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Sample records for macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

  1. Megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria syndrome: the first case report in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon-Chul; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Min-Jee; Lee, Yun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria syndrome (MCAP), previously known as macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome, is a rare multiple-malformation syndrome that is characterized by progressive megalencephaly, capillary malformations of the midline face and body, or distal limb anomalies such as syndactyly. Herein, we report a female infant case that satisfies the recently proposed criteria of MCAP and describe the distinctive neuroradiological and morphological features. We have also reviewed recently published reports and the diagnostic criteria proposed by various authors in order to facilitate the clinical diagnosis of these children in pediatric neurology clinics. PMID:28018470

  2. Diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limb: part I. Clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pedro; Aguado, Leyre; Martínez-Cuesta, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    There is significant confusion in the literature when describing vascular anomalies, and vascular malformations are often misnamed or incorrectly classified. Part I of this two-part series on the diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limbs will discuss the dermatologist's role in the diagnosis of these lesions. At least nine types of vascular malformations with specific clinical and radiologic characteristics must be distinguished in the lower limbs: Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome, port-wine stain with or without hypertrophy, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, macrocephaly-capillary malformation, Parkes Weber syndrome, Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome, venous malformation, glomuvenous malformation, and lymphatic malformation. This article highlights the differences in clinical appearance and discusses the differential diagnosis of extensive vascular malformations in an attempt to ensure earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for these patients.

  3. Diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limb: part II. Systemic repercussions [corrected], diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pedro; Aguado, Leyre; Martínez-Cuesta, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    At least nine types of vascular malformations with specific clinical and radiologic characteristics must be distinguished in the lower limbs: Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome, port-wine stain with or without hypertrophy, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, macrocephaly-capillary malformation, Parkes Weber syndrome, Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome, venous malformation, glomuvenous malformation, and lymphatic malformation. Extensive vascular malformations are often more complex than they appear and require a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Vascular malformations may be associated with underlying disease or systemic anomalies. Part II of this two-part series on the diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limb highlights the systemic repercussions [corrected] (bone, articular, visceral, and hematologic involvement), diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions.

  4. Proteus Syndrome with Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Asilian, Ali; Kamali, Atefeh Sadat; Riahi, Nabet Tajmir; Adibi, Neda; Mokhtari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare sporadic disorder that appears with localized macrosomia, congenital lipomatosis, and slow flow vascular malformations, connective tissue nevus, and epidermal nevus. There are usually some manifestations at birth. The vascular abnormalities that have been reported in Proteus syndrome are capillary and slow flow venous malformation. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy with confirmed Proteus syndrome characterized by high flow vascular malformation (arteriovenous [AV] malformation) unlike the usual vascular malformations seen in this syndrome. This case adds a new perspective to the established clinical findings of the Proteus syndrome.

  5. The Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Willing, Marcia C.; Lind, Anne C.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three children from two families with a new pattern recognition malformation syndrome consisting of severe congenital microcephaly (MIC), intractable epilepsy including infantile spasms, and generalized capillary malformations that was first reported recently in this journal [Carter et al. (2011); Am J Med Genet A 155: 301–306]. Two of our reported patients are an affected brother and sister, suggesting this is an autosomal recessive severe congenital MIC syndrome. PMID:21815250

  6. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity.

  7. Klippel-Feil syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    PubMed

    Karaman, A; Kahveci, H

    2011-01-01

    The Klippel-Feil deformity is a complex of osseous and visceral anomalies, which include low hairline, platybasia, fused cervical vertebrae with a short neck, and deafness. Associated central nervous system abnormalities include occipital cephalocele, Chiari I malformation, syrinx, microcephaly, and hydrocephalus. Herein, we report a case with Klippel-Feil syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation.

  8. Sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hung; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Peng, Chun-Chih; Ho, Che-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    SCALP syndrome is an acronym describing the coincidence of sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus). We present a fourth case of this syndrome.

  9. Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with congenital portal venous malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Savarirayan, R; Tomlinson, P; Thompson, E

    1998-01-01

    We report a 4 year old boy in whom the clinical features of craniosynostosis and bilateral absent radii led to a diagnosis of Baller-Gerold syndrome. Additional congenital abnormalities included midface hypoplasia, atrial and ventricular septal defects, right hydronephrosis, partial sacral agenesis, and anterior ectopic anus. Evidence of portal venous hypertension was present from 8 months and a congenital portal venous malformation was discovered at 2 years. This is the first reported case of Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with a congenital portal venous malformation. We discuss the diagnostic confusion between this syndrome and other overlapping malformation syndromes and propose optimal evaluation strategies aimed at clarifying the nosology of these syndromes. Images PMID:9733037

  10. Diffuse pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in a child with polysplenia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kapur, S; Rome, J; Chandra, R S

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is usually seen as a well-circumscribed cystic mass. In this communication we describe a diffuse arteriovenous malformation in a 5-month-old infant. The lesion was seen only at the microscopic level and was associated with abdominal heterotaxy, atrial situs solitus, polysplenia, interrupted inferior vena cava, atrial septal defect, and atrioventricular canal. This uncommon association may be within the spectrum of polysplenia syndrome.

  11. Anorectal malformation and Down's syndrome in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    de Buys Roessingh, Anthony S; Mueller, Claudia; Wiesenauer, Chad; Bensoussan, Arié L; Beaunoyer, Mona

    2009-02-01

    Anorectal malformation (ARM) can be divided in high, intermediate, and low forms according to the level of termination of the rectum in relation to the pubococcygeal and ischiatic lines. Patients with Down's syndrome have a high incidence of gastrointestinal anomalies, such as tracheoesophageal fistula, duodenal obstruction, annular pancreas, Hirschsprung's disease, and ARM. In these children, ARM is generally low with or without a fistula. The mode of inheritance of ARM and its genetic relation with Down's syndrome is not known, even if the association (ARM-Down's syndrome) seems not to be coincidental. We describe here a very rare case of monozygotic twins born with the association of ARM and Down's syndrome.

  12. Spine malformation complex in 3 diverse syndromic entities

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; van Egmond-Fröhlich, Andreas; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirov, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstaetter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Clinical and radiographic phenotypic characterizations were the base line tool of diagnosis in 3 syndromic disorders in which congenital cervico-thoracic kyphosis was the major deformity. Patients concerns: Directing maximal care toward the radiographic analysis is not only the axial malformation but also toward the appendicular abnormalities was our main concern. We fully documented the diversity of the spine phenotypic malformation complex via the clinical and radiographic phenotypes. Diagnoses: We established the diagnosis via phenotypic/genotypic confirmation in 3 diverse syndromic entities namely acampomelic campomelic dysplasia, Larsen syndrome and Morquio syndrome type A (mucopolysaccharidosis type IV A). Interventions: Surgical interventions have been carried out in the Larsen syndrome and Morquio syndrome type A, resepectively. Outcomes: The earliest the diagnosis is, the better the results are. The necessity to diagnose children in their first year of life has many folds, firstly the management would be in favor of the child's growth and development and secondly, the prognosis could be clearer to the family and the medical staff as well. Our current paper is to sensitize paediatricians, physicians and orthopedic surgeons regarding the necessity to detect the aetiological understanding in every child who manifests a constellation of malformation complex. Lesons: Scoliosis and kyphosis/kyphoscoliosis are not a diagnosis in themselves. Such deformities are mostly a symptom complex correlated to dozens of types of syndromic associations. The rate curve progression and the final severity of congenital spine tilting are related to 3 factors: (a) the type of vertebral malformation present, (b) the patient's phenotype, and (c) the diagnosis. PMID:27977582

  13. Congenital Auricular Malformations: Description of Anomalies and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva

    2015-12-01

    Half of the malformations in the ear, nose, and throat region affect the ear. Malformations of the external ear (pinna or auricle with external auditory canal [EAC]) are collectively termed microtia. Microtia is a congenital anomaly that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the external ear (anotia). Microtia occurs more frequently in males (∼2 or 3:1), is predominantly unilateral (∼70-90%), and more often involves the right ear (∼60%). The reported prevalence varies geographically from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births. Microtia may be genetic (with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired. Malformations of the external ear can also involve the middle ear and/or inner ear. Microtia may be an isolated birth defect, but associated anomalies or syndromes are described in 20 to 60% of cases, depending on study design. These generally fit within the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum; defects are located most frequently in the facial skeleton, facial soft tissues, heart, and vertebral column, or comprise a syndrome (e.g., Treacher Collins syndrome). Diagnostic investigation of microtia includes clinical examination, audiologic testing, genetic analysis and, especially in higher grade malformations with EAC deformities, computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT for the planning of surgery and rehabilitation procedures, including implantation of hearing aids.

  14. [Proteus syndrome: Case report of bladder vascular malformation causing massive hematuria].

    PubMed

    Abbo, O; Bouali, O; Galinier, P; Moscovici, J

    2012-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic disorder consisting of disproportionate overgrowth of multiple tissues, vascular malformations, and connective tissue or epidermal nevi. Due to mosaic pattern of distribution, the phenotypes are variable and diverse. Vascular malformations are part of the major criteria used to define and diagnose this syndrome. It can involve the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, or the urinary tract but bladder malformations are rare. We report here a case of bladder vascular malformation in a 12-year-old boy known to have Proteus syndrome and review the literature on bladder malformations or tumors in this syndrome.

  15. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  16. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS): do concomitant esophageal malformations indicate a poor prognosis?

    PubMed

    Küker, W; Friese, S; Riethmüller, J; Krägeloh-Mann, I

    2000-12-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a syndrome of cortical malformation characterized by faciopharyngoglossomasticatory diplegia. We report on two cases of CBPS with associated esophageal malformations and a poor mental and motor development. The association of CBPS and esophageal malformations may indicate a subgroup of patients with a very early prenatal injury, characterised by a bad prognosis due to severe cortical disorganization. However, it can not be excluded that the association of CBPS and esophageal malformation is purely coincidental.

  17. Abernethy malformation: one of the etiologies of hepatopulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alfonso E; Ribeiro, Antônio F; Hessel, Gabriel; Baracat, Jamal; Ribeiro, José D

    2002-11-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is the clinical relationship between hepatic disease and the existence of pulmonary vascular dilatations, which can result in a range of arterial oxygenation abnormalities. It is probably caused by an alteration in the synthesis or metabolism of vasoactive pulmonary substances at a hepatic level, leading to vasodilatation of pulmonary vessels and diffusion perfusion defects. The Abernethy malformation is characterized by the congenital diversion of portal blood away from the liver, by either end-to-side or side-to-side shunt. Here, we report on a 5-year-and-11-month-old-boy who had started cyanosis at age 4 years and 11 months, and did not have any other pulmonary or cardiac signs or symptoms. In the investigation, arterial blood gases revealed a PaO(2) of 41.4 mm Hg. The chest x-ray film and echo Doppler cardiography were normal. Nuclear scanning with Technetium 99m-labeled macroaggregated albumin showed the presence of arteriovenous shunt, at 47%. Abdominal echography revealed Abernethy malformation with an absence of portal vein. We concluded that the patient had HPS caused by Abernethy malformation. The possible mechanism is that in this malformation, there is a deviation in the blood that comes from the spleen to the vena cava without passing through the liver, so there is no metabolism of some substances which can be responsible for the imbalance between the vasodilatation and the vasoconstriction of the pulmonary circulation. Abernethy malformation must be included as one of the etiologies of hepatopulmonary syndrome. This is the first case described in the literature with this form of presentation.

  18. Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with Extensive Arterial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Renee Frances; Barbeau, L. Daphna Yasova; Co-Vu, Jennifer; Beegle, Richard D.; Williams, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome is characterized by craniofacial, ocular and vertebral defects secondary to abnormal development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and vertebrae. Other findings include cardiac and vascular abnormalities. Though these associations are known, the specific anomalies are not well defined. We present a 7-month-old infant with intermittent respiratory distress that did not improve with respiratory interventions. Echocardiogram suggested a double aortic arch. Cardiac CT angiogram confirmed a right arch and aberrant, stenotic left subclavian artery, dilation of the main pulmonary artery, and agenesis of the left thyroid lobe. Repeat echocardiograms were concerning for severely dilated coronary arteries. Given dilation, a rheumatologic workup ensued, only identifying few weakly positive autoantibodies. Further imaging demonstrated narrowing of the aorta below the renal arteries and extending into the common iliac arteries and proximal femoral arteries. Given a physical exam devoid of rheumatologic findings, only weakly positive autoantibodies, normal inflammatory markers, and presence of the coronary artery dilation, the peripheral artery narrowings were not thought to be vasculitic. This case illustrates the need to identify definitive anomalies related to Goldenhar Syndrome. Although this infant's presentation is rare, recognition of specific vascular findings will help differentiate Goldenhar Syndrome from other disease processes. PMID:26688769

  19. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a…

  20. Cardiovascular Malformations in CHARGE Syndrome with DiGeorge Phenotype: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazushi; Morihana, Eiji; Fusazaki, Naoki; Ishikawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Both CHARGE syndrome and DiGeorge anomaly are frequently accompanied by cardiovascular malformations. Some specific cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B and truncus arteriosus are frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, while conotruncal defects and atrioventricular septal defects are overrepresented in patients with CHARGE syndrome. CHD7 gene mutation is identified in approximately two-thirds of patients with CHARGE syndrome, and chromosomal microdeletion at 22q11.2 is found in more than 95% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is occasionally accompanied by DiGeorge phenotype. We report two patients with dysmorphic features of both CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Although both of the two cases did not have 22q11.2 deletion, they had typical dysmorphic features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B. They also had characteristic features of CHARGE syndrome including ear malformation, genital hypoplasia, limb malformation, and endocrinological disorders. CHD7 gene mutation was confirmed in one of the two cases. When a patient with cardiovascular malformations frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome does not have 22q11.2 deletion, we suggest that associated malformations characteristic of CHARGE syndrome should be searched for.

  1. Cardiovascular Malformations in CHARGE Syndrome with DiGeorge Phenotype: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Morihana, Eiji; Fusazaki, Naoki; Ishikawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Both CHARGE syndrome and DiGeorge anomaly are frequently accompanied by cardiovascular malformations. Some specific cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B and truncus arteriosus are frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, while conotruncal defects and atrioventricular septal defects are overrepresented in patients with CHARGE syndrome. CHD7 gene mutation is identified in approximately two-thirds of patients with CHARGE syndrome, and chromosomal microdeletion at 22q11.2 is found in more than 95% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is occasionally accompanied by DiGeorge phenotype. We report two patients with dysmorphic features of both CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Although both of the two cases did not have 22q11.2 deletion, they had typical dysmorphic features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B. They also had characteristic features of CHARGE syndrome including ear malformation, genital hypoplasia, limb malformation, and endocrinological disorders. CHD7 gene mutation was confirmed in one of the two cases. When a patient with cardiovascular malformations frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome does not have 22q11.2 deletion, we suggest that associated malformations characteristic of CHARGE syndrome should be searched for. PMID:27957375

  2. Kabuki Syndrome and Anorectal Malformations: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siminas, Sotirios; Baillie, Colin Tennant; Turnock, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by a distinctive facies, intellectual disability, growth delay, and a variety of skeletal, visceral, and other anomalies, including anorectal malformations (ARMs). We present two cases of female patients with KS, diagnosed and successfully managed at our institution, one with a perineal fistula and one with a rectovestibular fistula. Our report, along with a literature review, shows that the syndrome is usually associated with “low” anomalies, with a potential for a good prognosis. Management of the anorectal anomaly in patients with KS is not essentially different from that in other nonsyndromic patients, taking into account the frequent association of the syndrome with serious congenital heart disease, which might affect the decision-making and timing of the stages of anorectal reconstruction. The frequent occurrence of learning and feeding difficulties makes establishment of toilet training and bowel management rather more challenging, requiring the expertise of a multidisciplinary team. The finding of ARMs in female patients with other characteristics of KS, although inconstant, could support the clinical suspicion for the syndrome until genetic confirmation is available, and should alert the physician for the potential of severe cardiac defects. PMID:26171318

  3. Malformation syndromes caused by disorders of cholesterol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Forbes D.; Herman, Gail E.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is critical for normal growth and development. In addition to being a major membrane lipid, cholesterol has multiple biological functions. These roles include being a precursor molecule for the synthesis of steroid hormones, neuroactive steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids. Cholesterol is also essential for the proper maturation and signaling of hedgehog proteins, and thus cholesterol is critical for embryonic development. After birth, most tissues can obtain cholesterol from either endogenous synthesis or exogenous dietary sources, but prior to birth, the human fetal tissues are dependent on endogenous synthesis. Due to the blood-brain barrier, brain tissue cannot utilize dietary or peripherally produced cholesterol. Generally, inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis lead to both a deficiency of cholesterol and increased levels of potentially bioactive or toxic precursor sterols. Over the past couple of decades, a number of human malformation syndromes have been shown to be due to inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis. Herein, we will review clinical and basic science aspects of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, desmosterolosis, lathosterolosis, HEM dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform erythroderma and Limb Defects Syndrome, sterol-C-4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, and Antley-Bixler syndrome. PMID:20929975

  4. Chiari I malformation as part of the Floating-Harbor syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kurzbuch, Arthur R; Magdum, Shailendra

    2016-12-01

    We report the first case of a patient diagnosed with Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) and Chiari I malformation. The 3-year-old girl was of proportional short stature, had delay of language development, conductive hearing loss and a high threshold of pain. Diagnosis of Chiari I malformation may be difficult in FHS patients who present with communication problems. Clinicians following patients with FHS should be aware of a possible relation between FHS and Chiari I malformation.

  5. Genetic modifiers of the physical malformations in velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vimla S; Morrow, Bernice E

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that Tbx1, a T-box containing transcription factor present on the deleted region, is likely responsible for the etiology of the syndrome. Furthermore, mutations in TBX1 have been found in rare non-deleted patients. Despite having the same sized deletion, most VCFS/DGS patients exhibit significant clinical variability. Stochastic, environmental and genetic factors likely modify the phenotype of patients with the disorder. Here, we review mouse genetics studies, which may help identify possible genetic modifiers for the physical malformations in VCFS/DGS.

  6. Short-segment Hirschsprung's disease, cat eye syndrome, and anorectal malformation: a unique association.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Chandrasen K; Grewal, Alka; Ward, Harry Charles

    2007-08-01

    The association of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) and anorectal malformations has been reported in 2.3% to 3.4% cases. Only 2 cases have previously been published where cat eye syndrome was associated with long (but not short) segment HD. Here, we report a case where there appears to be an association among short segment HD, cat eye syndrome, and anorectal malformation, which has not previously been identified. An abnormality in chromosome 22 may be involved in the development of this association.

  7. Severe Klippel-Feil syndrome with Mondini malformation of inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Alaqeel, Aqeel Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is defined as the fusion of cervical vertebra with associated congenital anomalies but was rarely reported to be associated with Mondini Malformation. We report a newborn girl with severe neck extension, computed tomography (CT) of the neck after birth showed fusion of the fifth, sixth, and seventh cervical vertebrae, compatible with Klippel-Feil Syndrome and CT temporal bone showed choclear dysplasia with incomplete number of turns that is compatible with Mondini Malformation. PMID:25852797

  8. Severe Klippel-Feil syndrome with Mondini malformation of inner ear.

    PubMed

    Alaqeel, Aqeel Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is defined as the fusion of cervical vertebra with associated congenital anomalies but was rarely reported to be associated with Mondini Malformation. We report a newborn girl with severe neck extension, computed tomography (CT) of the neck after birth showed fusion of the fifth, sixth, and seventh cervical vertebrae, compatible with Klippel-Feil Syndrome and CT temporal bone showed choclear dysplasia with incomplete number of turns that is compatible with Mondini Malformation.

  9. [Cognitive and affective characteristics of children with malformation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tosi, B; Maestro, S; Marcheschi, M

    1995-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the psychological and relational aspects in children suffering from specific malformative syndrome and precisely Down s., Sotos s., X-Fragile s. and Williams s. Indeed literature provides much data related to the phenotype, to the organic-biological characteristics, but little or nothing is known about the affective structure, the episodes and to the particular dynamics that emerge in he relation between the parents and the malformed child. A protocol was applied to our sample group (16 subjects). This protocol includes laboratory and instrumental tests (chromosome test, neurometabolic screening, EEG, CT or cranial MRI, cardiac and abdominal ultrasonography, ear and eye test) aspects. This evaluation is carried out through the proposal of standardized situations (psychometric tests) and a use of a freer observational setting. This permits us to understand how the child perceives himself the awareness and the image he has of himself and how able he is to integrate his illness experiences and his way of relating with the environment. The data of our observations are thus used to compile a grill for the structural diagnosis of the personality. Besides, this evaluation is flanked by the observation of the family in order to explore the psychological image that parents have of their child, his character, his good points, his bad points, his similarities, how he relates to them, any educational problems and the emotional reaction that the communication of the diagnosis has raised in them. The videotaped observations are subsequently evaluated through the application of a grill for the study of the mother-child relationship. The results obtained from the psychological research underline a reasonable heterogeneity both of the intellectual level and of the metapsychological profile. Twelve subjects were mentally retarded (5 with mild mental retardation, 7 with moderate mental retardation); the remaining 4 had a normal cognitive development

  10. Severe holocord syrinx in a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Segal, Devorah; Heary, Robert F; Sabharwal, Sanjeev; Barry, Maureen T; Ming, Xue

    2016-07-01

    The authors present the case of a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome who developed a rapidly progressive holocord syringomyelia that was treated surgically. A 3-year-old boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria (MCAP) syndrome presented with several months of right leg weakness, worsening scoliosis, and increased seizures. An MRI study of the brain demonstrated a Chiari I malformation and massively dilated syringomyelia extending from C-2 to the conus medullaris. The patient underwent an urgent suboccipital craniectomy with C1-3 laminectomies to relieve the CSF outflow obstruction with significant clinical improvement. Surgery was complicated by bleeding from intracranial vascular malformations. This report describes a very rapidly developing, massive holocord syringomyelia related to CSF obstruction due to an unusual congenital brain malformation and associated vascular overgrowth at the site. Serial, premorbid MRI studies demonstrated the very rapid progression from no Chiari malformation, to progressively greater cerebellar tonsillar herniation, to holocord syrinx. This complication has never been reported in MCAP syndrome and should be considered in any affected MCAP patient with a progressive neurological decline, even if previous spine imaging findings were normal. Surgical complications due to hemorrhage also need to be considered in this vascular brain malformation.

  11. Clinical syndromes of arteriovenous malformations of the transverse-sigmoid sinus.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, S; Soto, M; Silvela, J

    1975-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations or fistulae shunting arterial blood from branches of the external and internal carotid and vertebral arteries into the transverse-sigmoid sinus may produce different clinical syndromes. The literature is reviewed with 96 patients including six personal cases. Usually these malformations have a congenital origin and only in 4% of the series was there a previous history of a severe head injury. Clinical groups are defined and the role of angiography assessed. Direct surgical approach with occlusion or removal of the vascular malformation is the treatment of choice. Possible methods of treatment by selective embolization are discussed. Images PMID:1097602

  12. Renal tubular dysgenesis, absent nipples, and multiple malformations in three brothers: a new, lethal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hisama, F M; Reyes-Mugica, M; Wargowski, D S; Thompson, K J; Mahoney, M J

    1998-12-04

    We report on three brothers with renal tubular dysgenesis and absent nipples, each also had other malformations including pre-auricular pits and a preauricular tag, branchial clefts, choanal atresia, pulmonary lobation anomaly, ventricular septal defect, type IIB interrupted aortic arch, absent gallbladder, absent thymus, parathyroid gland, accessory spleen, imperforate anus, clinodactyly, and broad digits and small nails. All three infants died neonatally. This pattern of clinical malformations appears to be a previously unreported syndrome.

  13. High incidence of malformation syndromes in a series of 1,073 children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Merks, Johannes Hans M; Caron, Huib N; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2005-04-15

    Constitutional molecular defects are known to play a role in oncogenesis, as shown by the increased incidence of embryonic cancers in children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or of leukemia in children with Down syndrome. To establish the incidence and spectrum of malformation syndromes associated with childhood cancer we performed a clinical morphological examination on a series of 1,073 children with cancer. We diagnosed a syndrome in 42 patients (3.9%) and suspected the presence of a syndrome in another 35 patients (3.3%), for a total of 7.2%. This incidence of patients with a proven or suspected syndrome is high, and points to a possible association. We describe new syndrome-tumor associations in several entities: cleidocranial dysostosis (Wilms tumor), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) (acute lymphoblastic leukemia), Kabuki syndrome (neuroblastoma), LEOPARD syndrome (neuroblastoma), Poland anomaly (osteosarcoma; Hodgkin disease), and blepharophimosis epicanthus inversus syndrome (Burkitt lymphoma). Twenty of the 42 syndrome diagnoses were not recognized in the patients prior to this study, indicating that these diagnoses are commonly missed. We propose that all children with a malignancy should be examined by a clinical geneticist or a pediatrician skilled in clinical morphology to determine if the patients have a malformation syndrome.

  14. Nursery care of the newborn with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Memo, Luigi

    2009-10-01

    Congenital malformations are not so rare, and represent a relevant challenge to health care providers. We delineate a methodology for the clinical approach to the malformed newborn, that takes into account the needs of the patient as single person and as part of a familiar and social context. We consider first the medical problem that the neonatologists face in the nursery and neonatal intensive care unit regarding clinical assistance, diagnosis, parent counselling and hospital discharge. Then we focus on the periodic follow-up, and the role of the primary care physician and the specialist in the assistance of this patients.

  15. Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams-Beuren: à propos de trois nouvelles observations

    PubMed Central

    Sator, Hicham; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Dafiri, Rachida; Chat, Latifa

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de Williams-Beuren est une maladie génétique rare, il associe classiquement une dysmorphie faciale assez spécifique, des malformations cardiovasculaires et un profil neuropsychologique particulier. Nous rapportons les observations de trois enfants atteints du syndrome de Williams-Beuren en insistant surtout sur les anomalies vasculaires observées sur l'angio-scanner et angio-IRM. PMID:27200143

  16. [The newborn infant with a suspected malformation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Memo, L

    2010-06-01

    Congenital malformations occur in 2-3% of live births, and often represent a special diagnostic and management challenge. Few clinical guidelines exist to assist the neonatologist in the approach to diagnosis and initial management of the malformed newborn. To provide optimal care for these children, one must employ a systematic approach to identify the likely pathogenic mechanism leading to the birth defects present. Determining how distinct anomalies relate to one another may lead to elucidation of a specific genetic etiology for the patient's condition. Genetic testing is increasingly available to allow for diagnostic confirmation. Using this systematic approach to a child with congenital anomalies permits accurate prognostic and recurrence risk counseling, informed management decisions, and the appropriate allocation of social support and medical resources.

  17. Craniocervical junction malformation in a child with Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis-Möbius syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Grill, Franz; Safi, Hatem; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Chehida, Farid Ben; Klaushofer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    We report a male child with Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis (OMLH), the main features being bilateral sixth and seventh nerve palsies, limb anomalies and hypoplasia of the tongue. Additional features were shortness of the neck associated with torticollis. Radiographs of the cervical spine were non-contributory, but 3D computed tomography (CT) scanning of this area identified: a) congenital hypoplasia of the atlas; b) the simultaneous development of occiput-atlas malformation/developmental defect. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report assessing the cervico-cranium malformation in a child with OMLH-Möbius syndrome. PMID:17210070

  18. Microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome: Brothers with a homozygous STAMBP mutation, uncovered by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Sogaty, Sameera; Rasool, Mahmood; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abutalib, Yousif Ahmed; Walker, Susan; Marshall, Christian R; Merico, Daniele; Carter, Melissa T; Scherer, Stephen W; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H; Zarrei, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    We describe two brothers from a consanguineous family of Egyptian ancestry, presenting with microcephaly, apparent global developmental delay, seizures, spasticity, congenital blindness, and multiple cutaneous capillary malformations. Through exome sequencing, we uncovered a homozygous missense variant in STAMBP (p.K303R) in the two siblings, inherited from heterozygous carrier parents. Mutations in STAMBP are known to cause microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MIC-CAP) and the phenotype in this family is consistent with this diagnosis. We compared the findings in the present brothers with those of earlier reported patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Clinical spectrum of eye malformations in four patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bourchany, A; Giurgea, I; Thevenon, J; Goldenberg, A; Morin, G; Bremond-Gignac, D; Paillot, C; Lafontaine, P O; Thouvenin, D; Massy, J; Duncombe, A; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Masurel-Paulet, A; Chehadeh, S El; Huet, F; Bron, A; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Lyonnet, S; Faivre, L

    2015-07-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by a specific facial gestalt, intellectual deficiency, Hirschsprung disease and multiple congenital anomalies. Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox2 gene (ZEB2) cause MWS. ZEB2 encodes for Smad-interacting protein 1, a transcriptional co-repressor involved in TGF-beta and BMP pathways and is strongly expressed in early stages of development in mice. Eye abnormalities have rarely been described in patients with this syndrome. Herein, we describe four patients (two males and two females; mean age 7 years) with MWS and eye malformations. Ocular anomalies included, iris/retinal colobomas, atrophy or absence of the optic nerve, hyphema, and deep refraction troubles, sometimes with severe visual consequences. All eye malformations were asymmetric and often unilateral and all eye segments were affected, similarly to the nine MWS cases with ophthalmological malformations previously reported (iris/chorioretinal/optic disc coloboma, optic nerve atrophy, retinal epithelium atrophy, cataract, and korectopia). In human embryo, ZEB2 is expressed in lens and neural retina. Using the present report and data from the literature, we set out to determine whether or not the presence of eye manifestations could be due to specific type or location of mutations. We concluded that the presence of eye malformations, although a rare feature in MWS, should be considered as a part of the clinical spectrum of the condition.

  20. Fraser syndrome and cryptophthalmos: review of the diagnostic criteria and evidence for phenotypic modules in complex malformation syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, A; Tifft, C

    2002-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is characterised by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation, and musculoskeletal anomalies. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. No diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities have been documented in affected patients, and no molecular genetic studies have been reported. We have reviewed 117 cases diagnosed as Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos published since the comprehensive review of Thomas et al in 1986 in order to validate the published diagnostic criteria and to delineate the phenotype associated with this syndrome. Our series showed more females (57/117) than males and consanguinity was present in 29/119 (24.8%). Eighty-eight patients satisfied the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome (75%). Cryptophthalmos was present in 103/117 (88%), syndactyly in 72/117 (61.5%), and ambiguous genitalia in 20/117 (17.1%). Ear malformations were recorded in 69/117 (59%), and renal agenesis in 53/117 (45.3%). Use of the published diagnostic criteria excluded several patients with cryptophthalmos and one or more physical feature(s) consistent with Fraser syndrome. The frequency of additional anomalies in our series was also higher than previously reported (for example, imperforate anus or anal stenosis were found in 34/117 (29%) compared with 2/124 (2%) in the series of Thomas et al (1986) and choanal stenosis or atresia was present in 7/117 (6%) compared to 0/124. These findings emphasise the clinical variability associated with Fraser syndrome and support genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. We also noted patterns of anomalies (for example, bicornuate uterus with imperforate anus or anal stenosis and renal malformations) that are found in other syndromes and associations without cryptophthalmos, suggesting that common modifier genes may explain some of the phenotypic variation in Fraser syndrome. PMID:12205104

  1. Fraser syndrome and cryptophthalmos: review of the diagnostic criteria and evidence for phenotypic modules in complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A M; Tifft, C J

    2002-09-01

    Fraser syndrome is characterised by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation, and musculoskeletal anomalies. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. No diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities have been documented in affected patients, and no molecular genetic studies have been reported. We have reviewed 117 cases diagnosed as Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos published since the comprehensive review of Thomas et al in 1986 in order to validate the published diagnostic criteria and to delineate the phenotype associated with this syndrome. Our series showed more females (57/117) than males and consanguinity was present in 29/119 (24.8%). Eighty-eight patients satisfied the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome (75%). Cryptophthalmos was present in 103/117 (88%), syndactyly in 72/117 (61.5%), and ambiguous genitalia in 20/117 (17.1%). Ear malformations were recorded in 69/117 (59%), and renal agenesis in 53/117 (45.3%). Use of the published diagnostic criteria excluded several patients with cryptophthalmos and one or more physical feature(s) consistent with Fraser syndrome. The frequency of additional anomalies in our series was also higher than previously reported (for example, imperforate anus or anal stenosis were found in 34/117 (29%) compared with 2/124 (2%) in the series of Thomas et al (1986) and choanal stenosis or atresia was present in 7/117 (6%) compared to 0/124. These findings emphasise the clinical variability associated with Fraser syndrome and support genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. We also noted patterns of anomalies (for example, bicornuate uterus with imperforate anus or anal stenosis and renal malformations) that are found in other syndromes and associations without cryptophthalmos, suggesting that common modifier genes may explain some of the phenotypic variation in Fraser syndrome.

  2. Child with Deletion 9p Syndrome Presenting with Craniofacial Dysmorphism, Developmental Delay, and Multiple Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sirisena, Nirmala D.; Wijetunge, U. Kalpani S.; de Silva, Ramya; Dissanayake, Vajira H. W.

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month-old Sri Lankan male child case with a de novo terminal deletion in the p22→pter region of chromosome 9 is described. The child presented with craniofacial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and congenital malformations in agreement with the consensus phenotype. A distinctive feature observed in this child was complete collapse of the left lung due to malformation of lung tissue. Cytogenetic studies confirmed terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 distal to band p22 [46,XY,del(9)(p22→pter)]. This is the first reported case of a de novo deletion 9p syndrome associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. This finding contributes to the widening of the spectrum of phenotypic features associated with deletion 9p syndrome. PMID:23984121

  3. Upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Daire, V.; Iserin, L.; Sidi, D.

    1995-03-13

    We report on upper limb anomalies in two children with a complete DiGeorge sequence: conotruncal defects, hypocalcemia, thymic aplasia, and facial anomalies. One child had preaxial polydactyly, and the other had club hands with hypoplastic first metacarpal. In both patients, molecular analysis documented a 22q11 deletion. To our knowledge, limb anomalies have rarely been reported in DiGeorge syndrome, and they illustrate the variable clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Malformations of the middle and inner ear on CT imaging in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loos, Elke; Verhaert, Nicolas; Willaert, Annelore; Devriendt, Koenraad; Swillen, Ann; Hermans, Robert; Op de Beeck, Katya; Hens, Greet

    2016-11-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans, presents with a large variety of abnormalities. A common abnormality is hearing impairment. The exact pathophysiological explanation of the observed hearing loss remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the middle and inner ear malformations as seen on computer tomographic imaging in patients with 22q11DS. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 11 22q11DS patients who had undergone a CT of the temporal bone in the past. Of the 22 examined ears, two showed an abnormal malleus and incus, 10 presented with a dense stapes superstructure, and three ears had an abnormal orientation of the stapes. With regard to the inner ear, 12 ears showed an incomplete partition type II with a normal vestibular aqueduct. In four ears the vestibule and lateral semicircular canal were composed of a single cavity, in 14 ears the vestibule was too wide, and three ears had a broadened lateral semicircular canal. These findings suggest that malformations of the stapes, cochlea, vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal are frequent in 22q11DS. To our knowledge, the current study involves the largest case series describing middle and inner ear malformations in 22q11DS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    PubMed

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated.

  6. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E.

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  7. The association of Chiari type III malformation and Klippel-Feil syndrome with mirror movement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Erol, Fatih Serhat; Ucler, Necati; Yakar, Huseyin

    2011-01-01

    Basically Chiari type III malformation is a combination of encephalocele with of brain stem and cerebellar abnormality. Although Klippel-Feil syndrome may be associated with other congenital anomalies, this syndrome is mainly associated with varying degrees of cervical vertebral fusion anomalies. In this study, we reported the association of Chiari type III malformation and Klippel-Feil syndrome with the mirror movement by imaging studies. The main involvement in Chiari type III malformation and Klippel-Feil syndrome is in the craniocervical junction. In such a small area, the emergence of these complex pathologies in our case was remarkable. Our patient had reconstruction surgery of the posterior fossa and his encephalocele was excised successfully. Hydrocephaly and/or deterioration in the functions of other posterior fossa structures have not been seen in the patient's follow-up.

  8. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    do Vale, Jorge Marques; Silva, Eloísa; Pereira, Isabel Gil; Marques, Catarina; Sanchez-Serrano, Amparo; Torres, António Simões

    2014-01-01

    The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery. PMID:25410846

  9. Etiology of craniofacial malformations in mouse models of blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heude, Églantine; Bellessort, Brice; Fontaine, Anastasia; Hamazaki, Manatsu; Treier, Anna-Corina; Treier, Mathias; Levi, Giovanni; Narboux-Nême, Nicolas

    2015-03-15

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus-inversus syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by narrow palpebral fissures and eyelid levator muscle defects. BPES is often associated to premature ovarian insufficiency (BPES type I). FOXL2, a member of the forkhead transcription factor family, is the only gene known to be mutated in BPES. Foxl2 is essential for maintenance of ovarian identity, but the developmental origin of the facial malformations of BPES remains, so far, unexplained. In this study, we provide the first detailed account of the developmental processes leading to the craniofacial malformations associated to Foxl2. We show that, during development, Foxl2 is expressed both by Cranial Neural Crest Cells (CNCCs) and by Cranial Mesodermal Cells (CMCs), which give rise to skeletal (CNCCs and CMCs) and muscular (CMCs) components of the head. Using mice in which Foxl2 is selectively inactivated in either CNCCs or CMCs, we reveal that expression of Foxl2 in CNCCs is essential for the development of extraocular muscles. Indeed, inactivation of Foxl2 in CMCs has only minor effects on muscle development, whereas its inactivation in CNCCs provokes a severe hypoplasia of the levator palpabrae superioris and of the superior and inferior oblique muscles. We further show that Foxl2 deletion in either CNCCs or CMCs prevents eyelid closure and induces subtle skeletal developmental defects. Our results provide new insights in the complex developmental origin of human BPES and could help to understand the origin of other ocular anomalies associated to this syndrome.

  10. [Diabetic mother's newborn with Goldenhar syndrome and cerebral malformations. Case report].

    PubMed

    Kerckoff Villanueva, Hugo; Retamoza, Beatriz; Bautista, Armando

    2008-11-01

    Goldenhar syndrome, also known as oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome, is a rare illness with unknown etiology. It happens in 1 of 50,000 newborns and is characterized by first and second brachial arch changes, with variable grades of hemifacial hypoplasia. We report a clinical case of a 39-years-old woman with a BMI of 33, family history of diabetes mellitus decease, and two fetal losses with unknown etiology. We first met patient at 24 gestational weeks. Second level ultrasound findings were: fetus with tri-ventricular obstructive hydrocephalia, symmetrical macrocranium, and occipital encephalocele. As her capilar glycaemia level was 197 to 338 mg/dL, diagnosis was gestational diabetes. Patient was scheduled to cesarian section and we obtain a newborn with: 2,050 g of weight, 45 cm of height, 38 cm of cephalic diameter, 6/7 Apgar score, and 33 gestational weeks (Capurro). Obesity and 2-type diabetes are well-known fetal malformation etiologies, due to insulin resistance. Maternal hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in embryo cells, it changes Pax3 gene path, and causes several chromosomopaties and malformations; main perinatal mortality etiology, among them, are neural tube alterations. All together enable to establish this Goldenhar diagnosis: palpebral coloboma, facial asymmetry, external ear, upper hemivertebra, and microphthalmy.

  11. Cardiovascular malformations in Fryns syndrome: is there a pathogenic role for neural crest cells?

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela E; Pober, Barbara R; Mullen, Mary P; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2005-12-15

    We performed a comprehensive literature and case report review to characterize the cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) associated with Fryns syndrome (OMIM #229850), a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome consisting of diaphragmatic defects, significant pulmonary hypoplasia, distinctive facial appearance, distal digital hypoplasia, and numerous other external and internal anomalies. A total of 112 patients meeting diagnostic guidelines for Fryns syndrome were identified, of whom 82 met narrowly defined criteria (Group I) and 30 met broader diagnostic criteria (Group II). Twelve patients reported as having Fryns syndrome with atypical features (Group III) were also analyzed. A CVM was reported in 51% (42 of 82) of Group I patients, most commonly an atrial or ventricular septal defect (VSD) (23 of 42, 55%). Conotruncal and aortic arch CVMs were common (11 of 42, 26%), but not significantly so compared to the general population of infants to age 1 year [Ferencz et al., 1997]. Recognizing that minor septal defects associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) may occur in response to altered hemodynamics (instead of being a bonafide CVM), we excluded four patients reported as having hemodynamically insignificant VSDs. Following these exclusions, conotruncal CVMs were found more commonly than in the general population (11 of 38, 29%, P < or = 0.025). In Group II, 9 of 30 (30%) had a CVM with no predominant type among the small number of cases reviewed. Among the atypical Fryns syndrome patients in Group III, half (6 of 12, 50%) had a CVM; most (4 of 6, 67%) were conotruncal, in particular, type B interrupted aortic arch (3 of 4). Patients with Fryns syndrome have a high rate of CVMs, warranting thorough cardiac evaluation including echocardiogram (fetal and/or postnatal) in all patients, similar to the evaluation for other patients with diaphragmatic hernia. The possible association between conotruncal CVMs and Fryns syndrome may provide

  12. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis: the skin as a clue to complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea D; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Ruggieri, Martino; Zollino, Marcella; Corsello, Giovanni; Neri, Giovanni

    2015-08-05

    Hypertrichosis is defined as an excessive growth in body hair beyond the normal variation compared with individuals of the same age, race and sex and affecting areas not predominantly androgen-dependent. The term hirsutism is usually referred to patients, mainly women, who show excessive hair growth with male pattern distribution.Hypertrichosis is classified according to age of onset (congenital or acquired), extent of distribution (generalized or circumscribed), site involved, and to whether the disorder is isolated or associated with other anomalies. Congenital hypertrichosis is rare and may be an isolated condition of the skin or a component feature of other disorders. Acquired hypertrichosis is more frequent and is secondary to a variety of causes including drug side effects, metabolic and endocrine disorders, cutaneous auto-inflammatory or infectious diseases, malnutrition and anorexia nervosa, and ovarian and adrenal neoplasms. In most cases, hypertrichosis is not an isolated symptom but is associated with other clinical signs including intellective delay, epilepsy or complex body malformations.A review of congenital generalized hypertrichosis is reported with particular attention given to the disorders where excessive diffuse body hair is a sign indicating the presence of complex malformation syndromes. The clinical course of a patient, previously described, with a 20-year follow-up is reported.

  13. Polysyndactyly, complex heart malformations cardiopathy, and hepatic ductal plate anomalies: an autosomal recessive syndrome diagnosed antenatally.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Gasser, B

    2003-06-01

    A distinct syndrome was ascertained in a 3-year-old girl and her brother. The proband was the first child of first cousin parents. She was born after an uneventful pregnancy. At birth, multiple congenital anomalies were noted: ptosis of the left eyelid, hypertelorism, anteverted nares, large fontanel, long philtrum, ungueal hypoplasia, polysyndactyly, single transverse crease, complex cardiopathy, and hepatic cysts. During another pregnancy of the mother, fetal ultrasonographic examination showed an hypertrophy of the right ventricle and atria, a dextroposition of the aorta, a bilateral renal pelvis dilatation, and a club foot. After termination of the pregnancy, necropsy showed facial anomalies, a small penis, a polysyndactyly, a ventricular septum defect, and a malformation of the ductal plate. Bonneau et al. [1983: J Genet Hum 2:93-105] described a family in which three sibs had a complex cardiac malformation, hexadactyly of the first toe, and syndactyly of the third and fourth fingers. Rajab [1997: Clin Dysmorphol 6:85-88] described two sibs with similar features in an Omani family. The sibs described in this report had anomalies of the ductal plate which were not reported in the two other families. These new findings are in favor of autosomal inheritance of this condition which is amenable to antenatal diagnosis.

  14. SCALP syndrome: sebaceous nevus syndrome, CNS malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus) with neurocutaneous melanosis: a distinct syndromic entity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Joseph; Dohil, Magdalene A; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Cunningham, Bari B

    2008-05-01

    Nevus sebaceus syndrome (SNS) is a constellation of nevus sebaceus with extracutaneous findings, including the ophthalmologic nervous, and musculoskeletal systems. Didymosis aplasticosebacea is a recently described entity consisting of aplasia cutis congenita and nevus sebaceus, implying twin spotting (didymosis). We describe a neonate with a nevus sebaceus on the scalp and a limbal dermoid on her left eye. Contiguous with the nevus sebaceus was a giant congenital melanocytic nevus and numerous areas of membranous aplasia cutis congenita. We propose the acronym SCALP (nevus sebaceus, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, pigmented nevus) to summarize the unique features of this case and review the two similar cases in the literature.

  15. Middle and inner ear malformations in mutation-proven branchio-oculo-facial (BOF) syndrome: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carter, Melissa T; Blaser, Susan; Papsin, Blake; Meschino, Wendy; Reardon, Willie; Klatt, Regan; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Milunsky, Jeff; Chitayat, David

    2012-08-01

    Hearing impairment is common in individuals with branchio-oculo-facial (BOF) syndrome. The majority of described individuals have conductive hearing impairment due to malformed ossicles and/or external canal stenosis or atresia, although a sensorineural component to the hearing impairment in BOF syndrome is increasingly being reported. Sophisticated computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone has revealed middle and inner ear malformations in three previous reports. We present middle and inner ear abnormalities in three additional individuals with mutation-proven BOF syndrome. We suggest that temporal bone CT imaging be included in the medical workup of a child with BOF syndrome, in order to guide management.

  16. Chiari type 1 malformation in an infant with type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome: further evidence of acquired pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Adrianna; Al-Hayek, Ali; Matic, Damir

    2010-03-01

    There seems to be an association between type 1 Chiari malformation (CM) and some congenital craniosynostosis syndromes. Type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome is a condition associated with premature fusion of multiple cranial sutures, cloverleaf skull (kleeblatschädel deformity), prominent ptosis, thumb and first toe abnormalities, variable syndactyly, and mutated genes for type 1 or 2 fibroblast growth factor receptor. These children generally do poorly because of significant often severe neurologic and cognitive defects, and many die very young. Roughly half of all patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and virtually all with type 2 disease, also have type 1 CM. Chiari malformation may not be congenital but acquired as a consequence of the skull deformities and other associated intracranial factors in patients with craniosynostosis. We report a term male infant with type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome, who was not noted to have any CM on initial brain imaging done at 2 months but in whom repeated imaging demonstrated clear evidence of CM by 4 months, despite reconstructive craniotomies and unilateral ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion. Posterior fossa decompression yielded a good result. This patient provides further evidence to support the concept of acquired tonsillar herniation in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes. The etiology seems multifactorial and related to (1) the disproportionately slow growth of the skull relative to the brain, particularly in the posterior fossa, secondary to early fusion of skull sutures, in turn secondary to congenital deficiencies in fibroblast growth factor receptors; (2) impaired venous sinus drainage; (3) hydrocephalus; and (4) resultant elevations in intracranial pressure.

  17. Syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur pied malformé (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Benbella, Imane; Khalki, Hanane; Lahmadi, Khalid; Kouara, Sara; Abbadi, Abderrahim; Er-rami, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de larva migrans cutanée est une dermite sous cutanée causée par des larves d'ankylostomes d'animaux en impasse parasitaire chez l'homme. L'infestation transcutanée est favorisée par le contact avec le sol contaminé par les larves du parasite. Nous rapportons le cas d'un nourrisson de 15 mois, originaire de Guinée-Bissau, atteint d'un syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur un pied malformé. Cette malformation sous forme d'une syndactylie associée à une tuméfaction du pied, était à l'origine d'un retard d'acquisition de la station debout. De même, on a rapporté une notion de pieds nus, vue la difficulté de chausser le pied malformé du patient. Tous ces facteurs auraient contribués à favoriser l'infestation du malade par les larves du nématode. PMID:27217876

  18. Tethered cord syndrome secondary to the unusual constellation of a split cord malformation, lumbar myelomeningocele, and coexisting neurenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Okechi, Humphrey; Albright, A Leland; Nzioka, Ancent

    2012-01-01

    We describe a seminal case report of a child with a tethered cord syndrome secondary to the unusual constellation of a split cord malformation, lumbar myelomeningocele, and coexisting neurenteric cyst. A 17-year-old adolescent girl with a several-month history of myelopathy and urinary incontinence was examined whose spinal MRI scan demonstrated a type II split cord malformation with a large bone spur and an intradural neurenteric cyst in addition to lumbar myelomeningocele. Untethering of the spinal cord was achieved via a lumbar laminectomy. Pathological examination confirmed the intradural cyst to be a neurenteric cyst. Postoperatively there was stabilization of the neurological symptoms. Prophylactic surgery with total resection of the neurenteric cyst when feasible and spinal cord un-tethering appears to be associated with excellent outcomes.

  19. Two novel POC1A mutations in the primordial dwarfism, SOFT syndrome: Clinical homogeneity but also unreported malformations.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Iván Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos; Salamanca, Luis; Belinchón, Alberta; López-González, Vanesa; Sentchordi-Montané, Lucía; del Pozo, Ángela; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Lapunzina, Pablo; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; González-Casado, Isabel; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Heath, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    Primordial dwarfism encompasses rare conditions characterized by severe intrauterine growth retardation and growth deficiency throughout life. Recently, three POC1A mutations have been reported in six families with the primordial dwarfism, SOFT syndrome (Short stature, Onychodysplasia, Facial dysmorphism, and hypoTrichosis). Using a custom-designed Next-generation sequencing skeletal dysplasia panel, we have identified two novel homozygous POC1A mutations in two individuals with primordial dwarfism. The severe growth retardation and the facial profiles are strikingly similar between our patients and those described previously. However, one of our patients was diagnosed with severe foramen magnum stenosis and subglottic tracheal stenosis, malformations not previously associated with this syndrome. Our findings confirm that POC1A mutations cause SOFT syndrome and that mutations in this gene should be considered in patients with severe pre- and postnatal short stature, symmetric shortening of long bones, triangular facies, sparse hair and short, thickened distal phalanges.

  20. Joubert's syndrome with retinal dysplasia: neonatal tachypnoea as the clue to a genetic brain-eye malformation.

    PubMed Central

    King, M D; Dudgeon, J; Stephenson, J B

    1984-01-01

    Five children with features of Joubert's syndrome and Leber's amaurosis are described. The presenting symptoms were panting tachypnoea in the newborn, prolonged apnoeic attacks in the neonatal period (in both of identical twins), global developmental delay, and failure to develop vision. Three children had multiple hemifacial spasms, such as have been seen in Joubert's syndrome, and the same three had cystic dysplasia of the kidneys. Necropsy confirmed the retinal and renal pathology, together with agenesis of the vermis and brainstem dysgenesis in the identical twins. It is concluded that a gene for Leber's amaurosis may commonly manifest itself as the specific hind brain malformation underlying Joubert's syndrome. In infants with respiratory irregularities (especially rapid panting), hemifacial spasms, or developmental delay, absence of the cerebellar vermis should be specifically sought by ultrasound and computed tomography, and the electroretinogram measured, whether or not impaired vision is clinically evident. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6476867

  1. Occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Moon, Seok-Whan; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Ki, Chang Seok

    2013-12-01

    An 8-year-old male presented with a cystic lung lesion in the left lower lobe, which was initially detected during surgery for a spontaneous rupture of the sigmoid colon at the age of 6 years. Tissue fragility and a tendency to bleed easily were noted during the surgery, which strongly suggested vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although there was no abnormality in the hemostasis screening test, or any suspicious hereditary problem in his pedigree, genetic gene testing for vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was recommended, and showed a de novo mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This report presents the case of patient with occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung, in addition to a duplicated infrarenal vena cava.

  2. Genetically diagnosed Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and familial cerebral cavernous malformations in the same individual: a case report.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, James; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2017-01-01

    When faced with an unusual clinical feature in a patient with a Mendelian disorder, the clinician may entertain the possibilities of either the feature representing a novel manifestation of that disorder or the co-existence of a different inherited condition. Here we describe an individual with a submandibular oncocytoma, pulmonary bullae and renal cysts as well as multiple cerebral cavernous malformations and haemangiomas. Genetic investigations revealed constitutional mutations in FLCN, associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) and CCM2, associated with familial cerebral cavernous malformation. Intracranial vascular pathologies (but not cerebral cavernous malformation) have recently been described in a number of individuals with BHD (Kapoor et al. in Fam Cancer 14:595-597, 10.1007/s10689-015-9807-y , 2015) but it is not yet clear whether they represent a genuine part of that conditions' phenotypic spectrum. We suggest that in such instances of potentially novel clinical features, more extensive genetic testing to consider co-existing conditions should be considered where available. The increased use of next generation sequencing applications in diagnostic settings is likely to lead more cases such as this being revealed.

  3. CHD7 deficiency in "Looper", a new mouse model of CHARGE syndrome, results in ossicle malformation, otosclerosis and hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Ogier, Jacqueline M; Carpinelli, Marina R; Arhatari, Benedicta D; Symons, R C Andrew; Kile, Benjamin T; Burt, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7). Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X) within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment.

  4. A FETAL RAT TESTIS ENDOCRINE AND GENOMIC "SIGNATURE"ACCURATELY PREDICTS THE PHTHALATE SYNDROME OF MALFORMATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Phthalate esters (PE) vary greatly in their potency to induce malformations during sexual differentiation in the male rat. Since in vitro assay batteries are currently unable to generate useful information on the potential of chemicals within this class to disrupt ...

  5. VACTERL/caudal regression/Currarino syndrome-like malformations in mice with mutation in the proprotein convertase Pcsk5

    PubMed Central

    Szumska, Dorota; Pieles, Guido; Essalmani, Rachid; Bilski, Michal; Mesnard, Daniel; Kaur, Kulvinder; Franklyn, Angela; El Omari, Kamel; Jefferis, Joanna; Bentham, Jamie; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Johnson, Paul; Tymowska-Lalanne, Zuzanna; Stammers, Dave; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Morris, Andrew; Brown, Steve D.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Constam, Daniel; Seidah, Nabil G.; Prat, Annik; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-induced recessive mouse mutation (Vcc) with a pleiotropic phenotype that includes cardiac, tracheoesophageal, anorectal, anteroposterior patterning defects, exomphalos, hindlimb hypoplasia, a presacral mass, renal and palatal agenesis, and pulmonary hypoplasia. It results from a C470R mutation in the proprotein convertase PCSK5 (PC5/6). Compound mutants (Pcsk5Vcc/null) completely recapitulate the Pcsk5Vcc/Vcc phenotype, as does an epiblast-specific conditional deletion of Pcsk5. The C470R mutation ablates a disulfide bond in the P domain, and blocks export from the endoplasmic reticulum and proprotein convertase activity. We show that GDF11 is cleaved and activated by PCSK5A, but not by PCSK5A-C470R, and that Gdf11-deficient embryos, in addition to having anteroposterior patterning defects and renal and palatal agenesis, also have a presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and exomphalos. Pcsk5 mutation results in abnormal expression of several paralogous Hox genes (Hoxa, Hoxc, and Hoxd), and of Mnx1 (Hlxb9). These include known Gdf11 targets, and are necessary for caudal embryo development. We identified nonsynonymous mutations in PCSK5 in patients with VACTERL (vertebral, anorectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, limb malformation OMIM 192350) and caudal regression syndrome, the phenotypic features of which resemble the mouse mutation. We propose that Pcsk5, at least in part via GDF11, coordinately regulates caudal Hox paralogs, to control anteroposterior patterning, nephrogenesis, skeletal, and anorectal development. PMID:18519639

  6. Fluctuating Kluver-Bucy syndrome in a child with epilepsy due to bilateral anterior temporal congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Pestana, Elia M; Gupta, Ajay

    2007-03-01

    An 11-year-old boy with epilepsy due to congenital bilateral anterior temporal lobe malformations presented with fluctuating Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS). Since the age of 2, he had experienced clusters of three or four daily complex partial seizures over 2-3 days in a month, followed by a seizure-free interval of 3-4 weeks. During the seizure-free period, the patient exhibited hyperorality, sniffing, irritability alternating with placidity, anxiety, unsolicited sexual gestures, and unusual calmness after eating. KBS features escalated up to the onset of the seizure cluster, and remitted after the seizures. Brain MRI revealed bilateral anterior temporal cortical dysplasia with enlarged and dysmorphic amygdalar-hippocampal complex. Brain [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography PET showed bilateral anterior and mesial temporal hypometabolism. Video/EEG monitoring revealed independent right and left temporal lobe seizures. This is the first reported case of KBS due to congenital bitemporal malformations. Also, KBS behavior phenotype in this patient fluctuated, with escalation during the seizure-free period and remission induced by the monthly seizure cluster. This fluctuating pattern could represent forced normalization.

  7. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome).

  8. An adolescent with 48,XXYY syndrome with hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder and renal malformations.

    PubMed

    Katulanda, Prasad; Rajapakse, J Rasika D K; Kariyawasam, Jayani; Jayasekara, Rohan; Dissanayake, Vajira H W

    2012-09-01

    48,XXYY is a rare sex chromosome aneuploidy affecting 1 in 18,000 to 50,000 male births. They present with developmental delay, hypogonadism, gynecomastia, intention tremors, and a spectrum of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. At one time this condition was considered a variant of Klinefelter syndrome. In clinically suspected cases, 48,XXYY syndrome can be diagnosed by chromosome culture and karyotyping. This patient presented with hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, and renal malformatons. Klinefelter syndrome was clinically suspected. The karyotype confirmed the diagnosis of 48,XXYY syndrome. This is the first reported case of 48,XXYY syndrome from Sri Lanka.

  9. Profound microcephaly, primordial dwarfism with developmental brain malformations: a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Saleem, Sahar N; Ahmed, Mahmoud K H; Issa, Mahmoud; Effat, Laila K; Kayed, Hisham F; Zaki, Maha S; Gaber, Khaled R

    2012-08-01

    We describe two sibs with a lethal form of profound congenital microcephaly, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, subtle skeletal changes, and poorly developed brain. The sibs had striking absent cranial vault with sloping of the forehead, large beaked nose, relatively large ears, and mandibular micro-retrognathia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extremely simplified gyral pattern, large interhemispheric cyst and agenesis of corpus callosum, abnormally shaped hippocampus, and proportionately affected cerebellum and brainstem. In addition, fundus examination showed foveal hypoplasia with optic nerve atrophy. No abnormalities of the internal organs were found. This profound form of microcephaly was identified at 17 weeks gestation by ultrasound and fetal brain MRI helped in characterizing the developmental brain malformations in the second sib. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as RNU4ATAC, SLC25A19, and ASPM. These clinical and imaging findings are unlike that of any recognized severe forms of microcephaly which is believed to be a new microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) with developmental brain malformations with most probably autosomal recessive inheritance based on consanguinity and similarly affected male and female sibs.

  10. The prune belly syndrome in a female foetus with urorectal septum malformation sequence: a case report on a rare entity with an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dibyajyoti; Kusre, Giriraj; Dutta, Hemonta Kumar; Sarma, Adity

    2013-08-01

    The prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly which is characterized by the triad of an absent or a deficient development of the abdominal muscle, bilateral cryptorchidism and an anomalous urinary tract. In its full form, this condition occurs only in males. However, a similar condition occurs in females in the absence of cryptorchidism. On the other hand, the urorectal septum malformation sequence is a lethal congenital malformation which is characterized by the development of a phallus like structure, a smooth perineum and the absence of urethral, vaginal and anal openings. We are reporting a case of a female foetus with the prune belly syndrome, which was associated with a urorectal septum malformation sequence. A dead foetus with a protruded abdomen and ambiguous genitalia, was born at 32 weeks of pregnancy. On autopsy, it was found to have female internal genital organs. The left kidney, the urinary bladder and the rectum were absent. The sigmoid colon, the ureters and the fallopian tubes opened into a common cloacal sac. The histopathological examination of the ovary showed the presence of Leydig's cells. The occurrence of the female counterpart of the prune belly syndrome is extremely rare and only few of such cases were found to be discussed in the details in the indexed English literature so far. Hence, we hope that this case report will contribute to the existing knowledge on the prune belly syndrome.

  11. Multiple congenital malformations in two sibs reminiscent of hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Dincsoy, M.Y.; Salih, M.A.M.; Al-Jurayyan, N.

    1995-04-10

    We report on two sibs, born to consanguineous parents, with defects of the midline including cleft lip and palate, flat nose, hypotelorism, and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, in addition to short limbs, radiolucent tibial notch, digital anomalies, ambiguous genitalia, and hypopituitarism. In spite of the similarities between this condition and the hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes, our patients had neither preaxial nor postaxial polydactyly, but had previously undescribed bilateral radiolucent tibial notch, which is not known to be part of those two syndromes. The cases presented here may very well represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Pulmonary arterovenous malformation causing hemothorax in a pregnant woman without Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Napolitano, Filomena; Vatrella, Alessandro; Zeppa, Pio; Laperuta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), although most commonly congenital, are usually detected later in life. Case report: We present a case of a 19-year-old woman with no previous history of AVM or telangiectasia, who presented dyspnea and hypoxia by massive left hemothorax in the 34th week of gestation. After emergent cesarean delivery, a chest computed tomography (CT) with i.v. contrast showed a likely 3 cm area of active contrast in left lower lung. Chest tube placement revealed about 2 liters of blood. The patient was subsequently found to have pulmonary AVM. A successful embolisation of AVM followed by lung atipic resection involving AVM and decortication for lung re-expansion were the treatments provided. Conclusions: Women with known pulmonary AVM should be maximally treated prior to becoming pregnant, and the physician should be alert to complications of pulmonary AVM during pregnancy. PMID:28352753

  13. Sibs with the fetal akinesia sequence, fetal edema, and malformations: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Toriello, H V; Bauserman, S C; Higgins, J V

    1985-06-01

    Pena and Shokeir [J Pediatr 85:373-375. 1974] first described a syndrome characterized by multiple ankyloses, camptodactyly, facial anomalies, and pulmonary hypoplasia, which was later termed Pena-Shokeir I syndrome. Recent evidence suggests that a more accurate designation for this condition is the fetal akinesia sequence, which is almost certainly a heterogeneous entity. We describe sibs who were diagnosed as having Pena-Shokeir I syndrome but who did not have the muscular or anterior horn cell changes characteristic of other infants with the fetal akinesia sequence. In addition, both sibs had fetal edema, the first sib had coarctation of the aorta, and the second had polydactyly and thyroid hypoplasia. We suggest that this case provides further evidence for heterogeneity in the fetal akinesia sequence and may represent a provisionally unique syndrome.

  14. Craniospinal Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia, Aneurysmal Bone Cysts, and Chiari Type 1 Malformation Coexistence in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urgun, Kamran; Yılmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Konya, Deniz; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kılıç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are defined as benign cystic lesions of bone composed of blood-filled spaces. ABCs may be a secondary pathology superimposed on fibrous dysplasia (FD). Concomitant FD and ABC in relation with McCune-Albright syndrome is an extremely rare condition. Here, we report concomitant, double ABCs in bilateral occipital regions and FD from the skull base to the C2 vertebra with Chiari type 1 malformation. A 14-year-old female with a diagnosis of McCune-Albright syndrome presented with swellings at the back of her head. The lesions were consistent with ABCs and were totally resected with reconstruction of the calvarial defects. The coexistence of FD, bilateral occipital ABCs, and Chiari malformation type 1 in a McCune-Albright patient is an extremely rare condition and, to our knowledge, has not been reported to date. Exact diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment usually lead to a good outcome.

  15. Disorders of Transcriptional Regulation: An Emerging Category of Multiple Malformation Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Some genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the transcriptional machinery as well as proteins involved in epigenetic modification of the genome share many overlapping features, such as facial dysmorphisms, growth problems and developmental delay/intellectual disability. As a basis for some shared phenotypic characteristics in these syndromes, a similar transcriptome disturbance, characterized by global transcriptional dysregulation, is believed to play a major role. In this review article, a general overview of gene transcription is provided, and the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying some disorders of transcriptional regulation, such as Rubinstein- Taybi, Coffin-Siris, Cornelia de Lange, and CHOPS syndromes, are discussed. PMID:27867341

  16. Dlx5 Homeodomain: DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome

    DOE PAGES

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; ...

    2016-01-29

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1;more » this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes.« less

  17. Dlx5 Homeodomain: DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J.; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-29

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1; this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes.

  18. Femoral-facial syndrome with malformations in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leal, Evelia; Macías-Gómez, Nelly; Rodríguez, Lisa; Mercado, F Miguel; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2003-01-01

    The femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FFS) is a very rare association of femoral and facial abnormalities. Maternal diabetes mellitus has been mainly involved as the causal agent. We report the second case of FFS with anomalies in the central nervous system (CNS) including corticosubcortical atrophy, colpocephaly, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri and absent septum pellucidum. The psychomotor development has been normal. We propose that the CNS defects observed in these patients are part of the spectrum of abnormalities in the FFS.

  19. Mutations in ANKRD11 cause KBG syndrome, characterized by intellectual disability, skeletal malformations, and macrodontia.

    PubMed

    Sirmaci, Asli; Spiliopoulos, Michail; Brancati, Francesco; Powell, Eric; Duman, Duygu; Abrams, Alex; Bademci, Guney; Agolini, Emanuele; Guo, Shengru; Konuk, Berrin; Kavaz, Asli; Blanton, Susan; Digilio, Maria Christina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Young, Juan; Zuchner, Stephan; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-08-12

    KBG syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability associated with macrodontia of the upper central incisors as well as distinct craniofacial findings, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Although believed to be genetic in origin, the specific underlying defect is unknown. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified deleterious heterozygous mutations in ANKRD11 encoding ankyrin repeat domain 11, also known as ankyrin repeat-containing cofactor 1. A splice-site mutation, c.7570-1G>C (p.Glu2524_Lys2525del), cosegregated with the disease in a family with three affected members, whereas in a simplex case a de novo truncating mutation, c.2305delT (p.Ser769GlnfsX8), was detected. Sanger sequencing revealed additional de novo truncating ANKRD11 mutations in three other simplex cases. ANKRD11 is known to interact with nuclear receptor complexes to modify transcriptional activation. We demonstrated that ANKRD11 localizes mainly to the nuclei of neurons and accumulates in discrete inclusions when neurons are depolarized, suggesting that it plays a role in neural plasticity. Our results demonstrate that mutations in ANKRD11 cause KBG syndrome and outline a fundamental role of ANKRD11 in craniofacial, dental, skeletal, and central nervous system development and function.

  20. Mutations in ANKRD11 Cause KBG Syndrome, Characterized by Intellectual Disability, Skeletal Malformations, and Macrodontia

    PubMed Central

    Sirmaci, Asli; Spiliopoulos, Michail; Brancati, Francesco; Powell, Eric; Duman, Duygu; Abrams, Alex; Bademci, Guney; Agolini, Emanuele; Guo, Shengru; Konuk, Berrin; Kavaz, Asli; Blanton, Susan; Digilio, Maria Christina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Young, Juan; Zuchner, Stephan; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    KBG syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability associated with macrodontia of the upper central incisors as well as distinct craniofacial findings, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Although believed to be genetic in origin, the specific underlying defect is unknown. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified deleterious heterozygous mutations in ANKRD11 encoding ankyrin repeat domain 11, also known as ankyrin repeat-containing cofactor 1. A splice-site mutation, c.7570-1G>C (p.Glu2524_Lys2525del), cosegregated with the disease in a family with three affected members, whereas in a simplex case a de novo truncating mutation, c.2305delT (p.Ser769GlnfsX8), was detected. Sanger sequencing revealed additional de novo truncating ANKRD11 mutations in three other simplex cases. ANKRD11 is known to interact with nuclear receptor complexes to modify transcriptional activation. We demonstrated that ANKRD11 localizes mainly to the nuclei of neurons and accumulates in discrete inclusions when neurons are depolarized, suggesting that it plays a role in neural plasticity. Our results demonstrate that mutations in ANKRD11 cause KBG syndrome and outline a fundamental role of ANKRD11 in craniofacial, dental, skeletal, and central nervous system development and function. PMID:21782149

  1. Combined ultrasound and exome sequencing approach recognizes Opitz G/BBB syndrome in two malformed fetuses.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Anna Maria; Imperatore, Valentina; Bianciardi, Laura; Baldassarri, Margherita; Galluzzi, Paolo; Furini, Simone; Centini, Giovanni; Renieri, Alessandra; Mari, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are the most common congenital craniofacial anomalies and can occur as an isolated defect or be associated with other anomalies such as posterior fossa anomalies as a part of several genetic syndromes. We report two consecutive voluntary pregnancy interruptions in a nonconsanguineous couple following the fetal ultrasound finding of cleft lip and palate and posterior fossa anomalies confirmed by means of post-termination examination on the second fetus. The quantitative fluorescent PCR, the karyotype, and the comparative genomic hybridization-array analysis after amniocentesis were normal. Exome sequencing on abortive material from both fetuses detected a missense mutation in MID1, resulting in a clinical diagnosis of Opitz G/BBB syndrome. The same mutation was found in the mother and in her brother, who both revealed cerebellar anomalies at an MRI examination. Our study supports the efficacy of exome sequencing in the presence of both a family history suggestive of an inherited disorder and well-documented ultrasound findings. It reveals the importance of a synergistic effort between gynecologists and geneticists aimed at the integration of the most sophisticated ultrasound techniques with the next-generation sequencing tools to provide a definite diagnosis essential to orient the final decision and to estimate a proper recurrence risk.

  2. Focal dermal hypoplasia: report of a case with myelomeningocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus with a review of neurologic manifestations of Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tess; Perrier, Renee; Haber, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 305600) is a rare X-linked dominant congenital disorder involving defects of mesodermal- and ectodermal-derived structures. It is associated with mutations in the PORCN gene, a regulator of Wnt signaling proteins. The phenotype is highly variable, although all describe characteristic skin findings as a primary diagnostic feature. To date there are few case reports of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with central nervous system abnormalities. We report the second case of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with myelomenigocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus and the first in a male. Genetic testing identified a novel mosaic three base pair deletion within the PORCN gene (c.853_855delACG). This case highlights the importance of neurological evaluation in focal dermal hypoplasia and consideration of other syndromes more commonly associated with central nervous system abnormalities. In this report we summarize the literature on neurological manifestations in Goltz syndrome.

  3. Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Houssein A; Oldfield, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the circumstances of a patient with a cauda equina syndrome due to the development of a lumbar subdural CSF collection with ventral displacement of the cauda equina shortly following posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). This unusual, but clinically significant, complication was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage of the extraarachnoid CSF collection. Although there are a few cases of intracranial subdural hygroma developing after surgery for CM-I, often attributed to a pinhole opening in the arachnoid, as far as the authors can determine, a spinal subdural hygroma associated with surgery for CM-I has not been recognized.

  4. Cadaveric liver transplantation in biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome with the absence of retrohepatic inferior vena cava, preduodenal portal vein, and intestinal malrotation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sen-Oran, E; Yankol, Y; Tuzun, B; Kocak, B; Kanmaz, T; Acarli, K; Kalayoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old female infant with biliary atresia underwent cadaveric liver transplantation due to progressive cholestatic hepatitis following a Kasai operation. She had biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome (BASM) composed of an absent retrohepatic inferior vena cava with an azygous connection, preduodenal portal vein, polysplenia, and intestinal malrotation. A portal vein thrombosis developed on the 4th postoperative day requiring immediate treatment by thrombectomy. The patient is well with normal liver function at 3 months follow-up. Although BASM may render the transplantation more difficult, the presence of BASM is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation.

  5. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  6. CHD7 Deficiency in “Looper”, a New Mouse Model of CHARGE Syndrome, Results in Ossicle Malformation, Otosclerosis and Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, Jacqueline M.; Carpinelli, Marina R.; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Symons, R. C. Andrew; Kile, Benjamin T.; Burt, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7). Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X) within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment. PMID:24840056

  7. Endothelial Neuropilin Disruption in Mice Causes DiGeorge Syndrome-Like Malformations via Mechanisms Distinct to Those Caused by Loss of Tbx1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingjing; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sucov, Henry M.

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of human congenital malformations known as DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is replicated in mice by mutation of Tbx1. Vegfa has been proposed as a modifier of DGS, based in part on the occurrence of comparable phenotypes in Tbx1 and Vegfa mutant mice. Many additional genes have been shown to cause DGS-like phenotypes in mice when mutated; these generally intersect in some manner with Tbx1, and therefore impact the same developmental processes in which Tbx1 itself is involved. In this study, using Tie2Cre, we show that endothelial-specific mutation of the gene encoding the VEGFA coreceptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) also replicates the most prominent terminal phenotypes that typify DGS. However, the developmental etiologies of these defects are fundamentally different from those caused by absence of TBX1. In Tie2Cre/Nrp1 mutants, initial pharyngeal organization is normal but subsequent pharyngeal organ growth is impaired, second heart field differentiation is normal but cardiac outflow tract cushion organization is distorted, neural crest cell migration is normal, and palatal mesenchyme proliferation is impaired with no change in apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that impairment of VEGF-dependent endothelial pathways leads to a spectrum of DiGeorge syndrome-type malformations, through processes that are distinguishable from those controlled by Tbx1. PMID:22396765

  8. Endothelial neuropilin disruption in mice causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations via mechanisms distinct to those caused by loss of Tbx1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingjing; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sucov, Henry M

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of human congenital malformations known as DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is replicated in mice by mutation of Tbx1. Vegfa has been proposed as a modifier of DGS, based in part on the occurrence of comparable phenotypes in Tbx1 and Vegfa mutant mice. Many additional genes have been shown to cause DGS-like phenotypes in mice when mutated; these generally intersect in some manner with Tbx1, and therefore impact the same developmental processes in which Tbx1 itself is involved. In this study, using Tie2Cre, we show that endothelial-specific mutation of the gene encoding the VEGFA coreceptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) also replicates the most prominent terminal phenotypes that typify DGS. However, the developmental etiologies of these defects are fundamentally different from those caused by absence of TBX1. In Tie2Cre/Nrp1 mutants, initial pharyngeal organization is normal but subsequent pharyngeal organ growth is impaired, second heart field differentiation is normal but cardiac outflow tract cushion organization is distorted, neural crest cell migration is normal, and palatal mesenchyme proliferation is impaired with no change in apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that impairment of VEGF-dependent endothelial pathways leads to a spectrum of DiGeorge syndrome-type malformations, through processes that are distinguishable from those controlled by Tbx1.

  9. Germline PTPN11 and somatic PIK3CA variant in a boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP)--pure coincidence?

    PubMed

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Spaich, Christiane; Gabriel, Heinz-Dieter; Zenker, Martin; Bartholdi, Deborah; Biskup, Saskia

    2015-03-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome that is diagnosed by clinical criteria. Recently, somatic and germline variants in genes that are involved in the PI3K-AKT pathway (AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA) have been described to be associated with MCAP and/or other related megalencephaly syndromes. We performed trio-exome sequencing in a 6-year-old boy and his healthy parents. Clinical features were macrocephaly, cutis marmorata, angiomata, asymmetric overgrowth, developmental delay, discrete midline facial nevus flammeus, toe syndactyly and postaxial polydactyly--thus, clearly an MCAP phenotype. Exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic de novo germline variant in the PTPN11 gene (c.1529A>G; p.(Gln510Arg)), which has so far been associated with Noonan, as well as LEOPARD syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing (>100 × coverage) did not reveal any alteration in the known megalencephaly genes. However, ultra-deep sequencing results from saliva (>1000 × coverage) revealed a 22% mosaic variant in PIK3CA (c.2740G>A; p.(Gly914Arg)). To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a PTPN11 germline variant in an MCAP patient. Data from experimental studies show a complex interaction of SHP2 (gene product of PTPN11) and the PI3K-AKT pathway. We hypothesize that certain PTPN11 germline variants might drive toward additional second-hit alterations.

  10. Germline PTPN11 and somatic PIK3CA variant in a boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP) - pure coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Spaich, Christiane; Gabriel, Heinz-Dieter; Zenker, Martin; Bartholdi, Deborah; Biskup, Saskia

    2015-01-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome that is diagnosed by clinical criteria. Recently, somatic and germline variants in genes that are involved in the PI3K-AKT pathway (AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA) have been described to be associated with MCAP and/or other related megalencephaly syndromes. We performed trio-exome sequencing in a 6-year-old boy and his healthy parents. Clinical features were macrocephaly, cutis marmorata, angiomata, asymmetric overgrowth, developmental delay, discrete midline facial nevus flammeus, toe syndactyly and postaxial polydactyly—thus, clearly an MCAP phenotype. Exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic de novo germline variant in the PTPN11 gene (c.1529A>G; p.(Gln510Arg)), which has so far been associated with Noonan, as well as LEOPARD syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing (>100 × coverage) did not reveal any alteration in the known megalencephaly genes. However, ultra-deep sequencing results from saliva (>1000 × coverage) revealed a 22% mosaic variant in PIK3CA (c.2740G>A; p.(Gly914Arg)). To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a PTPN11 germline variant in an MCAP patient. Data from experimental studies show a complex interaction of SHP2 (gene product of PTPN11) and the PI3K-AKT pathway. We hypothesize that certain PTPN11 germline variants might drive toward additional second-hit alterations. PMID:24939587

  11. Severe intellectual disability, West syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, and syndactyly in a patient with partial tetrasomy 17q25.3.

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Karl; Stadler, Anja; Schallner, Jens; Franke, Kathlen; Gerlach, Eva-Maria; Schrock, Evelin; Rump, Andreas; Fauth, Christine; Tinschert, Sigrid; Oexle, Konrad

    2013-12-01

    We report on a de novo 0.5 Mb triplication (partial tetrasomy) of chromosome 17q25.3 in a 10-year-old girl with severe intellectual disability, infantile seizures (West syndrome), moderate hearing loss, Dandy-Walker malformation, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism, striking cutaneous syndactyly (hands 3-4, feet 2-3), joint laxity, and short stature. The triplication resulted from the unusual combination of a terminal duplication at 17qter and a cryptic translocation of an extra copy of the same segment onto chromosome 10qter. The breakpoint at 17q25.3 was located within the FOXK2 gene. SNP chip analysis suggested that the rearrangement occurred during paternal meiosis involving both paternal chromosomes 17.

  12. Glomuvenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Henning, J Scott; Kovich, Olympia I; Schaffer, Julie V

    2007-01-27

    A 9-year-old girl presented with a congenital, blue-purple, partially compressible plaque with a cobblestone surface on the left lateral foot and ankle. Similar, solitary, blue nodules later appeared elsewhere on the extremities. The lesions were tender to palpation and were associated with spontaneous paroxysms of pain and paresthesias. Histopathologic evaluation of a skin biopsy specimen showed rows of glomus cells that surrounded thin-walled vascular channels, which confirmed the diagnosis of glomuvenous malformations. This autosomal dominant condition, which is due to mutations in the GLMN gene, presents with clinical findings that are distinct from those of familial, multiple, cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. Treatment options include excision, sclerotherapy, and laser therapy (ablative or pulsed dye).

  13. Dandy-Walker malformation and Wisconsin syndrome: novel cases add further insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of 3q23q25 deletions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is one of the commonest congenital cerebellar defects, and can be associated with multiple congenital anomalies and chromosomal syndromes. The occurrence of overlapping 3q deletions including the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes in few patients, along with data from mouse models, have implicated both genes in the pathogenesis of DWM. Methods and results Using a SNP-array approach, we recently identified three novel patients carrying heterozygous 3q deletions encompassing ZIC1 and ZIC4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that only two had a typical DWM, while the third did not present any defect of the DWM spectrum. SNP-array analysis in further eleven children diagnosed with DWM failed to identify deletions of ZIC1-ZIC4. The clinical phenotype of the three 3q deleted patients included multiple congenital anomalies and peculiar facial appearance, related to the localization and extension of each deletion. In particular, phenotypes resulted from the variable combination of three recognizable patterns: DWM (with incomplete penetrance); blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome; and Wisconsin syndrome (WS), recently mapped to 3q. Conclusions Our data indicate that the 3q deletion is a rare defect associated with DWM, and suggest that the hemizygosity of ZIC1-ZIC4 genes is neither necessary nor sufficient per se to cause this condition. Furthermore, based on a detailed comparison of clinical features and molecular data from 3q deleted patients, we propose clinical diagnostic criteria and refine the critical region for WS. PMID:23679990

  14. Loss of Wnt5a disrupts second heart field cell deployment and may contribute to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Tanvi; Li, Ding; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Hutson, Mary R.; Kelly, Robert G.; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Outflow tract (OFT) malformation accounts for ∼30% of human congenital heart defects and manifests frequently in TBX1 haplo-insufficiency associated DiGeorge (22q11.2 deletion) syndrome. OFT myocardium originates from second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the pharyngeal and splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), but how these progenitors are deployed to the OFT is unclear. We find that SHF progenitors in the SpM gradually gain epithelial character and are deployed to the OFT as a cohesive sheet. Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, is expressed specifically in the caudal SpM and may regulate oriented cell intercalation to incorporate SHF progenitors into an epithelial-like sheet, thereby generating the pushing force to deploy SHF cells rostrally into the OFT. Using enhancer trap and Cre transgenes, our lineage tracing experiments show that in Wnt5a null mice, SHF progenitors are trapped in the SpM and fail to be deployed to the OFT efficiently, resulting in a reduction in the inferior OFT myocardial wall and its derivative, subpulmonary myocardium. Concomitantly, the superior OFT and subaortic myocardium are expanded. Finally, in chick embryos, blocking the Wnt5a function in the caudal SpM perturbs polarized elongation of SHF progenitors, and compromises their deployment to the OFT. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for Wnt5a in deploying SHF progenitors from the SpM to the OFT. Given that Wnt5a is a putative transcriptional target of Tbx1, and the similar reduction of subpulmonary myocardium in Tbx1 mutant mice, our results suggest that perturbing Wnt5a-mediated SHF deployment may be an important pathogenic mechanism contributing to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. PMID:25410658

  15. Loss of Wnt5a disrupts second heart field cell deployment and may contribute to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Tanvi; Li, Ding; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Hutson, Mary R; Kelly, Robert G; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-03-15

    Outflow tract (OFT) malformation accounts for ∼30% of human congenital heart defects and manifests frequently in TBX1 haplo-insufficiency associated DiGeorge (22q11.2 deletion) syndrome. OFT myocardium originates from second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the pharyngeal and splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), but how these progenitors are deployed to the OFT is unclear. We find that SHF progenitors in the SpM gradually gain epithelial character and are deployed to the OFT as a cohesive sheet. Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, is expressed specifically in the caudal SpM and may regulate oriented cell intercalation to incorporate SHF progenitors into an epithelial-like sheet, thereby generating the pushing force to deploy SHF cells rostrally into the OFT. Using enhancer trap and Cre transgenes, our lineage tracing experiments show that in Wnt5a null mice, SHF progenitors are trapped in the SpM and fail to be deployed to the OFT efficiently, resulting in a reduction in the inferior OFT myocardial wall and its derivative, subpulmonary myocardium. Concomitantly, the superior OFT and subaortic myocardium are expanded. Finally, in chick embryos, blocking the Wnt5a function in the caudal SpM perturbs polarized elongation of SHF progenitors, and compromises their deployment to the OFT. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for Wnt5a in deploying SHF progenitors from the SpM to the OFT. Given that Wnt5a is a putative transcriptional target of Tbx1, and the similar reduction of subpulmonary myocardium in Tbx1 mutant mice, our results suggest that perturbing Wnt5a-mediated SHF deployment may be an important pathogenic mechanism contributing to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome.

  16. Polysplenia with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Papagiannis, J; Kanter, R J; Effman, E L; Pratt, P C; Marcille, R; Browning, I B; Armstrong, B E

    1993-03-01

    A patient with polysplenia syndrome, dextrocardia, left atrial isomerism, normal great vessel relationships, and no intracardiac shunts developed progressive cyanosis and clubbing. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) were diagnosed by angiography and confirmed by lung biopsy. Superior mesenteric arteriogram revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal vein branches and a portosystemic shunt. The possible etiologies of PAVMs are discussed.

  17. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used.

  18. A Rare Case of Acroangiodermatitis Associated with a Congenital Arteriovenous Malformation (Stewart-Bluefarb Syndrome) in a Young Veteran: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Archie, Mark; Khademi, Saieh; Aungst, David; Nouvong, Aksone; Freeman, Shanna; Gelabert, Hugh; Rigberg, David; deVirgilio, Christian; Lewis, Michael; O'Connell, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AD) is a rare angioproliferative disease manifesting with cutaneous lesions clinically similar to Kaposi's sarcoma. AD is a benign hyperplasia of preexisting vasculature and may be associated with acquired or congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVM), or severe chronic venous insufficiency (because of hypostasis, elevated venous pressure, arteriovenous shunting). Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome is the rare syndrome in which AD is associated with a congenital AVM. We present the case of a young veteran with a painful, chronic nonhealing ulcer and ipsilateral popliteal artery occlusion likely because of trauma, who elected transmetatarsal amputation for symptomatic relief. A 24-year-old male veteran presented with a 5-year history of a nonhealing dorsal left foot ulcer, resulting from a training exercise injury. He ultimately developed osteomyelitis requiring antibiotics, frequent debridements, multiple trials of unsuccessful skin substitute grafting, and severe unremitting pain. He noted a remote history of left digital deformities treated surgically as a child, and an AVM, previously endovascularly treated at an outside facility. Arterial duplex revealed somewhat dampened left popliteal, posterior tibial (PT), and dorsalis pedis (DP) artery signals with arterial brachial index of 1.0. CT angiography showed occlusion of the proximal to mid popliteal artery with significant calcifications felt initially to be a result of prior trauma. Pedal pulses were palpable and transcutaneous oxygen measurements revealed adequate oxygenation. Because of unremitting pain, the patient opted for amputation. Pathology revealed vascular proliferation consistent with AD. This case illustrates an unusual diagnosis of acroangiodermatitis, and a rare syndrome when associated with his underlying AVM (Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome). This resulted in a painful, chronic ulcer and was further complicated by trauma-related arterial occlusive disease. AD disease can hinder wound

  19. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  20. Dlx5 homedomain/DNA complex; Structure, binding and effect of mutations related to split-hand and foot malformation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1; this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes. PMID:26829219

  1. Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Anorectal malformations comprise a wide spectrum of diseases, which can affect boys and girls, and involve the distal anus and rectum as well as the urinary and genital tracts. They occur in approximately 1 in 5000 live births. Defects range from the very minor and easily treated with an excellent functional prognosis, to those that are complex, difficult to manage, are often associated with other anomalies, and have a poor functional prognosis. The surgical approach to repairing these defects changed dramatically in 1980 with the introduction of the posterior sagittal approach, which allowed surgeons to view the anatomy of these defects clearly, to repair them under direct vision, and to learn about the complex anatomic arrangement of the junction of rectum and genitourinary tract. Better imaging techniques, and a better knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the pelvic structures at birth have refined diagnosis and initial management, and the analysis of large series of patients allows better prediction of associated anomalies and functional prognosis. The main concerns for the surgeon in correcting these anomalies are bowel control, urinary control, and sexual function. With early diagnosis, management of associated anomalies and efficient meticulous surgical repair, patients have the best chance for a good functional outcome. Fecal and urinary incontinence can occur even with an excellent anatomic repair, due mainly to associated problems such as a poorly developed sacrum, deficient nerve supply, and spinal cord anomalies. For these patients, an effective bowel management program, including enema and dietary restrictions has been devised to improve their quality of life. PMID:17651510

  2. Genetic causes of vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka

    2007-10-15

    Vascular malformations are localized defects of vascular development. They usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. Although most malformations are sporadic, inheritance is observed, enabling genetic analysis. Usually, sporadic forms present with a single lesion whereas multiple lesions are observed in familial cases. The last decade has seen unraveling of several causative genes and beginning of elucidation of the pathophysiological pathways involved in the inherited forms. In parallel, definition of the clinical phenotypes has improved and disorders such as Parkes-Weber syndrome (PKWS), first thought to be sporadic, is now known to be part of a more common inheritable phenotype. In addition, the concept of double-hit mechanism that we proposed earlier to explain the incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and multifocality of lesions in inherited venous anomalies is now becoming confirmed, as some somatic mutations have been identified in venous, glomuvenous and cerebral cavernous malformations. It is thus tempting to suggest that familial forms of vascular malformations follow paradominant inheritance and that sporadic forms, the etiopathogenic causes of which are still unelucidated, are caused by somatic mutations in the same genes.

  3. Stratified whole genome linkage analysis of Chiari type I malformation implicates known Klippel-Feil syndrome genes as putative disease candidates.

    PubMed

    Markunas, Christina A; Soldano, Karen; Dunlap, Kaitlyn; Cope, Heidi; Asiimwe, Edgar; Stajich, Jeffrey; Enterline, David; Grant, Gerald; Fuchs, Herbert; Gregory, Simon G; Ashley-Koch, Allison E

    2013-01-01

    Chiari Type I Malformation (CMI) is characterized by displacement of the cerebellar tonsils below the base of the skull, resulting in significant neurologic morbidity. Although multiple lines of evidence support a genetic contribution to disease, no genes have been identified. We therefore conducted the largest whole genome linkage screen to date using 367 individuals from 66 families with at least two individuals presenting with nonsyndromic CMI with or without syringomyelia. Initial findings across all 66 families showed minimal evidence for linkage due to suspected genetic heterogeneity. In order to improve power to localize susceptibility genes, stratified linkage analyses were performed using clinical criteria to differentiate families based on etiologic factors. Families were stratified on the presence or absence of clinical features associated with connective tissue disorders (CTDs) since CMI and CTDs frequently co-occur and it has been proposed that CMI patients with CTDs represent a distinct class of patients with a different underlying disease mechanism. Stratified linkage analyses resulted in a marked increase in evidence of linkage to multiple genomic regions consistent with reduced genetic heterogeneity. Of particular interest were two regions (Chr8, Max LOD = 3.04; Chr12, Max LOD = 2.09) identified within the subset of "CTD-negative" families, both of which harbor growth differentiation factors (GDF6, GDF3) implicated in the development of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). Interestingly, roughly 3-5% of CMI patients are diagnosed with KFS. In order to investigate the possibility that CMI and KFS are allelic, GDF3 and GDF6 were sequenced leading to the identification of a previously known KFS missense mutation and potential regulatory variants in GDF6. This study has demonstrated the value of reducing genetic heterogeneity by clinical stratification implicating several convincing biological candidates and further supporting the hypothesis that

  4. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations.

    PubMed

    Escot, Sophie; Blavet, Cédrine; Faure, Emilie; Zaffran, Stéphane; Duband, Jean-Loup; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-02-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology.

  5. Disruption of Mks1 localization to the mother centriole causes cilia defects and developmental malformations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Francis, Deanne; Yu, Qing; SanAgustin, Jovenal T; Francis, Richard; Tansey, Terry; Henry, Charisse; Wang, Baolin; Lemley, Bethan; Pazour, Gregory J; Lo, Cecilia W

    2011-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a recessive disorder resulting in multiple birth defects that are associated with mutations affecting ciliogenesis. We recovered a mouse mutant with a mutation in the Mks1 gene (Mks1(del64-323)) that caused a 260-amino-acid deletion spanning nine amino acids in the B9 domain, a protein motif with unknown function conserved in two other basal body proteins. We showed that, in wild-type cells, Mks1 was localized to the mother centriole from which the cilium was generated. However, in mutant Mks1(del64-323) cells, Mks1 was not localized to the centriole, even though it maintained a punctate distribution. Resembling MKS patients, Mks1 mutants had craniofacial defects, polydactyly, congenital heart defects, polycystic kidneys and randomized left-right patterning. These defects reflected disturbance of functions subserved by motile and non-motile cilia. In the kidney, glomerular and tubule cysts were observed along with short cilia, and cilia were reduced in number to a near-complete loss. Underlying the left-right patterning defects were fewer and shorter nodal cilia, and analysis with fluorescent beads showed no directional flow at the embryonic node. In the cochlea, the stereocilia were mal-patterned, with the kinocilia being abnormally positioned. Together, these defects suggested disruption of planar cell polarity, which is known to regulate node, kidney and cochlea development. In addition, we also showed that Shh signaling was disrupted. Thus, in the neural tube, the floor plate was not specified posteriorly even as expression of the Shh mediator Gli2 increased. By contrast, the Shh signaling domain was expanded in the anterior neural tube and anterior limb bud, consistent with reduced Gli3-repressor (Gli3R) function. The latter probably accounted for the preaxial digit duplication exhibited by the Mks1(del64-323) mutants. Overall, these findings indicate that centriole localization of Mks1 is required for ciliogenesis of motile and

  6. ALOBAR HOLOPROSENCEPHALY, CLEFT LIP/PALATE, URORECTAL SEPTUM MALFORMATION SEQUENCE AND CONGENITAL PERINEAL HERNIA IN A FETUS.

    PubMed

    Girisha, K M; Nayak, S S; Shukla, A; Bhat, S K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a fetus with alobar holoprosencephaly, complete cleft lip and palate, urorectal septum malformation sequence and perineal hernia. To our knowledge this appears to be a novel fetal malformation syndrome.

  7. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  8. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  9. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected.

  10. [Diagnosis and management of Mondini malformation].

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Fang, Y; Yang, S

    1997-02-01

    Owing to the development of imaging technology and audiology, some of the sensorineural hearing loss cases that were previcusly considered to be of unknown cause have been found to be inner ear malformation. Five cases of Mondini malformation are reviewed in this paper. CSF otorhinorrhea occurred in four cases, Klippel-Feil syndrome in three, and concurrent otosclerosis in one patient. In discussion, the authors point out that: 1) CT scanning is an supplement to audiologic tests for such patients; 2) perilymph fistula in Mondini malformation is often found at the oval window and its vicinity, the foot plate and the round window; 3) the fistula can be treated by plugging with fascial tissue via tympanoplastic approach with endaural incision. The mucosa around the fistula should be stripped away and the plugging tissue should be of dumb-bell shape.

  11. Pediatric neuroanesthesia. Arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Newfield, P; Hamid, R K

    2001-06-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations can occur singly, multiply, and in conjunction with aneurysms and denovo, family, or in conjunction with connective-tissue disorders. Intracranial hemorrhage is the most common presentation, occurring in 20% to 50% of cases. In children, seizures are the second most common presentation occurring in 15% to 20% of cases. The modalities available treatment of arteriovenous malformations are microsurgery, embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery with heavy particles, alpha knife, or linear accelerator. Induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia are designed to prevent rupture of arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm and to improve intracranial compliance in the presence of an intracranial hematoma, during both diagnostic (CT, MR scanning) and therapeutic procedures.

  12. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-09-24

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered.

  13. [Venous malformations: clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Casanova, D; Boon, L-M; Vikkula, M

    2006-01-01

    Venous malformations (VM) are localized defects of blood vessels that are due to vascular dysmorphogenesis. These slow-flow lesions can affect any tissue or organ. Clinically, a cutaneous VM is characterized by a bluish mass that is compressible on palpation. Phleboliths are commonly present. Symptoms depend on location and size. VM are often sporadic and isolated, however, they can be associated with other malformations and be part of a syndrome; Klippel-Trenaunay (capillary-lymphatico-venous malformation with limb hypertrophy) is the most common. Glomuvenous malformation (GVM) is another type of venous anomaly. In contrast to VM, GVM is often painful on palpation and not compressible. Clinical diagnosis of VM is often made in the presence of a bluish cutaneous lesion: however, other lesions can mimick VM. The most frequent anomalies are a blue naevus, a hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation, a sub-cutaneous hemangioma or even the presence of dilated superficial normal veins due to underlying venous stenoses. This chapter will detail the clinical characteristics of venous anomalies and their differential diagnosis.

  14. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J.; Pasztor, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  15. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  16. JS-X syndrome: A multiple congenital malformation with vocal cord paralysis, ear deformity, hearing loss, shoulder musculature underdevelopment, and X-linked recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hoeve, Hans L J; Brooks, Alice S; Smit, Liesbeth S

    2015-07-01

    We report on a family with a not earlier described multiple congenital malformation. Several male family members suffer from laryngeal obstruction caused by bilateral vocal cord paralysis, outer and middle ear deformity with conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, facial dysmorphisms, and underdeveloped shoulder musculature. The affected female members only have middle ear deformity and hearing loss. The pedigree is suggestive of an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. SNP-array revealed a deletion and duplication on Xq28 in the affected family members. A possible aetiology is a neurocristopathy with most symptoms expressed in structures derived from branchial arches.

  17. Congenital vascular malformation associated with multiple cranial, vertebral and upper limb skeletal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Marsden, N; Shokrollahi, K; Maw, K; Sierakowski, A; Bhat, F A; Mathur, B

    2010-07-01

    The association between congenital vascular malformations and altered bone growth, the so-called vascular bone syndrome, is well documented. Various eponymous syndromes each with their individual traits, such as Klippel-Trenaunay, Parkes-Weber and Servelle-Martorell syndrome have been described, along with variations. We report on a previously undescribed case of congenital vascular malformation associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities affecting the skull, vertebrae and right upper limb, and discuss the literature.

  18. Large plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (glomangioma) simulating venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Vercellino, N; Nozza, P; Oddone, M; Bava, G L

    2006-07-01

    Glomuvenous malformations and venous malformations are vascular lesions that can be distinguished on the basis of clinical and pathological features. A vascular lesion of the skin and superficial and deep soft tissues of a lower limb in a 5-year-old child is described. The clinical and radiological features, including skeletal muscle involvement, were typical of venous malformation, whereas the histopathological features were those of a glomuvenous malformation. The clinical and histopathological features are briefly discussed.

  19. [Multiple intracranial arteriovenous malformation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, Miguel; Santin-Amo, José María; Román-Pena, Paula; Vázquez Herrero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are thought to be exceedingly rare lesions and have usually been reported as single cases. The incidence of multiple cerebral AVMs in major series ranges from 0.3% to 9% and, in the majority of cases, these malformations are associated with other vascular anomalies of the brain or soft tissues. We report a 62-year-old woman that presented with a left temporal haemorrhage. Angiography showed 3 AVMs located in the left temporal lobe, left cerebellar hemisphere and right temporal lobe. The lesions were treated with radiosurgery.

  20. Rare malformation of glans penis: arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Akin, Y; Sarac, M; Yucel, S

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric glans penis malformations, especially arteriovenous malformations (AVM), are very rare. Herein, we report two rare cases. A 14-year-old boy attended our outpatient clinic with chief complaints of purple swelling and rapidly growing lesion on the glans penis. The lesion was excised surgically after physical and radiological evaluations. Pathology reported AVM and the patient is being followed up. The second case is a 2-year-old boy who was admitted with a big lesion involving glans penis and genital area that has been present since birth. In physical and radiological evaluations, lesion on the glans penis was pulsatile. Parents of the patient did not want any surgery and patient has been in follow-up. Diagnosis of the vascular lesions on glans penis is very easy by physical and radiological examinations today. Long-term follow-up is very important for AVM. Clinicians must make a careful effort to document new glans lesions in the pediatric population and decrease anxiety in the parents of affected children.

  1. Congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformation initially diagnosed as esophageal atresia type C: challenging diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Doeke; Koot, Bart G; van der Griendt, Erik Jonas; van Rijn, Rick R; van der Steeg, Alida F

    2012-10-01

    Communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformations are extremely rare congenital malformations, characterized by a communicating fistula between an isolated part of the respiratory system and the esophagus or the stomach. In this article, we present a case of esophageal atresia type C, later diagnosed as a rare form of a communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformation, an esophageal atresia combined with right main bronchus originating from the lower esophagus. Therapeutic resection of the right lung was complicated by postpneumonectomy syndrome.

  2. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  3. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  4. Variants in CUL4B are associated with cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M; Yntema, Helger G; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B A; Brunner, Han G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A James; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B.

  5. Craniosynostosis with tracheal sleeve: a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome, tracheal sleeve and additional malformations in whom an FGFR2 mutation was found.

    PubMed

    Zackai, Elaine H; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Stolle, Catherine; Huff, Dale S

    2003-07-01

    We discuss a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome who had a tracheal sleeve and an FGFR2 mutation. In the light of our findings, and previous reports of patients with craniosynostosis that also reported similar mutations, we suggest that genomic screening for FGFR2 may be useful in cases with negative FGFR2 mutation testing.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency CM-AVM is thought to occur in at least 1 in 100,000 people of northern European origin. The prevalence of the condition in other populations ...

  7. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parinda H; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called “visceral heterotaxy”, in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.  PMID:26180693

  8. Spondylocostal dysostosis associated with type I split cord malformation and double nipple on one side: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Muhammet Bahadır; Kaymak, Aysegul; Kurt, Gokhan; Percin, Ferda Emriye; Baykaner, Kemali

    2013-01-01

    Jarcho Levin syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by multipl vertebral and costal anomalies at birth. Jarcho Levin syndrome includes two phenotypic groups: spondylothoracic dysostosis and spondylocostal dysostosis. The prognosis of spondylothoracic dysostosis has worse than spondylocostal dysostosis, because of respiratory complications. Associated malformations include those of the congenital heart disease, urogenital malformation, skeletal anomalies and neural tube defects. We present a patient with spondylocostal dysostosis, who also had type I split cord malformation, tethered cord, scoliosis and double nipple on the right. Although the association of spondylocostal dysostosis and type I split cord malformation is very rare, double nipples on one side is no previously reported.

  9. [Screening for systemic manifestations of vascular malformations in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler disease)].

    PubMed

    Cerra Pohl, Ana; Werner, Jochen Alfred; Folz, Benedikt Josef

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler- Weber syndrome) is a disease characterized by systemic vascular malformations. Typical clinical manifestations are recurrent epistaxis and telangiectases of the skin and the mucous membranes. The syndrome is furthermore characterized by its hereditary aspect. The disease seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, mainly because of the accompanying vascular malformations in vital organs, like the liver, the kidney, the lung, the brain, and the eyes. The diagnosis and treatment of systemic vascular malformations requires interdisciplinary management.

  10. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  11. Townes-Brocks syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C.; Michaelis, R.

    1999-01-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with multiple malformations and variable expression. Major findings include external ear anomalies, hearing loss, preaxial polydactyly and triphalangeal thumbs, imperforate anus, and renal malformations. Most patients with Townes-Brocks syndrome have normal intelligence, although mental retardation has been noted in a few.


Keywords: Townes-Brocks syndrome; chromosome 16q12.1; SALL1 PMID:10051003

  12. The oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1), a cause of polycystic kidney disease and associated malformations, maps to Xp22.2-Xp22.3.

    PubMed

    Feather, S A; Woolf, A S; Donnai, D; Malcolm, S; Winter, R M

    1997-07-01

    Key features of the oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1) include malformations of the face, oral cavity and digits. In addition, the clinical phenotype often includes mental retardation and renal functional impairment. Approximately 75% of cases of OFD1 are sporadic, and the condition occurs almost exclusively in females. In familial cases, the most likely mode of inheritance is considered to be X-linked dominant with prenatal lethality in affected males. Therefore, the OFD1 gene product appears to have widespread importance in organogenesis and is essential for fetal survival. We have studied two kindreds in which the clinical course was dominated by polycystic kidney disease requiring dialysis and transplantation. Using polymorphic chromosome markers spaced at approximately 10 cM intervals along the X chromosome, we mapped the disease to a region on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp22.2-Xp22.3) spanning 19.8 cM and flanked by crossovers with the markers DXS996 and DX7S105. There was a maximum lod score of 3.32 in an 'affecteds only' analysis using a marker within the KAL gene (theta = 0.0 ), thereby confirming the location of the gene for OFD1 on the X chromosome. The remainder of the X chromosome was excluded by recombinants in affected individuals. The importance of our findings includes the definitive assignment of this male-lethal disease to the X chromosome and the mapping of a further locus for a human polycystic kidney disease. Furthermore, this mapping study suggests a possible mouse model for OFD1 as the X-linked dominant Xpl mutant, in which polydactyly and renal cystic disease occurs, maps to the homologous region of the mouse X chromosome.

  13. Split cervical spinal cord malformation and vertebral dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Andro, C; Pecquery, R; De Vries, P; Forlodou, P; Fenoll, B

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of vertebral malformation associated with diplomyelia believed to be a type II split cord malformation. Cervicothoracic level cases are exceptional. This article reports the case of an 11-year-old boy with no neurological symptoms who had not undergone surgery. The diagnosis was made during pregnancy by prenatal screening with ultrasound and MRI. Several embryological theories have been offered to provide an explanation for this syndrome. Close follow-up is mandatory. Surgery must only be considered if neurological deterioration occurs.

  14. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  15. Overgrowth Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Andrew C.; Kalish, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall–Smith, Weaver, Simpson–Golabi–Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan–Riley–Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith–Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel–Trenaunay–Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  16. [Diagnostics of genetic malformations in small ruminants].

    PubMed

    Ganter, M

    2013-01-01

    The epidemic occurrence of the Schmallenberg virus has induced numerous congenital malformations in small ruminants. Because of this high incidence of malformed lambs, an overview of the different causes of congenital malformations is provided. The most frequent infectious and physical causes as well as mineral and vitamin deficiencies and toxic agents which can induce congenital malformations are indicated. This list is supplemented by advice on sampling and laboratory diagnosis for an etiological diagnosis of the malformations.

  17. 35(th) Annual David W Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis: abstracts of the 2014 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Stephen R; Lipinski, Robert J; Williams, Marc S; Carey, John C

    2015-08-01

    The 35(th) Annual David W Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis was held on July 25-30, 2014 at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. The conference, which honors the legacy of David Smith, brought together over 130 clinicians and researchers interested in congenital malformations and their underlying mechanisms of morphogenesis. As is the tradition of the meeting, the Workshop highlighted five themes besides mechanisms of morphogenesis: Evolution and Development, Minor Malformations, CHARGE syndrome, Craniofacial Development/ Malformations, and Disorders of Chromatin Remodeling. This Conference Report includes the abstracts presented at the Workshop.

  18. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  19. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  20. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain. We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated. PMID:27149441

  1. A Rare Coexistence of Bilateral Congenital Wilms Tumor with Ductal Plate Malformation at Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Chatterjee, Debajyoti; Gowda, Kiran; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital Wilms tumor is a tumor of childhood. Here we present an unusual case of bilateral congenital Wilms tumor with associated ductal plate malformation. In addition, there was also associated oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, and multiple skeletal anomalies in this index case. Although various syndromic associations of Wilms tumor are well described in the literature, an association of congenital Wilms tumor with ductal plate malformation, polysplenia, and skeletal malformations is not reported. We believe that this is the first reported case of such an association.

  2. Embolization of Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, H.; Hongo, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Takamae, T.; Okudera, H.; Koyama, J.I.; Oya, F.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Treatment options for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are still controversial due to the recent result of stereotactic radiosurgery and the improved result of microsurgical resection. We investigated previously treated AVM cases and discussed the efficacy and safety of preoperative embolization especially for microsurgical resection of high-grade AVM in the Spetzler-Martin grading. Efficacy of preoperative embolization was evaluated based on 126 previously treated AVM cases at Shinshu University Hospital during the last 25 years. The safety of embolization was evaluated based on our previously-embolized 58 AVM cases (91 procedures) in the last 11 years after introduction of preoperative embolization for AVM. In all 126 cases, 82 were treated before introduction of embolization and 44 were treated after introduction of embolization. In 82 cases of the pre-embolization era, 63 lesions were removed totally in 63 AVMs (77%), partially resected in 11 (13%) and untreated in eight (10%). In 74 surgically removed cases, 11 (15%) cases showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In 44 cases of the embolization era, lesions were removed totally in 29 AVMs (66%), disappeared only with embolization in one (2%), disappeared with radiosurgery in seven (16%) and were untreated in five (11%). In 32 surgically removed cases, only one (2%) case showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In all 58 embolized cases, 44 were surgically removed, six were treated with radiosurgery, one was eliminated with embolization alone and six were partially obliterated and followed up for their location. In 91 procedures for 58 cases, two haemorrhagic and three ischemic complications occurred, three were transient and two remained having neurological deficits. The introduction of preoperative embolization improved the total removal rate and reduced the intra/postoperative bleeding rate in surgical removal of AVM. The total risk of embolization is low and well-designed preoperative

  3. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  4. Congenital malformations of the brain and spine.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Prashant; Zamora, Carlos; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly address the most common congenital brain and spinal anomalies as well as their most salient imaging, especially magnetic resonance, findings. Some of them, such as Chiari II, and open spinal defects, have become relatively rare due to their detection in utero and repair of the spinal malformation. Regardless of the type of brain anomaly, the most common clinical symptoms are mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and seizure; the latter two may need to be surgically and medically addressed. The most commonly found spinal congenital anomalies include the filum terminale lipoma which is generally asymptomatic and incidental and the caudal regression syndrome for which no primary treatment exists. Any spinal congenital anomaly may present in adulthood as a consequence of spinal cord tethering and/or development of syringomyelia.

  5. Fraser-cryptophthalmos syndrome with colonic atresia.

    PubMed

    Narang, Manish; Kumar, Manish; Shah, Dheeraj

    2008-02-01

    Fraser cryptophthalmos syndrome is a severe genetic disorder comprising of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and genitourinary abnormalities. Gastrointestinal malformations are also increasingly being described. We describe a neonate with this syndrome having colonic atresia leading to cecal rupture and pneumoperitoneum.

  6. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-26

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS-MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype-phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments.

  7. Influence of maternal distress during pregnancy on fetal malformations.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, S

    1980-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether emotional stress in a pregnant woman might have an adverse effect in the form of malformations on fetal development. The children of 1,263 women whose applications for legal abortion in 1960 had been refused were compared with the next children born in the same delivery wards and paired matched controls were thereby obtained. Results. 1) The incidence of malformations according to the criteria established by the Swedish Register of Malformations was 1.8% in the proband series as against 1.1% in the control series. 2) The incidence of malformation increased with higher age and lower social class in the proband series, whereas no such connection was found in the control series. 3) The incidence of malformations for children of abortion applicants 25 years of age and above from social class III was 3% in the proband series as against 0.6% in the control series (P = 0.017). 4) One malformation, cleft palate, occurred at a significantly (P less than 0.01) higher incidence than in the country as a whole, four cases against the expected value of 0.69. 5) Etiological analysis showed that three of the cases were chromosomal aberrations, all of them Down's syndrome, in two cases there was a genetic background and two cases were thalidomide-induced phocomelia. In three proband children there may have been a connection with the abuse of alcohol by the mother. 6) When the chromosomal, genetic and thalidomide cases are excluded, the preponderance of malformations in the proband children of mothers 25 years of age and above belonging to social class III still remains (2.2% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.017). Conclusion. The results may be seen as support for the hypothesis that emotional stress in a pregnant woman, operationally defined by the factor unwanted pregnancy, may interfere with fetal development and result in a higher incidence of malformations. The interference may occur directly via psycho-endocrinal or autonomous mechanisms or

  8. Cardiac arteriovenous malformation causing sudden death.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Beatriz; Suárez-Mier, M Paz; Argente, Trinidad

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac vascular malformations are rare. We report a subendocardial arteriovenous malformation (AVM), associated with extensive myocardial fibrosis, causing sudden death in a 25-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first autopsy case reported.

  9. The Axenfeld syndrome and the Rieger syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, N; Kaback, M

    1978-01-01

    A family is reported in which both the syndrome of Axenfeld and the eye malformations of the syndrome of Rieger occur, indicating that both may be expressions of the same gene. We also review the associated anomalies already reported, emphasise their high incidence, suggest that these are not accidental associations, and propose some possible explanations for the high incidence. Images PMID:416212

  10. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE FACE CAPILLARY MALFORMATION].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Gindich, O A; Dabizha, A Yu; Ogorodnik, Ya P

    2015-08-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 37 patients for the head and neck capillary malformations were analyzed. Optimal surgical tactics, depending on the malformation form and localization, was proposed. Restitution of the tissues defect after excision of malformation, using the flaps transposition, have permitted to achieve good esthetic results.

  11. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  12. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Dodia, Nazera; George, Suku

    2015-09-17

    We present the case of a 54-year-old woman with intermittent right-sided abdominal pain. Ultrasound scans showed an unusual vascular appearance of the uterus with a thinned endometrium. Contrast CT led to a strong suspicion of an arteriovenous malformation of the uterus. The patient was successfully treated with a hysterectomy with salpingo-oophorectomy.

  13. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  14. The Arnold-Chiari Malformation and Its Implications for Individuals with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittler, Joel E.

    1986-01-01

    The Arnold-Chiari malformation is present in most infants born with myelomeningocele (a form of spina bifida) and hydrocephalus. The syndrome is responsible for structural abnormalities in the brain, and peripheral nervous system. Etiology, symptoms, impact on central nervous system structures, surgical treatment, and implications for education…

  15. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be...

  16. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-05-01

    SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain.We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated.

  17. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  18. The Nager acrofacial dysostosis syndrome with the tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E; Cadbury, R; Baraitser, M

    1985-10-01

    A male infant is described with mandibulofacial dysostosis and absent thumbs, consistent with the Nager acrofacial dysostosis syndrome. In addition, the tetralogy of Fallot was present. Major congenital heart malformations occur rarely in this syndrome.

  19. Venous malformation: update on aetiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dompmartin, A; Vikkula, M; Boon, L M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on aetiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations (VMs). VMs are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneomucosal VMs or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous and capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, blue rubber bleb naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of VMs within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to low-molecular-weight heparin, which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose-ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area.

  20. Sonographic markers for early diagnosis of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Renna, Maria Daniela; Pisani, Paola; Conversano, Francesco; Perrone, Emanuele; Casciaro, Ernesto; Renzo, Gian Carlo Di; Paola, Marco Di; Perrone, Antonio; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Fetal malformations are very frequent in industrialized countries. Although advanced maternal age may affect pregnancy outcome adversely, 80%-90% of fetal malformations occur in the absence of a specific risk factor for parents. The only effective approach for prenatal screening is currently represented by an ultrasound scan. However, ultrasound methods present two important limitations: the substantial absence of quantitative parameters and the dependence on the sonographer experience. In recent years, together with the improvement in transducer technology, quantitative and objective sonographic markers highly predictive of fetal malformations have been developed. These markers can be detected at early gestation (11-14 wk) and generally are not pathological in themselves but have an increased incidence in abnormal fetuses. Thus, prenatal ultrasonography during the second trimester of gestation provides a “genetic sonogram”, including, for instance, nuchal translucency, short humeral length, echogenic bowel, echogenic intracardiac focus and choroid plexus cyst, that is used to identify morphological features of fetal Down’s syndrome with a potential sensitivity of more than 90%. Other specific and sensitive markers can be seen in the case of cardiac defects and skeletal anomalies. In the future, sonographic markers could limit even more the use of invasive and dangerous techniques of prenatal diagnosis (amniocentesis, etc.). PMID:24179631

  1. Multiple cavernous malformations with supravermian arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation are congenital vascular abnormalities that have been reported in 0.4% of the population; they represent 5-13% of all cerebrovascular malformations. Onset of cerebral cavernous malformations may be associated with seizures, intracranial hemorrhages, focal neurological deficit or migraine-type headaches. Some patients may require surgical intervention due to hemorrhage. Multiple cavernomas in childhood have been reported in the literature, but they are rare. This manuscript presents a 12-year-old girl with multiple cavernomas accompanied by supravermian arachnoid cyst detected by neuroimaging techniques. This is the first report that demonstrates a case of pediatric multiple cavernous malformation coexisting with arachnoid cyst of the supravermian cistern.

  2. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear bone malformations with posterior labyrinth involvement: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Palomeque Vera, Juan Miguel; Platero Sánchez-Escribano, María; Gómez Hervás, Javier; Fernández Prada, María; González Ramírez, Amanda Rocío; Sainz Quevedo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Inner ear bone malformations are one cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss. This investigation focused on those affecting the posterior labyrinth, especially enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, which is associated with fluctuating and progressive hearing loss. The objectives of this study were to analyze the behavior of the electrical stimulation, auditory functionality and linguistic development in patients with inner ear malformations involving the posterior labyrinth. The study included ten patients undergoing cochlear implantation (cases: five with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, two with vestibular aqueduct stenosis/aplasia, and three with semicircular canal disorders). Post-implantation, data were gathered on the electrical stimulation threshold and maximum comfort levels and on the number of functioning electrodes. Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech (EARS) subtests were used to assess auditory functionality and language acquisition at 6, 12, and 24 months post-implantation. Results were compared with findings in a control group of 28 cochlear implantation patients without these malformations. No significant differences were found between case and control groups in electrical stimulation parameters; auditory functionality subtest scores were lower in cases than controls, although the difference was only statistically significant for some subtests. In conclusion, cochlear implantation patients with posterior labyrinth bone malformations and profound hearing loss, including those with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, showed no significant difference in electrical stimulation threshold with controls. Although some auditory functionality test results were lower in cases than in controls, cochlear implantation appears to be beneficial for all patients with these malformations.

  3. Antenatal diagnosis of deletion chromosome 11(q23-qter) (Jacobsen syndrome).

    PubMed

    Foley, Patricia; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Mullarkey, Marice; Reardon, William

    2007-07-01

    A case of Jacobsen syndrome, suspected antenatally on the grounds of trigonocephaly and hypoplastic left heart syndrome, is presented. Clinicians are reminded that a hypoplastic left heart should not be assumed to be an isolated malformation and that a careful search for associated malformations can facilitate the recognition of an underlying genetic syndrome.

  4. [A case report of a patient with FATCO syndrome: fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia and oligosyndactyly].

    PubMed

    D'Amato Gutiérrez, Mónica; Palacio Díaz, Felipe A

    2016-06-01

    The FATCO syndrome, (Fibular Aplasia, Tibial Campomelia and Oligosyndactyly) are bone malformations with main alteration in lower limbs. It is a rare entity and there are few cases reported in international literature, and so far there are not published cases in Colombia. Here we present a case of a male newborn with prenatal and postnatal signs consistent with FATCO syndrome without other organs malformations, and there is a brief discussion about this syndrome and other different malformations associated with it.

  5. Nitrosatable drug exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy and selected congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jean D.; Werler, Martha M; Shinde, Mayura U; Vuong, Ann M; Kelley, Katherine E.; Huber, John C.; Sharkey, Joseph R.; Griesenbeck, John S.; Romitti, Paul A.; Malik, Sadia; Suarez, Lucina; Langlois, Peter H.; Canfield, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nitrosatable drugs can react with nitrite in the stomach to form N-nitroso compounds, and results from animal studies suggest that N-nitroso compounds are teratogens. With data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, the relation between prenatal exposure to nitrosatable drugs and limb deficiencies, oral cleft, and heart malformations in offspring was examined. METHODS Maternal reports of drugs taken during the first trimester of pregnancy were classified with respect to nitrosatability for mothers of 741 babies with limb deficiencies, 2,774 with oral cleft malformations, 8,091 with congenital heart malformations, and 6,807 without major congenital malformations. Nitrite intake was estimated from maternal responses to a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS Isolated transverse limb deficiencies and atrioventricular septal defects were associated with secondary amine drug exposures (adjusted odds ratios [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence limit [CI] 1.11, 2.06 and aOR 1.97, 95% CI 1.19, 3.26, respectively). Tertiary amines were associated with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (aOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.10, 2.04) and single ventricle (aOR 1.61, 95% CI 1.06, 2.45). These two malformations were also significantly associated with amide drugs. For several malformations, the strongest associations with nitrosatable drug use occurred among mothers with the highest estimated dietary nitrite intake, especially for secondary amines and atrioventricular septal defects (highest tertile of nitrite, aOR 3.30, 95% CI 1.44, 7.58). CONCLUSION Prenatal exposure to nitrosatable drugs may be associated with several congenital malformations, especially with higher nitrite intake. The possible interaction between nitrosatable drugs and dietary nitrite on risk of congenital malformations warrants further attention. PMID:22903972

  6. A Case Report: Jacobsen Syndrome Complicated by Paris-Trousseau Syndrome and Shone's Complex.

    PubMed

    Malia, Laurie A; Wolkoff, Leslie I; Mnayer, Laila; Tucker, Joseph W; Parikh, Nehal S

    2015-10-01

    A preterm infant presenting with a congenital cardiac malformation and thrombocytopenia was found to have a karyotype showing a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 of the segment 11q24.1-11qter consistent with Jacobsen syndrome. The infant was later diagnosed with Paris-Trousseau syndrome, commonly associated with Jacobsen syndrome. Because children with cardiac malformations often require high-risk surgical procedures in the early neonatal period, those with platelet dysfunction require prompt identification at birth.

  7. Unusual association of Arnold-Chiari malformation and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2012-07-09

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital or acquired defects associated with the displacement of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal. First described by Chiari (1891), this has various grades of severity and involves various parts of neuraxis, for example, cerebellum and its outputs, neuro-otological system, lower cranial nerves, spinal sensory and motor pathways. The symptomatology of Arnold-Chiari malformations may mimic multiple sclerosis, primary headache syndromes, spinal tumours and benign intracranial hypertension. We highlighted a case of Chiari type I malformation, who presented with posterolateral ataxia associated with significant vitamin B(12) deficiency. The patient was supplemented with vitamin B(12) injections and showed remarkable improvement at follow-up after 3 months.

  8. Understanding venous malformations of the head and neck: a comprehensive insight.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Giacomo; Ierardi, Anna Maria

    2017-03-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are congenital vascular malformations. They are very often misnamed and thus incorrectly managed. The aim of the present paper is to provide the reader with the most updated literature available and to offer a detailed description of each single aspect of this disease. In detail, the paper discusses the epidemiology, the embryological origins and the physiopathology of VMs. Then, the clinical features of sporadic, inherited and syndromic VMs are discussed. The instrumental diagnosis is presented, and the role of US, CT, MRI and phlebography is pointed out. Differential diagnoses with other vascular malformations and tumors are described. The clinical session ends with the staging of VMs relying on MRI and rheological features. All aspects of treatment are described: conservative measures, medical treatment, sclerotherapy, laser and surgery are thoroughly discussed. A section is reserved to bony VMs. Their clinical aspects and the appropriate treatment are presented.

  9. Unusual cause of lower extremity wounds: Cobb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Cobb syndrome (Cutaneomeningospinal Angiomatosis) is a rare segmental neurocutaneous syndrome associated with metameric cutaneous and spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In this syndrome, capillary malformation or angiokeratoma-like lesions are formed in a dermatomal distribution, with an AVM in the corresponding segment of the spinal cord. The spinal cord lesions can cause neurological disorder and paraplegia, which typically develop during young adulthood. We report a 32-year-old male with the Cobb syndrome associated with lower extremity painful wounds and acute-onset paraplegia due to metameric vascular malformations.

  10. Radiosurgery for brainstem arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Koga, Tomoyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2013-01-01

    The authors outlined the treatment result of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) inside the brainstem by reviewing the 4 existing studies in detail. The majority of patients with brainstem AVMs had a history of hemorrhage, leading to neurological deficits at the time of treatment in 72-73% of patients. The most frequent location was the midbrain or the pons depending on studies, while the medulla oblongata was the least common location throughout the series. The obliteration rate after radiosurgery was 44-73%, which was generally lower than in other locations, while the complication rate was 5-14%, which was expectedly higher than in other locations. No objective evidence for size is known, and therefore, patient selection and treatment planning should be carefully performed after judicious assessment of treatment risks and benefits among limited treatment options.

  11. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  12. New insights into craniofacial malformations

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human skull and face is a highly orchestrated and complex three-dimensional morphogenetic process, involving hundreds of genes controlling the coordinated patterning, proliferation and differentiation of tissues having multiple embryological origins. Craniofacial malformations that occur because of abnormal development (including cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis and facial dysostoses), comprise over one-third of all congenital birth defects. High-throughput sequencing has recently led to the identification of many new causative disease genes and functional studies have clarified their mechanisms of action. We present recent findings in craniofacial genetics and discuss how this information together with developmental studies in animal models is helping to increase understanding of normal craniofacial development. PMID:26085576

  13. Genetic Basis of Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Parrini, Elena; Conti, Valerio; Dobyns, William B.; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities, severe epilepsy, and reproductive disadvantage. Genes that have been associated to MCD are mainly involved in cell proliferation and specification, neuronal migration, and late cortical organization. Lissencephaly-pachygyria-severe band heterotopia are diffuse neuronal migration disorders causing severe global neurological impairment. Abnormalities of the LIS1, DCX, ARX, RELN, VLDLR, ACTB, ACTG1, TUBG1, KIF5C, KIF2A, and CDK5 genes have been associated with these malformations. More recent studies have also established a relationship between lissencephaly, with or without associated microcephaly, corpus callosum dysgenesis as well as cerebellar hypoplasia, and at times, a morphological pattern consistent with polymicrogyria with mutations of several genes (TUBA1A, TUBA8, TUBB, TUBB2B, TUBB3, and DYNC1H1), regulating the synthesis and function of microtubule and centrosome key components and hence defined as tubulinopathies. MCD only affecting subsets of neurons, such as mild subcortical band heterotopia and periventricular heterotopia, have been associated with abnormalities of the DCX, FLN1A, and ARFGEF2 genes and cause neurological and cognitive impairment that vary from severe to mild deficits. Polymicrogyria results from abnormal late cortical organization and is inconstantly associated with abnormal neuronal migration. Localized polymicrogyria has been associated with anatomo-specific deficits, including disorders of language and higher cognition. Polymicrogyria is genetically heterogeneous, and only in a small minority of patients, a definite genetic cause has been identified. Megalencephaly with normal cortex or polymicrogyria by MRI imaging, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia can all result from mutations in genes of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. Postzygotic mutations have been described for most MCD and can be limited to the dysplastic tissue in the

  14. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Kerecuk, Larissa; Schreuder, Michiel F; Woolf, Adrian S

    2008-06-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or dysplasia, although rare, lead to renal failure. With advances in dialysis and transplantation for young children, it is now possible to prevent the early death of at least some individuals with severe malformations. Other renal tract malformations, such as congenital pelviureteric junction obstruction and primary vesicoureteric reflux, are relatively common. Renal tract malformations are, collectively, the major cause of childhood end-stage renal disease. Their contribution to the number of adults on renal replacement therapy is less clear and has possibly been underestimated. Renal tract malformations can be familial, and specific mutations of genes involved in renal tract development can sometimes be found in affected individuals. These features provide information about the causes of malformations but also raise questions about whether to screen relatives. Whether prenatal decompression of obstructed renal tracts, or postnatal initiation of therapies such as prophylactic antibiotics or angiotensin blockade, improve long-term renal outcomes remains unclear.

  15. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  16. [Papillary oedema revealing Arnold Chiari malformation type 1: about a case].

    PubMed

    Imane, Mouhoub; Asmae, Maadane; Toufik, Ramdani; Rachid, Sekhsoukh

    2016-01-01

    Arnold Chiari malformation type 1 is defined as a herniation of the cerebellar tonsils into the foramen magnum of more than 5 mm. Symptoms are most commonly dominated by occipital headache, torticollis and sometimes swallowing disorders. Ophthalmologically abnormal convergences, oculomotor palsy and diplopia are the main clinical signs. We report the case of a 9 year old child, who presented with visual loss evolving since 6 months. Ophthalmologic examination showed visual acuity of 4/10 in both eyes, retained ocular motility and rotational nystagmus. The examination of the anterior segment of the eye showed megalocornea with no evidence of goniodysgenesis, iridodonesis associated with atrophy of the dilator muscle and microcoria with lazy photomotor reflex. Normal intraocular pressure was 14 mmHg. Ocular fundus examination, despite difficulties in performing it, objectified bilateral papilledema (stage II). General physical examination showed torticollis, scoliosis and a tetra-pyramidal syndrome. MRI showed Chiari malformation type I associated with hydrocephalus and syringomyelia. Neurosurgical intervention based on internal CSF drainage with occipitocervical osteo-dural decompression was proposed. The evolution was favorable with regression of clinical signs. Ophthalmologically, there was a regression of papilledema but visual acuity remained stationary. The occurrence of papilledema associated with Chiari malformation type 1 is rare, it has been only reported in 2% of symptomatic patients. Its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. The originality of our study consists in the association of cerebellar malformations with ocular malformations including megalocornea and microcoria which make ophthalmologic examination more difficult to perform.

  17. Spinal dermoid sinus in a Dachshund with vertebral and thoracic limb malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dermoid sinus is an uncommon epithelial-lined fistula that may be associated with vertebral malformations. In humans, Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare condition characterized by congenital cervical vertebral fusion and may be associated with other developmental defects, including dermoid sinus. The present case report describes an adult Dachshund with cervical and cranial thoracic vertebral malformations as well as thoracic limb malformations resembling KFS with a concurrent type IV dermoid sinus. Case presentation A 1.5 year-old Dachshund with congenital thoracic limbs deformities and cervical-thoracic vertebral malformations presented with cervical hyperesthesia, rigidity of the cervical musculature and tetraparesis. Neurologic, radiographic, and computed tomography (CT) (2D, 3D, CT fistulography) examinations revealed skeletal anomalies, a dermoid sinus in the cranial thoracic region and epidural gas within the vertebral canal. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the sinus tract were performed and confirmed a type IV dermoid sinus. The clinical signs progressively recovered postoperatively, and no recurrent signs were observed after 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Cervical vertebral malformations associated with limbs anomalies have not been reported in dogs and may represent a condition similar to KFS in humans. KFS can occur concurrently with other congenital conditions including dermoid sinus and should be included among the complex congenital anomalies described in dogs. PMID:24593884

  18. Anterior commissure absence without callosal agenesis: a new brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T N; Stevens, J M; Free, S L; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Sisodiya, S M

    2002-04-23

    The authors report a novel human brain malformation characterized by the absence of the anterior commissure without callosal agenesis, but associated with gross unilateral panhemispheric malformation incorporating subependymal heterotopia, subcortical heterotopia, and gyral abnormalities including temporal malformation and polymicrogyria. In contrast, a normal anterior commissure was found in 125 control subjects and in 113 other subjects with a range of brain malformations.

  19. [Hydrops fetalis associated with Noonan syndrome].

    PubMed

    Paupe, A; Chassevent, J; Lenclen, R; Blanc, P; Carbajal, R; Hoenn, E; Olivier-Martin, M

    1991-01-01

    A case of Noonan syndrome associated with hydrops fetalis has been reported; it is recalled that morphological anomalies common to both Turner and Noonan syndromes depend on similar lymphatic anomalies. In the present case it is therefore proposed that the malformations of Noonan syndrome and hydrops fetalis proceed from the same lymphatic anomalies.

  20. PHACE Syndrome: Persistent Fetal Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Hrbac, T.; Chmelova, J.; Skoloudik, D.; Prochazka, M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary PHACE(S) syndrome is an acronym for neurocutaneous disease encompassing the expression of (P) posterior cranial fossa malformations, (H) facial haemangiomas, (A) arterial anomalies, (C) aortic coarctaion and other cardiac defects, (E) eye abnormalities and (S) for sternal malformation or stenotic arterial diseases. We report on a case of PHACE syndrome complete expression with persistent fetal vascular anomalies unusually in a 55-year-old women with large bilateral facial and neck haemangioma and posterior fossa circulation insufficiency. PMID:20584448

  1. Capillary Malformation–Arteriovenous Malformation, a New Clinical and Genetic Disorder Caused by RASA1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Iiro; Boon, Laurence M.; Mulliken, John B.; Burrows, Patricia E.; Dompmartin, Anne; Watanabe, Shoji; Vanwijck, Romain; Vikkula, Miikka

    2003-01-01

    Capillary malformation (CM), or “port-wine stain,” is a common cutaneous vascular anomaly that initially appears as a red macular stain that darkens over years. CM also occurs in several combined vascular anomalies that exhibit hypertrophy, such as Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and Parkes Weber syndrome. Occasional familial segregation of CM suggests that there is genetic susceptibility, underscored by the identification of a large locus, CMC1, on chromosome 5q. We used genetic fine mapping with polymorphic markers to reduce the size of the CMC1 locus. A positional candidate gene, RASA1, encoding p120-RasGAP, was screened for mutations in 17 families. Heterozygous inactivating RASA1 mutations were detected in six families manifesting atypical CMs that were multiple, small, round to oval in shape, and pinkish red in color. In addition to CM, either arteriovenous malformation, arteriovenous fistula, or Parkes Weber syndrome was documented in all the families with a mutation. We named this newly identified association caused by RASA1 mutations “CM-AVM,” for capillary malformation–arteriovenous malformation. The phenotypic variability can be explained by the involvement of p120-RasGAP in signaling for various growth factor receptors that control proliferation, migration, and survival of several cell types, including vascular endothelial cells. PMID:14639529

  2. Glomuvenous malformation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Flors, Lucia; Norton, Patrick T; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of a glomuvenous malformation involving the dorsal aspect of the right hand and distal forearm in an 11-year-old boy. He had a history of multiple vascular anomalies since birth and presented with increasing right hand pain. MRI played an important role in characterizing and determining the extent of the lesion. In particular, dynamic time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography precisely defined its vascularity. The diagnosis was made histopathologically after partial resection of the lesion. Glomuvenous malformation is a rare developmental hamartoma that originates from the glomus body. Clinically they usually resemble a venous malformation but they are a different entity. In the appropriate clinical setting this rare condition must be included in the differential diagnosis of a vascular malformation, especially when subtle arterial enhancement, early venous shunting and progressive filling of dilated venous spaces are depicted on MRA.

  3. [Central nervous system malformations: neurosurgery correlates].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-León, Juan C; Betancourt-Fursow, Yaline M; Jiménez-Betancourt, Cristina S

    2013-09-06

    Congenital malformations of the central nervous system are related to alterations in neural tube formation, including most of the neurosurgical management entities, dysraphism and craniosynostosis; alterations of neuronal proliferation; megalencefaly and microcephaly; abnormal neuronal migration, lissencephaly, pachygyria, schizencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, heterotopia and cortical dysplasia, spinal malformations and spinal dysraphism. We expose the classification of different central nervous system malformations that can be corrected by surgery in the shortest possible time and involving genesis mechanisms of these injuries getting better studied from neurogenic and neuroembryological fields, this involves connecting innovative knowledge areas where alteration mechanisms in dorsal induction (neural tube) and ventral induction (telencephalization) with the current way of correction, as well as the anomalies of cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal migration and finally the complex malformations affecting the posterior fossa and current possibilities of correcting them.

  4. Inner ear malformations: a practical diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Mazón, M; Pont, E; Montoya-Filardi, A; Carreres-Polo, J; Más-Estellés, F

    2016-12-29

    Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss is a major cause of disability; although inner ear malformations account for only 20-40% of all cases, recognition and characterization will be vital for the proper management of these patients. In this article relevant anatomy and development of inner ear are surveyed. The role of neuroimaging in pediatric sensorineural hearing loss and cochlear preimplantation study are assessed. The need for a universal system of classification of inner ear malformations with therapeutic and prognostic implications is highlighted. And finally, the radiological findings of each type of malformation are concisely described and depicted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a crucial role in the characterization of inner ear malformations and allow the assessment of the anatomical structures that enable the selection of appropriate treatment and surgical approach.

  5. Venous malformations: clinical diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Behravesh, Sasan; Yakes, Wayne; Gupta, Nikhil; Naidu, Sailendra; Chong, Brian W.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformation (VM) is the most common type of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). They are present at birth and are often symptomatic, causing morbidity and pain. VMs can be challenging to diagnose and are often confused with hemangioma in terminology as well as with imaging. An accurate clinical history and cross-sectional imaging are critical for diagnosis and for devising management. This manuscript will review imaging approaches to diagnosing VMs and current treatment strategies. PMID:28123976

  6. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  7. Spontaneous thrombosis of vein of Galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kariyappa, Kalpana Devi; Krishnaswami, Murali; Gnanaprakasam, Francis; Ramachandran, Madan; Krishnaswamy, Visvanathan

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare intracranial vascular malformation. Before the advent and advancement of various endovascular techniques, there was dismal prognosis. Rarely, this condition may spontaneously thrombose without the need for surgical or endovascular treatment with good prognosis. We report a case of an 8-month-old infant who had serial imaging, suggestive of VOGM and presented to us for further management, wherein the imaging revealed spontaneous thrombosis. PMID:27857804

  8. Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Adnan Aslam; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani

    2015-10-01

    Fraser's Syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a spectrum of malformations. The most consistent features are Cryptophthalmos (CO), syndactyly, genitourinary tract abnormalities, laryngeal and tracheal anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphism, malformations of the ear and nose, orofacial clefting and musculoskeletal defects. FS is genetically heterogeneous; so far mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1 genes have been linked to FS. FS can be diagnosed on clinical examination, pre-natal ultrasound or perinatal autopsy. We present a case of a 3 months old child born to consanguineous healthy parents with bilateral complete CO, unilateral microphthalmia, hypertelorism, syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with cryptorchidism and an umbilical hernia. We also present the criteria for diagnosing FS and the significant features on pre-natal ultrasonography. Around 200 case reports of patients with FS and CO have been published. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of FS in Pakistan.

  9. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tanmay H; Badve, Manasi S; Olajide, Kowe O; Skorupan, Havyn M; Waters, Jonathan H; Vallejo, Manuel C

    2011-07-01

    Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-year-old female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae) who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiber-optic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III) precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus.

  10. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, L S; Shih, C J

    1993-12-01

    This paper analyzes the available literature on intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in Taiwan. The incidence and symptoms of the disease are studied with a view to assisting practitioners in its recognition. The incidence of intracranial AVM in patients who have suffered hemorrhagic stroke in Taiwan is 2.5% to 4.8%, with the male to female ratio being 1.5:1. The peak age at which bleeding from intracranial AVM occurred ranged from 10 to 40 years; bleeding showed no seasonal variation. Sudden headaches, vomiting, and disturbance of consciousness were the commonest presenting symptoms of AVM, similar to the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. However, the possibility of focal neurological deficit among patients with intracranial AVM was higher than in patients with intracranial aneurysms. Risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, smoking and alcohol intake showed no close relationship to bleeding in intracranial AVM. Pregnancy is not a risk factor in female patients with intracranial AVM with no history of hemorrhage. Small intracranial AVM are more likely to bleed. Since 1961 the majority of Taiwan's intracranial AVM patients have been treated surgically, while before that date general medicine was the treatment of choice. In recent years, several developments such as operation microscope, microsurgical instruments and microsurgical techniques have enhanced the efficacy of surgical intervention in the treatment of AVM. When the mortality and morbidity rates resulting from the two forms of treatment are compared, surgical treatment shows a better prognosis for the treatment of intracranial AVM.

  11. Novel Vascular Malformation in an Affected Newborn with Deletion Del(4)(q31.3)

    PubMed Central

    de León Ojeda, Norma Elena; Soriano-Torres, Michel; Cabrera, Mercedes J.; Benítez Ramos, Dunia Bárbara

    2012-01-01

    We report on a newborn male patient with a terminal deletion in the long arm of the chromosome 4 with a congenital heart defect unreported before in association with this syndrome. The patient had multiple congenital anomalies including a pointed duplicated fingernail, low set posteriorly rotated ears, large anterior fontanel, micrognathia, glabellar capillary vascular malformation, and Interrupted Aortic Arch type C. The patient died due to multiple congenital malformations; a peripheral chromosome analysis showed 46, XY, del(4)(q31.3) de novo. The only reported case with the same deletion was a male newborn that exhibited the pattern of minor anomalies of deletion 4q31 syndrome. The parents were cytogenetically normal. We compare clinical signs to other cases with a deletion in long arm of chromosome 4. PMID:23320208

  12. Megalencephaly, polymicrogyria and ribbon-like band heterotopia: A new cortical malformation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yu; Magara, Shinichi; Okazaki, Kenichi; Komatsubara, Takao; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tohyama, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Megalencephalic polymicrogyria syndromes include megalencephaly-capillary malformation and megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus. Recent genetic studies have identified that genes in the PI3K-AKT pathway are involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Herein, we report a patient who presented with developmental delay, epilepsy and peculiar neuroimaging findings of megalencephaly, polymicrogyria, and symmetrical band heterotopia in the periventricular region. The heterotopias exhibited inhomogeneous signals with undulatory mixtures of gray and white matter, resembling ribbon-like heterotopia, with a predominance in the temporal to occipital regions. These neuroradiological findings were not consistent with those in known megalencephalic polymicrogyria syndromes. No genetic abnormality was identified through whole-exome sequencing. The neuroimaging findings of this patient may represent a novel cortical malformation involving megalencephaly with polymicrogyria and ribbon-like band heterotopia.

  13. Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome (CHAOS) as part of Fraser syndrome: ultrasound and autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Mesens, T; Witters, I; Van Robaeys, J; Peeters, H; Fryns, J P

    2013-01-01

    Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome (CHAOS) is a potential lethal condition. We describe a case report of CHAOS, with additional malformations diagnosed at 20 weeks. Autopsy findings are suggestive for Fraser syndrome (cryptophthalmos-syndactyly syndrome; OMIM 219000). The diagnosis was confirmed by mutation analysis of FRAS1.

  14. Endovascular occlusion of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations with the ArtVentive Endoluminal Occlusion System™

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, Fabio; Silvestre, Mattia; Cervo, Amedeo; Giurazza, Francesco; Corvino, Antonio; Maglione, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) are vascular anomalies of the lung and carry the risk of cerebral thromboembolism, brain abscess, or pulmonary hemorrhage. We describe a 64-year-old male with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome) who presented with a five-year history of progressive effort dyspnea and a PAVM in the right upper lobe successfully treated by transcatheter embolization of feeding arteries using a new occlusion device, the ArtVentive Endoluminal Occlusion System™. PMID:27559714

  15. Detection of a de novo duplication of 1q32-qter by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in a boy with multiple malformations: further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duba, H C; Erdel, M; Löffler, J; Bereuther, L; Fischer, H; Utermann, B; Utermann, G

    1997-01-01

    We report a dysmorphic boy with a de novo partial trisomy 1q. The boy has microcephaly, bilateral cleft lip and palate, low set and dysmorphic ears, brain anomalies, pulmonary stenosis, duodenal obstruction, dysplastic kidneys, and bifid thumbs. The trisomic segment 1q32-qter is duplicated with an inverted insertion at 1p36.3. The aberration was initially detected at amniocentesis and confirmed and defined by GTG banding, chromosome microdissection, and FISH on postnatal blood samples. The parents had normal karyotypes. De novo partial duplications of chromosome 1q have rarely been reported. Comparison of our patient with other published pure trisomy 1q cases showed similarities which allowed the further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome. Images PMID:9138155

  16. [Congenital unilateral muscular hyperplasia of the hand - a rare malformation].

    PubMed

    Pillukat, T; Lanz, U

    2004-01-01

    This is a report on eight cases of a rare congenital malformation in the upper extremity, consisting of a unilateral muscular hyperplasia. In addition to the hand, all segments of the upper extremity may be affected. The hyperplasia is always unilateral, preferably on the right hand side, in combination with accessory muscles. Hereditary dependence or association with other malformations has not been observed. Six of eight patients were male. Shoulder and arm function were normal in all cases. Ulnar drift of the fingers in the metacarpophalangeal joints (six of eight patients), flexion contractures of the metacarpophalangeal joints (six of eight patients) and extension contractures of the wrist (three of eight patients) to various degrees were seen. A prominence of the second and third metacarpal head with an enlarged space between them gave the affected hands a very typical appearance (six of eight patients). Deformities and functional limitations requiring surgical treatment were present in six patients. In all cases, accessory muscles were found intraoperatively and resected. The macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the muscle specimen did not differ from normal muscular tissue. In all cases, additional procedures were necessary to improve the overall function. Nevertheless, the reconstructive efforts did not lead to an entirely normal hand function or appearance. The malformation we describe can clearly be distinguished from other malformations such as arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, Freeman-Sheldon syndrome or macrodactyly. Up to now, only two other reports were found in the literature showing characteristics similar to those in our own cases. Four similar cases were observed by Benatar. From a pathomechanical point of view, a disturbance in the muscular balance seems to cause the deformities and functional limitations. This imbalance could be related to accessory muscles which are not opposed by defined antagonists or to an unbalanced hyperplasia of

  17. A cluster of hypoplastic left heart malformation in Baltimore, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, K S; Loffredo, C A

    2006-01-01

    Congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs) of the left side of the heart show familial recurrence of various forms of obstructive malformations, including hypoplastic left heart (HLH), interrupted aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta, and aortic stenosis. In a previous population-based study in the Baltimore-Washington region, these malformations were associated with parental reports of occupational or leisure solvent exposure, overt diabetes, and family history of CCVM in first-degree relatives. Spatial analysis in this well-characterized study population may augment self-reported data by revealing additional associations with potential environmental risk factors. We used spatial analysis to identify clusters of HLH as a group. The study population included all live-born cases of hypoplastic left heart syndrome diagnosed in the first year of life between 1981 and 1989 and a random sample of unaffected infant controls matched by year and hospital of birth. The nested case-control cohort in this spatial analysis included 77 HLH cases and 1894 controls in Maryland and the District of Columbia. Nonparametric and regression analyses included personal variables from the interview data set as well as spatial variables. A region of Baltimore was identified that contained HLH at twice the expected frequency based on the distribution of population younger than 5 years of age. The region included 30 of 77 geocoded cases of HLH in the cohort and is significant by spatial scanning at p = 0.056. Within this region, male cases of HLH were disproportionately present compared to females. This cluster is in a region of Baltimore with industrial release of solvents, dioxin, and polychlorinated biphenyls in air. Outside the cluster, HLH is associated with family history of CCVM in a first-degree relative, maternal exposure to miscellaneous solvents, paternal anesthesia, maternal art painting, aspirin ingestion, and maternal diabetes. Inside the cluster, father's painting and

  18. Spectrum of malformations of the hindbrain (cerebellum, pons, and medulla) in a cohort of children with high rate of parental consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Sztriha, László; Johansen, Johan G

    2005-06-01

    We review 25 patients with a spectrum of hindbrain (cerebellum, pons, and medulla) malformations from a cohort of children with high parental consanguinity rate. Twenty-three of the 25 patients were born to consanguineous parents. The patients were classified in four groups. Eleven patients of 6 families had malformation of the hindbrain and midbrain with molar tooth sign (10 patients of 5 families with typical Joubert syndrome), 5 patients showed severe supratentorial anomalies in addition to the hindbrain malformations, 5 patients had pontocerebellar or cerebellar hypoplasia with anterior horn cell disease in the spinal cord (spinal muscular atrophy), and 4 patients showed malformations affecting predominantly the hindbrain without substantial involvement of other systems. A locus for Joubert syndrome was previously identified on chromosome 9q34.3 in two families, and a second locus on chromosome 11p12-q13.3 in another family. A third Joubert syndrome locus has been mapped at 6q23 and a mutation in the AHI1 gene at this site has been found recently in a further family from this cohort. Delineation of homogeneous subgroups of patients with hindbrain malformations and molecular genetic analysis of these groups may lead to identification of further loci, genes and mutations responsible for the malformations.

  19. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Associated Cardiovascular Malformations: Type, Frequency, and Impact on Management

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Angela E.; Pober, Barbara R.; Adatia, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The co-occurrence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) has important clinical, genetic, and developmental implications. Previous examinations of this topic often included patients with genetic syndromes. To correct this potential bias, we undertook an extensive review of the literature and obtained new data. The frequency of CVMs associated with isolated CDH was 11–15%. A careful analysis of CVMs indicates that atrial and ventricular septal defects, conotruncal defects, and left ventricular outflow tract obstructive defects were the most common type of CVMs, but proportional to the frequency of occurrence in the general population. The combination of CVM and CDH results in a poorer prognosis than would be expected with either malformation alone. However, the impact on survival from patients with a genetic syndrome has not been consistently evaluated. We encourage researchers to re-analyze existing series and recommend that future studies distinguish isolated CDH from that which is associated with other malformations, especially as part of genetic syndromes. Therapies should be tailored to maximize cardiac output and systemic oxygen delivery rather than systemic oxygen saturation alone. Although there is speculation about the frequency with which isolated left ventricular “hypoplasia” occurs in patients with CDH, we suggest it results from compression of a pre-load deficient left ventricle by the hypertensive right ventricle, and unlike true hypoplasia, is reversible. Irrespective of the type of severity of CVMs in patients with CDH, the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary vascular disease predicts outcome. PMID:17436301

  20. Paroxysmal hemicrania-tic and Chiari I malformation: an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Monzillo, P; Nemoto, P; Costa, A; Rocha, A J

    2007-12-01

    A 54 year-old female has a clinical diagnosis of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) according to IHS-criteria (2004) three years ago. Six months after that, she developed symptoms compatible with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) involving the second and third trigeminal territories also at the left side. Cranial and cervical spine resonance magnetic images showed extensive cervical syringomyelia that included nucleus caudalis (C2 level) region and a posterior fossa Chiari I malformation without hydrocephalus. The association between CPH and TN is called chronic paroxysmal hemicrania-tic syndrome (CPH-tic). This is the first clinical description of a secondary cause of CPH-tic syndrome in the literature.

  1. Ovine craniofacial malformation: a morphometrical study.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, T; Kuiper, H; Pielmeier, R; Ganter, M; Distl, O; Staszyk, C

    2012-12-01

    Craniofacial malformation in 64 sheep was phenotypically described as mandibular distoclusion. Digital radiographs were examined in order to determine the degree of morphological changes in certain bones of the skull. Therefore, laterolateral standardised digital radiographs were used to determine anatomic reference points. Subsequently, five reference lines were defined and 16 linear and seven angular measurements were determined to describe malformations in the bones of the skull. Statistical analysis revealed a significant shortening of the rostral part of the corpus mandibulae and of the ramus mandibulae. However, the molar part of the mandible remained unchanged. These morphological changes caused premolar and molar malocclusion. No further craniofacial abnormalities, such as an elongation of the maxilla or of the incisive bone, were identified. In conclusion, the phenotypically observed mandibular distoclusion is caused by a shortening of specific parts of the mandible. This form of ovine craniofacial malformation is therefore best described as brachygnathia inferior.

  2. Debendox in early pregnancy and fetal malformation.

    PubMed

    Fleming, D M; Knox, J D; Crombie, D L

    1981-07-11

    During the mid-1960s, 22 977 pregnant women in Scotland and England were followed up prospectively for the incidence of malformations in their infants evident at birth or within six weeks. During the first 13 weeks of gestation 620 of these women had been prescribed Debendox (dicyclomine-doxylamine-pyridoxine) and 743 other women agents other than Debendox containing pyridoxine. Of the 620 women given Debendox, 589 (95%) had a normal outcome of pregnancy, 8 (13%) delivered a malformed infant, and 23 (3.7%) had other outcomes. Of the 22 357 women who were given Debendox, 445 (2.0%) produced infants with malformation; and the rates for all abnormal outcomes among women given Debendox and those not given the drug were 5.0% and 5.4% respectively. These results support the hypothesis that Debendox is not teratogenic.

  3. Debendox in early pregnancy and fetal malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, D M; Knox, J D; Crombie, D L

    1981-01-01

    During the mid-1960s, 22 977 pregnant women in Scotland and England were followed up prospectively for the incidence of malformations in their infants evident at birth or within six weeks. During the first 13 weeks of gestation 620 of these women had been prescribed Debendox (dicyclomine-doxylamine-pyridoxine) and 743 other women agents other than Debendox containing pyridoxine. Of the 620 women given Debendox, 589 (95%) had a normal outcome of pregnancy, 8 (13%) delivered a malformed infant, and 23 (3.7%) had other outcomes. Of the 22 357 women who were given Debendox, 445 (2.0%) produced infants with malformation; and the rates for all abnormal outcomes among women given Debendox and those not given the drug were 5.0% and 5.4% respectively. These results support the hypothesis that Debendox is not teratogenic. PMID:6789952

  4. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth.

  5. Middle and inner ear malformations in two siblings exposed to valproic acid during pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Houtte, Evelyne; Casselman, Jan; Janssens, Sandra; De Kegel, Alexandra; Maes, Leen; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2014-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a known teratogenic drug. Exposure to VPA during the pregnancy can lead to a distinct facial appearance, a cluster of major and minor anomalies and developmental delay. In this case report, two siblings with fetal valproate syndrome and a mild conductive hearing loss were investigated. Radiologic evaluation showed middle and inner ear malformations in both children. Audiologic, vestibular and motor examination was performed. This is the first case report to describe middle and inner ear malformations in children exposed to VPA.

  6. Atypical presentations in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Rath, G P; Bithal, P K; Chaturvedi, A

    2006-01-01

    Myelomeningocele with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus is a common association seen in infants with a congenital failure of neurulation. Here we report two cases of such an association presenting with different sets of problems. The first patient presented with severe inspiratory stridor due to bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis, which was relieved completely within 24 h of definitive surgery. The second patient experienced intraoperative cardiac arrest. Definitive surgery was followed after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The cause of the perioperative sequence of events in both cases is attributed to the associated pathologies of Chiari II malformation.

  7. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  8. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Cochlear Malformation.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Etsuko; Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Takahashi, Nozomi; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) has proven to be an effective treatment for severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Inner ear malformation is a rare anomaly and occurs in approximately 20% of cases with congenital SNHL. In cases with cochlear malformation, CI can be successfully performed in nearly all patients, the exceptions being those with complete labyrinthine and cochlear aplasia. It is important to evaluate the severity of inner ear deformity and other associated anomalies during the preimplantation radiological assessment in order to identify any complication that may potentially occur during the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  9. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  10. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations.

    PubMed

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders.

  11. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  12. PHACES syndrome and ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos

    2011-04-01

    PHACES syndrome is a spectrum of anomalies, P, posterior fossa anomalies as Dandy-Walker malformation; H, hemangioma; A, arterial lesions of the head and neck (the most commonly detected include dysplasia, aberrant origin or course, hypoplasia, and absence or agenesis); C, cardiac abnormalities as aortic coarctation; E, abnormalities of the eye and S, sternal defect, that may be present in up to 2% of children with facial hemangiomas and 20% of children with segmental facial hemangiomas. The constellation of PHACES syndrome symptoms may vary significantly between different patients. Major and minor criteria for PHACES syndrome have been recently described in order to improve their classification and management. We report the case of a newborn with PHACES syndrome, who had additional congenital defects including ectopia cordis as the most severe form of midline defect. Although the list and variety of published cardiac malformations in PHACES syndrome are extensive, ectopia cordis has not been previously reported.

  13. Cardiac and non-cardiac malformations produced by Mercury in hamsters. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    The susceptibility of the developing mammalian embryo to the adverse effects of mercury is well documented. A variety of organic mercury compounds have been demonstrated to produce embryotoxic effects in experimental animals. HARADA recently summarized the reports of human intrauterine methylmercury poisoning, i.e., congenital Minamata disease, resulting from the ingestion of contaminated food. Ongoing studies in this laboratory have involved several different aspects of the embryotoxicity produced by inorganic mercury in hamsters including a dose response study, the interaction of mercuric acetate with cadmium and zinc, the effect of different routes of administration, the placental permeability of /sup 203/Hg and the embryotoxic response in several different hamster strains. Little is known regarding a human syndrome of congenital malformations characterized by ectopia cordis, internal cardiac defects and abnormalities of the diaphragm and ventral body wall. Most papers regarding this human syndrome are clinical reports describing the characteristics and management of specific cases; only speculative information is provided regarding etiology and possible embryopathic mechanisms. The observation that a similar syndrome, which will be designated CNC for cardiac and non-cardiac malformations, can be produced by mercury in hamsters prompted the present study. The specific goals of this study were 1) to study the effect of treating pregnant hamsters at different times during embryonic organogenesis to determine the time which produces the highest incidence of the CNC syndrome and whether different treatment times modify the morphological characteristics of the inclusive malformations and 2) to study the structural features of all mercury-induced external and internal abnormalities of the CNC syndrome in late gestation fetuses.

  14. Cerebral vasospasm. Part I. In cerebral vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, J P; Kase, C S

    1983-01-01

    This review enumerates the many proposed mechanisms of vasospasm, including cellular elements, agents derived from the blood and injured cerebral tissues, alteration of calcium: magnesium ratios, free radical reactions, hypothalamic injury, clogging of the subarachnoid space, obstructions of the vasa vasorum and necrosis of the media with subintimal proliferation and intraluminal acidosis. At present, no single agent has been demonstrated as the only source of vasospasm, and whether the disorder is spasm or a chronic arteriopathy remains the subject of argument. The factors influencing the frequency, timing, severity and distribution of angiographically documented vasospasm are discussed, including data from our own population-based study over a 3 year period showing an incidence of vasospasm of 73%. Special emphasis is given to the observation that differences in patient populations play a major role in the incidence and severity of reported vasospasm: those from non-selective populations show a higher incidence of vasospasm and a greater severity of the syndromes attributed to spasm. Hypotheses are offered to account for the low frequency of vasospasm in hemorrhages from arteriovenous malformations and mycotic aneurysms. Clinical syndromes of vasospasm are reviewed, with special emphasis on our own material. The mode of onset and subsequent course of syndromes include those of sudden onset consistent with embolism, and those of gradual onset suggesting a low flow state. Their relationship to the severity of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and the vasospasm is presented. The paucity of syndromes of isolated deep infarcts of the lacunar type is noted. An account is given of the many failed therapies and the future hopes for early surgery. Innovations in medical therapy, including the use of some platelet inhibitors available only in some countries, and rationales for the use of aspirin and even heparin is discussed.

  15. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  16. Chiari I Malformation in Nephropathic Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kavya I; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative incidence of Chiari I malformations in children with cystinosis compared with those in the general population. Study design Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed on 53 patients with nephropathic cystinosis and 120 controls, age range 3-18 years. Results Ten of 53 (18.9%) cystinosis patients had Chiari I or tonsillar ectopia, and only 2 of 120 controls (1.6%) had a similar finding. At least 2 of the patients had symptoms or signs thought to be related to the malformation, and one had surgical decompression. Two had an associated cervical syrinx. Conclusions Children with cystinosis have a 12-fold higher prevalence of Chiari I malformations than the general pediatric population. Chiari I malformations should be high on the differential diagnosis when individuals with cystinosis develop neurologic signs and symptoms, and MRI scans should be performed on children with cystinosis who present with new-onset headache, ataxia, incontinence, or other unexplained neurologic symptoms. PMID:26265281

  17. Angular craniometry in craniocervical junction malformation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi

    2013-10-01

    The craniometric linear dimensions of the posterior fossa have been relatively well studied, but angular craniometry has been poorly studied and may reveal differences in the several types of craniocervical junction malformation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate craniometric angles compared with normal subjects and elucidate the main angular differences among the types of craniocervical junction malformation and the correlation between craniocervical and cervical angles. Angular craniometries were studied using primary cranial angles (basal and Boogard's) and secondary craniocervical angles (clivus canal and cervical spine lordosis). Patients with basilar invagination had significantly wider basal angles, sharper clivus canal angles, larger Boogard's angles, and greater cervical lordosis than the Chiari malformation and control groups. The Chiari malformation group does not show significant differences when compared with normal controls. Platybasia occurred only in basilar invagination and is suggested to be more prevalent in type II than in type I. Platybasic patients have a more acute clivus canal angle and show greater cervical lordosis than non-platybasics. The Chiari group does not show significant differences when compared with the control, but the basilar invagination groups had craniometric variables significantly different from normal controls. Hyperlordosis observed in the basilar inavagination group was associated with craniocervical kyphosis conditioned by acute clivus canal angles.

  18. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D'Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-02-10

    The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital malformations most frequently reported in literature or signaled by breeders to the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production of the University Federico II (Naples, Italy) in river buffalo are: musculoskeletal defects (transverse hemimelia, arthrogryposis, umbilical hernia) and disorders of sexual development. In conclusion this review put in evidence that river buffalo have a great variety of malformations due to genetic causes, and TH and omphalocele are the most frequent and that several cases are still not reported, leading to an underestimation of the real weight of genetic diseases in this species.

  19. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  20. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  1. Two Unique TUBB3 Mutations Cause Both CFEOM3 and Malformations of Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Mary C.; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Tischfield, Max A.; Stasheff, Steven F.; Brancati, Francesco; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma; Nuovo, Sara; Garaci, Francesco; MacKinnon, Sarah E.; Hunter, David G.; Grant, P. Ellen; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    One set of missense mutations in the neuron specific beta tubulin isotype 3 (TUBB3) has been reported to cause malformations of cortical development (MCD), while a second set has been reported to cause isolated or syndromic Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles type 3 (CFEOM3). Because TUBB3 mutations reported to cause CFEOM had not been associated with cortical malformations, while mutations reported to cause MCD had not been associated with CFEOM or other forms of paralytic strabismus, it was hypothesized that each set of mutations might alter microtubule function differently. Here, however, we report two novel de novo heterozygous TUBB3 amino acid substitutions, G71R and G98S, in four patients with both MCD and syndromic CFEOM3. These patients present with moderately severe CFEOM3, nystagmus, torticollis, and developmental delay, and have intellectual and social disabilities. Neuroimaging reveals defective cortical gyration, as well as hypoplasia or agenesis of the corpus callosum and anterior commissure, malformations of hippocampi, thalami, basal ganglia and cerebella, and brainstem and cranial nerve hypoplasia. These new TUBB3 substitutions meld the two previously distinct TUBB3-associated phenotypes, and implicate similar microtubule dysfunction underlying both. PMID:26639658

  2. Longevity and Patau syndrome: what determines survival?

    PubMed

    Peroos, Sherina; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pugh, Jennifer Harriet; Arthur-Farraj, Peter; Hodes, Deborah

    2012-12-06

    The authors report of an 8-year-old girl with non-mosaic Patau syndrome. The median life expectancy of Patau syndrome is 7-10 days, and 90% die in the first year of life. Survival is often attributed to mosaicism and the severity of associated malformations. We delineate the developing phenotype and review the literature discussing potential contributory factors to longevity.

  3. Fraser syndrome: recurrence in a family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Tandon, Indu; Deo, Sujata

    2007-12-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, genitourinary mal-formations and mental retardation. We report a family with affected child where the pregnant woman was referred at 24 weeks of gestation for termination of pregnancy. The aborted fetus showed typical findings suggestive of Fraser syndrome.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of cri du chat syndrome with encephalocele.

    PubMed

    Bakkum, Jamie N; Watson, William J; Johansen, Keith L; Brost, Brian C

    2005-10-01

    A 19-year-old primigravida was found to have an encephalocele on screening ultrasound study. Amniocentesis indicated cri du chat syndrome, 5p-. Although cri du chat syndrome has been noted in association with central nervous system malformations, encephalocele is a rare finding in this syndrome.

  5. PHACE syndrome and congenitally absent thyroid gland at MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Mark D; Yu, John-Paul J; Asch, Sarah; Mathes, Erin F

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and abnormalities of the eye. Thyroid disorders associated with PHACE syndrome have been described, although there are limited reports of this rare occurrence. We report a case of PHACE syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism in an infant, for which absent thyroid gland was diagnosed at magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. A Single-Center Experience of CNS Anomalies or Neural Tube Defects in Patients With Jarcho-Levin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Peker, Erdal; Gülşen, İsmail; Ağengin, Kemal; Kaba, Sultan; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2016-03-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS) is a genetic disorder characterized by distinct malformations of the ribs and vertebrae, and/or other associated abnormalities such as neural tube defect, Arnold-Chiari malformation, renal and urinary abnormalities, hydrocephalus, congenital cardiac abnormalities, and extremity malformations. The study included 12 cases at 37-42 weeks of gestation and diagnosed to have had Jarcho-Levin syndrome, Arnold-Chiari malformation, and meningmyelocele. All cases of Jarcho-Levin syndrome had Arnold-Chiari type 2 malformation; there was corpus callosum dysgenesis in 6, lumbosacral meningmyelocele in 6, lumbal meningmyelocele in 3, thoracal meningmyelocele in 3, and holoprosencephaly in 1 of the cases. With this article, the authors underline the neurologic abnormalities accompanying Jarcho-Levin syndrome and that each of these abnormalities is a component of Jarcho-Levin syndrome.

  7. [Fryns syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heljić, Suada; Terzić, Sabina; Dzinović, Amra; Mackić, Mirela

    2006-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an extremely rare developmental disorder associated with deletion of long arm of chromosome 16. Characteristics of the Fyns syndrome are: craniofacial dysmorfism, diaphragmatic defects with lung hypoplasia, distal digital hypoplasia, brain and urogenital abnormalities and other developmental disturbances. After the first description in two stillborn sisters by Fryns (1971), new reports appeared with descriptions included disorders which have not described previously. We described a case of female live born with deletion of long arm of chromosome 16. Our patient had a typical craniofacial dysmorfism, brain abnormalities (Dandy Walker malformation), cardiac defects (artial septal defect and persistent ductus arteriosus), renal hypoplasia, gastrointestinal problems, hypotonia and feeding difficulties. Our patient had no diaphragmatic hernia and he survived neonatal period with severe neurological impairment.

  8. Intestinal atresia, encephalocele, and cardiac malformations in infants with 47,XXX: Expansion of the phenotypic spectrum and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bağci, Soyhan; Müller, Andreas; Franz, Axel; Heydweiller, Andreas; Berg, Christoph; Nöthen, Markus M; Bartmann, Peter; Reutter, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the 47,XXX karyotype often occurs adventitiously during prenatal fetal karyotyping in cases of advanced maternal age. Although most females with 47,XXX appear healthy at birth, various types of congenital malformations have been reported, of which urinary tract anomalies are the most frequent. We report on 2 newborns with 47,XXX and congenital cardiac defects, one of whom had duodenal atresia and the other an occipital encephalocele. This expands the spectrum of malformations reported in association with the triple-X syndrome. We also present a review of the literature on non-urinary tract malformations in females with 47,XXX. We conclude that prenatal identification of the 47,XXX karyotype is an indication for detailed fetal ultrasonography which should include examination of multiple organ systems. Such prenatal screening for possible associated congenital malformations should help to ensure optimal perinatal clinical management of 47,XXX cases.

  9. Fraser syndrome in a 96-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Impallomeni, Mario; Subramanian, Deepak; Mahmood, Nazim; Illes, Joseph; Joseph, Illes

    2006-11-01

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the life expectancy is <1 year. The main features are cryptophthalmos, ear, nose and skeletal malformations, syndactyly, laryngeal stenosis and malformation of the uro-genital system, lungs, liver and central nervous system (CNS). We report the clinical, laboratory and post-mortem findings of this condition in an elderly woman aged 96 years. She is the oldest known patient with Fraser syndrome.

  10. A locus for cerebral cavernous malformations maps to chromosome 7q in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, D.A.; Gallione, C.J.; Morrison, L.A.; Davis, L.E.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1995-07-20

    Cavernous malformations (angiomas) affecting the central nervous system and retina can be inherited in autosomal dominant pattern (OMIM 116860). These vascular lesions may remain clinically silent or lead to a number of neurological symptoms including seizure, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit, and migraine. We have mapped a gene for this disorder in two families, one of Italian-American origin and one of Mexican-American origin, to markers on proximal 7q, with a combined maximum lod score of 3.92 ({theta} of zero) with marker D7S479. Haplotype analysis of these families places the locus between markers D7S502 proximally and D7S515 distally, an interval of approximately 41 cM. The location distinguishes this disorder from an autosomal dominant vascular malformation syndrome where lesions are primarily cutaneous and that maps to 9p21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [A malformation to know: os odontoideum. Report on two pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Cherradi Lachhab, I; Dafiri, R

    2014-04-01

    The os odontoideum, or mobile odontoid apophysis, is a malformation of the cervico-occipital hinge caused by missing unity in the ossification center of the dens on the body of the axis. This malformation induces atloaxial instability and exposes the subject to the risk of bulbar-medullary compression. The true incidence of this condition is difficult to determine because many cases are asymptomatic. The pathogenesis is discussed. Congenital and traumatic theories have been advanced. Clinically, the defect can be discovered incidentally or revealed by neck pain, a stiff neck, dizziness, or deficient syndrome. CT and MRI imaging can detect the defects, and allow one to study the impact on the contents of the spinal canal and detect lesions. We report two new os odontoideum observations in children aged 5 and 14 years who were referred for equilibrium disorders and tetraparesis, respectively.

  12. Partial urorectal septum malformation sequence in a kitten with disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brice S; Pain, Amélie; Meynaud-Collard, Patricia; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    A 2-month-old kitten exhibited simultaneously an imperforate anus, hypospadias, rectourethral fistula and genital dysgenesis (penis restricted to the glans, absence of prepuce and bifid scrotum). Surgical correction consisted of separation of the urinary and digestive tracts, perineal urethrostomy and connection of the rectum to the newly made anal opening. Pathological examination of the testes, conventionally removed at 9 months of age, showed no mature spermatozoa and underdevelopment of germ and Leydig cells. In humans, the absence of an anal opening in association with abnormal sexual development defines the urorectal septum malformation sequence. Here, we describe the first case of this syndrome in a kitten with a normal male karyotype (38,XY) and a normal coding sequence for the SRY gene. Both the rectourethral fistula and observed genital abnormalities might have been induced by a disturbance in the hedgehog signalling pathway. However, although four polymorphic sites were identified by DHH gene sequencing, none cosegregated with the malformation.

  13. Fraser syndrome: a new case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Bishoy S; Shehata, Bahig M

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos and cutaneous syndactyly. We present a case of Fraser syndrome with bilateral cryptophthalmos and other common features of Fraser syndrome including syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with clitoromegaly, vaginal atresia, and unilateral renal agenesis. We also present the major and minor diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and the frequency of associated malformations.

  14. Cytogenomic Aberrations in Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Mahshid; Lalani, Seema R.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cardiovascular malformations are the most common birth defects, with a complex multifactorial etiology. Genetic factors play an important role, illuminated by numerous cytogenetically visible abnormalities, as well as submicroscopic genomic imbalances affecting critical genomic regions in the affected individuals. Study of rare families with Mendelian forms, as well as emerging next-generation sequencing technologies have uncovered a multitude of genes relevant for human congenital cardiac diseases. It is clear that the complex embryology of human cardiac development, with an orchestrated interplay of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and signal transduction pathway molecules can be easily perturbed by genomic imbalances affecting dosage-sensitive regions. This review focuses on chromosomal abnormalities contributing to congenital heart diseases and underscores several genomic disorders linked to human cardiac malformations in the last few decades. PMID:27385961

  15. Occipitoatlantoaxial malformation in an adult goat.

    PubMed

    Seva, Juan I; Gómez, Serafin; Pallarés, Francisco J; Sánchez, Pedro; Bernabé, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    An occipitoatlantoaxial malformation was diagnosed in a 1-year-old Murciano-Granadina goat. At clinical examination, the head and cranial part of the neck were deviated to the right. Clinical signs of spinal cord or brain disease were not observed. At necropsy, morphological abnormalities were seen in the craniovertebral junction and cervical vertebrae, characterized by a firm attachment and incomplete articulation between the occipital bone and the atlas, and scoliosis in the cervical regions. The definitive diagnosis was bilateral asymmetrical occipitoatlantoaxial fusion with rotation of the atlas and atlantoaxial subluxation. To the authors' knowledge, this case report is the second occipitoatlantoaxial malformation described in a goat and the first description in an adult goat.

  16. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  17. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term "arteriovenous malformation," limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected.

  18. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  19. Embolization and radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Andres R.; Santillan, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) requires a multidisciplinary management including microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This article reviews the recent advancements in the multimodality treatment of patients with AVMs using endovascular neurosurgery and SRS. We describe the natural history of AVMs and the role of endovascular and radiosurgical treatment as well as their interplay in the management of these complex vascular lesions. Also, we present some representative cases treated at our institution. PMID:22826821

  20. Arteriovenous malformations: epidemiology and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Aki; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain are relatively rare congenital developmental vascular lesions. They may cause hemorrhagic stroke, epilepsy, chronic headache, or focal neurologic deficits, and the incidence of asymptomatic AVMs is increasing due to widespread availability of noninvasive imaging methods. Since the most severe complication of an AVM is hemorrhagic stroke, most epidemiologic studies have concentrated on the hemorrhage risk and its risk factors. In this article, the authors discuss the epidemiology, presenting symptoms, and hemorrhage risk associated with brain AVMs.

  1. A child with Roberts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Rabia; Waqar, Sahar; Ahmad, Tahir Masood; Irfan Waheed, Khawaja Ahmad; Sultan, Tipu; Qureshi, Ahmad Usaid

    2011-07-01

    Roberts syndrome is a genetically determined rare birth defect causing, skeletal deformities, particularly symmetrical limb reduction and craniofacial anomalies. For any child with limb and craniofacial bony malformations, this syndrome should be considered in the differentials. Although this syndrome represents only a small proportion of the total number of individuals with limb deficiency, it is important to be identified in order to give accurate genetic counselling including recurrence risk in siblings and possible prenatal diagnosis. This is the case report of a 22 days old male infant who presented with defective development of all four extremities and craniofacial abnormalities. The overall clinical and radiological features were suggestive of Roberts syndrome.

  2. "Moebius syndrome": a case report.

    PubMed

    Shashikiran, N D; Subba Reddy, V V; Patil, R

    2004-09-01

    Moebius syndrome is an extremely rare disorder characterized by a lifetime facial paralysis, involving sixth and seventh cranial nerves with malformations of orofacial structures and the limbs. In this case, an 8 year old girl with Moebius syndrome is presented, clinical findings are described and management aspects are discussed. Early dental evaluation and parental counselling as a part of preventive dental regimen can go a long way in providing complete psychosocial rehabilitation for such physically disabled children.

  3. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached. PMID:7437804

  4. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-11-22

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached.

  5. [Aicardi syndrome with Dandy-Walker type malformation].

    PubMed

    Laguado-Herrera, Yuly V; Manrique-Hernández, Edgar F; Peñaloza-Mantilla, Camilo A; Quintero-Gómez, David A; Contreras-García, Gustavo A; Sandoval-Martínez, Diana K

    2015-07-16

    Introduccion. El sindrome de Aicardi (OMIM 304050) fue descrito en 1965. Su triada clasica esta compuesta por espasmos infantiles, agenesia parcial o total del cuerpo calloso y alteraciones oculares, como lagunas coriorretinianas. Se postula un mecanismo de herencia ligado a X dominante. Caso clinico. Niña nacida a termino, sin antecedentes familiares patologicos ni consanguinidad parental, con diagnostico prenatal de malformacion tipo Dandy-Walker, quien presento episodios convulsivos, coloboma del nervio optico, bloque vertebral toracico con presencia de escoliosis, ecografia transfontanelar con agenesia del cuerpo calloso y cariotipo 46,XX. Se diagnostico de sindrome de Aicardi y fallecio con mes y medio de edad. En la autopsia se evidencio hidrocefalia supratentorial con presencia de papiloma de los plexos coroideos, quiste en la fosa posterior (cuarto ventriculo), hipoplasia del vermis cerebeloso, agenesia del hemisferio del cuerpo calloso y cerebeloso izquierdo, rasgos faciales caracteristicos del sindrome, paladar ojival, pectus excavatum, escoliosis, quiste paraovarico y hepatomegalia. Conclusiones. Pocos casos han descrito la asociacion de la patologia y la presencia de malformacion de Dandy-Walker. Se comunica un nuevo caso con esta asociacion, teniendo en cuenta que las alteraciones relacionadas, principalmente agenesia o hipoplasia del cuerpo calloso, sugieren que tiene un componente genetico de base. El estudio de busqueda de la etiologia de centrarse en evaluar aquellos genes que tengan relacion con el neurodesarrollo y su activacion en la etapa de organogenia. El diagnostico definitivo establece el pronostico, manejo y asesoria genetica a la familia.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... many cell activities, including cell growth and division (proliferation), movement (migration) of cells, and cell survival. These ... cells to grow and divide continuously. Increased cell proliferation leads to the overgrowth of the brain, blood ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... A, Isidor B, David A, Smyser CD, Paciorkowski AR, Willing M, Woulfe J, Das S, Beaulieu CL, Marcadier ... Free article on PubMed Central Mirzaa GM, Paciorkowski AR, Smyser CD, Willing MC, Lind AC, Dobyns WB. ...

  8. Sirenomelia: mermaid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodlow, O G; Sibley, R I; Allen, B G; Kamanda, W S; Gullattee, A C; Rayfield, W C

    1988-03-01

    Sirenomelia, or "mermaid syndrome," represents a severe form of caudal regression. It is a rare congenital malformation that is incompatible with life. In the following case report, a double inferior vena cava was also present, and this anomaly in association with sirenomelia has not been reported. Ultrasound may be useful in the early antenatal detection of this anomaly. This is the first case of sirenomelia reported in the black race.

  9. Congenital malformations of the ear and cochlear implantation in children: review and temporal bone report of common cavity.

    PubMed

    Graham, J M; Phelps, P D; Michaels, L

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this review is to analyze aspects of congenital malformation of the ear in relation to cochlear implantation in children. Having briefly described the in utero development of the ear and the classification of types of external, middle and inner ear malformation, five practical aspects of these malformations are discussed. It seems likely that the combination of bilateral profound sensorineural deafness with bilateral microtia severe enough to make a surgical approach to the cochlea difficult will be extremely uncommon. No such cases have been reported, although Klippel-Feil deformity seems the syndrome most likely to produce this set of circumstances. Abnormalities in the intratympanic course of the facial nerve have been associated with cochlear malformation, emphasizing the benefit of intra-operative facial nerve monitoring, and a technique suggested for safely avoiding an abnormally placed nerve. Fistulae of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and perilymph can complicate surgery and are relatively common in common cavity and Mondini malformations. Strategies for facilitating surgery in the presence of 'gushers', for measuring the pressure of a gusher and for placement of the cochlear implant electrode array are reviewed, with reports of fluctuating levels of electric current when implants lie in dysplastic cochleas. The relationship of implant performance to VIIIth nerve tissue in malformed cochleas is discussed, with a description of the histological findings in a common cavity cochlea. Techniques for identifying the absence of the cochlear nerve are reviewed. Stimulation of the facial nerve by cochlear implants has been described in cases of congenital malformation of the labyrinth but is relatively uncommon. Case reports of the benefit received by implanted children with congenital cochlear malformation have appeared since 1988. Most cases reported have not yet been followed for long enough to establish a clear picture of the outcome following

  10. Maternal homocystinuria and Moebius syndrome? Vascular aetiology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Anthony, M Y

    2011-02-14

    A case of Moebius syndrome is reported in an infant of a mother known to have pyridoxine-unresponsive homocystinuria. The authors suggest that Moebius syndrome could result from early vascular insufficiency or disruption occurring early in development related to maternal homocystinuria. Moebius syndrome consists of congenital complete or partial facial nerve palsy with or without paralysis of other cranial nerves and often in association with other malformations of the limbs and orofacial structures, but usually without gross structural brain abnormalities.

  11. Malformations in neotropical viperids: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, S S; Grego, K F; Lorigados, C A B; Fonseca-Pinto, A C B C; Fernandes, W; Sá-Rocha, L C; Catão-Dias, J L

    2013-11-01

    Malformations can occur in all living species, but there is little information about anomalies that occur in snakes and their frequency. This study assessed malformations in newborn South American pit vipers (Bothrops jararaca) and South American rattlesnakes (Crotalus durissus) from wild captured pregnant females (240 and 35 litters, respectively). Newborn snakes were measured, weighed, sexed and studied grossly and by radiography for the presence of malformations. Ninety-five malformed pit vipers were identified from 4,087 births (2.3%), while 36 malformed rattlesnakes were found from 324 births (11.1%). Spinal abnormalities were the most common in both species, followed by fusion of ventral scales. Pit vipers showed a greater range of malformations including schistosomia (22.1%), kinked tail (13.7%), bicephaly (3.1%) and hydrocephaly (2.1%).

  12. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents – diagnosis, clinic, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be

  13. Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations: Current Theory and Management

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Gresham T.; Friedman, Adva B.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumor. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. This paper reviews current theory and practice in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these more common vascular anomalies. PMID:22611412

  14. Chiari Type I malformation presenting with bilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dolgun, Habibullah; Turkoglu, Erhan; Kertmen, Hayri; Yilmaz, Erdal R; Sekerci, Zeki

    2009-09-01

    Chiari Type I malformations can present with several clinical signs and symptoms. We describe a 44-year-old female patient presenting with bilateral hearing loss with hydrocephalus coexisting with Chiari Type I malformation and a unilateral arachnoid cyst. Thus, sensorineural hearing loss may be caused by hydrocephalus with Chiari Type I malformation. The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt without a posterior fossa decompression is an effective treatment.

  15. [Diagnosis of fetal malformations with ultrasound--state of development].

    PubMed

    Fendel, M; Fendel, H

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonography is of great importance for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal malformations and abnormalities. An early diagnosis in the second trimester is of great interest for an intrauterine or an extrauterine therapy planning (the choice of the time and mode of delivery). Defects of the neural tube including hydrocephalus, malformations of the extremities, the gastrointestinal tract, omphaloceles, the urogenital and cardiac system are described. Four cases of fetal malformations are presented: fetal myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, bilateral hydronephrosis and lymphangioma with fetal ascites.

  16. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed.

  17. Progress and perspective of TBX6 gene in congenital vertebral malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yuzhi; Liu, Zhenlei; Liu, Sen; Zhu, Qiankun; Qiu, Guixing; Huang, Shishu; Giampietro, Philip F.; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformation is a series of significant health problems affecting a large number of populations. It may present as an isolated condition or as a part of an underlying syndromes occurring with other malformations and/or clinical features. Disruption of the genesis of paraxial mesoderm, somites or axial bones can result in spinal deformity. In the course of somitogenesis, the segmentation clock and the wavefront are the leading factors during the entire process in which TBX6 gene plays an important role. TBX6 is a member of the T-box gene family, and its important pathogenicity in spinal deformity has been confirmed. Several TBX6 gene variants and novel pathogenic mechanisms have been recently revealed, and will likely have significant impact in understanding the genetic basis for CVM. In this review, we describe the role which TBX6 plays during human spine development including its interaction with other key elements during the process of somitogenesis. We then systematically review the association between TBX6 gene variants and CVM associated phenotypes, highlighting an important and emerging role for TBX6 and human malformations. PMID:27437870

  18. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neurophatic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarly based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients. PMID:20018097

  19. Notch receptor expression in human brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hill-Felberg, Sandra; Wu, Hope Hueizhi; Toms, Steven A; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-08-01

    The roles of the Notch pathway proteins in normal adult vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of brain arteriovenous malformations are not well-understood. Notch 1 and 4 have been detected in human and mutant mice vascular malformations respectively. Although mutations in the human Notch 3 gene caused a genetic form of vascular stroke and dementia, its role in arteriovenous malformations development has been unknown. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry screening on tissue microarrays containing eight surgically resected human brain arteriovenous malformations and 10 control surgical epilepsy samples. The tissue microarrays were evaluated for Notch 1-4 expression. We have found that compared to normal brain vascular tissue Notch-3 was dramatically increased in brain arteriovenous malformations. Similarly, Notch 4 labelling was also increased in vascular malformations and was confirmed by western blot analysis. Notch 2 was not detectable in any of the human vessels analysed. Using both immunohistochemistry on microarrays and western blot analysis, we have found that Notch-1 expression was detectable in control vessels, and discovered a significant decrease of Notch 1 expression in vascular malformations. We have demonstrated that Notch 3 and 4, and not Notch 1, were highly increased in human arteriovenous malformations. Our findings suggested that Notch 4, and more importantly, Notch 3, may play a role in the development and pathobiology of human arteriovenous malformations.

  20. A case report: Pulmonary venous malformation complicated with pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Supakul, Nucharin; Fan, Rong; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary venous malformation is extremely rare. We present imaging and clinical findings of a 17-year-old male with multifocal subcutaneous venous malformations and multiple cystic lesions in the liver and spleen, suggestive of slow flow vascular malformation. In the right lung, chest radiography followed by chest CT demonstrated large tortuous pulmonary veins and cystic emphysematous changes. Tc99m-MAA (pertechnetate-labeled macroaggregated albumin) lung perfusion scan demonstrated only 3% of normal perfusion to the right lung, with no evidence of arteriovenous shunting. The child had diffuse intraparenchymal hemorrhage throughout the right lower and middle lobes and underwent resection. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of venous malformation complicated with bleeding.

  1. EGFR mutation of adenocarcinoma in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-03-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the resection of multiple cysts accompanied by a nodule. The pathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma with surrounding atypical epithelial cell proliferation in a Type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation. There was epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in the adenocarcinoma and surrounding atypical epithelial cells that had proliferated. Malignant transformation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation may be related to the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in this case, with atypical epithelial cell proliferation as a precursor. We emphasize the importance of complete resection of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the possibility of treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated cases.

  2. Currarino syndrome and spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Kole, Matthew J; Fridley, Jared S; Jea, Andrew; Bollo, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Currarino syndrome is a rare constellation of congenital anomalies characterized by the triad of sacral dysgenesis, presacral mass, and anorectal malformation. It is frequently associated with other congenital anomalies, often including occult spinal dysraphism. Mutations in the MNX1 gene are identified in the majority of cases. The authors report a rare case of Currarino syndrome in an infant with tethered cord syndrome and a dorsal lipomyelomeningocele continuous with a presacral intradural spinal lipoma, in addition to an imperforate anus and a scimitar sacrum. They review the literature to highlight patterns of occult spinal dysraphism in patients with Currarino syndrome and their relationship to tethered cord syndrome. Approximately 60% of the patients with Currarino syndrome reported in the literature have an occult spinal dysraphism. Published studies suggest that the risk of tethered cord syndrome may be higher among patients with a lipoma and lower among those with a teratoma or anterior meningocele.

  3. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  4. Congenital malformations and genetic diseases in comic books.

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, A; Adib, S M

    2003-01-01

    Medical syndromes have often been represented in fine arts, but rarely have clinical diagnoses been discussed in comic book characters. Since their first appearance in Europe in the middle of the 19th century and in America in 1895, comic books have been considered as "the 9th art". In many comic books, the appearance and/or the behavior of central or support characters are suggestive of already well-defined medical disorders. The representation of five particular groups or clinical features: mental retardation, abnormal stature, abnormal hair, obesity, and cranial malformations is discussed from mostly European comic series. Whether comic authors intended to describe specific clinical entities while drawing their characters or whether such situations appeared by mere luck, is open to debate. In many series from the first half of the 20th century characters with remarkable clinical features were also painted as psycho-social deviants. Such stereotypes are found much less frequently nowadays. Writers of comic books, realizing the major impact of their work especially in adolescent age groups, have increasingly been using their series to actually promote issues of equity and well being for physically or mentally impaired people.

  5. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z.

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  6. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christopher C.; Steinbacher, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a genetic disorder resulting in congenital craniofacial malformation. Patients typically present with downslanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid colobomas, microtia, and malar and mandibular hypoplasia. This autosomal dominant disorder has a variable degree of phenotypic expression, and patients have no associated developmental delay or neurologic disease. Care for these patients requires a multidisciplinary team from birth through adulthood. Proper planning, counseling and surgical techniques are essential for optimizing patient outcomes. Here the authors review the features, genetics, and treatment of Treacher Collins syndrome. PMID:23633935

  7. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  8. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  9. BIOLOGY OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS OF THE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Gabrielle G.; Golanov, Eugene; Awad, Issam A.; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose This review discusses recent research on the genetic, molecular, cellular, and developmental mechanisms underlying the etiology of vascular malformations of the brain (VMBs), including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and the AVMs of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Summary of Review The identification of gene mutations and genetic risk factors associated with CCM, HHT, and sporadic AVM has enabled the development of animal models for these diseases and provided new insights into their etiology. All of the genes associated with VMBs to date have known or plausible roles in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Recent work suggests that the angiogenic process most severely disrupted by VMB gene mutation is that of vascular stabilization, the process whereby vascular endothelial cells form capillary tubes, strengthen their intercellular junctions, and recruit smooth muscle cells to the vessel wall. In addition, there is now good evidence that in some cases CCM lesion formation involves a genetic two-hit mechanism, in which a germline mutation in one copy of a CCM gene is followed by a somatic mutation in the other copy. There is also increasing evidence that environmental second hits can produce lesions when there is a mutation to a single allele of a VMB gene. Conclusions Recent findings begin to explain how mutations in VMB genes render vessels vulnerable to rupture when challenged with other inauspicious genetic or environmental factors, and have suggested candidate therapeutics. Understanding of the cellular mechanisms of VMB formation and progression in humans has lagged behind that in animal models. New knowledge of lesion biology will spur new translational work. Several well-established clinical and genetic database efforts are already in place, and further progress will be facilitated by collaborative expansion and standardization of these. PMID:19834013

  10. Oral vascular malformations: laser treatment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Rocchetti, F.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Lo Giudice, G.

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations are a very heterogeneous group of circulatory system's diseases that can involve different kind of vessels: arterial, venous or lymphatic ones. Many treatments, such as conventional surgery, embolization, steroid therapy and laser therapy, are available for vascular lesions. The laser approach relies more therapeutic techniques: the transmucosal thermophotocoagulation, intralesional photocoagulation, the excisional biopsy. Today laser is demonstrated to be the gold standard technique to treat vascular lesions that allows a safe and efficient treatment and a lower post-operative healing time. The only disadvantage is the risk of carbonization that could be avoided by using the multiple-spot single pulsed wave technique.

  11. [Recurrent meningitis in inner ear malformations].

    PubMed

    Claros, Pedro; Matusialk, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Authors present two cases of children with reccurent meningitis and unilateral deafness. Implemented diagnostics (CT, NMR, ABR) revealed one side inner ear congenital malformation in one case and anterior fossa bony defect accompanied by labirynthine deformation in the other case. The presence of perilymphatic fistulae in oval and round windows and cerebrospinal fluid leakage has been confirmed in both cases during surgery. Carefull obliteration of the Eustachian tube and both windows has been performed. Non- complicated postoperative course (2 months and 6 years - respectively) has prooved the effectiveness of applied treatment.

  12. Congenital malformations of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shraddha S; Parmar, Hemant A; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Mukherji, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    Congenital ear or temporal bone malformations are a diagnostic challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Newer imaging techniques can detect subtle changes in middle ear and cochlear anatomy. This information is invaluable with increasing use of hearing restoration surgeries and/or cochlear implants in such patients. This article discusses the embryogenesis, classification system, and salient imaging findings of congenital outer, middle ear, and inner ear anomalies in children. Both high-resolution computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the temporal bones are described.

  13. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  14. Prevalence at birth of congenital malformations in communities near the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Hessol, N.A.; Gilbert, E.S.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of congenital malformations among births in Benton and Franklin counties, in southeastern Washington State, from 1968 through 1980. The Hanford Site is in this area and serves as a major employer. In addition, various agriculturally and chemically related activities are in the area. Hospital and vital records were used to identify 454 malformation cases among 23,319 births; this yielded a malformation rate of 19.6 per 1000 births, a rate similar to those reported in other studies. The rates of specific malformations ascertained during the first year of life were compared with combined rates from the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho from the Birth Defects Monitoring Program. Among defects that would be expected to be comparably ascertained, a statistically significant elevated rate of neural tube defects was observed (1.72 per 1000 births vs. 0.99 per 1000). Rates of cleft lip were significantly lower in Benton and Franklin counties than in the Birth Defects Monitoring Program (0.59 per 1,000 vs. 1.17 per 1000). For congenital heart defects, pyloric stenosis, and Down syndrome, which are often not diagnosed in the newborn period, Birth Defects Monitoring Program data did not offer appropriate comparisons. The rates of these defects did not appear to be elevated in relation to rates found in other relevant populations. When rates of neural tube defects were compared with those in populations other than the Birth Defects Monitoring Program, the Benton and Franklin county rates were still considered to be elevated. The increased bicounty rate cannot be explained by employment of the parents at Hanford or by the impact of plant emissions on the local population.

  15. Lethal pallister-killian syndrome: Phenotypic similarity with fryns syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ignacio Rodriquez, J.; Garcia, I.; Alvarez, J.; Delicado, A.; Palacios, J.

    1994-11-01

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, profound mental retardation, and epilepsy. Chromosomes of peripheral lymphocytes are usually normal, but tissue cultures show varying degrees of mosaicism for isochromosome 12p. In babies who die neonatally of severe malformations, including diaphragmatic hernia, and who also have a {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, and other internal anomalies, Fryns syndrome is more likely to be suspected than Pallister-Killian syndrome, especially if karyotyping is unavailable or if peripheral lumphocytes have a normal chromosome constitution. An initial diagnosis of Fryns syndrome had to be modified in 3 successive newborn infants since chromosome analysis or in situ hybridization with a chromosome 12 probe on kidney tissue demonstrated the mosaic aneuploidy characteristic of Pallister-Killian syndrome. These 3 patients confirm that a similar pattern of malformations can be present in both conditions at birth. It consists of {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and other defects. Newborn infants who present this phenotype, but lack a conclusively normal chromosome test, may not have Fryns syndrome. A diagnosis of Fryns syndrome should be made carefully to avoid the risk of inappropriate genetic counseling. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant condition, readily recognisable in childhood. It is characterised by a pattern of typical facial dysmorphism and malformations including congenital cardiac defects, short stature, abnormal chest shape, broad or webbed neck, and a variable learning disability. Mildly affected adults may not be diagnosed until the birth of a more obviously affected child. The phenotype is highly variable. Important progress in understanding the molecular basis of this and other related conditions was made in 2001 when germline mutations in the PTPN11 gene were found to account for ∼50% of cases. Since then, mutations in additional genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) pathway have been identified in a proportion of the remainder. Molecular confirmation of diagnosis is now possible for many families and has become increasingly important in guiding management. Increased awareness by paediatricians will lead to earlier diagnosis, and provide patients and their families with accurate genetic counselling, including options when planning pregnancy.

  17. Congenital Malformations Attributed to Prenatal Exposure to Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Padmanabhan

    2016-12-06

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) remains one of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs. It is also used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, childhood nephrotic syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. It is a potent immunosuppressive agent. It is commonly used in blood and bone marrow transplantation. With the growing trend among women postponing childbearing, the number of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer is also increasing thus escalating the chances of exposure of the unborn child to antineoplastic drugs. A review of the literature provides strong evidence for the teratogenic effects on infants prenatally exposed to CPA. Both sporadic case reports and larger case series have demonstrated that babies with cyclophosphamide embryopathy are afflicted with intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, and craniofacial malformations including eye anomalies, cleft/arched palate, hydrocephaly, micrognathia, low set microtia, hearing defects, craniosynostosis, and facial asymmetry. Also observed in these cases are limb defects such as radial, ulnar and tibial hypoplasia, club foot, digital defects of the hand and feet as well as vertebral fusion, brevicolis, and occasional Sprengel's deformity. These anomalies vary in consistency of occurrence and severity of the phenotype across cases and lack the specificity of thalidomide embryopathy or rubella embryopathy. However, that they do occur is no longer in doubt. First trimester of pregnancy seems to be particularly susceptible to fetal malformations, although CPA effects on fetuses of later stages of gestation (hearing defects, growth restriction for example) are also reported occasionally. One of the major concerns from a mechanistic point of view is our inability to dissect the teratogenic effects of CPA from those of other drugs administered together with CPA as combination therapy. Animal experiments have been of particular value in that they are able to circumvent the numerous extraneous

  18. Stenogyria - not only in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Brągoszewska, Hanna; Duczkowski, Marek; Mierzewska, Hanna

    2014-12-15

    Stenogyria, meaning multiple small compacted gyri separated by shallow sulci, is reported in the literature in association with Chiari II malformation (CM II) which in turn is reported in association with myelomeningocele (MMC). The authors present five cases of stenogyria (and other abnormalities found in CM II, like callosal hypoplasia/dysplasia, agenesis of the anterior commissure, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri) in children without the history of MMC or any other form of open spinal dysraphism. In these cases stenogyria was associated with Chiari I malformation, rhombencephalosynapsis and spina bifida. Stenogyria, which is not a true neuronal migration disorder, should not be mistaken for polymicrogyria which is also present in CM II. It is histologically different from polymicrogyria because the cortex is normally organized. Also on MRI, the general sulcal pattern is preserved in stenogyria, while it is completely distorted in polymicrogyria. The authors conclude that features traditionally attributed to CM II, like stenogyria, occur not only in the population of patients with MMC as opposed to the widely accepted theory.

  19. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity.

  20. Sirenomelia and caudal malformations in two families.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Marion; Layet, Valérie; Costa, Teresa; Roumazeilles, Yves; Chenal, Pierre; Cailliez, Daniel; Gerard, Bénédicte

    2012-07-01

    We report on two families with co-occurrence of sirenomelia and caudal malformations. In the first family, the mother had undergone surgery for a short form of imperforate anus. Her first pregnancy was terminated because of bilateral renal agenesis with oligohydramnios. Her second pregnancy was interrupted because of sirenomelia. The second family was referred to us because of caudal malformation in their two children. The parents' spinal radiographs were normal. The first pregnancy resulted in a girl with imperforate anus, absence of S3-S5 and coccyx, abnormal pelvic floor, and an almost bifid anteriorly located bladder. The second pregnancy resulted in a baby girl with sirenomelia. No diabetes was present during the pregnancies in either of these two families. These families confirm the hypothesis that major genes are responsible for the embryogenesis of the caudal part of the embryo, with variable expression, as has been already described in sirenomelia mouse models (CYP26A1, BMP7/tsg). Molecular studies are underway in these families and in sporadic cases in our laboratory to explore the genetic basis of sirenomelia in humans.

  1. The value of screening for multiple arterio-venous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Folz, Benedikt J; Wollstein, Ana Cerra; Alfke, Heiko; Dünne, Anja A; Lippert, Burkard M; Görg, Konrad; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Bien, Siegfried; Werner, Jochen A

    2004-10-01

    Occult visceral arterio-venous malformations (AVMs) may be a constant threat to patients suffering from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome (M. ROW). HHT patients predominantly become symptomatic through chronic, recurrent epistaxis, a symptom that can alert physicians at an early stage of the disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether occult, visceral arterio-venous malformations could be detected by screening imaging studies in patients suffering from HHT. In a comprehensive diagnostic study, Rendu-Osler-Weber patients were examined for potential visceral arterio-venous malformations by physical examination and non-invasive imaging techniques. The Department of Otolaryngology of the Philipps University of Marburg is a major referral center and coordinated the screening procedures. Thirty-five individuals with the presumed diagnosis of HHT gave informed consent to the screening investigations. Eighteen of 35 individuals were found to suffer from visceral vascular malformations; most of the AVMs were diagnosed in the lung, but also the liver, spleen, brain and eyes were affected. Six patients could be treated preventively by arterial embolization for AVMs of the lung, liver and brain. Comprehensive screening for occult AVMs in HHT patients seems to be justified to avert potential complications in this group of patients.

  2. Pathogenesis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Hydrodynamics of the Chiari I Malformation.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Heiss, John D; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-10-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the Chiari I malformation that is based on observations of the anatomy visualized by modern imaging with MRI and prospective studies of the physiology of patients before and after surgery. The pathogenesis of a Chiari I malformation of the cerebellar tonsils is grouped into 4 general mechanisms.

  3. Glomuvenous Malformation: A Rare Periorbital Lesion of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Katherine M; Godfrey, Kyle J; Solomon, James P; Lin, Jonathan H; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O

    Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), previously referred to as glomus tumors or glomangiomas, are benign, mesenchymal venous malformations arising from glomus bodies. Glomus bodies are modified smooth muscle neuromyoarterial structures involved in temperature regulation via blood shunting. These classically occur in the digits but can occur in other locations. The authors present a case of a periorbital GVM presented following blunt trauma to the area.

  4. Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformation associated with chylous ascites.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Maria; Martín-Santiago, Ana; Gómez, Cristina; Fiol, Miquel; Benítez-Segura, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformation (GVM) is caused by loss of function mutations in glomulin gene. We report a newborn with this rare vascular disorder associated with chylous ascites. The common mesenchymal origin of GVM and lymphatic vessels as well as the glomulin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells in utero could help explain this unusual prenatal complication of glomuvenous malformations.

  5. [The progress of inner ear malformation in radiological research].

    PubMed

    Kong, Dehua; Fu, Kuang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear malformations are anomalies linking to development insults at different periods of embryogenesis,which are common causes of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The evaluation of pediatric sensorineural hearing loss mostly depends on high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, which can excellently depict the temporal bones and inner ear malformations.

  6. Variations of some elements in cadmium-induced malformed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, S.

    1981-08-01

    Reports of malformation induced by cadmium such as the appearance of vertebral anomalies in carp have been described by the present author. In this paper, the appearance of such malformed fish by exposure to cadmium was confirmed in a repeat experiment. Decalcification of the fish was studied from spinal x-ray photographs and the results of some elements analysis.

  7. Identifying Aarskog Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mufeed, Abdullah; Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Hasoon, Umer

    2016-01-01

    Aarskog syndrome also known as Aarskog-Scott Syndrome, Facio-digito-genital Syndrome or Faciogenital Dysplasia is a rare, X-linked disorder predominantly affecting males, characterized by facial, skeletal and genital anomalies. This is a case report of a 15-year-old male patient who visited our college complaining of poor facial aesthetics. History revealed consanguinity and his sibling to be suffering from the same. A diagnosis of Aarskog syndrome was made based upon the detailed patient history, thorough clinical evaluation and identification of characteristic findings in radiographs. Professional counselling explained him the nature of his condition and treatment options to correct dental anomalies and congenital malformations were advised. PMID:28209013

  8. [Cochlear implant for malformations of the inner ear].

    PubMed

    Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Maier, W; Beck, R; Schild, C; Birkenhäger, R; Wesarg, T; Kröger, S; Arndt, S

    2009-06-01

    The radiologic evaluation of the temporal bone in cochlear implant candidates can detect malformations of the inner ear in up to 20% of cases. The aim of our study was to analyze and classify malformations of the inner ear in patients with cochlear implants carried out from 2001 to 2009. Malformations of the inner ear, including malformations of the internal auditory canal were detected in 12.7% of children and 3.4% of adults. Mondini dysplasia was most common and occurred in 45% of cases. The surgical procedure had to be adapted according to the individual malformation. Modification of surgical access, management of intraoperative CSF gusher, choice of electrode array, intraoperative imaging and the use of navigation were the most important factors. Rehabilitation results were generally very positive and corresponded to the expectation depending on the duration of deafness, if no additional handicaps were present.

  9. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  10. Venous malformations: classification, development, diagnosis, and interventional radiologic management.

    PubMed

    Legiehn, Gerald M; Heran, Manraj K S

    2008-05-01

    Venous malformations are categorized as low-flow vascular malformations within the domain of vascular anomalies and are the most common vascular malformation encountered clinically. Venous malformations are by definition present at birth, undergo pari passu growth, and present clinically because of symptoms related to mass effect or stasis. Although diagnosis can usually be made by clinical history and examination, differentiation from other vascular and nonvascular entities often requires an imaging work-up that includes ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and diagnostic phlebography. All decisions regarding imaging work-up and decision to treat must be coordinated though referral and discussions with a multidisciplinary team and be based on clearly defined clinical indications. Percutaneous image-guided sclerotherapy has become the mainstay of treatment for venous malformations and involves the introduction of any one of a number of endothelial-cidal sclerosants into the vascular spaces of the lesion, with each sclerosant possessing its own unique spectrum of advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Intrafamilial variability in Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prasun, Pankaj; Pradhan, Mandakini; Goel, Himanshu

    2007-08-01

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutanaeous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation and musculoskeletal anomalies. There is marked interfamilial clinical heterogeneity. However, there is strong phenotypic similarity and concordance of the degree of severity of the disease within a family. We report a family with two cases of Fraser syndrome with marked clinical heterogeneity. One case had lethal phenotype with bilateral renal agenesis, while the other had mild phenotype with normal kidneys. It has not been reported before and highlights the importance of careful screening of pregnancies in families with Fraser syndrome.

  12. Pallister-Killian syndrome: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chung; Lin, Lung-Huang; Tsai, Li-Ping; Huang, Cheng-Hung; Hung, Kun-Long; Liao, Hung-Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Pallister-Killian Syndrome (PKS) is a rare sporadic congenital anomaly disorder, characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, especially craniofacial dysmorphism. It is also associated with mental retardation, seizure, skin pigmentation, and visceral malformations such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart defect, anorectal anomalies, and genital malformation. This syndrome usually presents with tissue-limited mosaicism of supernumerary 12p isochromosome i (12p). Moreover, diagnosis of Pallister-Killian Syndrome (PKS) is difficult because the ratio of abnormal to normal karyotyping is much lower in peripheral lymphocytes than in skin fibroblasts. We report the first case in Taiwan, who has tetrasomy 12p mosaic in peripheral lymphocytes.

  13. Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II with otolaryngological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Havle, A; Shedge, S; Malashetti, S; Jain, V

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of oro-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr's syndrome) which is characterized by malformations of the oral cavity, face and digits. The facial and oral features include tongue nodules, cleft or high-arched palate, missing teeth, broad nose; cleft lip. The digital features include clinodactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, brachydactyly and duplication of the hallux.

  14. Moebius syndrome with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Jyoti; Bagnawar, Mahananda; Deshmukh, C T

    2006-05-01

    Moebius syndrome is characterized by congenital complete or partial facial nerve palsy with or without paralysis of cranial nerves and often associated with other malformations. Cardiac anomalies though known are very rare and till date only 4 cases have been reported. We present a case of Moebius syndrome with supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection which has not yet been reported in literature.

  15. Fraser syndrome with partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajoo; Bhattacharya, Arunaloke

    2008-06-01

    Fraser syndrome is characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation, and musculoskeletal anomalies. We report a case of a two day old neonate who presented with features suggestive of the diagnosis of Fraser syndrome. This child also had partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection and congenital hypo-thyroidism.

  16. Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome in siblings: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Gokulraj, Sabitha; Mohan, N.; Raj, J. Babususai; Ahamed, S. Yasmeen; Arokiaraj, C. J. Stephen; Subbulakshmi, A. Cicilia

    2016-01-01

    Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome or chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting several skeletal manifestations and congenital heart malformations. Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome comprises of a tetrad of clinical manifestations of chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac defects. Here, we are presenting a very rare case of Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome in siblings. PMID:27829775

  17. Wildervanck's syndrome with severe inner ear dysplasia and agenesis of the right internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Mónica; Urbasos, María; Amarillo, Viviana Elizabeth; Herrera, María Teresa; García-Peces, Victoria; Plaza, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    We describe a case with Wildervanck syndrome (cervico-oculo-acoustic syndrome) comprising Klippel-Feil anomaly, retractio bulbi (Duane syndrome), and congenital sensorineural deafness. An 18-month male baby had a severe inner ear dysplasia, and MRI also showed a complex vascular carotid malformation associated.

  18. A case of Norman-Roberts syndrome identified from postnatal diagnosis of microlissencephaly.

    PubMed

    Tosello, Barthélémy; Brévaut-Malaty, Véronique; Chaumoître, Kathia; Gire, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Lissencephaly is a rare brain malformation. What differentiates microlissencephaly from classical lissencephaly and other variants is the presence of severe microcephaly. Very few postnatal cases of Norman-Roberts syndrome are described in the literature. We report a case of microlissencephaly with a polymalformative syndrome that prompted postnatal diagnosis of Norman-Roberts syndrome.

  19. Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  20. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  1. Congenital cardiovascular malformations and the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, A M

    2010-03-01

    After birth, gas exchange is achieved in the lung, whereas prenatally it occurs in the placenta. This is associated with differences in blood flow patterns in the fetus as compared with the postnatal circulation. Congenital cardiovascular malformations are associated with haemodynamic changes in the fetus, which differ from those occurring postnatally. Obstruction to cardiac outflow may alter myocardial development, resulting in progressive ventricular hypoplasia. Alteration of oxygen content may profoundly influence pulmonary vascular and ductus arteriosus responses. Interference in blood flow and oxygen content may affect cerebral development as a result of inadequate oxygen or energy substrate supply. The circulatory effects may be gestational dependent, related to maturation of vascular responses in different organs. These prenatal influences of congenital cardiac defects may severely affect immediate, as well as longterm, postnatal prognosis and survival. This has stimulated the development of techniques for palliation of disturbed circulation during fetal life.

  2. Small Rho-GTPases and cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rho-GTPases have been found to be crucial for cytoskeleton remodelling and cell polarity, as well as key players in directed cell migration in various tissues and organs, therefore becoming good candidates for involvement in neuronal migration disorders. We recently found that genetic deletion of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse cerebral cortex results in three distinct cortical malformations: a defect in the proliferation of progenitor cells during development that leads to a bigger cerebral cortex in the adult mouse, a change in the morphology of radial glial cells that results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH, also called Double Cortex) and an increase in the speed of migrating newborn neurons. The latter, together with the aberrant radial glial shape, is likely to be the cause of cobblestone lissencephaly, where neurons protrude beyond layer I at the pial surface of the brain. PMID:23524873

  3. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  4. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding.

  5. Temporary umbilical loop colostomy for anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshinori; Takada, Kohei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Sato, Masahito; Kwon, A-Hon

    2012-11-01

    Transumbilical surgical procedures have been reported to be a feasible, safe, and cosmetically excellent procedure for various pediatric surgical diseases. Umbilical loop colostomies have previously been created in patients with Hirschsprung's disease, but not in patients with anorectal malformations (ARMs). We assessed the feasibility and cosmetic results of temporal umbilical loop colostomy (TULC) in patients with ARMs. A circumferential skin incision was made at the base of the umbilical cord under general anesthesia. The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia were cored out vertically, and the umbilical vessels and urachal remnant were individually ligated apart from the opening in the fascia. A loop colostomy was created in double-barreled fashion with a high chimney more than 2 cm above the level of the skin. The final size of the opening in the skin and fascia was modified according to the size of the bowel. The bowel wall was fixed separately to the peritoneum and fascia with interrupted 5-0 absorbable sutures. The bowel was opened longitudinally and everted without suturing to the skin. The loop was divided 7 days postoperatively, and diversion of the oral bowel was completed. The colostomy was closed 2-3 months after posterior saggital anorectoplasty through a peristomal skin incision followed by end-to-end anastomosis. Final wound closure was performed in a semi-opened fashion to create a deep umbilicus. TULCs were successfully created in seven infants with rectourethral bulbar fistula or rectovestibular fistula. Postoperative complications included mucosal prolapse in one case. No wound infection or spontaneous umbilical ring narrowing was observed. Skin problems were minimal, and stoma care could easily be performed by attaching stoma bag. Healing of umbilical wounds after TULC closure was excellent. The umbilicus may be an alternative stoma site for temporary loop colostomy in infants with intermediate-type anorectal malformations, who undergo radical

  6. Genetic Screening of Pediatric Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Merello, Elisa; Pavanello, Marco; Consales, Alessandro; Mascelli, Samantha; Raso, Alessandro; Accogli, Andrea; Cama, Armando; Valeria, Capra; De Marco, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations mostly located within the central nervous system. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10 genes are identified in about 90 % of familial cases of CCMs and two thirds of sporadic cases with multiple lesions. In this study, we performed genetic screening of a cohort of 31 patients, mainly pediatric. We analyzed the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing of exons and intronic boundaries. A total of 9 typical pathogenic loss-of-function mutations were identified in 10 out 31 patients (32 %). The 75 % of familial cases were mutated and the percentage reached to 85 % when we consider only pediatric cases. Detection rate in sporadic cases with multiple lesions was considerably lower (16 %). We identified a novel variant of CCM3, the c.130-131insT (p.R45Efs*8), in 1 pediatric sporadic case with multiple lesions that introduced a premature termination codon into the messenger RNA (mRNA), most likely leading to mRNA decay. Similar to other CCM pediatric series, the main symptoms associated to clinical debut consisted of cerebral hemorrhage. In conclusion, the penetrance of CCM mutations in familial pediatric cases is high (85 %). The genetic workup could improve clinical and genetic counseling in CCM patients. Moreover, we confirmed the high risk of hemorrhage in children with CCMs.

  7. Fetal Valproate Syndrome with Limb Defects: An Indian Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok; Sharma, Manish; Mathur, Priyanshu; Bansal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common disorder and exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy increases the risk of teratogenicity. Older AEDs such as valproate and phenobarbital are associated with a higher risk of major malformations in the fetus than newer AEDs like lamotrigine and levetiracetam. Exposure to valproic acid during first trimester can result in fetal valproate syndrome (FVS), comprising typical facial features, developmental delay, and a variety of malformations such as neural tube defects, cardiac and genitourinary malformations, and limb defects. We are presenting an Indian case of FVS with major limb defects. PMID:28003925

  8. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended.

  9. Chronic daily headache in the adults: differential diagnosis between symptomatic Chiari I malformation and spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Mea, Eliana; Chiapparini, Luisa; Leone, Massimo; Franzini, Angelo; Messina, Giuseppe; Bussone, Gennaro

    2011-12-01

    This article briefly reviews the spectrum of headaches associated with Chiari type I malformation (CMI) and specifically analyzes the current data on the possibility of this malformation as an etiology for some cases of chronic daily headache (CDH). CMI is definitely associated with cough headache and not with primary episodic headaches, with the rare exception of basilar migraine-like cases. With regard to CDH, there is no clear evidence supporting an association with CMI. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study would be justified only in patients showing either a Valsalva-aggravating component or cervicogenic features. Hydrocephalus and low-intracranial pressure syndrome should be ruled out in patients showing tonsillar herniation in an MRI study and consulting due to daily headache.

  10. Anthelmintic induced congenital malformations in sheep embryos using netobimin.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Cristofol, C; Carretero, A; Arboix, M; Ruberte, J

    1998-01-24

    Benzimidazole compounds have teratogenic effects in domestic and experimental animals. In this study, 14 Manchega ewes were treated orally, under controlled conditions, with 20 mg netobimin (a prodrug of a benzimidazole compound) per/kg bodyweight on the 17th day of pregnancy. Congenital malformations and abortions affected 60 per cent of the lambs. The main malformations were skeletal and renal, but vascular malformations were observed for the first time. The abnormalities were investigated using radiological, dissection and vascular injection techniques, and associations among them were recorded. The anomalies are discussed in terms of embryological considerations.

  11. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  12. Congenital inner ear malformations without sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Kato, Zenichiro; Sasai, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Funato, Michinori; Orii, Kenji; Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2009-10-01

    Inner ear malformations are frequently found in patients with congenital hearing loss. It has been reported that normal hearing is rare in patients with severe inner ear vestibular malformations. A 9-year-old boy had had complained of recurrent dizziness and disequilibrium for 2 months. Clinical and neuro-otological examinations showed peripheral involvement of the vestibular system, while audiological investigation was normal. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, with three-dimensional reconstruction, showed dysplasia of the bilateral lateral semicircular canals (LSCCs). Isolated vestibular malformation might not be as rare as previously thought, and should be examined by imaging of the temporal bone.

  13. Otosclerosis associated with type B-1 inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, A; Dispenza, F; Aggarwal, N; Russo, A

    2010-06-01

    Malformations of bony inner ear are rare anomalies occurring in approximately 20% of patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss is usually associated with abnormalities of the external and middle ear. Recent reports of patients with lateral semicircular canal malformations indicate inner ear malformations to be associated with sensorineural or conductive hearing loss. Differential diagnosis of conductive hearing loss should include otosclerosis, isolated ossicular deformities, inner ear anomalies or a combination of these. In this report, a case is described with right vestibule-lateral semicircular canal dysplasia presenting at our centre with bilateral otosclerosis.

  14. [Arteriovenous malformation-glioma association: study of four cases].

    PubMed

    Borges, Lia Raquel R; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Pelaez, Maria Paula; Stávale, João Norberto; Santos, Adrialdo J; Carrete, Henrique; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Ferraz, Fernando A P; Gabbai, Alberto A

    2003-06-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic findings in 4 patients with the diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation associated with glioma that were operated on from 1991 to 2000 in our institution. Four patients (2 males; age between 15 and 52 years) presented with progressive headache with clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension (in 3) and partial seizures (in 1). CT scan showed a brain tumor without any detectable pathologic vessels. Histologic examination revealed astrocytic tumors associated with arteriovenous malformation. No patient presented the vascular component intermixed with the tumor. The arteriovenous-glioma association is rare and must be identified by a clear demarcation between the malformation and the tumor.

  15. [Morphological alterations of oto-mandibular syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bettega, G; Morand, B; Lebeau, J; Raphaël, B

    2001-10-01

    Otomandibular dysplasia is a congenital malformation defined by a certain degree of temporomandibular or pterygomandibular hypoplasia. The syndrome is characterised by the variability of clinical findings, but the three major features are auricular, mandibular and maxillary hypoplasia. All the laterofacial structures may be affected. The deformity is usually unilateral but bilateral cases exist; a lot of associated malformations have been described. Multiple classification systems have been published. Some of them are very complex, but it is possible to define a simple diagnostic diagram based on ethiopathogenic data. Bilateral involvement affects predominantly the zygoma, and concerns hereditary syndromes. When the mandibular hypoplasia is evident Franceschetti or Goldenhar syndrome is suspected; otherwise Treacher-Collins syndrome is probable. Unilateral cases are not, in general, hereditary and the hypoplasia predominates on the mandible. The difference between hemifacial microsomia or mandibular dysplasia is made by the presence of associated laterofacial deformities.

  16. Fraser syndrome in three consecutive siblings.

    PubMed

    Kalaniti, Kaarthigeyan; Sandhya, V

    2011-05-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a rare disorder characterized by a combination of acrofacial and urogenital malformations with or without cryptophthalmos. We report a newborn and its two elder siblings who had multiple congenital anomalies and clinico-radiological features consistent with FS.

  17. MOEBIUS SYNDROME: CHALLENGES OF AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Budić, Ivana; Šurdilović, Dušan; Slavković, Anđelka; Marjanović, Vesna; Stević, Marija; Simić, Dušica

    2016-03-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes.

  18. [The syndrome of polysplenia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zach, M; Beitzke, A; Gypser, G; Sager, W

    1977-05-01

    A strong tendency to symmetrical development of the organ systems manifests itself in the syndrome of Polysplenia. These symmetrical organs show the anatomy of leftsided structures. For this reason the syndrome is also referred to as the "syndrome of bilateral leftsidedness". It encompasses complex abnormalities of situs, typical cardiac and vascular deformities as well as extracardiac malformations. Polysplenia is the leading symptom. Diagnosis is rarely made intra vitam. Certain typical deformities can give hints to this diagnosis, which is finally proved by szintigraphic and arteriographic visualization of multiple spleens. A typical case is reported and subsequently discussed according to the picture of this syndrome in the literature.

  19. Generalized overgrowth syndromes with prenatal onset.

    PubMed

    Yachelevich, Naomi

    2015-04-01

    Children with generalized overgrowth syndromes are large at birth, or have excessive postnatal growth. Many of these syndromes are associated with an increase in neoplasia. Consideration of the possibility of overgrowth syndrome in a pediatric patient who presents with increased growth parameters, variable malformations and neurodevelopmental phenotype, and distinctive features, is important for medical management, reproductive counseling, and tumor surveillance for some of the disorders. This review describes the clinical features and surveillance recommendations for the common generalized overgrowth syndromes the pediatrician may encounter. It also provides a glimpse into advances of recent years in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disrupted growth regulation in these disorders.

  20. Longevity and Patau syndrome: what determines survival?

    PubMed Central

    Peroos, Sherina; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pugh, Jennifer Harriet; Arthur-Farraj, Peter; Hodes, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The authors report of an 8-year-old girl with non-mosaic Patau syndrome. The median life expectancy of Patau syndrome is 7–10 days, and 90% die in the first year of life. Survival is often attributed to mosaicism and the severity of associated malformations. We delineate the developing phenotype and review the literature discussing potential contributory factors to longevity. PMID:23220825

  1. Type I Chiari malformation presenting central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Okawa, Masako; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Komada, Ichiro; Hatano, Taketo; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a rare but a well-known clinical feature of type I Chiari malformation. It may be obstructive or central in nature. Sleep apnea in patients with type I Chiari malformation rarely presents without accompanying neurological signs or symptoms. We here report a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with central sleep apnea without any other neurological signs but was ultimately diagnosed with type I Chiari malformation. The patient initially showed mild improvement in symptoms after administration of an acetazolamide. Finally, posterior fossa decompression dramatically improved her respiratory status during sleep, both clinically and on polysomnography. This case suggests that type I Chiari malformation should be considered in the differential diagnoses of central apneas in children, even if there are no other neurological signs and symptoms. Furthermore, sagittal craniocervical magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary for a definitive diagnosis.

  2. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  3. [Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung. Importance of prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Beatriz; Oñoro, Gonzalo; Cantarín Extremera, Verónica; Sanz Santiago, Verónica; Sequeiros, Adolfo

    2011-04-01

    Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is a rare malformation of the lung airway which often performed diagnosed in the prenatal period by ultrasound. Ultrasound monitoring should be performed during pregnancy to assess lung development. We report the case of a 4-year-old patient with prenatal diagnosis of cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung, not confirmed by chest radiograph at birth. The patient underwent surgery at 4 years of age after diagnosis was made for presenting recurrent pneumonia. A normal chest radiograph at birth does not exclude this malformation and a computerized tomography at 4 weeks of birth must be done to confirm or rule out this anomaly. Once the diagnosis is made, surgical treatment should be prompted to avoid complications.

  4. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  5. Chiari-I malformation in two fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Akin, Ahmet; Canakci, Zafer; Sen, Ahmet; Tore, Hasan F

    2003-07-01

    This report describes two cases of Chiari Malformation Type I (Chiari-I) in fighter pilots of the Turkish Air Force. Chiari-I is a congenital malformation characterized by herniation of cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Patients have symptoms and signs related to dysfunction of the brainstem, spinal cord, and cerebellum. They generally are symptomatic in the earlier years of life. However, asymptomatic cases can eventually become symptomatic in later years. Symptoms can be provoked by increasing intracranial pressure (Valsalva or straining). We report on two pilots with Chiari-I malformation who had no symptoms or signs in their daily activities. Furthermore, these pilots had successfully completed physiological training, including centrifuge training, without any symptoms. However, they suffered from headache, neck spasms, and/or disequilibrium under +Gz during flight training sorties. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, possibility of acquired cases, and aeromedical disposition of Chiari malformations are discussed.

  6. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  7. Prolonged expiratory apnoea with cyanosis in Arnold Chiari II malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nahin

    2017-01-01

    Apnoea associated with Arnold Chiari malformation is a known entity and can be obstructive or central. Differentiating between two types is vital to deciding management pathway and prognosticating disease process. PMID:28321315

  8. Anaesthetic Management in Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akçıl, Eren Fatma; Dilmen, Özlem Korkmaz; Tunalı, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Costello syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterised by growth and mental retardation, macrocephaly, short neck and macroglossia. Cardiac involvement can also occur in Costello syndrome and is presented in the form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, tachyarrythmias and valvular dysfunction. Nervous system involvement including ventriculomegaly, hydrocephaly and Chiari type 1 malformation are also common. Predisposition of papillomata and malignant tumours are high. General anaesthesia practice in patients with Costello syndrome may be complicated by difficult airway because of macrocephaly, short neck, macroglossia and oral or laryngeal papillomas. The airway management and cardiac abnormalities are the major concerns of an anaesthesiologist in Costello syndrome. We report the anaesthetic management of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt replacement for hydrocephaly in an 18-month-old child with Costello syndrome. PMID:27366541

  9. Glomuvenous Malformation: A Rare Periorbital Lesion of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, Katherine M.; Godfrey, Kyle J; Solomon, James P.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Korn, Bobby S.; Kikkawa, Don O.

    2016-01-01

    Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), previously referred to as glomus tumors or glomangiomas, are benign, mesenchymal venous malformations arising from glomus bodies. Glomus bodies are modified smooth muscle neuromyoarterial structures involved in temperature regulation via blood shunting. These classically occur in the digits but can occur in other locations. The authors present a case of a periorbital GVM presented following blunt trauma to the area. PMID:27065433

  10. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  11. Supernumerary nipples and renal malformations: a family study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin; Schwartz, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    We describe a family with supernumerary nipples and kidney and urinary tract malformations. The proband is a 59-year-old man with a supernumerary nipple and recently identified hypoplastic kidney, bladder diverticulum, and hypotonic bladder. His mother also has a supernumerary nipple and a recently identified hypoplastic kidney. Of his three children, all male, one has a supernumerary nipple but has not been evaluated for a kidney or urinary tract malformation. This familial disorder is discussed.

  12. Split cord malformation type I distal to segmental myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Addas, Bassam M.

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of myelomeningocele (MMC) and split cord malformation (SCM) is a well-known phenomenon. The SCM is usually above or at the level of the MMC. Split cord malformation distal to the MMC is considered to be the rarest form of such a combination. We report a case of SCM (type I) distal to the MMC diagnosed pre-operatively. Repair of the MMC and the SCM were carried out in the same setting. PMID:25551117

  13. Contemporary Themes: Congenital Malformations and the Problem of their Control*

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of preventing or reducing the prevalence of human congenital malformations is discussed in the light of current knowledge about their aetiology. The original data presented are derived from an epidemiological study of all the infants (92,982) born in the three years 1964-6 to women resident in a defined area of South Wales and all the congenital malformations (3,242) discovered in those infants by the second anniversary of their birth. PMID:4262651

  14. Mechanisms of cerebellar tonsil herniation in patients with Chiari malformations as guide to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Misao; Kula, Roger W.; Dlugacz, Yosef D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of Chiari malformations is incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that different etiologies have different mechanisms of cerebellar tonsil herniation (CTH), as revealed by posterior cranial fossa (PCF) morphology. Methods In 741 patients with Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) and 11 patients with Chiari malformation type II (CM-II), the size of the occipital enchondrium and volume of the PCF (PCFV) were measured on reconstructed 2D-CT and MR images of the skull. Measurements were compared with those in 80 age- and sex-matched healthy control individuals, and the results were correlated with clinical findings. Results Significant reductions of PCF size and volume were present in 388 patients with classical CM-I, 11 patients with CM-II, and five patients with CM-I and craniosynostosis. Occipital bone size and PCFV were normal in 225 patients with CM-I and occipitoatlantoaxial joint instability, 55 patients with CM-I and tethered cord syndrome (TCS), 30 patients with CM-I and intracranial mass lesions, and 28 patients with CM-I and lumboperitoneal shunts. Ten patients had miscellaneous etiologies. The size and area of the foramen magnum were significantly smaller in patients with classical CM-I and CM-I occurring with craniosynostosis and significantly larger in patients with CM-II and CM-I occurring with TCS. Conclusions Important clues concerning the pathogenesis of CTH were provided by morphometric measurements of the PCF. When these assessments were correlated with etiological factors, the following causal mechanisms were suggested: (1) cranial constriction; (2) cranial settling; (3) spinal cord tethering; (4) intracranial hypertension; and (5) intraspinal hypotension. PMID:20440631

  15. Evaluation and prevalence of major central nervous system malformations: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tutus, Sadan; Ozyurt, Sezin; Yilmaz, Ebru; Acmaz, Gokhan; Akin, Mustafa Ali

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Central nervous system (CNS) anomalies are the most common abnormalities of all malformations and can be diagnosed on routine prenatal ultrasonography (US). We aimed to find out fetal CNS anomaly rate in our clinic which is the referral center in the region. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 15000 pregnant women who were scanned for routine obstetric follow-up from January 2012 to July 2013 in our referral center. We diagnosed CNS anomalies in 41 fetuses by using high resolution ultrasound unit with 3.5 MHz transabdominal and 6 MHz transvaginal transducers. RESULTS: CNS anomalies included 12 Chiari malformations, 2 Dandy-Walker malformations (DWM), 1 variant of Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS), 3 iniencephalies, 15 anencephalies, 1 alobar holoprosencephaly, 2 isolated hydrocephalies, 3 hydrocephalies with cerebellar hypoplasia, 1 occipital encephalocele, 1 lumbosacral myelomeningocele accompanied with microcephaly. There were some associated anomalies in the groups that included club-foot deformities in 6 cases, ventricular septal defect (VSD) in 2 cases, polycystic kidney in 2 cases, scoliosis in 1 case, hypoplasic left ventricle in 1 case; alone atrium, single umbilical artery, echogenic focus, hydronephrosis and cleft lip and palate in the same case, and omphalocele in one. CONCLUSION: Prognosis and early detection of CNS abnormalities have become an important issue because the most serious complications of major CNS anomalies are disability and getting bedridden and this situation is inevitably related to health economy. On the other hand prognosis of the fetus and family counseling is another important issue. Parents should decide whether to continue their pregnancies or not. PMID:28058307

  16. Detection of genomic imbalances by array based comparative genomic hybridisation in fetuses with multiple malformations

    PubMed Central

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Saugier-Veber, P; Jacquemont, S; Joubert, M; David, A; Frebourg, T; Rival, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Malformations are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in full term infants and genomic imbalances are a significant component of their aetiology. However, the causes of defects in many patients with multiple congenital malformations remain unexplained despite thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Methods: We used a commercially available array based comparative genomic hybridisation method (array CGH), able to screen all subtelomeric regions, main microdeletion syndromes, and 201 other regions covering the genome, to detect submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in 49 fetuses with three or more significant anomalies and normal karyotype. Results: Array CGH identified eight genomic rearrangements (16.3%), all confirmed by quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments. Subtelomeric and interstitial deletions, submicroscopic duplications, and a complex genomic imbalance were identified. In four de novo cases (15qtel deletion, 16q23.1–q23.3 deletion, 22q11.2 deletion, and mosaicism for a rearranged chromosome 18), the genomic imbalance identified clearly underlay the pathological phenotype. In one case, the relationship between the genotype and phenotype was unclear, since a subtelomeric 6q deletion was detected in a mother and her two fetuses bearing multiple malformations. In three cases, a subtelomeric 10q duplication, probably a genomic polymorphism, was identified. Conclusions: The detection of 5/49 causative chromosomal imbalances (or 4/49 if the 6qtel deletion is not considered as causative) suggests wide genome screening when standard chromosome analysis is normal and confirms that array CGH will have a major impact on pre and postnatal diagnosis as well as providing information for more accurate genetic counselling. PMID:15689449

  17. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  18. Extensive comedonal and cystic acne in Patau syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio; Fernandez-Crehuet, Pablo; Del Prado, Elena; Martes, Pilar; Hernández-Martín, Angela; De Diego, Verónica; Carapeto, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Patau syndrome is a chromosomal disorder associated with multiple malformations caused by inheritance of an extra chromosome (trisomy 13). Some skin defects have been reported in patients with Patau syndrome, such as scalp defects, glabellar stains, deep palmar creases, rocker-bottom feet, convex soles, hyperconvextity of the nails, and multiple hemangiomas. To our knowledge, widespread comedonal and cystic acne have not been previously reported in Patau syndrome.

  19. Prevention and avoidance of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Nevin, N C

    1988-06-15

    Many congenital abnormalities do not have either a Mendelian pattern of inheritance or an identifiable chromosome abnormality and are described as 'multifactorial' as it is assumed they are determined by several genes, each with added effects and modified to a greater or lesser extent by environmental factors. They include spina bifida and anencephaly, cleft lip or cleft palate or both, congenital heart defect and congenital dislocation of the hip, and they constitute a major community health problem. Developments in genetics, biochemistry and cytogenetics have presented new approaches to the prevention and avoidance of congenital abnormalities. The approaches available for the avoidance of congenital malformations include the avoidance of harmful environmental factors, the screening of the newborn and early treatment, genetic counselling and antenatal monitoring with selective termination. The prevention of neural-tube defects in 'high risk' mothers can be achieved by periconceptional vitamin supplementation. In Northern Ireland, of 438 fully supplemented women, only 4 (0.98%) infants or fetuses among 407 infants and fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect, whereas of 356 unsupplemented women, 16 (4.7%) infants or fetuses among 337 infants or fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect.

  20. Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Associated with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture. PMID:25371789

  1. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation associated with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2014-10-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture.

  2. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-06

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  4. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  5. Genetic and Developmental Basis of Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Mohamad; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) are the most common birth defect, occurring in 1–5% of all live births. Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors all influence the development of CVMs, and an improved understanding of causation of CVMs is a prerequisite for prevention. Cardiac development is a complex, multi-step process of morphogenesis that is under genetic regulation. Multiple developmental pathways act independently or in combination to effect proper cardiac lineage specification, differentiation, and structure. Because of this complexity, there are numerous potential mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact both fetal cardiac development and latent cardiac disease. Although the genetic contribution to CVMs is well recognized, the genetic causes of human CVMs are still identified relatively infrequently. Mouse models are important tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms underpinning cardiac development as well as the complex genetics that characterize human CVMs. In this review we provide an overview of the key genetic concepts characterizing human CVMs, review their developmental basis, and provide examples to illustrate the critical developmental and genetic concepts underlying the pathogenesis of CVMs. PMID:26876120

  6. Carotid ultrasound for pulmonary arteriovenous malformation screening

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Günther; Maßmann, Alexander; Gräber, Stefan; Geisthoff, Urban W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) can cause serious neurological complications. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of contrast-enhanced Doppler ultrasound (CE-US) of the common carotid artery as a screening test for detection of PAVMs. Methods A total of 124 consecutive patients with HHT or a positive family history underwent screening for PAVMs with CE-US and thoracic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA). CE-US was performed after receiving (D)-galactose microparticulate, and CE-MRA with gadobenate dimeglumine. Twenty-five patients with confirmed PAVMs were referred to conventional pulmonary catheter angiography (PA). Findings on CE-US and CE-MRA were evaluated using contingency tables and McNemar’s test. Results Using CE-MRA as the reference test, CE-US had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 87%, and a negative predictive value of 100%. In 25 patients who underwent PA, PAVMs that had been diagnosed on CE-US and CE-MRA were confirmed. Of the PAVMs detected by CE-MRA, 24% were not identified on PA. Conclusion CE-US is a simple, minimally invasive screening method that can easily be performed in different settings. CE-US can predict PAVMs with high probability of success. CE-US may be a simple alternative to transthoracic echocardiography in the assessment of PAVMs in certain HHT-patients. PMID:28352707

  7. Psychosocial adjustment and craniofacial malformations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pertschuk, M J; Whitaker, L A

    1985-02-01

    Forty-three children between the ages of 6 and 13 years with congenital facial anomalies underwent psychosocial evaluation prior to surgery. Also evaluated were healthy children matched to the craniofacial subjects by sex, age, intelligence, and economic background. Relative to this comparison group, the craniofacial children were found to have poorer self-concept, greater anxiety at the time of evaluation, and more introversion. Parents of the craniofacial children noted more frequent negative social encounters for their children and more hyperactive behavior at home. Teachers reported more problematic classroom behavior. Examination of these results revealed craniofacial malformations to be associated with psychosocial limitations rather than marked deficits. These children tended to function less well than the comparison children, but with few exceptions, they were not functioning in a psychosocially deviant range. Explanations for the observed circumscribed impact of facial deformity include the use of denial as a coping mechanism, possible diminished significance of appearance for younger children, and the restricted environment experienced by most of the subjects. It can be predicted that time would render these protective influences ineffective, so that adolescent and young adult patients could be at far greater psychosocial risk.

  8. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  9. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  10. 576 kb deletion in 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI is associated with limb malformation, congenital heart disease and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-Fu; Yang, Yi-Feng; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-10

    1p36 deletion (monosomy 1p36) is one of the most common terminal deletions observed in humans, characterized by special facial features, mental retardation, heart defects, development delay and epilepsy. Previously, we reported molecular findings in patients with limb, congenital heart disease (CHD) and other malformations with SNP-array. In a syndromic patient of the same cohort, we detected a small deletion of 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI (Sloan-Kettering Institute protooncoprotein). Recently, dominant mutations in SKI were identified to be correlated with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. Retrospective examination revealed this patient with limb malformations, CHD, epilepsy and mild development delay. Together with previous reports, our study suggests that the 1p36.33-1p36.32 deletion encompassing SKI may represents a previous undescribed microdeletion disorder.

  11. Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986–2003

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D.; Mahle, William T.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Flanders, W. Dana; Mulholland, James A.; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2009-01-01

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3–7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks’ gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986–March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 μm (PM10), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM10 and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM10 levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed. PMID:19258486

  12. Cardiopulmonary bypass in surgery for complex-combined vascular malformation of the lower limb: case report.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M S; Sharaf, I; Thambidorai, C R; Zainal, A; Somasundaram, S; Adeeb, S; Sajjad, M Y; Bilkis, B; Felicia, L S K

    2005-05-01

    A 16-year-old boy was referred with features of Parkes Weber syndrome (PWS) involving the right lower limb. He had presented at birth with cutaneous vascular malformations (VM) in the right thigh and at the age of 7 years developed congestive cardiac failure, which was controlled with drugs. He received alpha interferon and steroids during this period without any benefit. He defaulted follow-up and at 12 years of age presented with further enlargement of the VM in the right thigh and leg with skin and soft tissue thickening. At this stage, embolization and subsequent excision of the VM were tried, but the surgery was abandoned because of massive hemorrhage. Over the next 4 years, the boy became totally bedridden because of massive increase in the size of the limb, repeated hemorrhages, and secondary infection of the VM. Right hip disarticulation was considered the best option to improve his quality of life. To prevent uncontrollable hemorrhage during surgery, the disarticulation was done under cardiopulmonary bypass with low circulatory flow. Postoperatively, the patient required intensive care nursing for a week. He is presently ambulatory with crutches. Cardiopulmonary bypass with low flow has been used for treating posttraumatic arteriovenous malformations. However, its use in surgery for PWS has not been reported earlier.

  13. Ambient air pollution and cardiovascular malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986-2003.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D; Mahle, William T; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J; Botto, Lorenzo D; Flanders, W Dana; Mulholland, James A; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E

    2009-04-15

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3-7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks' gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986-March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 microm (PM(10)), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM(10) and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM(10) levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed.

  14. Compound heterozygous PKHD1 variants cause a wide spectrum of ductal plate malformations.

    PubMed

    Courcet, Jean-Benoît; Minello, Anne; Prieur, Fabienne; Morisse, Laurent; Phelip, Jean-Marc; Beurdeley, Alain; Meynard, Daniel; Massenet, Denis; Lacassin, Flore; Duffourd, Yannis; Gigot, Nadège; St-Onge, Judith; Hillon, Patrick; Vanlemmens, Claire; Mousson, Christiane; Cerceuil, Jean-Pierre; Guiu, Boris; Thevenon, Julien; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Michel-Calemard, Laurence; Faivre, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Ductal plate malformations (DPM) present with a wide phenotypic spectrum comprising Von Meyenburg complexes (VMC), Caroli disease (CD), Caroli syndrome (CS), and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Variants in PKHD1 are responsible for ARPKD and CS with a high inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability. Rare familial cases of CD had been reported and exceptional cases of CD are associated with PKHD1 variants. In a family of three siblings presenting with a wide spectrum of severity of DPM, we performed whole exome sequencing and identified two PKHD1 compound heterozygous variants (c.10444G>A; p.Arg3482Cys and c.5521C>T; p.Glu1841Lys), segregating with the symptoms. Two compound heterozygous PKHD1 variants, including one hypomorphic variant, were identified in two other familial cases of DPM with at least one patient presenting with CD. This report widens the phenotypic variability of PKHD1 variants to VMC, and others hepatic bile ducts malformations with inconstant renal phenotype in adults and highlights the important intra-familial phenotypic variability. It also showed that PKHD1 might be a major gene for CD. This work adds an example of the contribution of exome sequencing, not only in the discovery of new genes but also in expanding the phenotypic spectrum of well-known disease-associated genes, using reverse phenotyping.

  15. FAM222B Is Not a Likely Novel Candidate Gene for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Kirchmaier, Bettina; Rath, Matthias; Korenke, G Christoph; Tetzlaff, Fabian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Neveling, Kornelia; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Kuss, Andreas W; Gilissen, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3. A yeast 2-hybrid screen revealed interactions of FAM222B with the tubulin cytoskeleton and STAMBP which is known to be associated with microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome. However, a phenotype similar to existing models was not found, neither in fam222bb/fam222ba double mutant zebrafish generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases nor in an in vitro sprouting assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with siRNA against FAM222B. These observations led to the assumption that aberrant FAM222B is not involved in the formation of CCMs.

  16. FAM222B Is Not a Likely Novel Candidate Gene for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Kirchmaier, Bettina; Rath, Matthias; Korenke, G. Christoph; Tetzlaff, Fabian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Neveling, Kornelia; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Kuss, Andreas W.; Gilissen, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3. A yeast 2-hybrid screen revealed interactions of FAM222B with the tubulin cytoskeleton and STAMBP which is known to be associated with microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome. However, a phenotype similar to existing models was not found, neither in fam222bb/fam222ba double mutant zebrafish generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases nor in an in vitro sprouting assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with siRNA against FAM222B. These observations led to the assumption that aberrant FAM222B is not involved in the formation of CCMs. PMID:27587990

  17. Detecting congenital malformations - Lessons learned from the Mpepu study, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Zash, Rebecca; Shapiro, Roger L.; Batlang, Oganne; Botebele, Kerapetse; Bennett, Kara; Chilisa, Florence; von Widenfelt, Erik; Makhema, Joseph; Lockman, Shahin; Holmes, Lewis B.; Powis, Kathleen M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A large and increasing number of HIV-infected women are conceiving on antiretroviral treatment (ART). While most antiretrovirals are considered safe in pregnancy, monitoring for rare pregnancy and infant adverse outcomes is warranted. Methods We conducted a retrospective secondary analysis nested within a clinical trial of infant cotrimoxazole vs. placebo prophylaxis in Botswana (the Mpepu Study). Infants were examined at birth, and at least every 3 months through 18 months of age. Abnormal physical findings and diagnostic testing revealing malformations were documented. Post hoc, a geneticist classified all reported malformations based on available documentation. Structural malformations with surgical, medical or cosmetic importance were classified as major malformations. We present a descriptive analysis of identified malformations. Results Between 2011 and 2014, 2,933 HIV-infected women who enrolled in the Mpepu study delivered 2,971 live-born infants. Study staff conducted 2,944 (99%) newborn exams. One thousand eighty-eight (38%) women were taking ART at conception; 1,147 (40%) started ART during pregnancy; 442 (15%) received zidovudine monotherapy; and 223 (7%) received no antiretroviral during pregnancy. Of 33 reported anomalies, 25 (76%) met congenital malformations criteria, 10 (30%) were classified as major malformations, 4 (40%) of which were identified after the birth exam. Discussion Our results highlight the importance of staff training on identification of congenital malformations, programmatic monitoring beyond the birth examination and the value of geneticist involvement in the malformations classification process in resource-limited settings. These elements will be important to fully define antiretroviral drug safety in pregnancy. Significance Surveillance systems for monitoring the safety of antiretroviral use during pregnancy among HIV-infected women in resource-limited setting are lacking. The World Health Organization

  18. [KID syndrome, pachydermatoglyphy and Dandy-Walker syndrome].

    PubMed

    Boudghene-Stambouli, O; Merad-Boudia, A; Abdelali, S

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of KID syndrome in a young girl born to non-consanguinous parents without any similar family history. The typical features of this dysplasia, erythrokeratodermia with dry rugous teguments, pachydermia folds of the knees, facial erythema, peribuccal grooves, leucokeratosic perleche, hypotrichosis of the eye lashes and eyebrows, early onset deafness and ophtalmological lesions were observed. The characteristic pachydermatoglyphia of the hands was present. A malformation of the posterior cerebral fossa--a dandy walker syndrome--was revealed at computed tomography.

  19. Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia. Report on a new case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, L; Brayer, C; Attali, T; Samperiz, S; Tiran-Rajaofera, I; Ramful, D; Pilorget, H

    2005-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by coarse facies, diaphragmatic hernia, distal limb hypoplasia and malformations of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and central nervous systems. Diaphragmatic hernia is a leading diagnostic feature in Fryns syndrome, recorded in more than 80% of cases. We report a newborn with clinical features of Fryns syndrome except the diaphragmatic hernia. Cases of Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia are reviewed. Even in the absence of diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary anomalies are described in Fryns syndrome, especially pulmonary hypoplasia. Fetal mice, exposed to nitrofen, have a high incidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and other malformations similar to that seen in Fryns syndrome. Nitrofen might target molecular mechanisms similar to those involved in Fryns syndrome.

  20. [Thalassemic syndromes and anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Olivé, M; Mora, A; Ballvé, M; Cortés, C; Cabarrocas, E

    1992-01-01

    Thalassemic syndromes are produced by a quantitative defect in the synthesis of globin chains of hemoglobin. They are classified according to the severity of the clinical picture and to the type of globin chain that is affected. Physiopathology, clinical picture, and treatment of thalassemias are discussed in this work. Thalassemia minor does not create, in general, anesthetic problems. In cases of thalassemia major one should consider not only problems derived from the severity of the anemia it self, but also those related to transfusional therapy, and to bony malformations that may disturb tracheal intubation. Discussion on the management of homozygotic thalassemia during the pre, per, and postoperative phase completes this revision.

  1. Roberts-SC syndrome, a rare syndrome and cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Jyotsna; Dewan, Madhu; Hussain, Altaf

    2008-07-01

    Roberts SC syndrome is a rare syndrome with only 17 previously recognized patients reported in medical literature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple malformations, particularly, symmetrical limb reduction, craniofacial anomalies such as bilateral cleft lip and palate, micrognathia, and severe growth and mental retardation. Our patient, a young child of five years having Roberts-SC, was successfully operated for cleft palate under general anesthesia. The main features of the syndrome and the technical problems of anesthesia and surgery are discussed in this report.

  2. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Christopher J.; Ding, Dale; Leed, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeated radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeated radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3 years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42 Gy and 19.06 Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9–71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80 months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8 months. The most common complications of repeated radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at three years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  3. Immune Response in Human Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Du, Hongyan; Duckworth, Edward; Raja, Harish; Batjer, H. Hunt; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preliminary observations suggesting the presence of B and plasma cells and oligoclonality of immunoglobulin (Ig) G in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) have motivated a systematic study correlating the infiltration of the immune cells with clinical activity and antigen-triggered immune response in surgically excised lesions. Methods Infiltration of plasma, B, T and HLA-DR expressing cells and macrophages within 23 excised CCMs was related to clinical activity. Relative amounts of Ig isotypes were determined. IgG clonality of mRNA from CCMs was assessed by spectratyping, cloning and sequencing. Results Infiltration of the immune cells ranged widely within CCM lesions and cells were generally co-expressed with each other. Immune cell infiltration did not associate with recent bleeding and lesion growth. Significantly more B lymphocytes in CCM lesions were associated with venous anomaly. More T cells were present in solitary lesions. More T cells and less macrophages were present in CCMs from younger subjects. IgG isotype was present in all CCM lesions. Most lesions also expressed IgM and IgA, with IgM predominance over IgA correlating with recent CCM growth. Oligoclonality was shown in IgG mRNA from CCMs, but not from peripheral blood lymphocytes, with only eight CDR3 sequences observed among 134 clones from two CCM lesions. Conclusions An antigen-directed oligoclonal IgG immune response is present within CCM lesions regardless of recent clinical activity. Apparent differences in immune response in younger patients and in lesions with recent growth will need confirmation in other series. The pathogenicity of oligoclonal immune response will require systematic hypothesis testing in recently available CCM murine models. PMID:19286587

  4. Case report of spontaneous hemorrhage in a sublingual arteriovenous malformation causing an emergent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pickett, David O; Hudson, John W

    2014-01-01

    The literature is devoid of articles on spontaneous orofacial hemorrhage with hematoma formation without an underlying condition. Rupture of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is possibly the rarest form of spontaneous hemorrhage and life-threatening hematoma formation. This pathology is widely known because of its occurrence in the central nervous system, but it can appear in any location. AVM is not generally thought to be an inherited disorder, except in the context of a specific hereditary syndrome. AVMs can be seen using computerized tomographic angiography, but distraction angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment decision making. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment; however, endovascular embolization has become an important adjunct to surgical intervention. With shrinkage of the lesion or definitive treatment with coils, particles, or glue. Other important considerations in the choice of treatment are the patient's age, lesion size and location, and prior history of hemorrhage.

  5. Muscular dystrophy: central nervous system alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation defects and brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Fagiolari, Gigliola; Cappellini, Anna; Cagliani, Rachele; Prelle, Alessandro; Lucchini, Valeria; Fortunato, Francesco; Locatelli, Federica; Crugnola, Veronica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Bresolin, Nereo; Moggio, Maurizio; Lamperti, Costanza

    2010-03-01

    The authors describe the case of a patient affected with congenital muscular dystrophy with lack of muscle alpha-dystroglycan. Brain gross anatomy showed lissencephaly and pachygyria. Light microscopy showed heterotopias in white matter. The brain stem and cerebellum were normal. They found no expression of alpha-dystroglycan either in the frontal cortex or in the heterotopic nuclei, while a normal expression was found in the cerebellum. These results suggest that alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation defects may account for both the muscle disease and the brain supratentorial malformation in our patient. The authors did not identify any mutations in the genes most frequently related to these syndromes. Therefore, this case suggests that a new gene may be associated with congenital muscular dystrophy with alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation defects, cortical migration defects, and sparing of the cerebellum.

  6. Moebius syndrome with Taussig-Bing anomaly.

    PubMed

    Islam, M I; Chowdhury, A S; Hasan, M T

    2014-01-01

    We report a 6 years old male child, presented with difficulty in swallowing, crying and smiling from early infancy and recurrent episodes of cyanosis on exertion for about 2 years. He had facial dysmorphism, clubbing and polydactyly and right sided lower motor neuron type of facial nerve palsy. On examination and relevant investigations findings were consistent with Moebius syndrome and Taussig-Bing anomaly. Moebius syndrome comprises of congenital facial nerve palsy with or without palsy of the other cranial nerves and the associated organ system malformations. Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation consisting of a transposed aorta, a large pulmonary artery which arises primarily from the right ventricle and ventricular septal defect. Simultaneous occurrence of Moebius syndrome and Taussig-Bing anomaly has not yet been reported in the past.

  7. Association of Wolfram syndrome with Fallot tetralogy in a girl.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin A; Demir, Korcan; Hazan, Filiz; Yıldız, Melek; Elmas, Özlem N; Özkan, Behzat

    2016-06-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD: diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations of the WFS1 (wolframin) on chromosome 4 are responsible for the clinical manifestations in majority of patients with Wolfram syndrome. Wolfram syndrome is also accompanied by neurologic and psychiatric disorders, urodynamic abnormalities, restricted joint motility, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism in males and diabetic microvascular disorders. There are very limited data in the literature regarding cardiac malformations associated in children with Wolfram syndrome. A 5-year-old girl with Wolfram syndrome and tetralogy of Fallot is presented herein.

  8. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  9. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  10. Neurodevelopmental Malformations of the Cerebellar Vermis in Genetically Engineered Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raddy L; Van Dine, Sarah E; Gilbert, Mary E; Leheste, Joerg R; Torres, German

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformations are almost exclusively found along the primary fissure and are indicative of deficits of neuronal migration during cerebellar development. In the present report, we test the prediction that genetically engineered rats on Sprague-Dawley or Long-Evans backgrounds will also exhibit the same cerebellar malformations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that three different transgenic lines on two different backgrounds had cerebellar malformations. Heterotopia in transgenic rats had identical cytoarchitecture as that observed in wild-type rats including altered morphology of Bergmann glia. In light of the possibility that heterotopia could affect results from behavioral studies, these data suggest that histological analyses be performed in studies of cerebellar function or development when using genetically engineered rats on these backgrounds in order to have more careful interpretation of experimental findings.

  11. Defining anural malformations in the context of a developmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Cole, R.A.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Wolcott, M.; Helgen, J.C.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes terminology and general concepts involved in animal development for the purpose of providing background for the study and understanding of frog malformations. The results of our radiographic investigation of rear limb malformations in Rana pipiens provide evidence that frog malformations are the product of early developmental errors. Although bacteria, parasites and viruses were identified in these metamorphosed frogs, the relevant window to look for the teratogenic effect of these agents is in the early tadpole stage during limb development. As a result, our microbiological findings must be regarded as inconclusive relative to determining their contribution to malformations because we conducted our examinations on metamorphosed frogs not tadpoles. Future studies need to look at teratogenic agents (chemical, microbial, physical or mechanical) that are present in the embryo, tadpole, and their environments at the stages of development that are relevant for the malformation type. The impact of these teratogenic agents then needs to be assessed in appropriate animal models using studies that are designed to mimic field conditions. The results of these laboratory tests should then be analyzed in such a way that will allow comparison with the findings in the wild-caught tadpoles and frogs.

  12. Pathobiology of human cerebrovascular malformations: basic mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gault, Judith; Sarin, Hemant; Awadallah, Nabil A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A

    2004-07-01

    Cerebrovascular malformations affect more than 3% of the population, exposing them to a lifetime risk of hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) exhibit an immature vessel wall, a brittle hemorrhagic tendency, and epileptogenesis, whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) lack capillary beds and manifest apoplectic bleeding under high-flow conditions. There are also more benign venous anomalies, capillary malformations, and lesions with mixed and transitional features. Advances have been made toward understanding the natural history, radiological and pathological correlates, and clinical management. Yet, mechanisms of lesion genesis and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown, and the clinical behavior in individual patients is highly unpredictable. Lesion pathogenesis likely involves abnormal assembly or maintenance of blood vessels, resulting in dysmorphic vessel phenotypes. Familial CCM disease is in part caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal-related protein that is likely integral to interendothelial cell connectivity and maturation of the vascular wall. Rare familial forms of AVM disease have been correlated with two different transforming growth factor-beta receptor components, possibly causing disturbance in signaling during vascular assembly. Relevance of these mechanisms to the more common and otherwise identical sporadic CCM and AVM lesions is being explored. In this report, basic mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how they possibly relate to the common cerebrovascular malformation lesions are reviewed. Novel concepts are discussed related to the cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates in CCM and AVM as well as to how this knowledge can be applied to predict, explain, and possibly modify clinical disease manifestations.

  13. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome with knee joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takehiko; Masumoto, Natsuko; Sonoda, Motoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuno, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) involves cutaneous vascular malformation characterized by multiple venous malformations. This commonly affects the skin and gastrointestinal tract. BRBNS is associated with anemia and occasionally involves orthopedic manifestations. A 6-year-old boy was referred to hospital for evaluation of anemia. He presented with a rubber-like soft-tissue mass in the left knee and the right side of the neck, recurrent pain, and fixed flexion contracture of the knee. Blood examination indicated consumption coagulopathy and anemia caused by not only iron-deficiency anemia but also microangiopathy. Endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract indicated multiple bluish-black sessile venous malformations. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the knee showed intra-articular and intramuscular involvement. Based on these findings, BRBNS with knee joint disorder was diagnosed. With regard to vascular malformations, like other diseases such as inflammatory arthropathy, ultrasonography of the joint may become a new diagnostic approach for evaluating orthopedic manifestations.

  14. Kousseff syndrome: A fifth case?

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, R.A.; Hamilton, W.; Pinette, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kousseff originally described three siblings with an open sacral myelomeningocele, conotruncal cardiac malformations, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, retrognathia, a short neck with a low posterior hairline, and renal agenesis as a new autosomal recessive condition. Open neural tube lesions and complex conotruncal cardiac defects are relatively common malformations, both as isolated defects and individually as components of syndromes, but they have been found together only rarely, as part of chromosomal syndromes or following maternal exposures. Toriello et al. reported a fourth case and suggested the eponym Kousseff syndrome for myelomeningcocele, conotruncal defects and minor facial abnormalies. We report a fifth probable case. This male infant was born by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 38 weeks gestation to a 23-year-old G{sub 2}P{sub 1001} mother. Pregnancy was complicated by an elevated alpha-fetoprotein at 16 weeks gestation, followed by an ultrasound diagnosis of an open disease. After birth, physical examination also revealed dysmorphic facies, with a bulbous nose and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly and hypotonia. Echocardiogram demonstrated complex conotruncal malformations. The patient underwent closure of the myelomeningocele but died at one month of age. Chromosomal analysis was normal (46,XY). Because conotruncal heart defects have been associated with deletions on chromosome 22, FISH analysis using a probe for the DiGeorge syndrome on the long arm of chromosome 22 was performed. It indicated no detectable deletion within this critical region on 22q11. Nonetheless there remains the possibility of a gene (or genes) located on 22q that could produce findings of this rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome when disrupted. Therefore, further investigation on this chromosome is warranted.

  15. Management of patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Karlsson, Bengt; Wallace, M Christopher; Edner, Göran

    2003-06-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain, which are probably genetically determined, are errors in the development of the vasculature that, together with the effects of blood flow, may lead to a focal arteriovenous shunt. Clinically, the adult patient may present with acute or chronic neurological symptoms-fixed or unstable-such as deficits, seizures or headache. Sometimes the lesion is an incidental finding. In about half of the patients, the revealing event is an intracranial haemorrhage. The prevalence of AVM in the western world is probably <0.01% and the detection rate is about one per 100,000 person-years. Most AVMs are revealed in patients 20-40 years of age. Therefore, the risk of developing neurological symptoms from an AVM, usually because of haemorrhage, increases with patient age. In the young adult population, AVMs are significant risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke. This risk increases with AVM volume and is higher in centrally located AVMs. Almost all patients with AVM are subjected to treatment, either by surgery, radiosurgery or embolisation, with the functional aim of reducing the risk of haemorrhage or to alleviate neurological symptoms with an acceptable treatment risk. Few neurocentres have physicians highly skilled in all treatment modalities. Therefore, the prescribed treatment may not be defined from an objective assessment of what is optimal for each individual patient, but rather from local expertise. In this context, more and better data about the natural history and the outcome of different treatments, as well as predictive models, would be valuable to help to optimise the management. Management strategies obviously differ according to local preferences, but results presented in the literature suggest the following strategy: (I) cortically located AVMs with a nidus volume <10 ml could be operated, with or without presurgical embolisation, unless there is a single feeder that can easily be catheterised and embolised for

  16. Mermaid syndrome: virtually no hope for survival.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Nicolas; Meyrat, Blaise Julien; Guignard, Jean-Pierre; Hohlfeld, Judith

    2004-07-01

    Sirenomelia, also called the mermaid syndrome is a severe malformation involving multiple organs and characterized by partially or completely developed lower extremities fused by the skin. The birth of a "mermaid" is very rare (1.2-4.2 cases for 100,000 births); most are stillborn, or die at or shortly after birth. The case of a living female neonate with dipodic simelia (fusion of well-developed legs) is presented. No prenatal diagnosis was made and the newborn had an uneventful neonatal course following Cesarean section delivery. The complex and striking malformation was obvious at birth and further evaluation revealed very poorly functioning kidneys, associated with abnormal anorectum, urogenital tract, and external genitalia, as well as a pelvic malformation. Supportive care was applied because of the poor prognosis and the child died at 7 weeks of age, due to renal failure.

  17. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  18. Genes and brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jeffrey J; Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2015-11-05

    Neuronal positioning is a fundamental process during brain development. Abnormalities in this process cause several types of brain malformations and are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Little is known about the pathogenesis of developmental brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning, which has hindered research into potential treatments. However, recent advances in neurogenetics provide clues to the pathogenesis of aberrant neuronal positioning by identifying causative genes. This may help us form a foundation upon which therapeutic tools can be developed. In this review, we first provide a brief overview of neural development and migration, as they relate to defects in neuronal positioning. We then discuss recent progress in identifying genes and brain malformations associated with aberrant neuronal positioning during human brain development.

  19. Cranial malformations in related white lions (Panthera leo krugeri).

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F E; Schröder, C; Degiorgi, G; Zeira, O; Bollo, E

    2010-11-01

    White lions (Panthera leo krugeri) have never been common in the wild, and at present, the greatest population is kept in zoos where they are bred for biological and biodiversity conservation. During the years 2003 to 2008 in a zoological garden in northern Italy, 19 white lions were born to the same parents, who were in turn paternally consanguineous. Out of the 19 lions, 4 (21%) were stillborn, 13 (69%) died within 1 month, and 1 (5%) was euthanatized after 6 months because of difficulty with prehension of food. Six lions (32%) showed malformations involving the head (jaw, tongue, throat, teeth, and cranial bones). One lion (5%) still alive at 30 months revealed an Arnold-Chiari malformation upon submission for neurological evaluation of postural and gait abnormalities. Paternal consanguinity of the parents, along with inbreeding among white lions in general, could account for the high incidence of congenital malformations of the head in this pride of white lions.

  20. Revision Stapedectomy in a Female Patient with Inner Ear Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tirth R.; Moberly, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an unusual case of surgical management of congenital mixed hearing loss in a female patient with inner ear malformation. This report outlines the role of temporal bone imaging and previous surgical history in evaluating a patient's risk of perilymph gusher during stapes surgery. Methods. A 68-year-old female patient with a history of profound bilateral mixed hearing loss due to ossicular and cochlear malformation presented to our otology clinic. She had undergone multiple unsuccessful previous ear surgeries. Computed tomography revealed bilateral inner ear malformations. She elected to proceed with revision stapedectomy. Results. The patient received modest benefit to hearing, and no operative complications occurred. Conclusions. Although stapedectomy has been shown to improve hearing in patients with stapes fixation, there is risk of perilymph gusher in patients with inner ear abnormalities. Evaluation and counseling of the risk of gusher during stapes surgery should be done on a case-by-case basis. PMID:27144044

  1. Arteriovenous Malformation Underlying a Plexiform Neurofibroma: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaheer; Khani, Sepideh; Zare, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 are well described in the literature, however, arteriovenous malformation is a very rare finding in neurofibromatosis type 1. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a soft mass on the right flank. Provisional diagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma was made on the basis of clinical and histological observations. Because the lesion was warm on palpation, imaging studies were performed to evaluate further and arteriovenous malformation was detected underlying the plexiform neurofibroma. This report emphasizes the importance of careful examination and proper investigations of the plexiform neurofibroma prior to treatment strategies to avoid future complications. The rarity of plexiform neurofibroma in association with arteriovenous malformation at the same site was also highlighted in this report.

  2. Endovascular embolization of life threatening intracranial arterio-venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Khan, S U; Rahman, K M; Siddiqui, M R; Hoque, M A; Mondol, B A; Hussain, S; Mohammad, Q D

    2010-07-01

    Haemorrhagic stroke from cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) represents 2% of all hemorrhagic strokes. A clear understanding of the diagnostic and treatment algorithms of cerebral AVM management is very important, because AVMs are a cause of hemorrhage in young adults. Surgery, endovascular therapy, and radiosurgery can be used alone or in combination to treat an AVM. We reported a 40 years old man of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), complicated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Digital subtraction angiogram was done for diagnosis and endovascular embolization for treatment of the case. This is the first successful cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) embolization in any government hospital of Bangladesh. The aim of this case report is to inform about this new technologies and emerging treatment strategies in these areas.

  3. Brainstem cavernous malformations: Natural history versus surgical management.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Choudhri, Omar; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-10-01

    While brainstem cavernous malformations were once considered inoperable, improvements in patient selection, surgical exposures, intraoperative MRI-guidance, MR tractography, and neurophysiologic monitoring have resulted in good outcomes in the majority of operated patients. In a consecutive series of 104 patients with brainstem cavernous malformations, only 14% of patients experienced cranial nerve or motor dysfunction that was worse at late follow-up, relative to their preoperative condition. Outcomes were predicted by several factors, including larger lesion size, lesions that crossed the midline, the presence of a developmental venous anomaly, older age, and greater time interval from lesion hemorrhage to surgery. The 14% of patients who experienced a persistent neurological deficit as a result of surgery, while substantial from any perspective, compares favorably with the risks of observation based on a recent meta-analysis. Curative resection is a safe and effective treatment for brainstem cavernous malformations that will prevent re-hemorrhage in symptomatic patients.

  4. Fryns syndrome phenotype and trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Ladonne, J.M.; Gaillard, D.; Carre-Pigeon, F.; Gabriel, R.

    1996-01-02

    Trisomy 22 was detected in a 32-week-old fetus born to an overweight mother with hypertension. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was associated with phenotypic manifestations of Fryns Syndrome: Diaphragmatic hernia, facial defects, and nail hypoplasia with short distal fifth phalanges. This is the second report of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in trisomy 22. This case demonstrates the importance of karyotyping malformed fetuses or newborns, even if a nonchromosome syndrome seems identifiable on clinical grounds. To date, at least 10 cases of Fryns syndrome have been reported without chromosome analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Management of the Amniotic Band Syndrome with Cleft Palate: Literature Review and Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Ortega, Carolina; Flores-Velázquez, Joselín; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Noyola-Frías, Miguel Ángel; Santos-Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Amniotic Band Syndrome (ABS) is a group of congenital malformations that includes the majority of typical constriction rings and limb and digital amputations, together with major craniofacial, thoracic, and abdominal malformations. The syndrome is caused by early rupture of the amniotic sac. Some of the main oral manifestations include micrognathia, hyperdontia, and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, which is present in 14.6% of patients with this syndrome. The purpose of this report was to describe the clinical characteristics and the oral treatment provided to a 6-month-old male patient affected with ABS with cleft lip and palate. PMID:28246561

  6. [Complex cyanotic heart defect in a newborn infant with cat eye syndrome].

    PubMed

    Paul, T; Reimer, A; Wilken, M; Miller, K; Kallfelz, H C

    1991-04-01

    In a cyanotic newborn with characteristic features of Cat-Eye-Syndrome, cytogenetic examination disclosed a supernumerary small bisatellited chromosome. Angiography showed Tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia and a narrow patent ductus arteriosus with additional stenosis of the bifurcation of the pulmonary artery. At an age of 14 weeks, the patient died after the attempt of corrective cardiac surgery. Congenital cardiac malformation is present in more than one third of patients with cat-eye-syndrome and is usually the lifelimiting malformation in this syndrome.

  7. [Children with infantile haemangiomas should be worked-up for PHACE syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Trine; Salskov-Iversen, Maria Luise; Stausbøl-Grøn, Birgitte; Hedelund, Lene

    2013-09-09

    Infantile haemangiomas are the most common tumours in infants. Large facial haemangiomas are associated with posterior fossa malformations, haemangiomas, arteriel malformations, cardiac defects and eye anomalies (PHACE) syndrome in 20-31%. The diagnosis requires a large facial haemangiom and the minimum of one extracutaneous manifestation. Infants with large facial haemangiomas are in risk of PHACE syndrome and need to be referred to paediatric expertise. This case represents an infant with a large facial haemangioma, who was diagnosed with a coarctatio aortae and hence the PHACE syndrome.

  8. Overlap of Moebius and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome with gastroschisis and pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Knut; Backes, Heiko; Auber, Bernd; Kriebel, Thomas; Stellmer, Franziska; Zoll, Barbara

    2009-12-01

    The oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndromes (OLHS) represent a group of rare conditions characterized by congenital malformations involving the tongue, mandible, and limbs. There is considerable overlap between the syndromes gathered under the term OLHS, and a marked variability of face and limb anomalies as well as additional malformations. In this report we describe a girl with gastroschisis and pulmonary hypoplasia in addition to features of Moebius syndrome comprising hypoplasia of the tongue and mandible, brachydactyly of halluces, cranial nerve palsies with bilateral facial paralysis and an inability to execute horizontal eye movements. Karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization were normal. This observation confirms an overlap between Moebius syndrome and OLHS and widens the spectrum of associated malformations. Intrauterine environmental factors including vascular insufficiency, high maternal fever, and drug abuse are likely to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  9. [Arnold-Chiari malformation in Noonan syndrome and other syndromes of the RAS/MAPK pathway].

    PubMed

    Ejarque, Ismael; Millán-Salvador, José M; Oltra, Silvestre; Pesudo-Martínez, José V; Beneyto, Magdalena; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Introduccion. El sindrome de Noonan (SN) y otros sindromes con fenotipo similar, como LEOPARD, cardiofaciocutaneo, Costello y Legius, estan asociados a mutaciones en genes incluidos en la via RAS/MAPK (rasopatias), una importante via de señalizacion relacionada con la proliferacion celular. El descenso de las amigdalas cerebelares dentro del canal medular cervical, conocido como malformacion de Arnold-Chiari (MAC), se ha descrito en pacientes afectos de SN, lo que ha llevado a sugerir que la MAC podria formar parte del espectro fenotipico del SN. Presentamos dos casos con SN y MAC. Casos clinicos. Caso 1: mujer de 29 años con fenotipo de Noonan. Fue intervenida a los 9 años de estenosis valvular pulmonar. A los 27 años, presento MAC sintomatica que preciso descompresion quirurgica. Presentaba mutacion c.922A>G (N308D) en el gen PTPN perteneciente a la via RAS/MAPK. Caso 2: niña de 10 años con fenotipo de Noonan y MAC asintomatica detectada en resonancia magnetica cerebral. Era portadora de la mutacion c.923A>G (N308S) en el gen PTPN11. Conclusiones. Hemos encontrado en la bibliografia seis pacientes con esta asociacion, cuatro con fenotipo Noonan y dos con LEOPARD. Nuestros dos pacientes aportan evidencia suplementaria a la hipotesis de que la MAC formaria parte del espectro fenotipico del SN. El escaso numero de pacientes publicados con esta asociacion no permite extraer recomendaciones sobre el momento y la frecuencia de estudio de neuroimagen; no obstante, una exploracion neurologica cuidadosa deberia incluirse en la guia anticipatoria de salud en los sindromes de la via RAS/MAPK.

  10. [Urinary tract abnormalities with anorrectal malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Ceres, M L; Olagüe, R; Andrés, V; Lanuza, A

    1978-01-01

    Thirty five patients with anorrectal malformations are reviewed. These are divided in high and low anomalies according to some simple clinical data, better than the drawing of reference lines to determinate the height of puborrectalis muscle. Malformations were associated in 13 cases with urinary tract estructural anomalies and in four cases with isolated vesico-ureteral reflux. Diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made in 14 patients, 12 of them with recto-urinary fistula. A point is made about the complete and early exploration of all these patients to prevent irreparable renal damage that could be developed.

  11. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital renal malformations using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, K P; Merchant, R H; Gondhalekar, A; Lulla, C P; Mehta, A A; Mehta, K P

    1998-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine the accuracy of antenatal sonography for the detection of congenital renal malformations and to characterize the type of malformations, seen in a 3-year prospective study at a university-affiliated maternity hospital. Participants were 31,217 pregnant women, during the study period, and subjects were 65 fetuses in whom renal malformations were detected on antenatal ultrasound. Pelvic ultrasound scans were performed at least once between 20 and 37 weeks' gestation on all pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the hospital for the detection of renal malformations. Fetal urinary sampling, diversion procedures, or termination of pregnancy were carried out as required in those detected to have renal anomalies. Postnatal diagnosis was confirmed by sonography or autopsy. Diagnostic procedures and renal surgery were performed postnatally if indicated. Sixty-five fetuses (0.2 per cent) were diagnosed to have congenital renal malformation antenatally at a mean gestational age of 28.4 weeks. A dilated urinary system was seen in 39, cystic renal disease in 15, agenesis/hypoplasia in six, combined lesions in four, and a horseshoe kidney in one. Oligohydramnios was noted in 20 (31 per cent) pregnancies. Multiple congenital malformations associated with renal anomalies were detected in 12 pregnancies. Termination was carried out at 20 weeks in two pregnancies for lethal malformations; fetal urinary sampling was done in two fetuses with obstructed uropathy, and a vesicoamniotic shunt inserted in one. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed a dilated urinary system in 32, cystic renal dysplasia in 15, renal aplasia/hypoplasia in five, combined lesions in six, and a horseshoe and an ectopic kidney in one each. Five infants were found to be normal. There were seven stillbirths and seven neonatal deaths. Radionuclide scans showed obstruction in nine, decreased renal function in six, and absent renal functions in 10 infants. Micturating

  12. Vascular malformations: an update on imaging and management.

    PubMed

    Sierre, Sergio; Teplisky, Darío; Lipsich, José

    2016-04-01

    Vascular malformations comprise a broad and heterogeneous range of lesions that often represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the pediatrician. For a long time, the use of an inaccurate nomenclature has led to confusion. Since management depends on the specific vascular malformation, a proper classification and identification is critical. The objective of this article is to provide the necessary information about the current classification and terminology of vascular anomalies, including basic concepts about available imaging diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the management of such complex condition.

  13. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  14. Diffusion imaging and tractography of congenital brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael; Barkovich, A James; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion imaging is an MRI modality that measures the microscopic molecular motion of water in order to investigate white matter microstructure. The modality has been used extensively in recent years to investigate the neuroanatomical basis of congenital brain malformations. We review the basic principles of diffusion imaging and of specific techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). We show how DTI and HARDI, and their application to fiber tractography, has elucidated the aberrant connectivity underlying a number of congenital brain malformations. Finally, we discuss potential uses for diffusion imaging of developmental disorders in the clinical and research realms.

  15. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Malformations. Consensus Document of the International Union of Phlebology (IUP): updated 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B; Baumgartner, I; Berlien, P; Bianchini, G; Burrows, P; Gloviczki, P; Huang, Y; Laredo, J; Loose, D A; Markovic, J; Mattassi, R; Parsi, K; Rabe, E; Rosenblatt, M; Shortell, C; Stillo, F; Vaghi, M; Villavicencio, L; Zamboni, P

    2015-04-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are the most common vascular developmental anomalies (birth defects) . These defects are caused by developmental arrest of the venous system during various stages of embryogenesis. VMs remain a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to the wide range of clinical presentations, unpredictable clinical course, erratic response to the treatment with high recurrence/ persistence rates, high morbidity following non-specific conventional treatment, and confusing terminology. The Consensus Panel reviewed the recent scientific literature up to the year 2013 to update a previous IUP Consensus (2009) on the same subject. ISSVA Classification with special merits for the differentiation between the congenital vascular malformation (CVM) and vascular tumors was reinforced with an additional review on syndrome-based classification. A "modified" Hamburg classification was adopted to emphasize the importance of extratruncular vs. truncular sub-types of VMs. This incorporated the embryological ongm, morphological differences, unique characteristics, prognosis and recurrence rates of VMs based on this embryological classification. The definition and classification of VMs were strengthened with the addition of angiographic data that determines the hemodynamic characteristics, the anatomical pattern of draining veins and hence the risk of complication following sclerotherapy. The hemolymphatic malformations, a combined condition incorporating LMs and other CVMs, were illustrated as a separate topic to differentiate from isolated VMs and to rectify the existing confusion with name-based eponyms such as Klippei-Trenaunay syndrome. Contemporary concepts on VMs were updated with new data including genetic findings linked to the etiology of CVMs and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. Besides, newly established information on coagulopathy including the role of D-Dimer was thoroughly reviewed to provide guidelines on investigations and

  17. [The incidence of external congenital malformations at the Hospital de Ginecopediatría No. 48 in León, Guanajuato].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Arriaga, J L; Cortés-Gallo, G; Aldana-Valenzuela, C; Ramírez-Huerta, A C

    1991-10-01

    From June 1st, 1989 to May 31st, 1990, 16,987 consecutive newborns were examined at the No. 48 Gynecological Pediatric Hospital of the IMSS National Medical Center, looking for external congenital malformations including esophageal atresias, anorectal malformations and congenital hip luxations, all easily detected during a routine exploration. Each deformed newborn assigned two control patients the following two newborn babies showing no birth defects. 308 deformed newborns were detected, an incidence of 1.81%. Among the most frequent defects were midline flat hemangiomas, polyotia, Down syndrome, congenital hip luxation and myelomeningocele. The only significant statistical difference found with respect to the control group was a greater family history of defects in the case group (P less than 0.0001). When comparing our results with those from other studies, including a study done locally 15 years ago, we found differences among specific malformations: congenital hip malformation, polydactylia, foot deformities, flat hemangiomas, nevus and polyotias. Yet, the overall frequency of defects found was similar.

  18. [Biliary atresia and polysplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Yosra; Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayet; Belghith, Mohsen; Lassad, Sahnoun; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare malformation characterized by the association of multiple rates and other congenital anomalies dominated by cardiac, vascular, intestinal and bile malformations. We report the observation of a patient operated in the neonatal period (3 days) for an upper intestinal obstruction with situs inversus. Surgical exploration noted the presence of multiple rates, a preduodenal vein, a biliary atresia and a duodenal atresia. The surgical procedures performed were a latero-lateral duodeno-duodenostomy and hepatoportoenterostomy of KASAI with simple immediate and delayed outcomes. The follow up was of 23 years. We recall the epidemiological characteristics of this malformative association and we discuss the role played by the prognosis of polysplenia syndrome in the evolution of biliary atresia. The diagnosis and treatment of biliary atresia are always urgent to increase the chances of success of the Kasai, and the chances of prolonged survival with native liver. However, almost all long-term survivors (even anicteric) have biliary cirrhosis, which requires lifelong follow up.

  19. Consensus conference on Chiari: a malformation or an anomaly? Scoliosis and others orthopaedic deformities related to Chiari 1 malformation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Luca F; Motta, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we analysed the orthopaedic malformation in patients affected by Chiari I malformations as well as conservative or surgical treatment. The most common deformity in these patients is scoliosis. Different studies suggest a causal relation between syringomyelia and spinal deformities that differ by the type of deformities: asymptomatic scoliosis is characterized by a higher incidence of a single curve and convexity to the left, while symptomatic scoliosis is characterized by a double thoracolumbar curve. The conservative treatment with brace in these patients is not effective and scoliosis is typically evolutive. The evidence of the international data is that in patients without myelomeningocele or congenital scoliosis, but with Arnold Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia, suboccipital craniectomy gives the best chance for syrinx reduction and scoliosis improvement, particulary in children younger than 10 years and below a Cobb angle of 30°. The orthopaedic treatment in late decompression or in progressive curve is spine arthrodesis.

  20. Microcephaly, Intellectual Impairment, Bilateral Vesicoureteral Reflux, Distichiasis and Glomuvenous Malformations Associated with a 16q24.3 Contiguous Gene Deletion and a Glomulin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew G.; Dagenais, Susan L.; Garcia-Perez, José L.; Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka; Strouse, Peter; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Glover, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Two hereditary syndromes, lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LD) and blepharo-chelio-dontic (BCD) syndrome include the aberrant growth of eyelashes from the meibomian glands, known as distichiasis. LD is an autosomal dominant syndrome primarily characterized by distichiasis and the onset of lymphedema usually during puberty. Mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXC2 are the only known cause of LD. BCD syndrome consists of autosomal dominant abnormalities of the eyelid, lip, and teeth, and the etiology remains unknown. In this report, we describe a proband that presented with distichiasis, microcephaly, bilateral grade IV vesicoureteral reflux requiring ureteral re-implantation, mild intellectual impairment and apparent glomuvenous malformations. Distichiasis was present in three generations of the proband’s maternal side of the family. The glomuvenous malformations were severe in the proband, and maternal family members exhibited lower extremity varicosities of variable degree. A GLMN (glomulin) gene mutation was identified in the proband that accounts for the observed glomuvenous malformations; no other family member could be tested. TIE2 sequencing revealed no mutations. In the proband, an additional submicroscopic 265 kb contiguous gene deletion was identified in 16q24.3, located 609 kb distal to the FOXC2 locus, which was inherited from the proband’s mother. The deletion includes the C16ORF95, FBXO31, MAP1LC3B, and ZCCHC14 loci and 115 kb of a gene desert distal to FOXC2 and FOXL1. Thus, it is likely that the microcephaly, distichiasis, vesicoureteral and intellectual impairment in this family may be caused by the deletion of one or more of these genes and/or deletion of distant cis-regulatory elements of FOXC2 expression. PMID:22407726

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging in fetuses with unilateral cortical malformations and callosal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Glenn, O A; Quiroz, E M; Berman, J I; Studholme, C; Xu, D

    2010-06-01

    DWI was performed in fetuses with callosal agenesis and unilateral cortical malformations. ADC values were retrospectively measured in the developing white matter underlying the cortical malformation and compared with the corresponding contralateral white matter. In all 3 patients, ADC values were lower under the areas of cortical malformation compared with the normal contralateral side. Our findings suggest that there are structural differences in the developing white matter underlying areas of cortical malformation.

  2. Arnold-Chiari malformation type 1 complicated by sudden onset anterior spinal artery thrombosis, tetraparesis and respiratory arrest.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Zayyani, Najah R; Al Miamini, Wail; Khoujah, Amer M; Alharbi, Zeyad; Diari, Mohd S

    2011-04-15

    Chiari in 1891 described a constellation of anomalies at the base of the brain inherited congenitally, the characteristic of which are (1) extension of a tongue of cerebellar tissue posterior to the medulla and cord that extends into the cervical spinal canal; (2) caudal displacement of the medulla and the inferior part of the fourth ventricle into the cervical canal; and (3) a frequent but not invariable association with syringomyelia or a spinal developmental abnormality. Chiari recognized four types of abnormalities. Presently, the term has come to be restricted to Chiari's types I and II, that is, to cerebellomedullary descent without and with a meningomyelocele, respectively. The association of Arnold-Chairi malformation and high cervical cord infarction is unusual. The most common syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS), is caused by interruption of blood flow to the anterior spinal artery, producing ischaemia in the anterior two-thirds of the cord, with resulting neurologic deficits. Causes of ASAS include aortic disease, postsurgical, sepsis, hypotension and thromboembolic disorders. The authors present an interesting case of cervical cord infarction due to anterior spinal artery thrombosis in a patient of type 1 Arnold-Chiari malformation without any of the above predisposing factors.

  3. FGFR-associated craniosynostosis syndromes and gastrointestinal defects.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Christine E; Bowdin, Sarah; Arudchelvan, Yamini; Forrest, Christopher R; Brakora, Katherine A; Marcucio, Ralph S; Gong, Siew-Ging

    2016-12-01

    Craniosynostosis is a relatively common birth defect characterized by the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Examples of craniosynostosis syndromes include Crouzon (CS), Pfeiffer (PS), and Apert (AS) syndrome, with clinical characteristics such as midface hypoplasia, hypertelorism, and in some cases, limb defects. Mutations in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-2 comprise the majority of known mutations in syndromic forms of craniosynostosis. A number of clinical reports of FGFR-associated craniosynostosis patients and mouse mutants have been linked to gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders, leading to the hypothesis of a direct link between FGFR-associated craniosynostosis syndromes and GIT malformations. We conducted an investigation to determine GIT symptoms in a sample of FGFR-associated craniosynostosis syndrome patients and a mouse model of CS containing a mutation (W290R) in Fgfr2. We found that, compared to the general population, the incidence of intestinal/bowel malrotation (IM) was present at a higher level in our sample population of patients with FGFR-associated craniosynostosis syndromes. We also showed that the mouse model of CS had an increased incidence of cecal displacement, suggestive of IM. These findings suggest a direct relationship between FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes and GIT malformations. Our study may shed further light on the potential widespread impact FGFR mutations on different developmental systems. Based on reports of GIT malformations in children with craniosynostosis syndromes and substantiation with our animal model, GIT malformations should be considered in any child with an FGFR2-associated craniosynostosis syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chiari type 1 malformation in a pseudotumour cerebri patient: is it an acquired or congenital Chiari malformation?

    PubMed

    Istek, Seref

    2014-06-04

    Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a developmental abnormality of the cerebellar tonsils. Patients with CM1 commonly present with headache. Papilloedema is rarely seen in CM1. However, a 52-year-old woman presented to the hospital with a headache and her ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral papilloedema. Her cranial MRI was compatible with borderline CM1. Bilateral papilloedema and headache suggested idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) as the preliminary diagnosis. IIH is a rare case in CM1. This article argues about this association and discusses as to whether it is an acquired or congenital Chiari malformation.

  5. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,…

  6. Mimosa tenuiflora as a Cause of Malformations in Ruminants in the Northeastern Brazilian Semiarid Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Craniofacial anomalies, eye malformations, and permanent flexures of the forelimbs are common malformations seen in ruminants grazing semiarid rangelands of Northeastern Brazil. To investigate the cause of these malformations, we fed 2 suspected plants, Mimosa tenuiflora or Prosopis juliflora, to gr...

  7. [A case of Edwards' syndrome in pregnancy complicated by serologic incompatibility and preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Murawski, Marek; Gryboś, Marian; Zalewska, Dominika; Symonowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-12-01

    A case of Edwards' syndrome (trisomy 18) diagnosed in the third pregnancy trimester is described. The diagnosis was based on sonographic examination and cytogenetic amniocentesis. Lethal genetic fetal malformation determined the medical indication to preterm delivery. Additionally, serologic incompatibility during pregnancy was observed, as well as pregnancy induced hypertension turning into preeclampsia after the labour action was evoked. A caesarean section due to obstetric indications was done. Phenotype and lethal congenital malformations in the newborn have confirmed of the chromosome aberration prenatally diagnosed.

  8. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  9. Congenital subclavian arteriovenous malformation causing cardiac failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Anoop, T M; Sreejith, P; Thomas, Joby K; Gailin, B; Jabbar, P K; Ittycheria, Cherian C; George, Raju

    2009-07-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the thoracic region are rarely reported in adults. The authors report an unusual case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a large congenital AVM and heart failure. The diagnosis was made using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and computed tomography. Embolization followed by surgical resection of the AVM resulted in the prompt relief of heart failure.

  10. Spitz nevus arising upon a congenital glomuvenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Arica, Deniz A; Arica, Ibrahim E; Yayli, Savas; Cobanoglu, Umit; Akay, Bengu N; Anadolu, Rana; Bahadir, Sevgi

    2013-01-01

    There are several reports of the collision of vascular and pigmentary anomalies (e.g., phakomatosis pigmentovascularis) and the association between congenital melanocytic nevi and infantile hemangiomas. We report a case of Spitz nevus arising in skin overlying a congenital plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (GVM). This is the first report of a Spitz nevus arising in direct contiguity to a GVM.

  11. Diagnosis and Nonsurgical Management of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, R. D.; Moloney, J. C.; Anderson, H. J.

    2007-11-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon problem and traditional treatment by hysterectomy excludes the possibility of future pregnancy. Developments in interventional techniques make transcatheter embolization of the feeding vessel(s) a therapeutic alternative, potentially preserving the patient's fertility. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of uterine AVM.

  12. Cochlear implantation in inner ear malformations--a review article.

    PubMed

    Sennaroglu, Levent

    2010-03-01

    Inner ear malformations constitute about 20% of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. In this review article an updated classification of cochlear malformations is provided. Incomplete partition and cochlear hypoplasia cases are each divided further into three groups. There are two main difficulties in the surgery of inner ear malformations; gusher and facial nerve abnormalities. Radiological features of malformations necessary to identify these problems preoperatively are discussed. Facial nerve abnormalities that may occur are described. Two different types of cerebrospinal fluid leakage are defined and necessary measures to prevent leakage are described. Standard and modified surgical approaches to overcome the described problems are described with literature findings. Finally meningitis which may occur with and without cochlear implantation in this special group of patients is emphasized. This is common in incomplete partition type I patients and is usually due to a fistula in one of the windows (usually oval window) which occurs as a result of cerebrospinal fluid pressure. This is a medical emergency leading to potential meningitis and measures that should be taken to stop the leak as soon as possible are described.

  13. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  14. Surgical and Technical Modalities for Hearing Restoration in Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Thomas, Jan Peter; Volkenstein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Malformations of the external and middle ear often go along with an aesthetic and functional handicap. Independent of additional aesthetic procedures, a successful functional hearing restoration leads to a tremendous gain in quality of life for affected patients. The introduction of implantable hearing systems (bone conduction and middle ear devices) offers new therapeutic options in this field. We focus on functional rehabilitation of patients with malformations, either by surgical reconstruction or the use of different implantable hearing devices, depending on the disease itself and the severity of malformation as well as hearing impairment. Patients with an open ear canal and minor malformations are good candidates for surgical hearing restoration of middle ear structures with passive titanium or autologous implants. In cases with complete fibrous or bony atresia of the ear canal, the most promising functional outcome and gain in quality of life can be expected with an active middle ear implant or a bone conduction device combined with a surgical aesthetic rehabilitation in a single or multi-step procedure. Although the surgical procedure for bone conduction devices is straightforward and safe, more sophisticated operations for active middle ear implants (e.g., Vibrant Soundbridge, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) provide an improved speech discrimination in noise and the ability of sound localization compared with bone conduction devices where the stimulation reaches both cochleae.

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Patients Who Underwent Surgery for Genital Tract Malformations at Peking Union Medical College Hospital across 31 Years

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Han; Zhu, Lan; Liu, Ai-Ming; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female genital malformations represent miscellaneous deviations from normal anatomy. This study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent surgery for genital tract malformations at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) during a 31-year period. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed surgical cases of congenital malformation of the female genital tract at PUMCH for a 31-year period, analyzed the clinical characteristics of 1634 hospitalized patients, and investigated their general condition, diagnosis, and treatment process. Results: The average patient age was 27.6 ± 9.9 years. The average ages of patients who underwent surgery for uterine malformation and vaginal malformation were 31.9 ± 8.8 years and 24.7 ± 9.0 years, respectively; these ages differed significantly (P < 0.01). Among patients with genital tract malformation, the percentages of vaginal malformation, uterine malformation, vulva malformation, cervical malformation, and other malformations were 43.9%, 43.5%, 7.4%, 2.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among patients with uterine malformation, 34.5% underwent surgery for the genital tract malformation, whereas in patients with vaginal malformation, the proportion is 70.6%; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The percentage of complications of the urinary system in patients with vaginal malformations was 10.2%, which was statistically significantly higher than that (5.3%) in patients with uterine malformations (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Compared to patients with uterine malformations, patients with vaginal malformations displayed more severe clinical symptoms, a younger surgical age, and a greater need for attention, early diagnosis, and treatment. Patients with genital tract malformations, particularly vaginal malformations, tend to have more complications of the urinary system and other malformations than patients with uterine malformations. PMID:27748336

  16. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  17. Possible homozygous Waardenburg syndrome in a fetus with exencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-06

    This paper describes a pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome and an aborted fetus who had severe congenital malformations but no detected genetic mutations. The authors concluded that despite the fact that no homozygosity of the fetus was demonstrated, the phenotype pointed to homozygous mutations of the PAX3 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for deep intracranial arteriovenous malformations, part 1: Brainstem arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Ding, Dale; Chen, Ching-Jen; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    The management of brainstem arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are one of the greatest challenges encountered by neurosurgeons. Brainstem AVM have a higher risk of hemorrhage compared to AVM in other locations, and rupture of these lesions commonly results in devastating neurological morbidity and mortality. The potential morbidity associated with currently available treatment modalities further compounds the complexity of decision making for affected patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has an important role in the management of brainstem AVM. SRS offers acceptable obliteration rates with lower risks of hemorrhage occurring during the latency period. Complex nidal architecture requires a multi-disciplinary treatment approach. Nidi partly involving subpial/epipial regions of the dorsal midbrain or cerebellopontine angle should be considered for a combination of endovascular embolization, micro-surgical resection and SRS. Considering the fact that incompletely obliterated lesions (even when reduced in size) could still cause lethal hemorrhages, additional treatment, including repeat SRS and surgical resection should be considered when complete obliteration is not achieved by first SRS. Patients with brainstem AVM require continued clinical and radiological observation and follow-up after SRS, well after angiographic obliteration has been confirmed.

  20. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  1. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  2. Seckel syndrome accompanied by semilobar holoprosencephaly and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Sarici, Dilek; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Kara, Ahu; Doganay, Selim; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2012-03-01

    Seckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, and its characteristic features include prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, and "bird-like" face with prominent, beak-like nose and micrognathia. Additional abnormalities were described in the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, endocrine, and central nervous systems. We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a neonate with Seckel syndrome accompanied by semilobar holoprosencephaly and arthrogryposis. Major brain malformations may be associated with Seckel syndrome. Imaging studies should be performed to determine any central nervous system abnormalities. Considering the basic defect of neuroblast proliferation in Seckel syndrome, neuronal migration disorders should be sought in these patients.

  3. Sturge–Weber syndrome – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Shahid M.; Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS), also called as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis is an uncommon congenital neurological disorder & frequent among the neurocutaneous syndromes specifically with vascular predominance. This disorder is characterized by facial capillary malformation & other neurological condition. The oral manifestations are gingival hemangiomatosis restricting to either side in upper and lower jaw, sometimes bilateral. We report a case of SWS with oral, ocular and neurological features. PMID:25853049

  4. [A case of Wilm's tumor with full symptomatic WAGR syndrome].

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D; Daszkiewicz, P

    1995-03-01

    The authors of this paper presented a case of a baby with full-symptomatic WAGR syndrome (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genital tract malformation and mental retardation) treated in the I Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Pediatrics, Medical Academy Poznań. The etiology of this syndrome was discussed (deletion of the 13th band of the 11th chromosome short arm). The reason for treatment failure was analysed.

  5. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of urorectal septum malformation sequence and chromosomal microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yan; Wu, Qingqing; Liu, Yan; Sun, Lijuan; Zhi, Wenxue; Zhang, Puqing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS) is a rare congenital abnormal syndrome that is caused by the incomplete division of the cloaca. Based on whether the cloaca membrane breaks down or not, the URSMS are classified as full and partial forms. The prenatal diagnosis of URSMS remains challenging because of poor recognition to this malformation and the relatively non-specific sonographic features. We report a prenatally sonographic diagnosed case of the partial URSMS, and review the literature to summarize the prenatal features. Case report and review: A 37-year old woman was referred at 24 weeks of gestation for fetal abdominal cyst. Detailed sonographic examination was done and revealed the vesicocolic fistula, distended colon, absence of perianal hypoechoic ring, pyelectasis, and small stomach bubble. The URSMS was suspected. Amniocentesis was done and karyotyping revealed 46,XY. Furthermore, chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) was performed for the first time in URSMS and an alteration of 111.8Kb deletion was detected in 16p13.3 which was located inside the RBFOX1 gene. Parental studies showed that the deletion was inherited from the father who has nomal clinical phenotype. The woman elected to terminate the pregnancy at 25 weeks gestation and postmortem examination confirmed the diagnosis of partial URSMS. The published studies were reviewed and 28 cases of URSMS with conducted prenatal ultrasonography were collected in this report. The most common sonographic description, as suspicious signs of URSMS, were severe oligohydramnios or anhydramnios, urinary tract anomalies, fetal intra-abdominal cysts, and dilated bowel. Also, enterolithiasis and vesicocolic fistula were relatively infrequent but highly specific feature of URSMS. Conclusions: URSMS is difficult to be diagnosed prenatally. However, it has characteristic features that can be detected by fetal ultrasonography, and a precise prenatal sonographic examination is crucial

  6. Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia, DOOR syndrome or Fryns-like syndrome? Report on patients from Indian Ocean islands.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Cuillier, Fabrice; Malan, Valerie; Brayer, Claire; Grondard, Maeva; Jacquemot-Dekkak, Laure; Kieffer-Traversier, Marie; Pierre, Florence; Laurain, Céline; Samperiz, Sylvain; Tiran-Rajaofera, Isabelle; Ramful, Duksha

    2014-03-01

    We report on six patients (five unpublished patients) from the Indian Ocean islands, with coarse face, cleft lip or palate, eye anomalies, brachytelephalangy, nail hypoplasia, various malformations (genitourinary or cerebral), abnormal electroencephalograms with impaired neurological examination and lethal outcome. Massive polyhydramnios was noted in the third trimester of pregnancy and neonatal growth was normal or excessive. The combination of the features is consistent with the diagnosis of Fryns syndrome (FS) without congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Besides chromosomal aberrations and microdeletion syndrome, differential diagnoses include conditions overlapping with FS such as Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, and conditions with hypoplasia/absence of the distal phalanges such as DOOR syndrome, Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, and Rudiger syndrome.

  7. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder.

  8. Recognition of caudal regression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boulas, Mari M

    2009-04-01

    Caudal regression syndrome, also referred to as caudal dysplasia and sacral agenesis syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation characterized by varying degrees of developmental failure early in gestation. It involves the lower extremities, the lumbar and coccygeal vertebrae, and corresponding segments of the spinal cord. This is a rare disorder, and true pathogenesis is unclear. The etiology is thought to be related to maternal diabetes, genetic predisposition, and vascular hypoperfusion, but no true causative factor has been determined. Fetal diagnostic tools allow for early recognition of the syndrome, and careful examination of the newborn is essential to determine the extent of the disorder. Associated organ system dysfunction depends on the severity of the disease. Related defects are structural, and systematic problems including respiratory, cardiac, gastrointestinal, urinary, orthopedic, and neurologic can be present in varying degrees of severity and in different combinations. A multidisciplinary approach to management is crucial. Because the primary pathology is irreversible, treatment is only supportive.

  9. [Moebius syndrome: therapeutic proposals from 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Braye, F; Souchere, B; Franc, C; Freidel, M

    1996-12-01

    Moebius syndrome is a congenital bilateral palsy of the sixth and seventh cranial nerves. It results a total absence of facial expression and a severe strabismus. Social life is greatly disturbed. Other anomalies may be associated, especially other cranial palsies and Poland syndrome. The etiology of this syndrome isn't clearly established. Stem necrosis secondary to a vascular deficiency is often admitted. We report two observations. We emphasize the importance of a complete maxillo-facial treatment including maxillo-mandibular anomaly. Both patient underwent orthognathic surgery. The first one for class II and the second for class III anomaly. One patient underwent a facial reanimation by temporal muscle transfer. Orthognathic surgery must be realized prior to facial reanimation. A correction of the strabismus is possible. Moebius syndrome is a rare (200 observations) but very severe malformation. Maxillofacial surgery is able to improve the morphological and relational aspect of Moebius syndrome.

  10. PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid endobronchial tumor.

    PubMed

    Mama, Nadia; H'mida, Dorra; Lahmar, Imen; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum

    2014-05-01

    PHACES syndrome consists of the constellation of manifestations including posterior fossa anomalies of the brain (most commonly Dandy-Walker malformations), hemangiomas of the face and scalp, arterial abnormalities, cardiac defects, eye anomalies and sternal defects. We present a case with a possible PHACES syndrome including sternal cleft and supraumbilical raphé, precordial skin tag, persistent left superior vena cava and subtle narrowing of the aorta with an endobronchial carcinoid tumor. All these anomalies were discovered on chest multi-detector CT. This is a unique case of PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor. Review of the literature revealed 3 cases of PHACES syndrome with glial tumor. The authors tried to find the relationship between PHACES syndrome and carcinoid tumors or gliomas, which all derive from the neural crest cells.

  11. Epizootic of ovine congenital malformations associated with Schmallenberg virus infection.

    PubMed

    van den Brom, R; Luttikholt, S J M; Lievaart-Peterson, K; Peperkamp, N H M T; Mars, M H; van der Poel, W H M; Vellema, P

    2012-02-01

    Epizootic outbreaks of congenital malformations in sheep are rare and have, to the best of our knowledge, never been reported before in Europe. This paper describes relevant preliminary findings from the first epizootic outbreak of ovine congenital malformations in the Netherlands. Between 25 November and 20 December 2011, congenital malformations in newborn lambs on sheep farms throughout the country were reported to the Animal Health Service in Deventer. Subsequently, small ruminant veterinary specialists visited these farms and collected relevant information from farmers by means of questionnaires. The deformities varied from mild to severe, and ewes were reported to have given birth to both normal and deformed lambs; both male and female lambs were affected. Most of the affected lambs were delivered at term. Besides malformed and normal lambs, dummy lambs, unable to suckle, were born also on these farms. None of the ewes had shown clinical signs during gestation or at parturition. Dystocia was common, because of the lambs' deformities. Lambs were submitted for post-mortem examination, and samples of brain tissue were collected for virus detection. The main macroscopic findings included arthrogryposis, torticollis, scoliosis and kyphosis, brachygnathia inferior, and mild-to-marked hypoplasia of the cerebrum, cerebellum and spinal cord. Preliminary data from the first ten affected farms suggest that nutritional deficiencies, intoxication, and genetic factors are not likely to have caused the malformations. Preliminary diagnostic analyses of precolostral serum samples excluded border disease virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus, and bluetongue virus. In December 2011, samples of brain tissue from 54 lambs were sent to the Central Veterinary Institute of Wageningen University Research, Lelystad. Real-time PCR detected the presence of a virus, provisionally named the Schmallenberg virus, in brain tissue from 22 of the 54 lambs, which originated from seven of eight

  12. Congenital Mirror Movements in Gorlin Syndrome: A Case Report With DTI and Functional MRI Features.

    PubMed

    Sag, Erdal; Gocmen, Rahsan; Yildiz, F Gokcem; Ozturk, Zeynelabidin; Temucin, Cagri; Teksam, Ozlem; Utine, Eda

    2016-03-01

    Congenital mirror movements are rare conditions that define the inability to perform unimanual movements. Gorlin syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is a genetic disorder with multiple nevi predisposing to basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal malformations. Herein we report on an adolescent patient with Gorlin syndrome and coexisting congenital mirror movements. To our knowledge, this is the first patient in the literature who has both of these very rare conditions.

  13. A second locus for Rieger syndrome maps to chromosome 13q14

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.C.; Del Bono, E.A.; Pralea, A.M.

    1996-09-01

    Rieger syndrome is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder typically characterized by malformations of the eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and exhibits significant variable expressivity. One locus associated with this disorder has been mapped to 4q25. Using a large four-generation pedigree, we have identified a second locus for Rieger syndrome located on chromosome 13q14. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Pregnancies at a late reproductive age in a patient with Turner's syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Aparna; Wardle, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Women with Turner's syndrome are usually sterile. It is unusual for women with Turner's syndrome to give birth after the age of 34 and those who proceed with pregnancy are at a higher risk of having spontaneous miscarriage and chromosomally malformed children necessitating genetic counselling.

  15. Updates and Future Horizons on the Understanding, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sturge-Weber Syndrome Brain Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Warren; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Ball, Karen L.; Juhasz, Csaba; Jordan, Lori C.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Comi, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To review recent developments in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Method: Members of the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium Sturge-Weber Syndrome National Workgroup contributed their expertise to review the literature and present promising directions for research. Results: The increasing number…

  16. Type and frequency of cardiac defects in embryofetal alcohol syndrome. Report of 16 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Löser, H; Majewski, F

    1977-01-01

    Within a period of 3 years, 56 infants and children with embryofetal alcohol syndrome have been detected and examined for heart defects. All children were from mothers who had been addicted to alcohol even during pregnancy and they showed a typical pattern of malformations, as described by Lemoine et al. (1968) and Jones et al. (1973). In 16 cases cardiovascular malformations were confirmed by heart catheterisation or pathological examination. The overall incidence of heart defects in this syndrome was 29 per cent. The incidence rises to nearly 50 per cent in the more severe types of this syndrome. Atrial septal defects were found to be the most common heart defect (10 out of 16 cases); ventricular septal defects and other variable malformations occurred less frequently. The high incidence of heart defects indicates that alcoholism during pregnancy has to be considered as a serious and preventable cause of congenital heart disease. Images PMID:603740

  17. De novo 13q deletions in two patients with mild anorectal malformations as part of VATER/VACTERL and VATER/VACTERL-like association and analysis of EFNB2 in patients with anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Dworschak, Gabriel C; Draaken, Markus; Marcelis, Carlo; de Blaauw, Ivo; Pfundt, Rolph; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Bartels, Enrika; Hilger, Alina; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Schmiedeke, Eberhard; Grasshoff-Derr, Sabine; Schmidt, Dominik; Märzheuser, Stefanie; Hosie, Stuart; Weih, Sandra; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Palta, Markus; Leonhardt, Johannes; Schäfer, Mattias; Kujath, Christina; Rissmann, Anke; Nöthen, Markus M; Zwink, Nadine; Ludwig, Michael; Reutter, Heiko

    2013-12-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) comprise a broad spectrum of conditions ranging from mild anal anomalies to complex cloacal malformations. In 40-50% of cases, ARM occurs within the context of defined genetic syndromes or complex multiple congenital anomalies, such as VATER/VACTERL (vertebral defects [V], ARMs [A], cardiac defects [C], tracheoesophageal fistula with or without esophageal atresia [TE], renal malformations [R], and limb defects [L]) association. Here, we report the identification of deletions at chromosome 13q using single nucleotide polymorphism-based array analysis in two patients with mild ARM as part of VATER/VACTERL and VATER/VACTERL-like associations. Both deletions overlap the previously defined critical region for ARM. Heterozygous Efnb2 murine knockout models presenting with mild ARM suggest EFNB2 as an excellent candidate gene in this region. Our patients showed a mild ARM phenotype, closely resembling that of the mouse. We performed a comprehensive mutation analysis of the EFNB2 gene in 331 patients with isolated ARM, or ARM as part of VATER/VACTERL or VATER/VACTERL-like associations. However, we did not identify any disease-causing mutations. Given the convincing argument for EFNB2 as a candidate gene for ARM, analyses of larger samples and screening of functionally relevant non-coding regions of EFNB2 are warranted. In conclusion, our report underlines the association of chromosome 13q deletions with ARM, suggesting that routine molecular diagnostic workup should include the search for these deletions. Despite the negative results of our mutation screening, we still consider EFNB2 an excellent candidate gene for contributing to the development of ARM in humans.

  18. Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    DeBarber, Andrea E.; Eroglu, Yasemen; Merkens, Louise S.; Pappu, Anuradha S.; Steiner, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple congenital malformation/intellectual disability syndrome, with clinical characteristics encompassing a wide spectrum and great variability. Elucidation of the biochemical and molecular genetic basis for the autosomal recessively inherited SLOS, specifically, understanding SLOS as a cholesterol deficiency syndrome caused by mutations in DHCR7, opened up enormous possibilities for therapeutic intervention. When cholesterol was discovered to be the activator of sonic hedgehog, cholesterol deficiency with inactivation of this developmental patterning gene was thought to be the cause of SLOS malformations, yet this explanation is overly simplistic. Still, despite these important research breakthroughs, there is no proven treatment for SLOS. Better animal models are needed to allow potential treatment testing and the study of disease pathophysiology, which is incompletely understood. Creation of human cellular models will surely be useful, especially models of brain cells. In vivo human studies are essential as well. There have only been limited natural history studies of SLOS to date. Biomarker development will be critical in facilitating clinical trials in this rare condition, since clinical phenotype may change over many years. Additional research in these and other areas is critical if we are to make headway towards ameloriating the effects of this devastating condition. PMID:21777499

  19. Multiple disseminated glomuvenous malformations: do we know enough?

    PubMed

    Solovan, C; Chiticariu, Elena; Beinsan, Doina; Zurac, Sabina; Baderca, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    Multiple glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), also known as glomangiomas, are uncommon entities with histological features of both glomus cells proliferation and venous malformation. A 14-year-old boy was admitted to our clinic with multiple dermal blue nodules, disseminated in different segments of the body. The patient's family history was positive for similar lesions; his mother and maternal grandmother had some asymptomatic blue nodules on their body. Histological examination showed a tumor composed of multiple caveronous vessels surrounded by glomus cells, positive for alpha smooth muscle actin, HHF35 (pan-actin), and h-caldesmon. This is a case of multiple GVMs, a rare disease caused by mutations in glomulin gene, with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The clinical and histopathological features are briefly discussed.

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery with the linear accelerator: treatment of arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Betti, O O; Munari, C; Rosler, R

    1989-03-01

    An original stereotactic radiosurgical approach coupling a) Talairach's stereotactic methodology, b) a specially devised mechanical system, and c) a linear accelerator is detailed. The authors present their preliminary results on 66 patients with nonsurgical intracranial arteriovenous malformations. The doses delivered for treatment varied from 20 to 70 Gy. Doses of no more than 40 Gy were used in 80% of patients. An angiographic study was performed when the computed tomographic scan controls showed relevant modifications of the lesion volume. Total obliteration was obtained in 27 of the 41 patients (65.8%) who were followed up for at least 24 months. The percentage of the cured patients is significantly higher when a) the entire malformation is included in the 75% isodose (96%) and b) the maximum diameter of the lesion is less than 12 mm (81%). Two patients died of rebleeding at 18 and 29 months after treatment.

  1. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations: Updated literature review.

    PubMed

    Yahya, S; Heyes, G; Nightingale, P; Lamin, S; Chavda, S; Geh, I; Spooner, D; Cruickshank, G; Sanghera, P

    2017-04-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the leading causing of intra-cerebral haemorrhage. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established treatment for arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and commonly delivered using Gamma Knife within dedicated radiosurgery units. Linear accelerator (LINAC) SRS is increasingly available however debate remains over whether it offers an equivalent outcome. The aim of this project is to evaluate the outcomes using LINAC SRS for AVMs used within a UK neurosciences unit and review the literature to aid decision making across various SRS platforms. Results have shown comparability across platforms and strongly supports that an adapted LINAC based SRS facility within a dynamic regional neuro-oncology department delivers similar outcomes (in terms of obliteration and toxicity) to any other dedicated radio-surgical platform. Locally available facilities can facilitate discussion between options however throughput will inevitably be lower than centrally based dedicated national radiosurgery units.

  2. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bolde, Saroj; Pudale, Smita; Pandit, Gopal; Ruikar, Kirti; Ingle, Sachin B

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a congenital disorder of the lung similar to bronchopulmonary sequestration. In CPAM, usually an entire lobe of lung is replaced by a non-working cystic piece of abnormal lung tissue. This abnormal tissue will never function as normal lung tissue. The underlying cause for CPAM is not known. It occurs in approximately 1 in every 30000 pregnancies. The association between CPAM and malignancy has been well documented. There is a small risk (0.7%) of malignant transformation within the cyst. So early diagnosis and surgical resection is important to prevent the grave complications. Herein, we are reporting two interesting cases of CPAM and one belonged to Type II and other belonged to Type III of Stocker’s classification. PMID:25984523

  3. Use of tramadol in early pregnancy and congenital malformation risk.

    PubMed

    Källén, Bengt; Reis, Margareta

    2015-12-01

    Only few studies exist regarding the risk of a teratogenic effect of tramadol when used in early pregnancy. Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, women (deliveries in 1997-2013) who had reported the use of tramadol in early pregnancy were identified. Maternal characteristics and concomitant drug use were analyzed. Among 1,682,846 women (1,797,678 infants), 1751 (1776 infants) had used tramadol, 96 of the infants had a congenital malformation and 70 of them were relatively severe. The adjusted odds ratio for a relatively severe malformation was 1.33 (95% CI 1.05-1.70). The odds ratios for cardiovascular defects (1.56, 95% CI 1.04-2.29) and for pes equinovarus (3.63, 95% CI 1.61-6.89) were significantly increased. The study suggests a teratogenic effect of tramadol but the risk increase is moderate.

  4. Congenital malformations of the vertebral column in ancient amphibians.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, F; Rothschild, B M; Hampe, O; Sobral, G; Gubin, Y M; Asbach, P

    2014-04-01

    Temnospondyls, the largest group of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic amphibians, primitively possess rhachitomous vertebrae with multipartite centra (consisting of one horse-shoe-shaped inter- and paired pleurocentra). In a group of temnospondyls, the stereospondyls, the intercentra became pronounced and disc-like, whereas the pleurocentra were reduced. We report the presence of congenital vertebral malformations (hemi, wedge and block vertebrae) in Permian and Triassic temnospondyls, showing that defects of formation and segmentation in the tetrapod vertebral column represent a fundamental failure of somitogenesis that can be followed throughout tetrapod evolution. This is irrespective of the type of affected vertebra, that is, rhachitomous or stereospondylous, and all components of the vertebra can be involved (intercentrum, pleurocentrum and neural arch), either together or independently on their own. This is the oldest known occurrence of wedge vertebra and congenital block vertebra described in fossil tetrapods. The frequency of vertebral congenital malformations in amphibians appears unchanged from the Holocene.

  5. Pediatric lymphatic malformations: evolving understanding and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Defnet, Ann M; Bagrodia, Naina; Hernandez, Sonia L; Gwilliam, Natalie; Kandel, Jessica J

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal treatment of lymphatic malformations continues to expand as new information about the biology and genetics of these lesions is discovered, along with knowledge gained from clinical practice. A patient-centered approach, ideally provided by a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team, should guide timing and modality of treatment. Current treatment options include observation, surgery, sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and laser therapy. New medical and surgical therapies are emerging, and include sildenafil, propranolol, sirolimus, and vascularized lymph node transfer. The primary focus of management is to support and optimize these patients' quality of life. Researchers continue to study lymphatic malformations with the goal of increasing therapeutic options and developing effective clinical pathways for these complicated lesions.

  6. Behavioral effects of congenital ventromedial prefrontal cortex malformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A detailed behavioral profile associated with focal congenital malformation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has not been reported previously. Here we describe a 14 year-old boy, B.W., with neurological and psychiatric sequelae stemming from focal cortical malformation of the left vmPFC. Case Presentation B.W.'s behavior has been characterized through extensive review Patience of clinical and personal records along with behavioral and neuropsychological testing. A central feature of the behavioral profile is severe antisocial behavior. He is aggressive, manipulative, and callous; features consistent with psychopathy. Other problems include: egocentricity, impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of empathy, lack of respect for authority, impaired moral judgment, an inability to plan ahead, and poor frustration tolerance. Conclusions The vmPFC has a profound contribution to the development of human prosocial behavior. B.W. demonstrates how a congenital lesion to this cortical region severely disrupts this process. PMID:22136635

  7. Giant splenic artery aneurysm associated with arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Aditya; Whitehouse, Richard; Johnson, Robert W; Augustine, Titus

    2006-12-01

    Giant splenic artery aneurysms are extremely rare entities that have important clinical implications. The size and the natural history pose unique challenges in the management of these lesions. We present one such case that was associated with a primary arteriovenous malformation in the splenic hilum. This is the third largest aneurysm reported in literature so far and the characteristic feature is that this is the first case of a hilar arteriovenous fistula complicated by formation of a giant aneurysm and another smaller aneurysm. In our opinion the hilar malformation was congenital in origin and responsible for the formation of the two aneurysms. We also present an up to date review of literature on this subject.

  8. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Chandan B.; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  9. A malformed newborn with 9p and 4q trisomy.

    PubMed

    Fryns, J P; Azou, M; Devliegher, H; Eggermont, E; van den Berghe, H

    1981-01-01

    A malformed male newborn with partial trisomy 9p (qter-9q13) and distal 4q trisomy (4qter-4q31), being the unbalanced product of a balanced reciprocal translocation in the mother karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;9)(q31;q13) is reported. Besides the typical craniofacial stigmata of pure 9q trisomy the child presented with poor neurological condition and failure to thrive.

  10. Headache and Chiari I Malformation in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Victorio, M Cristina; Khoury, Chaouki K

    2016-02-01

    Headache is a common problem in children and adolescents. Its recurrent and disabling nature may lead to use of neuroimaging to exclude secondary causes of headache such as Chiari I malformation (CM I). CM I has a variety of presentation with headache being the most common symptom. CM I can be asymptomatic and is also often found incidentally in neuroimaging done for conditions other than headache. This article reviews the spectrum of headache in patients with CM I.

  11. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  12. From the aerospace medicine residents' teaching file. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Beckstrand, Devin P

    2004-07-01

    A USAF transport pilot was referred to the Aeromedical Consult Service for a cardiology work-up. During his evaluation for an abnormal treadmill, a chest X-ray showed a probable pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM). A CT scan of his chest and a shunt study confirmed this diagnosis. The aviator was referred for treatment and later underwent successful balloon embolization therapy. A discussion of PAVM presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and aeromedical aspects follows.

  13. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  14. Cochlear implantation in the Mondini inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, R T; Robbins, A J; Myres, W A; Pope, M L

    1986-07-01

    We report the case of a profoundly deaf 4-year-old boy with congenital deafness as a result of Mondini's dysplasia. The Mondini inner ear malformation is the result of arrested labyrinthine development during embryogenesis and is characterized by both bony and membranous anomalies of the inner ear. The dysplastic cochlear anatomy does not preclude successful cochlear implantation, and electrical threshold measurements are similar to those recorded in pediatric subjects deafened as a result of other causes.

  15. Radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, M; Runge, M; Kocher, M; Zähringer, M; Treuer, H; Sturm, V

    2004-07-27

    The authors evaluated the efficacy of radiosurgery (RS) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT AVMs). Two patients with seven HHT AVMs were treated by linear accelerator-RS. Complete obliteration was achieved 18 to 24 months post-treatment without side effects. Because HHT AVMs are small and multiple, RS is superior to microsurgery because it is noninvasive and all AVMs can be treated in one session regardless of their location.

  16. Bilateral radial hemimelia and multiple malformations in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Pisoni, Luciano; Cinti, Filippo; Del Magno, Sara; Joechler, Monika

    2012-08-01

    Hemimelia is a congenital disease of complete or partial absence of one or more bones. The most important hypothesis is that radial agenesis is a consequence of neural crest injury. Treatment selection depends on the degree of the deformity and the reduction of limb function. This report describes a case of bilateral radial hemimelia and multiple malformations in a kitten aged 2 months treated conservatively with splint bandage, until bone maturity. The re-evaluation was performed 4 years later.

  17. Congenital malformations: an inquiry into classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed Central

    Kalter, H

    1998-01-01

    In the beginning, as a familiar book recalls, the earth was a formless void. And by separating light from dark, water from sky, life from dust, order came forth. Thus appeared organisation and categorisation. This is to say, classification, since to classify is to make for order and clarity. These are the qualities needed today for the study of congenital malformations and eventual control of their occurrence. What follows is an inquiry into the present state of this desideratum. PMID:9719373

  18. Cognitive profiles of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients with minor brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Maria T; Walsh, Karin S; Kardel, Peter G; Kutteruf, Rachel E; Bhatt, Rujuta R; Bouton, Tara C; Vezina, Louis-Gilbert; Packer, Roger J

    2012-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic condition associated with increased risk of abnormal brain development. The relationship between a specific type of brain malformation and a distinct cognitive sign/deficiency remains unknown. This study investigated the frequency of brain malformations in children with neurofibromatosis type 1, and the impact of those brain malformations on cognitive performance. A retrospective examination was performed of cranial magnetic resonance imaging and clinical records in 604 neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. Eighteen patients with brain malformations and intellectual evaluations were available and compared to a subset of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients (n = 20) without brain malformations. The most common brain malformations included hypothalamic hamartomas and Chiari I malformation. More complex migration disorders were also observed. Comparisons of cognitive profiles between groups revealed differences in patients with hamartomas compared with those manifesting Chiari I malformations or control subjects. As a group, those with hamartomas demonstrated below-average global intellect, whereas patients with Chiari I or no malformations performed in the average range. Disorders in cell organization, expressed as brain malformations (hamartomas or more complex defects), may comprise part of the expression of organizational and developmental defects in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and possibly other rat sarcoma gene-mitogen activated protein kinase pathway disorders.

  19. Environmental monitoring using malformed embryos of the amphipod Monoporeia affinis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundelin, B.; Eriksson, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis, such as embryonic malformation were confirmed as the most sensitive variable, when soft bottom microcosms were exposed to metals such as cadmium and lead, arsenic, organic compounds such as 4,5,6 trichloroguaiacol, contaminated sediment from areas impacted by heavy metals and pulp mill effluents. The effects were demonstrated also in low concentrations that did not significantly affect the meiofauna community. The microcosm test-system with high ecological realism could offer a possibility to translate laboratory results to the natural environments. Field surveys outside different types of pulp mills and metal works on the coast of the Gulf of Bothnia have confirmed the laboratory results. Significantly higher levels of malformed embryos of Monoporeia affinis were demonstrated in the impacted areas in comparison with reference areas. The reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis have been used in the national environmental monitoring program during two years and results indicated possibilities to distinguish between effects of xenobiotica and secondary eutrophication effects, such as unsaturated oxygen condition and occurrence of sulfides, which resulted in increased frequencies of dead eggs but not affected the frequencies of malformed eggs and embryos.

  20. Editorial brain malformation surveillance in the Zika era

    PubMed Central

    Trevathan, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The current surveillance systems for congenital microcephaly are necessary to monitor the impact of Zika virus (ZIKV) on the developing human brain, as well as the ZIKV prevention efforts. However, these congenital microcephaly surveillance systems are insufficient. Abnormalities of neuronal differentiation, development and migration may occur among infants with normal head circumference who have intrauterine exposure to ZIKV. Therefore, surveillance for congenital microcephaly does not ascertain many of the infants seriously impacted by congenital ZIKV infection. Furthermore, many infants with normal head circumference and with malformations of the brain cortex do not have clinical manifestations of their congenital malformations until several months to many years after birth, when they present with clinical manifestations such as seizures/epilepsy, developmental delays with or without developmental regression, and/or motor impairment. In response to the ZIKV threat, public health surveillance systems must be enhanced to ascertain a wide variety of congenital brain malformations, as well as their clinical manifestations that lead to diagnostic brain imaging. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:869–874, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27891785

  1. Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

  2. Sonography of fetal Dandy-Walker malformation: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Pilu, G; Goldstein, I; Reece, E A; Perolo, A; Foschini, M P; Hobbins, J C; Bovicelli, L

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four cases of fetal Dandy-Walker malformation recognized in utero with ultrasound between 16 and 37 weeks' gestation are reported. In each case a qualitative examination of the posterior fossa structures was performed, including the cerebellar hemispheres, cerebellar vermis, fourth ventricle and cisterna magna. In each case, the transverse cerebellar diameter and the depth of the cisterna magna were measured in a standard transcerebellar view of the fetal brain. The atrial width of the lateral ventricles was also assessed. The transverse cerebellar diameter was abnormal in 15 cases, the cisterna magna depth was abnormal in 33, and the atrial width was abnormal in 30. It is concluded that measurement of the transverse cerebellar diameter is unreliable in predicting fetal Dandy-Walker malformation. Measurements of the cisterna magna and atrium seem to be more valuable, although the real sensitivity remains unclear. In pregnancies at risk for fetal Dandy-Walker malformation, the sonographic examination should not be limited to the cerebral ventricles and transcerebellar view but should include a detailed evaluation of all the different anatomical components of the posterior fossa, especially the fourth ventricle and inferior cerebellar vermis.

  3. OBESITY AND THE RISK AND DETECTION OF FETAL MALFORMATIONS

    PubMed Central

    RACUSIN, Diana; STEVENS, Blair; CAMPBELL, Genevieve; AAGAARD-TILLERY, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of obesity in pregnancy has increased over the past two decades, with nearly 50% of U.S. women aged 15–49 are classified as overweight or obese. Obesity (independent of diabetes) among gravidae poses unique risks which extend towards the fetus, with several large population-based analyses demonstrating independent increased risks for fetal malformations including neural tube defects, cardiac anomalies, and orofacial clefts as well as stillbirth and macrosomia. Unfortunately, several lines of evidence also suggest that the quality of the prenatal fetal anatomic survey and certain aspects of prenatal diagnostic screening programs are significantly limited. The net effect is that among obese gravidae, the increased risk of fetal anomalies is further offset by a concomitant diminished ability to sonographically detect such malformation in the prenatal interval. The purpose of this summary review is to systematically examine the evidence suggesting an increased risk of fetal malformations in obese gravidae, the contributing role of diabetes, and the limitations of prenatal diagnostic and sonographic screening among this at-risk population. PMID:22713503

  4. Heterozygous Mutations of OTX2 Cause Severe Ocular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ragge, Nicola K.; Brown, Alison G.; Poloschek, Charlotte M.; Lorenz, Birgit; Henderson, R. Alex; Clarke, Michael P.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Fielder, Alistair; Gerrelli, Dianne; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Ruddle, Piers; Hurst, Jane; Collin, J. Richard O.; Salt, Alison; Cooper, Simon T.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Williamson, Kathleen A.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Heyningen, Veronica van; Hanson, Isabel M.

    2005-01-01

    Major malformations of the human eye, including microphthalmia and anophthalmia, are examples of phenotypes that recur in families yet often show no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern. Defining loci by mapping is therefore rarely feasible. Using a candidate-gene approach, we have identified heterozygous coding-region changes in the homeobox gene OTX2 in eight families with ocular malformations. The expression pattern of OTX2 in human embryos is consistent with the eye phenotypes observed in the patients, which range from bilateral anophthalmia to retinal defects resembling Leber congenital amaurosis and pigmentary retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed defects of the optic nerve, optic chiasm, and, in some cases, brain. In two families, the mutations appear to have occurred de novo in severely affected offspring, and, in two other families, the mutations have been inherited from a gonosomal mosaic parent. Data from these four families support a simple model in which OTX2 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause ocular malformations. Four additional families display complex inheritance patterns, suggesting that OTX2 mutations alone may not lead to consistent phenotypes. The high incidence of mosaicism and the reduced penetrance have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:15846561

  5. Congenital inner ear malformations without sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Kumiko; Horiguchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2008-03-01

    It has been reported that normal hearing is rare in patients with severe inner ear vestibular malformations [Kokai H, Oohashi M, Ishikawa K, Harada K, Hiratsuka H, Ogasawara M et al. Clinical review of inner ear malformation. J Otolaryngol Jpn 2003;106(10):1038-44; Schuknecht HF. Mondini dysplasia. A clinical pathological study. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 1980;89(Suppl. 65):1-23; Jackler RK, Luxford WM, House WF. Congenital malformations of the inner ear: a classification based on embryogenesis. Laryngoscope 1987;97:2-14; Phelps PD. Congenital lesions of the inner ear, demonstrated by tomography. Arch Otolaryngol 1974;100:11-8]. A 37-year-old woman had combined dysplasia of the posterior and lateral semicircular canals (PSCC, LSCC) with normal cochlear development and normal hearing in both ears. She had complained of dizziness for 8 months. High resolution computed tomography (CT) showed hypogenesis of the bony labyrinth in both ears. Bilateral PSCC and LSCC dysplasia and dilatation of the vestibule were detected. Magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) revealed that the deformity of the PSCC was more severe than the LSCC. Although the caloric test of the left ear elicited no nystagmus and there was reduced response in the right ear, the horizontal vestibulo-occular reflex (VOR) was present. Her dizzy sensation disappeared within 3 months without special treatment. The dizziness attack might have been caused by a temporary breakdown of her peripheral vestibular system.

  6. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  7. Concurrent split cord malformation and teratoma: dysembryology, presentation, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ranjith; Reynolds, Renee; Moreno, Jessica R; Cummings, Thomas J; Bagley, Carlos A

    2014-02-01

    Split cord malformation (SCM) is a rare form of spinal dysraphism in which the spinal cord is divided in the sagittal plane, forming a double neural tube. In addition to being associated with a variety of malformations, SCM may occur with spinal cord tumors, with only exceptional cases involving teratomas. As only eight patients with a teratoma associated with SCM have been reported, their presentation characteristics and treatment are currently unclear. We review the literature of all patients with SCM with concurrent spinal teratoma, discuss the potential dysembryology, and report the first case of SCM with concurrent spinal teratoma in an elderly patient. The mean age of those with concurrent SCM and teratomas was 39.4 years, with 55.6% occurring in females. The lumbar spine was the most frequent location for teratomas (66.7%), with the Type II malformation more commonly occurring with these tumors (75%). The duration of symptoms varied widely, ranging from 1 month to 5 years, with the average duration being nearly 2 years. Back pain (87.5%) and lower extremity weakness (75%) were the most common presenting symptoms. As SCM may be associated with progressive neurological deterioration and teratomas can contain immature or malignant components, surgery should be attempted with the goal of gross total resection. Nonetheless, in patients with a concurrent tumor and spinal dysraphism, spinal teratomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Gross total resection of these lesions may be safely achieved even in the presence of SCM using intraoperative electrophysiologic monitoring.

  8. Sulindac metabolites decrease cerebrovascular malformations in CCM3-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bravi, Luca; Rudini, Noemi; Cuttano, Roberto; Giampietro, Costanza; Maddaluno, Luigi; Ferrarini, Luca; Adams, Ralf H.; Corada, Monica; Boulday, Gwenola; Tournier-Lasserve, Elizabeth; Dejana, Elisabetta; Lampugnani, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a disease of the central nervous system causing hemorrhage-prone multiple lumen vascular malformations and very severe neurological consequences. At present, the only recommended treatment of CCM is surgical. Because surgery is often not applicable, pharmacological treatment would be highly desirable. We describe here a murine model of the disease that develops after endothelial-cell–selective ablation of the CCM3 gene. We report an early, cell-autonomous, Wnt-receptor–independent stimulation of β-catenin transcription activity in CCM3-deficient endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo and a triggering of a β-catenin–driven transcription program that leads to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. TGF-β/BMP signaling is then required for the progression of the disease. We also found that the anti-inflammatory drugs sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone, which attenuate β-catenin transcription activity, reduce vascular malformations in endothelial CCM3-deficient mice. This study opens previously unidentified perspectives for an effective pharmacological therapy of intracranial vascular cavernomas. PMID:26109568

  9. Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome: a rare cause of chronic occult blood loss and iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Martin Bell; Stawowy, Marek; Clausen, Niels

    2016-12-20

    Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a rare vascular disorder with malformed veins, or blebs, appearing in the skin or internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is the most common feature and often subject to bleeding, potentially resulting in chronic occult blood loss and iron deficiency anaemia. We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with venous malformations on the feet and severe anaemia. Although massive sudden haemorrhage rarely occurs, awareness of the illness is necessary to prevent complications.

  10. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  11. Diaphragmatic hernia in Denys-Drash syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Deloof, E.; Moerman, P.

    1995-05-22

    We report on a newborn infant with male pseudohermaphroditism and glomerular lesions (Denys-Drash syndrome) but without Wilms tumor. A constitutional heterozygous mutation in the WT1 gene ({sup 366} Arg to His) was identified. In addition the child had a large diaphragmatic hernia, so far not described in Denys-Drash syndrome. The expression of the WT1 gene in pleural and abdominal mesothelium and the occurrence of diaphragmatic hernia in transgenic mice with a homozygous WT1 deletion strongly suggests that the diphragmatic hernia in this patient is part of the malformation pattern caused by WT1 mutations. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Klippel–Trénaunay Syndrome – A Very Rare and Interesting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Lamba, Sachin; Pandita, Aakash; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome (KTS or KT) is an infrequently seen dermatological syndrome, which is often viewed as a triad of vascular malformation (capillary malformations or port-wine brands), venous varicosity, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy. We report a case of a 12-year-old male who presented to us with the symptoms of varicose plaques over both lower limbs and was diagnosed as a case of KTS. Management is normally conservative and includes stockings for compression of the branches to reduce edema because of chronic venous insufficiency; modern devices that cause on and off pneumatic compression; and rarely, surgical correction of varicose veins with lifelong follow-up. The orthopedic abnormalities are treated with epiphysiodesis in order to prevent (stop) overgrowing of limb and correction of bone deformity. PMID:25861232

  13. Surgical management of scalp arterio-venous malformation and scalp venous malformation: An experience of eleven cases

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Forhad Hossain; Haque, Mohammod Raziul; Kawsar, Khandkar Ali; Sarker, Mainul Haque; Momtazul Haque, A. F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Scalp arterio-venous malformation (AVM) and scalp venous malformation (SVM) are rare conditions that usually need surgical treatment. Here, we have reported our experience of the surgical management of such lesions with a short review of the literature. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 11 patients with scalp AVM and SVM, who underwent surgical excision of lesion in our hospital from 2006 to 2012, were included. All suspected high-flow AVM were investigated with the selective internal and external carotid digital subtraction angiogram (DSA) ± computed tomography (CT) scan of brain with CT angiogram or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain with MR angiogram, and all suspected low-flow vascular malformation (VM) was investigated with MRI of brain + MR angiogram. Eight were high-flow and three were low-flow VM. Results: All lesions were successfully excised. Scalp cosmetic aspects were acceptable in all cases. There was no major post-operative complication or recurrence till last follow-up. Conclusions: With preoperative appropriate surgical planning, scalp AVM and SVM can be excised without major complication. PMID:23960313

  14. A gene prenature ovarian failure associated with eyelid malformation maps to chromosomes 3q22-q23

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure and XX gonadal dysgenesis leading to female infertility have been reported in association with an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation of the eyelids: blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES; MIM 110100). This association distinguishes BPES type I from BPES type II, in which affected females are fertile and the transmission occurs through both sexes. Recently, a gene responsible for BPES type II has been mapped to chromosome 3q22-q23, and the critical region for the gene location has been reduced to the interval between loci D3S1615 and D3S1316. Hitherto, however, no information regarding the localization of the gene for BPES type I, in which female ovarian failure is associated with eyelid malformation, has been available. We have studied two independent families affected with BPES type I, including a total of 12 affected individuals (6 infertile women) and 6 healthy relatives. The diagnostic criteria for the ophthalmological anomaly included (1) reduced horizontal diameter of palpebral fissures, (2) drooping of the upper eyelids, and (3) an abnormal skinfold running from the lower lids. Telecanthus and a flat nasal bridge were present in most cases. In both families the disease was transmitted only by the male, and no affected woman of childbearing age was fertile. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Syndrome of arachnomelia in Simmental cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buitkamp, Johannes; Luntz, Bernhard; Emmerling, Reiner; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Weppert, Myriam; Schade, Benjamin; Meier, Norbert; Götz, Kay-Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Background The syndrome of arachnomelia is an inherited malformation mainly of limbs, back and head in cattle. At present the arachnomelia syndrome has been well known mainly in Brown Swiss cattle. Nevertheless, the arachnomelia syndrome had been observed in the Hessian Simmental population during the decade 1964–1974. Recently, stillborn Simmental calves were observed having a morphology similar to the arachnomelia syndrome. The goal of this work was the characterization of the morphology and genealogy of the syndrome in Simmental to establish the basis for an effective management of the disease. Results The first pathologically confirmed arachnomelia syndrome-cases in the current Simmental population appeared in the year 2005. By 2007, an additional 140 calves with the arachnomelia syndrome were identified. The major pathological findings were malformed bones affecting the head, long bones of the legs and the vertebral column. It could be shown that, with the exception of two cases that were considered as phenocopies, all of the paternal and about two-third of the maternal pedigrees of the affected calves could be traced back to one common founder. Together with the data from experimental matings, the pedigree data support an autosomal recessive mutation being the etiology of the arachnomelia syndrome. The frequency of the mutation in the current population was estimated to be 3.32%. Conclusion We describe the repeated occurrence of the arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental calves. It resembles completely the same defect occurring in the Brown Swiss breed. The mutation became relatively widespread amongst the current population. Therefore, a control system has to be established and it is highly desirable to map the disease and develop a genetic test system. PMID:18828914

  16. [Syndromes 2. Pfeiffer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Freihofer, H P

    1998-07-01

    Acrocephalosyndactylias are syndromes characterized by abnormalities of the head (craniosynostosis), the face (hypertelorism, retromaxillism), hands and feet (cutaneous or bony syndactyly). Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but spontaneous cases are described also. The group is divided into several syndromes with varying penetrance and expressivity. As an example of an acrocephalosyndactylia is the Pfeiffer syndrome presented.

  17. Aarskog syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pectus excavatum References Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M. Moderate short stature, facial and genital. In: Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . ...

  18. Unusual clinical history of a male infant with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Surányi, Andrea; Bitó, Tamás; Vajda, György; Kaiser, László; Gáspár, Gábor; Katona, Márta; Szabó, János; Pál, Attila

    2009-03-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy of chromosome 18) is generally characterized by the disorders of central nervous system, as well as the musculoskeletal and genitourinary systems. In majority of the cases with trisomy 18 the following malformations can be found: ventricular septal defect, horseshoe kidneys, oesophageal atresia, omphalocele, facial clefts, diaphragmatic hernias and genital hypoplasia. We report a male patient with Edwards syndrome. The boy had a partial agenesis of corpus callosum, oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula, renal agenesis, ventricular septal defect, Dandy-Walker cyst and low-set malformed ears. The first three features are unique based on previous literature reports on trisomy 18. This report allows a further delineation of the trisomy 18 syndrome.

  19. The trisomy 18 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Anna; Carey, John C

    2012-10-23

    The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600) due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects ). The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care). Upper airway obstruction is likely more common

  20. The trisomy 18 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600) due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects ). The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care). Upper airway obstruction is likely more common

  1. Familial Aggregation of Chiari Malformation: Presentation, Pedigree, and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Laszlo; Mobley, James; Ray, Coby

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the largest familial aggregation of Chiari malformation in a single family to date as reported in the literature. This study is a retrospective case series of a family of whom five individuals have a confirmed case of Chiari malformation and three additional individuals have Chiari signs and symptoms. This contribution further supports the implication of genetics in the transmission of Chiari malformation. The family reported in this study also has a significant incidence of Ehlers-Danlos. Three sisters, including a set of twins, presented with confirmed cases of Chiari malformation and four of the five children of the twin sisters presented with confirmed or suspected Chiari malformation. Of note, the non-twin sister has three children who are unaffected. This report provides further evidence for a shared loci between the Chiari malformation and Ehlers-Danlos.

  2. Bill malformations in double-crested cormorants with low exposure to organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, T.; Fox, G.A.; Danesik, K.L.

    1999-12-01

    Eight of 20 newly hatched double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), captured at Dore Lake (Saskatchewan, Canada) and raised in captivity, developed malformed bills when they were 2 to 3 weeks old. Malformation was characterized by abnormal flexure and rotation of the maxilla and mandible, resulting in a crossed bill. By radiography, the premaxillary and dental bones were misshapen. Morphologically similar malformed bills in free-living comorants have been attributed to exposure to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. However, the concentrations of total PCBs in the livers of these captive cormorants with malformed bills and in their diet were lower than have been previously associated with such malformations and were considered too low to have been the cause. The bill malformations may have been caused by deficiency of vitamin D{sub 3}, because the cormorants were kept indoors without exposure to ultraviolet light and were fed frozen fish that may have been deficient in this vitamin.

  3. Antennal malformations in light ocelli drones of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Chaud-Netto, J

    2000-02-01

    Malformed antennae of Apis mellifera light ocelli drones were drawn, dissected and mounted permanently on slides containing Canada balsam, in order to count the olfactory discs present in each segment, in comparison with the number of those structures in normal antennae of their brothers. Some drones presented morphological abnormalities in a single segment of the right or left antenna, but others had two or more malformed segments in a same antenna. Drones with malformations in both antennae were also observed. The 4th and 5th flagellum segments were the most frequently affected. In a low number of cases the frequency of olfactory discs in malformed segments did not differ from that one recorded for normal segments. However, in most cases studied, the antennal malformations brought about a significant reduction in the number of olfactory discs from malformed segments.

  4. Arnold-Chiari type I malformation presenting as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Unal, M; Bagdatoglu, C

    2007-03-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital hindbrain and spinal cord abnormalities characterized by herniation of the contents of the posterior cranial fossa caudally through the foramen magnum into the upper cervical spine. It is important to recognize Arnold-Chiari type I malformation in the differential diagnosis of adult vertigo cases. We present a 51-year-old patient with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation that was initially diagnosed as posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  5. Definitions and Anatomic Considerations in Chiari I Malformation and Associated Syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-10-01

    Current understanding of the hindbrain hernias known as Chiari I malformations is based on more than 100 years of pathologic and clinical experience. Over time, the definition of this finding has been analyzed and altered. The term Chiari I malformation is currently used to describe tonsillar ectopia in a wide range of patients with varying embryonic derailments. This article discusses this malformation, its various definitions, and varied anatomic traits. In addition, the morphology of the commonly associated syringomyelia is reviewed.

  6. Nonsurgical treatment for esotropia secondary to Arnold-Chiari I malformation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Baxstrom, Curtis R

    2009-09-01

    A 14-year-old girl with diplopia and esotropia secondary to Arnold-Chiari I malformation was surgically treated with Arnold-Chiari I malformation decompression (suboccipital craniectomy), C1 and partial C2 laminectomy, and duraplasty. The residual esotropia was treated with compensatory prisms and vision therapy more than 1 year after Arnold-Chiari malformation surgery. The esotropia was resolved after approximately 3.5 months of treatment. Five years later, the patient continued to maintain fusion without compensatory prism.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Chiari 1 Malformation Co-occurring in a Child.

    PubMed

    Osuagwu, Ferdnand C; Amalraj, Benedict; Noveloso, Bernard D; Aikoye, Salisu A; Bradley, Ronald

    2016-03-20

    Very few studies have shown associations between autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and Chiari 1 malformation. Here, we report an 10-year-old male that presented after having seizures with a history of Chiari 1 malformation, autism spectrum disorder and ADHD with moderate mental retardation and speech delay. This case highlights the fact that autism spectrum disorder as biologically based neurodevelopmental disorder with altered brain growth may be associated with Chiari 1 malformation and ADHD.

  8. Emerging role of contrast-enhanced MRI in diagnosing vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Turley, Ryan S; Lidsky, Michael E; Markovic, Jovan N; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Vascular malformations comprise a diverse and rare group of lesions which generally pose a formidable treatment challenge. Requisite for optimal surgical planning are imaging modalities capable of delineating involved anatomy and malformation flow characteristics. In this regard, we and others have purported the advantages of contrast-enhanced MRI. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding the emerging of role of contrast enhanced MRI for the management of vascular malformations.

  9. Nevus vascularis mixtus (cutaneous vascular twin nevi) associated with intracranial vascular malformation of the Dyke-Davidoff-Masson type in two patients.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Martino; Milone, Pietro; Pavone, Piero; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Polizzi, Agata; Caltabiano, Rosario; Fichera, Marco; Gabriele, Anna Lia; Distefano, Angela; De Pasquale, Rocco; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Micali, Giuseppe; Pavone, Lorenzo

    2012-11-01

    The term twin spotting refers to phenotypes characterized by the spatial and temporal co-occurrence of two (or more) different nevi arranged in variable cutaneous patterns, and can be associated with extra-cutaneous anomalies. Several examples of twin spotting have been described in humans including nevus vascularis mixtus, cutis tricolor, lesions of overgrowth, and deficient growth in Proteus and Elattoproteus syndromes, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis of Brocq, and the so-called phacomatoses pigmentovascularis and pigmentokeratotica. We report on a 28-year-old man and a 15-year-old girl, who presented with a previously unrecognized association of paired cutaneous vascular nevi of the telangiectaticus and anemicus types (naevus vascularis mixtus) distributed in a mosaic pattern on the face (in both patients) and over the entire body (in the man) and a complex brain malformation (in both patients) consisting of cerebral hemiatrophy, hypoplasia of the cerebral vessels and homolateral hypertrophy of the skull and sinuses (known as Dyke-Davidoff-Masson malformation). Both patients had facial asymmetry and the young man had facial dysmorphism, seizures with EEG anomalies, hemiplegia, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), autoimmune thyroiditis, a large hepatic cavernous vascular malformation, and left Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) [LCPD-like presentation]. Array-CGH analysis and mutation analysis of the RASA1 gene were normal in both patients.

  10. FOXC1 is required for normal cerebellar development and is a major contributor to chromosome 6p25.3 Dandy-Walker malformation

    PubMed Central

    Aldinger, Kimberly A; Lehmann, Ordan J; Hudgins, Louanne; Chizhikov, Victor V; Bassuk, Alexander G; Ades, Lesley C; Krantz, Ian D; Dobyns, William B; Millen, Kathleen J

    2010-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM), the most common human cerebellar malformation, has only one characterized associated locus1,2. Here we characterize a second DWM-linked locus on 6p25.3, showing that deletions or duplications encompassing FOXC1 are associated with cerebellar and posterior fossa malformations including cerebellar vermis hypoplasia (CVH), mega-cisterna magna (MCM) and DWM. Foxc1-null mice have embryonic abnormalities of the rhombic lip due to loss of mesenchyme-secreted signaling molecules with subsequent loss of Atoh1 expression in vermis. Foxc1 homozygous hypomorphs have CVH with medial fusion and foliation defects. Human FOXC1 heterozygous mutations are known to affect eye development, causing a spectrum of glaucoma-associated anomalies (Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, ARS; MIM no. 601631). We report the first brain imaging data from humans with FOXC1 mutations and show that these individuals also have CVH. We conclude that alteration of FOXC1 function alone causes CVH and contributes to MCM and DWM. Our results highlight a previously unrecognized role for mesenchyme-neuroepithelium interactions in the mid-hindbrain during early embryogenesis. PMID:19668217

  11. Moebius Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ...

  12. A case report of aphallia with urorectal septum malformation sequence in a newborn: a very rarely seen condition

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Ravinder; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Aphallia (absence of penis) is an extremely rare abnormality which has rarely been described in medical literature and can be part of the urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS). URSMS has hardly been reported in medical literature and includes the absence of perineal and anal openings in association with ambiguous genitalia and urogenital, colonic, and lumbosacral anomalies. This case report tells the importance of detailed examination of infants that are diagnosed with aphallia. We report a case of a newborn who was diagnosed as aphallia with the URSMS syndrome after birth. The neonate had an endocardial cushion defect (atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect) and bilateral agenesis of the kidney. The neonate succumbed to death secondary to hypoplastic lung leading to respiratory failure. PMID:26673776

  13. Arteriovenous malformations in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: looking beyond ALK1-NOTCH interactions.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Caolo, Vincenza; Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations--enlarged shunts allowing arterial flow to bypass capillaries and enter directly into veins. HHT is caused by mutations in ALK1 or Endoglin; however, the majority of arteriovenous malformations are idiopathic and arise spontaneously. Idiopathic arteriovenous malformations differ from those due to loss of ALK1 in terms of both location and disease progression. Furthermore, while arteriovenous malformations in HHT and Alk1 knockout models have decreased NOTCH signalling, some idiopathic arteriovenous malformations have increased NOTCH signalling. The pathogenesis of these lesions also differs, with loss of ALK1 causing expansion of the shunt through proliferation, and NOTCH gain of function inducing initial shunt enlargement by cellular hypertrophy. Hence, we propose that idiopathic arteriovenous malformations are distinct from those of HHT. In this review, we explore the role of ALK1-NOTCH interactions in the development of arteriovenous malformations and examine a possible role of two signalling pathways downstream of ALK1, TMEM100 and IDs, in the development of arteriovenous malformations in HHT. A nuanced understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying idiopathic and HHT-associated arteriovenous malformations will allow for development of targeted treatments for these lesions.

  14. Field guide to malformations of frogs and toads, with radiographic interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, Carol U.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, students found numerous malformed frogs on a field trip to a Minnesota pond. Since that time, reports of malformed frogs have increased dramatically. Malformed frogs have now been reported in 44 states in 38 species of frogs, and 19 species of toads. Estimates as high as 60% of the newly metamorphosed frog populations have had malformations at some ponds (NARCAM, ’99). The wide geographic distribution of malformed frogs and the variety of malformations are a concern to resource managers, research scientists and public health officials. The potential for malformations to serve as a signal of ecosystem disruption, and the affect this potential disruption might have on other organisms that share those ecosystems, has not been resolved. Malformations represent an error that occurred early in development. The event that caused the developmental error is temporally distant from the malformation we see in the fully developed animal. Knowledge of normal developmental principles is necessary to design thoughtful investigations that will define the events involved in abnormal development in wild frog populations.

  15. The pathobiology of vascular malformations: insights from human and model organism genetics.

    PubMed

    Wetzel-Strong, Sarah E; Detter, Matthew R; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Vascular malformations may arise in any of the vascular beds present in the human body. These lesions vary in location, type, and clinical severity of the phenotype. In recent years, the genetic basis of several vascular malformations has been elucidated. This review will consider how the identification of the genetic factors contributing to different vascular malformations, with subsequent functional studies in animal models, has provided a better understanding of these factors that maintain vascular integrity in vascular beds, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of vascular malformations. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Bleomycin sclerotherapy for lymphatic malformation after unsuccessful surgical excision: case report.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, A; Gazikalovic, A; Adjic, O

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are benign cystic masses resulting from the abnormal development of lymphatic channels. Lymphatic malformations occur primarily in the head and neck region. Surgical excision of lymphatic malformation is followed by high rate of recurrence and a high risk of complications. Bleomycin is an established antineoplastic drug. It can be used as a sclerosing agent in vascular anomalies. We present a child who was unsuccessfully treated with four surgical resections, with peripheral palsy of facial nerve as complication. The lymphatic malformation was successfully treated in our institution with intralesional administration of bleomycin.

  17. Antenatal hemorrhage of a cervical lymphatic malformation presenting as a draining neck mass: An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, R N; Nawaz, M; Bettolli, M; Ferretti, E

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations in the neck can present as large fetal neck masses causing airway obstructions with potential perinatal demise and can pose a therapeutic challenge. We present a rare case of prenatally diagnosed large fetal neck mass with features of lymphatic malformation with intralesional hemorrhage of uncertain origin. Postnatal evaluation showed a complex cystic-solid lesion eroding through the skin with an open wound that made it clinically hard to differentiate from a teratoma. Given that malignancy could not be completely ruled out, surgery was favored. Final pathology showed a complex lymphatic malformation with intralesional hemorrhage, despite having no associated capillary, venous or arterial malformations.

  18. Trematode infection causes malformations and population effects in a declining New Zealand fish.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David W; Thomas, Harriet; Thieltges, David W; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    1. Animal malformations engender wide public and scientific concern because of associated environmental health risks. This is highlighted by increased incidence of limb malformations in amphibians associated with trematode infections and disturbance. Malformations may signal new emerging disease threats, but whether the phenomenon is broadly applicable across taxa, or has population-scale impacts, is unknown. 2. Malformations are widely reported in fish and, until now, have been attributed mainly to contaminants. We tested whether the trematode Telogaster opisthorchis caused severe malformations, leading to population effects, in Galaxias anomalus, a threatened New Zealand freshwater fish. 3. Experimental infection of larval fish caused increasing spinal malformation and mortality with infection intensity that closely matched field patterns. Field malformation frequency peaked in January (65%), before declining sharply in February (25%) and remaining low thereafter. 4. The peak occurred during a 'critical window' of larval development, with the decline coincident with a population crash, indicating that malformation was causing mortality in the field. 5. The occurrence of such critical developmental windows may explain why this mechanism of population impact has been overlooked. With global environmental stressors predicted to enhance trematode infections, our results show that parasite-induced malformation, and its population-scale impacts, could be more widespread than previously considered.

  19. Airway response to sirolimus therapy for the treatment of complex pediatric lymphatic malformations.

    PubMed

    Alemi, A Sean; Rosbe, Kristina W; Chan, Dylan K; Meyer, Anna K

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck lymphatic malformations can create airway management challenges requiring tracheotomy. Sirolimus, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), may inhibit growth of lymphatic malformations. We describe two patients born with large lymphatic malformations with improved airway symptoms following sirolimus therapy. Patient #1 underwent tracheotomy and multi-modal therapy including sirolimus with reduction in airway involvement but regrowth after discontinuation of sirolimus. Patient #2 also experienced a significant response to sirolimus allowing for extubation and discharge without tracheotomy. Early initiation of sirolimus therapy should be considered as a means to avoid tracheotomy in complex head and neck lymphatic malformations.

  20. The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, R.; Hennekam, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is one of the archetypical multiple congenital malformation syndromes. The recent discovery of the biochemical cause of SLOS and the subsequent redefinition of SLOS as an inborn error of cholesterol metabolism have led to important new treatment possibilities for affected patients. Moreover, the recent recognition of the important role of cholesterol in vertebrate embryogenesis, especially with regard to the hedgehog embryonic signalling pathway and its effects on the expression of homeobox genes, has provided an explanation for the abnormal morphogenesis in the syndrome. The well known role of cholesterol in the formation of steroid hormones has also provided a possible explanation for the abnormal behavioural characteristics of SLOS.


Keywords: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome; cholesterol metabolism; 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase; clinical history; management PMID:10807690