macaca thibetana) Provides New Insight into the Macaque Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Osada, Naoki; Xing, Jinchuan; Yi, Yong; Du, Lianming; Silva, Pedro; Wang, Hongxing; Sakate, Ryuichi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Xu, Huailiang; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Macaques are the most widely distributed nonhuman primates and used as animal models in biomedical research. The availability of full-genome sequences from them would be essential to both biomedical and primate evolutionary studies. Previous studies have reported whole-genome sequences from rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaque (M. fascicularis, CE), both of which belong to the fascicularis group. Here, we present a 37-fold coverage genome sequence of the Tibetan macaque (M. thibetana; TM). TM is an endemic species to China belonging to the sinica group. On the basis of mapping to the rhesus macaque genome, we identified approximately 11.9 million single-nucleotide variants), of which 3.9 million were TM specific, as assessed by comparison two Chinese rhesus macaques (CR) and two CE genomes. Some genes carried TM-specific homozygous nonsynonymous variants (TSHNVs), which were scored as deleterious in human by both PolyPhen-2 and SIFT (Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant) and were enriched in the eye disease genes. In total, 273 immune response and disease-related genes carried at least one TSHNV. The heterozygosity rates of two CRs (0.002617 and 0.002612) and two CEs (0.003004 and 0.003179) were approximately three times higher than that of TM (0.000898). Polymerase chain reaction resequencing of 18 TM individuals showed that 29 TSHNVs exhibited high allele frequencies, thus confirming their low heterozygosity. Genome-wide genetic divergence analysis demonstrated that TM was more closely related to CR than to CE. We further detected unusual low divergence regions between TM and CR. In addition, after applying statistical criteria to detect putative introgression regions (PIRs) in the TM genome, up to 239,620 kb PIRs (8.84% of the genome) were identified. Given that TM and CR have overlapping geographical distributions, had the same refuge during the Middle Pleistocene, and show similar mating behaviors, it is highly likely that there was an ancient

  5. Stress Sensitive Female Macaques Have Decreased Fev and Serotonin-Related Gene Expression That Is Not Reversed by Citalopram

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Fernanda B.; Centeno, Maria L.; Costa, Maria E.; Reddy, Arubala P.; Cameron, Judy L.; Bethea, Cynthia L.

    2009-01-01

    Female cynomolgus monkeys exhibit different degrees of reproductive dysfunction with moderate metabolic and psychosocial stress. When stressed with a paradigm of relocation and diet for 60 days or 2 menstrual cycles, highly stress resilient monkeys (HSR) continued to ovulate during the stress cycles whereas stress sensitive monkeys (SS) did not. After cessation of stress, monkeys characterized as HSR or SS were administered placebo (PL) or S-citalopram (CIT) for 15 weeks at doses that normalized ovarian steroid secretion in the SS animals and that maintained blood citalopram levels in a therapeutic range. After euthanasia, the brain was perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. The pontine midbrain was blocked and sectioned at 25μm. The expression of 4 genes pivotal to serotonin neural function was assessed in the 4 groups of monkeys (n=4/group). Fev (fifth Ewing variant) ETS transcription factor, tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), and the 5HT1A autoreceptor were determined at 7–8 levels of the dorsal raphe nucleus with in situ hybridization (ISH) using radiolabeled- and digoxygenin-incorporated riboprobes. Positive pixel area and cell number were measured with Slidebook 4.2 in the digoxigenin assay for Fev. Optical density (OD) and positive pixel area were measured with NIH Image software in the radiolabeled assays for TPH2, SERT and 5HT1A. All data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA. Stress-sensitive monkeys had significantly fewer Fev-positive cells and lower Fev-positive pixel area in the dorsal raphe than stress-resilient monkeys. Stress-sensitive macaques also had significantly lower levels of TPH2, SERT and 5HT1A mRNAs in the dorsal raphe nucleus than stress-resilient macaques. However, citalopram did not alter the expression of either Fev, TPH2, SERT or 5HT1A mRNAs. These data suggest that stress-sensitive macaques have fewer serotonin neurons than stress-resilient macaques, and that they have deficient Fev expresssion

  6. An MRI based average macaque monkey stereotaxic atlas and space (MNI monkey space).

    PubMed

    Frey, Stephen; Pandya, Deepak N; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Bailey, Lara; Petrides, Michael; Collins, D Louis

    2011-04-15

    In studies of the human brain, a standard stereotaxic space such as the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI space) is widely used to provide a common reference for the three-dimensional localization of functional activation foci and anatomical structures, enabling the comparison of results obtained across different studies. Here we present a standard macaque monkey brain MRI template that offers a common stereotaxic reference frame to localize anatomical and functional information in an organized and reliable way for comparison across individual monkeys and studies. We have used MRI volumes from a group of 25 normal adult macaque monkeys (18 cynomolgus and 7 rhesus) to create a common standard macaque monkey brain as well as atlases for each of these species separately. In addition, the digital macaque monkey volume was subjected to 3D volumetric analysis and comparison of brain structures between the individual brains and the average atlas. Furthermore, we provide a means of transforming any macaque MRI volume into MNI monkey space coordinates in 3D using simple web based tools. Coordinates in MNI monkey space can also be transformed into the coordinate system of a detailed neuroanatomical paper atlas (Paxinos et al., 2008), enabling researchers to identify and delineate cortical and subcortical structures in their individual macaque monkey brains.

  7. Immunogenicity of a reduced-dose whole killed rabies vaccine is significantly enhanced by ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, Merck amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) or a synthetic TLR9 agonist in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Daniel; Antonello, Joseph M; Bett, Andrew J; Medi, Muneeswara B; Casimiro, Danilo R; ter Meulen, Jan

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for novel rabies vaccines suitable for short course, pre- and post-exposure prophylactic regimens which require reduced doses of antigen to address the current worldwide supply issue. We evaluated in rhesus macaques the immunogenicity of a quarter-dose of a standard rabies vaccine formulated with Merck's amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate adjuvant, the saponin-based ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, or a synthetic TLR9 agonist. All adjuvants significantly increased the magnitude and durability of the humoral immune response as measured by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Several three-dose vaccine regimens resulted in adequate neutralizing antibody of ≥ 0.5 IU/ml earlier than the critical day seven post the first dose. Rabies vaccine with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant given at days 0 and 3 resulted in neutralizing antibody titers which developed faster and were up to one log10 higher compared to WHO-recommended intramuscular and intradermal regimens and furthermore, passive administration of human rabies immunoglobulin did not interfere with immunogenicity of this reduced dose, short course vaccine regimen. Adjuvantation of whole-killed rabies vaccine for intramuscular injection may therefore be a viable alternative to intradermal application of non-adjuvanted vaccine for both pre- and post-exposure regimens.

  8. Efficient production of cynomolgus monkeys with a toolbox of enhanced assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunhan; Li, Jiayu; Wang, Ge; Ke, Qiong; Qiu, Sien; Gao, Liang; Wan, Haifeng; Zhou, Yang; Xiang, Andy Peng; Huang, Qunshan; Feng, Guoping; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) in nonhuman primates is low due to no screening criterions for selecting sperm, oocyte, and embryo as well as its surrogate mothers. Here we analyzed 15 pairs of pregnant and non-pregnant cynomolgus monkeys, each pair of which received embryos from one batch of fertilized oocytes, and found ratio of endometrial to myometrial thicknesses in abdominal ultrasonic transverse section of uterus is a reliable indicator for selection of recipients for embryo transfer. We performed 305 ovarian stimulations in 128 female cynomolgus monkeys and found that ovarian stimulation can be performed in a whole year and repeated up to six times in the same monkey without deteriorating fertilization potential of eggs until a poor response to stimulation happened. Fertilization can be efficiently achieved with both conventional and piezo-driven intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedures. In semen collection, semen quality is higher with the penile robe electrical stimulus method compared with the rectal probe method. Moreover, caesarean section is an effective strategy for increasing baby survival rates of multiple pregnancies. These findings provide a practical guidance for the efficient use of ARTs, facilitating their use in genetic engineering of macaque monkeys for basic and translational neuroscience research. PMID:27173128

  9. Cynomolgus monkey as a surrogate for human aldehyde oxidase metabolism of the EGFR inhibitor BIBX1382.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Cerny, Matthew A; Yang, Young-Sun; Asher, Constance; Wong, Diane; Frederick, Kosea; Gilpin, Kyle

    2014-10-01

    BIBX1382 was an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor under clinical investigation for treatment of cancer. This candidate possessed an attractive preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion profile, yet failed in clinical studies due in part to poor oral exposure, resulting from extensive metabolism by aldehyde oxidase (AO). In vitro metabolism studies were performed in liver cytosol and cryopreserved hepatocytes from multiple species. In addition, a pharmacokinetic study was performed in cynomolgus monkey for comparison with the reported human pharmacokinetics of BIBX1382. Estimated hepatic clearance of BIBX1382 in rhesus (42 ml/min per kg) and cynomolgus monkey (43 ml/min per kg) liver cytosol was comparable to human (≥93% of liver blood flow). Metabolite identification after incubation of BIBX1382 in liver cytosol fortified with the AO inhibitor raloxifene confirmed that AO is involved in the formation of the predominant metabolite (BIBU1476, M1) in cynomolgus monkey. After intravenous and oral administration of BIBX1382 to cynomolgus monkeys, high plasma clearance (118 ml/min per kg) and low oral exposure (C(max) = 12.7 nM and 6% oral bioavailability) was observed, with the exposure of M1 exceeding BIBX1382 after oral dosing. This pharmacokinetic profile compared favorably with the human clinical data of BIBX1382 (plasma clearance 25-55 ml/min per kg and 5% oral bioavailability). Thus, it appears that cynomolgus monkey represents a suitable surrogate for the observed human AO metabolism of BIBX1382. To circumvent clinical failures due to uncharacterized metabolism by AO, in vitro studies in the appropriate subcellular fraction, followed by pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic studies in the appropriately characterized surrogate species should be conducted for substrates of AO.

  10. In vivo individual variations in pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in cynomolgus monkeys genotyped for cytochrome P450 2C9.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Kitsugi, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kanami; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are used frequently in preclinical studies for new drug development due to their evolutionary closeness to humans. An antiretroviral drug, efavirenz, is a typical probe substrate for human cytochrome P450 (P450) 2B6, but is mainly metabolized by cynomolgus monkey P450 2C9. In this study, plasma concentrations of efavirenz were assessed in six cynomolgus monkeys genotyped for P450 2C9 c.334 A > C (I112L) (three wild-type, one heterozygote and two homozygotes) by high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. After intravenous administration at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg, biphasic plasma elimination curves of efavirenz were seen in these cynomolgus monkeys. The mean plasma concentration of the primary metabolite 8-hydroxyefavirenz (1 h after treatment, with hydrolysis by β-glucuronidase) in the wild-type group was significantly higher (4.0-fold) than the combined heterozygous and homozygous group mean. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve value of efavirenz in the homozygous group after oral administration at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg was significantly higher (2.0-fold) than the combined wild-type and heterozygous group. These results collectively indicated that P450 2C9 c.334 A > C (I112L) variation was associated with efavirenz metabolic clearance in vivo. Cynomolgus P450 2C9 polymorphism might account for interindividual variations of efavirenz metabolism in cynomolgus monkeys. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Cynomolgus and rhesus monkey visual pigments. Application of Fourier transform smoothing and statistical techniques to the determination of spectral parameters

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Microspectrophotometric measurements were performed on 217 photoreceptors from cynomolgus, Macaca fascicularis, and rhesus, M. mulatta, monkeys. The distributions of cell types, for rods and blue, green, and red cones were: 52, 12, 47, and 44, respectively, for the cynomolgus, and 22, 4, 13, and 13 for the rhesus. Visual cells were obtained fresh (unfixed), mounted in various media (some containing 11- cis-retinal), and then located visually under dim red (650 nm) illumination. Absolute absorbance (A), linear dichroism (LD), and bleaching difference (BD) absorbance spectra were recorded through the sides of outer segments. The spectra were subjected to rigorous selection criteria, followed by digital averaging and Fourier transform filtering. Statistical methods were also applied to the accepted samples in the estimation of population means and variances. The wavelength of mean peak absorbance (lambda max) and the standard error at 95% certainty of the rod and blue, green, and red cone pigments in cynomolgus were 499.7 +/- 2.5, 431.4 +/- 4.2, 533.9 +/- 2.4, and 565.9 +/- 2.8 nm, respectively. The rhesus pigments were statistically indistinguishable from the cynomolgus, having lambda max of approximately 500, 431, 534, and 566 nm. Statistical tests did not reveal the presence of a lambda max subpopulation (i.e., anomalous pigments). The bandwidth of each alpha-band was determined in two segments, giving rise to the longwave half-density (LWHDBW), shortwave half-density (SWHDBW), and total half-density (THDBW) bandwidths. The LWHDBW was found to have the smallest variance. Both the LWHDBW and the THDBW showed linear dependence on the peak wavenumber (lambda max)-1 for the four macaque pigments. PMID:3598558

  12. Pegfilgrastim administered in an abbreviated schedule, significantly improved neutrophil recovery after high-dose radiation-induced myelosuppression in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Farese, A M; Cohen, M V; Stead, R B; Jackson, W; Macvittie, T J

    2012-11-01

    Conventional daily administration of filgrastim is effective in reducing the duration of severe neutropenia and enhancing survival following lethal radiation, myelosuppressive cytotoxic therapy or myeloablation and stem cell transplantation. A sustained-duration form of filgrastim, pegfilgrastim has significantly simplified scheduling protocols after chemotherapy-induced neutropenia to a single injection while maintaining the therapeutic effectiveness of daily administration of filgrastim. We examined the ability of a single or double (weekly) administration of pegfilgrastim to significantly improve neutrophil recovery in a rhesus macaque model of severe radiation-induced myelosuppression. Animals were exposed to potentially lethal 6 Gy total-body X radiation. After irradiation all animals received supportive care and were administered either pegfilgrastim at 300 μg/kg on day 1 or day 1 and day 7 post exposure, or filgrastim at 10 μg/kg/day initiated on day 1 post exposure and continued daily through neutrophil recovery. Pharmacokinetic parameters and neutrophil-related values for duration of neutropenia, neutrophil nadir, time to recovery to an absolute neutrophil count ≥500/μL or ≥2000/μL, and days of antibiotic support were determined. Effective plasma concentrations of pegfilgrastim were maintained in neutropenic animals until after the onset of hematopoietic recovery, which is consistent with neutrophil-dependent properties of elimination. Administration of pegfilgrastim at day 1 and day 7 was most effective at improving neutrophil recovery compared to daily administration of filgrastim or a single injection of pegfilgrastim on day 1, after severe, radiation-induced myelosuppression in rhesus macaques.

  13. Antitherapeutic antibody-mediated hepatotoxicity of recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL in the cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Zuch de Zafra, Christina L; Ashkenazi, Avi; Darbonne, Walter C; Cheu, Melissa; Totpal, Klara; Ortega, Shirley; Flores, Heather; Walker, Mark D; Kabakoff, Bruce; Lum, Bert L; Mounho-Zamora, Barbara J; Marsters, Scot A; Dybdal, Noël O

    2016-01-01

    Apo2L/TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and an important inducer of apoptosis. Recombinant human (rhu) Apo2L/TRAIL has been attractive as a potential cancer therapeutic because many types of tumor cells are sensitive to its apoptosis-inducing effects. Nonclinical toxicology studies were conducted to evaluate the safety of rhuApo2L/TRAIL for possible use in humans. The cynomolgus monkey was chosen for this safety assessment based on high protein sequence homology between human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL and comparable expression of their receptors. Although hepatotoxicity was observed in repeat-dose monkey studies with rhuApo2L/TRAIL, all animals that displayed hepatotoxicity had developed antitherapeutic antibodies (ATAs). The cynomolgus ATAs augmented the cytotoxicity of rhuApo2L/TRAIL but not of its cynomolgus counterpart. Of note, human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL differ by four amino acids, three of which are surface-exposed. In vivo studies comparing human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL supported the conclusion that these distinct amino acids served as epitopes for cross-species ATAs, capable of crosslinking rhuApo2L/TRAIL and thus triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. We describe a hapten-independent mechanism of immune-mediated, drug-related hepatotoxicity – in this case – associated with the administration of a human recombinant protein in monkeys. The elucidation of this mechanism enabled successful transition of rhuApo2L/TRAIL into human clinical trials. PMID:27512959

  14. Antitherapeutic antibody-mediated hepatotoxicity of recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Zuch de Zafra, Christina L; Ashkenazi, Avi; Darbonne, Walter C; Cheu, Melissa; Totpal, Klara; Ortega, Shirley; Flores, Heather; Walker, Mark D; Kabakoff, Bruce; Lum, Bert L; Mounho-Zamora, Barbara J; Marsters, Scot A; Dybdal, Noël O

    2016-08-11

    Apo2L/TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and an important inducer of apoptosis. Recombinant human (rhu) Apo2L/TRAIL has been attractive as a potential cancer therapeutic because many types of tumor cells are sensitive to its apoptosis-inducing effects. Nonclinical toxicology studies were conducted to evaluate the safety of rhuApo2L/TRAIL for possible use in humans. The cynomolgus monkey was chosen for this safety assessment based on high protein sequence homology between human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL and comparable expression of their receptors. Although hepatotoxicity was observed in repeat-dose monkey studies with rhuApo2L/TRAIL, all animals that displayed hepatotoxicity had developed antitherapeutic antibodies (ATAs). The cynomolgus ATAs augmented the cytotoxicity of rhuApo2L/TRAIL but not of its cynomolgus counterpart. Of note, human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL differ by four amino acids, three of which are surface-exposed. In vivo studies comparing human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL supported the conclusion that these distinct amino acids served as epitopes for cross-species ATAs, capable of crosslinking rhuApo2L/TRAIL and thus triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. We describe a hapten-independent mechanism of immune-mediated, drug-related hepatotoxicity - in this case - associated with the administration of a human recombinant protein in monkeys. The elucidation of this mechanism enabled successful transition of rhuApo2L/TRAIL into human clinical trials.

  15. Developmental toxicity of dibutyltin dichloride in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Mariko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi; Ihara, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl) has been shown to be teratogenic in rats. The present study was conducted to determine the teratogenic potential of DBTCl given to pregnant monkeys during the entire period of organogenesis. Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed once daily by nasogastric intubation with DBTCl at 0, 2.5 or 3.8 mg/kg on days 20-50 of pregnancy, the whole period of organogenesis. The pregnancy outcome was determined on day 100 of pregnancy. In both DBTCl-treated groups, a significant increase in the incidence of pregnant females with soft stool and/or diarrhea, and with yellowish stool was observed. Maternal body weight gain at 3.8 mg/kg and food consumption at 2.5 and 3.8 mg/kg were decreased during the administration period. The survival rate of fetuses at terminal cesarean sectioning was decreased in the DBTCl-treated groups and significantly decreased at 2.5 mg/kg. There were no changes in the developmental parameters of surviving fetuses, including fetal body weight, crown-rump length, tail length, sex ratio, anogenital distance and placental weight, in the DBTCl-treated groups. No external, internal or skeletal malformations were found in the fetuses in any group. Although internal and skeletal variations were found, no difference in the incidence of fetal variation was noted between the control and DBTCl-treated groups. No effect on skeletal ossification was observed in fetuses in the DBTCl-treated groups. The data demonstrate that DBTCl is embryolethal but not teratogenic in cynomolgus monkeys.

  16. TRIM5 genotypes in cynomolgus monkeys primarily influence inter-individual diversity in susceptibility to monkey-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akatsuki; Nomaguchi, Masako; Kono, Ken; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Yokoyama, Masaru; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Hironori; Shioda, Tatsuo; Sugiura, Wataru; Matano, Tetsuro; Adachi, Akio; Nakayama, Emi E; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    TRIM5α restricts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in cynomolgus monkey (CM) cells. We previously reported that a TRIMCyp allele expressing TRIM5-cyclophilin A fusion protein was frequently found in CMs. Here, we examined the influence of TRIM5 gene variation on the susceptibility of CMs to a monkey-tropic HIV-1 derivative (HIV-1mt) and found that TRIMCyp homozygotes were highly susceptible to HIV-1mt not only in vitro but also in vivo. These results provide important insights into the inter-individual differences in susceptibility of macaques to HIV-1mt.

  17. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  18. A new method to evaluate macaque health using exhaled breath: A case study of M. tuberculosis in a BSL-3 setting.

    PubMed

    Mellors, Theodore R; Blanchet, Lionel; Flynn, JoAnne L; Tomko, Jaime; O'Malley, Melanie; Scanga, Charles A; Lin, Philana L; Hill, Jane E

    2017-03-01

    Breath is hypothesized to contain clinically relevant information, useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease, as well as understanding underlying pathogenesis. Nonhuman primates, such as the cynomolgus macaque, serve as an important model for the study of human disease, including over 70 different human infections. In this feasibility study, exhaled breath was successfully collected in less than 5 min under Biosafety Level 3 conditions from five anesthetized, intubated cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, before and after lung infection with M. tuberculosis The breath was subsequently analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 384 macaque breath features were detected, with hydrocarbons being the most abundant. We provide putative identification for 19 breath molecules and report on overlap between the identified macaque breath compounds and those identified in previous human studies.NEW & NOTEWORTHY To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the volatile molecule content of macaque breath has been comprehensively sampled and analyzed. We do so here in a Biosafety Level 3 setting in the context of M. tuberculosis lung infection. The breath of nonhuman primates represents a novel fluid that could provide insight into disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV SME660 or SIV MAC251 recapitulates human mucosal infection by HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Koraber, Bette; Perelson, Alan; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, E; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel approach to the identification of transmitted or early founder HIV -1 genomes in acutely infected humans based on single genome amplification and sequencing. Here we tested this approach in 18 acutely infected Indian rhesus macaques to determine the molecular features of SIV transmission. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (IR) or intravenously (IV) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV -1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA one to five weeks after infection. IR inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or few viruses (median 1; range 1-5) that diversified randomly with near star-like phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or few nuc1eotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder virus( es). IV infection was approximately 10,000-fold more efficient than IR infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV -1.

  20. Poster: the macaque genome.

    PubMed

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) facilitates an extraordinary range of biomedical and basic research, and the publication of the genome only makes it a more powerful model for studies of human disease; moreover, the macaque's position relative to humans and chimpanzees affords the opportunity to learn about the processes that have shaped the last 25 million years of primate evolution. To allow users to explore these themes of the macaque genome, Science has created a special interactive version of the poster published in the print edition of the 13 April 2007 issue. The interactive version includes additional text and exploration, as well as embedded video featuring seven scientists discussing the importance of the macaque and its genome sequence in studies of biomedicine and evolution. We have also created an accompanying teaching resource, including a lesson plan aimed at teachers of advanced high school life science students, for exploring what a comparison of the macaque and human genomes can tell us about human biology and evolution. These items are free to all site visitors.

  1. Protection against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus infection in cynomolgus monkeys by an inactivated H5N1 whole particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Misako; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Itoh, Yasushi; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Kitano, Mitsutaka; Arikata, Masahiko; Pham, Van Loi; Ishida, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Naoko; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Takaya; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Le, Quynh Mai; Ito, Mutsumi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2013-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection has been reported in poultry and humans with expanding clade designations. Therefore, a vaccine that induces immunity against a broad spectrum of H5N1 viruses is preferable for pandemic preparedness. We established a second H5N1 vaccine candidate, A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (Vac-3), in our virus library and examined the efficacy of inactivated whole particles of this strain against two clades of H5N1 HPAIV strains that caused severe morbidity in cynomolgus macaques. Virus propagation in vaccinated macaques infected with either of the H5N1 HPAIV strains was prevented compared with that in unvaccinated macaques. This vaccine also prevented propagation of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in macaques. In the vaccinated macaques, neutralization activity, which was mainly shown by anti-hemagglutinin antibody, against H5N1 HPAIVs in plasma was detected, but that against H1N1 virus was not detected. However, neuraminidase inhibition activity in plasma and T-lymphocyte responses in lymph nodes against H1N1 virus were detected. Therefore, cross-clade and heterosubtypic protective immunity in macaques consisted of humoral and cellular immunity induced by vaccination with Vac-3.

  2. Effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy on bone turnover in periarticular tibial osteophytes in surgically postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Olson, Erik J; Lindgren, Bruce R; Carlson, Cathy S

    2008-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on size and indices of bone turnover in periarticular osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys and to compare dynamic indices of bone turnover in osteophyte bone with those of subchondral bone (SCB) and epiphyseal/metaphyseal cancellous (EMC) bone. One hundred sixty-five adult female cynomolgus macaques were bilaterally ovariectomized and randomly divided into three age- and weight-matched treatment groups for a 36-month treatment period. Group 1 (OVX control) received no treatment, Group 2 (SPE) received soy phytoestrogens, and Group 3 (ERT) received conjugated equine estrogens in the diet; all monkeys were labeled with calcein before necropsy. A midcoronal, plastic-embedded section of the right proximal tibia from 20 randomly selected animals per treatment group was examined histologically. Forty-nine of the sections (OVX control, n=16; SPE, n=16; ERT, n=17) contained lateral abaxial osteophytes, and static and dynamic histomorphometry measurements were taken from osteophyte bone, SCB from the lateral tibial plateau, and EMC bone. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test, correlation and regression methods, and the Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank test. There was no significant effect of long-term ERT on osteophyte area or on any static or dynamic histomorphometry parameters. The bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness in osteophyte bone were considerably higher than in EMC bone; whereas, trabecular separation was considerably lower in osteophyte bone. In all three treatment groups, BS/BV was significantly lower in osteophyte bone vs. EMC bone and significantly higher in osteophyte bone vs. lateral SCB. We conclude that osteophyte area and static and dynamic histomorphometry parameters within periarticular tibial osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys are not significantly influenced by long-term ERT, but

  3. Neurons in the brain of the male cynomolgus monkey accumulate /sup 3/H-medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, R.P.; Bonsall, R.W.; Rees, H.D.

    1986-03-01

    MPA is a synthetic progestin with androgen-depleting activity. It is used clinically to reduce sexual motivation and aggression in male sex offenders. The mechanisms for its behavioral effects are not known. The authors used steroid autoradiography to help identify sites where MPA may act in the brain of male primates. Twenty-four hours after castration, two adult male cynomolgus macaques, weighing 4.9 and 6.6 kg, were administered 5 mCi /sup 3/H-MPA (NEN, 47.7 Ci/mmol) i.v., and were killed 1 h later. Left sides of the brains and samples of pituitary glands were frozen and 4-micron sections were cut and processed for thaw-mount autoradiography. Radioactivity was concentrated in the nuclei of many neutrons in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (n.), arcuate n., medial preoptic n., and anterior hypothalamic area. Virtually no labeled cells were seen in the bed n. of stria terminalis, lateral septal n., amygdala, or pituitary gland. Right sides of the brains were analyzed by HPLC which demonstrated that 98% of the radioactivity in cell nuclei from the hypothalamus was in the form of unmetabolized /sup 3/H-MPA. The distribution of labelling in the brain following /sup 3/H-MPA administration resembled that previously seen following /sup 3/H-ORG 2058 in female cynomolgus monkeys. These data indicate that MPA has a circumscribed localization in the brain.

  4. Validation of Multi-Detector Computed Tomography as a Non-Invasive Method for Measuring Ovarian Volume in Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeryl C.; Appt, Susan E.; Werre, Stephen R.; Tan, Joshua C.; Kaplan, Jay R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate low radiation dose, contrast-enhanced, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques. Computed tomography scans of four known-volume phantoms and nine mature female cynomolgus macaques were acquired using a previously described, low radiation dose scanning protocol, intravenous contrast enhancement, and a 32-slice MDCT scanner. Immediately following MDCT, ovaries were surgically removed and the ovarian weights were measured. The ovarian volumes were determined using water displacement. A veterinary radiologist who was unaware of actual volumes measured ovarian CT volumes three times, using a laptop computer, pen display tablet, hand-traced regions of interest, and free image analysis software. A statistician selected and performed all tests comparing the actual and CT data. Ovaries were successfully located in all MDCT scans. The iliac arteries and veins, uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, ureters, urinary bladder, rectum, and colon were also consistently visualized. Large antral follicles were detected in six ovaries. Phantom mean CT volume was 0.702±SD 0.504 cc and the mean actual volume was 0.743±SD 0.526 cc. Ovary mean CT volume was 0.258±SD 0.159 cc and mean water displacement volume was 0.257±SD 0.145 cc. For phantoms, the mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 2.5%. For ovaries, the least squares mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 5.4%. The ovarian CT volume was significantly associated with actual ovarian volume (ICC coefficient 0.79, regression coefficient 0.5, P = 0.0006) and the actual ovarian weight (ICC coefficient 0.62, regression coefficient 0.6, P = 0.015). There was no association between the CT volume accuracy and mean ovarian CT density (degree of intravenous contrast enhancement), and there was no proportional or fixed bias in the CT volume measurements. Findings from this study indicate that MDCT is a valid non

  5. Validation of multi-detector computed tomography as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Appt, Susan E; Werre, Stephen R; Tan, Joshua C; Kaplan, Jay R

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate low radiation dose, contrast-enhanced, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques. Computed tomography scans of four known-volume phantoms and nine mature female cynomolgus macaques were acquired using a previously described, low radiation dose scanning protocol, intravenous contrast enhancement, and a 32-slice MDCT scanner. Immediately following MDCT, ovaries were surgically removed and the ovarian weights were measured. The ovarian volumes were determined using water displacement. A veterinary radiologist who was unaware of actual volumes measured ovarian CT volumes three times, using a laptop computer, pen display tablet, hand-traced regions of interest, and free image analysis software. A statistician selected and performed all tests comparing the actual and CT data. Ovaries were successfully located in all MDCT scans. The iliac arteries and veins, uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, ureters, urinary bladder, rectum, and colon were also consistently visualized. Large antral follicles were detected in six ovaries. Phantom mean CT volume was 0.702+/-SD 0.504 cc and the mean actual volume was 0.743+/-SD 0.526 cc. Ovary mean CT volume was 0.258+/-SD 0.159 cc and mean water displacement volume was 0.257+/-SD 0.145 cc. For phantoms, the mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 2.5%. For ovaries, the least squares mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 5.4%. The ovarian CT volume was significantly associated with actual ovarian volume (ICC coefficient 0.79, regression coefficient 0.5, P=0.0006) and the actual ovarian weight (ICC coefficient 0.62, regression coefficient 0.6, P=0.015). There was no association between the CT volume accuracy and mean ovarian CT density (degree of intravenous contrast enhancement), and there was no proportional or fixed bias in the CT volume measurements. Findings from this study indicate that MDCT is a valid non

  6. Deleterious impact of feto-maternal MHC compatibility on the success of pregnancy in a macaque model.

    PubMed

    Aarnink, Alice; Mee, Edward T; Savy, Nicolas; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Rose, Nicola J; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-02-01

    The impact of feto-maternal histocompatibility on reproduction has inspired long-lasting debates. However, after the review of numerous articles, the impact of HLA allele sharing within couples on fecundity remains questionable. We decided to explore the impact of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) feto-maternal compatibility on reproduction in a cynomolgus macaque facility composed of animals of Mauritian descent. The Mauritian-derived macaque population presents a very restricted MHC polymorphism (only seven founding haplotypes) due to a strong founding bottleneck effect. The MHC polymorphism was investigated in 237 trios (male, female and offspring) using 17 microsatellite markers distributed across the MHC. Haplotypes were confirmed by segregation analysis. We evaluated the relative frequencies of MHC-compatible and MHC-semi-compatible offspring with the mothers. Among the 237 trios, we selected 42 trios for which the identity of the father is certain and for which the theoretical probabilities of fully compatible and semi-compatible offspring were equal. We found 11 offspring fully compatible and 31 offspring semi-compatible with their respective mother. The observed proportions were clearly outside the interval of confidence of 99 % and therefore most probably resulted from a selection of the semi-compatible offspring during pregnancy. We concluded that MHC fully compatible cynomolgus macaque offspring have a selective survival disadvantage in comparison with offspring inheriting a paternal MHC haplotype differing from maternal haplotypes.

  7. Do vervets and macaques respond differently to BMAA?

    PubMed

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-12-01

    Vervets with chronic dietary exposure to BMAA develop neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and sparse β-amyloid plaque-like deposits in the brain. Macaques dosed via oral gavage with BMAA developed marked neurological signs in the absence of cell death. These differences may result from increased vulnerability of macaques to BMAA, the higher effective dose they received via oral gavage, and the possibility of stable adducts due to the bicarbonate used to neutralize their BMAA dose. Confirmation of chromatolysis and cell death in macaque brains was visualized using toluidine staining. In contrast, immunological staining with AT8 and β-amyloid (1-42) antibodies and thioflavine-S stain in vervet brains suggests early stage labeling of neurites and NFT and plaque-like formation in the absence of neuronal loss. The lack of neurologic deficits reported in vervets is in keeping with early preclinical pathology observed with these immunohistochemical methods. BMAA toxicity in vervet brains causes the early events that occur in the genesis of neurofibrillary pathology. Taken together, these different studies of vervets and macaques demonstrate BMAA toxicity in the brain due to chronic exposures. The use of more sensitive immunohistochemical methods in the vervet study most likely explains the differences in neuropathology reported for vervets and macaques.

  8. Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 gene in the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Dai, Q X; Yao, Y F; Qi, Z C; Huang, Y; Ni, Q Y; Zhang, M W; Xu, H L

    2015-03-13

    In this study, the complete coding region sequence of an innate immune-related TLR4 gene was obtained from the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) genome via PCR and direct sequencing. The sequence had a total length of 2481 bp, contained 3 complete exons, and encoded 826 amino acids (AAs); its isoelectric point was 5.703, and the molecular weight was 94.72 kDa. The high structure prediction showed that the protein was comprised of one extracellular region, one transmembrane region, and one intracellular region. There were 48 potential functional sites in the protein, including glycosylation, phosphorylation, and acetylation sites. A homology analysis among 9 primate species, including the Tibetan macaque, human, chimpanzee, gibbon, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, pig-tailed monkey, squirrel monkey, and small-eared galago, showed that the homology of the nucleotide and AA sequences ranged from 60.9-99.5% and 51.4- 99.0%, respectively. Higher variability was identified in the extracellular region of the TLR4 protein, and its variable sites accounted for 88.79% (AA) of the total variable sites. Additionally, the number of AAs at the 3' end of the intracellular region was notably different among the primate lineages. The phylogenetic tree based on TLR4 gene exons of 9 primate species showed that the Tibetan macaque clustered with the rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, and pig-tailed monkey; it was most distant from the small-eared galago. This study will provide an important basis for further study on the expression, regulation, and polymorphism of the TLR4 gene and the relationship between polymorphisms and host disease susceptibility.

  9. Simian varicella virus reactivation in cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalingam, Ravi Traina-Dorge, Vicki Wellish, Mary Lorino, Rebecca Sanford, Robert Ribka, Erin P. Alleman, Scott J. Brazeau, Elizabeth Gilden, Donald H.

    2007-11-10

    SVV infection of primates closely resembles VZV infection of humans. Like VZV, SVV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons. We used this model to study the effect of immunosuppression on varicella reactivation. Cynomolgus monkeys latently infected with SVV were irradiated and treated with tacrolimus and prednisone. Of four latently infected monkeys that were immunosuppressed and subjected to the stress of transportation and isolation, one developed zoster, and three others developed features of subclinical reactivation. Another non-immunosuppressed latently infected monkey that was subjected to the same stress of travel and isolation showed features of subclinical reactivation. Virus reactivation was confirmed not only by the occurrence of zoster in one monkey, but also by the presence of late SVV RNA in ganglia, and the detection of SVV DNA in non-ganglionic tissue, and SVV antigens in skin, ganglia and lung.

  10. Metabolism by conjugation appears to confer resistance to paracetamol (acetaminophen) hepatotoxicity in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Barrass, Nigel; Gales, Sonya; Lenz, Eva; Parry, Tony; Powell, Helen; Thurman, Dale; Hutchison, Michael; Wilson, Ian D; Bi, Luke; Qiao, Junwen; Qin, Qiuping; Ren, Jin

    2015-03-01

    1. Paracetamol overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in humans. This study was undertaken in cynomolgus monkeys to study the pharmacokinetics, metabolism and the potential for hepatotoxic insult from paracetamol administration as a possible model for human toxicity. 2. No adverse effects were observed for doses of up to 900 mg/kg/d for 14 d. Only minor sporadic increases in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase in a number of animals were observed, with no clear dose response. 3. Toxicokinetic analysis showed good plasma exposure, albeit with less than proportional rises in Cmax and AUC, with increasing dose. The Cmax values in monkey were up to 3.5 times those associated with human liver toxicity and the AUC approx. 1000 times those associated with liver enzyme changes in 31-44% of human subjects. 4. Metabolite profiling of urine by (1)H NMR spectroscopy revealed paracetamol and its glucuronide and sulphate metabolites. Glutathione-derived metabolites, e.g. the cysteinyl conjugate, were only present in very low concentrations whilst the mercapturate was not detected. 5. These in vivo observations demonstrated that the cynomolgus monkey is remarkably resistant to paracetamol-induced toxicity and a poor model for investigating paracetamol-related hepatotoxicity in humans.

  11. Fetal malformations and early embryonic gene expression response in cynomolgus monkeys maternally exposed to thalidomide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was performed to determine experimental conditions for thalidomide induction of fetal malformations and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying thalidomide teratogenicity in cynomolgus monkeys. Cynomolgus monkeys were orally administered (±)-thalidomid...

  12. Fetal malformations and early embryonic gene expression response in cynomolgus monkeys maternally exposed to thalidomide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was performed to determine experimental conditions for thalidomide induction of fetal malformations and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying thalidomide teratogenicity in cynomolgus monkeys. Cynomolgus monkeys were orally administered (±)-thalidomid...

  13. Establishment of a translational endothelial cell model using directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from Cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Eva C.; Heckel, Tobias; Keller, David; Giroud, Nicolas; Leonard, Brian; Christensen, Klaus; Roth, Adrian; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Graf, Martin; Patsch, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Due to their broad differentiation potential, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer a promising approach for generating relevant cellular models for various applications. While human PSC-based cellular models are already advanced, similar systems for non-human primates (NHPs) are still lacking. However, as NHPs are the most appropriate animals for evaluating the safety of many novel pharmaceuticals, the availability of in vitro systems would be extremely useful to bridge the gap between cellular and animal models. Here, we present a NHP in vitro endothelial cell system using induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from Cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Based on an adapted protocol for human IPSCs, we directly differentiated macaque IPSCs into endothelial cells under chemically defined conditions. The resulting endothelial cells can be enriched using immuno-magnetic cell sorting and display endothelial marker expression and function. RNA sequencing revealed that the differentiation process closely resembled vasculogenesis. Moreover, we showed that endothelial cells derived from macaque and human IPSCs are highly similar with respect to gene expression patterns and key endothelial functions, such as inflammatory responses. These data demonstrate the power of IPSC differentiation technology to generate defined cell types for use as translational in vitro models to compare cell type-specific responses across species. PMID:27779219

  14. Effect of soy isoflavones on thyroid hormones in intact and ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Marnie G; Kaplan, Jay R; Appt, Susan E; Register, Thomas C; Shively, Carol A

    2014-10-01

    Soy isoflavones are commonly used to alleviate menopause-related symptoms. Postmenopausal women are at increased risk for hypothyroidism, and there are concerns that isoflavones may be detrimental to thyroid health. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of soy protein and isoflavones on thyroid function and the relationship between thyroid function and ovarian function. Adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were randomized to consume two diets differing only in protein source: casein-lactalbumin (n = 44) or soy protein with isoflavones (n = 41). After 34 months, all animals were ovariectomized via laparotomy. Half of the monkeys from each diet treatment group continued to consume their preovariectomy treatment phase diet (either isolated soy protein [n = 19] or casein-lactalbumin [n = 21]) for an additional 34 months. The remaining animals did not continue their diets and thus were not considered further. Circulating progesterone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone were measured at baseline. Thyroid hormones were remeasured during each treatment phase. Dietary soy increased triiodothyronine in preovariectomized monkeys and prevented a decline in thyroxine after surgical menopause (both P's < 0.05). Mean progesterone concentrations were positively correlated with triiodothyronine at baseline in preovariectomized monkeys (P < 0.01). Progesterone levels and triiodothyronine are positively correlated in macaques. Dietary soy increases triiodothyronine in preovariectomized monkeys and prevents a decline in thyroxine after surgical menopause. The outcomes observed in this study suggest that soy protein and isoflavone consumption does not adversely affect-and may even preserve-thyroid function in postmenopausal women.

  15. Progression of Pathogenic Events in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Variola Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    suggesting potential targets for therapeutic intervention in humans. Results Comparative Pathology of VARV Infection Gross Necropsy Findings. 108 pfu...first became apparent on day 3 and were limited to peripheral and visceral lymphadenopathy and prominent splenic lymphoid follicles in one animal only...Epitheliocentric lesions were commonly found in haired skin and oronasal mucosa. Cutaneous lesions became apparent histologically at day 3, and

  16. Exploring the Potential of Variola Virus Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques as a Model for Human Smallpox

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    hemorrhage, features of a coagulopathy were observed, which included hemorrhagic effusions in the thoracic and abdominal cavities and the ocular anterior...lymph nodes (Fig. 2b). Vesicular and pustular lesions erupted synchronously in a centrifugal distribution, more numerous on the extremities than on the

  17. Experimental Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) with Aerosolized Monkeypox Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    not ethical or feasible, showing efficacy in an animal model that emulates human disease is required by the ‘‘Animal Rule’’ of the US Food and Drug and...was isolated from 200 ml of tissue suspension, 100 ml of blood, or 100 ml of throat swab media with a BioRobot M48 (Qiagen, Valencia, CA) according to...gradually decreased thereafter. There were no group-wise differences between blood or throat swab viral load on days 1–10, but the viral levels in whole

  18. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    natural reservoirs for SARS-CoV. Himalayan palm civets (Paguma larvata) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) were found to be susceptible to...Technology, Salt Lake City, Utah, United Table 1. Summary of Routes of Infection and Clinical Findings Group Route Animal Sex Virus Overt Clinical

  19. Acquisition of intravenous cocaine self-administration with concurrent access to food in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Nader, M A

    2000-11-01

    The present study used a concurrent schedule of food and drug delivery in socially housed male cynomolgus monkeys (Macacafascicularis; N = 15) to study variables that influence cocaine acquisition. Each monkey was implanted with subcutaneous vascular access ports, and responding was maintained under a concurrent food, saline schedule with the lever associated with each stimulus presentation varied daily. Next, increasing cocaine doses (0.003-0.3 mg/kg/inj) were concurrently available with food for at least 5 consecutive sessions per dose. Under these conditions, an unexpected lever bias emerged in all 15 monkeys. The development of the lever bias could not be predicted on the basis of cocaine dose or total intake and was not related to social rank. These findings suggest that in monkeys, concurrent fixed-ratio schedules of food and cocaine presentation may result in persistent biased responding that overshadows cocaine preference in studies of acquisition.

  20. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aiming; Xie Shuilin; Sun He; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Wei Xiaoxiong; Dai Renke

    2009-03-15

    Fibrate drugs are PPAR{alpha} agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity.

  1. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  2. Functional neurotoxicity evaluation of noribogaine using video-EEG in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Authier, Simon; Accardi, Michael V; Paquette, Dominique; Pouliot, Mylène; Arezzo, Joseph; Stubbs, R John; Gerson, Ronald J; Friedhoff, Lawrence T; Weis, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Continuous video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring remains the gold standard for seizure liability assessments in preclinical drug safety assessments. EEG monitored by telemetry was used to assess the behavioral and EEG effects of noribogaine hydrochloride (noribogaine) in cynomolgus monkeys. Noribogaine is an iboga alkaloid being studied for the treatment of opioid dependence. Six cynomolgus monkeys (3 per gender) were instrumented with EEG telemetry transmitters. Noribogaine was administered to each monkey at both doses (i.e., 160 and 320mg/kg, PO) with an interval between dosing of at least 6days, and the resulting behavioral and EEG effects were evaluated. IV pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), served as a positive control for induced seizures. The administration of noribogaine at either of the doses evaluated was not associated with EEG evidence of seizure or with EEG signals known to be premonitory signs of increased seizure risk (e.g., sharp waves, unusual synchrony, shifts to high-frequency patterns). Noribogaine was associated with a mild reduction in activity levels, increased scratching, licking and chewing, and some degree of poor coordination and related clinical signs. A single monkey exhibited brief myoclonic movements that increased in frequency at the high dose, but which did not appear to generalize, cluster or to be linked with EEG abnormalities. Noribogaine was also associated with emesis and partial anorexia. In contrast, PTZ was associated with substantial pre-ictal EEG patterns including large amplitude, repetitive sharp waves leading to generalized seizures and to typical post-ictal EEG frequency attenuation. EEG patterns were within normal limits following administration of noribogaine at doses up to 320mg/kg with concurrent clinical signs that correlated with plasma exposures and resolved by the end of the monitoring period. PTZ was invariably associated with EEG paroxysmal activity leading to ictal EEG. In the current study, a noribogaine

  3. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Nathan; Weinfurter, Jason T.; Harsla, Trevor R.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Belli, Aaron J.; Michaels, Anthony J.; Reimann, Keith A.; DeMars, Robert I.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies. PMID:28719653

  4. Assessment of Cardiac Troponin I Responses in Nonhuman Primates during Restraint, Blood Collection, and Dosing in Preclinical Safety Studies.

    PubMed

    Reagan, William J; Barnes, Robert; Harris, Peter; Summers, Sandy; Lopes, Sarah; Stubbs, Makeida; Blackwell, David; Steidl-Nichols, Jill

    2017-02-01

    Limited information has been published on the use of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as a biomarker of cardiac injury in monkeys. The purpose of these studies was to characterize the cTnI response seen in cynomolgus macaques during routine dosing and blood collection procedures typically used in preclinical safety studies and to better understand the pathogenesis of this response. We measured cTnI using two different methods, the Siemens Immulite cTnI assay and the more sensitive Siemens Troponin I-Ultra assay. We were able to demonstrate that after oral, subcutaneous, or intravenous dosing of common vehicles, as well as serial chair restraint for venipuncture blood collection, that minimal to mild transient increases in cTnI could be detected in monkeys with both assays. cTnI values typically peaked at 2, 3, 4, or 6 hr after sham dosing and returned to baseline at 22 or 24 hr. In addition, marked increases in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) occurred in monkeys during the restraint procedures, which likely initiated the cTnI release in these animals. Monkeys that were very well acclimated to the chairing procedures and had vascular access ports for blood sampling did not have marked increases in HRs and BP or increases in cTnI.

  5. Exposure to Macaque Monkey Bite.

    PubMed

    Johnston, William F; Yeh, Jesson; Nierenberg, Richard; Procopio, Gabrielle

    2015-11-01

    The herpes B virus is a zoonotic agent that is endemic among macaque monkeys only, but can cause fatal encephalomyelitis in humans. A 26-year-old female presented to a U.S. emergency department after being bitten by a wild macaque monkey. The emergency medicine team administered rabies immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine. The team also prescribed acyclovir for prophylactic coverage against herpes B, a deadly zoonotic agent that is endemic among macaque monkeys. A discussion of background, exposure, transmission, symptoms, treatment for herpes B, including latest data available, literature, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines are included. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Zoonotic exposures can cause infectious diseases, which are unfamiliar and deadly. The emergency physician's knowledge of the association between the deadly herpes B infection and wild macaque monkey may expedite treatment and be instrumental in patient morbidity and survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque" and Bartonella quintana bacteremia in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Mascarelli, Patricia E; Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Rohde, Cynthia M; Kelly, Catherine M; Ramaiah, Lila; Leach, Michael W; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2013-05-01

    Here, we report latent infections with Bartonella quintana and a hemotropic Mycoplasma sp. in a research colony of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis, and signature nucleotide sequence motifs of the hemotropic Mycoplasma 16S rRNA and RNase P genes indicate the presence of a novel organism.

  7. Effect of physical restraint on glucose tolerance in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Naoya; Kanazawa, Kanpei; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi; Horikawa, Tadahiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    Physiologic stress has been demonstrated to impair glucose tolerance. Glucose tolerance tests were performed using six cynomolgus monkeys. Chair-restrained subjects elicited higher elevations of plasma glucose and cortisol compared with squeezing device-restrained subjects. The responses to a glucose challenge are altered by different restraint procedures.

  8. Protection against soman or VX poisoning by human butyrylcholinesterase in guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lenz, David E; Maxwell, Donald M; Koplovitz, Irwin; Clark, Connie R; Capacio, Benjamin R; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Federko, James M; Luo, Chunyuan; Saxena, Ashima; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Olson, Carl

    2005-12-15

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE), purified from outdated human plasma, is being evaluated for efficacy against nerve agents in guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. Previous studies in rodents and nonhuman primates demonstrated that pretreatment of animals with enzymes that can scavenge nerve agents could provide significant protection against behavioral and lethal effects of nerve agent intoxication. In preparation for evaluation of efficacy of HuBuChE prior to initiating an investigational new drug (IND) application, the pharmacokinetics of HuBuChE were evaluated in guinea pigs and in cynomolgus monkeys. HuBuChE was injected intramuscularly (i.m.) at two doses, and blood samples were taken to follow the time-course of HuBuChE in blood for up to 168 h after administration. In guinea pigs, the two doses of HuBuChE, 19.9 and 32.5 mg/kg, produced similar times of maximal blood concentration (T(max) of 26.0 and 26.8 h, respectively) and similar elimination half-times (t(1/2) of 64.6 and 75.5 h, respectively). Enzyme levels were still 10-fold over baseline at 72 h. Based on these data, guinea pigs were administered 150 mg/kg of enzyme i.m. and challenged at T(max). Soman or VX doses were approximately 1.5, 2.0 and 2.0 x LD50 administered subcutaneously (s.c.) in sequence at 90-120 min apart. None of the animals displayed signs of organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase intoxication at any of the challenge levels, and all survived for the 14-day duration of the experiment. Similar experiments were carried out with cynomolgus monkeys to determine the pharmacokinetics of HuBuChE and its efficacy against soman. The complete survival of nearly all animals tested to date, coupled with the maximal blood concentration and half-life elimination profile obtained for HuBuChE after i.m. injection, provides strong support for the continued development of HuBuChE as a product to protect against nerve agents.

  9. Thirteen-week Intravenous Toxicity Study of a Novel Humanized Anti-Human Death Receptor 5 Monoclonal Antibody, CS-1008, in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kohji; Sugiura, Tomomi; Koyama, Kumiko; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kamimura, Yasuhiro; Takasaki, Wataru; Manabe, Sunao

    2010-01-01

    CS-1008, a humanized monoclonal antibody that is agonistic to human death receptor 5, was intravenously administered to cynomolgus monkeys twice a week for 13 weeks at 3 different dose levels (5, 15 and 42 mg/kg) in order to evaluate its potential toxicity. A control group received phosphate buffered saline containing 0.01% polysorbate 80. Each of the 4 groups consisted of 3 male and 3 female cynomolgus monkeys. No animal in any group died during the dosing period. No toxic changes in clinical signs, food consumption, body weight, electrocardiography, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, blood chemistry, gross pathology, organ weights or histopathology were noted in any group during the dosing period. In the toxicokinetic analysis, the values for the maximum concentration of CS-1008 in plasma and the area under the curve generally increased with increasing dose. No clear differences in the toxicokinetic parameters or profiles were observed between the sexes. Development of anti-CS-1008 antibodies was not detected in any sample. The no-observed adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of CS-1008 in cynomolgus monkeys under the conditions of this study was concluded to be 42 mg/kg in both sexes, when administered intravenously twice a week for 13 weeks. This study supports the development of CS-1008 as a therapeutic biopharmaceutical. PMID:22272006

  10. Divergent Simian Arteriviruses Cause Simian Hemorrhagic Fever of Differing Severities in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, Louise H.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Charlier, Olivia; Rojas, Oscar; Byrum, Russell; Ragland, Dan R.; Cohen, Melanie; Sanford, Hannah B.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) is a highly lethal disease in captive macaques. Three distinct arteriviruses are known etiological agents of past SHF epizootics, but only one, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV), has been isolated in cell culture. The natural reservoir(s) of the three viruses have yet to be identified, but African nonhuman primates are suspected. Eleven additional divergent simian arteriviruses have been detected recently in diverse and apparently healthy African cercopithecid monkeys. Here, we report the successful isolation in MARC-145 cell culture of one of these viruses, Kibale red colobus virus 1 (KRCV-1), from serum of a naturally infected red colobus (Procolobus [Piliocolobus] rufomitratus tephrosceles) sampled in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Intramuscular (i.m.) injection of KRCV-1 into four cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) resulted in a self-limiting nonlethal disease characterized by depressive behavioral changes, disturbance in coagulation parameters, and liver enzyme elevations. In contrast, i.m. injection of SHFV resulted in typical lethal SHF characterized by mild fever, lethargy, lymphoid depletion, lymphoid and hepatocellular necrosis, low platelet counts, increased liver enzyme concentrations, coagulation abnormalities, and increasing viral loads. As hypothesized based on the genetic and presumed antigenic distance between KRCV-1 and SHFV, all four macaques that had survived KRCV-1 injection died of SHF after subsequent SHFV injection, indicating a lack of protective heterotypic immunity. Our data indicate that SHF is a disease of macaques that in all likelihood can be caused by a number of distinct simian arteriviruses, although with different severity depending on the specific arterivirus involved. Consequently, we recommend that current screening procedures for SHFV in primate-holding facilities be modified to detect all known simian arteriviruses. PMID:26908578

  11. Macaque Proteome Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and 1918 Reassortant Influenza Virus Infections▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joseph N.; Palermo, Robert E.; Baskin, Carole R.; Gritsenko, Marina; Sabourin, Patrick J.; Long, James P.; Sabourin, Carol L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The host proteome response and molecular mechanisms that drive disease in vivo during infection by a human isolate of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and 1918 pandemic influenza virus remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lung tissue over 7 days of infection with HPAI (the most virulent), a reassortant virus containing 1918 hemagglutinin and neuraminidase surface proteins (intermediate virulence), or a human seasonal strain (least virulent). A high-sensitivity two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy strategy and functional network analysis were implemented to gain insight into response pathways activated in macaques during influenza virus infection. A macaque protein database was assembled and used in the identification of 35,239 unique peptide sequences corresponding to approximately 4,259 proteins. Quantitative analysis identified an increase in expression of 400 proteins during viral infection. The abundance levels of a subset of these 400 proteins produced strong correlations with disease progression observed in the macaques, distinguishing a “core” response to viral infection from a “high” response specific to severe disease. Proteome expression profiles revealed distinct temporal response kinetics between viral strains, with HPAI inducing the most rapid response. While proteins involved in the immune response, metabolism, and transport were increased rapidly in the lung by HPAI, the other viruses produced a delayed response, characterized by an increase in proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, RNA processing, and translation. Proteomic results were integrated with previous genomic and pathological analysis to characterize the dynamic nature of the influenza virus infection process. PMID:20844032

  12. Neuroblastoma at the trigeminal nerve in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Akiko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K.; Okazaki, Takanobu; Kobayashi, Kinji; Nakatsuji, Shunji; Matsumoto, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A male cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) of 5 years and 11 months of age from the vehicle control group of a 4-week repeated oral dose toxicity study had a spontaneously occurring mass lesion directly attached to the proximal part of the left trigeminal nerve. Histologically, the mass was characterized by a multifocal nodular appearance. Nodular zones showed low to moderate cellularity and were composed of small round cells exhibiting nuclear uniformity. On the other hand, inter-nodular zones were composed of nerve fiber containing septa and closely aggregated highly pleomorphic cells. Immunohistochemically, the small round cells were strongly immunopositive for synaptophysin, neuN, and class III beta-tubulin, while the highly pleomorphic cells were weakly immunopositive for neuN and occasionally immunopositive for class III beta-tubulin and doublecortin, suggesting that the tumor had originated from a neuronal lineage cell. Based on these findings, the mass was diagnosed as a neuroblastoma at the trigeminal nerve. PMID:27559245

  13. Spontaneous cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor in a juvenile cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Rogerson, Petrina; Blanco, Ana L; Naylor, Stuart W; Bradley, Alys

    2012-08-01

    A neoplastic mass compressing the left cerebellar hemisphere and hindbrain was observed at trimming in a 3½-year-old male cynomolgus monkey from a control dose group. Microscopically, the neoplastic mass was nonencapsulated, invasive, and showed two morphological patterns. The predominant area consisted of densely packed undifferentiated, polygonal to spindle cells arranged in vague sheets supported by a scant fibrovascular stroma. The other area was less cellular and composed of round neoplastic cells separated by eosinophilic fibrillar material. Immunohistochemical staining for vimentin, synaptophysin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament, and S-100 confirmed the presence of primitive undifferentiated neuroectodermal cells and some cells with neuronal or glial differentiation. On the basis of histopathology and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor with neuronal and glial differentiation was made. Primitive neuroectodermal tumors are rare in animals including nonhuman primates; this is the first published report in this species.

  14. Effect of Soy Isoflavones on Thyroid Hormones in Intact and Ovariectomized Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Marnie G.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Appt, Susan E.; Register, Thomas C.; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Soy isoflavones are commonly used to alleviate menopause-related symptoms. Menopausal women are at an increased risk for hypothyroidism and there are concerns that isoflavones may be detrimental to thyroid health. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of soy protein and isoflavones on thyroid function and the relationship between thyroid and ovarian function. Methods Adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were randomized to consume two diets differing only in protein source: casein-lactalbumin (n = 44) or soy protein with isoflavones (n = 41). After 34 months all animals were ovariectomized via laparotomy. Half of the monkeys from each diet treatment group continued to consume their Pre-Ovariectomy treatment phase diet (either SOY [n = 19] or CL [n = 21]) for an additional 34 months. The remaining animals did not continue their diets, and thus were not considered further. Circulating progesterone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone were measured at baseline. Thyroid hormones were remeasured during each treatment phase. Results Dietary soy increased triiodothyronine in pre-ovariectomized monkeys and prevented a decline in thyroxine following surgical menopause (both p’s < 0.05). Mean progesterone concentrations were positively correlated with triiodothyronine at baseline in pre-ovariectomized monkeys (p < 0.01). Conclusions Progesterone levels and triiodothyronine are positively correlated in macaques. Dietary soy increases triiodothyronine in pre-ovariectomized monkeys and prevents a decline in thyroxine following surgical menopause. The outcomes observed in this study suggest soy protein and isoflavone consumption does not adversely affect and may even preserve thyroid function in postmenopausal women. PMID:24618766

  15. The Extracellular Domain of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Elicits Atypical Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Rat and Macaque Species

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Alan D.; Taslim, Najla; Reece, Shaun P.; Grebenciucova, Elena; Ray, Richard H.; Rosenbaum, Matthew D.; Wardle, Robert L.; Van Scott, Michael R.; Mannie, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are advantageous in that the heterogeneity of clinical signs appears more reflective of those in multiple sclerosis (MS). Conversely, models of classical EAE feature stereotypic progression of an ascending flaccid paralysis that is not a characteristic of MS. The study of atypical EAE however has been limited due to the relative lack of suitable models that feature reliable disease incidence and severity, excepting mice deficient in gamma-interferon signaling pathways. In this study, atypical EAE was induced in Lewis rats, and a related approach was effective for induction of an unusual neurologic syndrome in a cynomolgus macaque. Lewis rats were immunized with the rat immunoglobulin variable (IgV)-related extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (IgV-MOG) in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) followed by one or more injections of rat IgV-MOG in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA). The resulting disease was marked by torticollis, unilateral rigid paralysis, forelimb weakness, and high titers of anti-MOG antibody against conformational epitopes of MOG, as well as other signs of atypical EAE. A similar strategy elicited a distinct atypical form of EAE in a cynomolgus macaque. By day 36 in the monkey, titers of IgG against conformational epitopes of extracellular MOG were evident, and on day 201, the macaque had an abrupt onset of an unusual form of EAE that included a pronounced arousal-dependent, transient myotonia. The disease persisted for 6–7 weeks and was marked by a gradual, consistent improvement and an eventual full recovery without recurrence. These data indicate that one or more boosters of IgV-MOG in IFA represent a key variable for induction of atypical or unusual forms of EAE in rat and Macaca species. These studies also reveal a close correlation between humoral immunity against conformational epitopes of MOG, extended confluent demyelinating plaques in spinal cord

  16. The extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein elicits atypical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rat and Macaque species.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Alan D; Taslim, Najla; Reece, Shaun P; Grebenciucova, Elena; Ray, Richard H; Rosenbaum, Matthew D; Wardle, Robert L; Van Scott, Michael R; Mannie, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Atypical models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are advantageous in that the heterogeneity of clinical signs appears more reflective of those in multiple sclerosis (MS). Conversely, models of classical EAE feature stereotypic progression of an ascending flaccid paralysis that is not a characteristic of MS. The study of atypical EAE however has been limited due to the relative lack of suitable models that feature reliable disease incidence and severity, excepting mice deficient in gamma-interferon signaling pathways. In this study, atypical EAE was induced in Lewis rats, and a related approach was effective for induction of an unusual neurologic syndrome in a cynomolgus macaque. Lewis rats were immunized with the rat immunoglobulin variable (IgV)-related extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (IgV-MOG) in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) followed by one or more injections of rat IgV-MOG in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The resulting disease was marked by torticollis, unilateral rigid paralysis, forelimb weakness, and high titers of anti-MOG antibody against conformational epitopes of MOG, as well as other signs of atypical EAE. A similar strategy elicited a distinct atypical form of EAE in a cynomolgus macaque. By day 36 in the monkey, titers of IgG against conformational epitopes of extracellular MOG were evident, and on day 201, the macaque had an abrupt onset of an unusual form of EAE that included a pronounced arousal-dependent, transient myotonia. The disease persisted for 6-7 weeks and was marked by a gradual, consistent improvement and an eventual full recovery without recurrence. These data indicate that one or more boosters of IgV-MOG in IFA represent a key variable for induction of atypical or unusual forms of EAE in rat and Macaca species. These studies also reveal a close correlation between humoral immunity against conformational epitopes of MOG, extended confluent demyelinating plaques in spinal cord and

  17. Alprazolam as an in vivo probe for studying induction of CYP3A in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Tatsuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Kozakai, Kazumasa; Tsuneto, Yumi; Uno, Yasuhiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2010-10-01

    Induction of the cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme is a major concern in the drug discovery processes. To predict the clinical significance of enzyme induction, it is helpful to investigate pharmacokinetic alterations of a coadministered drug in a suitable animal model. In this study, we focus on the induction of CYP3A, which is involved in the metabolism of approximately 50% of marketed drugs and is inducible in both the liver and intestine. As a marker substrate for CYP3A activity, alprazolam (APZ) was selected and characterized using recombinant CYP3A enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli. Both human CYP3A4 and its cynomolgus P450 ortholog predominantly catalyzed APZ 4-hydroxylation with sigmoidal kinetics. When administered intravenously and orally to cynomolgus monkeys, APZ had moderate clearance; its first-pass extraction ratio after oral dosing was estimated to be 0.09 in the liver and 0.45 in the intestine. Pretreatment with multiple doses of rifampicin (20 mg/kg p.o. for 5 days), a known CYP3A inducer, significantly decreased plasma concentrations of APZ after intravenous and oral administrations (0.5 mg/kg), and first-pass extraction ratios were increased to 0.39 in the liver and 0.63 in the intestine. The results were comparable to those obtained in clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) reports related to CYP3A induction, although the rate of recovery of CYP3A activity seemed to be slower than rates estimated in clinical studies. In conclusion, pharmacokinetic studies using APZ as a probe in monkeys may provide useful information regarding the prediction of clinical DDIs due to CYP3A induction.

  18. Animal-to-Human Dose Translation of Obiltoxaximab for Treatment of Inhalational Anthrax Under the US FDA Animal Rule.

    PubMed

    Nagy, C F; Mondick, J; Serbina, N; Casey, L S; Carpenter, S E; French, J; Guttendorf, R

    2017-01-01

    Obiltoxaximab, a monoclonal antibody against protective antigen (PA), is approved for treatment of inhalational anthrax under the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Animal Rule. The human dose was selected and justified by comparing observed obiltoxaximab exposures in healthy and infected New Zealand White rabbits and cynomolgus macaques to observed exposures in healthy humans, to simulated exposures in healthy and infected humans, and to serum PA levels in infected animals. In humans, at 16 mg/kg intravenous, obiltoxaximab AUC was >2 times that in animals, while maximum serum concentrations were comparable to those in animals and were maintained in excess of the concentration required for PA neutralization in infected animals for 2-3 weeks. Obiltoxaximab 16 mg/kg in humans provided exposure beyond that of 16 mg/kg in animals, ensuring a sufficient duration of PA neutralization to allow for adaptive immunity development. Our approach to dose translation may be applicable to other agents being developed under the Animal Rule.

  19. Animal‐to‐Human Dose Translation of Obiltoxaximab for Treatment of Inhalational Anthrax Under the US FDA Animal Rule

    PubMed Central

    Mondick, J; Serbina, N; Casey, LS; Carpenter, SE; French, J; Guttendorf, R

    2016-01-01

    Obiltoxaximab, a monoclonal antibody against protective antigen (PA), is approved for treatment of inhalational anthrax under the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Animal Rule. The human dose was selected and justified by comparing observed obiltoxaximab exposures in healthy and infected New Zealand White rabbits and cynomolgus macaques to observed exposures in healthy humans, to simulated exposures in healthy and infected humans, and to serum PA levels in infected animals. In humans, at 16 mg/kg intravenous, obiltoxaximab AUC was >2 times that in animals, while maximum serum concentrations were comparable to those in animals and were maintained in excess of the concentration required for PA neutralization in infected animals for 2–3 weeks. Obiltoxaximab 16 mg/kg in humans provided exposure beyond that of 16 mg/kg in animals, ensuring a sufficient duration of PA neutralization to allow for adaptive immunity development. Our approach to dose translation may be applicable to other agents being developed under the Animal Rule. PMID:27925405

  20. Immunosuppressive effect of ASP2408, a novel CD86-selective variant of CTLA4-Ig, in rats and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shinsuke; Fujii, Yasutomo; Karrer, Erik E; Takamura, Fujiko; Chapin, Steven J; Neighbors, Margaret; Viswanathan, Sridhar; Devens, Bruce H; Higashi, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Hidekazu

    2016-11-01

    The CTLA4-Ig fusion proteins abatacept and belatacept inhibit CD28-mediated T cell activation by binding CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) costimulatory ligands and are clinically proven immunosuppressants used for rheumatoid arthritis and renal transplantation, respectively. Abatacept and belatacept preferentially bind CD80, yet CD86 has been implicated as the dominant ligand for CD28-mediated costimulation of T cells. We investigated the immunosuppressive effects of ASP2408, a novel CTLA4-Ig with CD86 selectivity and high potency created by directed evolution methods. Here we evaluated the effect of ASP2408 in vitro using cynomolgus monkey and rat T cell proliferation assays and in vivo using cynomolgus monkey tetanus toxoid (TTx) immunization and a rat rheumatoid arthritis model. ASP2408 was 290-fold and 21-fold more potent in suppressing in vitro monkey T cell proliferation than abatacept and belatacept, respectively. ASP2408 inhibited anti-TTx immunological reactions in cynomolgus monkey at a 10-fold lower dose level than belatacept, through complete CD86 and partial CD80 receptor occupancies, and also suppressed inflammation in the rat collagen-induced arthritis model. Overall, improved immunosuppressive potency of ASP2408 relative to abatacept and belatacept correlated well with improved CD86 binding affinity. These results may support the advantage of preferential enhancement of CD86 binding affinity to inhibit T cell-mediated immune response and improved dosing convenience in humans relative to abatacept or belatacept. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and immunogenicity profiling of an anti-CCL21 monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dudal, S; Subramanian, K; Flandre, T; Law, WS; Lowe, PJ; Skerjanec, A; Genin, J-C; Duval, M; Piequet, A; Cordier, A; Jarai, G; Van Heeke, G; Taplin, S; Krantz, C; Jones, S; Warren, AP; Brennan, FR; Sims, J; Lloyd, P

    2015-01-01

    QBP359 is an IgG1 human monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity to human CCL21, a chemokine hypothesized to play a role in inflammatory disease conditions through activation of resident CCR7-expressing fibroblasts/myofibroblasts. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of QBP359 in non-human primates were characterized through an integrated approach, combining PK, PD, immunogenicity, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tissue profiling data from single- and multiple-dose experiments in cynomolgus monkeys. When compared with regular immunoglobulin typical kinetics, faster drug clearance was observed in serum following intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg of QBP359. We have shown by means of PK/PD modeling that clearance of mAb-ligand complex is the most likely explanation for the rapid clearance of QBP359 in cynomolgus monkey. IHC and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry data suggested a high turnover and synthesis rate of CCL21 in tissues. Although lymphoid tissue was expected to accumulate drug due to the high levels of CCL21 present, bioavailability following subcutaneous administration in monkeys was 52%. In human disease states, where CCL21 expression is believed to be expressed at 10-fold higher concentrations compared with cynomolgus monkeys, the PK/PD model of QBP359 and its binding to CCL21 suggested that very large doses requiring frequent administration of mAb would be required to maintain suppression of CCL21 in the clinical setting. This highlights the difficulty in targeting soluble proteins with high synthesis rates. PMID:26230385

  2. Retinal, functional, and morphological comparisons of two different macaque species, Macaca mulatta and Macaca fasicularis, for models of laser eye injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Hacker, Henry D.; Brown, Araceli; Cheramie, Rachael; Martinsen, Gary L.; Rockwell, Benjamin; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2005-04-01

    The past several years has seen a severe shortage of pathogen-free Indian origin rhesus macaques due to the increased requirement for this model in retroviral research. With greater than 30 years of research data accumulated using the Rhesus macaque as the model for laser eye injury there exists a need to bridge to a more readily available nonhuman primate model. Much of the data previously collected from the Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) provided the basis for the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards for laser safety. Currently a Tri-service effort is underway to utilize the Cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) as a replacement for the Rhesus macaque. Preliminary functional and morphological baseline data collected from multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and retinal cell counts were compared from a small group of monkeys and tissues to determine if significant differences existed between the species. Initial functional findings rom mfERG yielded only one difference for the n2 amplitude value which was greater in the Cynomolgus monkey. No significant differences were seen in retinal and foveal thickness, as determined by OCT scans and no significant differences were seen in ganglion cell and inner nuclear cell nuclei counts. A highly significant difference was seen in the numbers of photoreceptor nuclei with greater numbers in the Rhesus macaque. This indicates more studies should be performed to determine the impact that a model change would have on the laser bioeffects community and their ability to continue to provide minimal visible lesion data for laser safety standards. The continued goal of this project will be to provide that necessary baseline information for a seamless transition to a more readily available animal model.

  3. Modification of the Fc Region of a Human Anti-oncostatin M Monoclonal Antibody for Higher Affinity to FcRn Receptor and Extension of Half-life in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nnane, Ivo P; Han, Chao; Jiao, Qun; Tam, Susan H; Davis, Hugh M; Xu, Zhenhua

    2017-01-28

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anti-oncostatin M (OSM) IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, CNTO 1119 and its Fc variant (CNTO 8212), which incorporates the LS(Xtend) mutation to extend terminal half-life (T1/2 ), after a single intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) administration in cynomolgus monkeys, and to predict human PK. In study 1, single doses of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 were administered IV or SC at 3 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 3 per group). In study 2, single doses of CNTO 8212 were administered IV at 1, 5 or 20 mg/kg, or SC at 5 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 5 per group). Serial blood samples were collected for assessment of serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and/or CNTO 8212. A two-compartment population PK model with first-order elimination was utilized to simultaneously describe the serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 over time after IV and SC administration in cynomolgus monkeys. The typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys were clearance (CL) = 2.81 mL/day/kg, volume of distribution of central compartment (V1 ) = 31.3 mL/kg, volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V2 ) = 23.3 mL/kg, absolute bioavailability (F) = 0.84 and T1/2 = 13.4 days. In comparison, the typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 8212 in cynomolgus monkeys were CL = 1.41 mL/day/kg, V1 = 39.8 mL/kg, V2 = 32.6 mL/kg, F = 0.75 and T1/2 = 35.7 days. The mean CL of CNTO 8212 was ~50% lower compared with that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. The overall volume of distribution (V1 +V2 ) for CNTO 8212 was about 32% larger compared with that for CNTO 1119, but generally similar to the vascular volume in cynomolgus monkeys. The T1/2 of CNTO 8212 was significantly (p < 0.05) longer by about 2.7-fold than that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. Thus, the modification of the Fc portion of an anti-OSM IgG1 mAb for higher FcRn binding affinity resulted in lower systemic clearance and

  4. Safety evaluation of chronic intrathecal administration of heparan N-sulfatase in juvenile cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Richard W; Felice, Brian R; Boyd, Robert B; Butt, Mark T; Ruiz, Juan A; Heartlein, Michael W; Calias, Pericles

    2012-06-01

    An intrathecal (IT) formulation of recombinant human heparan N-sulfatase (HNS) is under development for the treatment of the neurological symptoms of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPS IIIA; Sanfilippo A disease), the defining clinical feature of this disorder. Since the average age of MPS IIIA patients is 4.5 years, the pivotal toxicology studies for HNS were conducted in juvenile cynomolgus monkeys to evaluate the effects on the developing brain. Monkeys were implanted with an IT-lumbar drug delivery device and dosed every other week by slow bolus administration (1.5, 4.5, or 8.3 mg/dose HNS for 6 months; 12 doses), with device and vehicle controls receiving phosphate-buffered saline or vehicle, respectively. Eight animals per group (four/sex) were necropsied at 3 and 6 months (device control group necropsied at 3 months), and eight animals from the vehicle group and the three HNS-dosed groups were necropsied 1 month after the final IT dose. No HNS-related clinical signs or gross central nervous system lesions were observed. Compared with controls, there were cellular infiltrates of slight-to-minimal mean severity in the meninges/perineurium surrounding the brain/spinal cord correlating with transient increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocytes, predominantly eosinophils, which largely resolved 1 month after the final dose. These changes were not associated with any adverse morphological changes in the brain or spinal cord. There appeared to be a dose-related trend toward higher mean CSF HNS levels and in tissue HNS activity levels in the brain, spinal cord, and liver. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level was 8.3 mg/dose given every other week, the highest dose administered.

  5. Safety evaluation of chronic intrathecal administration of idursulfase-IT in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Felice, Brian R; Wright, Teresa L; Boyd, Robert B; Butt, Mark T; Pfeifer, Richard W; Pan, Jing; Ruiz, Juan A; Heartlein, Michael W; Calias, Pericles

    2011-08-01

    Recombinant human idursulfase, an intravenous enzyme replacement therapy indicated for treatment of somatic symptoms of mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome), is anticipated to have minimal benefit for the cognitive impairment associated with the severe phenotype. Because intrathecal (IT) administration of enzyme replacement therapy for other lysosomal enzyme disorders has shown efficacy in animal models, an IT formulation of idursulfase (idursulfase-IT) and a drug-delivery device (subcutaneous port connected to a lumbar IT catheter) were developed for treating central nervous system (CNS) involvement. In this chronic safety study, cynomolgus monkeys were dosed weekly with IV idursulfase (0.5 mg/kg) and every four weeks with idursulfase-IT (3, 30, and 100 mg) for six months, with device and vehicle controls treated similarly (n = 6, all groups). Necropsies were performed twenty-four hours post-final IT dose or after a recovery period (four weeks post-final dose in vehicle-control, 3 mg, and 100 mg IT groups: n = 6). No clinical signs or gross central nervous system lesions were observed. Compared to controls, more pronounced cellular infiltrates in brain and spinal cord meninges were noted, which largely resolved after the recovery period. Central nervous sytem levels of idursulfase-IT were dose dependent, as determined by enzyme activity and immunohistochemistry. The no-observed-adverse-effect level of idursulfase-IT was 100 mg.

  6. The highly-selective 5-HT(1A) agonist F15599 reduces L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia without compromising anti-parkinsonian benefits in the MPTP-lesioned macaque.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Johnston, Tom H; Fox, Susan H; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective anti-parkinsonian agent available, but upon chronic administration, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience abnormal involuntary movements, dyskinesia. Modulation of serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptors is regarded as an effective way to alleviate dyskinesia, yet this approach has been marred by a reduction of the therapeutic effectiveness of L-DOPA. We hypothesised that highly-selective 5-HT1A stimulation might be a way to alleviate dyskinesia without compromising L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action. F15599 (also known as NLX-101) is a highly-selective 5-HT1A agonist that displays over 1000 × selectivity over off-target receptors. Seven cynomolgus macaques were administered MPTP and developed severe parkinsonism. Following chronic administration of L-DOPA, they developed severe and reproducible dyskinesia. F15599 (0.003, 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered in combination with L-DOPA and its effect on dyskinesia and L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian was assessed. In combination with L-DOPA, F15599 (0.1 mg/kg) reduced the severity of peak-dose dyskinesia, by ≈45% (P < 0.001), compared to L-DOPA alone. F15599 (any dose) had no effect on duration of on-time or motor activity counts compared to L-DOPA alone. F15599 at 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg significantly reduced duration of on-time with disabling dyskinesia (by ≈49% and ≈71%, P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that F15599, a highly-selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, alleviates dyskinesia without exerting a deleterious effect on L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action.

  7. Competitive inhibition of SGLT2 by tofogliflozin or phlorizin induces urinary glucose excretion through extending splay in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takumi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Fukazawa, Masanori; Honda, Kiyofumi; Yamane, Mizuki; Yoshida, Ayae; Azabu, Hiroko; Kitamura, Hidekazu; Toyota, Naoto; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Yoshiki

    2014-06-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors showed a glucose lowering effect in type 2 diabetes patients through inducing renal glucose excretion. Detailed analysis of the mechanism of the glucosuric effect of SGLT2 inhibition, however, has been hampered by limitations of clinical study. Here, we investigated the mechanism of urinary glucose excretion using nonhuman primates with SGLT inhibitors tofogliflozin and phlorizin, both in vitro and in vivo. In cells overexpressing cynomolgus monkey SGLT2 (cSGLT2), both tofogliflozin and phlorizin competitively inhibited uptake of the substrate (α-methyl-d-glucopyranoside; AMG). Tofogliflozin was found to be a selective cSGLT2 inhibitor, inhibiting cSGLT2 more strongly than did phlorizin, with selectivity toward cSGLT2 1,000 times that toward cSGLT1; phlorizin was found to be a nonselective cSGLT1/2 inhibitor. In a glucose titration study in cynomolgus monkeys under conditions of controlled plasma drug concentration, both tofogliflozin and phlorizin increased fractional excretion of glucose (FEG) by up to 50% under hyperglycemic conditions. By fitting the titration curve using a newly introduced method that avoids variability in estimating the threshold of renal glucose excretion, we found that tofogliflozin and phlorizin lowered the threshold and extended the splay in a dose-dependent manner without significantly affecting the tubular transport maximum for glucose (TmG). Our results demonstrate the contribution of SGLT2 to renal glucose reabsorption (RGR) in cynomolgus monkeys and demonstrate that competitive inhibition of cSGLT2 exerts a glucosuric effect by mainly extending splay and lowering threshold without affecting TmG. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that express green fluorescent protein throughout the whole body

    PubMed Central

    Seita, Yasunari; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Matsushita, Jun; Azami, Takuya; Okahara, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji; Itoh, Yasushi; Imamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Masaki; Tooyama, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Erika; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are valuable for human disease modelling, because rodents poorly recapitulate some human diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease amongst others. Here, we report for the first time, the generation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic cynomolgus monkeys by lentivirus infection. Our data show that the use of a human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer and chicken beta actin promoter (CAG) directed the ubiquitous expression of the transgene in cynomolgus monkeys. We also found that injection into mature oocytes before fertilization achieved homogenous expression of GFP in each tissue, including the amnion, and fibroblasts, whereas injection into fertilized oocytes generated a transgenic cynomolgus monkey with mosaic GFP expression. Thus, the injection timing was important to create transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that expressed GFP homogenously in each of the various tissues. The strategy established in this work will be useful for the generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys for transplantation studies as well as biomedical research. PMID:27109065

  9. Sertraline effects on cerebrospinal fluid monoamines and species-typical socioemotional behavior of female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Register, Thomas C; Higley, J Dee; Willard, Stephanie L

    2014-04-01

    Although widely prescribed, little is known about the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on social behavior and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamines in female primates. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of sertraline on agonistic and affiliative behavior. Twenty-one adult female cynomolgus monkeys were housed in small, stable social groups, trained to participate in oral dosing, and began a 5-week cumulative dose-response study. Serial doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg of sertraline were administered orally for 1 week each. Behavior was recorded daily during 10-min observations before and 4 h after dosing. On the seventh day of dosing, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline and CSF monoamines/metabolites were determined 4 h after the last dose. At 20 mg/kg, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline was in the therapeutic range. CSF 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid decreased by 33 % (p < 0.05). Overall aggression, submission, locomotion, and time alone decreased, whereas affiliative behaviors (body contact, grooming) increased (all p values <0.05). Effects of sertraline on aggression and submission were social status-dependent, reducing aggression in dominants and submission in subordinates. A clinically relevant oral dose of sertraline resulted in CSF metabolite changes similar to those observed in patients and altered the socioemotional behavior of female monkeys. Changes in CSF 5-HT and dopamine are novel observations that may be sex-specific. The robust effects of sertraline on aggression and affiliation may explain the efficacy of SSRIs on a range of human behavioral pathologies that share the characteristics of increased aggression and decreased sociality.

  10. Sertraline Effects on Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamines and Species-typical Socioemotional Behavior of Female Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Carol A.; Register, Thomas C.; Higley, J. Dee; Willard, Stephanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although widely prescribed, little is known about selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) effects on social behavior and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamines in female primates. Objective To determine the effects of sertraline on agonistic and affiliative behavior. Methods 21 adult female cynomolgus monkeys were housed in small, stable social groups, trained to participate in oral dosing, and began a 5-week cumulative dose response study. Serial doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg of sertraline were administered orally for one week each. Behavior was recorded daily during 10-minute observations before and 4 hours after dosing. On the 7th day of dosing, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline and CSF monoamines/metabolites were determined 4 hours after the last dose. Results At 20 mg/kg, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline was in the therapeutic range. CSF 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid decreased 33% (p<0.05). Overall aggression, submission, locomotion and time alone decreased, whereas affiliative behaviors (body contact, grooming) increased (all p’s<0.05). Effects of sertraline on aggression and submission were social status-dependent, reducing aggression in dominants and submission in subordinates. Conclusions A clinically relevant oral dose of sertraline resulted in CSF metabolite changes similar to those observed in patients, and altered the socioemotional behavior of female monkeys. Changes in CSF 5-HT and dopamine are novel observations that may be sex-specific. The robust effects of sertraline on aggression and affiliation may explain the efficacy of SSRIs on a range of human behavioral pathologies that share the characteristics of increased aggression and decreased sociality. PMID:24193371

  11. Visible lesion laser thresholds in Cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) retina with a 1064 nm 12-ns pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Kumru, Semih S.

    2007-02-01

    A series of experiments in a new animal model for retinal damage, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), have been conducted to determine the damage threshold for 12.5-nanosecond laser exposures at 1064 nm. These results provide a direct comparison to threshold values obtained in rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), which is the model historically used in establishing retinal maximum permissible exposure (MPE) limits. In this study, the irradiance level of a collimated Gaussian laser beam of 2.5 mm diameter at the cornea was randomly varied to produce a rectangular grid of exposures on the retina. Exposures sites were fundoscopically evaluated at post-irradiance intervals of 1 hour and 24 hours. Probit analysis was performed on dose-response data to obtain probability of response curves. The 50% probability of damage (ED50) values for 1 and 24 hours post-exposure are 28.5(22.7-38.4) μJ and 17.0(12.9-21.8) μJ, respectively. These values compare favorably to data obtained with the rhesus model, 28.7(22.3-39.3) μJ and 19.1(13.6-24.4) μJ, suggesting that the cynomolgus monkey may be a suitable replacement for rhesus monkey in photoacoustic minimum visible lesion threshold studies.

  12. SPL7013 gel as a topical microbicide for prevention of vaginal transmission of SHIV89.6P in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-Hou; Emau, Peter; Cairns, J Scott; Flanary, Leon; Morton, William R; McCarthy, Tom D; Tsai, Che-Chung

    2005-03-01

    SPL7013 is a dendrimer with a polyanionic outer surface that allows multiple interactions with target sites. It potently binds and blocks HIV-1 and chimeric simian/HIV-1 viruses (SHIVs) replication in vitro. Gels containing different concentrations of SPL7013 were used as topical microbicides in female pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) to study their ability to prevent vaginal transmission of SHIV(89,6P). On virus challenge, all untreated macaques (8/8) and seven of eight macaques treated with placebo gel were infected within 2 weeks postinfection (PI) and showed high plasma viremia and dramatic CD4(+) cell decline within 4 weeks PI. In contrast, 6/6 macaques, 5/6 macaques, and 2/6 macaques treated with 5% w/w (50 mg/ml), 3% w/w (30 mg/ml), and 1% w/w (10 mg/ml) SPL7013 gels, respectively, resisted viral challenge. The results showed that animals treated with SPL7013 showed a dose-dependent resistance to virus challenge. Neither SPL7013 nor placebo gels produced any adverse effects following the single application in the study. These results showed that 3-5% w/w SPL7013 gels were effective in blocking vaginal transmission of SHIV in macaques after single gel application followed by single virus challenge. These results suggest that SPL7013 gel may be a promising anti-HIV microbicide formulation for further evaluation.

  13. Pharmacokinetic profile of raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir in plasma and mucosal secretions in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Massud, Ivana; Martin, Amy; Dinh, Chuong; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; Heneine, Walid; Pau, Chou-Pong; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacokinetic studies in animal models are important for assessing the prophylactic potential of antiretroviral drugs for HIV prevention. This study sought to identify clinically relevant doses of the marketed integrase inhibitors raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir in macaques and investigate drug penetration and antiviral activity in mucosal secretions. Methods Macaques received one oral dose of raltegravir, elvitegravir or dolutegravir alone or in combination with emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate followed by drug level measurements in blood and rectal and vaginal secretions. Antiviral activity was investigated in TZM-bl cells exposed to SHIV162p3 in the presence of rectal secretions collected from treated animals. Results Plasma drug concentrations with 50 mg/kg raltegravir or elvitegravir were within the range seen in humans receiving 400–800 mg of raltegravir or 800 mg of unboosted elvitegravir but lower than with 150 mg of elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat. AUC0–24 values for dolutegravir increased proportionally with the dose, with a calculated human-equivalent dose of 20 mg/kg. Elvitegravir showed the highest penetration in rectal and vaginal fluids despite the absence of pharmacological boosting, followed by raltegravir and dolutegravir. Rectal secretions collected at 24 h from treated macaques blocked infection of TZM-bl cells by 50% at dilutions of 1/1000 (raltegravir), 1/800 (dolutegravir) and >1/30 000 (elvitegravir). Conclusions We defined macaque doses of HIV integrase inhibitors that recapitulate human clinical doses, which will facilitate efficacy and dose escalation studies in macaques. High and sustained drug concentrations and activity in mucosal secretions suggest that integrase inhibitors are promising candidates for HIV prevention. PMID:25630643

  14. Pharmacokinetic profile of raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir in plasma and mucosal secretions in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Massud, Ivana; Martin, Amy; Dinh, Chuong; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; Heneine, Walid; Pau, Chou-Pong; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2015-05-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies in animal models are important for assessing the prophylactic potential of antiretroviral drugs for HIV prevention. This study sought to identify clinically relevant doses of the marketed integrase inhibitors raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir in macaques and investigate drug penetration and antiviral activity in mucosal secretions. Macaques received one oral dose of raltegravir, elvitegravir or dolutegravir alone or in combination with emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate followed by drug level measurements in blood and rectal and vaginal secretions. Antiviral activity was investigated in TZM-bl cells exposed to SHIV162p3 in the presence of rectal secretions collected from treated animals. Plasma drug concentrations with 50 mg/kg raltegravir or elvitegravir were within the range seen in humans receiving 400-800 mg of raltegravir or 800 mg of unboosted elvitegravir but lower than with 150 mg of elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat. AUC0-24 values for dolutegravir increased proportionally with the dose, with a calculated human-equivalent dose of 20 mg/kg. Elvitegravir showed the highest penetration in rectal and vaginal fluids despite the absence of pharmacological boosting, followed by raltegravir and dolutegravir. Rectal secretions collected at 24 h from treated macaques blocked infection of TZM-bl cells by 50% at dilutions of 1/1000 (raltegravir), 1/800 (dolutegravir) and >1/30 000 (elvitegravir). We defined macaque doses of HIV integrase inhibitors that recapitulate human clinical doses, which will facilitate efficacy and dose escalation studies in macaques. High and sustained drug concentrations and activity in mucosal secretions suggest that integrase inhibitors are promising candidates for HIV prevention. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Neurobiology of Stress-Induced Reproductive Dysfunction In Female Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Centeno, Maria Luisa; Cameron, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well accepted that stress can precipitate mental and physical illness. However, it is becoming clear that given the same stress, some individuals are very vulnerable and will succumb to illness while others are more resilient and cope effectively, rather than becoming ill. This difference between individuals is called stress sensitivity. Stress-sensitivity of an individual appears to be influenced by genetically inherited factors, early life (even prenatal) stress, and by the presence or absence of factors that provide protection from stress. In comparison to other stress-related diseases, the concept of sensitivity versus resilience to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction has received relatively little attention. The studies presented herein were undertaken to begin to identify stable characteristics and the neural underpinnings of individuals with sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction. Female cynomolgus macaques with normal menstrual cycles either stop ovulating (Stress Sensitive) or to continue to ovulate (Stress Resilient) upon exposure to a combined metabolic and psychosocial stress. However, even in the absence of stress, the stress sensitive animals have lower secretion of the ovarian steroids, estrogen and progesterone, have higher heart rates, have lower serotonin function, have fewer serotonin neurons and lower expression of pivotal serotonin-related genes, have lower expression of 5HT2A and 2C genes in the hypothalamus, have higher gene expression of GAD67 and CRH in the hypothalamus and have reduced GnRH transport to the anterior pituitary. Altogether, the results suggest that the neurobiology of reproductive circuits in stress sensitive individuals is compromised. We speculate that with the application of stress, the dysfunction of these neural systems becomes exacerbated and reproductive function ceases. PMID:18931961

  16. Biodistribution and safety of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Ravel, Guillaume; Mantel, Nathalie; Silvano, Jeremy; Rogue, Alexandra; Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas; Burdin, Nicolas

    2017-10-13

    The first licensed dengue vaccine is a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (CYD-TDV; Sanofi Pasteur). This study assessed the biodistribution, shedding, and toxicity of CYD-TDV in a non-human primate model as part of the nonclinical safety assessment program for the vaccine. Cynomolgus monkeys were given one subcutaneous injection of either one human dose (5log10 CCID50/serotype) of CYD-TDV or saline control. Study endpoints included clinical observations, body temperature, body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology, immunogenicity, and post-mortem examinations including histopathology. Viral load, distribution, persistence, and shedding in tissues and body fluids were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The subcutaneous administration of CYD-TDV was well tolerated. There were no toxicological findings other than expected minor local reactions at the injection site. A transient low level of CYD-TDV viral RNA was detected in blood and the viral genome was identified primarily at the injection site and in the draining lymph nodes following immunization. These results, together with other data from repeat-dose toxicity and neurovirulence studies, confirm the absence of toxicological concern with CYD-TDV and corroborate clinical study observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Myocarditis, Disseminated Infection, and Early Viral Persistence Following Experimental Coxsackievirus B Infection of Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Cammock, Cheryl E.; Halnon, Nancy J.; Skoczylas, Jill; Blanchard, James; Bohm, Rudolf; Miller, Christopher J.; Lai, Chi; Krogstad, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) infection is a common cause of acute viral myocarditis. The clinical presentation of myocarditis caused by this enterovirus is highly variable, ranging from mildly symptoms to complete hemodynamic collapse. These variations in initial symptoms and in the immediate and long term outcomes of this disease have impeded development of effective treatment strategies. Nine cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with myocarditic strains of CVB. Virological studies performed up to 28 days post-inoculation demonstrated the development of neutralizing antibody in all animals, and the presence of CVB in plasma. High dose intravenous inoculation (n = 2) resulted in severe disseminated disease, while low dose intravenous (n = 6) or oral infection (1 animal) resulted in clinically unapparent infection. Transient, minor, echocardiographic abnormalities were noted in several animals, but no animals displayed signs of significant acute cardiac failure. Although viremia rapidly resolved, signs of myocardial inflammation and injury were observed in all animals at the time of necropsy, and CVB was detected in postmortem myocardial specimens up to 28 days PI. This non-human primate system replicates many features of illness in acute coxsackievirus myocarditis and demonstrates that myocardial involvement may be common in enteroviral infection; it may provide a model system for testing of treatment strategies for enteroviral infections and acute coxsackievirus myocarditis. PMID:24040287

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability of a Therapeutic Enzyme (Idursulfase) in Cynomolgus Monkeys after Intrathecal and Intravenous Administration

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongsheng; Chung, Jou-Ku; Mascelli, Mary Ann; McCauley, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy with iduronate-2-sulfatase is an approved treatment for Hunter syndrome, however, conventional intravenous delivery cannot treat the neurologic manifestations of the disease due to its limited central nervous system penetration. Intrathecal administration of iduronate-2-sulfatase for delivery to the central nervous system is currently under investigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of idursulfase in the central nervous system of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fasicularis) after intravenous and intrathecal administration. Twenty-seven monkeys, treatment-naïve to enzyme replacement therapy, were placed into 4 groups according to body weight: Group 1 was administered 0.5 mg/kg idursulfase intravenously, Groups 2–4 were administered an intrathecal formulation (1-, 10-, and 30-mg doses). Blood samples and cerebrospinal fluid (sampled at the cisterna magna or lumbar level) were collected at the same time points for 72 hours post dosing. Following intravenous administration, a high maximum serum concentration and rapid distribution of iduronate-2-sulfatase out of the central compartment were observed (elimination half-life: 4.3 hours). Iduronate-2-sulfatase exposure in the cerebrospinal fluid was limited, suggesting intravenous administration provided minimal penetration of the blood–brain barrier. Following intrathecal administration, a high maximum observed concentration was immediately noted and elimination half-life ranged between 7.8–10 hours and 5.9–6.7 hours (cisterna magna and lumbar sampling, respectively). Cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetic profiles at different doses of iduronate-2-sulfatase were similar and the dose/exposure relationship was proportional. After intrathecal administration, movement of iduronate-2-sulfatase from cerebrospinal fluid to serum was observed (systemic bioavailability was 40–83%). The clear penetration of iduronate-2-sulfatase into the cerebrospinal

  19. Heterotopic autotransplantation of ovarian cortex in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Suguru; Suzuki, Nao; Hashimoto, Shu; Takae, Seido; Takenoshita, Makoto; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Morimoto, Yoshiharu; Ishizuka, Bunpei

    2010-02-01

    Abstract In recent years, removal of ova or ovaries before chemotherapy or radiation therapy has been investigated in young female cancer patients to avoid the adverse effects of treatment. Orthotopic autotransplantation of ovarian cortex has advantages such as easy collection of ova and the possibility of spontaneous pregnancy. Although children have been born after successful orthotopic autotransplantation into the residual ovaries, some patients cannot undergo this procedure such as those who need bilateral ovariectomy or pelvic radiation therapy, therefore it is still necessary to investigate suitable heterotopic autotransplantation sites. The present study was performed in primates (cynomolgus monkeys) with the objective of determining the optimum site for heterotopic autotransplantation of ovarian cortex to enhance the clinical application of this method. The retroperitoneal iliac fossa and omentum were selected as sites for heterotopic autotransplantation. Two cynomolgus monkeys were subjected to laparotomy under anesthesia. After resection of the bilateral adnexae, the ovaries were cut into 0.5 cm cubes that were transplanted. Blood levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, and progesterone were monitored, and monkeys with a regular estrus cycle underwent superovulation and egg collection. In both monkeys studied, recovery of a regular estrus cycle was confirmed after heterotopic autotransplantation of ovarian tissue. MII phase ova were successfully collected from tissues transplanted into the retroperitoneal iliac fossa or omentum. Development to the early blastocyst stage was confirmed after microfertilization. We established an appropriate method of heterotopic autotransplantation using ovarian cortex into the retroperitoneal iliac fossa or omentum in primates.

  20. A pharmacodynamic study of SR 47436, a selective AT1 receptor antagonist, on blood pressure in conscious cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Roccon, A.; Marchionni, D.; Donat, F.; Segondy, D.; Cazaubon, C.; Nisato, D.

    1994-01-01

    1. Conscious normotensive cynomolgus monkeys were chronically instrumented for the measurement of arterial blood pressure and heart rate to investigate the relationships between the plasma concentration, suppression of the pressor response to angiotensin II (AII), compensatory increase in plasma AII, and hypotensive effect obtained after a single oral dose of SR 47436, a potent and specific nonpeptide AT1 receptor antagonist. As blood sampling could influence the hypotensive effect of SR 47436 through activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), drug effects were studied in groups of animals with or without blood samplings. 2. SR 47436 at 10 mg kg-1 induced a hypotensive effect which was not greater following a second dose of 30 mg kg-1, indicating that a maximal hypotensive effect had already been obtained. 3. A single oral dose of SR 47436 (10 mg kg-1) caused a sustained hypotension and a marked inhibition of the AII-induced pressor response, lasting for up to 28 h. These effects of SR 47436 are consistent with good oral bioavailability and a slow elimination of the drug (t 1/2 approximately 20 h), and were accompanied by a sustained increase in plasma AII concentration. Taken together, both the hypotensive response and the compensatory increase in AII indicated that vascular and juxtaglomerular AII receptors were blocked. 4. Although a fair correlation between individual plasma drug concentrations and inhibition of AII-induced pressor response was observed, neither the hypotensive effect nor the compensatory increase in AII correlated with the plasma drug levels. 5. Basal arterial pressure and AII-induced pressor response were not affected by blood samplings. 6. These results suggest that SR 47436 is an effective and long lasting AT1 receptor antagonist with a potent hypotensive action in normotensive cynomolgus monkeys.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8012690

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of PrP(Sc) in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of macaques infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi; Masujin, Kentaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Ono, Fumiko; Shibata, Hiroaki; Tobiume, Minoru; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Shimozaki, Noriko; Terao, Keiji; Yamakawa, Yoshio; Sata, Tetsutaro

    2014-11-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the prominent accumulation of the misfolded form of a normal cellular protein (PrP(Sc)) in the central nervous system. The pathological features and biochemical properties of PrP(Sc) in macaque monkeys infected with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion have been found to be similar to those of human subjects with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Non-human primate models are thus ideally suited for performing valid diagnostic tests and determining the efficacy of potential therapeutic agents. In the current study, we developed a highly efficient method for in vitro amplification of cynomolgus macaque BSE PrP(Sc). This method involves amplifying PrP(Sc) by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) using mouse brain homogenate as a PrP(C) substrate in the presence of sulfated dextran compounds. This method is capable of amplifying very small amounts of PrP(Sc) contained in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and white blood cells (WBCs), as well as in the peripheral tissues of macaques that have been intracerebrally inoculated with the BSE prion. After clinical signs of the disease appeared in three macaques, we detected PrP(Sc) in the CSF by serial PMCA, and the CSF levels of PrP(Sc) tended to increase with disease progression. In addition, PrP(Sc) was detectable in WBCs at the clinical phases of the disease in two of the three macaques. Thus, our highly sensitive, novel method may be useful for furthering the understanding of the tissue distribution of PrP(Sc) in non-human primate models of CJD. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. Respiratory mechanics: comparison of Beagle dogs, Göttingen minipigs and Cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Truchetti, Geoffrey; Troncy, Eric; Robichaud, Annette; Gold, Leslie; Schuessler, Thomas; Maghezzi, Said; Bassett, Leanne; Authier, Simon

    2014-01-01

    When the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) is determined by respiratory safety pharmacology, follow-up studies are warranted and may include airway resistance and compliance. Respiratory mechanics in commonly used large animal species (Beagle dogs, Cynomolgus monkeys, and Göttingen minipigs) were compared. Eighteen animals were used (3/sex/species) in an anesthetized model (propofol infusion) with pancuronium as a neuromuscular blocker. Parameters of respiratory mechanics were evaluated at baseline and at peak drug effect. Resistance (Rrs) and elastance (Ers) were measured by applying a single frequency forced oscillation (0.5 Hz) to the subject's airway opening and fitting the flow, volume and pressure data to the single compartment model of the lung. Increasing doses of intravenous (IV) methacholine were administered in all three species, as well as doubling aerosolized concentrations of the same bronchoconstrictor agent before and after inhaled albuterol. The slope of the IV methacholine dose-response curve for Rrs was similar in dogs and monkeys and both species differed from minipigs, which showed greater reactivity. At the highest IV dose tested, minipigs also reached higher levels of bronchoconstriction than the other two species. They were followed, in decreasing order, by dogs and monkeys. Albuterol induced a significant decrease in the slope of the dose-response curve only in dogs and monkeys. Scientific literature is available on respiratory mechanics in monkeys and dogs but not in minipigs. Our results suggest that minipigs were more reactive than dogs and monkeys to IV methacholine while less sensitive to inhaled albuterol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Ceftiofur Crystalline Free Acid in Male Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) after Subcutaneous Administration.

    PubMed

    Salyards, Gregory W; Knych, Heather K; Hill, Ashley E; Kelly, Kristi R; Christe, Kari L

    2015-09-01

    Trauma is a common sequela to agonistic social encounters in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and veterinarians often prescribe antibiotics as part of a balanced treatment plan. Long-acting, single-dose, injectable antibiotics for use in rhesus macaques are unavailable currently. Ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA) is a long-acting, single-dose, injectable third-generation cephalosporin that provides at least 7 d of ceftiofur therapeutic plasma concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domesticus). We hypothesized that CCFA would achieve similar therapeutic concentrations (≥ 0.2 μg/mL) in rhesus macaques. We describe the pharmacokinetic profile of CCFA in healthy, adult male rhesus macaques ( n = 6) in this 2-period, 2-treatment crossover study of 5 and 20 mg/kg SC administered once. Plasma ceftiofur metabolite concentrations were determined prior to and for a maximum of 21 d after administration. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The 5-mg dose achieved a maximal plasma concentration of 2.24 ± 0.525 μg/mL at 2.59 ± 1.63 h, an AUC of 46.9 ± 17.6 h/μg/mL, and a terminal elimination half-life of 56.5 ± 21.7 h; for the 20-mg/kg dose, these parameters were 9.18 ± 4.90 μg/mL at 1.82 ± 1.30 h, 331 ± 84.4 h/μg/mL, and 69.7 ± 8.86 h, respectively. No adverse effects were noted after either dose. Macaques maintained plasma ceftiofur concentrations of 0.2 μg/mL or greater for at least 2 d after 5 mg/kg SC and at least 7 d after 20 mg/kg SC.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Ceftiofur Crystalline Free Acid in Male Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) after Subcutaneous Administration

    PubMed Central

    Salyards, Gregory W; Knych, Heather K; Hill, Ashley E; Kelly, Kristi R; Christe, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a common sequela to agonistic social encounters in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and veterinarians often prescribe antibiotics as part of a balanced treatment plan. Long-acting, single-dose, injectable antibiotics for use in rhesus macaques are unavailable currently. Ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA) is a long-acting, single-dose, injectable third-generation cephalosporin that provides at least 7 d of ceftiofur therapeutic plasma concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domesticus). We hypothesized that CCFA would achieve similar therapeutic concentrations (≥0.2 μg/mL) in rhesus macaques. We describe the pharmacokinetic profile of CCFA in healthy, adult male rhesus macaques (n = 6) in this 2-period, 2-treatment crossover study of 5 and 20 mg/kg SC administered once. Plasma ceftiofur metabolite concentrations were determined prior to and for a maximum of 21 d after administration. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The 5-mg dose achieved a maximal plasma concentration of 2.24 ± 0.525 μg/mL at 2.59 ± 1.63 h, an AUC of 46.9 ± 17.6 h/μg/mL, and a terminal elimination half-life of 56.5 ± 21.7 h; for the 20-mg/kg dose, these parameters were 9.18 ± 4.90 μg/mL at 1.82 ± 1.30 h, 331 ± 84.4 h/μg/mL, and 69.7 ± 8.86 h, respectively. No adverse effects were noted after either dose. Macaques maintained plasma ceftiofur concentrations of 0.2 μg/mL or greater for at least 2 d after 5 mg/kg SC and at least 7 d after 20 mg/kg SC. PMID:26424255

  5. Limited susceptibility of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to leprosy after experimental administration of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Gerald P; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Tan, Esterlina V; Fajardo, Tranquilino T; Villahermosa, Laarni G; Cellona, Roland V; Balagon, Maria V; White, Valerie A; Saunderson, Paul R; Walsh, Douglas S

    2012-08-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis-importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1-19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration.

  6. Cynomolgus Monkey Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated By Using Allogeneic Genes.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that are potentially similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells can be artificially established by introduction into somatic cells of the transgenes POU5F1 (also known as Oct3/4), SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), iPS cells generated by using these four allogeneic transgenes should be an important resource for various types of biomedical research because the use of xenogeneic transgenes may cause complications. To establish such iPS cells, cynomolgus monkey somatic cells were infected with amphotropic retroviral vectors, which were derived from Plat-A cells, containing cDNA for the cynomolgus monkey genes POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. As a result, iPS cells could be established from somatic cells from fetal liver and newborn skin of cynomolgus monkeys, similarly to the case for mouse and human somatic cells.

  7. Limited Susceptibility of Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to Leprosy after Experimental Administration of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Gerald P.; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C.; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Fajardo, Tranquilino T.; Villahermosa, Laarni G.; Cellona, Roland V.; Balagon, Maria V.; White, Valerie A.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Walsh, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis—importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1–19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration. PMID:22855766

  8. Biological variables in the hair uptake of methylmercury from blood in the Macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mottet, N.K.; Body, R.L.; Wilkens, V.; Burbacher, T.M.

    1987-04-01

    The total mercury (Hg) in hair and blood of 45 young healthy adult female Macaque fascicularis given 0, 50, 70, or 90 ..mu..g MeHg/kg body wt orally in apple juice daily revealed a close and constant ratio between blood Hg and hair. The amount of hair Hg does not increase with time (maximum period of observation 490 days) at a given dose level. Also the ratio was unchanged between background and subtoxic dose levels. Individuals at a given dose level with a higher-than-average blood level had a proportionately higher hair level. The Macaque blood/hair ratio is markedly lower than that reported for humans. Pregnancy did not have an appreciable effect on the hair mercury level. Review of the known variables in human and Macaque hair growth and structures does not provide an explanation for the difference. They suggest that an as yet unidentified biological variable(s), possibly circumfollicular blood flow, could account for the difference. This ratio difference notwithstanding, controlled studies on Macaque hair such as this add support for the validity of terminal hair as a trace metal exposure indicator.

  9. Use of catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition to minimize L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-induced dyskinesia in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned macaque.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Johnston, Tom H; Snoeren, Tessa; Koprich, James B; Hill, Michael P; Fox, Susan H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2013-03-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia is a complication of dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease. Lowering the L-DOPA dose reduces dyskinesia but also reduces the antiparkinsonian benefit. A therapy that could enhance the antiparkinsonian action of low-dose L-DOPA (LDl) without exacerbating dyskinesia would thus be of considerable therapeutic benefit. This study assessed whether catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibition, as an add-on to LDl, might be a means to achieve this goal. Cynomolgus macaques were administered 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Dyskinesia was established by chronic treatment with L-DOPA. Two doses of L-DOPA were identified - high-dose L-DOPA (LDh), which provided good antiparkinsonian benefit but was compromised by disabling dyskinesia, and LDl, which was sub-threshold for providing significant antiparkinsonian benefit, without dyskinesia. LDh and LDl were administered in acute challenges in combination with vehicle and, for LDl, with the COMT inhibitor entacapone (5, 15 and 45 mg/kg). The duration of antiparkinsonian benefit (ON-time), parkinsonism and dyskinesia were determined. The ON-time after LDh was ∼170 min and the ON-time after LDl alone (∼98 min) was not significantly different to vehicle (∼37 min). In combination with LDl, entacapone significantly increased the ON-time (5, 15 and 45 mg/kg being ∼123, ∼148 and ∼180 min, respectively). The ON-time after LDl/entacapone 45 mg/kg was not different to that after LDh. However, whereas the percentage ON-time that was compromised by disabling dyskinesia was ∼56% with LDh, it was only ∼31% with LDl/entacapone 45 mg/kg. In addition to the well-recognized action of COMT inhibition to reduce wearing-OFF, the data presented suggest that COMT inhibition in combination with low doses of L-DOPA has potential as a strategy to alleviate dyskinesia.

  10. Use of Operant Performance to Guide and Evaluate Medical Treatment in an Adult Male Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    treatment. The affected monkey received ketoprofen , buprenorphine, or their combination but continued to perform poorly during daily operant behavioral...evening administration of buprenorphine (0.01 mg/kg IM) was added to the treatment regimen of ketoprofen (2.0 mg/kg IM) ad- ministration in the...well below the reinforced band. Treatment with ketoprofen or the ketoprofen -buprenorphine combination failed to increase mean response duration

  11. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-01-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [18F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [18F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  12. Muscle dimensions in the Japanese macaque hand.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Oishi, Motoharu

    2012-10-01

    Macaques have been used as an important paradigm for understanding the neural control mechanisms of human precision grip capabilities. Therefore, we dissected the forearms and hands of two male Japanese macaques to systematically record the muscle mass, fascicle length and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA). Comparisons of the mass fractions and PCSA fractions of the hand musculature among the Japanese macaque, chimpanzee, and human demonstrated that the sizes of the thenar and hypothenar eminence muscle groups are more balanced in the macaque and chimpanzee, but those of the thenar eminence group are much larger in the human, indicating that the capacity to generate force at the tip of the thumb is more restricted in macaques, despite their high manual dexterity. In the macaque, however, the extrinsic flexor muscles are much larger, possibly to facilitate weight bearing by the forelimbs in pronograde quadrupedal locomotion and forceful grasping of arboreal supports in gap-crossing movements such as leaping. Taking such anatomical differences imposed on the hand musculoskeletal system into consideration seems to be an important method of clarifying the mechanisms of precision grip in macaques.

  13. Evaluation of early fetal exposure to vaginally-administered metronidazole in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kary E; Newcomb, Deanna L; Moffat, Graeme J; Zalikowski, Julie; Chellman, Gary J; McNerney, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Given concern about potential embryo-fetal harm following seminal exposure to drugs with teratogenic potential, pharmaceutical companies use theoretical calculations to estimate seminal concentrations, maternal exposure, and distribution across the placenta to the embryo-fetal compartment for risk assessment. However, it is plausible that there are additional mechanisms whereby the conceptus is exposed. In order to determine if theoretical calculations are sufficiently conservative to predict embryo-fetal exposure from drugs in semen, pregnant cynomolgus monkeys were given a vaginal dose of metronidazole during the early fetal period and cesarean-sectioned. Maternal, fetal, and amniotic fluid samples were analyzed for metronidazole and 2-hydroxymetronidazole. Exposure to metronidazole and its metabolite were comparable in all matrices. These data demonstrated no preferential transfer mechanism to conceptus following intravaginal administration of a small molecule drug; and therefore, suggest that traditional modeling for embryo-fetal exposure to drugs in semen in support of risk assessment for pharmaceutical agents is sufficiently conservative. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate in Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    IWAMA, Ryosuke; SATO, Tsubasa; SAKURAI, Ken; TAKASUNA, Kiyoshi; ICHIJO, Toshihiro; FURUHAMA, Kazuhisa; SATOH, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), a three-blood-sample method using iodixanol was assessed in comparison with the conventional multisample strategy using inulin. Iodixanol and inulin were coadministered intravenously 40 mg I/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively, to male monkeys, followed by blood collection 60, 90 and 120 min later. A close correlation (r=0.96) was noted between the GFR values estimated by both methods. In clinically healthy monkeys, the basal values were determined to be 3.06 ± 0.50 ml/min/kg. This is the first report, suggesting that serum clearance of iodixanol is a ready-to-use tool for a screening the GFR in monkeys, although it is necessary to perform a more longitudinal study using animals with reduced renal function. PMID:24998395

  15. Air sacculitis in three rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and one Japanese macaque (M. fuscata).

    PubMed

    Cullin, Cassandra O; Colgin, Lois M A; Lewis, Anne D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial infection of the laryngeal air sacs (air sacculitis) is infrequently reported in nonhuman primates, where it leads to chronic respiratory disease. It is particularly uncommon in macaques; however, we report here suppurative air sacculitis with extension to adjacent cervical tissues in three rhesus macaques and one Japanese macaque. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., and an anaerobic bacterium were isolated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pharmacodynamic Model of Hepcidin Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Xiao, Jim J; Sasu, Barbra; Hinkle, Beth; Perez-Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2016-05-01

    Hepcidin (H25) is a hormone peptide synthesized by the liver that binds to ferroportin and blocks iron export. In this study, H25 was inhibited by administration of single and multiple doses of an anti-H25 monoclonal antibody Ab 12B9m in cynomolgus monkeys. The objective of this analysis was to develop a pharmacodynamic model describing the role of H25 in regulating iron homeostasis and the impact of hepcidin inhibition by Ab 12B9m. Total serum H25 and Ab 12B9m were determined in each animal. Corresponding measurements of serum iron and hemoglobin (Hb) were obtained. The PD model consisted of iron pools in serum (FeS), reticuloendothelial macrophages (FeM), hemoglobin (FeHb), and liver (FeL). The iron was assumed to be transported between the FeS, FeHb, and FeM unidirectionally at rates k S, k Hb, and k M. H25 serum concentrations were described by the previously developed PK model with the parameters fixed at their estimates. The serum iron and Hb data were fitted simultaneously. The corresponding estimates of the rate constants were k S/Fe0 = 0.113 h(-1), k M = 0.00191 h(-1), and k Hb = 0.00817 h(-1). The model-based IC50 value for the H25 inhibitory effect on ferroportin activity was 0.398 nM. The PD model predicted a negligible effect of Ab 12B9m on Hb levels for the tested doses. The presented PD model adequately described the serum iron time courses following single and multiple doses of Ab 12B9m. Ab 12B9m-induced inhibition of H25 resulted in a temporal increase in serum and liver iron and a decrease in the iron stored in reticuloendothelial macrophages.

  17. Functional Genomics Highlights Differential Induction of Antiviral Pathways in the Lungs of SARS-CoV–Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Teal, Thomas; Leijten, Lonneke M; Rain, Brandon; Osterhaus, Albert D; Haagmans, Bart L; Katze, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is likely mediated by disproportional immune responses and the ability of the virus to circumvent innate immunity. Using functional genomics, we analyzed early host responses to SARS-CoV infection in the lungs of adolescent cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) that show lung pathology similar to that observed in human adults with SARS. Analysis of gene signatures revealed induction of a strong innate immune response characterized by the stimulation of various cytokine and chemokine genes, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IP-10, which corresponds to the host response seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome. As opposed to many in vitro experiments, SARS-CoV induced a wide range of type I interferons (IFNs) and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in the lungs of macaques. Using immunohistochemistry, we revealed that these antiviral signaling pathways were differentially regulated in distinctive subsets of cells. Our studies emphasize that the induction of early IFN signaling may be critical to confer protection against SARS-CoV infection and highlight the strength of combining functional genomics with immunohistochemistry to further unravel the pathogenesis of SARS. PMID:17696609

  18. Alterations in Peripheral Blood B-cell Populations in SHIV89.6P-infected Macaques (Macacca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Heather M; Shipley, Timothy W; Norris, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    In addition to CD4+ T cell depletion, the B cell compartment of HIV-infected patients exhibits abnormalities, including deficits and diminished responses to ex vivo antigenic stimulation and in vivo vaccination. We used chimeric simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of cynomolgus macaques to determine the dynamics of peripheral blood B cell alterations in this model of HIV infection. During the course of infection, we observed progressive loss of total and memory (CD27+) B cells, increased percentages of activated (CD95+) B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and deficits in the CD21+ B cell population. In addition, we noted declines in subsets of memory B cells, including both IgM+ and class-switched (IgD–IgM– CD27+) cells, with sustained deficits in the IgM+ memory (IgM+CD27+) B cell population. The similarity of the B cell alterations in these studies to those observed in HIV+ subjects supports the utility of the SHIV macaque model for examination of HIV-related B cell dysfunction. PMID:21819698

  19. Macaque-human interactions and the societal perceptions of macaques in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Sha, John Chih Mun; Gumert, Michael D; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Chan, Sharon; Fuentes, Agustín

    2009-10-01

    Humans and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) interface in several locations in Singapore. We investigated six of these interface zones to assess the level of conflict between the two species. We observed macaque-to-human interactions and distributed questionnaires to residents and visitors of nature reserves. We observed an average of two macaque-to-human interactions per hour at the sites, which included affiliative or submissive behaviors (46.9%), aggression (19.1%), taking food and other items (18.5%) searching bins, cars, and houses (13.4%), and nonaggressive contact (2.1%). Two-thirds of interactions occurred when a human was carrying food or food cues, and one-quarter occurred when a human provoked macaques. Only 8% of interactions occurred without a clear human-triggered context. Our interview showed one-third of respondents experienced nuisance problems from macaques. They had items taken from them (50.5%) and received threats (31.9%). Residents reported more nuisance problems than visitors, and their perceptions toward macaques differed. Residents were more aware of the consequences of food provisioning and that there were regulations against feeding. Residents fed macaques less and held more negative sentiments toward macaques. Nearly half of the interviewed people held neutral attitudes toward macaques and only 26.2% of respondents thought conflict with macaques warranted urgent action. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents supported education programs to ameliorate human-macaque conflict, and less than 15% supported removing or eradicating macaques. 87.6% felt that it is importance to conserve and protect macaques. Our results show that human-macaque conflict exists in Singapore, but that it may not be severe. Human behavior is largely responsible for macaque-to-human interactions, and thus could be lessened with management of human behavior in interface zones (i.e. restrict food carrying and provocation). Moreover, our interviews shows people

  20. A potential aphrodisiac for female macaques.

    PubMed

    Pertovaara, Antti; Linnankoski, Ilkka; Artchakov, Denis; Rämä, Pia; Carlson, Synnöve

    2004-09-01

    Earlier studies suggest that alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and dopamine receptor agonists may enhance sexual activity in human and nonhuman male primates. It is not known whether these compounds influence the sexual behavior of female primates. We determined whether the administration of a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist (atipamezole), a dopamine receptor agonist (apomorphine), or their combination to female Macaca arctoides (stumptail macaque) monkeys produces changes in sexual behavior of the female with a male. Following the administration of drugs to the female, the behavior of the female with a male stumptail was observed for 30 min. Atipamezole dose dependently (0.03-0.3 mg/kg im) increased short-time mounting behavior of the male and the total number of copulations. Apomorphine alone (0.125-0.25 mg/kg) or in combination with atipamezole had no significant effects on sexual behavior. The result indicates that a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist administered in the female stumptail increases sexual behavior of the male with the female. A plausible explanation for this finding is that a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist increases sexual arousal in female stumptails and this, possibly due to a change in psychosocial behavior of the female, triggers increased sexual activity in males.

  1. Tonkean macaques communicate with their right hand.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Hélène; Fizet, Jonas; Vauclair, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    There are two conflicting hypotheses to explain the origins of language. Vocal origin theory states that language results from the gradual evolution of animals' vocal communication, but gestural origin theory considers that language evolved from gestures, with the initial left-hemispheric control of manual gestures gradually encompassing vocalizations. To contribute to this debate, we investigated functional hemispheric specialization related to hand biases when grasping or showing an object through manual gesture in Tonkean macaques. The results of this study, the first quantitative study on Tonkean macaques' handedness, showed a remarkable convergence of the Tonkean macaques' handedness patterns with those of baboons and human infants, with hand preferences for manual communicative gestures significantly favoring the use of the right hand. Our findings support the hypothesis that left hemispheric lateralization for language is derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of macaques, baboons and humans.

  2. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  3. Birth Origin Differentially Affects Depressive-Like Behaviours: Are Captive-Born Cynomolgus Monkeys More Vulnerable to Depression than Their Wild-Born Counterparts?

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine MJ.; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse early-life experience might lead to the expression of abnormal behaviours in animals and the predisposition to psychiatric disorder (e.g. major depressive disorder) in Humans. Common breeding processes employ weaning and housing conditions different from what happens in the wild. Methods The present study, therefore, investigated whether birth origin impacts the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 captive-born and 40 wild-born socially-housed cynomolgus macaques in farming conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses. Results We identified 10 distinct profiles (groups A to J) that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, distances between individuals and locations in the cage. Data suggest that 4 captive-born and 1 wild-born animals (groups G and J) present depressive-like symptoms, unnatural early life events thereby increasing the risk of developing pathological symptoms. General differences were also highlighted between the captive- and wild-born populations, implying the expression of differential coping mechanisms in response to the same captive environment. Conclusions Birth origin thus impacts the development of atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups. PMID:23861787

  4. Sexual partner preference in female Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Paul L

    2002-02-01

    Whether animals ever exhibit a preference for same-sex sexual partners is a subject of debate. Japanese macaques represent excellent models for examining issues related to sexual preference in animals because females, in certain populations, routinely engage in both heterosexual and homosexual behavior over the course of their life spans. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that female homosexual behavior in Japanese macaques is a sexual behavior, not a sociosexual one. Additional evidence indicates that female Japanese macaques do not engage in homosexual behavior simply because acceptable male mates are unavailable or unmotivated to copulate. Patterns of sexual partner choice by female Japanese macaques that are the focus of intersexual competition indicate that females of this species choose same-sex sexual partners even when they are simultaneously presented with a motivated, opposite-sex alternative. Thus, in some populations of Japanese macaques, females prefer certain same-sex sexual partners relative to certain male mates, and vice versa. Taken together, this evidence suggests that female Japanese macaques are best characterized as bisexual in orientation, not preferentially homosexual or preferentially heterosexual.

  5. The ischial callosities of Sulawesi macaques.

    PubMed

    Juliandi, Berry; Suryobroto, Bambang; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah

    2009-12-01

    Sulawesi island has a high level of endemism, including the seven species of monkey from the genus Macaca (macaques). These monkeys have a pair of sitting pads, termed ischial callosities that have diverse shapes and previously were described verbally only. Although useful, these verbal descriptions cannot fully describe shape variation and are somewhat subjective, and cannot directly be used to analyze relationships among species. Here, we report a quantitative analysis of shape of Sulawesi macaque ischial callosities using geometric morphometric tools to optimally describe shape variation and objectively reconstruct general pattern of callosity shapes. By quantification of shape variation, we compare the relationships of each Sulawesi macaque species with each other and with the two geographically neighboring macaque species, M. nemestrina and M. fascicularis, by consensus coordinates of the callosity outlines. The Sulawesi macaques have a wider degree of variation compared with M. fascicularis and M. nemestrina; variation exists in the dorsal part and in the bending of the callosity. There are three general types of callosity shape in Sulawesi macaques: oval without bending (M. tonkeana and M. maurus), oval with outward bending (M. ochreata and M. brunnescens), and oval or reniform with inward bending (M. hecki, M. nigrescens, and M. nigra). These types are congruent with their geographical distribution. The pathway of shape change may have started from oval without bending in the center and the southern peninsula, to outward bending in the southeastern species, and to oval or reniform with inward bending in the northern species.

  6. 4-week range-finding and 1-year oral toxicity studies of sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Blair, M; Chappel, C I

    1998-02-01

    Sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) is used as an emulsion stabilizer in citrus-based soft drinks. A 4-week range-finding study and a 1-year chronic toxicity study were conducted to determine the tolerance and effects of this food additive in cynomolgus monkeys. SAIB was administered by gavage in corn oil solutions to groups of one monkey of each sex in the range-finding study and four monkeys of each sex in the 1-year study. The dose levels employed in both studies were 0, 500, 1450 and 2400 mg/kg body weight. Control monkeys were given corn oil by gavage. Based on the range-finding study, the 2400 mg/kg body weight dose level of SAIB was considered to be the highest dose of SAIB in corn oil that would be tolerated in a long-term study. No differences were observed between treated and control animals in either study with respect to body weight gain, clinical chemistry, haematology, organ weights, gross necropsy or light microscopy findings that could be attributed to SAIB treatment. Results of specific tests of hepatobiliary function in the 1-year study, including serum enzymes, bilirubin and bile acids, bromsulfophthalein retention and electron microscopic studies of the liver, were also negative. It was concluded that the highest dose level fed, 2400 mg/kg body weight, was the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL).

  7. Pancreatic ectasia in uremic macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, R. T.; Strauss, W.; Wheeler, W.

    1982-01-01

    Pancreatic ectasia (PE) is a common incidental finding in people dying from uremia. It has been described as dilatation of acini, inspissation of secretions, and proliferation of ductal cells. PE occurred in 17 macaques, 11 of which were known to have been uremic. The lesion was studied by light and electronmicroscopy and histochemistry and by construction of a three-dimensional model of a dilated acinar ductal system from serial semithick Epon sections. Atrophic acinar cells interspersed with clumps of centroacinar cells lined all portions of the system. There was no evidence of ductular proliferation. Fibrillar material was present in the dilated acinar lumens and associated with epithelial cells and leukocytes, but no blockage of the system was demonstrated. The lesion is similar to those induced by a variety of experimental procedures and to the pancreatic lesions of cystic fibrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6175218

  8. Comparison of the toxicokinetic behavior of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and nonafluorobutane-1-sulfonic acid (PFBS) in cynomolgus monkeys and rats.

    PubMed

    Chengelis, Christopher P; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Myers, Nichole R; Shinohara, Motoki; Stetson, Philip L; Sved, Daniel W

    2009-06-01

    The toxicokinetics of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and nonafluoro-1-butanesulfonic acid (PFBS) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Systemic exposure to PFHxA was lower than for PFBS following single equivalent intravenous or oral (rat only) doses. Serum clearance was more rapid for PFHxA than for PFBS. In rats, exposure to PFHxA and PFBS was up to 8-fold (intravenous) and 4-fold (oral) higher for males than females and serum clearance of PFHxA and PFBS was more rapid in females than males; however, there was no appreciable difference in the extent or rate of urinary elimination between compounds or genders. There were no apparent differences between genders in the serum half-life for PFHxA following 26 days of repeated oral dosing in rats; exposure decreased upon repeated dosing.

  9. Estrogen and androgen dynamics in the cynomolgus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Bourget, C.; Femino, A.; Franz, C.; Longcope, C.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of androgen, estrogen, and cortisol (F) production, metabolism, and protein binding in cynomolgus monkeys (M. fascicularis) to provide baseline data and to compare these parameters with those obtained in other primates. Constant infusions of /sup 3/H-labeled androgens, /sup 14/C-labeled estrogens, and (/sup 3/H)F were administered to 11 male cynomolgus monkeys (M. fascicularis) for 3.5 h. Blood samples were obtained from a peripheral vein during the infusion, and all urine was collected for 96 h. In each of 3 monkeys, a catheter was inserted into the hepatic vein, and during the infusions blood samples were obtained from the hepatic and peripheral veins and the femoral artery. All blood and urine samples were analyzed for radioactivity as testosterone (T), androstenedione (A), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1). When indicated, blood samples were also analyzed for radioactivity as F. Blood samples taken before the infusions were analyzed for endogenous T, A, DHT, E1, E2, and F concentrations; percent free T, free E2, and free F; and sex hormone-binding globulin and F-binding globulin capacities. The mean +/- SE MCRs for T, A, E2, E1, and F were 44 +/- 4, 407 +/- 40, 175 +/- 17, 315 +/- 28, and 57 +/- 6 liters/day, respectively. The mean blood production rates were 128 +/- 19, 91 +/- 14, 3.3 +/- 0.5, and 9.2 +/- 1.1 micrograms/day and 13.4 +/- 1.9 mg/day for T, A, E2, E1, and F, respectively. The aromatization of androgens was 1.30 +/- 0.10% for A to E1 and 0.28 +/- 0.03% for T to E2. The percent free F (4.34 +/- 0.42%) was greater than the percent free T (1.73 +/- 0.16%) or free E2 (2.75 +/- 0.22%), and the concentration of F-binding globulin was greater than that of sex hormone-binding globulin (227 +/- 35 vs. 60 +/- 7 nM).

  10. Age-related lesions in the cerebrum in middle-aged female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Rinya; Yang, Xiuying; Saski, Yuji; Iwashige, Shuichiro; Tanigawa, Yohei; Yoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Takaharu; Kamimura, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Horishi

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans is a progressive neurogenic disease that can be linked with such characteristic pathological findings in the cerebrum as senile plaques (SPs), neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and neuronal loss. In the present study, the authors investigated the age-related morphological changes in 12 middle-aged and 12 young cynomolgus monkeys. Low numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the hippocampal region in cynomolgus monkeys accompanied ageing, and there was a high number of microglial cells; however, no clearly neurotoxic abnormalities due to beta-amyloid were noted before the age of 20 years. The onset of SPs and CAA in the cerebrum in cynomolgus monkeys can occur before the age of 20 years. SPs were almost all categorized as diffuse plaques (DPs); they did not have amyloid cores and were unaccompanied by neuritic degeneration. In cynomolgus monkeys, SPs (DPs) occur before the appearance of CAA. From the above, it was concluded that cynomolgus monkeys showed pathological changes due to ageing similar to those related to Alzheimer's disease in humans, even before they were 20 years old.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in macaques is not suppressed by intranasal sprays of pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Clément; Hourani, Marianne-Lucas; Janin, Yves L; Dauzonne, Daniel; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Paturet, Adeline; Taborik, Fabrice; Vabret, Astrid; Contamin, Hugues; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    There is imperious need for efficient therapies against ubiquitous and life-threatening respiratory viruses, foremost among them being the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Several research groups who performed functional screens for broad-spectrum antivirals identified compounds targeting the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. Despite their strong antiviral activity in vitro, whether such antimetabolites are effective in vivo remains highly controversial. Here, we evaluated two potent pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors developed in our laboratory, IPPA17-A04 and GAC50, in a model of mild hRSV-infection in cynomolgus macaques. In this model, hRSV replication is restricted to the epithelium of the upper respiratory tract, and is compatible with a topical treatment by intranasal sprays. The local administration of palivizumab, a neutralizing anti-hRSV antibody used in clinics, significantly reduced virus replication. In contrast, pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors did not show any inhibitory effect on hRSV growth when delivered topically as experimented in our model. Our results should help to better define the potential applications of this class of antimetabolites in the treatment of viral infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Patricia C.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Rebelatto, Marlon; Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin; Towers, Heidi; McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  13. Thymic immunopathology and progression of SIVsm infection in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, S L; Kaaya, E E; Ordónez, C; Ekman, M; Feichtinger, H; Putkonen, P; Böttiger, D; Biberfeld, G; Biberfeld, P

    1995-05-01

    Thymuses from 22 cynomolgus monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsm) developed characteristic cortical and medullary changes including formation of B-cell follicles (8/21) and accumulation of virus immune complexes. Advanced thymic histopathology was correlated with more pronounced immunodeficiency. SIVsm provirus was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in most (16/18) thymuses and spliced viral env mRNA in 3 (3/7) thymuses with advanced histopathologic changes indicative of thymic SIVsm replication. By combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry, viral RNA was localized mainly to the follicular dendritic network, macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, and lymphocytes of the medullary regions. Latent infection by an Epstein-Barr-related herpesvirus (HVMF1) was also found by PCR and by ISH in medullary regions of three (3 of 8) thymuses with B-cell follicles, suggestive of an inductive role for B-cell proliferation in these thymuses. In a control group of HIV-2-infected nonimmunosuppressed monkeys, no comparable thymic changes were observed. Our results indicate that SIV, and probably by analogy HIV, can have direct and diverse pathogenic effects on the thymus that are important in the development of simian (human) AIDS.

  14. Unique Pattern of Enzootic Primate Viruses in Gibraltar Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A.; Pizarro, Mark; Shaw, Eric; Cortes, John; Fuentes, Agustin; Barry, Peter; Lerche, Nicholas; Grant, Richard; Cohn, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Because Gibraltar's macaques (Macaca sylvanus) have frequent contact with humans, we assayed 79 macaques for antibodies to enzootic primate viruses. All macaques were seronegative for herpesvirus B, simian T-cell lymphotropic virus, simian retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and rhesus cytomegalovirus. Seroprevalence of simian foamy virus reached 88% among adult animals. PMID:18598634

  15. Developmental toxicity assessment of tanezumab, an anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bowman, Christopher J; Evans, Mark; Cummings, Thomas; Oneda, Satoru; Butt, Mark; Hurst, Susan; Gremminger, Jessica-Lyn; Shelton, David; Kamperschroer, Cris; Zorbas, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Two intravenous studies with tanezumab, an anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, were conducted in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys to assess potential effects on pregnancy and pre- and postnatal development. Study 1 evaluated infants up to 12 months of age following weekly maternal dosing (0, 0.5, 4 or 30 mg/kg; 18 per group) from gestation day (GD) 20 through parturition. Study 2 evaluated infants 2 months postnatally following weekly maternal dosing (0, 0.5 or 30 mg/kg; 20-21 per group) from GD 20 through 48. In the absence of maternal toxicity, tanezumab increased stillbirth and post-birth infant mortality/morbidity, decreased infant growth and resulted in microscopic changes in the peripheral sympathetic and sensory nervous system of the infants at all doses. Decreased primary antibody responses and increased incidences in skin changes in infants were also observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level for maternal toxicity was 30 mg/kg and <0.5 mg/kg for developmental toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization, biomarkers, and reversibility of a monoclonal antibody-induced immune complex disease in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Heyen, Jonathan R; Rojko, Jennifer; Evans, Mark; Brown, Tom P; Bobrowski, Walter F; Vitsky, Allison; Dalton, Shana; Tripathi, Niraj; Bollini, Sangeetha Subbarao; Johnson, Theodore; Lin, John C; Khan, Nasir; Han, Bora

    2014-06-01

    Two 6-month repeat-dose toxicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys illustrated immune complex-mediated adverse findings in individual monkeys and identified parameters that potentially signal the onset of immune complex-mediated reactions following administration of RN6G, a monoclonal antibody (mAb). In the first study, 3 monkeys exhibited nondose-dependent severe clinical signs accompanied by decreased erythrocytes with increased reticulocytes, neutrophilia, monocytosis, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, decreased albumin, azotemia, and increased serum levels of activated complement products, prompting unscheduled euthanasia. Histologically, immunohistochemical localization of RN6G was associated with monkey immunoglobulin and complement components in glomeruli and other tissues, attributable to immune complex disease (ICD). All 3 animals also had anti-RN6G antibodies and decreased plasma levels of RN6G. Subsequently, an investigational study was designed and conducted with regulatory agency input to detect early onset of ICD and assess reversibility to support further clinical development. Dosing of individual animals ceased when biomarkers of ICD indicated adverse findings. Of the 12 monkeys, 1 developed anti-RN6G antibodies and decreased RN6G exposure that preceded elevations in complement products, interleukin-6, and coagulation parameters and decreases in albumin and fibrinogen. All findings in this monkey, except for antidrug antibody (ADA), reversed after cessation of dosing without progressing to adverse sequelae typically associated with ICD.

  17. Individual reference intervals of hematological and serum biochemical parameters in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tadashi; Kanefuji, Koji; Nakama, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys, one of a number of primates phylogenetically close to humans, are commonly used in animal studies. The purpose of this study was to assess biological variations in hematological and serum biochemical parameters in cynomolgus monkeys. Summary statistics and reference intervals were calculated using data from 95 male and 95 female Chinese-bred cynomolgus monkeys aged 3 to 7 years showing no abnormalities during the breeding period. Within- and between-animal variations were estimated using a random-effect analysis of variance (ANOVA), then, a simple method that applies prior information was proposed to estimate individual reference intervals. Parameters including MCV, MCH, PT, ALP, total cholesterol, and creatinine appeared to show a large between-animal variation; thus, it is considered that individual reference intervals for these parameters would be relatively small in comparison with overall reference intervals.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of tenofovir following intravaginal and intrarectal administration of tenofovir gel to rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Jeremy; Kashuba, Angela; Wang, Ruili; White, Nicole; Allen, Philip; Roberts, Jeffrey; Romano, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Tenofovir gel (1%) is being developed as a microbicide for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and has been shown to reduce transmission to women by 39%. The gel also prevents infection in macaques when applied intravaginally or intrarectally prior to challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), but very little pharmacokinetic information for macaques is available to help extrapolate the data to humans and thus inform future development activities. We have determined the pharmacokinetics of tenofovir in macaques following intravaginal and intrarectal administration of 0.2, 1, and 5% gels. Plasma and vaginal and rectal fluid samples were collected up to 24 h after dosing, and at 24 h postdosing biopsy specimens were taken from the vaginal wall, cervix, and rectum. Following vaginal and rectal administration, tenofovir rapidly distributed to the matrices distal to the site of administration. In all matrices, exposure increased with increasing dose, and with the 1% and 5% formulations, concentrations remained detectable in most animals 24 h after dosing. At all doses, concentrations at the dosing site were typically 1 to 2 log units higher than those in the opposite compartment and 4 to 5 log units higher than those in plasma. Exposure in vaginal fluid after vaginal dosing was 58 to 82% lower than that in rectal fluid after rectal dosing, but plasma exposure was 1- to 2-fold greater after vaginal dosing than after rectal dosing. These data suggest that a tenofovir-based microbicide may have the potential to protect when exposure is via vaginal or anal intercourse, regardless of whether the microbicide is applied vaginally or rectally.

  19. Acrylamide effects on the macaque visual system. I. Psychophysics and electrophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Barkdoll, E.; Maurissen, J.P.J.; Eskin, T.A.; Lapham, L.W.

    1985-03-01

    Oral acrylamide produces axonal swelling and later degeneration and gliosis in the distal optic tract, especially within the lateral geniculate nucleus, of macaque monkeys. Measures of visual thresholds and cortical-evoked potentials were used to study the time course of visual changes during exposure to acrylamide in macaque monkeys. Contrast sensitivity, visual acuity, and flicker fusion frequency were reduced during exposure, and only flicker fusion recovered rapidly and completely after exposure. Pattern-reversal-evoked responses exhibited increased latency and reduced amplitude during dosing but substantially recovered after exposure. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity for high spatial frequencies were decreased throughout the 140 days of testing after dosing. These results suggest an acute general depression of visual capacities as the initial effect of acrylamide exposure, whereas later effects were confined to high spatial frequencies. 29 references, 6 figures.

  20. Protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax with a Bacillus anthracis capsule conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Donald J; Ribot, Wilson J; Joyce, Joseph; Cook, James; Hepler, Robert; Nahas, Debbie; Chua, Jennifer; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2016-07-25

    The efficacy of currently licensed anthrax vaccines is largely attributable to a single Bacillus anthracis immunogen, protective antigen. To broaden protection against possible strains resistant to protective antigen-based vaccines, we previously developed a vaccine in which the anthrax polyglutamic acid capsule was covalently conjugated to the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serotype B and demonstrated that two doses of 2.5μg of this vaccine conferred partial protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax . Here, we demonstrate complete protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax with a higher 50μg dose of the same capsule conjugate vaccine. These results indicate that B. anthracis capsule is a highly effective vaccine component that should be considered for incorporation in future generation anthrax vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Faces and objects in macaque cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Knutsen, Tamara A; Mandeville, Joseph B; Tootell, Roger B H

    2003-09-01

    How are different object categories organized by the visual system? Current evidence indicates that monkeys and humans process object categories in fundamentally different ways. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that humans have a ventral temporal face area, but such evidence is lacking in macaques. Instead, face-responsive neurons in macaques seem to be scattered throughout temporal cortex, with some relative concentration in the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Here, using fMRI in alert fixating macaque monkeys and humans, we found that macaques do have discrete face-selective patches, similar in relative size and number to face patches in humans. The face patches were embedded within a large swath of object-selective cortex extending from V4 to rostral TE. This large region responded better to pictures of intact objects compared to scrambled objects, with different object categories eliciting different patterns of activity, as in the human. Overall, our results suggest that humans and macaques share a similar brain architecture for visual object processing.

  2. Effects of altered FcγR binding on antibody pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Leabman, Maya K; Meng, Y Gloria; Kelley, Robert F; DeForge, Laura E; Cowan, Kyra J; Iyer, Suhasini

    2013-01-01

    Antibody interactions with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), like FcγRIIIA, play a critical role in mediating antibody effector functions and thereby contribute significantly to the biologic and therapeutic activity of antibodies. Over the past decade, considerable work has been directed towards production of antibodies with altered binding affinity to FcγRs and evaluation of how the alterations modulate their therapeutic activity. This has been achieved by altering glycosylation status at N297 or by engineering modifications in the crystallizable fragment (Fc) region. While the effects of these modifications on biologic activity and efficacy have been examined, few studies have been conducted to understand their effect on antibody pharmacokinetics (PK). We present here a retrospective analysis in which we characterize the PK of three antibody variants with decreased FcγR binding affinity caused by amino acid substitutions in the Fc region (N297A, N297G, and L234A/L235A) and three antibody variants with increased FcγRIIIA binding affinity caused by afucosylation at N297, and compare their PK to corresponding wild type antibody PK in cynomolgus monkeys. For all antibodies, PK was examined at a dose that was known to be in the linear range. Since production of the N297A and N297G variants in Chinese hamster ovary cells results in aglycosylated antibodies that do not bind to FcγRs, we also examined the effect of expression of an aglycosylated antibody, without sequence change(s), in E. coli. All the variants demonstrated similar PK compared with that of the wild type antibodies, suggesting that, for the six antibodies presented here, altered FcγR binding affinity does not affect PK. PMID:24492343

  3. Detection of drug specific circulating immune complexes from in vivo cynomolgus monkey serum samples.

    PubMed

    Pierog, Piotr; Krishna, Murli; Yamniuk, Aaron; Chauhan, Anil; DeSilva, Binodh

    2015-01-01

    Administration of a biotherapeutic can result in the formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs). The resulting ADA can potentially form immune complexes (ICs) with the drug leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles and/or adverse events. Furthermore the presence of such complexes may interfere with accurate PK assessment, and/or detection of ADA in immunogenicity assays. Here, we present two assays to detect the presence of drug-ADA immune complexes in cynomolgus monkeys. Serum samples were analyzed for IC formation in vivo. 8/8 tested animals were positive for drug specific IC. Depending on the time point tested 4/8 or 7/8 animals tested positive for ADA during drug dosing. All 8 animals were confirmed positive for ADA during the washout phase, indicating drug interference in the bridging assay. Relative amount of IC over time was determined and its correlation with PK and ADA was then assessed. Multivariate data analysis demonstrates good correlation between signals obtained from the anti-drug and FcγRIIIa based capture assays, although due to its biological characteristic FcγRIIIa based assay captured only a subset of drug specific IC. In one animal IC remained in circulation even when the drug levels decreased below detection limit. Results from this study indicate the presence of IC during administration of an immunogenic biotherapeutic. Potential application of these assays includes detection of ADA in an IC during high drug levels. The results on the kinetics of IC formation during ADA response can complement the understanding of PK and ADA profiles. Moreover, the presence of IC indicates possible ADA interference in standard PK assays and potential underestimation of total drug exposure in toxicology studies. In addition this study also highlights the need to understand downstream in vivo consequences of drug-ADA IC as no animals under investigation developed adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Safety of recombinant human factor XIII in a cynomolgus monkey model of extracorporeal blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, R; Armstrong, K; Andrews, K; Hensler, J; Waggie, K; Heffernan, J; Reynolds, T; Rogge, M

    2005-01-01

    Factor XIII (FXIII) is a thrombin-activated plasma coagulation factor critical for blood clot stabilization and longevity. Administration of exogenous FXIII to replenish depleted stores after major surgery, including cardiopulmonary bypass, may reduce bleeding complications and transfusion requirements. Thus, a model of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was developed in adult male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to evaluate the nonclinical safety of recombinant human FXIII (rFXIII). The hematological and coagulation profile in study animals during and after 2 h of ECC was similar to that reported for humans during and after cardiopulmonary bypass, including observations of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and activation of coagulation and platelets. Intravenous slow bolus injection of 300 U/kg (2.1 mg/kg) or 1000 U/kg (7 mg/kg) rFXIII after 2 h of ECC was well tolerated in study animals, and was associated with a dose-dependent increase in FXIII activity. No clinically significant effects in respiration, ECG, heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, clinical chemistry, hematology (including platelet counts), or indicators of thrombosis (thrombin:anti-thrombin complex and D-Dimer) or platelet activation (platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin) were related to rFXIII administration. Specific examination of brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney from rFXIII-treated animals provided no evidence of histopathological alterations suggestive of subclinical hemorrhage or thrombosis. Taken as a whole, the results demonstrate the ECC model suitably replicated the clinical presentation reported for humans during and after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, and do not suggest significant concerns regarding use of rFXIII in replacement therapy after extracorporeal circulation.

  5. Effects elicited by toxaphene in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bryce, F; Iverson, F; Andrews, P; Barker, M; Cherry, W; Mueller, R; Pulido, O; Hayward, S; Fernie, S; Arnold, D L

    2001-12-01

    Toxaphene, which was added to glycerol/corn oil, was administered at a level of 1 mg/kg body weight/day in gelatin capsules to four healthy young adult cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) monkeys for 52 weeks. Four control monkeys ingested capsules containing only glycerol/corn oil. Each group had two males and two females. On a daily basis, each monkey's feed and water consumption was determined, its health was monitored and the females were swabbed to evaluate menstrual status. On a weekly basis, each monkey's body weight was determined and a detailed clinical evaluation was performed. At 4-week intervals, blood samples were taken for serum biochemistry, haematology and toxaphene analysis. Also, a local anaesthetic was administered to the nuchal fat pad area of each monkey, and adipose samples were obtained for toxaphene analysis. 1 day prior to the biopsies, a 24-h urine and faecal collection was obtained for toxaphene analysis. After 34 weeks of treatment, the immune system of the monkeys was evaluated. After 52 weeks of dosing, all treated and two control animals were necropsied. Liver samples were obtained and microsomal fractions were prepared immediately. A portion of liver and kidney was taken for toxaphene analysis. All of the major internal organs were weighed and bone marrow evaluations were conducted. Organ and tissue samples were fixed in 10% formalin and processed for light microscopy. There was no effect of treatment on body weight gain, feed consumption, water consumption or haematological parameters. Two major clinical findings were inflammation and/or enlargement of the tarsal gland and impacted diverticulae in the upper and lower eye lids. At necropsy, the relative spleen and thymus weights were greater for the treated monkeys than the controls. Toxaphene administration produced an increase in metabolism of aminopyrene, methoxyresorufin and ethoxyresorufin, three substrates that are altered specifically by cytochrome P450-based hepatic

  6. Effects of olanexidine gluconate on preoperative skin preparation: an experimental study in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hikaru; Tsubotani, Yoshie; Nii, Takuya; Hagi, Akifumi; Inoue, Yasuhide; Imamura, Tadashi

    2017-05-01

    To determine the bactericidal efficacy of a new topical antiseptic for preoperative skin preparation, olanexidine gluconate (development code: OPB-2045G), against transient or resident bacterial flora on the skin of cynomolgus monkeys. After measuring baseline bacterial counts on test sites marked on the abdomens, we applied olanexidine, chlorhexidine or povidone-iodine. After 10 min (fast-acting effect) and 6 h (long-lasting effect), bacterial counts were measured again and log10 reductions were calculated. In addition, we determined the bactericidal effects on the skin contaminated with blood before or after applying the antiseptics. In the non-blood-contaminated condition, the mean log10 reductions of olanexidine at doses of 1-2 % were significantly higher than those of saline (negative control), but did not significantly differ from those of 0.5 % chlorhexidine and 10 % povidone-iodine at either time point. But olanexidine was significantly more effective at both time points than chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine when applied after the site was contaminated with blood. Olanexidine was also significantly more effective than chlorhexidine and as effective as or more effective than povidone-iodine at both time points when skin was contaminated with blood after the antiseptics were applied. The bactericidal effects of olanexidine were comparable to those of commercial antiseptics such as chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine in non-blood-contaminated conditions. More importantly, the effect of olanexidine was hardly affected by blood unlike commercial antiseptics. Thus, it is considered that olanexidine has a favourable property for skin preparation in various types of surgical treatments.

  7. Effects of ascorbic acid deficiency and of erythorbic acid on blood components in the Cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, J D; Sauberlich, H E; Omaye, S T

    1979-01-01

    Eight male Cynomolgus monkeys were fed an ascorbic acid-free total liquid diet until plasma levels decreased from a mean of 1.1 mg/dl to 0.04 mg/dl at 8 weeks. They showed no visible signs of scurvy. The animals were then given a daily oral dose of 10 mg ascorbic acid/kg body weight for 4 weeks, when the experiment was ended. Four of the animals were given, in addition, 200 mg erythorbic acid/kg body weight orally each day. In all animals repletion was accomplished in two to three weeks using return to initial plasma ascorbic acid levels as the criterion. During deficiency, blood cellular elements were found to be more resistant to depletion than plasma. For erythrocytes, this may be explained at least partially by the observation that in vitro uptake of ascorbic acid tended to be related inversely to blood ascorbic acid levels. However, no such relationship was seen in leucocytes or platelets. Other measurements made on blood did not vary in response to changing ascorbic acid levels. These include serum cholesterol; erythrocyte, leucocyte, or platelet counts; leucocyte differential; hemoglobin concentration; and hematocrit. Urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratios were also unchanged. Erythorbic acid, a stereoisomer of ascorbic acid and a common food additive, has been cited as a possible interferent in the determination of whole blood or plasma ascorbic acid, since in the guinea pig it is absorbed from the gut and no commonly used ascorbic acid analysis can distinguish between the isomers. Under conditions of the present experiment, however, no elevation of apparent whole blood or plasma ascorbic acid was produced by inclusion of high levels of erythorbic acid in the diet. Animals given erythorbic acid in addition to ascorbic acid during repletion did not differ from those given ascorbic acid alone in any aspect mentioned above.

  8. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics Evaluation of Anti-heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor (HB-EGF) Monoclonal Antibody Using Cynomolgus Monkeys via (89)Zr-immuno-PET Study and the Determination of Drug Concentrations in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Noriyuki; Adachi, Maiko; Yamano, Kazuya

    2016-02-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family and is an important therapeutic target in some types of human cancers. KHK2866 is a humanized anti-HB-EGF monoclonal antibody IgG that neutralizes HB-EGF activity by inhibiting the binding of HB-EGF to its receptors. The phase I study of KHK2866 was discontinued because of neuropsychiatric toxicity. In this study, the pharmacokinetics of KHK2866 was evaluated by (89)Zr-immuno-PET study and the determination of drug concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid using cynomolgus monkeys was performed in order to predict neurotoxicity in a reverse-translational manner. KHK2866 was radiolabeled with (89)Zr for preclinical evaluations in normal cynomolgus monkeys and its distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, as a separate study, KHK2866 concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were determined after administration of a single dose. PET studies with monkeys revealed (89)Zr-KHK2866 accumulation in the liver, spleen and joints of multiple parts, but not in brain. In addition, the pharmacokinetic analyses in serum and CSF demonstrated a low penetration of KHK2866 into the brain. These studies indicate the difficulty of prediction for neuropsychiatric toxicity of monoclonal antibodies in human by means of pharmacokinetic evaluations using cynomolgus monkeys.

  9. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Live-Attenuated Junin (Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever) Vaccine in Rhesus Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    virus from animals in every dose group. vetted 1-2.5 weeks after initial virus recovery. That the viruses recovered were Junin virus is certain: all...wild-type strains (LI 1.25). When vivo neutralization and virus clearance are com- we used this system to examine viruses recovered plex and multi...Fredertcktfarniand Abstract. The safety and immunogenicity of Candid #1. a live-attenuated Junin- virus vaccine, were evaluated in rhesus macaques. Candid #1 was

  10. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Erin A.; Olson, Carl R.

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system. PMID:26067532

  11. Ambiguity aversion in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Benjamin Y; Heilbronner, Sarah R; Platt, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    People generally prefer risky options, which have fully specified outcome probabilities, to ambiguous options, which have unspecified probabilities. This preference, formalized in economics, is strong enough that people will reliably prefer a risky option to an ambiguous option with a greater expected value. Explanations for ambiguity aversion often invoke uniquely human faculties like language, self-justification, or a desire to avoid public embarrassment. Challenging these ideas, here we demonstrate that a preference for unambiguous options is shared with rhesus macaques. We trained four monkeys to choose between pairs of options that both offered explicitly cued probabilities of large and small juice outcomes. We then introduced occasional trials where one of the options was obscured and examined their resulting preferences; we ran humans in a parallel experiment on a nearly identical task. We found that monkeys reliably preferred risky options to ambiguous ones, even when this bias was costly, closely matching the behavior of humans in the analogous task. Notably, ambiguity aversion varied parametrically with the extent of ambiguity. As expected, ambiguity aversion gradually declined as monkeys learned the underlying probability distribution of rewards. These data indicate that ambiguity aversion reflects fundamental cognitive biases shared with other animals rather than uniquely human factors guiding decisions.

  12. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-06-14

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  13. Postexposure protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV infection by topical integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Parikh, Urvi M; West, Rolieria; Taylor, Andrew; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis; Hazuda, Daria; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2014-03-12

    Coitally delivered microbicide gels containing antiretroviral drugs are important for HIV prevention. However, to date, microbicides have contained entry or reverse transcriptase inhibitors that block early steps in virus infection and thus need to be given as a preexposure dose that interferes with sexual practices and may limit compliance. Integrase inhibitors block late steps after virus infection and therefore are more suitable for post-coital dosing. We first determined the kinetics of strand transfer in vitro and confirmed that integration begins about 6 hours after infection. We then used a repeat-challenge macaque model to assess efficacy of vaginal gels containing integrase strand transfer inhibitors when applied before or after simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We showed that gel containing the strand transfer inhibitor L-870812 protected two of three macaques when applied 30 min before SHIV challenge. We next evaluated the efficacy of 1% raltegravir gel and demonstrated its ability to protect macaques when applied 3 hours after SHIV exposure (five of six protected; P < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Breakthrough infections showed no evidence of drug resistance in plasma or vaginal secretions despite continued gel dosing after infection. We documented rapid vaginal absorption reflecting a short pharmacological lag time and noted that vaginal, but not plasma, virus load was substantially reduced in the breakthrough infection after raltegravir gel treatment. We provide a proof of concept that topically applied integrase inhibitors protect against vaginal SHIV infection when administered shortly before or 3 hours after virus exposure.

  14. Effects of ICOS+ T cell depletion via afucosylated monoclonal antibody MEDI-570 on pregnant cynomolgus monkeys and the developing offspring.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Simone M; Carlesso, Gianluca; Cheng, Lily I; Cook, Halie; DaCosta, Karma; Leininger, Joel; McKeever, Kathleen; Scott, Stephen Weasel; Taylor, Devon; Streicher, Katie; Eck, Steve; Reed, Molly; Faggioni, Raffaella; Herbst, Ronald; Dixit, Rakesh; Ryan, Patricia C

    2017-09-13

    MEDI-570 is a fully human afucosylated monoclonal antibody (MAb) against Inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS), highly expressed on CD4+ T follicular helper (TFH) cells. Effects of MEDI-570 were evaluated in an enhanced pre-postnatal development toxicity (ePPND) study in cynomolgus monkeys. Administration to pregnant monkeys did not cause any abortifacient effects. Changes in hematology and peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets in maternal animals and infants and the attenuated infant IgG immune response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) were attributed to MEDI-570 pharmacology. Adverse findings included aggressive fibromatosis in one dam and two infant losses in the high dose group with anatomic pathology findings suggestive of atypical lymphoid hyperplasia. The margin of safety relative to the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for the highest planned clinical dose in the Phase 1a study was 7. This study suggests that women of child bearing potential employ effective methods of contraception while being treated with MEDI-570. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of oral and intravenous administration of buspirone on food-cocaine choice in socially housed male cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A

    2015-03-13

    Drugs acting at D3 dopamine receptors have been suggested as medications for cocaine dependence. These experiments examined the effects of intravenously and orally administered buspirone, a D2-like receptor antagonist with high affinity for D3 and D4 receptors, on the relative reinforcing strength of cocaine in group-housed male cynomolgus monkeys. Use of socially housed monkeys permitted the assessment of whether social status, known to influence D2-like receptor availability, modulates the behavioral effects of buspirone. Buspirone was administered acutely to monkeys self-administering cocaine under a food-drug choice procedure in which a cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve was determined daily. When administered by either route, buspirone significantly decreased cocaine choice in dominant-ranked monkeys. In subordinate monkeys, however, i.v. buspirone was ineffective on average, and oral buspirone increased choice of lower cocaine doses. The effects of buspirone only differed according to route of administration in subordinate monkeys. Moreover, it is noteworthy that the effects of buspirone were similar to those of the D3 receptor-selective antagonist PG01037 and qualitatively different than those of less selective drugs that act at D2-like or serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors, suggesting a D3 and possibly D4 receptor mechanism of action for buspirone. Taken together, the data support the utility of drugs targeting D3/D4 receptors as potential treatments for cocaine addiction, particularly in combination with enriching environmental manipulations.

  16. A MIV-150/Zinc Acetate Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT Infection in Macaque Vaginal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Barnable, Patrick; Calenda, Giulia; Ouattara, Louise; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Kizima, Larisa; Rodríguez, Aixa; Abraham, Ciby; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Cooney, Michael L.; Roberts, Kevin D.; Sperling, Rhoda; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernandez-Romero, Jose A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Robbiani, Melissa; Teleshova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    To extend our observations that single or repeated application of a gel containing the NNRTI MIV-150 (M) and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) (MZC) inhibits vaginal transmission of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-RT in macaques, we evaluated safety and anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZC and related gel formulations ex vivo in macaque mucosal explants. In addition, safety was further evaluated in human ectocervical explants. The gels did not induce mucosal toxicity. A single ex vivo exposure to diluted MZC (1∶30, 1∶100) and MC (1∶30, the only dilution tested), but not to ZC gel, up to 4 days prior to viral challenge, significantly inhibited SHIV-RT infection in macaque vaginal mucosa. MZC's activity was not affected by seminal plasma. The antiviral activity of unformulated MIV-150 was not enhanced in the presence of ZA, suggesting that the antiviral activity of MZC was mediated predominantly by MIV-150. In vivo administration of MZC and CG significantly inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection (51–62% inhibition relative to baselines) of vaginal (but not cervical) mucosa collected 24 h post last gel exposure, indicating barrier effect of CG. Although the inhibitory effect of MZC (65–74%) did not significantly differ from CG (32–45%), it was within the range of protection (∼75%) against vaginal SHIV-RT challenge 24 h after gel dosing. Overall, the data suggest that evaluation of candidate microbicides in macaque explants can inform macaque efficacy and clinical studies design. The data support advancing MZC gel for clinical evaluation. PMID:25259616

  17. Measles vaccination of macaques by dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Rik L; LiCalsi, Cynthia; Quirk, Alan V; van Amerongen, Geert; Nodelman, Vladislav; Alcock, Robert; Yüksel, Selma; Ward, Gary H; Hardy, John G; Vos, Helma; Witham, Clyde L; Grainger, Christopher I; Kuiken, Thijs; Greenspan, Bernard J; Gard, Trevor G; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2007-01-26

    Measles vaccination via the aerosol route has proven effective under field conditions, using vaccine reconstituted prior to nebulization. Inhalation of a dry powder aerosol vaccine would have additional benefits, including easier logistics of administration, reduced cold chain dependence and the potential of single dose administration. We have evaluated two candidate dry powder measles vaccine formulations in macaques. Specific immune responses were demonstrated, but levels of immunity were lower than in animals vaccinated by injection or by nebulized aerosol. These studies provide proof of principle that dry powder inhalation is a possible route for measles vaccination, but suggest that either the vaccine formulation or the method of delivery need to be improved for a better immune response.

  18. Hybrid bioartificial liver support in cynomolgus monkeys with D-galactosamine-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Zhao, Yi-Chao; Cheng, Yuan; Jian, Guo-Deng; Pan, Ming-Xin; Gao, Yi

    2014-12-14

    To evaluate a hybrid bioartificial liver support system (HBALSS) in cynomolgus monkeys with acute liver failure. To establish a model of acute liver failure, 0.3 g/kg of D-galactosamine was injected intravenously into cynomolgus monkeys. Chinese human liver cells were introduced into a perfusion bioreactor to carry out hybrid bioartificial liver support treatment. Forty-eight hours after the injection, one group of cynomolgus monkeys received HBALSS care, and a second experimental group received no treatment. Clinical manifestations of all animals, survival time, liver and kidney functions and serum biochemistry changes were recorded. Simultaneous detection of the number, viability and function of hepatocytes in the hybrid bioartificial liver were also performed. Forty-eight hours after the injection of D-galactosamine, serum biochemistry levels were significantly increased, whereas albumin levels and the Fischer index were significantly reduced compared to baseline (all Ps < 0.05). Of the ten monkeys in the HBALSS treatment group, five survived, with an average duration of survival of 128 ± 3 h. All cynomolgus monkeys in the control group died, with a duration of survival of 112 ± 2 h. Survival time was significantly longer with HBALSS treatment (P < 0.05). Moreover, the number, viability and function of hepatocytes were maintained at a high level with HBALSS. The novel hybrid bioartificial liver plays a significant role in liver support by significantly reducing serum biochemistry levels and extending animal survival time.

  19. Personality structure and social style in macaques.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark James; Majolo, Bonaventura; Ostner, Julia; Schülke, Oliver; De Marco, Arianna; Thierry, Bernard; Engelhardt, Antje; Widdig, Anja; Gerald, Melissa S; Weiss, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Why regularities in personality can be described with particular dimensions is a basic question in differential psychology. Nonhuman primates can also be characterized in terms of personality structure. Comparative approaches can help reveal phylogenetic constraints and social and ecological patterns associated with the presence or absence of specific personality dimensions. We sought to determine how different personality structures are related to interspecific variation in social style. Specifically, we examined this question in 6 different species of macaques, because macaque social style is well characterized and can be categorized on a spectrum of despotic (Grade 1) versus tolerant (Grade 4) social styles. We derived personality structures from adjectival ratings of Japanese (Macaca fuscata; Grade 1), Assamese (M. assamensis; Grade 2), Barbary (M. sylvanus; Grade 3), Tonkean (M. tonkeana; Grade 4), and crested (M. nigra; Grade 4) macaques and compared these species with rhesus macaques (M. mulatta; Grade 1) whose personality was previously characterized. Using a nonparametric method, fuzzy set analysis, to identify commonalities in personality dimensions across species, we found that all but 1 species exhibited consistently defined Friendliness and Openness dimensions, but that similarities in personality dimensions capturing aggression and social competence reflect similarities in social styles. These findings suggest that social and phylogenetic relationships contribute to the origin, maintenance, and diversification of personality.

  20. Camptomelia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hopper, Kelly; Morales, Pablo; Garcia, Anapatricia; Wagner, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    An 8.5-mo-old female rhesus macaque was examined for an apparent lump on the right arm, below the elbow. The macaque showed no signs of pain or discomfort. Examination revealed that the lump was actually a bend in the forearm. Radiography demonstrated that some of the long bones of the animal were bowed. Differential diagnoses included rickets, hyperparathyroidism, pseudohyperparathyroidism, and a growth dysplasia. No other similar abnormalities in animals from that cage or any other enclosure in our large colony were observed. Blood chemistries and a complete hemogram were within normal limits for a macaque of this age. Serum was submitted for a vitamin D profile that included assays for parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and ionized calcium. Serum samples from sex- and age-matched normal controls were sent for comparison and to establish a baseline profile. The affected animal had vitamin D levels comparable to unaffected controls. Bone biopsies appeared normal for a macaque of this age. Fluorine levels in the drinking water supply were within acceptable limits. Consistent with the information available, a diagnosis of idiopathic camptomelia, or bowing of the long bones, was made. In humans, developmental camptomelia is associated with several bone dysplasias in infants and children. These conditions are thought to be caused by genetic mutations in enzymes or transcription factors that control development of the epiphyses and are almost always associated with other lethal and nonlethal developmental abnormalities.

  1. Complement inhibition in cynomolgus monkeys by anti-factor d antigen-binding fragment for the treatment of an advanced form of dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Loyet, Kelly M; Good, Jeremy; Davancaze, Teresa; Sturgeon, Lizette; Wang, Xiangdan; Yang, Jihong; Le, Kha N; Wong, Maureen; Hass, Philip E; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Haughney, Peter C; Morimoto, Alyssa; Damico-Beyer, Lisa A; DeForge, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    Anti-factor D (AFD; FCFD4514S, lampalizumab) is a humanized IgG Fab fragment directed against factor D (fD), a rate-limiting serine protease in the alternative complement pathway (AP). Evaluation of AFD as a potential intravitreal (IVT) therapeutic for dry age-related macular degeneration patients with geographic atrophy (GA) is ongoing. However, it is unclear whether IVT administration of AFD can affect systemic AP activation and potentially compromise host-immune responses. We characterized the pharmacologic properties of AFD and assessed the effects of AFD administered IVT (2 or 20 mg) or intravenous (0.2, 2, or 20 mg) on systemic complement activity in cynomolgus monkeys. For the IVT groups, serum AP activity was reduced for the 20 mg dose group between 2 and 6 hours postinjection. For the intravenous groups, AFD inhibited systemic AP activity for periods of time ranging from 5 minutes (0.2 mg group) to 3 hours (20 mg group). Interestingly, the concentrations of total serum fD increased up to 10-fold relative to predose levels following administration of AFD. Furthermore, AFD was found to inhibit systemic AP activity only when the molar concentration of AFD exceeded that of fD. This occurred in cynomolgus monkeys at serum AFD levels ≥2 µg/ml, a concentration 8-fold greater than the maximum serum concentration observed following a single 10 mg IVT dose in a clinical investigation in patients with GA. Based on these findings, the low levels of serum AFD resulting from IVT administration of a clinically relevant dose are not expected to appreciably affect systemic AP activity.

  2. Reference values of hematology, biochemistry, and blood type in cynomolgus monkeys from cambodia origin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kangmoo; Chang, Jaejin; Lee, Min-Jae; Wang, Seungsu; In, Kimhong; Galano-Tan, Wilhelm C; Jun, Sanghun; Cho, Kahee; Hwang, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Ju; Park, Wanje

    2016-03-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys as nonhuman primates are valuable animal models because they have a high level of human gene homology. There are many reference values for hematology and biochemistry of Cynomolgus monkeys that are needed for proper clinical diagnosis and biomedical research conduct. The body weight information and blood type are also key success factors in allogeneic or xenogeneic models. Moreover, the biological parameters could be different according to the origin of the Cynomolgus monkey. However, there are limited references provided, especially of Cambodia origin. In this study, we measured average body weight of 2,518 Cynomolgus monkeys and analyzed hematology and serum biochemistry using 119 males, and determined blood types in 642 monkeys with Cambodia origin. The average body weight of male Cynomolgus monkeys were 2.56±0.345 kg and female group was 2.43±0.330 kg at the age from 2 to 3 years. The male group showed relatively sharp increased average body weight from the 3 to 4 age period compared to the female group. In hematology and biochemistry, it was found that most of the data was similar when compared to other references even though some results showed differences. The ABO blood type result showed that type A, B, AB, and O was approximately 15.6, 33.3, 44.2, and 6.9%, respectively. The main blood type in this facility was B and AB. These biological background references of Cambodia origin could be used to provide important information to researchers who are using them in their biomedical research.

  3. Apolipoprotein A-I metabolism in cynomolgus monkey. Identification and characterization of beta-migrating pools

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, G.W.; Castle, C.K.

    1989-07-01

    Fresh plasma from control (C) and hypercholesterolemic (HC) cynomolgus monkeys was analyzed by agarose electrophoresis-immunoblotting with antibody to cynomolgus monkey apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. Two bands were evident on the autoradiogram: an alpha-migrating band (high density lipoprotein) and a beta-migrating band that comigrated exactly with cynomolgus monkey low density lipoprotein (LDL). The presence of beta-migrating apo A-I in the plasma of these monkeys was confirmed by Geon-Pevikon preparative electrophoresis, crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and isotope dilution studies in which radiolabeled apo A-I was found to equilibrate also with alpha- and beta-migrating pools of apo A-I in the plasma. Subfractionation of C and HC plasma by agarose column chromatography (Bio-Gel A-0.5M and A-15M) followed by agarose electrophoresis-immunoblotting indicated that the beta-migrating apo A-I in C was relatively homogeneous and eluted with proteins of Mr approximately 50 kD (apo A-I(50 kD)), whereas two beta-migrating fractions were identified in HC, one that eluted with the 50-kD proteins, and the other that eluted in the LDL Mr range (apo A-I(LDL)). The apo A-I(LDL) was precipitated by antibody to cynomolgus monkey apo B. The apo A-I(50 kD) accounted for 5 +/- 1% (mean +/- SD) of the plasma apo A-I in C plasma, and 15 +/- 7% in HC plasma. No apo A-I(LDL) was detected in C plasma, but that fraction accounted for 9 +/- 7% of the apo A-I in HC plasma. These data establish the presence of multiple pools of apo A-I in the cynomolgus monkey, which must be taken into consideration in any comprehensive model of apo A-I metabolism in this species.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-primaquine and (-)-primaquine enantiomers in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Saunders, David; Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Imerbsin, Rawiwan; Khemawoot, Phisit; Siripokasupkul, Raveewan; Tekwani, Babu L; Sampath, Aruna; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Ohrt, Colin; Lanteri, Charlotte; Gettyacamin, Montip; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Walker, Larry

    2014-12-01

    Primaquine (PQ) remains the sole available drug to prevent relapse of Plasmodium vivax malaria more than 60 years after licensure. While this drug was administered as a racemic mixture, prior studies suggested a pharmacodynamic advantage based on differential antirelapse activity and/or toxicities of its enantiomers. Oral primaquine enantiomers prepared using a novel, easily scalable method were given for 7 days to healthy rhesus macaques in a dose-rising fashion to evaluate their effects on the blood, liver, and kidneys. The enantiomers were then administered to Plasmodium cynomolgi-infected rhesus macaques at doses of 1.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of body weight/day in combination with chloroquine. The (-)-PQ enantiomer had higher clearance and apparent volume of distribution than did (+)-PQ and was more extensively converted to the carboxy metabolite. There is evidence for differential oxidative stress with a concentration-dependent rise in methemoglobin (MetHgb) with increasing doses of (+)-PQ greater than that seen for (-)-PQ. There was a marked, reversible hepatotoxicity in 2 of 3 animals dosed with (-)-PQ at 4.5 mg/kg. (-)-PQ in combination with chloroquine was successful in preventing P. cynomolgi disease relapse at doses of 0.6 and 1.3 mg/kg/day, while 1 of 2 animals receiving (+)-PQ at 0.6 mg/kg/day relapsed. While (-)-PQ was also associated with hepatotoxicity at higher doses as seen previously, this has not been identified as a clinical concern in humans during >60 years of use. Limited evidence for increased MetHgb generation with the (+) form in the rhesus macaque model suggests that it may be possible to improve the therapeutic window for hematologic toxicity in the clinic by separating primaquine into its enantiomers.

  5. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women.

  6. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets.

  7. Evaluation of Functional NK Cell Responses in Vaccinated and SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Ying, Olivia; Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are crucial components of the innate immune system due to their capacity to exert rapid cytotoxic and immunomodulatory function in the absence of prior sensitization. NK cells can become activated by exposure to target cells and/or by cytokines produced by antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined the effects of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine regimen and subsequent SIV infection on the cytotoxic and immunomodulatory functions of circulatory NK cells. While vaccination did not significantly impact the capacity of NK cells to kill MHC-devoid 721.221 target cells, SIV-infection led to a significant decrease in target cell killing. NK cells from uninfected macaques were responsive to a low dose (5 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation, leading to significant increases in their cytotoxic potential, however, NK cells from SIV-infected macaques required a higher dose (50 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation in order to significantly increase their cytotoxic potential. By contrast, no differences were observed in the capacity of NK cells from vaccinated and SIV-infected macaques to respond to IL-12 and IL-18. Similarly, NK cells both before and after infection exhibited equivalent responses to Fc-mediated activation. Collectively, our results show that early SIV-infection impairs the natural cytotoxic capacity of circulatory NK cells without affecting Fc-mediated or cytokine-producing function.

  8. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  9. Resource partitioning in tolerant and intolerant macaques.

    PubMed

    Rebout, Nancy; Desportes, Christine; Thierry, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    The clumped distribution of food resources promotes food defensibility and can lead to the monopolizing of resources by high-ranking individuals. However, the balance of power is set at different levels according to societies, meaning that resource partitioning should vary between them. This study investigates whether dominance asymmetry and resource partitioning are related in non-human primates by comparing two species with contrasting social styles, namely rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) which display strong social intolerance and a steep gradient of dominance, and Tonkean macaques (Macaca tonkeana), which exhibit higher levels of tolerance and more balanced dominance relationships. Study groups were kept in semi-free ranging conditions. Animals were provided with fruit in three different clumped conditions during 30-min trials. We found that higher-ranking rhesus macaques had priority for the access to fruit: these individuals spent longer in the feeding area in the first 10-min period of trials, while lower-ranking individuals had diminished access to fruit under the most clumped condition; this was associated with sustained agonistic interactions. Dominance effects were weaker in Tonkean macaques. They exhibited co-feeding between high- and low-ranking individuals in the first period; there was no significant effect of dominance even in the most clumped condition; and frequencies of agonistic interactions remained moderate relative to the number of individuals present in the feeding area. These results show that food resources were more equitably distributed among group members in tolerant macaques than in their intolerant counterparts. Dominance gradient and social tolerance may be considered as two aspects of the same phenomenon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Daily application of alprostadil topical cream (Vitaros) does not impact vaginal pH, flora, or histology in female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Meier-Davis, Susan R; Debar, Salma; Siddoway, Jacob; Rabe, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Topical alprostadil cream (Vitaros) is approved in Canada and Europe for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To determine the effects on the female urogenital tract with repeated administration of the entire dose (300 μg alprostadil containing 2.5% dodecyl-2-n,n-dimethylaminopropionate hydrochloride), the vaginal pH, flora, and histology were assessed as a model for 100% transference from male to the female during unprotected sexual intercourse. Female cynomolgus monkeys were administered the entire dose of Vitaros for 14 days with a 7-day recovery. Relative to vehicle and placebo cream, the vaginal pH and microflora were determined at baseline and weekly, thereafter. Vaginal biopsies were evaluated at the end of dosing and recovery. All animals were clinically normal for the study duration, and the vaginal pH was consistent between dose groups and the dosing period. Vaginal microflora and histopathology findings of mild inflammation were generally similar across treatment groups. In conclusion, repeated vaginal exposure to Vitaros did not alter the pH, microflora, or histology after 14 daily doses, supporting the safety of Vitaros transference to the female partner.

  11. Immunization of Macaques with Formalin-Inactivated Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Induces Interleukin-13-Associated Hypersensitivity to Subsequent RSV Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Swart, Rik L.; Kuiken, Thijs; Timmerman, Helga H.; Amerongen, Geert van; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G.; Vos, Helma W.; Neijens, Herman J.; Andeweg, Arno C.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. RSV vaccine development has been hampered by results of clinical trials in the 1960s, when formalin-inactivated whole-RSV preparations adjuvated with alum (FI-RSV) were found to predispose infants for enhanced disease following subsequent natural RSV infection. We have reproduced this apparently immunopathological phenomenon in infant cynomolgus macaques and identified immunological and pathological correlates. Vaccination with FI-RSV induced specific virus-neutralizing antibody responses accompanied by strong lymphoproliferative responses. The vaccine-induced RSV-specific T cells predominantly produced the Th2 cytokines interleukin-13 (IL-13) and IL-5. Intratracheal challenge with a macaque-adapted wild-type RSV 3 months after the third vaccination elicited a hypersensitivity response associated with lung eosinophilia. The challenge resulted in a rapid boosting of IL-13-producing T cells in the FI-RSV-vaccinated animals but not in the FI-measles virus-vaccinated control animals. Two out of seven FI-RSV-vaccinated animals died 12 days after RSV challenge with pulmonary hyperinflation. Surprisingly, the lungs of these two animals did not show overt inflammatory lesions. However, upon vaccination the animals had shown the strongest lymphoproliferative responses associated with the most pronounced Th2 phenotype within their group. We hypothesize that an IL-13-associated asthma-like mechanism resulted in airway hyperreactivity in these animals. This nonhuman primate model will be an important tool to assess the safety of nonreplicating candidate RSV vaccines. PMID:12388717

  12. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza A Virus Isolates Show Heterogeneous Virulence in Macaques ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rockx, Barry; Feldmann, Friederike; Belisle, Sarah E.; Palermo, Robert E.; Brining, Douglas; Gardner, Don; Proll, Sean C.; Marzi, Andrea; Tsuda, Yoshimi; LaCasse, Rachel A.; Kercher, Lisa; York, Anthony; Korth, Marcus J.; Long, Dan; Rosenke, Rebecca; Shupert, W. Lesley; Aranda, Celia Alpuche; Mattoon, John S.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Richt, Jürgen A.; Parnell, Michael; Ebihara, Hideki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    The first influenza pandemic of the new millennium was caused by a newly emerged swine-origin influenza virus (SOIV) (H1N1). This new virus is characterized by a previously unknown constellation of gene segments derived from North American and Eurasian swine lineages and the absence of common markers predictive of human adaptation. Overall, human infections appeared to be mild, but an alarming number of young individuals presented with symptoms atypical for seasonal influenza. The new SOIV also showed a sustained human-to-human transmissibility and higher reproduction ratio than common seasonal viruses, altogether indicating a higher pathogenic potential for this newly emerged virus. To study the virulence of the SOIV, we used a recently established cynomolgus macaque model and compared parameters of clinical disease, virology, host responses, and pathology/histopathology with a current seasonal H1N1 virus. We here show that infection of macaques with two genetically similar but clinically distinct SOIV isolates from the early stage of the pandemic (A/Mexico/4108/2009 and A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009) resulted in upper and lower respiratory tract infections and clinical disease ranging from mild to severe pneumonia that was clearly advanced over the mild infection caused by A/Kawasaki/UTK-4/2009, a current seasonal strain. Unexpectedly, we observed heterogeneity among the two SOIV isolates in virus replication, host transcriptional and cytokine responses, and disease progression, demonstrating a higher pathogenic potential for A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. Differences in virulence may explain more severe disease, as was seen with certain individuals infected with the emerged pandemic influenza virus. Thus, the nonhuman primate model closely mimics influenza in humans. PMID:21084481

  13. Minodronic acid (ONO-5920/YM529) prevents decrease in bone mineral density and bone strength, and improves bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Makoto; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Masuda, Taisei; Ochi, Yasuo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kishikawa, Katsuya; Ito, Masako; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2008-11-01

    This study examined the effect of the highly potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, minodronic acid (ONO-5920/YM529), on bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover, bone microarchitecture and bone strength in ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys. Skeletally mature female cynomolgus monkeys, aged 9-17 years, were ovariectomized or sham-operated. Minodronic acid was administered orally once a day in doses of 0, 0.015, and 0.15 mg/kg from the day after surgery for 17 months. Bone resorption markers (urinary N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen and deoxypyridinoline), bone formation markers (serum osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and lumbar vertebral BMD were measured at baseline and at 4, 8, 12 and 16 months after surgery. Treatment with minodronic acid dose-dependently inhibited OVX-induced increase in bone turnover markers and decrease in lumbar vertebral BMD, and minodronic acid at 0.15 mg/kg completely prevented these changes. At 17 months after surgery, minodronic acid also suppressed bone resorption (Oc.S/BS and N.Oc/BS) and bone formation (OS/BS, MS/BS, MAR, BFR/BS, and BFR/BV) in the lumbar vertebral bodies and tibia. In the mechanical tests, ultimate load on lumbar vertebral bodies and femoral neck of the OVX-control animals were significantly reduced compared to the sham animals. Minodronic acid prevented these reductions in bone strength at 0.15 mg/kg. There was significant correlation between BMD and bone strength, suggesting that the increase in bone strength was associated with the increase in BMD produced by minodronic acid. In micro-CT analysis of the lumbar vertebral bodies, minodronic acid improved trabecular architecture, converting rod structures into plate structures, and preventing the increase in trabecular disconnectivity at 0.15 mg/kg. In conclusion, similar to patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis, reduction in bone strength of lumbar vertebral bodies and femoral neck was clearly demonstrated in OVX

  14. Intravaginal ring eluting tenofovir disoproxil fumarate completely protects macaques from multiple vaginal simian-HIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Rastogi, Rachna; Teller, Ryan S; Srinivasan, Priya; Mesquita, Pedro M M; Nagaraja, Umadevi; McNicholl, Janet M; Hendry, R Michael; Dinh, Chuong T; Martin, Amy; Herold, Betsy C; Kiser, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Topical preexposure prophylaxis interrupts HIV transmission at the site of mucosal exposure. Intermittently dosed vaginal gels containing the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir protected pigtailed macaques depending on the timing of viral challenge relative to gel application. However, modest or no protection was observed in clinical trials. Intravaginal rings (IVRs) may improve efficacy by providing long-term sustained drug delivery leading to constant mucosal antiretroviral concentrations and enhancing adherence. Although a few IVRs have entered the clinical pipeline, 100% efficacy in a repeated macaque vaginal challenge model has not been achieved. Here we describe a reservoir IVR technology that delivers the tenofovir prodrug tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) continuously over 28 d. With four monthly ring changes in this repeated challenge model, TDF IVRs generated reproducible and protective drug levels. All TDF IVR-treated macaques (n = 6) remained seronegative and simian-HIV RNA negative after 16 weekly vaginal exposures to 50 tissue culture infectious dose SHIV162p3. In contrast, 11/12 control macaques became infected, with a median of four exposures assuming an eclipse of 7 d from infection to virus RNA detection. Protection was associated with tenofovir levels in vaginal fluid [mean 1.8 × 10(5) ng/mL (range 1.1 × 10(4) to 6.6 × 10(5) ng/mL)] and ex vivo antiviral activity of cervicovaginal lavage samples. These observations support further advancement of TDF IVRs as well as the concept that extended duration drug delivery devices delivering topical antiretrovirals could be effective tools in preventing the sexual transmission of HIV in humans.

  15. Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Engel, Gregory A; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Schillaci, Michael A; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a "monkey forest" (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B.

  16. Human Exposure to Herpesvirus B–Seropositive Macaques, Bali, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A.; Schillaci, Michael A.; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a “monkey forest” (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B. PMID:12141963

  17. Evaluation of a rapamycin-regulated serotype 2 adeno-associated viral vector in macaque parotid glands

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Changyu; Voutetakis, Antonis; Metzger, Mark; Wainer, Sandra; Cotrim, Ana P.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Clackson, Tim; Chiorini, John A.; Donahue, Robert E.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Salivary glands are useful target organs for local and systemic gene therapeutics. For such applications, the regulation of transgene expression is important. Previous studies by us in murine submandibular glands showed that a rapamycin transcriptional regulation system in a single serotype 2, adeno-associated viral (AAV2) vector was effective for this purpose. The present study evaluated if such a vector was similarly useful in rhesus macaque parotid glands. METHODS A recombinant AAV2 vector (AAV-TF-RhEpo-2.3w), encoding rhesus erythropoietin (RhEpo) and a rapamycin-inducible promoter, was constructed. The vector was administered to macaques at either of two doses (1.5×1011 [low dose] or 1.5×1012 [high dose] vector genomes) via cannulation of Stensen’s duct. Animals were followed for 12–14 weeks and treated at intervals with rapamycin (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg) to induce gene expression. Serum chemistry, hematology and RhEpo levels were measured at interval. RESULTS AAV-TF-RhEpo-2.3w administration led to low levels of rapamycin-inducible RhEpo expression in the serum of most macaques. In five animals no significant changes were seen in serum chemistry and hematology values over the study. One macaque, however, developed pneumonia, became anemic and subsequently required euthanasia. After the onset of anemia, a single administration of rapamycin led to significant RhEpo production in this animal. CONCLUSION Administration of AAV-TF-RhEpo-2.3w to macaque parotid glands was generally safe, but led only to low levels of serum RhEpo in healthy animals following rapamycin treatment. PMID:20374510

  18. Mitochondrial DNA and retroviral RNA analyses of archival oral polio vaccine (OPV CHAT) materials: evidence of macaque nuclear sequences confirms substrate identity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Neil; Jenkins, Adrian; Martin, Javier; Davis, Clare; Wood, David; Schild, Geoffrey; Bottiger, Margareta; Holmes, Harvey; Minor, Philip; Almond, Neil

    2005-02-25

    Inoculation of live experimental oral poliovirus vaccines (OPV CHAT) during the 1950s in central Africa has been proposed to account for the introduction of HIV into human populations. For this to have occurred, it would have been necessary for chimpanzee rather than macaque kidney epithelial cells to have been included in the preparation of early OPV materials. Theoretically, this could have led to contamination with a progenitor of HIV-1 derived from a related simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVCPZ). In this article we present further detailed analyses of two samples of OPV, CHAT 10A-11 and CHAT 6039/Yugo, which were used in early human trials of poliovirus vaccination. Recovery of poliovirus by culture techniques confirmed the biological viability of the vaccines and sequence analysis of poliovirus RNA specifically identified the presence of the CHAT strain. Independent nested sets of oligonucleotide primers specific for HIV-1/SIVCPZ and HIV-2/SIVMAC/SIVSM phylogenetic lineages, respectively, indicated no evidence of HIV/SIV RNA in either vaccine preparation, at a sensitivity of 100 RNA equivalents/ml. Analysis of cellular substrate by the amplification of two distinct regions of mitochondrial DNA (D-loop control region and 12S ribosomal sequences) revealed no evidence of chimpanzee cellular sequences. However, this approach positively identified rhesus and cynomolgus macaque DNA for the CHAT 10A-11 and CHAT 6039/Yugo vaccine preparations, respectively. Analysis of multiple clones of mtDNA 12S rDNA indicated a relatively high number of nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (numts) in the CHAT 10A-11 material, but confirmed the macaque origin of cellular substrate used in vaccine preparation. These data reinforce earlier findings on this topic providing no evidence to support the contention that poliovirus vaccination was responsible for the introduction of HIV into humans and sparking the AIDS pandemic.

  19. Antibody-dependent enhancement of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in vitro by plasma from SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, D C; Robinson, W E; Hirsch, V M; Modliszewski, A; Mitchell, W M; Johnson, P R

    1990-01-01

    Plasma from two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) experimentally infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV; isolate SIVmac251) enhanced SIVmac infection of a human CD4+ lymphoblastoid cell line, MT-2. Prechallenge plasma samples from these animals and serum from SIV-negative macaques did not enhance infection. Compared with controls, infection enhancement was characterized by the rapid appearance of syncytium formation (3 to 4 days sooner), reverse transcriptase release (10-fold increase), and cytopathic effect (60% cell killing). Enhancement of activity was dependent on the presence of diluted, fresh SIV-negative macaque serum as a source of complement. A requirement for complement was shown by the absence of enhancement in heat-inactivated serum and by dose-dependent inhibition of enhancement in the presence of polyclonal antibody to monkey complement component C3. Monoclonal antibody to CD4 (OKT4a) blocked enhancement completely, while monoclonal antibody to the human complement component C3d receptor CR2 (OKB7) reduced enhancement by greater than 50%, indicating a requirement for CD4 and CR2 in mediating this phenomenon. SIV infection-enhancing activity appeared in macaques soon after experimental inoculation (28 days). The titer increased over time and peaked just prior to the death of both macaques from opportunistic infections and lymphoma. In vitro SIV infection enhancement is nearly identical to the in vitro complement-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancing (C'-ADE) activity observed in human immunodeficiency virus-positive human sera (Robinson et al., Lancet i:790-794, 1988; Robinson et al., J. Acq. Immun. Def. Synd. 2:33-42, 1989). These observations validate the macaque-SIV model for studies of C'-ADE. Images PMID:2152808

  20. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  1. Smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer with the human maxi-k channel improves erectile function and enhances sexual behavior in atherosclerotic cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Christ, George J; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Williams, Koudy; Zhao, Weixin; D'Agostino, Ralph; Kaplan, Jay; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Yoo, James; Calenda, Giulia; Davies, Kelvin P; Sellers, Rani S; Melman, Arnold

    2009-12-01

    Despite the advent of effective oral therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED), many patients are not successfully treated, and side effects have been documented. To further evaluate the potential utility of naked DNA-based gene transfer as an attractive treatment option for ED. The effects of gene transfer on erectile function and sexual behavior were evaluated in eight male cynomolgus monkeys with ED secondary to moderately severe, diet-induced atherosclerosis. Following establishment of baseline characteristics, animals were subjected to intracavernous injection of a smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer vector (pSMAA-hSlo) encoding the pore-forming subunit of the human large-conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium channel (Maxi-K). For the sexual behavior studies, 2 wk of baseline data were obtained, and then animals were placed in the presence of estrogen-implanted females (n=2) three times per week for 30 min, and sexual behavior was recorded. The intracavernous pressure response to papaverine injection was also monitored. Dramatic changes in erectile function and sexual behavior were observed after intracorporal gene transfer. The frequency of partial (6±2 to 10±2) and full (2±1.5 to 5±1.4) erections were significantly increased, with a parallel 2-3-fold increase in the duration of the observed erections. The frequency and latency of ejaculation were increased and decreased, respectively. Frequency and duration of grooming by the female were increased, and the latency decreased. Increased latency and decreased frequency of body contact was also observed, and this is characteristic of the typical drop in consort intimacy that occurs after mating in most macaque species. In addition, an increased responsiveness to intracavernous papaverine injection was observed. The data indicate that intracorporal Maxi-K-channel gene transfer enhances erectile capacity and sexual behavior; the data imply that increased erectile function per se may lead to increased sexual

  2. Vascular origin of vildagliptin-induced skin effects in Cynomolgus monkeys: pathomechanistic role of peripheral sympathetic system and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Peter; Bentley, Phil; Sahota, Pritam; Schoenfeld, Heidi; Martin, Lori; Longo, Linda; Spaet, Robert; Moulin, Pierre; Pantano, Serafino; Dubost, Valerie; Lapadula, Dan; Burkey, Bryan; Kaushik, Virendar; Zhou, Wei; Hayes, Michael; Flavahan, Nick; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Busch, Steve

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to characterize skin lesions in cynomolgus monkeys following vildagliptin (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor) treatment. Oral vildagliptin administration caused dose-dependent and reversible blister formation, peeling and flaking skin, erosions, ulcerations, scabs, and sores involving the extremities at ≥5 mg/kg/day and necrosis of the tail and the pinnae at ≥80 mg/kg/day after 3 weeks of treatment. At the affected sites, the media and the endothelium of dermal arterioles showed hypertrophy/hyperplasia. Skin lesion formation was prevented by elevating ambient temperature. Vildagliptin treatment also produced an increase in blood pressure and heart rate likely via increased sympathetic tone. Following treatment with vildagliptin at 80 mg/kg/day, the recovery time after lowering the temperature in the feet of monkeys and inducing cold stress was prolonged. Ex vivo investigations showed that small digital arteries from skin biopsies of vildagliptin-treated monkeys exhibited an increase in neuropeptide Y-induced vasoconstriction. This finding correlated with a specific increase in NPY and in NPY1 receptors observed in the skin of vildagliptin-treated monkeys. Present data provide evidence that skin effects in monkeys are of vascular origin and that the effects on the NPY system in combination with increased peripheral sympathetic tone play an important pathomechanistic role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous toxicity. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  3. Individual differences in the effects of environmental stimuli on cocaine choice in socially housed male cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Studies in laboratory animals have demonstrated an influence of environmentally derived stress and enrichment on the reinforcing effects of stimulants. To characterize the effects of acute exposure to ethologically valid environmental stimuli on the reinforcing strength of cocaine relative to food in socially housed monkeys. Choice between cocaine and food was assessed in subsets of 16 socially housed (4/pen) male cynomolgus monkeys immediately after the following manipulations: (1) treats placed in home cage, (2) a 10-min exposure to a rubber snake, or (3) 3 to 7 days of living in a larger environment without cage mates. Placing treats in the home cage shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the left in five monkeys tested and to the right in 4 of 12 animals. The rubber snake significantly shifted the cocaine choice curve to the left in dominant monkeys. Exposure to an enlarged environment decreased cocaine choice in 9 of 15 monkeys; this effect was transient and not related to social rank. Repeated testing did not affect cocaine choice. Brief exposure to environmental events hypothesized to be stressors or enrichment altered cocaine choice, although not all individuals were affected and the effects were transient. Importantly, the data suggest that implementing positive changes in the environment produced effects that are clinically desirable. Understanding the behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms mediating sensitivity to environmental events in socially housed animals will lead to better treatment strategies for drug addiction.

  4. Radiosynthesis of the candidate beta-amyloid radioligand [(11)C]AZD2184: Positron emission tomography examination and metabolite analysis in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan D; Varnäs, Katarina; Cselényi, Zsolt; Gulyás, Balázs; Wensbo, David; Finnema, Sjoerd J; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Svensson, Samuel; Nyberg, Svante; Farde, Lars; Halldin, Christer

    2010-10-01

    Beta-amyloid accumulation is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AZD2184, a new radioligand for high-contrast positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of Abeta-deposits, has recently been developed and characterized in vitro and in rodents ex vivo. The objective of this study was to label AZD2184 with carbon-11, to perform in vivo characterization of [(11)C]AZD2184 ([(11)C]5) in the cynomolgus monkey brain as well as whole-body dosimetry, and to examine the metabolism of the labeled radioligand. [(11)C]5 was prepared by a two-step radiosynthesis starting with the reaction of 5-(6-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)pyridin-2-amine with [(11)C]methyl iodide followed by deprotection using water. Four brain PET measurements in two cynomolgus monkeys and one whole-body PET measurement were performed with [(11)C]5. There was a high and rapid brain uptake (2.2-3.4% of injected dose at 2 min). The distribution of brain radioactivity was fairly uniform, with early to late-brain concentration ratios (peak vs. 60 min) higher for [(11)C]5 than ratios previously reported for [(11)C]PIB (8.2 and 4.6, respectively). Based on the whole-body data, it was estimated that an effective dose in an adult male would be 6.2 muSv/MBq and thus would be safe from a radiation point of view for multiple scans within the same year. [(11)C]5 shows binding characteristics, suggesting low levels of white-matter retention, and may thus provide improved contrast when compared with currently used PET radioligands for visualization of Abeta-deposits. On the basis of the labeling chemistry and the results of the biological evaluation, we conclude that [(11)C]5 should be useful for routine clinical studies. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Well-differentiated Liposarcoma in a Bonnet Macaque (Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    Doane, Cynthia J; Johnson, Paula J; Besselsen, David G

    2017-03-01

    Here we describe the occurrence of a subcutaneous liposarcoma in a geriatric bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata). Clinical presentation was a rapidly growing, ulcerated, subcutaneous mass in the umbilical region of a 28-y-old intact female macaque. The mass was successfully removed through excisional biopsy, and histopathology provided a morphologic diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. The macaque recovered without complication and displayed no signs of recurrence for at least 18 mo after excision. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of liposarcoma in a bonnet macaque.

  6. Well-differentiated Liposarcoma in a Bonnet Macaque (Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    J Doane Paula J Johnson And David G Besselsen, Cynthia

    2017-03-20

    Here we describe the occurrence of a subcutaneous liposarcoma in a geriatric bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata). Clinicalpresentation was a rapidly growing, ulcerated, subcutaneous mass in the umbilical region of a 28-y-old intact female macaque. The mass was successfully removed through excisional biopsy, and histopathology provided a morphologic diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. The macaque recovered without complication and displayed no signs of recurrence for at least 18 mo after excision. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of liposarcoma in a bonnet macaque.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone in men and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Suvisaari, J; Tsong, Y Y; Aguillaume, C; Bardin, C W; Lähteenmaki, P; Sundaram, K

    1997-01-01

    Testosterone and its esters are widely used for androgen replacement therapy. In the prostate, testosterone ins 5 alpha-reduced to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which leads to an amplification of its stimulatory activity in this and other tissues that have significant 5 alpha-reductase activity. While this amplification is essential during fetal development, it has potentially undesirable consequences during adult life. 7 alpha-Methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) is a potent synthetic androgen that does not undergo 5 alpha reduction and is therefore being investigated for long-term clinical use because it is expected to be less stimulatory to the prostate. Since we anticipate using MENT acetate (MENT Ac) rather than MENT as the form of this androgen in humans, the bioavailability of MENT following the administration of MENT and MENT Ac was investigated in cynomolgus monkeys. Equimolar concentrations of MENT or MENT Ac were administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion via Alzet osmotic pumps. Serum MENT levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in blood samples collected daily for 4 days during steady state. The serum MENT levels were not significantly different in the two groups (11.3 +/- 1.6 vs. 13.1 +/- 1.2 nmol/L). This suggested that MENT Ac was rapidly converted to MENT in circulation. The hydrolysis of MENT Ac to MENT was confirmed by the in vitro incubation of MENT Ac with blood or plasma and the demonstration of MENT in products following separation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Following the demonstration of the safety of MENT Ac in subchronic toxicity studies in rats and rabbits, a pharmacokinetic study was performed in men. In normal men, a single intravenous bolus of 500 micrograms of MENT led to peak serum MENT levels at 3 minutes after dosing (when the first samples were collected), followed by an exponential decline, reaching undetectable levels by 180 minutes. The average terminal half-life and the metabolic clearance rate

  8. An Enhanced Pre- and Postnatal Development Study in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Tabalumab: A Human IgG4 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Breslin, William J; Hilbish, Kim G; Martin, Jennifer A; Halstead, Carolyn A; Newcomb, Deanna L; Chellman, Gary J

    2015-06-01

    Tabalumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with neutralizing activity against both soluble and membrane B-cell activating factor (BAFF), has been under development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential adverse effects of maternal tabalumab exposure on pregnancy, parturition, and lactation of the mothers and on the growth, viability, and development of the offspring through postnatal day (PND) 204. Tabalumab was administered by subcutaneous injection to presumed pregnant cynomolgus monkeys (16-19 per group) every 2 weeks from gestation day (GD) 20 to 22 until parturition at doses of 0, 0.3, or 30 mg/kg. Evaluations in mothers and infants included clinical signs, body weight, toxicokinetics, blood lymphocyte phenotyping, T-cell-dependent antibody response (infants only), antitherapeutic antibody (ATA), organ weights (infants only), and gross and microscopic histopathology. Infants were also examined for external and visceral morphologic and neurobehavioral development. There were no adverse tabalumab-related effects on maternal or infant endpoints. An expected pharmacological decrease in peripheral blood B-lymphocytes occurred in adults and infants; however, B-cell recovery was evident by PND154 in adults and infants at 0.3 mg/kg and by PND204 in infants at 30 mg/kg. At 30 mg/kg, a reduced IgM antibody response to T-cell-dependent antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was observed following primary immunization. Following secondary KLH immunization, all infants in both dose groups mounted anti-KLH IgM and IgG antibody responses similar to control. Placental and mammary transfer of tabalumab was demonstrated. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect level for maternal and developmental toxicity was 30 mg/kg, the highest dose tested. Exposures at 30 mg/kg provide a margin of safety of 16× the anticipated clinical exposure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of dopamine D2/D3 receptor ligands on food-cocaine choice in socially housed male cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Dopamine D2/D3 receptor partial agonists have been suggested as medications for cocaine dependence. The present experiments examined the effect of acute and repeated administration of drugs with varying intrinsic efficacy at D2/D3 receptors on the relative reinforcing strength of cocaine. Use of socially housed cynomolgus monkeys permitted the assessment of whether social status, known to alter D2/D3 receptor availability, influenced the behavioral effects of D2/D3 receptor compounds. The high-efficacy agonist R(-)-norpropylapomorphine [(-)-NPA], low-efficacy agonist aripiprazole (ARI), and antagonist eticlopride (ETIC) were administered acutely to monkeys self-administering cocaine under a food-cocaine choice procedure in which a cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve was determined daily. The effects of 5-day treatment with ARI and (-)-NPA were characterized under conditions in which monkeys did (ARI) or did not [ARI and (-)-NPA] self-administer cocaine during treatment. When administered acutely, ARI and ETIC increased the choice of low cocaine doses, and only (-)-NPA decreased the choice of higher cocaine doses and cocaine intake; effects were similar across social ranks. When administered repeatedly while self administration occurred only on days 1 and 5 of treatment, ARI, but not (-)-NPA, decreased cocaine choice in dominant monkeys, whereas (-)-NPA, but not ARI, did so in subordinates. When dominant monkeys self-administered cocaine on all five days of ARI treatment, however, these effects were not observed. The results indicate that the behavioral effects of D2/D3 receptor agonists can differ according to intrinsic efficacy and subject characteristics. Moreover, these results suggest that exposure to cocaine during treatment can counteract treatment-induced reductions in the reinforcing effects of cocaine.

  10. Predominant Infection of CD150+ Lymphocytes and Dendritic Cells during Measles Virus Infection of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    de Swart, Rik L; Yanagi, Yusuke; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Yüksel, Selma; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H; Duprex, W. Paul; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150), which has been identified as the receptor for wild-type MV. We have infected rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant MV strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP); thus bringing together the optimal animal model for measles and a virus that can be detected with unprecedented sensitivity. Blood samples and broncho-alveolar lavages were collected every 3 d, and necropsies were performed upon euthanasia 9 or 15 d after infection. EGFP production by MV-infected cells was visualized macroscopically, in both living and sacrificed animals, and microscopically by confocal microscopy and FACS analysis. At the peak of viremia, EGFP fluorescence was detected in skin, respiratory and digestive tract, but most intensely in all lymphoid tissues. B- and T-lymphocytes expressing CD150 were the major target cells for MV infection. Highest percentages (up to 30%) of infected lymphocytes were detected in lymphoid tissues, and the virus preferentially targeted cells with a memory phenotype. Unexpectedly, circulating monocytes did not sustain productive MV infection. In peripheral tissues, large numbers of MV-infected CD11c+ MHC class-II+ myeloid dendritic cells were detected in conjunction with infected T-lymphocytes, suggesting transmission of MV between these cell types. Fluorescent imaging of MV infection in non-human primates demonstrated a crucial role for lymphocytes and dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of measles and measles-associated immunosuppression. PMID:18020706

  11. Voluntary Ethanol Intake Predicts κ-Opioid Receptor Supersensitivity and Regionally Distinct Dopaminergic Adaptations in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C.; Helms, Christa M.; Lovinger, David M.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the striatum have long been implicated in mediating motivated behaviors and addiction. Previously it was demonstrated that κ-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling in the striatum plays a critical role in the increased reinforcing efficacy of ethanol following ethanol vapor exposure in rodent models. Although rodents have been used extensively to determine the neurochemical consequences of chronic ethanol exposure, establishing high levels of voluntary drinking in these models has proven difficult. Conversely, nonhuman primates exhibit similar intake and pattern to humans in regard to drinking. Here we examine the effects of chronic voluntary ethanol self-administration on dopamine neurotransmission and the ability of KORs to regulate dopamine release in the dorsolateral caudate (DLC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. Using voltammetry in brain slices from cynomolgus macaques after 6 months of ad libitum ethanol drinking, we found increased KOR sensitivity in both the DLC and NAc. The magnitude of ethanol intake predicted increases in KOR sensitivity in the NAc core, but not the DLC. Additionally, ethanol drinking increased dopamine release and uptake in the NAc, but decreased both of these measures in the DLC. These data suggest that chronic daily drinking may result in regionally distinct disruptions of striatal outputs. In concert with previous reports showing increased KOR regulation of drinking behaviors induced by ethanol exposure, the strong relationship between KOR activity and voluntary ethanol intake observed here gives further support to the hypothesis that KORs may provide a promising pharmacotherapeutic target in the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:25878269

  12. Development of Object Concepts in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Scott P.; Price, Tracy A.; Vance, Jayme A.; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    One of the most interesting questions in cognitive development is how we acquire and mentally represent knowledge about objects. We investigated the development of object concepts in macaque monkeys. Monkeys viewed trajectory occlusion movies in which a ball followed a linear path that was occluded for some portion of the display while their point of gaze was recorded with a corneal-reflection eye tracker. We analyzed the pattern of eye movements as an indicator of object representation. A majority of eye movements of adult monkeys were anticipatory, implying a functional internal object representation that guided oculomotor behavior. The youngest monkeys lacked this strong internal representation of objects. Longitudinal testing showed that this ability develops over time providing compelling evidence that object concepts develop similarly in monkeys and humans. Therefore, the macaque monkey provides an animal model with which to examine neural mechanisms underlying the development of object representations. PMID:18335495

  13. Gravity orientation tuning in macaque anterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Kim, Byounghoon; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2016-12-01

    Gravity may provide a ubiquitous allocentric reference to the brain's spatial orientation circuits. Here we describe neurons in the macaque anterior thalamus tuned to pitch and roll orientation relative to gravity, independently of visual landmarks. We show that individual cells exhibit two-dimensional tuning curves, with peak firing rates at a preferred vertical orientation. These results identify a thalamic pathway for gravity cues to influence perception, action and spatial cognition.

  14. Symmetry perception in humans and macaques.

    PubMed

    Beck, Diane M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    The human ability to detect symmetry has been a topic of interest to psychologists and philosophers since the 19th century, yet surprisingly little is known about the neural basis of symmetry perception. In a recent fMRI study, Sasaki and colleagues begin to remedy this situation. By identifying the neural structures that respond to symmetry in both humans and macaques, the authors lay the groundwork for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying symmetry perception.

  15. Peripheral Ossifying Fibroma and Juxtacortical Chondrosarcoma in Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Schmelting, Barthel; Zöller, Martina; Kaspareit, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Literature on spontaneous primary bone tumors in nonhuman primates is sparse. This case report describes 2 different neoplastic bone lesions in 2 adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), including macroscopic, radiographic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings. In one monkey, a firm mass located at the palatogingival junction of the left rostral maxilla was confirmed to be a peripheral ossifying fibroma in light of its histologic and immunohistochemical characteristics. In another monkey, a lobulated tumor at the right distal femur that radiographically showed moderate radiopacity with splotchy areas of mineralization was confirmed to be a juxtacortical chondrosarcoma on histologic examination. The 2 neoplastic bone lesions revealed rare histologic and immunohistochemical characteristics and contribute to the known tumor spectrum of cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:21333171

  16. Serial Cognition and Personality in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Altschul, Drew M.; Terrace, Herbert S.; Weiss, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We examined the associations between serial cognition and personality in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Nine macaques were tested on a simultaneous chaining task to assess their cognitive abilities. They were also rated for personality traits and scored according to a previously extracted six component structure derived from free-ranging rhesus macaques. Friendliness and Openness were positively associated with good performance on three measures of accuracy on the serial learning task: Progress, Error, and Rewarded (i.e., correctly completed) Trials. Faster Reaction Times were associated with lower Friendliness and higher Confidence, as well as higher Openness when only correct responses were analyzed. We also used regularized exploratory factor analysis to extract two, three, four, five, and six factor structures, and found consistent associations between accuracy and single factors within each of these structures. Prior results on intelligence in other nonhuman primate species have focused on basic intelligence tests; this study demonstrates that more complex, abstract cognitive tasks can be used to assess intelligence and personality in nonhuman primates. PMID:27158661

  17. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  18. A study of free portal pressure in cynomolgus monkeys with different degrees of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ke; Liu, Manrong; Li, Jianmin; Liang, Yi; Shang, Xiaobin; Wei, Xue; Wu, Qixin; Liu, Huimei; Ma, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of changes in free portal pressure (FPP) in cynomolgus monkeys with different levels of liver fibrosis and to lay a theoretical foundation for the study of FPP in patients with liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis models were successfully established in 15 of 20 cynomolgus monkeys using carbon tetrachloride, among which 10 monkeys developed severe liver fibrosis (S4; i.e., early cirrhosis). A randomized block design was used to study FPP in the 10 cynomolgus monkeys that developed complete liver fibrosis. The FPP values and the rates of change at different stages of liver fibrosis were analyzed. The normal FPP value of cynomolgus monkeys was 25.56 ± 2.33 mmHg; the FPP value at S1 was 36.05 ± 2.91 mmHg, with an increase of 41.04 ± 3.02%; the value at S2 was 42.79 ± 2.91 mmHg, with an increase of 67.41 ± 2.98%; the value at S3 was 50.27 ± 3.44 mmHg, with an increase of 96.67 ± 5.24%; and the value at S4 was 62.47 ± 3.75 mmHg, with an increase of 144.41 ± 6.34%. FPP and its increase at S4 were significantly higher than the normal value and those at S1, S2, and S3 (P < 0.01). These results showed that FPP increases along with the severity of liver fibrosis. FPP at S4 of severe liver fibrosis were >2-fold higher compared with the normal value.

  19. Protection Against Soman or VX Poisoning by Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Guinea Pigs and Cynomolgus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-15

    James M. Federko c, Chunyuan Luoc, Ashima Saxenac, Bhupendra P. Doctorc, Carl Olson d a Pharmacology Division, 3100 Ricketts Pt. Rd., US Army Medical...prior to initiating an investigational new drug (IND) application, the pharmacokinetics of HuBuChE were evaluated in guinea pigs and in cynomolgus monkeys... anticholinesterase intoxication at any of the challenge levels, and all survived for the 14-day duration of the experiment. Similar experiments were

  20. The effect of angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, sacubitril/valsartan, on central nervous system amyloid-β concentrations and clearance in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Heidi A; West, Tim; Verghese, Philip B; Holubasch, Mary; Shenoy, Neeta; Kagan, David; Buono, Chiara; Zhou, Wei; DeCristofaro, Marc; Douville, Julie; Goodrich, Geoffrey G; Mansfield, Keith; Saravanan, Chandra; Cumin, Frederic; Webb, Randy L; Bateman, Randall J

    2017-03-15

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is the first angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor approved to reduce cardiovascular mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. As neprilysin (NEP) is one of several enzymes known to degrade amyloid-β (Aβ), there is a theoretical risk of Aβ accumulation following long-term NEP inhibition. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of sacubitril/valsartan on central nervous system clearance of Aβ isoforms in cynomolgus monkeys using the sensitive Stable Isotope Labeling Kinetics (SILK™)-Aβ methodology. The in vitro selectivity of valsartan, sacubitril, and its active metabolite sacubitrilat was established; sacubitrilat did not inhibit other human Aβ-degrading metalloproteases. In a 2-week study, sacubitril/valsartan (50mg/kg/day) or vehicle was orally administered to female cynomolgus monkeys in conjunction with SILK™-Aβ. Despite low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain penetration, CSF exposure to sacubitril was sufficient to inhibit NEP and resulted in an increase in the elimination half-life of Aβ1-42 (65.3%; p=0.026), Aβ1-40 (35.2%; p=0.04) and Aβtotal (29.8%; p=0.04) acutely; this returned to normal as expected with repeated dosing for 15days. CSF concentrations of newly generated Aβ (AUC(0-24h)) indicated elevations in the more aggregable form Aβ1-42 on day 1 (20.4%; p=0.039) and day 15 (34.7%; p=0.0003) and in shorter forms Aβ1-40 (23.4%; p=0.009), Aβ1-38 (64.1%; p=0.0001) and Aβtotal (50.45%; p=0.00002) on day 15. However, there were no elevations in any Aβ isoforms in the brains of these monkeys on day 16. In a second study cynomolgus monkeys were administered sacubitril/valsartan (300mg/kg) or vehicle control for 39weeks; no microscopic brain changes or Aβ deposition, as assessed by immunohistochemical staining, were present. Further clinical studies are planned to address the relevance of these findings.

  1. Identification of MHC Haplotypes Associated with Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Whritenour, Jessica; Sanford, Jonathan C; Houle, Christopher; Adkins, Karissa K

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can significantly impact drug development and use. Studies to understand risk factors for drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions have identified genetic association with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Interestingly, drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can occur in nonhuman primates; however, association between drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles has not been described. In this study, tissue samples were collected from 62 cynomolgus monkeys from preclinical studies in which 9 animals had evidence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Microsatellite analysis was used to determine MHC haplotypes for each animal. A total of 7 haplotypes and recombinant MHC haplotypes were observed, with distribution frequency comparable to known MHC I allele frequency in cynomolgus monkeys. Genetic association analysis identified alleles from the M3 haplotype of the MHC I B region (B*011:01, B*075:01, B*079:01, B*070:02, B*098:05, and B*165:01) to be significantly associated (χ(2) test for trend, p < 0.05) with occurrence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Sequence similarity from alignment of alleles in the M3 haplotype B region and HLA alleles associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in humans was 86% to 93%. These data demonstrate that MHC alleles in cynomolgus monkeys are associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, similar to HLA alleles in humans.

  2. Effect of vasectomy on gene expression in the epididymis of cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Karine; Légaré, Christine; Saez, Fabrice; Sullivan, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Vasectomy has been shown to affect the pattern of mRNA expression of P34H, a human sperm protein added to the acrosomal cap during epididymal transit. It has been reported that vasectomy alters the histology of the reproductive tract in various species as a result of the increased pressure in the epididymis. The aim of this study was to evaluate if other epididymis-specific mRNAs, which are expressed in different patterns along the duct, are altered by vasectomy as well. We analyzed the expression of P31m (a monkey homologue of human P34H) and three different HE-like (HE-l) mRNAs along the epididymis in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Sexually mature cynomolgus monkeys were vasectomized unilaterally; then the epididymides were surgically removed at different time points. The ipsilateral normal epididymis was used as a control. Histomorphometric measurements showed that the height of the epididymal epithelial cells started to be affected only at 14 wk postsurgery. However, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analysis showed that the expression pattern of P31m, HE1, and HE5-like mRNA along the epididymis was not affected by vasectomy. Only the HE2-like mRNA predominantly expressed in the normal corpus epididymidis was significantly lowered 14 wk after vasectomy. Thus, ductal obstruction differentially alters mRNA expression along the epididymis of the cynomolgus monkey.

  3. Reference values of clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) used in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Kyu; Cho, Jae-Woo; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Park, Heejin; Han, Ji-Seok; Yang, Mi-Jin; Im, Wan-Jung; Park, Do-Yong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Han, Su-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are increasingly used in biomedical research since they are highly homologous to humans compared to other rodent animals. However, there is limited reliable reference data of the clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys, and in particular, only some coagulation and urinalysis parameters have been reported. Here, we reported the reference data of clinical chemical, hematological, blood coagulation, and urinalysis parameters in cynomolgus monkeys. The role of sex differences was analyzed and several parameters (including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cell, blood urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine kinase, gamma-glutamyl tranferase, and lactate dehydrogenase) significantly differed between male and female subjects. In addition, compared to previous study results, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine kinase, and aspartate aminotransferase showed significant variation. Interstudy differences could be affected by several factors, including age, sex, geographic origin, presence/absence of anesthetics, fasting state, and the analytical methods used. Therefore, it is important to deliberate with the overall reference indices. In conclusion, the current study provides a comprehensive and updated reference data of the clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys and provides improved assessment criteria for evaluating preclinical studies or biomedical research. PMID:27382375

  4. Developmental toxicity of dibutyltin dichloride given on three consecutive days during organogenesis in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Arima, Akihiro; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Mariko; Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Hirose, Akihiko; Ihara, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the administration of dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl) by nasogastric intubation during the entire period of organogenesis, days 20-50 of pregnancy, was embryolethal, but not teratogenic, in cynomolgus monkeys. The present study was conducted to further evaluate the developmental toxicity of DBTCl given to pregnant monkeys on 3 consecutive days during organogenesis. Cynomolgus monkeys were given DBTCl at 7.5 mg/kg body weight/day by nasogastric intubation on days 19-21, 21-23, 24-26, 26-28, 29-31, 31-33, or 34-36 of pregnancy, and the pregnancy outcome was determined on day 100 of pregnancy. Embryonic/fetal loss was observed in 1 female given DBTCl on days 19-21, 2 females given DBTCl on days 24-26, and 1 female given DBTCl on days 34-36. There were no effects of DBTCl on developmental parameters in surviving fetuses, including fetal body weight, crown-rump length, tail length, or placental weight. No external, internal, or skeletal malformations were detected in fetuses in any group. DBTCl did not affect the incidence of fetuses with skeletal variation or skeletal ossification of fetuses. These data confirm our previous findings that DBTCl was embryolethal, but not teratogenic, in cynomolgus monkeys.

  5. Histopathology of Incidental Findings in Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca Fascicularis) Used in Toxicity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Junko; Doi, Takuya; Kanno, Takeshi; Wako, Yumi; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Narama, Isao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our publication is to widely communicate pictures of spontaneous findings occurring in cynomolgus monkeys. Focal lymphoplasmacytic infiltration is commonly seen in the general organs. The frequency and severity of these lesions may be influenced by the administration of drugs with an effect on the immune system. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the lamina propria of the stomach is also frequently seen in cynomolgus monkeys, and it is caused mainly by a Helicobacter pylori infection. Various degrees of brown pigments are observed in various organs, and it is possible to distinguish the material of the pigments by its morphological features and site. A focal/segmental glomerular lesion is occasionally seen in a section of the kidney, and the minimal lesion has no influence on the urinalysis. We showed the common glomerular lesions in HE-stained sections, as well as in PAM- or PAS-stained sections, for understanding the details. Young and pubertal monkeys are usually used in toxicity studies; therefore, understanding various maturation stages of the genital system is important. In particular, the female genital system needs to be understood in the morphology, because their cyclic changes are different from other laboratory animals. Thus, we present the normal features of the cyclic changes of the female genital organs. Furthermore, we provide more information on spontaneous findings in cynomolgus monkeys for exact diagnoses in toxicity studies. PMID:22481861

  6. Sexual dimorphism of sulcal length asymmetry in the cerebrum of adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Imai, Noritaka; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2011-12-01

    The present study aimed to quantitatively clarify the gross anatomical asymmetry and sexual dimorphism of the cerebral hemispheres of cynomolgus monkeys. While the fronto-occipital length of the right and left cerebral hemispheres was not different between sexes, a statistically significant rightward asymmetry was detected in the cerebral width at the perisylvian region in females, but not in males (narrower width of the left side in the females). An asymmetry quotient of the sulcal lengths revealed a rightward asymmetry in the inferior occipital sulcus and a leftward asymmetry in the central and intraparietal sulci in both sexes. However, the laterality of the lengths of other sulci was different for males and females. The arcuate sulcus was directed rightward in males but there was no rightward bias in females. Interestingly, the principle sulcus and lateral fissure were left-lateralized in the males, but right-lateralized in the females. The results suggest that lateralization patterns are regionally and sexually different in the cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys. The present results provide a reference for quantitatively evaluating the normality of the cerebral cortical morphology in cynomolgus monkeys. © 2011 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2011 Japanese Teratology Society.

  7. Topical Delivery of Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine from Pod-Intravaginal Rings Protects Macaques from Multiple SHIV Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardana, Manjula; Churchman, Scott A.; Yang, Flora; Dinh, Chuong T.; Mitchell, James M.; Zhang, Jining; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S.; Butkyavichene, Irina; McNicholl, Janet M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Baum, Marc M.; Smith, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Topical preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV has been marginally successful in recent clinical trials with low adherence rates being a primary factor for failure. Controlled, sustained release of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs may help overcome these low adherence rates if the product is protective for extended periods of time. The oral combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) is currently the only FDA-approved ARV drug for HIV PrEP. A novel pod-intravaginal ring (IVR) delivering TDF and FTC at independently controlled rates was evaluated for efficacy at preventing SHIV162p3 infection in a rigorous, repeat low-dose vaginal exposure mode