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Sample records for macrolides

  1. Analysis of macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kanfer, I; Skinner, M F; Walker, R B

    1998-07-01

    The following macrolide antibiotics have been covered in this review: erythromycin and its related substances, azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin, roxithromycin, flurithromycin, josamycin, rokitamycin, kitasamycin, mycinamycin, mirosamycin, oleandomycin, rosaramicin, spiramycin and tylosin. The application of various thin-layer chromatography, paper chromatography, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary zone electrophoresis procedures for their analysis are described. These techniques have been applied to the separation and quantitative analysis of the macrolides in fermentation media, purity assessment of raw materials, assay of pharmaceutical dosage forms and the measurement of clinically useful macrolide antibiotics in biological samples such as blood, plasma, serum, urine and tissues. Data relating to the chromatographic behaviour of some macrolide antibiotics as well as the various detection methods used, such as bioautography, UV spectrophotometry, fluorometry, electrochemical detection, chemiluminescence and mass spectrometry techniques are also included.

  2. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  3. Immunomodulatory effect of macrolides: At what cost?

    PubMed

    Kipourou, Maria; Manika, Katerina; Papavasileiou, Apostolos; Pitsiou, Georgia; Lada, Martha; Ntinapogias, Evangelos; Kioumis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 60-year old female patient, with a 10 year history of non-CF bronchiectasis and use of macrolides as maintenance immunomodulatory treatment, who was diagnosed with macrolide-resistant Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease. Macrolides' immunomodulatory effect is appealing for non- CF bronchiectasis patients, hiding a high risk for resistance emergence. PMID:27222784

  4. Immunomodulatory effect of macrolides: At what cost?

    PubMed

    Kipourou, Maria; Manika, Katerina; Papavasileiou, Apostolos; Pitsiou, Georgia; Lada, Martha; Ntinapogias, Evangelos; Kioumis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 60-year old female patient, with a 10 year history of non-CF bronchiectasis and use of macrolides as maintenance immunomodulatory treatment, who was diagnosed with macrolide-resistant Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease. Macrolides' immunomodulatory effect is appealing for non- CF bronchiectasis patients, hiding a high risk for resistance emergence.

  5. Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, United States

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, David J.

    2009-01-01

    During year 6 (2005–2006) of the Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin surveillance study, 6,747 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were collected at 119 centers. The susceptibility of these isolates to macrolides was compared with data from previous years. Macrolide resistance increased significantly in year 6 (35.3%) from the stable rate of ≈30% for the previous 3 years (p<0.0001). Macrolide resistance increased in all regions of the United States and for all patient age groups. Rates were highest in the south and for children 0–2 years of age. Lower-level efflux [mef(A)]–mediated macrolide resistance decreased in prevalence to ≈50%, and highly resistant [erm(B) + mef(A)] strains increased to 25%. Telithromycin and levofloxacin susceptibility rates were >99% and >98%, respectively, irrespective of genotype. Pneumococcal macrolide resistance in the United States showed its first significant increase since 2000. High-level macrolide resistance is also increasing. PMID:19751588

  6. Trichomycin B, a polyene macrolide from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Komori, T

    1990-07-01

    Two polyene macrolide, trichomycins A and B, were compared by physico-chemical and microbiological methods. The two antibiotics were found to have the same molecular formula, C58H84N2O18 (MW 1,096), by elemental analysis and FAB-MS. However, 1H and 13C NMR spectrometry studies indicated that the hydroxyl at C-5 of trichomycin A located on C-9 in trichomycin B. Trichomycin B possessed lower activities against fungi and yeasts than those of trichomycin A. PMID:2387771

  7. Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes: prevalence and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, Catarina; Friães, Ana; Ramirez, Mario; Melo-Cristino, Jose

    2015-05-01

    Although penicillin remains the first-choice treatment for Streptococcus pyogenes infection, macrolides are important alternatives for allergic patients and lincosamides are recommended together with β-lactams in invasive infections. S. pyogenes may exhibit macrolide resistance because of active efflux (mef genes) or target modification (erm genes), the latter conferring cross resistance to lincosamides and streptogramin B. Worldwide, resistance is restricted to a limited number of genetic lineages, despite resistance genes being encoded on mobile genetic elements. For reasons that are not completely clear, resistance and the associated phenotypes are highly variable across countries. Although resistance remains high in several countries, particularly in Asia, an overall decreasing trend of resistance has been noted in recent years, mostly in Europe. This decrease is not always accompanied by declines in macrolide consumption, suggesting significant roles of other factors in determining the dynamics of macrolide-resistant clones. Continued surveillance is needed to obtain further insights into the forces governing macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes.

  8. Immunomodulatory effects of macrolide antibiotics - part 1: biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Altenburg, J; de Graaff, C S; van der Werf, T S; Boersma, W G

    2011-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are well known for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. This article provides an overview of the biological mechanisms through which macrolides exert this 'double effect'. Their antibacterial effect consists of the inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis, impaired bacterial biofilm synthesis, and the attenuation of other bacterial virulence factors. Apart from these direct antimicrobial effects, macrolides are known for their modulating effect on many components of the human immune system. By influencing the production of cytokines, they have a dampening effect on the proinflammatory response. Furthermore, the majority of cells involved in the immune response are, in one way or another, influenced when macrolide antibiotics are administered. Having such an obvious effect on the various aspects of the immune system, macrolides seem to be exceptionally suited for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  9. Spectrophotometric Investigations of Macrolide Antibiotics: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Keskar, Mrudul R; Jugade, Ravin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides, one of the most commonly used class of antibiotics, are a group of drugs produced by Streptomyces species. They belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties. They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different analytical techniques have been reported for the determination of macrolides such as chromatographic methods, flow injection methods, spectrofluorometric methods, spectrophotometric methods, and capillary electrophoresis methods. Among these methods, spectrophotometric methods are sensitive and cost effective for the analysis of various antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations as well as biological samples. This article reviews different spectrophotometric methods for the determination of macrolide antibiotics. PMID:26609215

  10. Parametrization of macrolide antibiotics using the Force Field Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Anna; Gumbart, James C

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are an important class of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome. Computer simulations of macrolides are limited since specific force field parameters have not been previously developed for them. Here we determine CHARMM-compatible force field parameters for erythromycin, azithromycin and telithromycin, using the Force Field Toolkit plugin in VMD. Because of their large size, novel approaches for parametrizing them had to be developed. Two methods for determining partial atomic charges, from interactions with TIP3P water and from the electrostatic potential, as well as several approaches for fitting the dihedral parameters were tested. The performance of the different parameter sets was evaluated by molecular dynamics simulations of the macrolides in ribosome, with a distinct improvement in maintenance of key interactions observed after refinement of the initial parameters. Based on the results of the macrolide tests, recommended procedures for parametrizing very large molecules using ffTK are given. PMID:26280362

  11. A platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiple, Ian B.; Zhang, Ziyang; Jakubec, Pavol; Langlois-Mercier, Audrey; Wright, Peter M.; Hog, Daniel T.; Yabu, Kazuo; Allu, Senkara Rao; Fukuzaki, Takehiro; Carlsen, Peter N.; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Zhou, Xiang; Condakes, Matthew L.; Szczypiński, Filip T.; Green, William D.; Myers, Andrew G.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical modification of structurally complex fermentation products, a process known as semisynthesis, has been an important tool in the discovery and manufacture of antibiotics for the treatment of various infectious diseases. However, many of the therapeutics obtained in this way are no longer effective, because bacterial resistance to these compounds has developed. Here we present a practical, fully synthetic route to macrolide antibiotics by the convergent assembly of simple chemical building blocks, enabling the synthesis of diverse structures not accessible by traditional semisynthetic approaches. More than 300 new macrolide antibiotic candidates, as well as the clinical candidate solithromycin, have been synthesized using our convergent approach. Evaluation of these compounds against a panel of pathogenic bacteria revealed that the majority of these structures had antibiotic activity, some efficacious against strains resistant to macrolides in current use. The chemistry we describe here provides a platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics and may also serve as the basis for their manufacture.

  12. A platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Seiple, Ian B; Zhang, Ziyang; Jakubec, Pavol; Langlois-Mercier, Audrey; Wright, Peter M; Hog, Daniel T; Yabu, Kazuo; Allu, Senkara Rao; Fukuzaki, Takehiro; Carlsen, Peter N; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Zhou, Xiang; Condakes, Matthew L; Szczypiński, Filip T; Green, William D; Myers, Andrew G

    2016-05-18

    The chemical modification of structurally complex fermentation products, a process known as semisynthesis, has been an important tool in the discovery and manufacture of antibiotics for the treatment of various infectious diseases. However, many of the therapeutics obtained in this way are no longer effective, because bacterial resistance to these compounds has developed. Here we present a practical, fully synthetic route to macrolide antibiotics by the convergent assembly of simple chemical building blocks, enabling the synthesis of diverse structures not accessible by traditional semisynthetic approaches. More than 300 new macrolide antibiotic candidates, as well as the clinical candidate solithromycin, have been synthesized using our convergent approach. Evaluation of these compounds against a panel of pathogenic bacteria revealed that the majority of these structures had antibiotic activity, some efficacious against strains resistant to macrolides in current use. The chemistry we describe here provides a platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics and may also serve as the basis for their manufacture.

  13. [Macrolides. Antiinflammatory and immunomodulator effects. Indication in respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the basics and the clinical implications of the immunomodulatory effects of macrolides in different respiratory diseases. In addition to their antiinfective properties, some macrolides possess immunomodulatory effects (14 member ring). These macrolides have been used successfully to treat diffuse panbronchiolitis, a progressive inflamatory disease and may be very useful in the treatment of asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic sinusitis, nasal polyps, otitis media with effusion, cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis. We present the basic and clinical work supporting its chronic use. We will need future double blind controlled trials to determine the long term efficacy of macrolides for the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases, as well as development of resistance, how to improve side effects ratio and the duration of effects after cessation of treatment.

  14. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS WITH ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques.

  15. Purification and characterization of macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase type II from a strain of Escherichia coli highly resistant to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kono, M; O'Hara, K; Ebisu, T

    1992-10-01

    The resistance mechanism of Escherichia coli BM2506 to macrolides was found to be due to inactivation. Inactivated oleandomycin was identified as oleandomycin 2'-phosphate by thin-layer chromatography. A new type of macrolide-phosphorylating enzyme, macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase type II (MPH(2')II), was detected, purified 95-fold and its enzymological properties investigated. MPH(2')II was a constitutive intracellular enzyme which showed high levels of activity with both 14-member-ring and 16-member-ring macrolides. The optimum pH for the inactivation of oleandomycin was 8.2 and the optimum temperature of the reaction was 40 degrees C. Enzyme activity was lost by heat treatment at 60 degrees C for 1 min. The isoelectric point and M(r) of the enzyme were 5.3 and 48,000, respectively. Purine nucleotides, such as ITP, GTP and ATP, were effective as cofactors in the inactivation of macrolides. An inhibitory effect of iodine, EDTA, or divalent cations on MPH(2')II activity was observed.

  16. Recent progress regarding the bioactivities, biosynthesis and synthesis of naturally occurring resorcinolic macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jiang, Cheng-shi; Zhang, Zai-long; Ma, Wen-quan; Guo, Yue-wei

    2014-01-01

    Macrolides, which comprise a family of lactones with different ring sizes, belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Resorcinolic macrolides, an important subgroup, possess interesting structures and exhibit a wide variety of bioactivities, such as anti-tumor, anti-bacteria, and anti-malaria activities, etc. This review summarizes progress in isolation, bioactivity studies, biosynthesis, and representative chemical syntheses of this group of macrolides in recent decades, encompassing 63 naturally occurring macrolides published in 120 articles. PMID:24464049

  17. Trisoxazole macrolides from Hexabranchus nudibranchs and other marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, S

    2006-01-01

    Trisoxazole macrolides are cytotoxic and antifungal metabolites initially isolated from the egg-ribbons of the Hexabranchus nudibranch and later found in other marine invertebrates. They possess a characteristic macrolide portion, in which three contiguous oxazole units are integrated, and a side-chain with an N-methyl-vinylformamide terminus. The planar structures of the first members of this group, ulapualides and kabiramide C, were determined by interpretation of spectral data in conjunction with chemical degradation. Following these studies, the structures of approximately 35 congeners have been reported, including mycalolides from a marine sponge Mycale sp. The absolute stereochemistry of mycalolides was determined by chemical methods. Trisoxazole macrolides depolymerize F-actin and form a 1:1 complex with G-actin, thereby exhibiting potent toxicity toward eukaryotic cells. X-ray crystallography established the mode of binding of some of the members to G-actin and their absolute stereochemistry. PMID:17153346

  18. Sequence-dependent elongation dynamics on macrolide-bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Magnus; Chen, Jin; Tsai, Albert; Kornberg, Guy; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2014-06-12

    The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET) has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough.

  19. Composite mobile genetic elements disseminating macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Agrawal, Sonia; Schroeder, Max R.; Farley, Monica M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in the U.S. and globally during the early 1990's. The RNA methylase encoded by erm(B) and the macrolide efflux genes mef(E) and mel were identified as the resistance determining factors. These genes are disseminated in the pneumococcus on mobile, often chimeric elements consisting of multiple smaller elements. To better understand the variety of elements encoding macrolide resistance and how they have evolved in the pre- and post-conjugate vaccine eras, the genomes of 121 invasive and ten carriage isolates from Atlanta from 1994 to 2011 were analyzed for mobile elements involved in the dissemination of macrolide resistance. The isolates were selected to provide broad coverage of the genetic variability of antibiotic resistant pneumococci and included 100 invasive isolates resistant to macrolides. Tn916-like elements carrying mef(E) and mel on the Macrolide Genetic Assembly (Mega) and erm(B) on the erm(B) element and Tn917 were integrated into the pneumococcal chromosome backbone and into larger Tn5253-like composite elements. The results reported here include identification of novel insertion sites for Mega and characterization of the insertion sites of Tn916-like elements in the pneumococcal chromosome and in larger composite elements. The data indicate that integration of elements by conjugation was infrequent compared to recombination. Thus, it appears that conjugative mobile elements allow the pneumococcus to acquire DNA from distantly related bacteria, but once integrated into a pneumococcal genome, transformation and recombination is the primary mechanism for transmission of novel DNA throughout the pneumococcal population. PMID:25709602

  20. Structure-activity relationships of ketolides vs. macrolides.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, S

    2001-01-01

    Since their discovery, the macrolide antimicrobials have proved clinically valuable for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, offering coverage against a broad spectrum of pathogens and excellent tolerability. However, the global increase in macrolide resistance among respiratory pathogens, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, threatens their future usefulness. The ketolides, of which telithromycin is the first to reach clinical development, represent a new generation of antimicrobials that have been developed with a view to overcoming the problem of macrolide resistance. Telithromycin is structurally derived from macrolides, and possesses several distinguishing features that are important for its improved microbiological profile. The L-cladinose at position C3 of the miacrolactone ring has been replaced with a keto function. This modification enables telithromycin to bind to its target without tripping the inducible resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB (MLS(B)) drugs that many groups of pathogens exhibit. The C6 position has been modified by the addition of a methoxy group. This helps prevent hemiketalization of the C6 position with the 3- and 9-keto groups, thereby conferring excellent acid stability, particularly at gastric pH values. Telithromycin is differentiated from other ketolide compounds by the addition of a large aromatic N-substituted carbamate extension from positions C11/C12. This carbamate extension improves binding of the drug to its target, the 50S ribosomal subunit, as demonstrated in in vitro experiments. Telithromycin binds to wild-type ribosomes with 10-fold greater affinity than erythromycin A and 6-fold greater affinity than clarithromycin; its affinity for MLS(B)-resistant ribosomes is > 20 times that of both macrolides. The increased ribosomal affinity of telithromycin correlates with its superior potency against Gram-positive cocci both in vitro and in vivo, and is one of the factors determining the drug

  1. Synthesis of a dimethylfuran-containing macrolide insect pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grignard chemistry was utilized to construct a key trisubstituted furan intermediate (3,4-dimethyl-2-[5-(tetrahydroppyran-2-yloxy)pentyl]furan) from 2,3-dimethylbutenolide, prepared via a Reformatsky route. The carbon skeleton of the macrolide pheromone also requires construction of a propionic aci...

  2. Improved Synthesis of a Dimethylfuran-Containing Macrolide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthetic pathway to the furan-containing macrolide pheromone of Galerucella beetles was shortened from 13 steps in the original synthesis to 10 steps, and the overall yield was increased greater than six fold. A concise Reformatsky-based sequence of reactions was utilized to construct the key ...

  3. Synthesis of a dimethylfuran-containing macrolide insect pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthetic pathway to the furan-containing macrolide pheromone of Galerucella beetles was shortened from 13 steps in the original synthesis to 10 steps, and the overall yield was increased greater than six fold. A concise Reformatsky-based sequence of reactions was utilized to construct the key ...

  4. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Current Knowledge on Macrolide Resistance and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pereyre, Sabine; Goret, Julien; Bébéar, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes community-acquired respiratory tract infections, particularly in school-aged children and young adults. These infections occur both endemically and epidemically worldwide. M. pneumoniae lacks cell wall and is subsequently resistant to beta-lactams and to all antimicrobials targeting the cell wall. This mycoplasma is intrinsically susceptible to macrolides and related antibiotics, to tetracyclines and to fluoroquinolones. Macrolides and related antibiotics are the first-line treatment of M. pneumoniae respiratory tract infections mainly because of their low MIC against the bacteria, their low toxicity and the absence of contraindication in young children. The newer macrolides are now the preferred agents with a 7-to-14 day course of oral clarithromycin or a 5-day course of oral azithromycin for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia due to M. pneumoniae, according to the different guidelines worldwide. However, macrolide resistance has been spreading for 15 years worldwide, with prevalence now ranging between 0 and 15% in Europe and the USA, approximately 30% in Israel and up to 90–100% in Asia. This resistance is associated with point mutations in the peptidyl-transferase loop of the 23S rRNA and leads to high-level resistance to macrolides. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations can be detected using several molecular methods applicable directly from respiratory specimens. Because this resistance has clinical outcomes such as longer duration of fever, cough and hospital stay, alternative antibiotic treatment can be required, including tetracyclines such as doxycycline and minocycline or fluoroquinolones, primarily levofloxacin, during 7–14 days, even though fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are contraindicated in all children and in children < 8 year-old, respectively. Acquired resistance to tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones has never been reported in M. pneumoniae clinical isolates but reduced susceptibility was reported

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Current Knowledge on Macrolide Resistance and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereyre, Sabine; Goret, Julien; Bébéar, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes community-acquired respiratory tract infections, particularly in school-aged children and young adults. These infections occur both endemically and epidemically worldwide. M. pneumoniae lacks cell wall and is subsequently resistant to beta-lactams and to all antimicrobials targeting the cell wall. This mycoplasma is intrinsically susceptible to macrolides and related antibiotics, to tetracyclines and to fluoroquinolones. Macrolides and related antibiotics are the first-line treatment of M. pneumoniae respiratory tract infections mainly because of their low MIC against the bacteria, their low toxicity and the absence of contraindication in young children. The newer macrolides are now the preferred agents with a 7-to-14 day course of oral clarithromycin or a 5-day course of oral azithromycin for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia due to M. pneumoniae, according to the different guidelines worldwide. However, macrolide resistance has been spreading for 15 years worldwide, with prevalence now ranging between 0 and 15% in Europe and the USA, approximately 30% in Israel and up to 90-100% in Asia. This resistance is associated with point mutations in the peptidyl-transferase loop of the 23S rRNA and leads to high-level resistance to macrolides. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations can be detected using several molecular methods applicable directly from respiratory specimens. Because this resistance has clinical outcomes such as longer duration of fever, cough and hospital stay, alternative antibiotic treatment can be required, including tetracyclines such as doxycycline and minocycline or fluoroquinolones, primarily levofloxacin, during 7-14 days, even though fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are contraindicated in all children and in children < 8 year-old, respectively. Acquired resistance to tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones has never been reported in M. pneumoniae clinical isolates but reduced susceptibility was reported in in

  6. Risks of population antimicrobial resistance associated with chronic macrolide use for inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Serisier, David J

    2013-05-01

    Macrolide antibiotics have established efficacy in the management of cystic fibrosis and diffuse panbronchiolitis-uncommon lung diseases with substantial morbidity and the potential for rapid progression to death. Emerging evidence suggests benefits of maintenance macrolide treatment in more indolent respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. In view of the greater patient population affected by these disorders (and potential for macrolide use to spread to disorders such as chronic cough), widespread use of macrolides, particularly azithromycin, has the potential to substantially influence antimicrobial resistance rates of a range of respiratory microbes. In this Personal View, I explore theories around population (rather than patient) macrolide resistance, appraise evidence linking macrolide use with development of resistance, and highlight the risks posed by injudicious broadening of their use, particularly of azithromycin. These risks are weighed against the potential benefits of macrolides in less aggressive inflammatory airway disorders. A far-sighted approach to maintenance macrolide use in non-cystic fibrosis inflammatory airway diseases is needed, which minimises risks of adversely affecting community macrolide resistance: combining preferential use of erythromycin and restriction of macrolide use to those patients at greatest risk represents an appropriately cautious management approach. PMID:24429132

  7. Risks of population antimicrobial resistance associated with chronic macrolide use for inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Serisier, David J

    2013-05-01

    Macrolide antibiotics have established efficacy in the management of cystic fibrosis and diffuse panbronchiolitis-uncommon lung diseases with substantial morbidity and the potential for rapid progression to death. Emerging evidence suggests benefits of maintenance macrolide treatment in more indolent respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. In view of the greater patient population affected by these disorders (and potential for macrolide use to spread to disorders such as chronic cough), widespread use of macrolides, particularly azithromycin, has the potential to substantially influence antimicrobial resistance rates of a range of respiratory microbes. In this Personal View, I explore theories around population (rather than patient) macrolide resistance, appraise evidence linking macrolide use with development of resistance, and highlight the risks posed by injudicious broadening of their use, particularly of azithromycin. These risks are weighed against the potential benefits of macrolides in less aggressive inflammatory airway disorders. A far-sighted approach to maintenance macrolide use in non-cystic fibrosis inflammatory airway diseases is needed, which minimises risks of adversely affecting community macrolide resistance: combining preferential use of erythromycin and restriction of macrolide use to those patients at greatest risk represents an appropriately cautious management approach.

  8. Prevalence and molecular analysis of macrolide-resistant Moraxella catarrhalis clinical isolates in Japan, following emergence of the highly macrolide-resistant strain NSH1 in 2011.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Ayako; Ogihara, Shinji; Yamada, Kageto; Tanimichi, Yumiko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Saito, Ryoichi

    2015-07-01

    Although Moraxella catarrhalis is known to be susceptible to macrolides, highly macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates have recently been reported in Japan and China. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates in Tokyo and Chiba, Japan, and studied the mechanisms underlying their resistance. Specifically, we determined the susceptibility of 593 clinical isolates (collected between December 2011 and May 2014) to erythromycin, using the disk diffusion method. For isolates with erythromycin resistance, we identified the MICs of seven antimicrobial agents, including macrolides, and used PFGE to analyse the clonal spread. We also performed sequencing analysis to investigate macrolide-resistance targets. Thirteen isolates (2.2 %) were found to be resistant to erythromycin, showing a high MIC90 to erythromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin and azithromycin. However, those isolates, in addition to 156 randomly selected erythromycin-susceptible strains, were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefixime and levofloxacin. The 13 highly macrolide-resistant isolates were classified into 10 clades and harboured three or four A2058T-mutated 23S rRNA alleles. Three highly macrolide-resistant isolates also exhibited mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 (V27A and R161C) and L22 (K68T). To the best of our knowledge, we have demonstrated for the first time that, whilst the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates is low in clinical settings in Japan, genetically diverse isolates with high-level macrolide resistance due to the acquisition of an A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA have already spread. Our study therefore lays the basis for epidemiological studies of macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis clinical isolates.

  9. Sequence selectivity of macrolide-induced translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amber R.; Gohara, David W.; Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2014-01-01

    The prevailing “plug-in-the-bottle” model suggests that macrolide antibiotics inhibit translation by binding inside the ribosome tunnel and indiscriminately arresting the elongation of every nascent polypeptide after the synthesis of six to eight amino acids. To test this model, we performed a genome-wide analysis of translation in azithromycin-treated Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast to earlier predictions, we found that the macrolide does not preferentially induce ribosome stalling near the 5′ end of mRNAs, but rather acts at specific stalling sites that are scattered throughout the entire coding region. These sites are highly enriched in prolines and charged residues and are strikingly similar to other ligand-independent ribosome stalling motifs. Interestingly, the addition of structurally related macrolides had dramatically different effects on stalling efficiency. Our data suggest that ribosome stalling can occur at a surprisingly large number of low-complexity motifs in a fashion that depends only on a few arrest-inducing residues and the presence of a small molecule inducer. PMID:25313041

  10. [Macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramines (MLS): mechanisms of action and resistance].

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Vasilica

    2010-01-01

    Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramines are distinct antibiotic (AB) families, with different chemical structure, but with similar antibacterial spectre and mechanisms. Macrolides are natural products of secondary metabolism of several species of actynomyces; they represent a group of compounds with a lactonic ring of variable dimensions (12-22 atoms of C) that can bind, by means of glycosidic bonds, sacharridic and/or amino-sacharridic structures. Most of the MLS antibiotics are bacteriostatic. Their mechanisms consist in inhibiting protein synthesis. the target being 50 S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, the binding sites being different for the different MLS classes. Erythromycin (E) was introduced in therapy in 1952; quickly, several bacterial genera started developing resistance to E. Strains resistant to E were as well resistant to all macrolides and other antibiotics with different structures--lincosamides and streptogramines B--resistance phenotype called MLSB. The main molecular mechanisms for bacterial resistance to MLS are: (1) Target modification, coded by erm genes (>12 classes). In Gram-positive cocii MLSB resistance, regardless of erm gene, can be: inducible (i MLSB)--when the presence of the inductor AB is necessary for methylation enzyme production; constitutive (c MLSB)--when the methylation enzyme is continuously produced Distinction between iMLSB and cMLSB can be easily appreciated based on the phenotypic expression of bacteria. In streptococci--all MLSB antibiotics can act as methylase inductors. (2) The decrease of AB intracellular concentration by active efflux, coded by mef genes--also called M resistance phenotype, low level resistance (LLR). (3) AB inactivation (enzymatic modification of AB); there are different resistance phenotypes: MLSB +SA and L phenotype (in staphyilococci) or SA4 phenotype and L phenotype (in enterococci).

  11. Macrolide-induced digoxin toxicity: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, T; Mamdani, M M; Juurlink, D N

    2009-10-01

    In this 15-year, population-based, nested case-control study, we investigated the association between hospitalization for digoxin toxicity and recent exposure to individual macrolide antibiotics. Clarithromycin was associated with the highest risk of digoxin toxicity (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 14.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.9-27.9), whereas erythromycin and azithromycin were associated with much lower risk (adjusted OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.7-7.9; and adjusted OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.1-12.5, respectively). We found no increased risk with a neutral comparator, cefuroxime (adjusted OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.2-3.4).

  12. Caught in the Act: In Vivo Development of Macrolide Resistance to Campylobacter jejuni Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, J. C.; Poly, F.; Tribble, D. R.; Guerry, P.; Carmolli, M. P.; Baqar, S.; Porter, C. K.; Pierce, K. K.; Darsley, M. J.; Sadigh, K. S.; Dill, E. A.; Kirkpatrick, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first instance of macrolide resistance developing in vivo following appropriate antibiotic use in a healthy volunteer as a part of a controlled human infection with Campylobacter jejuni. In vivo development of macrolide resistance may be an important contributor to antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni. PMID:20554818

  13. Interplay between the ribosomal tunnel, nascent chain, and macrolides influences drug inhibition.

    PubMed

    Starosta, Agata L; Karpenko, Viktoriya V; Shishkina, Anna V; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Sumbatyan, Natalia V; Schluenzen, Frank; Korshunova, Galina A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Wilson, Daniel N

    2010-05-28

    Accumulating evidence suggests that, during translation, nascent chains can form specific interactions with ribosomal exit tunnel to regulate translation and promote initial folding events. The clinically important macrolide antibiotics bind within the exit tunnel and inhibit translation by preventing progression of the nascent chain and inducing peptidyl-tRNA drop-off. Here, we have synthesized amino acid- and peptide-containing macrolides, which are used to demonstrate that distinct amino acids and peptides can establish interaction with components of the ribosomal tunnel and enhance the ribosome-binding and inhibitory properties of the macrolide drugs, consistent with the concept that the exit tunnel is not simply a Teflon-like channel. Surprisingly, we find that macrolide antibiotics do not inhibit translation of all nascent chains similarly, but rather exhibit polypeptide-specific inhibitory effects, providing a change to our general mechanistic understanding of macrolide inhibition.

  14. Cytotoxicity of macrolide antibiotics in a cultured human liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Viluksela, M; Vainio, P J; Tuominen, R K

    1996-09-01

    Cytotoxicity of erythromycin base, erythromycin estolate, erythromycin-11,12-cyclic carbonate, roxithromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin was compared in cultured human non-malignant Chang liver cells using reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and cellular protein concentration as end points of toxicity. Erythromycin estolate was the most toxic macrolide in all tests differing clearly from all the other macrolides studied. Erythromycin-11,12-cyclic carbonate was also more toxic than the other macrolides. Roxithromycin and clarithromycin were the next toxic derivatives, while erythromycin base and azithromycin were least toxic. Thus, cytotoxicity of the new semisynthetic macrolides, roxithromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin, is not substantially different from that of erythromycin base. In view of the low level of hepatotoxicity of macrolides hitherto reported in humans, the results do not suggest any substantial risk for hepatic disorders related to the use of azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin.

  15. A new cytotoxic trichothecene macrolide from the endophyte Myrothecium roridum.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Wang, Jian Shou; Shen, Hai Jun; Song, Yong Chun; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2010-07-01

    A new cytotoxic roridin-type trichothecene macrolide named roritoxin E(1) was characterized from the solid culture of Myrothecium roridum IFB-E091 (residing originally inside Artemisia annua root), together with the known compounds lumichrome (2), (22 E,24 S)-cerevisterol (3), and (22 E,24 R)-6 beta-methoxy-ergosta-7,22-diene-3 beta,5 alpha-diol (4). The structure of the new macrolide (1) was elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic (UV, IR, MS, and 1D and 2D NMR) analyses. Compound 1 was demonstrated to be inhibitory in vitro against the gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cell lines, with IC (50) values of 0.26 and 10.54 microg/mL, respectively. 5-Fluorouracil co-assayed as a positive control had an IC (50) value of 6.66 microg/mL against SGC-7901 cells, and it demonstrated only a 9.98 % growth inhibition against SMMC-7721 cells at 10 microg/mL. PMID:20195960

  16. Toxicity of macrolide antibiotics on isolated heart mitochondria: a justification for their cardiotoxic adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Ahmad; Eybagi, Sadaf; Seydi, Enayatollah; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Kazerouni, Negar Panahi; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    1. Macrolides belong to the polyketide class of natural products. These products are a group of drugs (typically antibiotics) which their activity stems from the presence of a macrolide ring. Antibiotic macrolides are used to treat infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria and Haemophilus influenzae infections such as respiratory tract and soft-tissue infections. Macrolides, mainly erythromycin and clarithromycin, rarely show QT prolongation, as their infamous adverse reaction which can lead to torsades de pointes. Electrophysiological studies showed that macrolides prolonging the QT interval inhibit the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr) through the block of potassium channels encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG). Other studies suggest that increased ROS generation alters the kinetics of hERG K(+) conductance. 2. In our study, rat cardiomyocytes were isolated with collagen perfusion technique. Finally, mitochondria isolated from cardiomyocytes were exposed to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin for their probable toxicity effects. 3. Our results demonstrated that macrolides induced reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and mitochondrial swelling and finally cytochrome c release in cardiomyocyte mitochondria. 4. These findings suggested that the toxicity of heart mitochondria is a starting point for cardiotoxic effects of macrolides including QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and arrhythmia.

  17. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype; msr(E), which encodes a macrolide efflux pump; and mph(E), which encodes a macrolide-inactivating phosphotransferase. Here, we describe a multiplex PCR assay that detects the presence of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) and differentiates between these genes. In addition, the assay distinguishes P. multocida from M. haemolytica by amplifying distinctive fragments of the 23S rRNA (rrl) genes. One rrl fragment acts as a general indicator of gammaproteobacterial species and confirms whether the PCR assay has functioned as intended on strains that are negative for erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E). The multiplex system has been tested on more than 40 selected isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica and correlated with MICs for the veterinary macrolides tulathromycin and tilmicosin, and the newer compounds gamithromycin and tildipirosin. The multiplex PCR system gives a rapid and robustly accurate determination of macrolide resistance genotypes and bacterial genus, matching results from microbiological methods and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:22564832

  18. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  19. International guidelines for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in adults: the role of macrolides.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M; Tan, James S

    2003-01-01

    The significance of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has led to the publication of guidelines from numerous international organisations. Because the macrolide class of antimicrobials is active against most of the key pathogens associated with CAP, agents from this class are commonly included in recommendations from these guidelines. However, there are differences among the various guidelines concerning the positioning of the macrolides for empirical therapy. An important factor concerning the use of macrolides for CAP is the emergence of resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae over the past decade. The rate of S. pneumoniae resistance to macrolides ranges from 4 to 70% of strains in worldwide surveillance studies. The most common mechanisms of resistance include methylation of a ribosomal target encoded by the erm gene and efflux of the macrolides by a cell membrane protein transporter, encoded by the mef gene. S. pneumoniae strains with the mef gene are resistant at a lower level (with minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] values generally 1-16 microg/ml) than erm resistant strains; and it is possible that such strains may be inhibited if sufficiently high levels of macrolide can be obtained at the infected site. Currently mef-associated resistance predominates in North America, whereas erm predominates in Europe. Until recently, reports of failure of treatment of CAP with macrolides has been rare, particularly for patients with low-risk for drug-resistant strains. However, since 2000, several patients treated with an oral macrolide who have subsequently required admission to the hospital for macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae (MRSP) bacteraemia have been reported in the literature. Major issues, which are fundamental to the use of the macrolides as recommended in the various guidelines, include the importance of providing therapy for 'atypical' pathogens and the clinical significance of MRSP. Presently, the macrolides are more prominently recommended in the

  20. Molecular characterization of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from pharyngitis patients in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Opavski, Natasa; Gajic, Ina; Borek, Anna L; Obszańska, Katarzyna; Stanojevic, Maja; Lazarevic, Ivana; Ranin, Lazar; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Mijac, Vera

    2015-07-01

    A steady increase in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes, group A streptococci (GAS) was reported in Serbia during 2004-2009 (9.9%). However, there are no data on the molecular epidemiology of pharyngeal macrolide resistance GAS (MRGAS) isolates. Therefore, the aims of this first nationwide study were to examine the prevalence of macrolide resistance in Serbian GAS and to determine their resistance phenotypes, genotypes and clonal relationships. Overall 3893 non-duplicate pharyngeal S. pyogenes isolates from outpatients with GAS infection were collected throughout country during 2008 and 2009. Among 486 macrolide resistant pharyngeal isolates collected, 103 were further characterized. Macrolide resistance phenotypes and genotypes were determined by double-disk diffusion test and PCR, respectively. Strain relatedness was determined by emm typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), phage profiling (PP) and virulence factor profiling (VFP). Overall, macrolide resistance among GAS isolates in Serbia was 12.5%. M phenotype was the most common (71.8%), followed by iMLS (18.4%) and cMLS (9.7%). Three clonal complexes--emm75/mefA/ST49, emm12/mefA/ST36 and emm77/ermA/tetO/ST63 comprised over 90% of the tested strains. Although MLVA, PP and VFP distinguished 10, 20 and 12 different patterns, respectively, cluster analysis disclosed only small differences between strains which belonged to the same emm/ST type. Our data indicate dominance of three major internationally widely disseminated macrolide resistant clones and a high genetic homogeneity among the Serbian MRGAS population. Continued surveillance of macrolide resistance and clonal composition in MRGAS in Serbia in future is necessary to determine stability of MRGAS clones and to guide therapy strategies.

  1. A convergent ring-closing metathesis approach to carbohydrate-based macrolides with potential antibiotic activity.

    PubMed

    Blom, Petra; Ruttens, Bart; Van Hoof, Steven; Hubrecht, Idzi; Van der Eycken, Johan; Sas, Benedikt; Van hemel, Johan; Vandenkerckhove, Jan

    2005-11-25

    [reaction: see text] An efficient convergent approach has been developed for the construction of novel, non-natural, carbohydrate-based macrolides. The key step in the synthesis is the formation of the macrocyclic ring via a ring-closing metathesis reaction. The obtained macrolide analogues have been screened for biological activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including resistant strains, yeasts, and molds.

  2. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C M; Honscha, M; Truong, N D; Holland, R; Hövener, B; Bryskier, A; Lütticken, R; Reinert, R R

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide-resistance was assessed in 216 consecutive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany. Seventeen isolates were resistant to erythromycin: 12 isolates revealed a macrolide (M) phenotype and harbored mefA, and five strains expressed an inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype of which four strains harbored ermA(TR) and one strain contained ermB(AM). Telithromycin (HMR 3647) and quinupristin/dalfopristin remained active particularly against the ermA(TR)-containing S. pyogenes isolates studied. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis identified multiple clones among erythromycin-resistant strains, but did not discriminate beyond the emm-type. mefA was present in three isolates either with emm2, emm12, or emm75, and in nine isolates with emm4. All four strains with ermA(TR) contained emm77, and the single strain with ermB(AM) harbored emm1. Despite the relative low rate of macrolide-resistance, these data suggest that at least three different macrolide-resistance determinants are prevalent in Germany and that mefA has spread rapidly into multiple clones of S. pyogenes.

  3. Induction of ribosome methylation in MLS-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by macrolides and ketolides.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Cao, Z; Hammond, R; Chen, Y; Beyer, J; Shortridge, V D; Phan, L Y; Pratt, S; Capobianco, J; Reich, K A; Flamm, R K; Or, Y S; Katz, L

    1999-01-01

    One major mechanism for resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae is MLS (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) resistance, manifested when the 23S rRNA is methylated by the product of an erm gene. This modification results in the decreased binding of all known macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotics to the ribosome. More than 30 ermAM-containing clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae were examined in our lab and showed high-level resistance (MIC > or =128 microg/ml) to erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, clindamycin, and ketolide (macrolides that lack the cladinose sugar) TE-802. We found that the new generation of ketolides A965 and A088 displayed variable activity against the same group of resistant S. pneumoniae strains. To understand the basis of variability of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of A965 and A088, we examined the effects of a series of macrolides and ketolides on the level of 23S rRNA methylation in five ermAM-containing resistant S. pneumoniae isolates. We show here that the basal levels of ribosomal methylation vary from strain to strain. The level of rRNA methylation can be strongly induced by erythromycin, azithromycin, and TE-802, resulting in high-level of resistance to these compounds. Ketolide A965 and A088, however, are weak inducers at sub-MIC drug concentrations, therefore showing variable activities in strains with differential methylation levels. PMID:10566867

  4. Macrolides and lincosamides in cattle and pigs: use and development of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Pyörälä, Satu; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Greko, Christina; Moreno, Miguel A; Pomba, M Constança Matias Ferreira; Rantala, Merja; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Threlfall, E John; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Törneke, Karolina

    2014-05-01

    Macrolides and lincosamides are important antibacterials for the treatment of many common infections in cattle and pigs. Products for in-feed medication with these compounds in combination with other antimicrobials are commonly used in Europe. Most recently approved injectable macrolides have very long elimination half-lives in both pigs and cattle, which allows once-only dosing regimens. Both in-feed medication and use of long-acting injections result in low concentrations of the active substance for prolonged periods, which causes concerns related to development of antimicrobial resistance. Acquired resistance to macrolides and lincosamides among food animal pathogens, including some zoonotic bacteria, has now emerged. A comparison of studies on the prevalence of resistance is difficult, since for many micro-organisms no agreed standards for susceptibility testing are available. With animal pathogens, the most dramatic increase in resistance has been seen in the genus Brachyspira. Resistance towards macrolides and lincosamides has also been detected in staphylococci isolated from pigs and streptococci from cattle. This article reviews the use of macrolides and lincosamides in cattle and pigs, as well as the development of resistance in target and some zoonotic pathogens. The focus of the review is on European conditions.

  5. Aquatic toxicity of the macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michaela; Weiss, Klaus; Maletzki, Dirk; Schüssler, Walter; Schudoma, Dieter; Kopf, Willi; Kühnen, Ute

    2015-02-01

    The human macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin is widespread in surface waters. Our study shows that its major metabolite 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin is found in surface waters in comparable amounts. This metabolite is known to be pharmacologically active. Additionally, clarithromycin is partly metabolised to N-desmethyl-clarithromycin, which has no antimicrobial activity. For clarithromycin, some ecotoxicological studies on aquatic organisms have been published. However, many of them are not conform with the scientific principles as given in the "Technical guidance for deriving environmental quality standards" (TGD-EQS), because numerous studies were poorly documented and the methods did not contain analytical measurements confirming that the exposure concentrations were in the range of ± 20% of the nominal concentrations. Ecotoxicological effects of clarithromycin and its two metabolites on the zebrafish Danio rerio (embryo test), the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, the aquatic monocotyledonous macrophyte Lemna minor, the freshwater green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus (Chlorophyta) and the cyanobacterium Anabaena flosaquae were investigated in compliance with the TGD-EQS. Environmental risk assessment was performed using ErC10 values of Anabaena, the species most sensitive to clarithromycin and 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin in our testing. Based oncomparable toxicity and similar concentrations of clarithromycin and its active metabolite 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin in surface waters, an additional multiplication factor of 2 to the assessment factor of 10 on the ErC10 of clarithromycin should be used. Consequently, a freshwater quality standard of 0.130 μg L(-1) is proposed for clarithromycin as the "lead substance". Taking this additional multiplication factor of 2 into account, single monitoring of clarithromycin may be sufficient, in order to reduce the number of substances listed for routine monitoring programs. PMID:25051235

  6. Carbohydrate-based macrolides prepared via a convergent ring closing metathesis approach: in search for novel antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ruttens, Bart; Blom, Petra; Van Hoof, Steven; Hubrecht, Idzi; Van der Eycken, Johan; Sas, Benedikt; Van Hemel, Johan; Vandenkerckhove, Jan

    2007-07-20

    An efficient convergent approach has been developed for the construction of novel, nonnatural polysubstituted carbohydrate-based macrolides. A key step in the synthesis is the formation of the macrocyclic ring via a ring-closing metathesis reaction. The obtained macrolide analogues have been screened for biological activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and molds.

  7. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Klima, Cassidy L.; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  8. Predominant role of msr(D) over mef(A) in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Isaka, Masanori; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is reported to be increasing. mef(A) gene-positive macrolide-resistant emm1 strains are thought to possibly contribute to the rise in the frequency of STSS. Although analyses of macrolide-resistant mechanisms, including mef(A) resistance, have been performed mainly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the role of this gene in Streptococcus pyogenes has not been completely investigated. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, we established the first mef(A)-knockout strain using an emm1-type S. pyogenes strain, and tested its susceptibility to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities were almost identical to those of the parental strain. Hence, we established a knockout strain for another gene, msr(D), that is located immediately downstream of mef(A). The macrolide resistances of the resulting strain significantly decreased, and were further altered when both mef(A) and msr(D) were knocked out. The introduction of the msr(D) gene into a macrolide-sensitive strain conferred more resistance than the introduction of the mef(A) gene. The erythromycin susceptibilities of knockout strains were further dissected using two additional emm4- and emm75-type S. pyogenes strains. We found almost identical results for both strains except for the mef(A) knockout emm4 type, whose susceptibility was altered, although the change was less than that for the msr(D) knockout. These results suggest that both mef(A) and msr(D) are involved in macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes, and that the msr(D) gene plays a more predominant role in macrolide resistance than mef(A).

  9. Macrolide antibiotics and the risk of ventricular arrhythmia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Trac, Mai H.; McArthur, Eric; Jandoc, Racquel; Dixon, Stephanie N.; Nash, Danielle M.; Hackam, Daniel G.; Garg, Amit X.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many respiratory tract infections are treated with macrolide antibiotics. Regulatory agencies warn that these antibiotics increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmia. We examined the 30-day risk of ventricular arrhythmia and all-cause mortality associated with macrolide antibiotics relative to nonmacrolide antibiotics. Methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study involving older adults (age > 65 yr) with a new prescription for an oral macrolide antibiotic (azithromycin, clarithromycin or erythromycin) in Ontario from 2002 to 2013. Our primary outcome was a hospital encounter with ventricular arrhythmia within 30 days after a new prescription. Our secondary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. We matched patients 1:1 using propensity scores to patients prescribed nonmacrolide antibiotics (amoxicillin, cefuroxime or levofloxacin). We used conditional logistic regression to measure the association between macrolide exposure and outcomes, and repeated the analysis in 4 subgroups defined by the presence or absence of chronic kidney disease, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and concurrent use of a drug known to prolong the QT interval. Results: Compared with nonmacrolide antibiotics, macrolide antibiotics were not associated with a higher risk of ventricular arrhythmia (0.03% v. 0.03%; relative risk [RR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–1.36) and were associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (0.62% v. 0.76%; RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.78–0.86). These associations were similar in all subgroups. Interpretation: Among older adults, macrolide antibiotics were not associated with a higher 30-day risk of ventricular arrhythmia than nonmacrolide antibiotics. These findings suggest that current warnings from the US Food and Drug Administration may be overstated. PMID:26903359

  10. Macrolide/Azalide Therapy for Nodular/Bronchiectatic Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Richard J.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; McNulty, Steven; Philley, Julie V.; Killingley, Jessica; Wilson, Rebecca W.; York, Deanna S.; Shepherd, Sara

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no large study validating the appropriateness of current treatment guidelines for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease. This is a retrospective single-center review evaluating the efficacy of macrolide/azalide-containing regimens for nodular/bronchiectatic (NB) MAC lung disease. METHODS: Patients were treated according to contemporary guidelines with evaluation of microbiologic responses. Macrolide susceptibility of MAC isolates was done at initiation of therapy, 6 to 12 months during therapy, and on the first microbiologic recurrence isolate. Microbiologic recurrence isolates also underwent genotyping for comparison with the original isolates. RESULTS: One hundred eighty patients completed > 12 months of macrolide/azalide multidrug therapy. Sputum conversion to culture negative occurred in 154 of 180 patients (86%). There were no differences in response between clarithromycin or azithromycin regimens. Treatment regimen modification occurred more frequently with daily (24 of 30 [80%]) vs intermittent (2 of 180 [1%]) therapy (P = .0001). No patient developed macrolide resistance during treatment. Microbiologic recurrences during therapy occurred in 14% of patients: 73% with reinfection MAC isolates, 27% with true relapse isolates (P = .03). Overall, treatment success (ie, sputum conversion without true microbiologic relapse) was achieved in 84% of patients. Microbiologic recurrences occurred in 74 of 155 patients (48%) after completion of therapy: 75% reinfection isolates, 25% true relapse isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Current guidelines for macrolide/azalide-based therapies for NB MAC lung disease result in favorable microbiologic outcomes for most patients without promotion of macrolide resistance. Intermittent therapy is effective and significantly better tolerated than daily therapy. Microbiologic recurrences during or after therapy are common and most often due to reinfection MAC genotypes. PMID:24457542

  11. Isolation of High Level Macrolide Resistant Bordetella pertussis Without Transition Mutation at Domain V in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Bahman; Bameri, Zakaria; Babaei, Ryhane; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bordetella pertussis, as a causative agent of whooping cough, due to the annual rise y of infection cases, failure of prophylaxis and treatment by macrolides, is considered as the new concern in the health care system. Objectives: The main objective of this study was the determination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at domain V, as the main binding site for macrolides, following the identification of high level macrolides resistant B. pertussis. Materials and Methods: Following the identification of 11 recovered B. pertussis isolates, from a total of 1084 nasopharyngeal swabs, by using the biochemical and molecular methods, the activities of erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin antibiotics against the recovered isolates were examined. Subsequently, A-G transition mutations in domain V were analyzed by molecular techniques, such as Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing. Results: After susceptibility testing, one strain was detected as a high level macrolide resistant B. pertussis (Erythromycin = 128 μg/mL, Clarithromycin > 256 μg/mL). After sequencing and PCR-RFLP methods, transition mutations in positions 2047 and 2058 of the mentioned domain were not observed. Conclusions: Although previous studies have shown that A-G transition mutations in 23 SrRNA gene (domain V) are the main reason for the occurrence of high level macrolides resistance in B. pertussis, however, the mentioned single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have not been detected in our resistant strain. This is the first report of high level macrolide resistant B. pertussis, without SNPs in domain V, in Iran. PMID:26396713

  12. Creation of Customized Bioactivity within a 14-Membered Macrolide Scaffold: Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation Using a Family-18 Chitinase.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akihiro; Maita, Nobuo; Gouda, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Hirose, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Saori; Saito, Yoshifumi; Nakano, Hayato; Kasai, Takako; Nakano, Hirofumi; Shiomi, Kazuro; Hirono, Shuichi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Omura, Satoshi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki

    2015-06-25

    Argifin, a 17-membered pentapeptide, inhibits chitinase. As argifin has properties that render it unsuitable as a drug development candidate, we devised a mechanism to create the structural component of argifin that bestows the chitinase inhibition and introduce it into a 14-membered macrolide scaffold. Here we describe (1) the designed macrolide, which exhibits ∼200-fold more potent chitinase inhibition than argifin, (2) the binding modes of the macrolide with Serratia marcescens chitinase B, and (3) the computed analysis explaining the reason for derivatives displaying increased inhibition compared to argifin, the macrolide aglycone displaying inhibition in a nanomolar range. This promises a class of chitinase inhibitors with novel skeletons, providing innovative insight for drug design and the use of macrolides as adaptable, flexible templates for use in drug discovery research and development.

  13. YS-822A, a new polyene macrolide antibiotic. I. Production, isolation, characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Itoh, A; Ido, J; Iwamoto, Y; Goshima, E; Miki, T; Hasuda, K; Hirota, H

    1990-08-01

    A new polyene macrolide antibiotic, YS-822A was isolated from the culture filtrate of a mutant strain H-8 of Streptoverticillium eurocidicum var. asterocidicus S-822. Whereas the original S-822 strain produced not only YS-822 substances but also teleocidin as by-product which is well-known as a strong carcinogenic promoter, the mutagenized H-8 strain produced the antibiotic with only a trace amount of teleocidin. Chemical and biological characterizations of the antibiotic revealed that YS-822A (molecular formula: C37H59NO14) is a new polyene macrolide with a wide antifungal spectrum and a low acute toxicity. PMID:2211361

  14. Macrolide-Based Microtubule-Stabilizing Agents - Chemistry and Structure-Activity Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, B.; Kuzniewski, C. N.; Wullschleger, C.; Altmann, K.-H.

    This article provides an overview on the chemistry and structure-activity relationships of macrolide-based microtubule-stabilizing agents. The primary focus will be on the total synthesis or examples thereof, but a brief summary of the current state of knowledge on the structure-activity relationships of epothilones, laulimalide, dictyostatin, and peloruside A will also be given. This macrolide class of compounds, over the last decade, has become the subject of growing interest due to their ability to inhibit human cancer cell proliferation through a taxol-like mechanism of action.

  15. Differences between Macrolide-Resistant and -Susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes: Importance of Clonal Properties in Addition to Antibiotic Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Costa, C.; Friães, A.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2012-01-01

    A steady decline in macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) in Portugal was reported during 1999 to 2006. This was accompanied by alterations in the prevalence of macrolide resistance phenotypes and in the clonal composition of the population. In order to test whether changes in the macrolide-resistant population reflected the same changing patterns of the overall population, we characterized both macrolide-susceptible and -resistant GAS associated with a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis recovered in the period from 2000 to 2005 in Portugal. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling was the best predictor of emm type and the only typing method that could discriminate clones associated with macrolide resistance and susceptibility within each emm type. Six PFGE clusters were significantly associated with macrolide susceptibility: T3-emm3-ST406, T4-emm4-ST39, T1-emm1-ST28, T6-emm6-ST382, B3264-emm89-ST101/ST408, and T2-emm2-ST55. Four PFGE clusters were associated with macrolide resistance: T4-emm4-ST39, T28-emm28-ST52, T12-emm22-ST46, and T1-emm1-ST28. We found no evidence for frequent ongoing horizontal transfer of macrolide resistance determinants. The diversity of the macrolide-resistant population was lower than that of susceptible isolates. The differences found between the two populations suggest that the macrolide-resistant population of GAS has its own dynamics, independent of the behavior of the susceptible population. PMID:22908153

  16. Disruption of an Enterococcus faecium Species-Specific Gene, a Homologue of Acquired Macrolide Resistance Genes of Staphylococci, Is Associated with an Increase in Macrolide Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kavindra V.; Malathum, Kumthorn; Murray, Barbara E.

    2001-01-01

    The complete sequence (1,479 nucleotides) of msrC, part of which was recently reported by others using a different strain, was determined. This gene was found in 233 of 233 isolates of Enterococcus faecium but in none of 265 other enterococci. Disruption of msrC was associated with a two- to eightfold decrease in MICs of erythromycin azithromycin, tylosin, and quinupristin, suggesting that it may explain in part the apparent greater intrinsic resistance to macrolides of isolates of E. faecium relative to many streptococci. This endogenous, species-specific gene of E. faecium is 53% identical to msr(A), suggesting that it may be a remote progenitor of the acquired macrolide resistance gene found in some isolates of staphylococci. PMID:11120975

  17. Fate and Ecotoxicology of Veterinary Macrolide and Sulfonamide Antibiotics in Surface Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are carried from manured lands and production sites in runoff to surface waters. Our objectives were to assess the environmental fate and ecotoxicology of two macrolide antibiotics (tylosin and erythromycin) and sulfamethazine. Experiments were designed to simulate Midwestern farm pond c...

  18. Identification of macrolide-resistant clones of Streptococcus pyogenes in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, C; Ramirez, M; Melo-Cristino, J

    2006-06-01

    Although the overall level of macrolide resistance (27%) has remained stable in Portugal, a rapid inversion in the dominant phenotypes has been noted, with a sharp decrease in the MLS(B) phenotype paralleled by an increase in the M phenotype. To gain further insight into these changes, 325 macrolide-resistant isolates were characterised using a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The use of Cfr9I, an isoschizomer of SmaI, to digest M phenotype isolates that were refractory to SmaI digestion allowed direct comparison of MLS(B) and M isolates. The results from PFGE and MLST were highly concordant and identified eight major clones, accounting for 92% of the isolates, each of which was associated exclusively with a single macrolide resistance phenotype. Two major clones were found among MLS(B) isolates, characterised by sequence types (ST) 46 (T12/emm22) and ST52 (T28/emm28), whereas clones characterised by ST39 (T4/emm4) and ST28 (T1/emm1) dominated among M isolates. The clone defined by ST52 corresponded to a bacitracin-resistant clone circulating in Europe, and a novel variant expressing other surface antigens (T12/emm22) was detected. The presence of the four major clones has been reported previously in other European countries, suggesting Europe-wide dissemination of a few macrolide-resistant lineages. PMID:16700698

  19. Evaluation of macrolides for possible use against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van der Paardt, Anne-Fleur; Wilffert, Bob; Akkerman, Onno W; de Lange, Wiel C M; van Soolingen, Dick; Sinha, Bhanu; van der Werf, Tjip S; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major global health problem. The loss of susceptibility to an increasing number of drugs behoves us to consider the evaluation of non-traditional anti-tuberculosis drugs.Clarithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, is defined as a group 5 anti-tuberculosis drug by the World Health Organization; however, its role or efficacy in the treatment of MDR-TB is unclear. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to summarise the evidence for the activity of macrolides against MDR-TB, by evaluating in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. PubMed and Embase were searched for English language articles up to May 2014.Even though high minimum inhibitory concentration values are usually found, suggesting low activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the potential benefits of macrolides are their accumulation in the relevant compartments and cells in the lungs, their immunomodulatory effects and their synergistic activity with other anti-TB drugs.A future perspective may be use of more potent macrolide analogues to enhance the activity of the treatment regimen.

  20. Transfer of Clostridium difficile Genetic Elements Conferring Resistance to Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B (MLSB) Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Fabrizio; Wasels, François; Spigaglia, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis is an important tool to investigate Clostridium difficile resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB). In particular, the protocols described in this chapter have been designed to investigate the genetic organization of erm(B)-containing elements and to evaluate the capability of these elements to transfer in C. difficile recipient strains using filter mating assay. PMID:27507342

  1. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  2. Nasopharyngeal carriage and macrolide resistance in Indigenous children with bronchiectasis randomized to long-term azithromycin or placebo.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Grimwood, K; Chang, A B; Chatfield, M D; Valery, P C; Leach, A J; Smith-Vaughan, H C; Morris, P S; Byrnes, C A; Torzillo, P J; Cheng, A C

    2015-11-01

    Although long-term azithromycin decreases exacerbation frequency in bronchiectasis, increased macrolide resistance is concerning. We investigated macrolide resistance determinants in a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Indigenous Australian children living in remote regions and urban New Zealand Māori and Pacific Islander children with bronchiectasis were randomized to weekly azithromycin (30 mg/kg) or placebo for up to 24 months and followed post-intervention for up to 12 months. Nurses administered and recorded medications given and collected nasopharyngeal swabs 3-6 monthly for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis was significantly lower in azithromycin compared to placebo groups, while macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus carriage was significantly higher. Australian children, compared to New Zealand children, had higher carriage overall, significantly higher carriage of macrolide-resistant bacteria at baseline (16/38 versus 2/40 children) and during the intervention (69/152 versus 22/239 swabs), and lower mean adherence to study medication (63 % versus 92 %). Adherence ≥70 % (versus <70 %) in the Australian azithromycin group was associated with lower carriage of any pathogen [odds ratio (OR) 0.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.53] and fewer macrolide-resistant pathogens (OR 0.34, 95 % CI 0.14-0.81). Post-intervention (median 6 months), macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae declined significantly in the azithromycin group, from 79 % (11/14) to 7 % (1/14) of positive swabs, but S. aureus strains remained 100 % macrolide resistant. Azithromycin treatment, the Australian remote setting, and adherence <70 % were significant independent determinants of macrolide resistance in children with bronchiectasis. Adherence to treatment may limit macrolide resistance by suppressing carriage.

  3. Macrolide-lincosamide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Lu, Li-Ming; Ren, Gao-Wa Na; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-07-27

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide-lincosamide (ML) resistance in 72 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with clinical mastitis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ML antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution technique, inducible ML resistance phenotype by the D test, and ML resistance genes by PCR assay. The isolates showed a high level of resistance to erythromycin (93.1%), azithromycin (93.1%), spiramycin (41.7%), tylosin (40.3%), tilmicosin (27.8%), and clindamycin (36.1%). Macrolide-lincosamide MIC(90) values were > or = 128 mg/L. Inducible ML resistance (iML) phenotype was detected in 52.8% (38/72) of isolates. In erythromycin-resistant (ER-R) strains, methylase genes ermB and ermC, efflux gene msrA/msrB, and inactivating enzyme genes lnuA and mphC were present alone or in various combinations, with ermB and ermC genes predominating. This is the first report of ML resistance genes ermB, mrsA/mrsB and mphC in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. The occurrence of high levels of resistance to ML antibiotics among the S. aureus isolates, and the high rate of iML phenotype, indicate that appropriate alternative antibiotics should be prescribed for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. Furthermore, significant differences in the conformations of lactone rings of 16- and 14-membered macrolides could explain why some isolates with a constitutive ML resistance (cML) phenotype were sensitive to 16-membered macrolides alone. The different interaction of the 16-membered macrolides with the 50S ribosomal subunit is also presumably the reason why the susceptibility results of tilmcosin differed from those of tylosin and spiramycin. PMID:18272297

  4. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  5. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  6. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. Material/Methods Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. Results Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. Conclusions SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  7. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. RESULTS Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  8. Combinations of Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Field Isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida▿

    PubMed Central

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product of the erm(42) gene. The second class shows no lincosamide resistance and lacks erm(42) and concomitant 23S rRNA methylation. Sequencing of the genome of a representative strain from this class, P. multocida 3361, revealed macrolide efflux and phosphotransferase genes [respectively termed msr(E) and mph(E)] that are arranged in tandem and presumably expressed from the same promoter. The third class exhibits the most marked drug phenotype, with high resistance to all of the macrolides tested, and possesses all three resistance determinants. The combinations of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) are chromosomally encoded and intermingled with other exogenous genes, many of which appear to have been transferred from other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The presence of some of the exogenous genes explains recent reports of resistance to additional drug classes. We have expressed recombinant versions of the erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) genes within an isogenic Escherichia coli background to assess their individually contributions to resistance. Our findings indicate what types of compounds might have driven the selection for these resistance determinants. PMID:21709086

  9. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli: resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, F. M.; Taylor, D. E.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Nachamkin, I.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone resistance in Campylobacter and track resistance trends in human clinical isolates in relation to use of these agents in food animals. Susceptibility data suggest that erythromycin and other macrolides should remain the drugs of choice in most regions, with systematic surveillance and control measures maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions. PMID:11266291

  10. Purification and characterization of macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase from a strain of Escherichia coli that is highly resistant to erythromycin.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, K; Kanda, T; Ohmiya, K; Ebisu, T; Kono, M

    1989-08-01

    Macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase [MPH(2')] was purified 90-fold from an erythromycin-resistant strain of Escherichia coli, and its enzymatic properties were investigated. MPH(2') is an inducible intracellular enzyme which showed high levels of activity with 14-member-ring macrolides and extremely low levels with 16-member-ring macrolides. The optimum pH for inactivation of oleandomycin was 8.2, and the optimum temperature of the reaction was 40 degrees C. Enzyme activity was lost by heat treatment at 50 degrees C for 1 min. The isoelectric point and molecular weight of the enzyme were 5.3 and 34,000, respectively. Purine nucleotides, such as GTP, ITP, and ATP, were effective as cofactors in the inactivation of macrolides. Iodine, EDTA, or divalent cations inhibited MPH(2') activity.

  11. Binding of Macrolide Antibiotics Leads to Ribosomal Selection against Specific Substrates Based on Their Charge and Size.

    PubMed

    Sothiselvam, Shanmugapriya; Neuner, Sandro; Rigger, Lukas; Klepacki, Dorota; Micura, Ronald; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S

    2016-08-16

    Macrolide antibiotic binding to the ribosome inhibits catalysis of peptide bond formation between specific donor and acceptor substrates. Why particular reactions are problematic for the macrolide-bound ribosome remains unclear. Using comprehensive mutational analysis and biochemical experiments with synthetic substrate analogs, we find that the positive charge of these specific residues and the length of their side chains underlie inefficient peptide bond formation in the macrolide-bound ribosome. Even in the absence of antibiotic, peptide bond formation between these particular donors and acceptors is rather inefficient, suggesting that macrolides magnify a problem present for intrinsically difficult substrates. Our findings emphasize the existence of functional interactions between the nascent protein and the catalytic site of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center. PMID:27498876

  12. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  13. Macrolones Are a Novel Class of Macrolide Antibiotics Active against Key Resistant Respiratory Pathogens In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Čipčić Paljetak, Hana; Verbanac, Donatella; Padovan, Jasna; Dominis-Kramarić, Miroslava; Kelnerić, Željko; Perić, Mihaela; Banjanac, Mihailo; Ergović, Gabrijela; Simon, Nerrisa; Broskey, John; Holmes, David J; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    As we face an alarming increase in bacterial resistance to current antibacterial chemotherapeutics, expanding the available therapeutic arsenal in the fight against resistant bacterial pathogens causing respiratory tract infections is of high importance. The antibacterial potency of macrolones, a novel class of macrolide antibiotics, against key respiratory pathogens was evaluated in vitro and in vivo MIC values against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae strains sensitive to macrolide antibiotics and with defined macrolide resistance mechanisms were determined. The propensity of macrolones to induce the expression of inducible erm genes was tested by the triple-disk method and incubation in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of compounds. In vivo efficacy was assessed in a murine model of S. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in mice were determined. The in vitro antibacterial profiles of macrolones were superior to those of marketed macrolide antibiotics, including the ketolide telithromycin, and the compounds did not induce the expression of inducible erm genes. They acted as typical protein synthesis inhibitors in an Escherichia coli transcription/translation assay. Macrolones were characterized by low to moderate systemic clearance, a large volume of distribution, a long half-life, and low oral bioavailability. They were highly efficacious in a murine model of pneumonia after intraperitoneal application even against an S. pneumoniae strain with constitutive resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. Macrolones are the class of macrolide antibiotics with an outstanding antibacterial profile and reasonable PK parameters resulting in good in vivo efficacy.

  14. Macrolones Are a Novel Class of Macrolide Antibiotics Active against Key Resistant Respiratory Pathogens In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Čipčić Paljetak, Hana; Verbanac, Donatella; Padovan, Jasna; Dominis-Kramarić, Miroslava; Kelnerić, Željko; Perić, Mihaela; Banjanac, Mihailo; Ergović, Gabrijela; Simon, Nerrisa; Broskey, John; Holmes, David J; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    As we face an alarming increase in bacterial resistance to current antibacterial chemotherapeutics, expanding the available therapeutic arsenal in the fight against resistant bacterial pathogens causing respiratory tract infections is of high importance. The antibacterial potency of macrolones, a novel class of macrolide antibiotics, against key respiratory pathogens was evaluated in vitro and in vivo MIC values against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae strains sensitive to macrolide antibiotics and with defined macrolide resistance mechanisms were determined. The propensity of macrolones to induce the expression of inducible erm genes was tested by the triple-disk method and incubation in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of compounds. In vivo efficacy was assessed in a murine model of S. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in mice were determined. The in vitro antibacterial profiles of macrolones were superior to those of marketed macrolide antibiotics, including the ketolide telithromycin, and the compounds did not induce the expression of inducible erm genes. They acted as typical protein synthesis inhibitors in an Escherichia coli transcription/translation assay. Macrolones were characterized by low to moderate systemic clearance, a large volume of distribution, a long half-life, and low oral bioavailability. They were highly efficacious in a murine model of pneumonia after intraperitoneal application even against an S. pneumoniae strain with constitutive resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. Macrolones are the class of macrolide antibiotics with an outstanding antibacterial profile and reasonable PK parameters resulting in good in vivo efficacy. PMID:27353268

  15. Desmethyl Macrolides: Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,8,10-Tridesmethyl Cethromycin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging at an alarming rate in both hospital and community settings. Motivated by this issue, we have prepared desmethyl (i.e., replacing methyl groups with hydrogens) analogues of third-generation macrolide drugs telithromycin (TEL, 2) and cethromycin (CET, 6), both of which are semisynthetic derivatives of flagship macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (1). Herein, we report the total synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of 4,8,10-tridesmethyl cethromycin (7). In MIC assays, CET analogue 7 was found to be equipotent with TEL (2) against a wild-type E. coli strain, more potent than previously disclosed desmethyl TEL congeners 3, 4, and 5, but 4-fold less potent than TEL (2) against a mutant E. coli A2058G strain. PMID:24470840

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility and macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pyogenes collected in Austria and Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gattringer, Rainer; Sauermann, Robert; Lagler, Heimo; Stich, Karin; Buxbaum, Astrid; Graninger, Wolfgang; Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2004-09-01

    A total of 341 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from Vienna, Austria and three Hungarian cities were tested for susceptibility to four macrolides and 12 other antibiotics. All isolates were fully susceptible to penicillin and the other beta-lactams tested. A high level of tetracycline resistance was found in Austria (26.7%) and in Hungary (30.5%). The rate of resistance to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin was 4.7% in Vienna and 3.7% in the Hungarian communities. In both countries, the MIC(90) values of erythromycin and clarithromycin were 0.12 mg/L and the MIC(90) of josamycin was 0.5mg/L. The M phenotype of resistance conferred by the mefA genes was predominant (n = 9) among the macrolide-resistant isolates (n = 14).

  17. Determination of macrolide antibiotics in chicken tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikin, Jamilah; Abdullah, Aminah

    2013-11-01

    A methodusingliquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)MS) for the simultaneous determination of three macrolides (tylosin, spiramycin and tilmicosin) in poultry muscle has been developed. The drugs were extracted with EDTA McIlvaine buffer, filter through celite 545 and the extracts were cleaned up by SPE Oasis HLB cartridge. Separation was carried out in end-capped silica-based C18 column and mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile with a binary gradient system at a flow rate 0.5 ml/min. Detection was performed by single mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode. Several parameters affecting the mass spectra were studied. Chicken samples from the market were analyzed to check the residue of macrolide antibiotics.

  18. Determination of macrolides in biological matrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Kees, F; Spangler, S; Wellenhofer, M

    1998-07-01

    A liquid chromatographic method for the determination of macrolide antibiotics is described using a cyanopropyl column which proved to be as efficient or superior to the normally used apolar reversed-phase columns. The recovery of the macrolides from water and plasma was 80-90%. Using 0.5 ml of plasma, 30 ng/ml of clarithromycin, 50 ng/ml of roxithromycin and 10 ng/ml of azithromycin could be determined with acceptable precision and accuracy. The method has been employed in pharmacokinetic studies in humans for the determination of roxithromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin in plasma, serum and other biological matrices. The particular selectivity of the cyanopropyl phase may also allow the simultaneous determination of erythromycin and its prodrug esters. PMID:9691325

  19. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Silvia; Amoroso, Ana M; Famiglietti, Angela; de Mier, Carmen; Vay, Carlos; Gutkind, Gabriel O

    2004-01-01

    Five hundred and seventy-eight strains of group A streptococci (GAS) isolated mostly from paediatric pharyngeal swabs were tested to evaluate their susceptibility to erythromycin. Resistant strains were then tested for their MICs to erythromycin and clindamycin, their phenotype of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin (MLS(B)) and for the presence of macrolide resistance genes. The rate of resistance to erythromycin was 8.2%. Constitutive, inducible and M phenotypes of resistance were detected in 2.1, 2.1 and 95.8% of resistant strains, respectively. All M phenotypes harboured the mefA gene, whereas constitutive and inducible phenotypes had ermB and ermTR genes, respectively.

  20. 6-Alkylquinolone-3-carboxylic acid tethered to macrolides synthesis and antimicrobial profile.

    PubMed

    Kapić, Samra; Cipcić Paljetak, Hana; Alihodzić, Sulejman; Antolović, Roberto; Eraković Haber, Vesna; Jarvest, Richard L; Holmes, David J; Broskey, John P; Hunt, Eric

    2010-09-01

    Two series of clarithromycin and azithromycin derivatives with terminal 6-alkylquinolone-3-carboxylic unit with central ether bond in the linker were prepared and tested for antimicrobial activity. Quinolone-linker intermediates were prepared by Sonogashira-type C(6)-alkynylation of 6-iodo-quinolone precursors. In the last step, 4'' site-selective acylation of 2'-protected macrolides was completed with the EDC reagent, which selectively activated a terminal, aliphatic carboxylic group in dicarboxylic intermediates. Antimicrobial activity of the new series of macrolones is discussed. The most potent compound, 4''-O-{6-[3-(3-carboxy-1-ethyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinolin-6-yl)-propoxy]-hexanoyl}-azithromycin (10), is highly active against bacterial respiratory pathogens resistant to macrolide antibiotics and represents a promising lead for further investigation.

  1. Development, stability, and molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Dave Bryson; Wang, Ying; Lin, Jun

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter were primarily focused on strains from various origins or used in vitro systems. In this study, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo experiments to examine the development, stability, and genetic basis of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni using erythromycin-resistant (Ery(r)) mutants derived from the same parent strain. Chickens inoculated with low-level Ery(r) mutants (MIC = 32 or 64 microg/ml) at 15 days old did not shed highly Ery(r) mutants (MIC > 512 microg/ml) after prolonged exposure to a low dose of tylosin. The low-level Ery resistance was not stable in vitro or in vivo in the absence of macrolide selection pressure. However, high-level Ery resistance displayed remarkable stability in vitro and in vivo. Ribosomal sequence analysis of 69 selected Ery(r) mutants showed that specific point mutations (A2074G or A2074C) occurred in all highly Ery(r) mutants. No mutations in ribosomal protein L4 were observed in any of the in vitro-selected Ery(r) mutants. However, three specific mutations in L4, G74D, G57D, and G57V, were widely found among in vivo-selected Ery(r) mutants. Insertion of three amino acids, TSH, at position 98 in ribosomal protein L22 was observed only in mutants selected in vitro. Inactivation of the CmeABC efflux pump dramatically reduced Ery MICs in Ery(r) mutants. Together, these findings suggest that multiple factors contribute to the emergence of highly Ery(r) Campylobacter in chicken, reveal resistance level-dependent stability of macrolide resistance in C. jejuni, and indicate that C. jejuni utilizes complex and different mechanisms to develop Ery resistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18779354

  2. In vitro activities of new macrolides and rifapentine against Brucella spp.

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, J A; Muñoz Bellido, J L; Fresnadillo, M J; Trujillano, I

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the in vitro activities of streptomycin, rifampin, tetracyclines, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, four new macrolides (roxithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and dirithromycin), and rifapentine against 62 strains of Brucella spp. Azithromycin and clarithromycin were, respectively, eight- and twofold more active than erythromycins (MIC for 90% of strains = 2, 8, and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively). The activity of rifapentine was similar to that of rifampin (MIC for 90% of strains = 1 microgram/ml). PMID:8494391

  3. Separation analysis of macrolide antibiotics with good performance on a positively charged C18HCE column.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Shen, Aijin; Yan, Jingyu; Jin, Gaowa; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-03-01

    The separation of basic macrolide antibiotics suffers from peak tailing and poor efficiency on traditional silica-based reversed-phase liquid chromatography columns. In this work, a C18HCE column with positively charged surface was applied to the separation of macrolides. Compared with an Acquity BEH C18 column, the C18HCE column exhibited superior performance in the aspect of peak shape and separation efficiency. The screening of mobile phase additives including formic acid, acetic acid and ammonium formate indicated that formic acid was preferable for providing symmetrical peak shapes. Moreover, the influence of formic acid content was investigated. Analysis speed and mass spectrometry compatibility were also taken into account when optimizing the separation conditions for liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The developed method was successfully utilized for the determination of macrolide residues in a honey sample. Azithromycin was chosen as the internal standard for the quantitation of spiramycin and tilmicosin, while roxithromycin was used for erythromycin, tylosin, clarithromycin, josamycin and acetylisovaleryltylosin. Good correlation coefficients (r(2) > 0.9938) for all macrolides were obtained. The intra-day and inter-day recoveries were 73.7-134.7% and 80.7-119.7% with relative standard deviations of 2.5-8.0% and 3.9-16.1%, respectively. Outstanding sensitivity with limits of quantitation (S/N ≥ 10) of 0.02-1 μg/kg and limits of detection (S/N ≥ 3) of 0.01-0.5 μg/kg were achieved. PMID:26782089

  4. A new macrolide from a marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Xin-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2013-08-01

    A new 16-membered macrolide named aspergillide D (1), along with six known compounds, including two polyketones (2-3) and four alkaloids (4-7), were isolated from the culture broth of a marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp. SCSGAF 0076. The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of NMR and mass spectra. Compound 5 showed an obvious inhibitory effect on influenza virus strains H1N1 and H3N2.

  5. The enhancement of cardiac toxicity by concomitant administration of Berberine and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Duo; Feng, Pan-Feng; Sun, Jia-Liang; Guo, Fengfeng; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Li, Bao-Xin

    2015-08-30

    As is well-known, hERG plays an essential role in phase III repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Blocking of hERG channels can lead to LQTS. Inhibition of the metabolism of CYPs activities may elevate plasma levels, to further increase accumulation of drug on cardiac. The elevated serum levels may however elicit unexpected toxicities. Therefore, the inhibition tests of hERG and CYP are central to the preclinical studies because they may lead to severe cardiac toxicity. Berberine is widely used as an antibacterial agent and often combined with macrolides to treat gastropathy. Our objective was to assess cardiac toxicity during the combined use of Berberine with macrolides. (1) Azithromycin reduced hERG currents by accelerated channel inactivation. (2) The combination of Berberine with Azithromycin reduced hERG currents, producing an inhibitive effect stronger than use of a single drug alone, due to the high binding affinity for the onset of inactivation. (3) When cells were perfused concomitantly with Berberine and Clarithromycin, they showed a stronger inhibitive effect on hERG currents by decreasing the time constant for the onset of inactivation. (4) The combined administration of Berberine with Clarithromycin had a powerful inhibitive effect on CYP3A activities than use of a single drug alone. Collectively, these results demonstrated that concomitant use of Berberine with macrolides may require close monitoring because of potential drug toxicities, especially cardiac toxicity.

  6. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness. PMID:24401781

  7. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness.

  8. Structure-activity relationships and mechanism of action of macrolides derived from erythromycin as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian-Hua; Han, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Enormous efforts were focused on the 3-descladinosyl erythromycin derivatives which led to 3-keto (ketolides), 3-O-acyl (acylides), 3-O-carbamate (carbamolides), and 3-O-alkyl (alkylides) and cladinosyl-containing erythromycin derivatives such as 4"-O-acyl, 4"-O-carbamate, and 4"-O-alkyl derivatives as recently exemplified by macrolones (macrolide-quinolone hybrids). Ketolides acquire activity against MLSB-resistant pathogens via a featured arylalkyl extension suspended on the macrolide core, which interacts with a base pair formed by A752Ec and U2609Ec located in the nascent peptide release tunnel of the bacterial rRNA. A base pair formed by C2610Ec and G2505Ec probably is another novel binding site for 3-descladinosyl non-ketolides. It is believed that 4"-derived compounds perhaps interfere with the formation of polypeptide because the extension oriented into peptidyl transferase center (PTC) region. Although macrolones are hybrids of macrolides and quinolones, they do not have dual modes of action, and serve only as protein synthesis inhibitors.

  9. The enhancement of cardiac toxicity by concomitant administration of Berberine and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Duo; Feng, Pan-Feng; Sun, Jia-Liang; Guo, Fengfeng; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Li, Bao-Xin

    2015-08-30

    As is well-known, hERG plays an essential role in phase III repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Blocking of hERG channels can lead to LQTS. Inhibition of the metabolism of CYPs activities may elevate plasma levels, to further increase accumulation of drug on cardiac. The elevated serum levels may however elicit unexpected toxicities. Therefore, the inhibition tests of hERG and CYP are central to the preclinical studies because they may lead to severe cardiac toxicity. Berberine is widely used as an antibacterial agent and often combined with macrolides to treat gastropathy. Our objective was to assess cardiac toxicity during the combined use of Berberine with macrolides. (1) Azithromycin reduced hERG currents by accelerated channel inactivation. (2) The combination of Berberine with Azithromycin reduced hERG currents, producing an inhibitive effect stronger than use of a single drug alone, due to the high binding affinity for the onset of inactivation. (3) When cells were perfused concomitantly with Berberine and Clarithromycin, they showed a stronger inhibitive effect on hERG currents by decreasing the time constant for the onset of inactivation. (4) The combined administration of Berberine with Clarithromycin had a powerful inhibitive effect on CYP3A activities than use of a single drug alone. Collectively, these results demonstrated that concomitant use of Berberine with macrolides may require close monitoring because of potential drug toxicities, especially cardiac toxicity. PMID:25976224

  10. Multiplex Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Macrolide Resistance Using PlexZyme and PlexPrime Technology

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tan, Lit Y.; Walker, Samantha; Twin, Jimmy; Poljak, Marin; Bradshaw, Catriona S.; Fairley, Christopher K.; Bissessor, Melanie; Mokany, Elisa; Todd, Alison V.; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a cause of non-gonoccocal urethritis (NGU) in men and cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. Recent international data also indicated that the first line treatment, 1 gram stat azithromycin therapy, for M. genitalium is becoming less effective, with the corresponding emergence of macrolide resistant strains. Increasing failure rates of azithromycin for M. genitalium has significant implications for the presumptive treatment of NGU and international clinical treatment guidelines. Assays able to predict macrolide resistance along with detection of M. genitalium will be useful to enable appropriate selection of antimicrobials to which the organism is susceptible and facilitate high levels of rapid cure. One such assay recently developed is the MG 23S assay, which employs novel PlexZyme™ and PlexPrime™ technology. It is a multiplex assay for detection of M. genitalium and 5 mutations associated with macrolide resistance. The assay was evaluated in 400 samples from 254 (186 males and 68 females) consecutively infected participants, undergoing tests of cure. Using the MG 23S assay, 83% (331/440) of samples were positive, with 56% of positives carrying a macrolide resistance mutation. Comparison of the MG 23S assay to a reference qPCR method for M. genitalium detection and high resolution melt analysis (HRMA) and sequencing for detection of macrolide resistance mutations, resulted in a sensitivity and specificity for M. genitalium detection and for macrolide resistance of 99.1/98.5% and 97.4/100%, respectively. The MG 23S assay provides a considerable advantage in clinical settings through combined diagnosis and detection of macrolide resistance. PMID:27271704

  11. Serotype and Genotype Replacement among Macrolide-Resistant Invasive Pneumococci in Adults: Mechanisms of Resistance and Association with Different Transposons▿

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, Laura; Ardanuy, Carmen; Tubau, Fe; Rolo, Dora; Grau, Immaculada; Pallarés, Román; Martín, Rogelio; Liñares, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze trends in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) due to macrolide-resistant strains and to study the evolution of serotypes, genotypes, and macrolide-resistant determinants of strains collected in a prospective study between 1999 and 2007 in Barcelona, Spain. IPD due to macrolide-resistant strains of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7) decreased from 2.16/100,000 (pre-PCV7 period, 1999 to 2001) to 0.80/100,000 (late-PCV7 period, 2005 to 2007) (P = 0.001), whereas IPD due to macrolide-resistant strains of non-PCV7 serotypes increased from 1.08/100,000 to 2.83/100,000 (P < 0.001). These changes were related to a fall of clones of PCV7 serotypes (ST81 [P < 0.05], ST90, ST315, and ST17) and an increase in new clones of serotypes 19A and 24F (ST230) and 33F (ST717) in the late-PCV7 period. The most common phenotype was MLSB (90.9%), related to the erm(B) gene. The frequent association between MLSB phenotype and tetracycline resistance [tet(M) gene], was related to transposons of the Tn916-family such as Tn6002 or Tn3872. In conclusion, overall adult IPD rates due to macrolide-resistant pneumococci stabilized between 1999 and 2007 in Barcelona. The decrease in macrolide-resistant PCV7 pneumococci was balanced by the increase in macrolide-resistant non-PCV7 pneumococci. PMID:20147647

  12. Multiplex Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Macrolide Resistance Using PlexZyme and PlexPrime Technology.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Tan, Lit Y; Walker, Samantha; Twin, Jimmy; Poljak, Marin; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K; Bissessor, Melanie; Mokany, Elisa; Todd, Alison V; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a cause of non-gonoccocal urethritis (NGU) in men and cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. Recent international data also indicated that the first line treatment, 1 gram stat azithromycin therapy, for M. genitalium is becoming less effective, with the corresponding emergence of macrolide resistant strains. Increasing failure rates of azithromycin for M. genitalium has significant implications for the presumptive treatment of NGU and international clinical treatment guidelines. Assays able to predict macrolide resistance along with detection of M. genitalium will be useful to enable appropriate selection of antimicrobials to which the organism is susceptible and facilitate high levels of rapid cure. One such assay recently developed is the MG 23S assay, which employs novel PlexZyme™ and PlexPrime™ technology. It is a multiplex assay for detection of M. genitalium and 5 mutations associated with macrolide resistance. The assay was evaluated in 400 samples from 254 (186 males and 68 females) consecutively infected participants, undergoing tests of cure. Using the MG 23S assay, 83% (331/440) of samples were positive, with 56% of positives carrying a macrolide resistance mutation. Comparison of the MG 23S assay to a reference qPCR method for M. genitalium detection and high resolution melt analysis (HRMA) and sequencing for detection of macrolide resistance mutations, resulted in a sensitivity and specificity for M. genitalium detection and for macrolide resistance of 99.1/98.5% and 97.4/100%, respectively. The MG 23S assay provides a considerable advantage in clinical settings through combined diagnosis and detection of macrolide resistance. PMID:27271704

  13. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T; Lopansri, Bert K; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R; Hecht, David W; Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart

    2015-11-02

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain.

  14. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R.; Hecht, David W.; Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain. PMID:26525793

  15. Macrolides sensitize EGFR-TKI-induced non-apoptotic cell death via blocking autophagy flux in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    MUKAI, SHUNTARO; MORIYA, SHOTA; HIRAMOTO, MASAKI; KAZAMA, HIROMI; KOKUBA, HIROKO; CHE, XIAO-FANG; YOKOYAMA, TOMOHISA; SAKAMOTO, SATOSHI; SUGAWARA, AKIHIRO; SUNAZUKA, TOSHIAKI; ŌMURA, SATOSHI; HANDA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; MIYAZAWA, KEISUKE

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult types of cancer to treat because of its high mortality rate due to chemotherapy resistance. We previously reported that combined treatment with gefitinib (GEF) and clarithromycin (CAM) results in enhanced cytotoxicity of GEF along with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress loading in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. An epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) such as GEF induces autophagy in a pro-survival role, whereas CAM inhibits autophagy flux in various cell lines. Pronounced GEF-induced cytotoxicity therefore appears to depend on the efficacy of autophagy inhibition. In the present study, we compared the effect on autophagy inhibition among such macrolides as CAM, azithromycin (AZM), and EM900, a novel 12-membered non-antibiotic macrolide. We then assessed the enhanced GEF-induced cytotoxic effect on pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and PANC-1. Autophagy flux analysis indicated that AZM is the most effective autophagy inhibitor of the three macrolides. CAM exhibits an inhibitory effect but less than AZM and EM900. Notably, the enhancing effect of GEF-induced cytotoxicity by combining macrolides correlated well with their efficient autophagy inhibition. However, this pronounced cytotoxicity was not due to upregulation of apoptosis induction, but was at least partially mediated through necroptosis. Our data suggest the possibility of using macrolides as ‘chemosensitizers’ for EGFR-TKI therapy in pancreatic cancer patients to enhance non-apoptotic tumor cell death induction. PMID:26718641

  16. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis. PMID:24393633

  17. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis.

  18. Balticolid: a new 12-membered macrolide with antiviral activity from an ascomycetous fungus of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Shushni, Muftah A M; Singh, Rajinder; Mentel, Renate; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    A new 12-membered macrolide, balticolid (1) was isolated from the EtOAc extract of the culture broth of fungal strain 222 belonging to the Ascomycota, which was found on driftwood collected from the coast of the Greifswalder Bodden, Baltic Sea, Germany. The structure of balticolid was determined to be (3R,11R), (4E,8E)-3-hydroxy-11-methyloxacyclododeca-4,8-diene-1,7-dione using extensive spectral data as well as the modified Mosher ester method. Balticolid (1) displayed anti-HSV-1 activity with an IC₅₀ value of 0.45 μM.

  19. Simple methods for the qualitative identification and quantitative determination of macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Danielson, N D; Holeman, J A; Bristol, D C; Kirzner, D H

    1993-02-01

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography is shown to be a rapid straightforward method for the qualitative differentiation of the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, oleandomycin, troleandomycin, spiramycin and tylosin. Organic salts do not interfere and identification of erythromycin and troleandomycin in commercial products is viable. Spectrophotometric quantitation of these same five antibiotics after reaction with concentrated sulphuric acid is studied at about 470 nm. Reaction conditions such as acid concentration, time and temperature are provided. The sugar moieties of the antibiotics are proposed as the reactive sites. Detection limits are about 0.2-1.0 microg ml-1 [corrected] and analysis of pharmaceutical products should be possible.

  20. Enantioselective Synthesis of Both Epimers at C-21 in the Proposed Structure of Cytotoxic Macrolide Callyspongiolide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun K; Kassekert, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    Both epimers at C-21 in the proposed structure of (+)-callyspongiolide have been synthesized in a convergent and enantioselective manner. The 14-membered macrolide with a sensitive C2-C3 cis-olefin functionality was installed by a Yamaguchi macrolactonization of hydroxyl alkynoic acid followed by hydrogenation over Lindlar's catalyst. The C5 methyl stereocenter was constructed by a ring-closing olefin metathesis followed by addition of methyl cuprate to an α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone. Other key reactions are chiral Corey-Bakshi-Shibata (CBS) reduction and Sonogashira coupling to conjoin the macrocyclic core and side chain. PMID:27331421

  1. Gastrointestinal motor-stimulating activity of macrolide antibiotics and analysis of their side effects on the canine gut.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Z; Suzuki, T; Nakaya, M; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1984-01-01

    For clarification of the nature of the side effects of macrolide antibiotics on the gastrointestinal tract, the motor-stimulating activity of these agents was studied in unanesthetized dogs. The results showed that erythromycin and oleandomycin, the 14-membered macrolides with two side chain sugars combined at C3 and C5 in a glycosidic linkage in parallel, strongly stimulate gastrointestinal motor activity, an action accompanied by vomiting at large doses. On the other hand, leucomycin, acetylspiramycin, and tylosin, belonging to a 16-membered macrolide with two side chain sugars in series combined at C5 of the lactone ring, did not induce contractions of the gastrointestinal tract. Motor-stimulating activity by erythromycin and oleandomycin was greatly inhibited by atropine sulfate. These results point to structure-physiological activity relationships. PMID:6524902

  2. Identification of a Grain Beetle Macrolide Pheromone and Its Synthesis by Ring-Closing Metathesis Using a Terminal Alkyne.

    PubMed

    Hötling, Susann; Bittner, Celine; Tamm, Matthias; Dähn, Sonja; Collatz, Jana; Steidle, Johannes L M; Schulz, Stefan

    2015-10-16

    A major C18-macrolide was found during analysis of the frass of the storage beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis to be (9Z,12Z,15R)-octadeca-9,12-dien-15-olide (10, cucujolide XI). The synthesis used ring-closing alkyne metathesis as a key step. The highly active 2,4,6-trimethylbenzylidyne molybdenum complex [MesCMo{OC(CF3)2Me}3] (12) allowed the use of a terminal alkyne and afforded the product in excellent yield. Bioassays proved the activity of the R-enantiomer 10 in the aggregation of the beetle. Cucujolide XI is the first macrolide pheromone oxidized at the ω-4 position.

  3. Functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis of acquired and intrinsic macrolide phosphotransferases in the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Sui, Zhihai; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Meilin; Chen, Weiqi; Feng, Jie

    2015-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group is composed of Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria of clinical and ecological importance. More than 200 B. cereus group isolates have been sequenced. However, there are few reports of B. cereus group antibiotic resistance genes. This study identified two functional classes of macrolide phosphotransferases (Mphs) in the B. cereus group. Cluster A Mphs inactivate 14- and 15-membered macrolides while Cluster B Mphs inactivate 14-, 15- and 16-membered compounds. The genomic region surrounding the Cluster B Mph gene is related to various plasmid sequences, suggesting that this gene is an acquired resistance gene. In contrast, the Cluster A Mph gene is located in a chromosomal region conserved among all B. cereus group isolates, and data indicated that it was acquired early in the evolution of the group. Therefore, the Cluster A gene can be considered an intrinsic resistance gene. However, the gene itself is not present in all strains and our comparative genomics analyses showed that it is exchanged among strains of the B. cereus group by the mean of homologous recombination. These results provide an alternative mechanism to intrinsic resistance.

  4. Hydrolysis of amphenicol and macrolide antibiotics: Chloramphenicol, florfenicol, spiramycin, and tylosin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon M; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotics that enter the environment can present human and ecological health risks. An understanding of antibiotic hydrolysis rates is important for predicting their environmental persistence as biologically active contaminants. In this study, hydrolysis rates and Arrhenius constants were determined as a function of pH and temperature for two amphenicol (chloramphenicol and florfenicol) and two macrolide (spiramycin and tylosin) antibiotics. Antibiotic hydrolysis rates in pH 4-9 buffer solutions at 25°C, 50°C, and 60°C were quantified, and degradation products were characterized. All of the antibiotics tested remained stable and exhibited no observable hydrolysis under ambient conditions typical of aquatic ecosystems. Acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis occurred at elevated temperatures (50-60°C), and hydrolysis rates increased considerably below pH 5 and above pH 8. Hydrolysis rates also increased approximately 1.5- to 2.9-fold for each 10°C increase in temperature. Based on the degradation product masses found, the functional groups that underwent hydrolysis were alkyl fluoride, amide, and cyclic ester (lactone) moieties; some of the resultant degradation products may remain bioactive, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. The results of this research demonstrate that amphenicol and macrolide antibiotics persist in aquatic systems under ambient temperature and pH conditions typical of natural waters. Thus, these antibiotics may present a risk in aquatic ecosystems depending on the concentration present.

  5. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux. PMID:26528273

  6. [Susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes to macrolides and quinolones in Guadalajara, Spain].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zurita, M E; Solís del Baño, S; Robres Guillén, P; González Praetorius, A; Gimeno Fernández, C; Pérez Pomata, M T; Bisquert Santiago, J

    2003-03-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the susceptibility of 104 Streptococcus pyogenes strains, which were isolated in 2000 and 2001 from clinical samples of different origins, to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin. The susceptibility testing was performed using the agar difusion method according to the guidelines of the NCCLS. All of the isolates showed susceptibility to penicillin and clindamycin. However, we detected 11 strains that were resistant to erythromycin (10.6%) and 4 strains resistant to ofloxacin (3.8%). We studied the resistance phenotypes of macrolides and lincosamides using erythromycin and clindamycin discs. Nine of the eleven strains that were resistant to erythromycin showed an M phenotype, while the remaining two showed inducible resistance to clindamycin, thus suggesting an MLS(B) inducible phenotype. No strains with constitutive resistance to erythromycin or clindamycin (MLS(B) constitutive phenotype) were identified. While penicillin is still uniformly active against S. pyogenes, in Guadalajara, there are 10.6% strains that are resistant to 14- and 15-atoms macrolides.

  7. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  8. Multi-residue fluorescent microspheres immunochromatographic assay for simultaneous determination of macrolides in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangmei; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Qi; Gao, Shuxia; Pei, Xingyao; Jiang, Haiyang; Wen, Kai

    2015-12-01

    A rapid, reliable, sensitive, and quantitative multi-residue fluorescent microspheres immunochromatographic assay (FMCA) was developed for simultaneous detection of four macrolides in raw milk. The IC50 value of the optimized FMCA was 1.36, 1.22, 1.01, and 1.39 ng/mL for erythromycin (ERY), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TIM), and tylosin (TYL), respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for the four macrolides was 0.13 ng/mL. The recoveries of ERY, SPI, TIM, and TYL from spiked raw milk ranged from 91.8-109.2, 89.6-114.4, 84.8-111.6, and 85.8-115.2%, respectively, with coefficients of variation (CVs) of 5.4-11.3, 7.9-15.7, 6.2-13.7, and 3.2-14.9%, respectively. The whole testing process was completed within 20 min. The antibody-mixed labeled method was successfully applied to the FMCA, which greatly simplified the operation steps and saved a lot of time. Compared with the immunogold chromatographic assay (IGCA), the FMCA is more sensitive and stable and has less antibody consumption. A parallel analysis in blind raw milk samples was conducted by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); the results showed good correlation (r(2) = 0.99) between the two methods. Therefore, the developed multi-residue FMCA is reliable and can be easily applied to other antibiotics or other contaminants. PMID:26497839

  9. The First Macrolide-Resistant Bordetella pertussis Strains Isolated From Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Nakhost Lotfi, Masoumeh; Nikbin, Vajiheh Sadat; Shooraj, Fahimeh; Azizian, Reza; Parzadeh, Masoumeh; Allahyar Torkaman, Mohammad Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whooping cough was considered as one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Resistant isolates of Bordetella pertussis to macrolides in some countries have been recently reported. Objectives: Recent reports on macrolide-resistant B. pertussis isolates and lack of evidence for such resistance in clinical isolates of the Iranian patients led the authors of the current study to study antibiotic susceptibility of the collected isolates in the country. Susceptibility of the B. pertussis isolates to three antibiotics was studied. Relatedness of the strains recovered in this research was also examined. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activities of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin antibiotics against the recovered isolates of 779 nasopharyngeal swabs were examined using MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration) method. Relationship of the strains was characterized by Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: Among the specimens, 11 cases (1.4%) were culture-positive. Among these isolates, only two isolates had high MIC values for erythromycin and clarithromycin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of the isolates revealed 6 PFGE profiles (A-F) among which three and two isolates had the same patterns in profiles A and B, respectively. Conclusions: Azithromycin can be a good drug of choice to treat patients infected by B. pertussis in Iran. Clonal relationship of the isolates showed that the same B. pertussis strains were isolated from different patients in Iran. PMID:25371806

  10. Macrolide-Peptide Conjugates as Probes of the Path of Travel of the Nascent Peptides through the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research on the bacterial ribosome, the ribosomal exit tunnel is still poorly understood. Although it has been suggested that the exit tunnel is simply a convenient route of egress for the nascent chain, specific protein sequences serve to slow the rate of translation, suggesting some degree of interaction between the nascent peptide chain and the exit tunnel. To understand how the ribosome interacts with nascent peptide sequences, we synthesized and characterized a novel class of probe molecules. These peptide–macrolide (or “peptolide”) conjugates were designed to present unique peptide sequences to the exit tunnel. Biochemical and X-ray structural analyses of the interactions between these probes and the ribosome reveal interesting insights about the exit tunnel. Using translation inhibition and RNA structure probing assays, we find the exit tunnel has a relaxed preference for the directionality (N → C or C → N orientation) of the nascent peptides. Moreover, the X-ray crystal structure of one peptolide derived from a positively charged, reverse Nuclear Localization Sequence peptide, bound to the 70S bacterial ribosome, reveals that the macrolide ring of the peptolide binds in the same position as other macrolides. However, the peptide tail folds over the macrolide ring, oriented toward the peptidyl transferase center and interacting in a novel manner with 23S rRNA residue C2442 and His69 of ribosomal protein L4. These data suggest that these peptolides are viable probes for interrogating nascent peptide–exit tunnel interaction. PMID:25198768

  11. Mycoplasma genitalium Prevalence, Coinfection, and Macrolide Antibiotic Resistance Frequency in a Multicenter Clinical Study Cohort in the United States.

    PubMed

    Getman, Damon; Jiang, Alice; O'Donnell, Meghan; Cohen, Seth

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence rates of Mycoplasma genitalium infections and coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms and the frequency of a macrolide antibiotic resistance phenotype were determined in urogenital specimens collected from female and male subjects enrolled in a multicenter clinical study in the United States. Specimens from 946 subjects seeking care from seven geographically diverse clinical sites were tested for M. genitalium and for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis Sequencing was used to assess macrolide antibiotic resistance among M. genitalium-positive subjects. M. genitalium prevalence rates were 16.1% for females and 17.2% for males. Significant risk factors for M. genitalium infections were black race, younger age, non-Hispanic ethnicity, and female symptomatic status. Female M. genitalium infections were significantly more prevalent than C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections, while the M. genitalium infection rate in males was significantly higher than the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis infection rates. The macrolide-resistant phenotype was found in 50.8% of females and 42% of males. These results show a high prevalence of M. genitalium single infections, a lower prevalence of coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms, and high rates of macrolide antibiotic resistance in a diverse sample of subjects seeking care across a wide geographic area of the United States. PMID:27307460

  12. mef(A) is the predominant macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bley, Christine; van der Linden, Mark; Reinert, Ralf René

    2011-05-01

    In this study, macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Germany were carefully characterised by susceptibility testing, phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of macrolides resistance genes, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Of 2045 S. pneumoniae and 352 S. pyogenes isolates, 437 (21.4%) and 29 (8.2%), respectively, were found to be macrolide-resistant. Amongst the S. pneumoniae isolates, the most prevalent resistance marker was mef(A) (57.7%) followed by erm(B) (27.0%) and mef(E) (11.2%). Of note, the dual resistance mechanism mef(E)+erm(B) was found in a relatively high proportion (4.1%) of pneumococcal isolates. Amongst the S. pyogenes isolates, 31.0% carried mef(A), 34.5% erm(B) and 13.8% erm(A). Dissemination of a single clone [mef(A)-positive England(14)-9] has significantly contributed to the emergence of macrolide resistance amongst pneumococci in Germany.

  13. Mycoplasma genitalium Prevalence, Coinfection, and Macrolide Antibiotic Resistance Frequency in a Multicenter Clinical Study Cohort in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Alice; O'Donnell, Meghan; Cohen, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence rates of Mycoplasma genitalium infections and coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms and the frequency of a macrolide antibiotic resistance phenotype were determined in urogenital specimens collected from female and male subjects enrolled in a multicenter clinical study in the United States. Specimens from 946 subjects seeking care from seven geographically diverse clinical sites were tested for M. genitalium and for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis. Sequencing was used to assess macrolide antibiotic resistance among M. genitalium-positive subjects. M. genitalium prevalence rates were 16.1% for females and 17.2% for males. Significant risk factors for M. genitalium infections were black race, younger age, non-Hispanic ethnicity, and female symptomatic status. Female M. genitalium infections were significantly more prevalent than C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections, while the M. genitalium infection rate in males was significantly higher than the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis infection rates. The macrolide-resistant phenotype was found in 50.8% of females and 42% of males. These results show a high prevalence of M. genitalium single infections, a lower prevalence of coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms, and high rates of macrolide antibiotic resistance in a diverse sample of subjects seeking care across a wide geographic area of the United States. PMID:27307460

  14. Macrolide-peptide conjugates as probes of the path of travel of the nascent peptides through the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Washington, Arren Z; Benicewicz, Derek B; Canzoneri, Joshua C; Fagan, Crystal E; Mwakwari, Sandra C; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Dunham, Christine M; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2014-11-21

    Despite decades of research on the bacterial ribosome, the ribosomal exit tunnel is still poorly understood. Although it has been suggested that the exit tunnel is simply a convenient route of egress for the nascent chain, specific protein sequences serve to slow the rate of translation, suggesting some degree of interaction between the nascent peptide chain and the exit tunnel. To understand how the ribosome interacts with nascent peptide sequences, we synthesized and characterized a novel class of probe molecules. These peptide-macrolide (or "peptolide") conjugates were designed to present unique peptide sequences to the exit tunnel. Biochemical and X-ray structural analyses of the interactions between these probes and the ribosome reveal interesting insights about the exit tunnel. Using translation inhibition and RNA structure probing assays, we find the exit tunnel has a relaxed preference for the directionality (N → C or C → N orientation) of the nascent peptides. Moreover, the X-ray crystal structure of one peptolide derived from a positively charged, reverse Nuclear Localization Sequence peptide, bound to the 70S bacterial ribosome, reveals that the macrolide ring of the peptolide binds in the same position as other macrolides. However, the peptide tail folds over the macrolide ring, oriented toward the peptidyl transferase center and interacting in a novel manner with 23S rRNA residue C2442 and His69 of ribosomal protein L4. These data suggest that these peptolides are viable probes for interrogating nascent peptide-exit tunnel interaction.

  15. A CASE STUDY: CROP (LETTUCE, SPINACH, AND CARROTS) UPTAKE OF THREE MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS (AZITHROMYCIN, CLINDAMYCIN AND ROXITHROMYCIN) AND OTHER DRUGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that human-use macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, clindamycin, and roxithromycin) are environmentally available in wastewaters, source waters, and biosolids. In order to better understand the fate of these compounds into food crops via root migration, we condu...

  16. Macrolide Resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Detection Rate by Real-Time PCR in Primary and Tertiary Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Joo Hee; Oh, Ki Jin; Cho, Hyun Mi; Park, Soon Deok; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in primary and tertiary care hospitals and its macrolide resistance rate. Methods Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 195 pediatric patients in primary and tertiary care hospitals from October to November 2010. The AccuPower MP real-time PCR kit (Bioneer, Korea) was used for the detection of M. pneumoniae. Direct amplicon sequencing was performed to detect point mutations conferring resistance to macrolides in the 23S rRNA gene. Results Among the 195 specimens, 17 (8.7%) were M. pneumoniae positive, and 3 of the strains (17.6%) obtained from these 17 specimens displayed the A2063G mutation in 23S rRNA. Three macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae isolates were isolated from patients hospitalized at the primary care hospital. The positive rates of M. pneumoniae for the primary and tertiary care hospitals were 12.1% (15/124) and 2.8% (2/71), respectively (P=0.033). Conclusions The positive rate of M. pneumoniae in the primary care hospital was higher than that in the tertiary care hospital. Simultaneous detection of M. pneumoniae and macrolide-resistant mutation genes in the 23S rRNA by real-time PCR is needed for rapid diagnosis and therapy of M. pneumoniae infections. PMID:24205489

  17. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  18. Molecular mechanisms of quinolone, macrolide, and tetracycline resistance among Campylobacter isolates from initial stages of broiler production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, D; Herrera-León, S; García-Peña, F J; Abad-Moreno, J C; Echeita, M A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance mechanisms of quinolones, macrolides and tetracycline in campylobacter isolates from grandparent and parent broiler breeders in Spain. Twenty-six isolates were investigated for quinolone resistance, three isolates for macrolide resistance and 39 for tetracycline resistance. All of the quinolone-resistant isolates possessed the mutation Thr86Ile in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA and one isolate possessed the mutation Pro104Ser. Only one Campylobacter coli population (defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction of flaA and pulsed field gel electrophoresis) was resistant to erythromycin, and the mutation A2075G (23S rDNA) was responsible for macrolide resistance. The tetO gene was found in all of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. Twenty-two out of the 39 isolates investigated by Southern blot possessed chromosomic location of tetO and 17 were located on plasmids. Most of the plasmids with tetO were of around 60 kb and conjugation was demonstrated in a selection of them. In conclusion, we showed that Thr86Ile is highly prevalent in quinolone-resistant isolates as well as mutation A2075G in macrolide-resistant isolates of poultry origin. More variability was found for tetO. The possibility of horizontal transmission of tetO among campylobacter isolates is also an issue of concern in public health. PMID:24689432

  19. Molecular mechanisms of quinolone, macrolide, and tetracycline resistance among Campylobacter isolates from initial stages of broiler production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, D; Herrera-León, S; García-Peña, F J; Abad-Moreno, J C; Echeita, M A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance mechanisms of quinolones, macrolides and tetracycline in campylobacter isolates from grandparent and parent broiler breeders in Spain. Twenty-six isolates were investigated for quinolone resistance, three isolates for macrolide resistance and 39 for tetracycline resistance. All of the quinolone-resistant isolates possessed the mutation Thr86Ile in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA and one isolate possessed the mutation Pro104Ser. Only one Campylobacter coli population (defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction of flaA and pulsed field gel electrophoresis) was resistant to erythromycin, and the mutation A2075G (23S rDNA) was responsible for macrolide resistance. The tetO gene was found in all of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. Twenty-two out of the 39 isolates investigated by Southern blot possessed chromosomic location of tetO and 17 were located on plasmids. Most of the plasmids with tetO were of around 60 kb and conjugation was demonstrated in a selection of them. In conclusion, we showed that Thr86Ile is highly prevalent in quinolone-resistant isolates as well as mutation A2075G in macrolide-resistant isolates of poultry origin. More variability was found for tetO. The possibility of horizontal transmission of tetO among campylobacter isolates is also an issue of concern in public health.

  20. Ultratrace analysis of nine macrolides, including tulathromycin A (Draxxin), in edible animal tissues with minicolumn liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martos, Perry A; Lehotay, Steven J; Shurmer, Bryn

    2008-10-01

    The analysis of nine macrolides is presented, including tulathromycin A (Draxxin), in beef, poultry, and pork muscle with a simple multiresidue extraction and analysis method using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The sample preparation method involves extraction with acetonitrile and defatting with hexane followed by dilution of the extracts for analysis. Separation of the nine macrolides was performed using an Atlantis dC 18, 3 mum, 3.9 mm x 20 mm minicolumn (guard column). Detection was carried out with two multiple reaction monitoring experiments per macrolide. The method detection limits (MDLs) were based on three times standard deviation of eight repeat spikes at 3.0 ng/g of a mix of the nine macrolides in the various tissues. The MDLs and retention times for the macrolides were as follows: lincomycin, 0.19 ng/g (t R = 5.00 min); tulathromycin, 0.46 ng/g (t R = 5.63 min); spiramycin, 0.21 ng/g (t R = 6.06 min); pirlimycin, 0.10 ng/g (t R = 6.04 min); clindamycin, 0.16 ng/g (t R = 6.20 min); tilmicosin, 0.29 ng/g (t R = 6.38 min); erythromycin, 0.19 ng/g (t R = 6.62 min); tylosin, 0.10 ng/g (t R = 6.72 min); and josamycin, 0.09 ng/g (t R = 6.98 min). Precision at 25 ng/g (n = 4) ranged from 2.3 to 9.4% for the compounds from beef muscle. Of interest is the detection of incurred residues of tulathromycin A in edible calf tissue at 0.10-7 mug/g, which is presented here for the first time. PMID:18778062

  1. Effect of Fluoroquinolones and Macrolides on Eradication and Resistance of Haemophilus influenzae in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Tsuji, Brian T; Gent, Janneane F; Kong, Yong; Holden, Patricia N; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of antibiotics on eradication of carriage and development of resistance in Haemophilus influenzae in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our goals were to assess antibiotic susceptibilities, prevalence of resistance genes, and development of resistance in H. influenzae and to evaluate the effect of macrolide and fluoroquinolone administration on H. influenzae eradication. Data were from a 15-year longitudinal study of COPD. Genome sequence data were used to determine genotype and identify resistance genes. MICs of antibiotics were determined by reference broth microdilution. Generalized linear mixed models were used to evaluate associations between antibiotic use and H. influenzae eradication. We examined 267 H. influenzae isolates from 77 individuals. All newly acquired H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to azithromycin. Five of 27 (19%) strains developed 4-fold increases in azithromycin MICs and reached or exceeded the susceptibility breakpoint (≤4 μg/ml) during exposure. H. influenzae isolates were uniformly susceptible to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin (MIC90s of 0.015, 0.015, and 0.06, respectively); there were no mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. Fluoroquinolone administration was associated with increased H. influenzae eradication compared to macrolides (odds ratio [OR], 16.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.67 to 104.09). There was no difference in H. influenzae eradication when comparing macrolide administration to no antibiotic (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 0.43 to 8.30). Fluoroquinolones are effective in eradicating H. influenzae in individuals with COPD. Macrolides are ineffective in eradicating H. influenzae, and their use in COPD patients may lead to decreased macrolide susceptibility and resistance.

  2. In vitro effects of four macrolides (roxithromycin, spiramycin, azithromycin (CP-62,993), and A-56268) on Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.R.; Pechere, J.C.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of four macrolides against intracellular Toxoplasma gondii was determined in three different in vitro systems. Unactivated murine peritoneal macrophages were infected with the virulent RH strain of T. gondii. The activity of the macrolides was first measured with (/sup 3/H)uracil, which is incorporated by the parasite but not the host cell. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and 95% confidence limits were calculated at 54 (38 to 73), 140 (98 to 201), 147 (101 to 214), and 246 (187 to 325) micron for roxithromycin, azithromycin (CP-62,993), A-56268, and spiramycin, respectively. Inhibition of Toxoplasma growth was confirmed by microscopic examination of the infected macrophages after treatment with roxithromycin. Compared with untreated controls, roxithromycin concentrations near the IC50s decreased the number of infected cells, the number of tachyzoites per vacuole, and the number of cells containing rosettes (i.e., clusters of more than eight tachyzoites). After treatment with the four macrolides, tachyzoites were released from the macrophages and subcultured in HeLa cells, which are nonprofessional phagocytes, to assess the viability of the remaining parasites. This showed that the macrolides at concentrations corresponding to four times their 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC90s) had no significant killing effect. At 8 times the IC90, roxithromycin showed an incomplete killing effect, similar to that of the combination of pyrimethamine (0.41 microM)-sulfadiazine (99.42 microM). All macrolides tested showed inhibitory effects against intracellular T. gondii, but amounts of azithromycin and A-56268 corresponding to the IC90 appeared to be toxic against the host macrophages, which might have had nonspecific activity against Toxoplasma metabolism.

  3. In vitro susceptibility of Pythium insidiosum to macrolides and tetracycline antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Erico Silva; Mario, Débora Alves Nunes; Denardi, Laura Bedin; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Santurio, Janio Morais

    2011-07-01

    We describe the in vitro activity of macrolides and tetracycline antibiotics against Pythium insidiosum. The MICs were determined according to CLSI procedures (visual MIC) and by a colorimetric method [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)]. The lowest geometric mean (GM) MIC (MICs in μg/ml) (0.39 and 0.7 by visual reading and colorimetric method, respectively) and MIC ranges (0.125 to 2.0) were obtained for minocycline, while the highest MICs were shown for erythromycin (GM of 7.58 and 12.25 by visual reading and colorimetric method, respectively, and MIC ranged from 2 to 32). This significant in vitro activity makes these classes of antibiotics good candidates for experimental treatment of pythiosis. PMID:21537028

  4. In Vitro Susceptibility of Pythium insidiosum to Macrolides and Tetracycline Antibiotics ▿

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, Érico Silva; Mario, Débora Alves Nunes; Denardi, Laura Bedin; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Santurio, Janio Morais

    2011-01-01

    We describe the in vitro activity of macrolides and tetracycline antibiotics against Pythium insidiosum. The MICs were determined according to CLSI procedures (visual MIC) and by a colorimetric method [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)]. The lowest geometric mean (GM) MIC (MICs in μg/ml) (0.39 and 0.7 by visual reading and colorimetric method, respectively) and MIC ranges (0.125 to 2.0) were obtained for minocycline, while the highest MICs were shown for erythromycin (GM of 7.58 and 12.25 by visual reading and colorimetric method, respectively, and MIC ranged from 2 to 32). This significant in vitro activity makes these classes of antibiotics good candidates for experimental treatment of pythiosis. PMID:21537028

  5. Resistance to tetracycline, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, trimethoprim, and sulfonamide drug classes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C

    2002-03-01

    The discovery and use of antimicrobial agents in the last 50 yr has been one of medicine's greatest achievements. These agents have reduced morbidity and mortality of humans and animals and have directly contributed to human's increased life span. However, bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to these agents by mutations, which alter existing bacterial proteins, and/or acquisition of new genes, which provide new proteins. The latter are often associated with mobile elements that can be exchanged quickly across bacterial populations and may carry multiple antibiotic genes for resistance. In some case, virulence factors are also found on these same mobile elements. There is mounting evidence that antimicrobial use in agriculture, both plant and animal, and for environmental purposes does influence the antimicrobial resistant development in bacteria important in humans and in reverse. In this article, we will examine the genes which confer resistance to tetracycline, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS), trimethoprim, and sulfonamide. PMID:11936257

  6. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  7. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F.; Baldor, Linda C.; Howe, Alan K.; Ebert, Alicia M.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M.; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans. PMID:26271225

  8. Ecological approach of macrolide-lincosamides-streptogramin producing actinomyces from Cuban soils.

    PubMed

    González, I; Niebla, A; Lemus, M; González, L; Iznaga, I O; Pérez, M E; Vallin, C

    1999-09-01

    We report in this study the frequency of Streptomyces strains to produce macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics isolated from Cuban soils. The screening assay is based on the induction of MLS-resistance phenotype in a clinical isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus S-18. Our results suggest that of 800 Streptomyces strains isolated from different soil samples, 6% were positives in the screening test used. The ferralitic red soil from Pinar del Río (north) provided the major percentage (3.6%) of MLS producing strains. The other soil samples tested belonging to Guira de Melena and Bauta in Havana, Matanzas City, Topes De Collantes (Villa Clara), and Soroa Mountains (Pinar del Rio) hill reached very low percentages.

  9. Three new 16-membered macrolide compounds from a genetically engineered strain S. avermitilis MHJ1011.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jun-Jie; Wan, Xu; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Chen, An-Liang; Wang, Ji-Dong

    2016-07-15

    Three new 16-membered macrolide compounds, 13α-O-α-l-oleandrosyl milbemycin β3 (1), 13α-O-α-l-oleandrosyl-25-ethyl milbemycin β3 (2), 13α-O-α-l-oleandrosyl-25-isopropyl milbemycin β3 (3), were isolated from the genetically engineered strains Streptomyces avermitilis MHJ1011. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques as well as ESI-MS and comparison with data from the literature. Both compounds 1-3 displayed impressive acaricidal activity against larval mites with the IC50 values of 0.0327, 0.0276 and 0.0235mg/L, respectively, which are higher than those of 13α-hydroxy milbemycin β3 and 13α-hydroxy-25-ethyl milbemycin β3. PMID:27246617

  10. Visualizing the 16-membered ring macrolides tildipirosin and tilmicosin bound to their ribosomal site.

    PubMed

    Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Andersen, Niels M; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-08-17

    The veterinary antibiotic tildipirosin (20,23-dipiperidinyl-mycaminosyl-tylonolide, Zuprevo) was developed recently to treat bovine and swine respiratory tract infections caused by bacterial pathogens such as Pasteurella multocida. Tildipirosin is a derivative of the naturally occurring compound tylosin. Here, we define drug-target interactions by combining chemical footprinting with structure modeling and show that tildipirosin, tylosin, and an earlier tylosin derivative, tilmicosin (20-dimethylpiperidinyl-mycaminosyl-tylonolide, Micotil), bind to the same macrolide site within the large subunit of P. multocida and Escherichia coli ribosomes. The drugs nevertheless differ in how they occupy this site. Interactions of the two piperidine components, which are unique to tildipirosin, distinguish this drug from tylosin and tilmicosin. The 23-piperidine of tildipirosin contacts ribosomal residues on the tunnel wall while its 20-piperidine is oriented into the tunnel lumen and is positioned to interfere with the growing nascent peptide.

  11. Novonestmycins A and B, two new 32-membered bioactive macrolides from Streptomyces phytohabitans HBERC-20821.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhongyi; Fang, Wei; Shi, Liqiao; Wang, Kaimei; Zhang, Yani; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Zhaoyuan; Yang, Ziwen; Gu, Yucheng

    2015-03-01

    Two new 32-membered macrolide compounds, named Novonestmycins A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the soil strain Streptomyces phytohabitans HBERC-20821. Their structures were elucidated by using spectroscopic methods, including 1D, 2D-NMR and MS spectrometry. The two compounds showed strong activities against the phytophathogenic fungi Corynespora cassiicola, Rhizoctonia solani and Septoria nodorum, with MIC values of 0.78, 0.39 and 0.78 μg ml(-1), respectively. In addition, the two compounds exhibited potent inhibitory activities against four different human tumor cell lines as well as one 5-FU-resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, with IC50 of 0.15-0.48 μg ml(-1) and 0.24-1.34 μg ml(-1), respectively.

  12. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011-2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50-90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if the

  13. Gene set analysis of survival following ovarian cancer implicates macrolide binding and intracellular signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Song, Honglin; Bolton, Kelly L.; Fenstermacher, David; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y. Ann; Iversen, Ed; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sutphen, Rebecca; Gayther, Simon A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, have identified novel susceptibility loci. GWAS for survival after EOC have had more limited success. The association of each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) individually may not be well-suited to detect small effects of multiple SNPs, such as those operating within the same biological pathway. Gene set analysis (GSA) overcomes this limitation by assessing overall evidence for association of a phenotype with all measured variation in a set of genes. Methods To determine gene sets associated with EOC overall survival, we conducted GSA using data from two large GWASes (N cases = 2,813, N deaths = 1,116), with a novel Principal Component – Gamma GSA method. Analysis was completed for all cases and then separately for high grade serous (HGS) histological subtype. Results Analysis of the HGS subjects resulted in 43 gene sets with p<0.005 (1.7%); of these, 21 gene sets had p < 0.10 in both GWASes, including intracellular signaling pathway (p = 7.3 × 10−5) and macrolide binding (p = 6.2 ×10−4) gene sets. The top gene sets in analysis of all cases were meiotic mismatch repair (p=6.3 ×10−4) and macrolide binding (p=1.0×10−3). Of 18 gene sets with p<0.005 (0.7%), eight had p < 0.10 in both GWASes. Conclusion This research detected novel gene sets associated with EOC survival. Impact Novel gene sets associated with EOC survival might lead to new insights and avenues for development of novel therapies for EOC and pharmacogenomic studies. PMID:22302016

  14. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011–2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50–90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if

  15. Macrolides from a Marine-Derived Fungus, Penicillium meleagrinum var. viridiflavum, Showing Synergistic Effects with Fluconazole against Azole-Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Miki; Sugita, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Koyama, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-22

    Two new 13-membered macrolides (1, 7), along with known 13-membered macrolides PF1163A, B, D, H, and F (2-6), were isolated from a strain of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium meleagrinum var. viridiflavum. The structures of 1 and 7 were elucidated from spectroscopic data (NMR, MS, IR). Compounds 1-7 showed synergistic effects with fluconazole against azole-resistant Candida albicans by a checkerboard assay.

  16. Associations of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance with molecular typing in Streptococcus pyogenes from invasive infections, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Morozumi, Miyuki; Chiba, Naoko; Shouji, Michi; Iwata, Satoshi; Sakata, Hiroshi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the relationship between emm type and antibiotic resistance in 283 invasive group A streptococcal strains collected during surveillance from 2010 to 2012 was analysed. Strains were characterised by emm typing, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility. Resistance rates for macrolide antibiotics conferred by mef(A), erm(A) or erm(B) were high (54.4%). The most prevalent (40.3%) macrolide resistance mediated by mef(A) was present in 92.2% of emm1 strains. It was found that 53.3% of emm12 strains and 91.7% of emm28 strains had erm(A) or erm(B) genes. Intermediate resistance to fluoroquinolones caused by a mutation in parC was found in 14.1% of strains. Furthermore, three strains (1.1%) with high resistance caused by mutations in both parC and gyrA were detected. Fluoroquinolone resistance was present in various emm types.

  17. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationships of α-Amino-γ-lactone Ketolides: A Novel Class of Macrolide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of α-amino-γ-lactone ketolide (3) was developed, which provided a versatile intermediate for the incorporation of a variety of aryl and heteroaryl groups onto the C-21 position of clarithromycin via HBTU-mediated amidation. The biological data for this important new class of macrolides revealed significantly potent activity against erythromycin-susceptible strains as well as efflux-resistant and erythromycin MLSB-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes. In addition, ketolide 11o showed excellent in vitro antibacterial activity against H. influenzae strain as compared to telithromycin. These results indicate that C-21 substituted γ-lactone ketolides have potential as a next generation macrolide antibiotics. PMID:25313326

  18. Macrolide antibiotics for treatment of asthma in adults: a meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiang; Guo, Tingting; Liu, Sitong; Peng, Shifeng; Yan, Zhipeng; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Yonggang; Fan, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Mounting studies have been showed that long-term macrolides used in patients with asthma could improve the lung function and symptoms. However, a large number of studies have reported inconclusive results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of macrolide antibiotics in patients with asthma. We have performed a search in PubMed, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wanfang databases. The weighed mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) was used to evaluate the pooled effect. Statistical analysis was performed by STATA 11.0 software. Totally 1306 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The overall results indicated that statistically significance of long-term macrolides therapy in patients with asthma on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (WMD: 0.11, P < 0.01), peak expiratory flow (PEF) (SMD: 0.25, P = 0.001), airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) (SMD: 0.90, P = 0.04), forced vital capacity (FVC) (WMD: 0.18, P = 0.05) and FEV1/FVC (WMD: 1.93, P < 0.001), but no statistically significance on FEV1/predict, FVC/predict, symptom scores, quality of life scores (QOL), reliever inhaler puffs per 24 h, and cell counts in sputum and blood. The subgroup analysis indicated macrolides could increase FEV1 and PEF in Caucasian and Asian, decrease AHR in Caucasian, while cells counts of sputum improvement among Asian. Therefore, the study suggested that long-term marolides therapy in asthma may improved the FEV1, PEF, AHR, FVC, FEV1/FVC and cells counts in sputum, but it can't improve other lung function (FEV1/predict and FVC/predict) and clinical outcomes (such as symptom, quality of life etc.).

  19. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  20. Occurrence and fate of macrolide antibiotics in wastewater treatment plants and in the Glatt Valley watershed, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    McArdell, Christa S; Molnar, Eva; Suter, Marc J F; Giger, Walter

    2003-12-15

    An analytical method was developed for determining macrolide antibiotics in treated wastewater effluents and in ambient water based on solid-phase extraction and LC/MS analysis as well as on LC/MS/MS for structural confirmation. In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) macrolides are only partly eliminated and can therefore reach the aquatic environment. In treated effluents from three WWTPs in Switzerland, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, and erythromycin-H2O, the main degradation product of erythromycin, were found. The most abundant, clarithromycin, reflects the consumption pattern of macrolide antibiotics. Summer concentrations of clarithromycin varied between 57 and 330 ng/L in treated WWTP effluents. In the WWTP Kloten-Opfikon seasonal differences revealed a load two times higher in winter than in summer. The higher abundance of erythromycin-H2O in the effluent of WWTP Kloten-Opfikon can be explained by distinct consumption patterns due to the main international airport of Switzerland in the catchment area. In the Glatt River clarithromycin reached concentrations of up to 75 ng/L. Mass flux determinations in treated effluents and in river water in the Glatt Valley watershed showed that elimination of clarithromycin along the river stretch of 36 km is insignificant (<20%). Investigations in the Glatt River before and after the diversion of the largest WWTP revealed an observable decrease in clarithromycin loads.

  1. Use of next generation sequence to investigate potential novel macrolide resistance mechanisms in a population of Moraxella catarrhalis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Li; Li, Dong-Fang; Xu, He-Ping; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ge; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Gong, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Xin; Wu, Hong-Long; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have confirmed that 23S rRNA gene mutation could be responsible for most of macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis, a recent study suggested otherwise. Next generation sequence based comparative genomics has revolutionized the mining of potential novel drug resistant mechanisms. In this study, two pairs of resistant and susceptible M. catarrhalis isolates with different multilocus sequence types, were investigated for potential differential genes or informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identified genes and SNPs were evaluated in 188 clinical isolates. From initially 12 selected differential genes and 12 informative SNPs, 10 differential genes (mboIA, mcbC, mcbI, mboIB, MCR_1794, MCR_1795, lgt2B/C, dpnI, mcbB, and mcbA) and 6 SNPs (C619T of rumA, T140C of rplF, G643A of MCR_0020, T270G of MCR_1465, C1348A of copB, and G238A of rrmA) were identified as possibly linked to macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis. Most of the identified differential genes and SNPs are related to methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or DNA, especially MCR_0020 and rrmA. Further studies are needed to determine the function and/or evolution process, of the identified genes or SNPs, to establish whether some novel or combined mechanisms are truly involved in M. catarrhalis macrolide resistance mechanism. PMID:27774989

  2. The serum amyloid A response to sterile silver nitrate in mice and its inhibition by dexamethasone and macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Glojnaric, Ines; Cuzic, Snjezana; Erakovic-Haber, Vesna; Parnham, Michael J

    2007-12-01

    Serum amyloid A protein (SAA) is an acute phase protein, known to be a sensitive indicator of inflammation. We have characterized the time course of the SAA response and inflammatory reaction to silver nitrate injection s.c. in mice and studied the effects of dexamethasone and macrolide antibiotics. 2% Sterile silver nitrate solution was injected s.c. into female BALB/c mice and blood collected by capillary action from the tail vein of each mouse at different time points. Hematological variables were determined, albumin by spectrophotometry and SAA and cytokines by ELISA. Animals were treated with either a single i.p. dose of dexamethasone (5-30 mg/kg) 1 h after or daily oral doses of macrolide antibiotics for 3 days. SAA concentrations after silver nitrate injection peaked at 24 h, preceded by increases in serum IL-1 beta and IL-6, associated with decreases in blood leukocytes and local tissue inflammation. Single dexamethasone treatment and daily dosing for 3 days with azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin (20-80 mg/kg p.o.), but not erythromycin (100-150 mg/kg p.o.), inhibited the increase in SAA but with varying time courses. SAA, measured continuously, is a useful marker of sterile inflammation in mice and is differentially inhibited by macrolide antibiotics.

  3. Characterization of the polyene macrolide P450 epoxidase from Streptomyces natalensis that converts de-epoxypimaricin into pimaricin

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the antifungal agent pimaricin by Streptomyces natalensis has been proposed to involve a cytochrome P450 encoded by the gene pimD. Pimaricin is derived from its immediate precursor de-epoxypimaricin by epoxidation of the C-4–C-5 double bond on the macrolactone ring. We have overproduced PimD with a N-terminal His6 affinity tag in Escherichia coli and purified the enzyme for kinetic analysis. The protein showed a reduced CO-difference spectrum with a Soret maximum at 450 nm, indicating that it is a cytochrome P450. Purified PimD was shown to catalyse the in vitro C-4–C-5 epoxidation of 4,5-de-epoxypimaricin to pimaricin. The enzyme was dependent on NADPH for activity with optimal pH at 7.5, and the temperature optimum was 30 °C. The kcat value for the epoxidation of de-epoxypimaricin was similar to the values reported for other macrolide oxidases. Enzyme activity was inhibited at high substrate concentration. This is the first time that a polyene macrolide P450 mono-oxygenase has been expressed heterologously and studied. The unique specificity of this epoxidase should be useful for the oxidative modification of novel polyene macrolide antibiotics. PMID:15228385

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from multiple provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    KONG, Ling-Cong; GAO, Duo; JIA, Bo-Yan; WANG, Zi; GAO, Yun-Hang; PEI, Zhi-Hua; LIU, Shu-Ming; XIN, Jiu-Qing; MA, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has spread widely throughout the world via animal movement and has become an important pathogen of bovine respiratory disease. However, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials for Mycoplasma bovis have not been studied in China. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolated from young cattle with respiratory infection in China. Mycoplasma bovis was detected in 32/45 bovine respiratory infection outbreaks at beef farms in 8 provinces in China. The isolates were susceptible or had medium sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and doxycycline, but were frequently resistant to macrolides (13/32, 41%). An A2058G (Escherichia coli Numbering) mutation located in the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA was observed in strains that were resistant to macrolides. This single mutations at the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA may play an important role in the resistance of Mycoplasma bovis strains to macrolides. PMID:26346744

  5. Single-nucleotide polymorphism PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and determination of macrolide resistance in respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Ji, Misuk; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Oh, Ji-Min; Jo, Ji Yoon; Choi, Eun Hwa; Yoo, Soo Jin; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Mi-Na; Sung, Heungsup

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PCR assay to be performed directly on respiratory samples for the simultaneous detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and its 23S rRNA gene mutations, which are responsible for macrolide resistance. For multiplex SNP PCR, two outer primers for amplification of the 23S rRNA gene and two mutant-specific primers for the discrimination of single base changes were designed. A total of 73M. pneumoniae-positive samples and 100M. pneumoniae-negative samples were analyzed using this assay. By SNP PCR, we detected two mutations conferring high-level macrolide resistance in 22 samples (A2063G from 20 and A2064G from 2 samples); these results are identical to those produced by the 23S rRNA gene sequencing of M. pneumoniae-positive samples. Thus, this assay can be used as a practical method for the simultaneous detection of M. pneumoniae and mutations associated with macrolide resistance directly from respiratory samples. PMID:24780151

  6. Antibiotic Selection Pressure and Macrolide Resistance in Nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Cluster-Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Skalet, Alison H.; Cevallos, Vicky; Ayele, Berhan; Gebre, Teshome; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Jorgensen, James H.; Zerihun, Mulat; Habte, Dereje; Assefa, Yared; Emerson, Paul M.; Gaynor, Bruce D.; Porco, Travis C.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2010-01-01

    Background It is widely thought that widespread antibiotic use selects for community antibiotic resistance, though this has been difficult to prove in the setting of a community-randomized clinical trial. In this study, we used a randomized clinical trial design to assess whether macrolide resistance was higher in communities treated with mass azithromycin for trachoma, compared to untreated control communities. Methods and Findings In a cluster-randomized trial for trachoma control in Ethiopia, 12 communities were randomized to receive mass azithromycin treatment of children aged 1–10 years at months 0, 3, 6, and 9. Twelve control communities were randomized to receive no antibiotic treatments until the conclusion of the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from randomly selected children in the treated group at baseline and month 12, and in the control group at month 12. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from the swabs using Etest strips. In the treated group, the mean prevalence of azithromycin resistance among all monitored children increased from 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%–8.9%) at baseline, to 46.9% (37.5%–57.5%) at month 12 (p = 0.003). In control communities, azithromycin resistance was 9.2% (95% CI 6.7%–13.3%) at month 12, significantly lower than the treated group (p<0.0001). Penicillin resistance was identified in 0.8% (95% CI 0%–4.2%) of isolates in the control group at 1 year, and in no isolates in the children-treated group at baseline or 1 year. Conclusions This cluster-randomized clinical trial demonstrated that compared to untreated control communities, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal resistance to macrolides was significantly higher in communities randomized to intensive azithromycin treatment. Mass azithromycin distributions were given more frequently than currently recommended by the World Health Organization's trachoma program. Azithromycin use in this setting did

  7. Epidemiology and Molecular Characterization of Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, I-Wen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Wang, Hui-Ying; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Hsieh, Li-Yun; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2014-01-01

    Our multicenter nationwide surveillance data indicated that erythromycin (ERY) resistance among group A Streptococcus (GAS) isolates in Taiwan declined from 53.1% in 1998 and 2000 to 14.6% in 2002 and 2004 and 10.7% in 2006 to 2010 (P < 0.01). The present study aimed to assess the epidemiology of GAS in Taiwan and identify factors associated with ERY resistance. All 127 ERY-resistant (ERYr) isolates and 128 randomly selected ERY-susceptible (ERYs) isolates recovered from 1998 to 2010 were emm typed. ERYr isolates were also characterized by ERY resistance phenotype and mechanisms and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Multilocus sequence typing was performed on selected ERYr isolates. The predominant emm types in ERYr isolates were emm22 (n = 33, 26.0%), emm12 (n = 24, 18.9%), emm4 (n = 21, 16.5%), and emm106 (n = 15, 11.8%). In ERYs isolates, emm12 (n = 27, 21.9%), emm1 (n = 18, 14.1%), emm106 (n = 16, 12.5%), and emm11 (n = 9, 7.1%) predominated. The most common ERY resistance phenotype was the M phenotype (resistant to macrolides) (70.9%), with all but one isolate carrying mef(A), followed by the constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (cMLSB) phenotype (26.8%), with isolates carrying erm(B) or erm(TR). ERYr isolates of the emm12-sequence type 36 (ST36) lineage with the cMLSB phenotype were mostly present before 2004, while those of the emm22-ST46 lineage with the M phenotype predominated in later years. Recovery from respiratory (throat swab) specimens was an independent factor associated with ERY resistance. emm1 and emm11 GAS isolates were significantly associated with ERYs, while emm22 was detected only in ERYr GAS. In addition, emm106 isolates were prevalent among the abscess/pus isolates, whereas emm12 isolates were strongly associated with a respiratory (throat) origin. In addition to identifying factors associated with ERY resistance in GAS, our study provides helpful information on the changing GAS epidemiology in Taiwan. PMID

  8. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    SciTech Connect

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  9. Structure and Function of the Macrolide Biosensor Protein, MphR(A), with and without Erythromycin

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianting; Sagar, Vatsala; Smolinsky, Adam; Bourke, Chase; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Cropp, T. Ashton

    2009-09-02

    The regulatory protein MphR(A) has recently seen extensive use in synthetic biological applications, such as metabolite sensing and exogenous control of gene expression. This protein negatively regulates the expression of a macrolide 2{prime}-phosphotransferase I resistance gene (mphA) via binding to a 35-bp DNA operator upstream of the start codon and is de-repressed by the presence of erythromycin. Here, we present the refined crystal structure of the MphR(A) protein free of erythromycin and that of the MphR(A) protein with bound erythromycin at 2.00- and 1.76-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. We also studied the DNA binding properties of the protein and identified mutants of MphR(A) that are defective in gene repression and ligand binding in a cell-based reporter assay. The combination of these two structures illustrates the molecular basis of erythromycin-induced gene expression and provides a framework for additional applied uses of this protein in the isolation and engineered biosynthesis of polyketide natural products.

  10. Molecular epidemiology and genetic linkage of macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Burnens, A P; Frey, J; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J

    2001-03-20

    A collection of 77 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from dogs and cats in Switzerland was examined for resistance to erythromycin. Resistance profiles for 14 additional antibiotics were compared between erythromycin-resistant and susceptible isolates. A resistance prevalence of 27% for erythromycin was observed in the population under study. Complete correlation between resistance to erythromycin, and to spiramycin, streptomycin, and neomycin was observed. The erythromycin-resistant isolates all had a reduced susceptibility to clindamycin when compared to the erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Both constitutive and inducible resistance phenotypes were observed for clindamycin. Ribotyping showed that macrolide-aminoglycoside resistance was randomly distributed among unrelated strains. This suggests that this particular resistance profile is not related to a single bacterial clone but to the horizontal transfer of resistance gene clusters in S. intermedius populations. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were all carrying erm(B), but not erm(A), erm(C), or msr(A). The erm(B) gene was physically linked to Tn5405-like elements known as resistance determinants for streptomycin, streptothricin, neomycin and kanamycin. Analysis of the region flanking erm(B) showed the presence of two different groups of erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in the S. intermedius population examined and of elements found in Gram-positive species other than staphylococci. This strongly suggests that erm(B) or the whole erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in S. intermedius originate from other bacterial species, possibly from enterococci. PMID:11230937

  11. Evolution of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes over 14 years in an area of central Italy.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Raffaela; Morandi, Matteo; Zanchi, Alessandra; Tordini, Giacinta; Pozzi, Gianni; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated temporal fluctuations in macrolide resistance rates, analysing genetic determinants of resistance and clonal evolution in a population of 2744 S. pyogenes isolates collected in the period 2000-2013. The total resistance rate to erythromycin of the isolates was 17.9 %. A maximum of erythromycin resistance emerged in 2000 (38.6 %), followed by a significant decrease to 5.2 % in 2012 (P < 0.0001). Molecular analysis revealed the presence and co-presence of known genetic resistance determinants mefA, mefE, ermTR and ermB, in line with phenotypes. PFGE analysis identified genetically related groups in 2000 and 2007-2008, mainly the MLS and M phenotypes, respectively. The most prevalent emm types among a representative subset of resistant isolates were emm2, emm75 and emm77. All emm2 and 88.2 % of the strains harbouring the emm75 gene were only recorded in M-phenotype strains, whilst all emm77-positive strains had the inducible MLS phenotype. The analysed susceptible isolates showed several emm types partially shared with resistant ones. Our results suggest that changes in bacterial population clonality, rather than horizontal transfer of resistance determinants, plays a major epidemiological role in S. pyogenes. Continuous monitoring of microbiological epidemiology seems to be crucial for correct and effective management of streptococcal infections.

  12. Functional characterization of CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis and biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A.

    PubMed

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2015-06-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis contains 33 cytochrome P450 genes in its genome, many of which play important roles in the biosynthesis process of antimicrobial agents. Here, we characterized the biochemical function and structure of CYP107W1 from S. avermitilis, which is responsible for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C. CYP107W1 was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Purified proteins exhibited the typical CO-binding spectrum of P450. Interaction of oligomycin C and oligomycin A (12-hydroxylated oligomycin C) with purified CYP107W1 resulted in a type I binding with Kd values of 14.4 ± 0.7 μM and 2.0 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. LC-mass spectrometry analysis showed that CYP107W1 produced oligomycin A by regioselectively hydroxylating C12 of oligomycin C. Steady-state kinetic analysis yielded a kcat value of 0.2 min(-1) and a Km value of 18 μM. The crystal structure of CYP107W1 was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The overall P450 folding conformations are well conserved, and the open access binding pocket for the large macrolide oligomycin C was observed above the distal side of heme. This study of CYP107W1 can help a better understanding of clinically important P450 enzymes as well as their optimization and engineering for synthesizing novel antibacterial agents and other pharmaceutically important compounds. PMID:25849761

  13. Structural and biochemical studies of actin in complex with synthetic macrolide tail analogs

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose H.; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Moriarty, Nigel; Fink, Sarah J.; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Adams, Paul D.; Marriott, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The actin filament-binding and filament-severing activities of the aplyronine, kabiramide and reidispongiolide families of marine macrolides are located within the hydrophobic tail region of the molecule. Two synthetic tail analogs of aplyronine C (SF-01 and GC-04) are shown to bind to G-actin with kd values of 285 +/−33 nM and 132 +/−13 nM, respectively. The crystal structures of actin complexes with GC-04, SF-01 and kabiramide C reveal a conserved mode of tail binding within the cleft that forms between sub-domains (SD) 1 and 3. Our studies support the view that filament severing is brought about by specific binding of the tail region to the SD1/3 cleft on the upper protomer, which displaces loop-D from the lower protomer on the same half-filament. With previous studies showing that GC-04 analog can sever actin filaments, it is argued that the shorter complex lifetime of tail analogs with F-actin would make them more effective at severing filaments compared with plasma gelsolin. Structure-based analyses are used to suggest more reactive or targetable forms of GC-04 and SF-01, which may serve to boost the capacity of the serum actin scavenging system, to generate antibody conjugates against tumor cell antigens, and to reduce sputum viscosity in children with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25047814

  14. Macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance in lipophilic Corynebacteria inhabiting healthy human skin.

    PubMed

    Szemraj, Magdalena; Kwaszewska, Anna; Pawlak, Renata; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2014-10-01

    Corynebacteria exist as part of human skin microbiota. However, under some circumstances, they can cause opportunistic infections. The subject of the study was to examine the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotic resistance in 99 lipophilic strains of Corynebacterium genus isolated from the skin of healthy men. Over 70% of the tested strains were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. All of which demonstrated a constitutive type of MLSB resistance mechanism. In all strains, there were being investigated the erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(X), lin(A), msr(A), and mph(C) genes that could be responsible for the different types of resistance to marcolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B. In all strains with the MLSB resistance phenotype, the erm(X) gene was detected. None of the other tested genes were discovered. Strains harboring the erm(X) gene were identified using a phenotypic method based on numerous biological and biochemical tests. Identification of the chosen strains was compared with the results of API Coryne, MALDI-TOF MS, and 16S rDNA sequencing methods. Only 7 out of the 23 investigated resistant strains provided successful results in all the used methods, showing that identification of this group of bacteria is still a great challenge. The MLSB resistance mechanism was common in most frequently isolated from healthy human skin Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Corynebacterium jeikeium strains. This represents a threat as these species are also commonly described as etiological factors of opportunistic infections.

  15. Macrolide analog F806 suppresses esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by blocking β1 integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Yan; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Yang-Min; Liao, Lian-Di; Cao, Hui-Hui; Xu, Xiu-E; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Fa-Min; Zhang, Ying-Li; Du, Ze-Peng; Chen, Hong; Huang, Wei; Jia, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Xie, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2015-06-30

    The paucity of new drugs for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) limits the treatment options. This study characterized the therapeutic efficacy and action mechanism of a novel natural macrolide compound F806 in human ESCC xenograft models and cell lines. F806 inhibited growth of ESCC, most importantly, it displayed fewer undesirable side effects on normal tissues in two human ESCC xenograft models. F806 inhibited proliferation of six ESCC cells lines, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging from 9.31 to 16.43 μM. Furthermore, F806 induced apoptosis of ESCC cells, contributing to its growth-inhibitory effect. Also, F806 inhibited cell adhesion resulting in anoikis. Mechanistic studies revealed that F806 inhibited the activation of β1 integrin in part by binding to a novel site Arg610 of β1 integrin, suppressed focal adhesion formation, decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and eventually triggered apoptosis. We concluded that F806 would potentially be a well-tolerated anticancer drug by targeting β1 integrin, resulting in anoikis in ESCC cells.

  16. Immunosuppressive Interactions among Calcium Channel Antagonists and Selected Corticosteroids and Macrolides Using Human whole Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Fung-Sing; Jusko, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immunosuppressive interactions of calcium channel antagonists [diltiazem (Dil), verapamil (Ver) and nifedipine (Nif)], with corticosteroids [methylprednisolone (Mpl), prednisolone (Prd)], and macrolides [tacrolimus (Tac) and sirolnnus (Sir)] were examined in human whole blood lymphocyte cultures. Gender-related differences in responses in the interactions between these drug classes were studied using blood from 6 males and 6 females. The nature and intensity of interactions were determined using an extended Loewe additivity model. All immunosuppressants exhibited higher potency than the calcium channel antagonists with mean IC50 values of: Dil (mM)Ver (mM)Nif (mM)Mpl (nM)Prd (nM)Tac (nM)Sir (nM)Male13541.921312.118.6150327Female11431.847.44.68.8111106 Gender-related differences in responses to Mpl and Prd were observed while the others were not significant. Additive interactions were found among calcium channel antagonists and corticosteroids. Significant synergistic interactions were observed between calcium channel antagonists and tacrolimus and sirolimus, although these are unlikely to be of clinical importance. These studies demonstrate diverse drug interactions in the examination of an important array of immunosuppressant drug combinations. PMID:15681895

  17. Molecular epidemiology and genetic linkage of macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Burnens, A P; Frey, J; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J

    2001-03-20

    A collection of 77 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from dogs and cats in Switzerland was examined for resistance to erythromycin. Resistance profiles for 14 additional antibiotics were compared between erythromycin-resistant and susceptible isolates. A resistance prevalence of 27% for erythromycin was observed in the population under study. Complete correlation between resistance to erythromycin, and to spiramycin, streptomycin, and neomycin was observed. The erythromycin-resistant isolates all had a reduced susceptibility to clindamycin when compared to the erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Both constitutive and inducible resistance phenotypes were observed for clindamycin. Ribotyping showed that macrolide-aminoglycoside resistance was randomly distributed among unrelated strains. This suggests that this particular resistance profile is not related to a single bacterial clone but to the horizontal transfer of resistance gene clusters in S. intermedius populations. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were all carrying erm(B), but not erm(A), erm(C), or msr(A). The erm(B) gene was physically linked to Tn5405-like elements known as resistance determinants for streptomycin, streptothricin, neomycin and kanamycin. Analysis of the region flanking erm(B) showed the presence of two different groups of erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in the S. intermedius population examined and of elements found in Gram-positive species other than staphylococci. This strongly suggests that erm(B) or the whole erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in S. intermedius originate from other bacterial species, possibly from enterococci.

  18. Structural and Biochemical Studies of Actin in Complex with Synthetic Macrolide Tail Analogues

    DOE PAGES

    Pereira, Jose H.; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Fink, Sarah J.; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Adams, Paul D.; Marriott, Gerard

    2014-07-22

    The actin filament-binding and filament-severing activities of the aplyronine, kabiramide, and reidispongiolide families of marine macrolides are located within the hydrophobic tail region of the molecule. Two synthetic tail analogues of aplyronine C (SF-01 and GC-04) are shown to bind to G-actin with dissociation constants of (285±33) and (132±13) nM, respectively. The crystal structures of actin complexes with GC-04, SF-01, and kabiramide C reveal a conserved mode of tail binding within the cleft that forms between subdomains (SD) 1 and 3. Our studies support the view that filament severing is brought about by specific binding of the tail region tomore » the SD1/SD3 cleft on the upper protomer, which displaces loop-D from the lower protomer on the same half-filament. With previous studies showing that the GC-04 analogue can sever actin filaments, it is argued that the shorter complex lifetime of tail analogues with F-actin would make them more effective at severing filaments compared with plasma gelsolin. In conclusion, structure-based analyses are used to suggest more reactive or targetable forms of GC-04 and SF-01, which may serve to boost the capacity of the serum actin scavenging system, to generate antibody conjugates against tumor cell antigens, and to decrease sputum viscosity in children with cystic fibrosis.« less

  19. Structural and Biochemical Studies of Actin in Complex with Synthetic Macrolide Tail Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jose H.; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Fink, Sarah J.; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Adams, Paul D.; Marriott, Gerard

    2014-07-22

    The actin filament-binding and filament-severing activities of the aplyronine, kabiramide, and reidispongiolide families of marine macrolides are located within the hydrophobic tail region of the molecule. Two synthetic tail analogues of aplyronine C (SF-01 and GC-04) are shown to bind to G-actin with dissociation constants of (285±33) and (132±13) nM, respectively. The crystal structures of actin complexes with GC-04, SF-01, and kabiramide C reveal a conserved mode of tail binding within the cleft that forms between subdomains (SD) 1 and 3. Our studies support the view that filament severing is brought about by specific binding of the tail region to the SD1/SD3 cleft on the upper protomer, which displaces loop-D from the lower protomer on the same half-filament. With previous studies showing that the GC-04 analogue can sever actin filaments, it is argued that the shorter complex lifetime of tail analogues with F-actin would make them more effective at severing filaments compared with plasma gelsolin. In conclusion, structure-based analyses are used to suggest more reactive or targetable forms of GC-04 and SF-01, which may serve to boost the capacity of the serum actin scavenging system, to generate antibody conjugates against tumor cell antigens, and to decrease sputum viscosity in children with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Cytotoxic 14-Membered Macrolides from a Mangrove-Derived Endophytic Fungus, Pestalotiopsis microspora.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Dai, Haofu; Makhloufi, Gamall; Heering, Christian; Janiak, Christoph; Hartmann, Rudolf; Mándi, Attila; Kurtán, Tibor; Müller, Werner E G; Kassack, Matthias U; Lin, Wenhan; Liu, Zhen; Proksch, Peter

    2016-09-23

    Seven new 14-membered macrolides, pestalotioprolides C (2), D-H (4-8), and 7-O-methylnigrosporolide (3), together with four known analogues, pestalotioprolide B (1), seiricuprolide (9), nigrosporolide (10), and 4,7-dihydroxy-13-tetradeca-2,5,8-trienolide (11), were isolated from the mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora. Their structures were elucidated by analysis of NMR and MS data and by comparison with literature data. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was used to confirm the absolute configurations of 1, 2, and 10, while Mosher's method and the TDDFT-ECD approach were applied to determine the absolute configurations of 5 and 6. Compounds 3-6 showed significant cytotoxicity against the murine lymphoma cell line L5178Y with IC50 values of 0.7, 5.6, 3.4, and 3.9 μM, respectively, while compound 5 showed potent activity against the human ovarian cancer cell line A2780 with an IC50 value of 1.2 μM. Structure-activity relationships are discussed. Coculture of P. microspora with Streptomyces lividans caused a roughly 10-fold enhanced accumulation of compounds 5 and 6 compared to axenic fungal control. PMID:27556865

  1. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in assembly of MacAB-TolC macrolide transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2012-12-01

    MacB is a founding member of the Macrolide Exporter family of transporters belonging to the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily. These proteins are broadly represented in genomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are implicated in virulence and protection against antibiotics and peptide toxins. MacB transporter functions together with MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, which stimulates MacB ATPase. In Gram-negative bacteria, MacA is believed to couple ATP hydrolysis to transport of substrates across the outer membrane through a TolC-like channel. In this study, we report a real-time analysis of concurrent ATP hydrolysis and assembly of MacAB-TolC complex. MacB binds nucleotides with a low millimolar affinity and fast on- and off-rates. In contrast, MacA-MacB complex is formed with a nanomolar affinity, which further increases in the presence of ATP. Our results strongly suggest that association between MacA and MacB is stimulated by ATP binding to MacB but remains unchanged during ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also found that the large periplasmic loop of MacB plays the major role in coupling reactions separated in two different membranes. This loop is required for MacA-dependent stimulation of MacB ATPase and at the same time, contributes to recruitment of TolC into a trans-envelope complex. PMID:23057817

  2. Chemotherapeutic activity of liposomal SJA-95: a new polyene macrolide antibiotic in experimental aspergillosis and cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sandhya K; Naik, Suresh R

    2009-05-01

    The incidence of systemic fungal infections that has risen dramatically over the past three decades has propelled a continuous need for more potent antifungal drugs. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the chemotherapeutic activity of a new heptaene polyene macrolide antibiotic (SJA-95) and liposomal incorporated SJA-95 (lip. SJA-95) in a mouse model of aspergillosis and cryptococcosis respectively. Lip. SJA-95 was prepared in our laboratory by the proliposome method involving incorporation of the antifungal into the proliposome mixture and its subsequent conversion into a liposomal dispersion by a simple dilution step. Treatment with free SJA-95 and lip. SJA-95, both in aspergillosis and cryptococcosis, progressively prolonged the survival time and decreased the fungal loads in vital organs respectively. A higher LD(50) value of lip. SJA as compared to that of free SJA-95 was indicative of reduced toxicity of lip. SJA-95. Our findings suggest lip. SJA-95 treatment results in prolonged survival time, effective microbiological clearance and reduced toxicity that might help to establish its usefulness as a chemotherapeutic agent in systemic fungal infections with fewer adverse reactions.

  3. Assessing antibiotic sorption in soil: a literature review and new case studies on sulfonamides and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Wegst-Uhrich, Stacia R; Navarro, Divina Ag; Zimmerman, Lisa; Aga, Diana S

    2014-01-01

    The increased use of veterinary antibiotics in modern agriculture for therapeutic uses and growth promotion has raised concern regarding the environmental impacts of antibiotic residues in soil and water. The mobility and transport of antibiotics in the environment depends on their sorption behavior, which is typically predicted by extrapolating from an experimentally determined soil-water distribution coefficient (Kd). Accurate determination of Kd values is important in order to better predict the environmental fate of antibiotics. In this paper, we examine different analytical approaches in assessing Kd of two major classes of veterinary antibiotics (sulfonamides and macrolides) and compare the existing literature data with experimental data obtained in our laboratory. While environmental parameters such as soil pH and organic matter content are the most significant factors that affect the sorption of antibiotics in soil, it is important to consider the concentrations used, the analytical method employed, and the transformations that can occur when determining Kd values. Application of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry can facilitate accurate determination of Kd at environmentally relevant concentrations. Because the bioavailability of antibiotics in soil depends on their sorption behavior, it is important to examine current practices in assessing their mobility in soil.

  4. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus saprophyticus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Le Bouter, Anne; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics as well as to assess the molecular basis of this resistance amongst 72 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 in University Hospital of Caen (France). Of the 72 strains studied, 33 (45.8%) were resistant to at least one MLS antibiotic, including 24 (72.7%) with an M phenotype, 5 (15.2%) with an inducible MLS(B) phenotype, 3 (9.1%) with a combined M+L phenotype and 1 (3.0%) with an L phenotype. All isolates were susceptible to the combination of streptogramins A and B. The resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), msr(A) and lnu(A) were detected alone in 0, 0, 5 (15.2%), 24 (72.7%) and 1 (3.0%) of the 33 MLS-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas 2 strains (6.1%) were positive for both msr(A) and lnu(A). All msr(A)-positive isolates exhibited an M phenotype, whereas all five erm(C)-positive and all three lnu(A)-positive strains displayed, respectively, an inducible MLS(B) phenotype and an L phenotype with a positive Hodge test. Plasmid analysis indicated that erm(C) and lnu(A) genes were borne by small-size plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb), whereas larger plasmids (30-90 kb) harboured msr(A). In conclusion, these findings show a high prevalence of MLS resistance in S. saprophyticus, which was mainly associated with the presence of the msr(A) gene. Since S. saprophyticus colonises the gastrointestinal tract, it may constitute an unexpected reservoir for MLS resistance genes, in particular msr(A), amongst coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  5. Effect of macrolide usage on emergence of erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter isolates in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Yan, Meiguan; Sahin, Orhan; Pereira, Sonia; Chang, Yun-Juan; Zhang, Qijing

    2007-05-01

    In this work we conducted both in vitro and in vivo experiments to examine the development and mechanisms of erythromycin (Ery) resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. In vitro plating revealed that both Campylobacter species had similar but low spontaneous mutation frequencies (3 x 10(-9) to <5.41 x 10(-10)) for Ery resistance. Chickens infected with C. jejuni or C. coli were subjected to single or multiple treatments with medicated water containing tylosin (0.53 g/liter), which transiently reduced the level of Campylobacter colonization but did not select for Ery-resistant (Ery(r)) mutants in the treated birds. However, when tylosin was given to the chickens in feed at a growth-promoting dose (0.05 g/kg feed), Ery(r) mutants emerged in the birds after prolonged exposure to the antibiotic. The vast majority of the in vitro- and in vivo-selected Campylobacter mutants with Ery MICs of 8 to 256 microg/ml lacked the known resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA gene, while the highly resistant mutants (Ery MIC > 512 microg/ml) had the A2074G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Inactivation of CmeABC, a multidrug efflux pump, dramatically reduced the Ery MIC in all of the examined mutants regardless of the presence of the A2074G mutation. Together, these results reveal distinct features associated with Ery resistance development in Campylobacter, demonstrate the significant role of CmeABC in Ery resistance, and suggest that long-term use of a macrolide as a growth promoter selects for the emergence of Ery(r) Campylobacter in animal reservoirs. PMID:17353243

  6. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms.

  7. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms. PMID:27166215

  8. Detection of macrolide and disinfectant resistance genes in clinical Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major source of infections associated with indwelling medical devices. Many antiseptic agents are used in hygienic handwash to prevent nosocomial infections by Staphylococci. Our aim was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance to quaternary ammonium compound of 46 S. aureus strains and 71 CoNS. Methods S. aureus (n = 46) isolated from auricular infection and CoNS (n = 71), 22 of the strains isolated from dialysis fluids and 49 of the strains isolated from needles cultures were investigated. Erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and mef) were analysed by multiplex PCR and disinfectant-resistant genes (qacA, qacB, and qacC) were studied by PCR-RFLP. Results The frequency of erythromycin resistance genes in S. aureus was: ermA+ 7.7%, ermB+ 13.7%, ermC+ 6% and msrA+ 10.2%. In addition, the number of positive isolates in CoNS was respectively ermA+ (9.4%), ermB+ (11.1%), ermC+ (27.4%), and msrA+ (41%). The MIC analyses revealed that 88 isolates (74%) were resistant to quaternary ammonium compound-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC). 56% of the BC-resistant staphylococcus isolates have at least one of the three resistant disinfectants genes (qacA, qacB and qacC). Nine strains (7.7%) among the CoNS species and two S. aureus strains (2%) harboured the three-qac genes. In addition, the qacC were detected in 41 strains. Conclusions Multi-resistant strains towards macrolide and disinfectant were recorded. The investigation of antibiotics and antiseptic-resistant CoNS may provide crucial information on the control of nosocomial infections. PMID:22032892

  9. Clonal Spread of a Unique Strain of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Within a Single Family in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chironna, Maria; Loconsole, Daniela; De Robertis, Anna Lisa; Morea, Anna; Scalini, Egidio; Quarto, Michele; Tafuri, Silvio; Germinario, Cinzia; Manzionna, Mariano

    2016-03-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MR-MP) is an increasing problem worldwide. This study describes the clonal spread of a unique strain of MR-MP within a single family. On January 23, 2015, nasopharyngeal swabs and sputum samples were collected from the index case (a 9-year-old girl) in southern Italy. The patient had pneumonia and was initially treated with clarithromycin. MR-MP infection was suspected due to prolonged symptoms despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Two further cases of pneumonia occurred in relatives (a 7-year-old cousin and the 36-year-old mother of the index case); therefore, respiratory samples were also collected from other family members. Sequence analysis identified mutations associated with resistance to macrolides. Both P1 major adhesion protein typing and multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing were performed to assess the relatedness of the strains. The index case, the cousin, the mother, and another 4 family members (twin siblings of the index case, a 3-year-old cousin, and the grandmother) were positive for MR-MP. All strains harbored the mutation A2063G, had the same P1 subtype (1), and were MLVA (7/4/5/7/2) type Z. In addition, the index case's aunt (31 years of age and the probable source of infection) harbored an M pneumoniae strain with the same molecular profile; however, this strain was susceptible to macrolides. This cluster of MR-MP infection/carriage caused by a clonal strain suggests a high transmission rate within this family and highlights the need for increased awareness among clinicians regarding the circulation of MR-MP. Novel strategies for the treatment and prevention of M pneumoniae infections are required. PMID:26986172

  10. Efficacy of β-Lactam-plus-Macrolide Combination Therapy in a Mouse Model of Lethal Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Kajiwara, Chiaki; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Umeki, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Kadota, Jun-Ichi; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, for which Streptococcus pneumoniae is accepted as a leading cause. Although β-lactam-plus-macrolide combination therapy for this disease is recommended in several guidelines, the clinical efficacy of this strategy against pneumococcal pneumonia remains controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of β-lactam-plus-macrolide combination therapy on lethal mouse pneumococcal pneumonia and explored the mechanisms of action in vitro and in vivo We investigated survival, lung bacterial burden, and cellular host responses in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids obtained from mice infected with pneumonia and treated with ceftriaxone, azithromycin, or both in combination. Although in vitro synergy was not observed, significant survival benefits were demonstrated with combination treatment. Lung neutrophil influx was significantly lower in the ceftriaxone-plus-azithromycin-treated group than in the ceftriaxone-treated group, whereas no differences in the lung bacterial burden were observed on day 3 between the ceftriaxone-plus-azithromycin-treated group and the ceftriaxone-treated group. Notably, the analysis of cell surface markers in the ceftriaxone-plus-azithromycin combination group exhibited upregulation of presumed immune checkpoint ligand CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II in neutrophils and CD11b-positive CD11c-positive (CD11b(+) CD11c(+)) macrophages and dendritic cells, as well as downregulation of immune checkpoint receptors cytotoxic-T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 and programmed death 1 in T helper and T regulatory cells. Our data demonstrate that the survival benefits of ceftriaxone-plus-azithromycin therapy occur through modulation of immune checkpoints in mouse pneumococcal pneumonia. In addition, immune checkpoint molecules may be a novel target class for future macrolide research. PMID:27480866

  11. Clonal Spread of a Unique Strain of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Within a Single Family in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chironna, Maria; Loconsole, Daniela; De Robertis, Anna Lisa; Morea, Anna; Scalini, Egidio; Quarto, Michele; Tafuri, Silvio; Germinario, Cinzia; Manzionna, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MR-MP) is an increasing problem worldwide. This study describes the clonal spread of a unique strain of MR-MP within a single family. On January 23, 2015, nasopharyngeal swabs and sputum samples were collected from the index case (a 9-year-old girl) in southern Italy. The patient had pneumonia and was initially treated with clarithromycin. MR-MP infection was suspected due to prolonged symptoms despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Two further cases of pneumonia occurred in relatives (a 7-year-old cousin and the 36-year-old mother of the index case); therefore, respiratory samples were also collected from other family members. Sequence analysis identified mutations associated with resistance to macrolides. Both P1 major adhesion protein typing and multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing were performed to assess the relatedness of the strains. The index case, the cousin, the mother, and another 4 family members (twin siblings of the index case, a 3-year-old cousin, and the grandmother) were positive for MR-MP. All strains harbored the mutation A2063G, had the same P1 subtype (1), and were MLVA (7/4/5/7/2) type Z. In addition, the index case's aunt (31 years of age and the probable source of infection) harbored an M pneumoniae strain with the same molecular profile; however, this strain was susceptible to macrolides. This cluster of MR-MP infection/carriage caused by a clonal strain suggests a high transmission rate within this family and highlights the need for increased awareness among clinicians regarding the circulation of MR-MP. Novel strategies for the treatment and prevention of M pneumoniae infections are required. PMID:26986172

  12. Rapid and specific detection of Helicobacter pylori macrolide resistance in gastric tissue by fluorescent in situ hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Trebesius, K; Panthel, K; Strobel, S; Vogt, K; Faller, G; Kirchner, T; Kist, M; Heesemann, J; Haas, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The development of macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori is considered an essential reason for failure of antibiotic eradication therapies. The predominant mechanism of resistance to macrolides, particularly clarithromycin, is based on three defined mutations within 23S rRNA, resulting in decreased binding of the antibiotic to the bacterial ribosome.
AIM—To develop an rRNA based whole cell hybridisation method to detect Helicobacter species in situ within gastric tissue, simultaneously with its clarithromycin resistance genotype.
METHODS—A set of fluorescent labelled oligonucleotide probes was developed, binding either to H pylori 16S rRNA or 23S rRNA sequences containing specific point mutations responsible for clarithromycin resistance. After hybridisation and stringent washing procedures, labelling of intact single bacteria was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The new approach was compared with PCR based assays, histology, and microbiological culture.
RESULTS—In comparison with the phenotypic resistance measurement by E test, the genotypic clarithromycin resistance correlated perfectly (100%) for 35 H pylori isolates analysed. In a set of gastric biopsy specimens (27) H pylori infection was confirmed by histology (17/27) and correctly detected by whole cell hybridisation. Five clarithromycin resistant strains were identified in gastric tissue specimens directly. Furthermore, non-cultivable coccoid forms of H pylori were easily detectable by whole cell hybridisation.
CONCLUSIONS—Whole cell hybridisation of rRNA holds great promise for cultivation independent, reliable, and rapid (three hours) genotypic determination of clarithromycin resistance in H pylori. Compared with PCR techniques it is independent of nucleic acid preparations, not prone to inhibition, and allows semiquantitative visualisation of the bacteria within intact tissue samples.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; macrolide resistance; clarithromycin; in

  13. First Report of Macrolide Resistance Gene erm(T) Harbored by a Novel Small Plasmid from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Chun-Mei; Pan, Yun; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Lei, Chang-Wei; Peng, Lin-Yao; Li, Qing-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The macrolide resistance gene erm(T) was identified for the first time in a porcine Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolate from swine in China. The novel 3,749-bp small plasmid pER29, which carries erm(T), had a G+C content of 31% and four distinct open reading frames. The presence of pER29 increased by at least 128-fold the MICs of clindamycin and erythromycin for E. rhusiopathiae. The fitness cost of pER29 could be responsible for the low frequency of erm(T) in E. rhusiopathiae. PMID:25666150

  14. The New Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Gene erm(45) Is Located within a Genomic Island in Staphylococcus fleurettii

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Juliette R. K.; Schwendener, Sybille; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Genome alignment of a macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB)-resistant Staphylococcus fleurettii strain with an MLSB-susceptible S. fleurettii strain revealed a novel 11,513-bp genomic island carrying the new erythromycin resistance methylase gene erm(45). This gene was shown to confer inducible MLSB resistance when cloned into Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(45)-containing island was integrated into the housekeeping gene guaA in S. fleurettii and was able to form a circular intermediate but was not transmissible to S. aureus. PMID:25779586

  15. Time-to-Detection of Inducible Macrolide Resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus Subspecies and Its Association with the Erm(41) Sequevar

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Sara; Grierson, William; Kein, Daniel; Tyler, Andrea D.; Wolfe, Joyce; Sharma, Meenu K.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the erm(41) gene of M.abscessus group organisms are associated with differences in inducible macrolide resistance, with current recommendations being to hold rapidly growing isolates for up to 14 days in order to ensure that resistance which develops more slowly can be detected. This study aimed to determine the ideal incubation time for accurate identification of inducible macrolide resistance as well as to determine if there was an association between the time taken to detect inducible resistance in M.abscessus group organisms and their erm(41) sequevar. We amplified and sequenced the erm(41) genes of a total of 104 M.abscessus group isolates and determined their sequevars. The isolates were tested for phenotypic clarithromycin resistance at days 7, 10, 14 and 21, using Trek Diagnostics Sensititre RAPMYCO microbroth dilution plates. Associations between erm(41) gene sequevars and time to detection of resistance were evaluated using Fisher’s exact test in R. The samples included in this study fell into 14 sequevars, with the majority of samples falling into Sequevar02 (16), Sequevar06 (15), Sequevar08 (7) and Sequvar 15 (31), and several isolates that were in small clusters, or unique. The majority (82.7%) of samples exhibiting inducible macrolide resistance were interpreted as resistant by day 7. Two isolates in Sequevar02, which has a T28C mutation that is associated with sensitivity, showed intermediate resistance at day 14, though the majority (13) were sensitive at day 14. The majority of isolates with inducible macrolide resistance fell into Sequevars 06,08 and 15, none of which contain the T28C mutation. These sequevars were analyzed to determine if there was any correlation between sequevar and time to detection of resistance. None was found. Based on these findings, we recommend the addition of a day 7 read to the CLSI guidelines to improve turn-around-times for these isolates. It is also recommended that erm(41) gene sequencing be added to

  16. Time-to-Detection of Inducible Macrolide Resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus Subspecies and Its Association with the Erm(41) Sequevar.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Sara; Grierson, William; Kein, Daniel; Tyler, Andrea D; Wolfe, Joyce; Sharma, Meenu K

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the erm(41) gene of M.abscessus group organisms are associated with differences in inducible macrolide resistance, with current recommendations being to hold rapidly growing isolates for up to 14 days in order to ensure that resistance which develops more slowly can be detected. This study aimed to determine the ideal incubation time for accurate identification of inducible macrolide resistance as well as to determine if there was an association between the time taken to detect inducible resistance in M.abscessus group organisms and their erm(41) sequevar. We amplified and sequenced the erm(41) genes of a total of 104 M.abscessus group isolates and determined their sequevars. The isolates were tested for phenotypic clarithromycin resistance at days 7, 10, 14 and 21, using Trek Diagnostics Sensititre RAPMYCO microbroth dilution plates. Associations between erm(41) gene sequevars and time to detection of resistance were evaluated using Fisher's exact test in R. The samples included in this study fell into 14 sequevars, with the majority of samples falling into Sequevar02 (16), Sequevar06 (15), Sequevar08 (7) and Sequvar 15 (31), and several isolates that were in small clusters, or unique. The majority (82.7%) of samples exhibiting inducible macrolide resistance were interpreted as resistant by day 7. Two isolates in Sequevar02, which has a T28C mutation that is associated with sensitivity, showed intermediate resistance at day 14, though the majority (13) were sensitive at day 14. The majority of isolates with inducible macrolide resistance fell into Sequevars 06,08 and 15, none of which contain the T28C mutation. These sequevars were analyzed to determine if there was any correlation between sequevar and time to detection of resistance. None was found. Based on these findings, we recommend the addition of a day 7 read to the CLSI guidelines to improve turn-around-times for these isolates. It is also recommended that erm(41) gene sequencing be added to

  17. Determination of Macrolide Antibiotics Using Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Thomas C.; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2012-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of macrolide antibiotics using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection was developed. Acetone and dichloromethane were used as the disperser solvent and extraction solvent, respectively. A mixture of extraction solvent and disperser solvent were rapidly injected into a 1.0 mL aqueous sample to form a cloudy solution. After the extraction, macrolide antibiotics were detected using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI/MS) with colloidal silver as the matrix. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 2, 3, 3, and 2 nM for erythromycin (ERY), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TILM), and tylosin (TYL), respectively. This developed method was successfully applied to the determination of macrolide antibiotics in human urine samples.

  18. Fermentation, isolation, purification and biological activity of SJA-95, a heptaene polyene macrolide antibiotic produced by the Streptomyces sp. strain S24.

    PubMed

    Naik, Suresh R; Desai, Sandhya K; Nanda, Rabindra K; Narayanan, Mangalam S

    2007-01-01

    A new strain, Streptomyces sp. S24 was isolated from a soil sample collected from Japan. Preliminary morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical studies on this strain were carried out. Under submerged culture conditions the strain produced heptaene polyene macrolide (SJA-95), which elicits promising antifungal activity in vitro against yeasts, filamentous fungi including clinical isolates and plant pathogens. Its antifungal activity is comparable to that of hamycin and amphotericin B. SJA-95 was found to be toxic when given by the parenteral route in mice and not absorbed by the oral route like other polyene heptaene macrolides. The physicochemical data, spectral studies and elemental analysis suggest that SJA-95 is a polyene macrolide antibiotic. However, the chemical structure needs to be elucidated by further spectroscopic studies viz. 13C NMR, FEB-MS, EL MS and other tests.

  19. Inducible Expression of both ermB and ermT Conferred High Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus Isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Meixia; Cai, Chao; Chen, Juan; Cheng, Changwei; Cheng, Guofu; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus is an under-recognized pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in humans. Despite increasing recognition of this subspecies as a cause for human infectious diseases, limited information is known about its antibiotic resistance mechanism. In this study, we aim to identify the molecular mechanism underlying the high macrolide resistance of six S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates from dead ducklings collected in several natural outbreaks in China during 2010-2013. All isolates exhibited multi-drug resistance including high macrolide resistance (MIC ≥ 1024 mg/L for erythromycin, and 512 mg/L for clarithromycin). Efflux-encoding mefA and mefE genes were not detectable in these isolates. The presence of 23S rRNA mutations in specific isolates did not significantly change macrolide MICs. No nucleotide substitutions were found in genes encoding ribosomal proteins L4 or L22. The ermB and ermT genes were found in the genomes of all isolates. These two genes were acquired independently in one highly virulent isolate AL101002, and clustered with Tn916 and IS1216, respectively. The expression of both ermB and ermT in all isolates was erythromycin inducible and yielded comparable macrolide MICs in all six isolates. Taken together, inducible expression of both ermB and ermT conferred high macrolide resistance in these S. gallolyticus subsp. pasterianus isolates. Our findings reveal new macrolide resistance features in S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus by both ermB and ermT. PMID:27669217

  20. Inducible Expression of both ermB and ermT Conferred High Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus Isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Meixia; Cai, Chao; Chen, Juan; Cheng, Changwei; Cheng, Guofu; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-09-22

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus is an under-recognized pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in humans. Despite increasing recognition of this subspecies as a cause for human infectious diseases, limited information is known about its antibiotic resistance mechanism. In this study, we aim to identify the molecular mechanism underlying the high macrolide resistance of six S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates from dead ducklings collected in several natural outbreaks in China during 2010-2013. All isolates exhibited multi-drug resistance including high macrolide resistance (MIC ≥ 1024 mg/L for erythromycin, and 512 mg/L for clarithromycin). Efflux-encoding mefA and mefE genes were not detectable in these isolates. The presence of 23S rRNA mutations in specific isolates did not significantly change macrolide MICs. No nucleotide substitutions were found in genes encoding ribosomal proteins L4 or L22. The ermB and ermT genes were found in the genomes of all isolates. These two genes were acquired independently in one highly virulent isolate AL101002, and clustered with Tn916 and IS1216, respectively. The expression of both ermB and ermT in all isolates was erythromycin inducible and yielded comparable macrolide MICs in all six isolates. Taken together, inducible expression of both ermB and ermT conferred high macrolide resistance in these S. gallolyticus subsp. pasterianus isolates. Our findings reveal new macrolide resistance features in S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus by both ermB and ermT.

  1. In Vitro Activity of the New Ketolide Telithromycin Compared with Those of Macrolides against Streptococcus pyogenes: Influences of Resistance Mechanisms and Methodological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bemer-Melchior, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Tassin, Sandrine; Bryskier, Andre; Schito, Gian Carlo; Drugeon, Henri-B.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes, 80 susceptible to macrolides and 27 resistant to erythromycin A (MIC >0.5 μg/ml), were examined. The erythromycin A-lincomycin double-disk test assigned 7 resistant strains to the M-phenotype, 8 to the inducible macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance (iMLSB) phenotype, and 12 to the constitutive MLSB resistance (cMLSB) phenotype. MICs of erythromycin A, clarithromycin, azithromycin, roxithromycin, and clindamycin were determined by a broth microdilution method. MICs of telithromycin were determined by three different methods (broth microdilution, agar dilution, and E-test methods) in an ambient air atmosphere and in a 5 to 6% CO2 atmosphere. Erythromycin A resistance genes were investigated by PCR in the 27 erythromycin A-resistant isolates. MICs of erythromycin A and clindamycin showed six groups of resistant strains, groups A to F. iMLSB strains (A, B, and D groups) are characterized by two distinct patterns of resistance correlated with genotypic results. A- and B-group strains were moderately resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and highly susceptible to telithromycin. All A- and B-group isolates harbored erm TR gene, D-group strains, highly resistant to macrolides and intermediately resistant to telithromycin (MICs, 1 to 16 μg/ml), were all characterized by having the ermB gene. All M-phenotype isolates (C group), resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and susceptible to clindamycin and telithromycin, harbored the mefA gene. All cMLSB strains (E and F groups) with high level of resistance to macrolides, lincosamide, and telithromycin had the ermB gene. The effect of 5 to 6% CO2 was remarkable on resistant strains, by increasing MICs of telithromycin from 1 to 6 twofold dilutions against D-E- and F-group isolates. PMID:11036012

  2. Inducible Expression of both ermB and ermT Conferred High Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meixia; Cai, Chao; Chen, Juan; Cheng, Changwei; Cheng, Guofu; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus is an under-recognized pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in humans. Despite increasing recognition of this subspecies as a cause for human infectious diseases, limited information is known about its antibiotic resistance mechanism. In this study, we aim to identify the molecular mechanism underlying the high macrolide resistance of six S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates from dead ducklings collected in several natural outbreaks in China during 2010–2013. All isolates exhibited multi-drug resistance including high macrolide resistance (MIC ≥ 1024 mg/L for erythromycin, and 512 mg/L for clarithromycin). Efflux-encoding mefA and mefE genes were not detectable in these isolates. The presence of 23S rRNA mutations in specific isolates did not significantly change macrolide MICs. No nucleotide substitutions were found in genes encoding ribosomal proteins L4 or L22. The ermB and ermT genes were found in the genomes of all isolates. These two genes were acquired independently in one highly virulent isolate AL101002, and clustered with Tn916 and IS1216, respectively. The expression of both ermB and ermT in all isolates was erythromycin inducible and yielded comparable macrolide MICs in all six isolates. Taken together, inducible expression of both ermB and ermT conferred high macrolide resistance in these S. gallolyticus subsp. pasterianus isolates. Our findings reveal new macrolide resistance features in S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus by both ermB and ermT. PMID:27669217

  3. Treponema pallidum pallidum Genotypes and Macrolide Resistance Status in Syphilitic Lesions among Patients at 2 Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Antonio; Vargas, Silver Keith; Leon, Segundo Ramos; Perez, Danny Giancarlo; Ramos, Lourdes Beatriz; Chow, Jeremy; Konda, Kelika Anne; Calvo, Gino Mauricio; Salvatierra, Hector J; Klaussner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We report the circulating genotypes and the frequency of macrolide-resistance patterns among Treponema pallidum pallidum DNA isolated from syphilitic lesions from patients who attended 2 sexual health clinics in Lima, Peru. We implemented and used a molecular typing scheme to describe local T. pallidum pallidum strains. Among 14 specimens, subtype 14d/f was the most prevalent strain in 7 fully typed T. pallidum DNA specimens obtained from men who have sex with men and transgender women presenting with chancre-like lesions. No macrolide-resistance mutations were found in T. pallidum DNA from 10 lesions. PMID:27322050

  4. Treponema pallidum pallidum Genotypes and Macrolide Resistance Status in Syphilitic Lesions among Patients at 2 Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Antonio; Vargas, Silver Keith; Leon, Segundo Ramos; Perez, Danny Giancarlo; Ramos, Lourdes Beatriz; Chow, Jeremy; Konda, Kelika Anne; Calvo, Gino Mauricio; Salvatierra, Hector J; Klaussner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We report the circulating genotypes and the frequency of macrolide-resistance patterns among Treponema pallidum pallidum DNA isolated from syphilitic lesions from patients who attended 2 sexual health clinics in Lima, Peru. We implemented and used a molecular typing scheme to describe local T. pallidum pallidum strains. Among 14 specimens, subtype 14d/f was the most prevalent strain in 7 fully typed T. pallidum DNA specimens obtained from men who have sex with men and transgender women presenting with chancre-like lesions. No macrolide-resistance mutations were found in T. pallidum DNA from 10 lesions.

  5. Timcodar (VX-853) Is a Non-FKBP12 Binding Macrolide Derivative That Inhibits PPARγ and Suppresses Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Lucien; Sanchez, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient overload and genetic factors have led to a worldwide epidemic of obesity that is the underlying cause of diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we used macrolide drugs such as FK506, rapamycin, and macrolide derived, timcodar (VX-853), to determine their effects on lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Rapamycin and FK506 bind to FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), such as FKBP12, which causes suppression of the immune system and inhibition of mTOR. Rapamycin has been previously reported to inhibit the adipogenic process and lipid accumulation. However, rapamycin treatment in rodents caused immune suppression and glucose resistance, even though the mice lost weight. Here we show that timcodar (1 μM), a non-FKBP12-binding drug, significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. A comparison of the same concentration of timcodar (1 μM) and rapamycin (1 μM) showed that both are inhibitors of lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Importantly, timcodar potently (p < 0.01) suppressed transcriptional regulators of adipogenesis, PPARγ and C/EBPα, resulting in the inhibition of genes involved in lipid accumulation. These studies set the stage for timcodar as a possible antiobesity therapy, which is rapidly emerging as a pandemic. PMID:27190501

  6. Cytotoxic Halogenated Macrolides and Modified Peptides from the Apratoxin-Producing Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from Guam

    PubMed Central

    Matthew, Susan; Salvador, Lilibeth A.; Schupp, Peter J.; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Collections of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from shallow patch reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam, afforded three hitherto undescribed analogues of the glycosidic macrolide lyngbyaloside, namely 2-epi-lyngbyaloside (1) and the regioisomeric 18E- and 18Z–lyngbyalosides C (2 and 3). Concurrently we discovered two new analogues of the cytoskeletal actin-disrupting lyngbyabellins, 27-deoxylyngbyabellin A (4) and lyngbyabellin J (5), a novel macrolide of the laingolide family, laingolide B (6), and a linear modified peptide, lyngbyapeptin D (7), along with known lyngbyabellins A and B, lyngbyapeptin A, and lyngbyaloside. The structures of 1–7 were elucidated by a combination of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analysis. Compounds 1–6 were either brominated (1–3) or chlorinated (4–6), consistent with halogenation being a hallmark of many marine natural products. All extracts derived from these L. bouillonii collections were highly cytotoxic due to the presence of apratoxin A or also apratoxin C. Compounds 1–5 showed weak to moderate cytotoxicity to HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. PMID:20704304

  7. Cytotoxic halogenated macrolides and modified peptides from the apratoxin-producing marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from Guam.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Susan; Salvador, Lilibeth A; Schupp, Peter J; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-09-24

    Collections of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from shallow patch reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam, afforded three hitherto undescribed analogues of the glycosidic macrolide lyngbyaloside, namely, 2-epi-lyngbyaloside (1) and the regioisomeric 18E- and 18Z-lyngbyalosides C (2 and 3). Concurrently we discovered two new analogues of the cytoskeletal actin-disrupting lyngbyabellins, 27-deoxylyngbyabellin A (4) and lyngbyabellin J (5), a novel macrolide of the laingolide family, laingolide B (6), and a linear modified peptide, lyngbyapeptin D (7), along with known lyngbyabellins A and B, lyngbyapeptin A, and lyngbyaloside. The structures of 1-7 were elucidated by a combination of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analysis. Compounds 1-6 were either brominated (1-3) or chlorinated (4-6), consistent with halogenation being a hallmark of many marine natural products. All extracts derived from these L. bouillonii collections were highly cytotoxic due to the presence of apratoxin A or apratoxin C. Compounds 1-5 showed weak to moderate cytotoxicity to HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

  8. Immunosuppressive macrolides of the type FK 506: a novel class of topical agents for treatment of skin diseases?

    PubMed

    Meingassner, J G; Stütz, A

    1992-06-01

    The immunosuppressive macrolide antibiotics FK 506 and rapamycin were tested for topical activity in experimental allergic contact dermatitis of farm pigs. This species was used because pig skin, in comparison to rodent skin, resembles human skin more closely. For comparison, cyclosporine A (CyA), which is orally but not topically active in patients with skin disease, dexamethasone, and clobetasol propionate were used. Treatment was performed twice, 30 min and 6 h after elicitation of challenge reaction. Topical application of 0.4 to 0.04% FK 506 caused a pronounced inhibition of inflammatory skin reactions of hypersensitivity to dinitrofluorobenzene. The treatment response was similar to the activity of 0.13% clobetasole. Dexamethasone (1.2%) was less active than clobetasol. In contrast, rapamycin and CyA were inactive at concentrations of 1.2 and 10%, respectively. Because the pig data on corticosteroids and cyclosporine A are in agreement with clinical findings, these studies indicate that immunosuppressive macrolides of the type FK 506 may be useful drugs for the topical treatment of human skin diseases that respond to local corticosteroids and oral treatment with cyclosporine A.

  9. Boosting Effect of 2-Phenylquinoline Efflux Inhibitors in Combination with Macrolides against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Cannalire, Rolando; Santos Costa, Sofia; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Sabatini, Stefano

    2015-12-11

    The identification of efflux inhibitors to be used as adjuvants alongside existing drug regimens could have a tremendous value in the treatment of any mycobacterial infection. Here, we investigated the ability of four 2-(4'-propoxyphenyl)quinoline Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux inhibitors (1-4) to reduce the efflux activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium strains. All four compounds were able to inhibit efflux pumps in both mycobacterial species; in particular, O-ethylpiperazinyl derivative 2 showed an efflux inhibitory activity comparable to that of verapamil, the most potent mycobacterial efflux inhibitor reported to date, and was able to significantly reduce the MIC values of macrolides against different M. avium strains. The contribution of the M. avium efflux pumps MAV_1406 and MAV_1695 to clarithromycin resistance was proved because they were found to be overexpressed in two M. avium 104 isogenic strains showing high-level clarithromycin resistance. These results indicated a correlation between increased expression of efflux pumps, increased efflux, macrolide resistance, and reduction of resistance by efflux pump inhibitors such as compound 2. Additionally, compound 2 showed synergistic activity with clarithromycin, at a concentration below the cytotoxicity threshold, in an ex vivo experiment against M. avium 104-infected macrophages. In summary, the 2-(4'-propoxyphenyl)quinoline scaffold is suitable to obtain compounds endowed with good efflux pump inhibitory activity against both S. aureus and nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:27623057

  10. Paenimacrolidin, a novel macrolide antibiotic from Paenibacillus sp. F6-B70 active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Chang; Qian, Chao-Dong; Fang, Hai-Huan; Wen, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Zhan, Zha-Jun; Ding, Rui; Li, Ou; Gao, Haichun

    2011-07-01

    Paenibacillus sp. F6-B70 was selected from several dozens of isolates with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using a 16S rDNA-based screening method. F6-B70 contained polyketide synthase (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) clusters in its genome revealed by PCR amplification of conserved adenylation and ketosynthase (KS) domains. Phylogenetic data suggested that the strain hosts trans-AT PKSs and their product may be a branched molecule. An antibiotic was subsequently isolated from the methanol extract of F6-B70 cells. The molecular formula of the antibiotic was deduced to be C(33) H(50) NaO(6) ([M + Na](+) , m/z 565.3505) by analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectral data. Elucidation of the structure by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy revealed that the active compound, paenimacrolidin (PAM), was a novel 22-membered macrolide with side-chains. The new antibiotic, mainly as a bacteriostatic agent, inhibits a couple of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus sp. strains. The antibiotic capacity of PAM was compromised by its instability, which can be overcome significantly with addition of an anti-oxidant. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of an active macrolide from paenibacilli, which may be a promising source of novel antibiotics.

  11. Timcodar (VX-853) Is a Non-FKBP12 Binding Macrolide Derivative That Inhibits PPARγ and Suppresses Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Terry D; John, Kezia; McBeth, Lucien; Trabbic, Christopher J; Sanchez, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient overload and genetic factors have led to a worldwide epidemic of obesity that is the underlying cause of diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we used macrolide drugs such as FK506, rapamycin, and macrolide derived, timcodar (VX-853), to determine their effects on lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Rapamycin and FK506 bind to FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), such as FKBP12, which causes suppression of the immune system and inhibition of mTOR. Rapamycin has been previously reported to inhibit the adipogenic process and lipid accumulation. However, rapamycin treatment in rodents caused immune suppression and glucose resistance, even though the mice lost weight. Here we show that timcodar (1 μM), a non-FKBP12-binding drug, significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. A comparison of the same concentration of timcodar (1 μM) and rapamycin (1 μM) showed that both are inhibitors of lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Importantly, timcodar potently (p < 0.01) suppressed transcriptional regulators of adipogenesis, PPARγ and C/EBPα, resulting in the inhibition of genes involved in lipid accumulation. These studies set the stage for timcodar as a possible antiobesity therapy, which is rapidly emerging as a pandemic. PMID:27190501

  12. Macrolide antibiotics removal using a circulating TiO2-coated paper photoreactor: parametric study and hydrodynamic flow characterization.

    PubMed

    Ounnar, Amel; Bouzaza, Abdelkrim; Favier, Lidia; Bentahar, Fatiha

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigates the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of biorecalcitrant macrolide antibiotics in a circulating tubular photoreactor. As target pollutants, spiramycin (SPM) and tylosin (TYL) were considered in this study. The photoreactor leads to the use of an immobilized titanium dioxide on non-woven paper under artificial UV-lamp irradiation. Maximum removal efficiency was achieved at the optimum conditions of natural pH, low pollutant concentration and a 0.35 L min(-1) flow rate. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was used to fit experimental results and the model constants were determined. Moreover, the total organic carbon analysis reveals that SPM and TYL mineralization is not complete. In addition, the study of the residence time distribution allowed us to investigate the flow regime of the reactor. Electrical energy consumption for photocatalytic degradation of macrolides using circulating TiO2-coated paper photoreactor was lower compared with some reported photoreactors used for the elimination of pharmaceutic compounds. A repetitive reuse of the immobilized catalyst was also studied in order to check its photoactivity performance. PMID:27232398

  13. Characterization of a new erm-related macrolide resistance gene present in probiotic strains of Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Leclercq, Roland

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B was studied in four Bacillus clausii strains that are mixed in a probiotic administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic chemotherapy and in three reference strains of B. clausii, DSM8716, ATCC 21536, and ATCC 21537. An 846-bp gene called erm(34), which is related to the erm genes conferring resistance to these antibiotics by ribosomal methylation, was cloned from total DNA of B. clausii DSM8716 into Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence presented 61% identity with that of Erm(D) from B. licheniformis, B. halodurans, and B. anthracis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI, followed by hybridization with an erm(34)-specific probe, indicated a chromosomal location of the gene in all B. clausii strains. Repeated attempts to transfer resistance to macrolides by conjugation from B. clausii strains to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium HM1070, and B. subtilis UCN19 were unsuccessful. PMID:14711653

  14. Ultra-Trace Analysis of Nine Macrolides, including Tulathromycin A (Draxxin), in Edible Animal Tissues with Mini-Column Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of 9 macrolides is presented, including tulathromycin A (Draxxin), in beef, poultry and pork muscle with a simple multi-residue extraction and analysis method using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The extraction method inv...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, Producer of the Methymycin/Pikromycin Family of Macrolide Antibiotics, Using PacBio Technology

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingxuan; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a producer of the methymycin/pikromycin family of macrolide antibiotics and a model host for natural product studies, obtained exclusively using PacBio sequencing technology. The 9.03-Mbp genome harbors 8,775 genes and 11 polyketide and nonribosomal peptide natural product gene clusters. PMID:27151802

  16. Reduced persistence of the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin in agricultural soil following several years of exposure in the field.

    PubMed

    Topp, Edward; Renaud, Justin; Sumarah, Mark; Sabourin, Lyne

    2016-08-15

    The macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin are very important in human and animal medicine, and can be entrained onto agricultural ground through application of sewage sludge or manures. In the present study, a series of replicated field plots were left untreated or received up to five annual spring applications of a mixture of three drugs to achieve a nominal concentration for each of 10 or 0.1mgkg(-1) soil; the latter an environmentally relevant concentration. Soil samples were incubated in the laboratory, and supplemented with antibiotics to establish the dissipation kinetics of erythromycin and clarithromycin using radioisotope methods, and azithromycin using HPLC-MS/MS. All three drugs were dissipated significantly more rapidly in soils with a history of field exposure to 10mgkg(-1) macrolides, and erythromycin and clarithromycin were also degraded more rapidly in field soil exposed to 0.1mgkg(-1) macrolides. Rapid mineralization of (14)C-labelled erythromycin and clarithromycin are consistent with biodegradation. Analysis of field soils revealed no carryover of parent compound from year to year. Azithromycin transformation products were detected consistent with removal of the desosamine and cladinose moieties. Overall, these results have revealed that following several years of exposure to macrolide antibiotics these are amenable to accelerated degradation. The potential accelerated degradation of these drugs in soils amended with manure and sewage sludge should be investigated as this phenomenon would attenuate environmental exposure and selection pressure for clinically relevant resistance. PMID:27096634

  17. Total Syntheses of the Resorcylic Acid Lactones Paecilomycin F and Cochliomycin C Using an Intramolecular Loh-Type α-Allylation Reaction for Macrolide Formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Bolte, Benoit; Banwell, Martin G; Willis, Anthony C

    2016-09-01

    Subjection of the resorcylic ester 16 to a Nozaki-Hiyama-Kishi reaction afforded the 12-membered lactone 17, while treatment of it under the Loh-type α-allylation conditions using indium metal gave the isomeric, 14-membered macrolide 18. Compound 18 was readily elaborated to the resorcylic acid lactone type natural products paecilomycin F and cochliomycin C. PMID:27541929

  18. Multicenter Study of the Mechanisms of Resistance and Clonal Relationships of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates Resistant to Macrolides, Lincosamides, and Ketolides in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. J.; Andreu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide, lincosamide, and ketolide mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships were characterized in a collection of 79 resistant group B streptococcus isolates obtained from neonates or pregnant women. The erm(B), erm(TR), and mef(A) genes were present in 62%, 30.4%, and 3.8% of the isolates, respectively. There was considerable clonal diversity among them. PMID:15917563

  19. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides Among Staphylococci Isolated From the Nasal Cavity of Hospital Employees in Khorramabad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Tahmasbi, Farzad; Anbari, Khatereh; Ghafarzadeh, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data on antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus strains isolated from nasal carriers in each region can be helpful to select appropriate drugs to eradicate carriage states, control nosocomial infections and also treat patients. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance profile and the molecular prevalence of the ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes among Staphylococcus strains isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 100 Staphylococcus isolates, 51 Staphylococcus aureus, 49 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees in Khorramabad, Iran. Susceptibility pattern to macrolide antibiotics were determined using the disk diffusion method. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was applied to determine the major erythromycin-resistant genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Results Fifty-three (53%) isolates were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin (cross-resistance); while 8 (8%) isolates had variable macrolide susceptibility pattern. Among the S. aureus isolates, the difference in prevalence of resistance to erythromycin between males and females was significant (P = 0.011). The frequency of ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA genes were 3%, 5%, 33% and 20%, respectively. It was also found that out of 53 isolates resistant to erythromycin, 44 (83%) isolates (eight S. aureus and thirty-six CoNS strains) carried at least one of the four tested genes. Eight (8%) isolates had intermediate phenotype to erythromycin, in which 4 (50%) isolates carried ermB or ermC genes. In addition, out of 39 erythromycin-susceptible isolates, 3 (7.7%) isolates were positive for ermB or ermC genes. Conclusions No entire association was found between genotype and phenotype methods to detect macrolides-resistant isolates. In addition, distribution of genetically erythromycin

  20. Direct Detection of Macrolide Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium Isolates from Clinical Specimens from France by Use of Real-Time PCR and Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Touati, Arabella; Peuchant, Olivia; Jensen, Jorgen S.; Bébéar, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted organism commonly treated with azithromycin. However, macrolide resistance has been reported and is associated with point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. To evaluate the prevalence of macrolide resistance in M. genitalium isolates from clinical specimens from France, we first used a previously reported high-resolution melting assay. Because susceptible and resistant M. genitalium isolates were hardly discriminated in M. genitalium-positive clinical specimens, we developed a new molecular assay for the rapid detection of macrolide resistance. An assay using real-time PCR based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) coupled with melting curve analysis was designed. The assay was first validated on characterized macrolide-resistant M. genitalium isolates and then applied to 202 urogenital M. genitalium-positive specimens collected from 178 patients from France in 2011 and 2012. Resistant genotypes were confirmed by 23S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the 202 M. genitalium-positive specimens, 155 were amplified, demonstrating a sensitivity of 76.7%. A substitution in the 23S rRNA gene was found in 14.2% of the patient samples. Nine and six patients had M. genitalium isolates with a substitution at positions 2059 and 2058, respectively. In four cases, a mixed population of wild-type and mutated M. genitalium isolates was observed. The prevalence of M. genitalium macrolide resistance has been stable in France since its detection in 2006. Our FRET PCR assay is able to discriminate between wild-type and resistant genotypes directly from clinical specimens. This assay will allow clinicians to shorten the time to the initiation of effective disease treatment. PMID:24574291

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of macrolide-resistant group A Streptococcus strains in the province of Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weiss, K; De Azavedo, J; Restieri, C; Galarneau, L A; Gourdeau, M; Harvey, P; Paradis, J F; Salim, K; Low, D E

    2001-03-01

    Resistance to macrolides among group A streptococci is an increasing problem worldwide. We examined 496 strains phenotypically and genotypically for resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin. Strains were isolated in five different geographical areas representing about 45% of the total Quebec population. The overall resistance rate was 4.6% but varied from 0% in rural areas to 9.4% in Montreal. Of the 23 strains showing resistance to erythromycin, 15 (65%) had an identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern, were of serotype M28T28 and harboured the erm(TR) gene, suggesting the spread of a single clone. Of the remaining eight strains, two strains had the erm(B) gene, five had the mef gene and one with a different serotype also had the erm(TR) gene.

  2. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana; Hanna, Khalil; Chiron, Serge

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Panday, Prashant N.; Pranger, Arianna D.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs. PMID:24309312

  4. Bioactive 7-Oxabicyclic[6.3.0]lactam and 12-Membered Macrolides from a Gorgonian-Derived Cladosporium sp. Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fei; Yang, Qin; Shao, Chang-Lun; Kong, Chui-Jian; Zheng, Juan-Juan; Liu, Yun-Feng; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2015-01-01

    One new bicyclic lactam, cladosporilactam A (1), and six known 12-membered macrolides (2–7) were isolated from a gorgonian-derived Cladosporium sp. fungus collected from the South China Sea. Their complete structural assignments were elucidated by comprehensive spectroscopic investigation. Quantum chemistry calculations were used in support of the structural determination of 1. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by calculation of its optical rotation. Cladosporilactam A (1) was the first example of 7-oxabicyclic[6.3.0]lactam obtained from a natural source. Compound 1 exhibited promising cytotoxic activity against cervical cancer HeLa cell line with an IC50 value of 0.76 μM. PMID:26198234

  5. Bioactive 7-Oxabicyclic[6.3.0]lactam and 12-Membered Macrolides from a Gorgonian-Derived Cladosporium sp. Fungus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei; Yang, Qin; Shao, Chang-Lun; Kong, Chui-Jian; Zheng, Juan-Juan; Liu, Yun-Feng; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2015-07-01

    One new bicyclic lactam, cladosporilactam A (1), and six known 12-membered macrolides (2-7) were isolated from a gorgonian-derived Cladosporium sp. fungus collected from the South China Sea. Their complete structural assignments were elucidated by comprehensive spectroscopic investigation. Quantum chemistry calculations were used in support of the structural determination of 1. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by calculation of its optical rotation. Cladosporilactam A (1) was the first example of 7-oxabicyclic[6.3.0]lactam obtained from a natural source. Compound 1 exhibited promising cytotoxic activity against cervical cancer HeLa cell line with an IC50 value of 0.76 μM.

  6. High Incidence of Macrolide and Tetracycline Resistance among Streptococcus Agalactiae Strains Isolated from Clinical Samples in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    EMANEINI, Mohammad; MIRSALEHIAN, Akbar; BEIGVIERDI, Reza; FOOLADI, Abbas Ali Imani; ASADI, Fatemeh; JABALAMELI, Fereshteh; TAHERIKALANI, Morovat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococci (GBS) is an important bacterial pathogen that causes a wide range of infections including neonatal sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and soft tissue or urinary tract infections. Material and methods: One hundred and fifteen isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae collected from urine specimens of patients attending a hospital in Tehran. All isolates were screened for their capsular types and genes encoding resistance to the macrolide and tetracycline antibiotics by PCR and multiplex PCR–based methods. Results: Most of isolates belonged to capsular types III (49%), V (19%), II (16%), and Ib (6%). Twelve isolates (10%) were nontypable. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and Quinupristin-dalfopristin, but were resistant to clindamycin (35%), chloramphenicol (45%), erythromycin (35%), linezolid (1%) and tetracycline (96%). The most prevalent antimicrobial resistance gene was tetM found in 93% of the isolates followed by ermTR, ermB, and tetK, found in 23%, 16%, and 16% of isolates, respectively. The genes, tetL, tetO, ermA, ermC and mefA were not detected in any of the S. agalactiae isolates. Of the 110 tetracycline resistant S. agalactiae, 89 isolates harbored the tetM gene alone and eighteen isolates carried the tetM gene with the tetK gene. All erythromycin-resistant isolates exhibited cMLSB resistance phenotype, 22 isolates harbored the ermTR gene alone and five isolates carried the ermTR gene with the ermB gene. The rate of coexistence of genes encoding the erythromycin and tetracycline resistance determinants was 34%. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that S. agalactiae isolates obtained from urine samples showed a high rate of resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and macrolide antibiotics and were commonly associated with the resistance genes temM, ermTR or ermB. PMID:25705271

  7. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, Keith D; Harhay, Dayna M; Apley, Michael D; Lubbers, Brian V; Clawson, Michael L; Schuller, Gennie; Harhay, Gregory P; White, Brad J; Larson, Robert L; Capik, Sarah F; Riviere, Jim E; Kalbfleisch, Ted; Tessman, Ronald K

    2016-08-30

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass medication=MM) or sham-saline injected (control=CON); second, to describe the macrolide resistance genes present in genetically typed M. haemolytica isolates; third, use whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to correlate the phenotypic resistance and genetic determinants for resistance among M. haemolytica isolates. M. haemolytica (n=276), P. multocida (n=253), and H. somni (n=78) were isolated from feedlot cattle diagnosed with BRD. Gamithromycin susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution. Whole-genome sequencing was utilized to determine the presence/absence of macrolide resistance genes and to genetically type M. haemolytica. Generalized linear mixed models were built for analysis. There was not a significant difference between MM and CON groups in regards to the likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica or P. multocida. The likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica differed significantly by state of origin in this study. A single M. haemolytica genetic subtype was associated with an over whelming majority of the observed resistance. H. somni isolation counts were low and statistical models would not converge. Phenotypic resistance was predicted with high sensitivity and specificity by WGS. Additional studies to elucidate the relationships between phenotypic expression of resistance/genetic determinants for resistance and clinical response to antimicrobials are necessary to inform judicious use of antimicrobials in the context of relieving animal disease and suffering. PMID:27527782

  8. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in the Pediatric Population in Germany during 2000-2001

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Lütticken, Rudolf; Bryskier, André; Al-Lahham, Adnan

    2003-01-01

    In a nationwide study in Germany covering 13 clinical microbiology laboratories, a total of 307 Streptococcus pyogenes (mainly pharyngitis) and 333 Streptococcus pneumoniae (respiratory tract infections) strains were collected from outpatients less than 16 years of age. The MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin A, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were determined by the microdilution method. In S. pyogenes isolates, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin, 0%; erythromycin A, 13.7%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin showed good activity against S. pyogenes isolates (MIC90 = 0.25 μg/ml; MIC range, 0.016 to 16 μg/ml). Three strains were found to be telithromycin-resistant (MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml). Erythromycin-resistant strains were characterized for the underlying resistance genotype, with 40.5% having the efflux type mef(A), 38.1% having the erm(A), and 9.5% having the erm(B) genotypes. emm typing of macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes isolates showed emm types 4 (45.2%), 77 (26.2%), and 12 (11.9%) to be predominant. In S. pneumoniae, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin intermediate, 7.5%; penicillin resistant, 0%; erythromycin A, 17.4%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin was highly active against pneumococcal isolates (MIC90 ≤ 0.016 μg/ml; range, 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml). The overall resistance profile of streptococcal respiratory tract isolates is still favorable, but macrolide resistance is of growing concern in Germany. PMID:12543648

  9. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  10. Identification of novel macrolides with antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and type I and III IFN-augmenting activity in airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Porter, James D.; Watson, Jennifer; Roberts, Lee R.; Gill, Simren K.; Groves, Helen; Dhariwal, Jaideep; Almond, Mark H.; Wong, Ernie; Walton, Ross P.; Jones, Lyn H.; Tregoning, John; Kilty, Iain; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Edwards, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma and COPD are triggered by rhinoviruses. Uncontrolled inflammatory pathways, pathogenic bacterial burden and impaired antiviral immunity are thought to be important factors in disease severity and duration. Macrolides including azithromycin are often used to treat the above diseases, but exhibit variable levels of efficacy. Inhaled corticosteroids are also readily used in treatment, but may lack specificity. Ideally, new treatment alternatives should suppress unwanted inflammation, but spare beneficial antiviral immunity. Methods In the present study, we screened 225 novel macrolides and tested them for enhanced antiviral activity against rhinovirus, as well as anti-inflammatory activity and activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Primary bronchial epithelial cells were grown from 10 asthmatic individuals and the effects of macrolides on rhinovirus replication were also examined. Another 30 structurally similar macrolides were also examined. Results The oleandomycin derivative Mac5, compared with azithromycin, showed superior induction (up to 5-fold, EC50 = 5–11 μM) of rhinovirus-induced type I IFNβ, type III IFNλ1 and type III IFNλ2/3 mRNA and the IFN-stimulated genes viperin and MxA, yet had no effect on IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA. Mac5 also suppressed rhinovirus replication at 48 h, proving antiviral activity. Mac5 showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae; however, it did not have any antibacterial properties compared with azithromycin when used against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (as a model organism) and also the respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Further non-toxic Mac5 derivatives were identified with various anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial activities. Conclusions The data support the idea that macrolides have antiviral properties through a mechanism that is yet to be ascertained. We also provide

  11. Activities of a New Fluoroketolide, HMR 3787, and Its (Des)-Fluor Derivative RU 64399 Compared to Those of Telithromycin, Erythromycin A, Azithromycin, Clarithromycin, and Clindamycin against Macrolide-Susceptible or -Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kensuke; Davies, Todd A.; Ednie, Lois M.; Bryskier, Andre; Palavecino, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 were compared to those of three macrolides, telithromycin, and clindamycin against 175 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates and 121 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates. HMR3787 and telithromycin were the most active compounds tested against pneumococci. Telithromycin and RU 64399 were equally active against macrolide-susceptible (MICs, 0.008 to 0.06 μg/ml) and -resistant S. pyogenes isolates, but HMR 3787 had lower MICs for ermB strains. PMID:11600391

  12. Rapid assay of A2058T-mutated 23S rRNA allelic profiles associated with high-level macrolide resistance in Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryoichi; Kasai, Ayako; Ogihara, Shinji; Yamada, Kageto; Tao, Kazuyuki

    2015-09-01

    We report on a restriction fragment-length polymorphism (HpyCH4III) assay for profile analysis of 23S rRNA gene A2058T-mutated alleles associated with high-level macrolide resistance in Moraxella catarrhalis. Our assay results were supported by DNA sequencing analysis, allowed for simultaneous testing of many strains, and produced results from pure-cultured colonies within 4 h.

  13. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for the determination of ten macrolide drugs residues in animal muscles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuqin; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Qingying; Zhang, Meiyu; Meng, Chenying; Li, Jiufeng; He, Limin

    2016-10-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of the residues of ten macrolide drugs in swine, cattle and chicken muscles samples. The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized using tylosin as a template and methacrylic acid as a functional monomer. Samples were extracted with sodium borate buffer solution and ethyl acetate, and purified by the MIP cartridge. The results showed that the cartridge exhibited good recognition performance for macrolides, and better purification effect than the traditional solid-phase extraction cartridges. Recoveries of analytes at three spiking levels 1, 5 and 20μgkg(-1) ranged from 60.7% to 100.3% with the relative standard deviations less than 14%. The limits of detection of the method were between 0.1 and 0.4μgkg(-1). The method is useful for the routine monitoring of the residues of macrolide drugs in animal muscles.

  14. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia.

  15. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia. PMID:27102715

  16. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A'. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A'. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them.

  17. Structure, absolute configuration, and conformational study of 12-membered macrolides from the fungus Dendrodochium sp. associated with the sea cucumber Holothuria nobilis Selenka.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Xu, Dong-Xiao; Mándi, Attila; Kurtán, Tibor; Li, Tie-Jun; Schulz, Barbara; Zhang, Wen

    2013-07-19

    Dendrodolides A-M (1-13), 13 new 12-membered macrolides, were isolated from Dendrodochium sp., a fungus associated with the sea cucumber Holothuria nobilis Selenka, which was collected from the South China Sea. The structures of the dendrodolides were elucidated by means of detailed spectroscopic analysis and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The absolute configurations were assigned using the modified Mosher method, exciton-coupled circular dichroism (ECCD), electronic solution and solid-state circular dichroism (ECD) supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) ECD calculations, and X-ray analysis. A detailed conformational analysis of the 13 derivatives indicated that the conformation of the flexible macrolide ring plays a decisive role in their chiroptical properties. Thus, it is highly recommended to apply advanced levels of theory and to avoid simple comparison of ECD spectra to determine the absolute configurations of these derivatives. In an in vitro bioassay, compounds 1-5, 7-9, 11, and 12 exhibited different levels of growth inhibitory activity against SMMC-7721 and HCT116 cells. This is the first report of 12-membered macrolides from the fungus of the genus Dendrodochium . The coisolation of four pairs of epimers is extremely interesting and indicates the complexity of β-ketoreductase stereospecificity in the biosynthesis of enigmatic iterative fungal polyketides.

  18. Structure elucidation at the nanomole scale. 1. Trisoxazole macrolides and thiazole-containing cyclic peptides from the nudibranch Hexabranchus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Dalisay, Doralyn S; Rogers, Evan W; Edison, Arthur S; Molinski, Tadeusz F

    2009-04-01

    A single specimen of Hexabranchus sanguineus, a nudibranch from the Indo-Pacific that is known to sequester kabiramides B and C and other trisoxazole macrolides, yielded new kabiramide analogues, 9-desmethylkbiramide B and 33-methyltetrahydrohalichondramide, and two new unexpected thiazole-containing cyclic peptides in submicromolar amounts. The structures of these cyclic peptides were determined by analyses of 1D and 2D NMR spectra recorded with a state-of-the-art 1 mm (1)H NMR high-temperature superconducting microcryoprobe, together with mass spectra. In addition to two proline residues, each peptide contains a thiazole- or oxazole-modified amino acid residue, together with conventional amino acid residues. All of the amino acid residues were l, as determined by Marfey's analysis of the acid hydrolysates of the peptides. This is the first report of cyclic thiazole peptides from H. sanguineus. Since thiazole-oxazole-modified peptides are typically associated with cyanobacteria and tunicates, the finding may imply a dietary component of the H. sanguineus that was previously overlooked. PMID:19254038

  19. Occurrence of sulfonamide-, tetracycline-, plasmid-mediated quinolone- and macrolide-resistance genes in livestock feedlots in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Mu, Quanhua; Li, Jin; Sun, Yingxue; Mao, Daqing; Wang, Qing; Luo, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock feedlots deserve attention because they are prone to transfer to human pathogens and thus pose threats to human health. In this study, the occurrence of 21 ARGs, including tetracycline (tet)-, sulfonamide (sul)-, plasmid-mediated quinolone (PMQR)- and macrolide-resistance (erm) genes were investigated in feces and adjacent soils from chicken, swine, and cattle feedlots in Northern China. PMQR and sul ARGs were the most prevalent and account for over 90.0 % of the total ARGs in fecal samples. Specifically, PMQR genes were the most prevalent, accounting for 59.6 % of the total ARGs, followed by sul ARGs (34.2 %). The percentage of tet ARGs was 3.4 %, and erm ARGs accounted for only 1.9 %. Prevalence of PMQR and sul ARGs was also found in swine and cattle feces. The overall trend of ARG concentrations in feces of different feeding animals was chicken > swine > beef cattle in the studied area. In soils, sul ARGs had the highest concentration and account for 71.1 to 80.2 % of the total ARGs, which is possibly due to the widely distributed molecular carriers (i.e., class one integrons), facilitating sul ARG propagation. Overall, this study provides integrated profiles of various types of ARGs in livestock feedlots and thus provides a reference for the management of antibiotic use in livestock farming.

  20. Novel spectrophotometric method for determination of some macrolide antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations using 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Safwan; Bayram, Roula

    2012-12-01

    New, simple and rapid spectrophotometric method has been developed and validated for the assay of two macrolide drugs, azithromycin (AZT) and erythromycin (ERY) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method was based on the reaction of AZT and ERY with sodium 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) in alkaline medium at 25 °C to form an orange-colored product of maximum absorption peak at 452 nm. All variables were studied to optimize the reaction conditions and the reaction mechanism was postulated. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 1.5-33.0 and 0.92-8.0 μg mL-1 with limit of detection values of 0.026 and 0.063 μg mL-1 for AZT and ERY, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 4.3 × 104 and 12.3 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for AZT and ERY, respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the determination of AZT and ERY in formulations and the results tallied well with the label claim. The results were statistically compared with those of an official method by applying the Student's t-test and F-test. No interference was observed from the concomitant substances normally added to preparations.

  1. A New, Potent, and Placenta-Permeable Macrolide Antibiotic, Solithromycin, for the Prevention and Treatment of Bacterial Infections in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Payne, Matthew S.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Ireland, Demelza J.; Newnham, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection–inflammation is a major cause of early preterm birth and subsequent neonatal mortality and acute or long-term morbidity. Antibiotics can be administered in pregnancy to prevent preterm birth either prophylactically to women at high risk for preterm delivery, or to women with diagnosed intrauterine infection, prelabor rupture of membranes, or in suspected preterm labor. The therapeutic goals of each of these scenarios are different, with different pharmacological considerations, although effective antimicrobial therapy is an essential requirement. An ideal antibiotic for these clinical indications would be (a) one that is easily administered and orally bioactive, (b) has a favorable adverse effect profile (devoid of reproductive toxicity or teratogenicity), (c) is effective against the wide range of microorganisms known to be commonly associated with intra-amniotic infection, (d) provides effective antimicrobial protection within both the fetal and amniotic compartments after maternal delivery, (e) has anti-inflammatory properties, and (f) is effective against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Here, we review the evidence from clinical, animal, and ex vivo/in vitro studies that demonstrate that a new macrolide-derived antibiotic – solithromycin – has all of these properties and, hence, may be an ideal antibiotic for the treatment and prevention of intrauterine infection-­related pregnancy complications. While this evidence is extremely encouraging, it is still preliminary. A number of key studies need to be completed before solithromycin’s true potential for use in pregnancy can be ascertained. PMID:27066004

  2. Genomic Epidemiology of Gonococcal Resistance to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins, Macrolides, and Fluoroquinolones in the United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Yonatan H.; Harris, Simon R.; Kirkcaldy, Robert D.; Green, Anna G.; Marks, Debora S.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Trees, David; Lipsitch, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is empirical and based on population-wide susceptibilities. Increasing antimicrobial resistance underscores the potential importance of rapid diagnostic tests, including sequence-based tests, to guide therapy. However, the usefulness of sequence-based diagnostic tests depends on the prevalence and dynamics of the resistance mechanisms. Methods. We define the prevalence and dynamics of resistance markers to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones in 1102 resistant and susceptible clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected from 2000 to 2013 via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project. Results. Reduced extended-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility is predominantly clonal and associated with the mosaic penA XXXIV allele and derivatives (sensitivity 98% for cefixime and 91% for ceftriaxone), but alternative resistance mechanisms have sporadically emerged. Reduced azithromycin susceptibility has arisen through multiple mechanisms and shows limited clonal spread; the basis for resistance in 36% of isolates with reduced azithromycin susceptibility is unclear. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae has arisen multiple times, with extensive clonal spread. Conclusions. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae and reduced cefixime susceptibility appear amenable to development of sequence-based diagnostic tests, whereas the undefined mechanisms of resistance to ceftriaxone and azithromycin underscore the importance of phenotypic surveillance. The identification of multidrug-resistant isolates highlights the need for additional measures to respond to the threat of untreatable gonorrhea. PMID:27638945

  3. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-01-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis. PMID:23549852

  4. The novel macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B resistance gene erm(44) is associated with a prophage in Staphylococcus xylosus.

    PubMed

    Wipf, Juliette R K; Schwendener, Sybille; Perreten, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    A novel erythromycin ribosome methylase gene, erm(44), that confers resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics was identified by whole-genome sequencing of the chromosome of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from bovine mastitis milk. The erm(44) gene is preceded by a regulatory sequence that encodes two leader peptides responsible for the inducible expression of the methylase gene, as demonstrated by cloning in Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(44) gene is located on a 53-kb putative prophage designated ΦJW4341-pro. The 56 predicted open reading frames of ΦJW4341-pro are structurally organized into the five functional modules found in members of the family Siphoviridae. ΦJW4341-pro is site-specifically integrated into the S. xylosus chromosome, where it is flanked by two perfect 19-bp direct repeats, and exhibits the ability to circularize. The presence of erm(44) in three additional S. xylosus strains suggests that this putative prophage has the potential to disseminate MLSB resistance.

  5. Antimicrobial and antifouling efficacy of urinary catheters impregnated with a combination of macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Saini, Hina; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) is increasing worldwide. This study was designed to modify a biomaterial by impregnating a silicone urinary catheter with combination of a macrolide, azithromycin (AZM) and a fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin (CIP). Drug release profiles showed slow yet continuous release of antibiotics from catheters for one month. In vitro efficacy testing showed that group B catheters [3% (w v(-1)) CIP + 6% (w v(-1)) AZM] outperformed group A catheters [2% (w v(-1)) CIP + 5% (w v(-1)) AZM] by (1) showing larger zones of inhibition (>31 mm) compared to group A (<28 mm) for up to 30 days against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1; (2) killing adhered bacteria in 24 h compared to 24-48 h in group A; (3) showing longer antimicrobial durability for four weeks; and (4) exhibiting a stable real-time shelf life of one year, suggesting that these catheters can be explored in clinical settings, especially in long-term CAUTI. PMID:26982572

  6. A Novel SimpleProbe PCR Assay for Detection of Mutations in the 23S rRNA Gene Associated with Macrolide Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lysvand, Hilde; Pukstad, Brita; Nordbø, Svein Arne

    2016-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant strains of Mycoplasma genitalium are an increasing problem throughout the world, and the implementation of a rapid and sensitive assay for mutation detection to guide treatment is needed. Macrolide-resistant strains have been shown to contain base substitutions in positions 2058 and 2059 (Escherichia coli numbering) in region V of the 23S rRNA gene. In this study, we present a SimpleProbe PCR followed by melting curve analysis to differentiate between macrolide-resistant mutants and wild types. The assay was performed on 159 Mycoplasma genitalium-positive samples, and the results were compared with DNA sequencing. We also looked at the prevalence of macrolide-resistant strains in a Norwegian population. Of 139 samples characterized successfully by sequencing, 54 (39%) were wild types and 85 (61%) were mutants, consisting of 59 (42%) A2059G, 24 (17%) A2058G, 1 (1%) A2058T, and 1 (1%) A2059C mutation. The melting curve analysis correctly differentiated between wild-type and mutant strains in all cases, but it could not identify the different mutant types. The SimpleProbe PCR proved to be a simple, rapid, and reliable method for the detection of macrolide-resistant isolates of Mycoplasma genitalium in a clinical setting. PMID:27487958

  7. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus hominis strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Makowska, Nicoletta; Bosacka, Karolina; Słotwińska, Anna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most frequently isolated bacteria from the blood and the predominant cause of nosocomial infections. Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, especially erythromycin and clindamycin, are important therapeutic agents in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci infections. Among CoNS, Staphylococcus hominis represents the third most common organism. In spite of its clinical significance, very little is known about its mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics, especially MLSB. Fifty-five S. hominis isolates from the blood and the surgical wounds of hospitalized patients were studied. The erm(C) gene was predominant in erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates. The methylase genes, erm(A) and erm(B), were present in 15 and 25% of clinical isolates, respectively. A combination of various erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes was detected in 15% S. hominis isolates. The efflux gene msr(A) was detected in 18% of isolates, alone in four isolates, and in different combinations in a further six. The lnu(A) gene, responsible for enzymatic inactivation of lincosamides was carried by 31% of the isolates. No erythromycin resistance that could not be attributed to the genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C) and msr(A) was detected. In S. hominis, 75 and 84%, respectively, were erythromycin resistant and clindamycin susceptible. Among erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates, 68% of these strains showed the inducible MLSB phenotype. Four isolates harbouring the msr(A) genes alone displayed the MSB phenotype. These studies indicated that resistance to MLSB in S. hominis is mostly based on the ribosomal target modification mechanism mediated by erm genes, mainly the erm(C), and enzymatic drug inactivation mediated by lnu(A).

  8. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    PubMed

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone. PMID:18519724

  9. The structure of DesR from Streptomyces venezuelae, a β-glucosidase involved in macrolide activation

    PubMed Central

    Zmudka, Matthew W; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have, indeed, altered the course of human history as is evidenced by the increase in human life expectancy since the 1940s. Many of these natural compounds are produced by bacteria that, by necessity, must have efficient self-resistance mechanisms. The methymycin/pikromycin producing species Streptomyces venezuelae, for example, utilizes β-glucosylation of its macrolide products to neutralize their effects within the confines of the cell. Once released into the environment, these compounds are activated by the removal of the glucose moiety. In S. venezuelae, the enzyme responsible for removal of the sugar from the parent compound is encoded by the desR gene and referred to as DesR. It is a secreted enzyme containing 828 amino acid residues, and it is known to be a retaining glycosidase. Here, we describe the structure of the DesR/d-glucose complex determined to 1.4-Å resolution. The overall architecture of the enzyme can be envisioned in terms of three regions: a catalytic core and two auxiliary domains. The catalytic core harbors the binding platform for the glucose ligand. The first auxiliary domain adopts a “PA14 fold,” whereas the second auxiliary domain contains an immunoglobulin-like fold. Asp 273 and Glu 578 are in the proper orientation to function as the catalytic base and proton donor, respectively, required for catalysis. The overall fold of the core region places DesR into the GH3 glycoside hydrolase family of enzymes. Comparison of the DesR structure with the β-glucosidase from Kluyveromyces marxianus shows that their PA14 domains assume remarkably different orientations. PMID:23225731

  10. [Occurrence of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in clinical specimens in 2003-2004].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was the analysis of frequency of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance among MSSA (n=1682) and MRSA (n=272) strains which were isolated in 2002-2004 from various clinical materials from patients hospitalized in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Toruń. Susceptibility testing and examination of methicillin-resistant strains were performed by the disc diffusion techniques according to recommendation of NCCLS. Resistance to the MLS(B) antimicrobials agents was higher among MRSA compared to MSSA isolates. The MLS, constitutive phenotype was more prevalent than the MLS(B) inducible phenotype among investigated MRSA (65.4%) and MSSA (7.6%) isolates. Inducible resistance had only 2.5% of the MSSA and 2.6% of the MRSA strains. Moreover in 2004 there were found increasing frequency of inducible MLS(B) resistance from 1.1% to 5.7% and decreasing frequency of constitutive MLS(B) resistance from 9.2% to 4.7% among MSSA strains, in comparison to 2003. The investigated MSSA MLS(B)-, MLS(B)- and MRSAMLS(B)+, MLS(B)- strains were the most frequently isolated from pus (adequately 5.2%, 28.8% and 30.5%, 10.7%) and also from nosopharynx swabs (1.7% MSSA MLS(B)+ and 22.9% MSSA MLS(B)-) and biomaterials (15,1% MRSA MLS(B)+ and 9.6% MRSA MLS(B)-). They mainly came from patients of the outpatient clinic (2,4% MSSA MLS(B)+ and 19.9% MSSA MLS(B)-) and patients treated at the neurosurgical ward (20.6% MRSA MLS(B)+ and 12.1% MRSA MLS(B)-).

  11. Occurrence and distribution of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides, and nitrofurans in livestock manure and amended soils of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Wan, Weining; Mao, Daqing; Wang, Chong; Mu, Quanhua; Qin, Songyan; Luo, Yi

    2015-03-01

    A feasible and rapid analysis for the simultaneous determination of sulfonamides (SAs), tetracyclines (TCs), fluoroquinolones (FQs), macrolides (MACs) and nitrofurans (NFs) in livestock manure and soils was established by solid-phase extraction (SPE)-ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). A total of 32 manure and 17 amended soil samples from the Liaoning and Tianjin areas in Northern China were collected for analysis. The largest detected frequencies and concentrations in manure samples were those of TCs (3326.6 ± 12,302.6 μg/kg), followed by FQs (411.3 ± 1453.4 μg/kg), SAs (170.6 ± 1060.2 μg/kg), NFs (85.1 ± 158.1 μg/kg), and MACs (1.4 ± 4.8 μg/kg). In general, veterinary antibiotics (VAs) were detected with higher concentrations in swine and chicken manure than in cattle manure, reflecting the heavy usage of VAs in swine and chicken husbandry in the studied area. Furthermore, higher residues of antibiotics were found in piglet and fattening swine manure than in sow manure. In addition, TCs were the most frequently (100%) detected antibiotics in amended soil with higher concentrations (up to 10,967.1 μg/kg) than any other VAs. The attenuation of SAs was more obvious than TCs in amended soil after fertilization, which can most likely be attributed to the stronger sorption of TCs than SAs to soil organic matter through cation exchange. This study illustrated the prevalence of TCs detected in both animal manure and fertilized agricultural soils in Northern China, which may increase the risk to human health through the food chain. Thus, TCs should be given more attention in the management of veterinary usage in livestock husbandry.

  12. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P < 0.05), implying the presence of SPM could induce the production of MLS resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation.

  13. Comparative Treatment Failure Rates of Respiratory Fluoroquinolones or β-Lactam + Macrolide Versus β-Lactam Alone in the Treatment for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adult Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chang, Shy-Shin; Chan, Ya-Lan; Pang, Laura; Hsu, Sue-Ming; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract No comparative effectiveness study has been conducted for the following 3 antibiotics: respiratory fluoroquinolone, β-lactam, and β-lactam + advanced macrolide. To gain insights into the real-world clinical effectiveness of these antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia in adult outpatients, our study investigated the treatment failure rates in 2 million representative participants from the National Health Informatics Project (NHIP) of Taiwan. A new-user cohort design was used to follow NHIP participants from January 2000 until December 2009. Treatment failure was defined by either one of the following events: a second antibiotic prescription, hospitalization due to CAP, an emergency department visit with a diagnosis of CAP, or 30-day nonaccident-related mortality. From 2006 to 2009, we identified 9256 newly diagnosed CAP outpatients, 1602 of whom were prescribed levofloxacin, 2100 were prescribed moxifloxacin, 5049 were prescribed β-lactam alone, and 505 were prescribed advanced macrolide + β-lactam. Compared with the β-lactam-based regimen, the propensity score-matched odds ratio for composite treatment failure was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.67–0.97) for moxifloxacin, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.90–1.35) for levofloxacin, and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.67–1.35) for macrolide +β-lactam. Moxifloxacin was associated with lower treatment failure rates compared with β-lactam alone, or levofloxacin in Taiwanese CAP outpatients. However, due to inherent limitations in our claims database, more randomized controlled trials are required before coming to a conclusion on which antibiotic is more effective for Taiwanese CAP outpatients. More population-based comparative effectiveness studies are also encouraged and should be considered as an integral piece of evidence in local CAP treatment guidelines. PMID:26426664

  14. [Determination of 35 antibiotic residues of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, penicillins, macrolides and amphenicols in milk by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectromtery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Li; Yang, Hongmei; Pan, Hongyan; Shi, Hailiang; Qian, Cong; Zhang, Shan

    2015-09-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was established for the simultaneous determination of 35 antibiotic residues of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, penicillins, macrolides and amphenicols in milk. The samples were extracted with alkaline acetonitrile and McIlvaine buffer solution under ultrasonication. The separation of target compounds was performed on an Eclipse XDB-C, column (150 mm x 2.1 mm, 3.5 µm) with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min, and with an injection volume of 10 µL. The identification and quantification of the compounds were completed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring ( MRM) mode. The limits of detection were all below 10.0 µg/kg. The average spiked recoveries of the method ranged from 70. 1% to 109. 9% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.89%-9.99%. After validation, the method was applied to the analysis of antibiotic residues in milk products in China. Fifty samples were screened under the well defined methodology, and the results showed that chloramphenicol, only in one sample, was monitored with the content of 0.48 µg/kg. A risk of contamination of milk with chloramphenicol has been determined to exist. Therefore this method is convenient, rapid, sensitive and reliable, and can be successfully applied to the simultaneous detection of the 35 antibiotic residues of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, penicillins, macrolides and amphenicols in milk. PMID:26753289

  15. Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin type B antibiotics due to a mutation in an rRNA operon of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Pernodet, J L; Boccard, F; Alegre, M T; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Guérineau, M

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens produces spiramycin, a macrolide antibiotic and expresses an inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLS). From a mutant of S.ambofaciens exhibiting a constitutive MLS resistance phenotype a resistance determinant was cloned on a low copy number vector (pIJ61) through its expression in Streptomyces lividans. Further characterization has shown that this determinant corresponded to a mutant rRNA operon with a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. In different organisms, mutations leading to MLS resistance have been located at a position corresponding to the adenine 2058 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. In the 23S rRNA from S.ambofaciens a similar position for the mutation has been postulated and DNA sequencing of this region has shown an adenine to guanine transition at a position corresponding to 2058. S.ambofaciens possesses four rRNA operons which we have cloned. In Streptomyces, contrary to other bacteria, a mutation in one among several rRNA operons confers a selectable MLS resistance phenotype. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed. Images PMID:2834204

  16. [Determination of 35 antibiotic residues of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, penicillins, macrolides and amphenicols in milk by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectromtery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Li; Yang, Hongmei; Pan, Hongyan; Shi, Hailiang; Qian, Cong; Zhang, Shan

    2015-09-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was established for the simultaneous determination of 35 antibiotic residues of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, penicillins, macrolides and amphenicols in milk. The samples were extracted with alkaline acetonitrile and McIlvaine buffer solution under ultrasonication. The separation of target compounds was performed on an Eclipse XDB-C, column (150 mm x 2.1 mm, 3.5 µm) with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min, and with an injection volume of 10 µL. The identification and quantification of the compounds were completed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring ( MRM) mode. The limits of detection were all below 10.0 µg/kg. The average spiked recoveries of the method ranged from 70. 1% to 109. 9% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.89%-9.99%. After validation, the method was applied to the analysis of antibiotic residues in milk products in China. Fifty samples were screened under the well defined methodology, and the results showed that chloramphenicol, only in one sample, was monitored with the content of 0.48 µg/kg. A risk of contamination of milk with chloramphenicol has been determined to exist. Therefore this method is convenient, rapid, sensitive and reliable, and can be successfully applied to the simultaneous detection of the 35 antibiotic residues of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, penicillins, macrolides and amphenicols in milk.

  17. Trace analysis of trimethoprim and sulfonamide, macrolide, quinolone, and tetracycline antibiotics in chlorinated drinking water using liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ye, Z.; Weinberg, H.S.; Meyer, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    A multirun analytical method has been developed and validated for trace determination of 24 antibiotics including 7 sulfonamides, 3 macrolides, 7 quinolones, 6 tetracyclines, and trimethoprim in chlorine-disinfected drinking water using a single solid-phase extraction method coupled to liquid chromatography with positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection. The analytes were extracted by a hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced resin and eluted with acidified methanol (0.1% formic acid), resulting in analyte recoveries generally above 90%. The limits of quantitation were mostly below 10 ng/L in drinking water. Since the concentrated sample matrix typically caused ion suppression during electrospray ionization, the method of standard addition was used for quantitation. Chlorine residuals in drinking water can react with some antibiotics, but ascorbic acid was found to be an effective chlorine quenching agent without affecting the analysis and stability of the antibiotics in water. A preliminary occurrence study using this method revealed the presence of some antibiotics in drinking waters, including sulfamethoxazole (3.0-3.4 ng/L), macrolides (1.4-4.9 ng/L), and quinolones (1.2-4.0 ng/L). ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  18. Synergistic combination of direct plasma membrane damage and oxidative stress as a cause of antifungal activity of polyol macrolide antibiotic niphimycin.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Doi, Takeshi; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The polyol macrolide niphimycin (NM) exhibited fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells accompanying the leakage of cytoplasmic components including nucleotide-like materials in addition to K+ at 10 microM or above. Such a dynamic change in the plasma membrane was observed upon treatment of cells with H2O2 but not with the polyene macrolide antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB). The NM-induced cell death could be prevented by the exogenous addition of phosphatidylcholine (PC) whereas such a protective effect was only weakly observed with ergosterol, the molecular target of AmB. NM-treated cells were further characterized with a dramatic loss of glutathione even at a dose of 5 microM or less, representing NM-triggered metabolic conversion of the antioxidant molecule. NM-treatment indeed accelerated the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 detectable with a specific fluorescent probe in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested a synergistic combination of direct plasma membrane damage and oxidative stress as a cause of antifungal activity of NM against S. cerevisiae. PMID:16233293

  19. In vitro activity of beta-lactams, macrolides, telithromycin, and fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation between drug resistance and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Hashikita, Giichi; Takahashi, Shun; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2005-10-01

    The in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined using 16 strains of penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) and 26 strains of penicillin intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) in Japan. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of potent antibiotics, including eight beta-lactams (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotiam, cefepime, cefditoren, faropenem, panipenem, and biapenem), three macrolides (erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), telithromycin, and three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin), were determined. Twenty-three strains exhibited genetic variations at pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b, which are genetic-PRSP (g-PRSP). g-PISP strains accounted for 62.5% (10/16) of the PSSP strains. The existence of an abnormal pbp gene conferred not only penicillin resistance but resistance to cephems; however, panipenem and biapenem had potent in vitro efficacy against alterations. Regarding the macrolide resistance mechanisms (mefA or ermB): 16 isolates had only mefA, 18 isolates had ermB, and 2 isolates had both mefA and ermB. There was no correlation between the existence of an abnormal pbp gene and the existence of the mefA gene or the ermB gene. PMID:16258826

  20. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC. PMID:23974027

  1. Reconstitution of the Escherichia coli macrolide transporter: the periplasmic membrane fusion protein MacA stimulates the ATPase activity of MacB.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Elena B; Devroy, Vishakha K; Lau, Sze Yi; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2007-02-01

    Periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) are essential components of the type I protein secretion systems and drug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies suggested that MFPs connect the inner and outer membrane components of the transport systems and by this means co-ordinate the transfer of substrates across the two membranes. In this study, we purified and reconstituted the macrolide transporter MacAB from Escherichia coli. Here, MacA is a periplasmic MFP and MacB is an ABC-type transporter. Similar to other MFP-dependent transporters from E. coli, the in vivo function of MacAB requires the outer membrane channel TolC. The purified MacB displayed a basal ATPase activity in detergent micelles. This activity conformed to Michaelis-Menten kinetics but was unresponsive to substrates or accessory proteins. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of MacB was strictly dependent on MacA. The catalytic efficiency of MacAB ATPase was more than 45-fold higher than the activity of MacB alone. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of MacA were essential for this activity. MacA stimulated MacB ATPase only in phospholipid bilayers and did not need the presence of macrolides. Our results suggest that MacA is a functional subunit of the MacB transporter. PMID:17214741

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of the Two Unrelated Macrolide-Resistant Corynebacterium argentoratense Strains CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, Isolated from Patients in the University Hospital of León, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francisco; Acedo, Alberto; Hernandez, Marta; Tauch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium argentoratense has been associated mainly with infections in the human respiratory tract. Genome sequencing of two unrelated clinical macrolide-resistant strains, CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, revealed the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene erm(X) allocated to a specific genomic region with 100% similarity to the widely distributed transposable element Tn5432. PMID:26159536

  3. Prevalence, genotyping and macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae among isolates of patients with respiratory tract infections, Central Slovenia, 2006 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Kogoj, Rok; Mrvic, Tatjana; Praprotnik, Marina; Kese, Darja

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study we employed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyse the occurrence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae among upper and lower respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the Central Region of Slovenia between January 2006 and December 2014. We also used a culture and pyrosequencing approach to genotype strains and infer their potential macrolide resistance. Of a total 9,431 tested samples from in- and out-patient with RTI, 1,255 (13%) were found to be positive by M. pneumoniae PCR. The proportion of positive samples was 19% (947/5,092)among children (≤16 years-old) and 7% (308/4,339) among adults (>16 years-old). Overall, among those PCR tested, the highest proportions of M. pneumonia infections during the study period were observed in 2010 and 2014. In these two years, 18% (218/1,237) and 25% (721/2,844) of samples were positive respectively,indicating epidemic periods. From the 1,255 M. pneumoniae PCR-positive samples, 783 (614 from paediatric and 169 from adult patients) were successfully cultured. Of these, 40% (312/783) were constituted of strains belonging to the P1 type II genomic group, while 60% (469/783) contained strains of the P1 type I group. Two isolates comprised both P1 type Iand II strains. Results of a genotype analysis by year,showed that the dominant M. pneumoniae P1 type during the 2010 epidemic was P1 type II (82% of isolates;81/99), which was replaced by P1 type I in the 2014 epidemic (75%; 384/510). This observation could indicate that the two epidemics may have been driven by a type shift phenomenon, although both types remained present in the studied population during the assessed period of time. Only 1% of strains (7/783) were found to harbour an A2063G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene,which confers macrolide resistance, suggesting that the occurrence of M. pneumoniae macrolide resistance still seems to be sporadic in our geographic area.

  4. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of novel 4″-glycyl linked quinolyl-azithromycins with potent activity against macrolide-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Dražen; Mutak, Stjepan

    2016-03-15

    A new azithromycin-based series of antibacterial macrolones is reported, which features the use of a 4″-ester linked glycin for tethering the quinolone side chain to the macrolide scaffold. Among the analogs prepared, compounds 9e and 22f with a quinolon-6-yl moiety were found to have potent and well-balanced activity against clinically important respiratory tract pathogens, including erythromycin-susceptible and MLSB resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Haemophilus influenzae. In addition, potential lead compounds 9e and 22f demonstrated outstanding levels of activity against Moraxella catarrhalis and inducibly MLSB resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The best member of this series 22f rivals or exceeds, in potency, some of the most active ketolide antibacterial agents known today, such as telithromycin and cethromycin. PMID:26860929

  5. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in the Czech Republic during 2011 to 2013: Increased Prevalence of Identified Genotypes and of Isolates with Macrolide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Grillová, Linda; Pĕtrošová, Helena; Mikalová, Lenka; Strnadel, Radim; Dastychová, Eliška; Kuklová, Ivana; Kojanová, Martina; Kreidlová, Miluše; Vaňousová, Daniela; Hercogová, Jana; Procházka, Přemysl; Zákoucká, Hana; Krchňáková, Alena; Vašků, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, a total of 262 samples, from 188 patients suspected of having syphilis were tested for the presence of treponemal DNA by PCR amplification of five chromosomal loci, including the polA (TP0105), tmpC (TP0319), TP0136, TP0548, and 23S rRNA genes. Altogether, 146 samples from 103 patients were PCR positive for treponemal DNA. A set of 81 samples from 62 PCR-positive patients were typeable, and among them, nine different genotypes were identified. Compared to a previous study in the Czech Republic during 2004 to 2010, the number of genotypes detected among syphilis patients in a particular year increased to six in both 2012 and 2013, although they were not the same six. The proportion of macrolide-resistant clinical isolates in this 3-year study was 66.7%. PMID:25100820

  6. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of novel 4″-glycyl linked quinolyl-azithromycins with potent activity against macrolide-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Dražen; Mutak, Stjepan

    2016-03-15

    A new azithromycin-based series of antibacterial macrolones is reported, which features the use of a 4″-ester linked glycin for tethering the quinolone side chain to the macrolide scaffold. Among the analogs prepared, compounds 9e and 22f with a quinolon-6-yl moiety were found to have potent and well-balanced activity against clinically important respiratory tract pathogens, including erythromycin-susceptible and MLSB resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Haemophilus influenzae. In addition, potential lead compounds 9e and 22f demonstrated outstanding levels of activity against Moraxella catarrhalis and inducibly MLSB resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The best member of this series 22f rivals or exceeds, in potency, some of the most active ketolide antibacterial agents known today, such as telithromycin and cethromycin.

  7. The cytotoxic macrolide FD-891 induces caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and subsequent apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Susumu; Eguchi, Tadashi; Motegi, Atsushi; Mizoue, Kazutoshi; Usui, Takeo; Nagai, Kazuo; Kataoka, Takao

    2009-09-01

    The 16-membered macrolide FD-891 exerts cytotoxicity toward several cancer cell lines. In this study, we showed that FD-891 induces apoptosis in various human cancer cell lines. Human leukemia Jurkat cells were highly sensitive to FD-891, exhibiting caspase activation and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c into the cytosol at early time points after exposure to FD-891. By contrast, Jurkat cells deficient in caspase-8 were resistant to FD-891-induced apoptosis and manifested little induction of cytochrome c release as well as caspase-9 processing. Consistent with these results, the overexpression of the Bcl-2 family member Bcl-x(L) or the caspase-8 modulator c-FLIP(L) markedly prevented FD-891-induced apoptosis. These results clearly demonstrate that FD-891 triggers caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and subsequent apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect of prophylactic macrolides on children with chronic lung disease: a protocol for a double-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Ricardo A; Gomez-Rubio, Ana M; Harris, Tomika; Yadav, Aravind; McBeth, Katrina; Gonzales, Traci; Jon, Cindy; Stark, James; Avritscher, Elenir; Pedroza, Claudia; Smith, Keely; Colasurdo, Giuseppe; Wootton, Susan; Piedra, Pedro; Tyson, Jon E; Samuels, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies suggest that the high mortality rate of respiratory viral infections is a result of an overactive neutrophilic inflammatory response. Macrolides have anti-inflammatory properties, including the ability to downregulate the inflammatory cascade, attenuate excessive cytokine production in viral infections, and may reduce virus-related exacerbations. In this study, we will test the hypothesis that prophylactic macrolides will reduce the severity of respiratory viral illness in children with chronic lung disease by preventing the full activation of the inflammatory cascade. Methods and analysis A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial that will enrol 92 children to receive either azithromycin or placebo for a period of 3–6 months during two respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons (2015–2016 and 2016–2017). We expect a reduction of at least 20% in the total number of days of unscheduled face-to-face encounters in the treatment group as compared with placebo group. Standard frequentist and Bayesian analyses will be performed using an intent-to-treat approach. Discussion We predict that the prophylactic use of azithromycin will reduce the morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections during the winter season in patients with chronic lung disease as evidenced by a reduction in the total number of days with unscheduled face-to-face provider encounters. Ethics and dissemination This research study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston on 9 October 2014. On completion, the results will be published. Trial registration number NCT02544984. PMID:27638496

  9. Prevalence and mechanism of resistance against macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins among Enterococcus faecium isolates from food-producing animals and hospital patients in Belgium.

    PubMed

    De Graef, E M; Decostere, A; De Leener, E; Goossens, H; Baele, M; Haesebrouck, F

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of acquired resistance to streptogramins, macrolides, and lincosamides and the genetic background of this resistance was investigated in Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from food-producing animals and hospital patients 4-5 years after the ban of streptogramins as growth promoters. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D), virginiamycin M1 (virgM1), erythromycin (ery), tylosin (tyl), and lincomycin (lin) were determined by the agar dilution method for E. faecium isolates derived from pigs (80), broilers (45), and hospitalized patients (103). Resistance or susceptibility was interpreted using a microbiological criterion and breakpoints recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), if available. The isolates were also screened by PCR for erm(B), lnu(A), lnu(B), mef(A/E), vat(D), vat(E), vga(A), vga(B), and vgb(A) genes. Acquired resistance to Q/D, virgM1, ery, tyl, and lin was detected in 34%, 96%, 46%, 46%, and 69% of the porcine strains, respectively. For broiler strains this was 15% (Q/D), 98% (virgM1), 69% (ery), 71% (tyl), and 89% (lin) and for human strains 23% (Q/D), 65% (virgM1), 54% (ery), 52% (tyl), and 60% (lin). Strains showing cross-resistance against macrolides and lincosamides almost always carried the erm(B) gene. This gene was present in 64% of the Q/D-resistant isolates. Only in two human and three broiler Q/D- and virgM1-resistant isolates, a combination of the erm(B) and vat(D) or vat(E) genes was found. The genetic background of resistance could not be determined in the other Q/D- or virgM1-resistant strains. This study demonstrates that streptogramin resistance is frequently present in strains from hospitalized patients and food-producing animals, but the genetic basis hitherto mostly remains obscure. PMID:17650967

  10. The ermC leader peptide: amino acid alterations leading to differential efficiency of induction by macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Mayford, M; Weisblum, B

    1990-01-01

    The inducibility of ermC by erythromycin, megalomicin, and celesticetin was tested with both wild-type ermC and several regulatory mutants altered in the 19-amino-acid-residue leader peptide, MGIFSIFVISTVHYQP NKK. In the model test system that was used, the ErmC methylase was translationally fused to beta-galactosidase. Mutational alterations that mapped in the interval encoding Phe-4 through Ile-9 of the leader peptide not only affected induction by individual antibiotics, but did so differentially. The subset of mutations that affected inducibility by the two macrolides erythromycin and megalomicin overlapped and were distinct from the subset of mutations that affected induction by celesticetin. These studies provide a model system for experimentally varying the relative efficiencies with which different antibiotics induce the expression of ermC. The possibility that antibiotics with inducing activity interact directly with the nascent leader peptide was tested by using a chemically synthesized decapeptide, MGIFSIFVIS--, attached at its C-terminus to a solid-phase support. This peptide, however, failed to bind erythromycin in vitro. PMID:2113911

  11. SRR-SB3, a disulfide-containing macrolide that inhibits a late stage of the replicative cycle of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Witvrouw, M; Balzarini, J; Pannecouque, C; Jhaumeer-Laulloo, S; Esté, J A; Schols, D; Cherepanov, P; Schmit, J C; Debyser, Z; Vandamme, A M; Desmyter, J; Ramadas, S R; de Clercq, E

    1997-01-01

    From a series of macrocyclic diamides possessing the disulfide linkage, only SRR-SB3, a compound that complexes with zinc, was found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1; strain IIIB) replication at a concentration of 1.8 to 6.5 micrograms/ml in MT-4, CEM, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. SRR-SB3 was toxic to MT-4 cells at a concentration of 15.9 micrograms/ml, resulting in a selectivity index of 9 in these cells. This macrolide was also effective against various other HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates and HIV-1 strains resistant to protease inhibitors and nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. It was also active against various HIV-2 strains, simian immunodeficiency virus (strain MAC251), and Moloney murine sarcoma virus, but not against viruses other than retroviruses. In addition, the compound was found to inhibit chronic HIV-1 infections in vitro. The compound in combination with other antiviral agents, such as zidovudine, zalcitabine, and stavudine, showed an effect that was between additive and synergistic. Time-of-addition experiments indicated that SRR-SB3 acts at a late stage of the HIV-1 replicative cycle. PMID:9021177

  12. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes.

  13. tcrB, a Gene Conferring Transferable Copper Resistance in Enterococcus faecium: Occurrence, Transferability, and Linkage to Macrolide and Glycopeptide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2002-01-01

    A newly discovered gene, designated tcrB, which is located on a conjugative plasmid conferring acquired copper resistance in Enterococcus faecium, was identified in an isolate from a pig. The tcrB gene encodes a putative protein belonging to the CPx-type ATPase family with homology (46%) to the CopB protein from Enterococcus hirae. The tcrB gene was found in E. faecium isolated from pigs (75%), broilers (34%), calves (16%), and humans (10%) but not in isolates from sheep. Resistant isolates, containing the tcrB gene, grew on brain heart infusion agar plates containing up to 28 mM CuSO4 compared to only 4 mM for the susceptible isolates. Copper resistance, and therefore the presence of the tcrB gene, was strongly correlated to macrolide and glycopeptide resistance in isolates from pigs, and the tcrB gene was shown to be located on the same conjugative plasmid as the genes responsible for resistance to these two antimicrobial agents. The frequent occurrence of this new copper resistance gene in isolates from pigs, where copper sulfate is being used in large amounts as feed additive, suggests that the use of copper has selected for resistance. PMID:11959576

  14. Invasive pneumococci before the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Turkey: antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype distribution, and molecular identification of macrolide resistance.

    PubMed

    Altun, Hatice Uludag; Hascelik, Gülsen; Gür, Deniz; Eser, Özgen Köseoglu

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluates the antimicrobial susceptibilities and serotype distributions of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) isolates identified in a Turkish hospital before the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). The susceptibilities of all isolates were determined by evaluating six antibiotics: penicillin (PEN), ceftriaxone (CRO), levofloxacin (LEV), erythromycin (ERY), clindamycin (CD), and vancomycin (VAN). Serotyping and amplification of macrolide resistance genes were performed. Sixteen (50%) and four (2%) isolates were resistant to PEN and LEV, respectively. No isolates demonstrated VAN resistance. Intermediate resistance to CRO was found in 4% of all invasive isolates. Twenty-three (12.6%) isolates were resistant to ERY. Four (2%) invasive SP isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Serogroups 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 23 were the most common in both age groups. The potential coverage rates of PCV7 and PCV13 were 44.1 and 66.1% in children and 39.8 and 71.5% in adults, respectively. Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is required.

  15. Distribution characteristics of clarithromycin and azithromycin, macrolide antimicrobial agents used for treatment of respiratory infections, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of clarithromycin (CAM) and azithromycin (AZM), macrolide antimicrobial agents, in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In the in vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of CAM and AZM in ELF and AMs following oral administration (50 mg/kg) to rats were markedly higher than those in plasma, and the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma of CAM and AZM were 12 and 2.2, and the AUC ratios of AMs/ELF were 37 and 291, respectively. In the in vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers were greater than the apical-to-basolateral transport. MDR1 substrates reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM. In the in vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular concentrations of CAM and AZM in cultured AMs (NR8383) were greater than the extracellular concentrations. The uptake of CAM and AZM by NR8383 was inhibited by ATP depletors. These data suggest that the high distribution of CAM and AZM to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by the AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms.

  16. Structure Elucidation at the Nanomole-Scale. 1. Trisoxazole Macrolides and Thiazole-containing Cyclic Peptides from the Nudibranch Hexabranchus sanguineus

    PubMed Central

    Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Rogers, Evan W.; Edison, Arthur S.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2009-01-01

    A single specimen of Hexabranchus sanguineus, a nudibranch from the Indo-Pacific that is known to sequester kabiramides B, C and other trisoxazole macrolides, yielded new kabiramide analogs – 9-desmethylkabiramide B and 33-methyltetrahydrohalichondramide – and two new unexpected thiazole-containing cyclic peptides in sub-micromole amounts. The structures of these cyclic peptides were determined by analyses of 1D and 2D NMR spectra recorded with a state-of-the-art 1-mm 1H NMR high-temperature superconducting micro-cryoprobe, together with mass spectra. In addition to two proline residues, each peptide contains a thiazole- or oxazole-modified amino acid residue, together with conventional amino acid residues. All of the amino acid residues were L- as determined by Marfey’s analysis of the acid hydrolysates of the peptides. This is the first report of cyclic thiazole peptides from H. sanguineus. Since thiazole-oxazole modified peptides are typically associated with cyanobacteria and tunicates, the finding may imply a dietary component of the H. sanguineus that was previously overlooked. PMID:19254038

  17. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes. PMID:16008619

  18. Detection of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(44) and a novel erm(44) variant in staphylococci from aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Heß, Stefanie; Li, Jun; Feßler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Gallert, Claudia; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLSB) is not restricted to staphylococci from clinical samples but can also be present in staphylococci from the aquatic environment. Two coagulase-negative staphylococci-Staphylococcus xylosus and S. saprophyticus were obtained from sewage and receiving river water samples and were investigated for the genetic basis of inducible MLSB resistance by whole-genome sequencing. Two rRNA methylases encoded by erm(44) and a novel erm(44) variant were identified, which had only 84% amino acid identity. While fragments of phage DNA were found in the vicinity of the erm(44) gene of S. xylosus, no relics of mobile genetic elements were detected in the sequences flanking the erm(44) variant gene in the S. saprophyticus strain. The functionality of the erm genes was confirmed by cloning and transformation experiments. Based on the obtained sequences, specific PCR assays for both erm genes were developed and used to identify erm(44) in another 7 S. xylosus and 17 S. saprophyticus isolates from aquatic environments. PMID:26207047

  19. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled.

  20. A novel generic dipstick-based technology for rapid and precise detection of tetracycline, streptogramin and macrolide antibiotics in food samples.

    PubMed

    Link, Nils; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-02-20

    Excessive use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and as growth promoters in stock farming has been associated with the dramatically increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant human pathogenic bacteria. European community legislators have therefore restricted the veterinary use of antibiotics and banned them as growth-promoting food additives in stock breeding (1831/2003/EC). The monitoring of such legislation requires technology for precise and straightforward on-site quantification of antibiotics in farm samples and food products without the need for extensive laboratory equipment and trained personnel. Capitalizing on bacterial transcriptional regulators (TetR, PIP, E), which are dose-dependently released from their cognate operators (tetO, PIR, ETR) upon binding of specific classes of antibiotics (tetracycline, streptogramins, macrolides) we have designed an easy-to-handle dipstick-based assay for detection of antibiotic levels in serum, meat and milk whose detection limits are up to 40-fold below licensed threshold values. The generic dipstick consists of either nitrocellulose, nylon or polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF) membrane strips coated with streptavidin and immobilized biotinylated operator DNA, which acts as capture DNA to bind hexa-histidine (His(6))-tagged bacterial biosensors. Antibiotics present in specific samples triggered the dose-dependent release of the capture DNA-biosensor interaction, which, after dipping into two different solutions, results in a correlated conversion of a chromogenic substrate by a standard His(6)-targeted enzyme complex. This can be quantified by comparison of the dipstick to a standardized color scale or by assessing the terminal solution at 450nm. As demonstrated using serum, meat and milk samples spiked with 14 different antibiotics, the dipstick technology provided sensitive detection in a rapid assay format, and could be employed to monitor non-authorized use of antibiotics and to discover novel antibiotics. PMID

  1. Characterization of Enterococcus faecium with macrolide resistance and reduced susceptibility to quinupristin/dalfopristin in a Japanese hospital: detection of extensive diversity in erm(B)-regulator regions.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Nayuta; Urushibara, Noriko; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Suzaki, Keisuke; Watanabe, Naoki; Quiñones, Dianelys; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-08-01

    Cross-resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics is mainly mediated by the erm (erythromycin ribosome methylation) genes that encode 23S rRNA methylases in enterococi, and various mechanisms are involved in the streptogramin B resistance. Prevalence of MLSB resistance and its genetic mechanisms were analyzed for a total of 159 strains of Enterococcus faecium isolated from clinical specimens in a university hospital in Japan from 1997 to 2006. Resistance to erythromycin (EM) and clindamycin was detected in 88.1% and 89.9% of all the strains examined, respectively, and expression of resistance was totally constitutive. Although none of the strain was resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D), 28 strains (17.6%) showed intermediate resistance to Q/D (MIC: 2 μg/ml). The erm(B) gene was detected in 139 strains (87.4%), and msrC was found in all the strains examined, whereas no other known MLSB resistance genes were identified. The erm(B) regulator region (RR) containing a coding region of the leader peptide was classified into 13 genetic variations (L1-L3, M, S1-S7, D, and R genotypes) in 56 strains. However, no relatedness was identified between the erm(B) RR genotype and EM resistance, or reduced susceptibility to Q/D, although most of Q/D-intermediate strains were assigned to the L1, L2, and S1 genotypes. Q/D-intermediate strains were classified into five multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) types, including four types of clonal complex (CC)-C1, five sequence types (STs), including four STs of CC-17, and several resistance gene/virulence factor profiles. The present study revealed the occurrence of Q/D-intermediate E. faecium, which are composed of heterogeneous strains in Japan, and more genetic diversity in the erm(B) RRs than those reported previously.

  2. Hierarchical Control on Polyene Macrolide Biosynthesis: PimR Modulates Pimaricin Production via the PAS-LuxR Transcriptional Activator PimM

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Vicente, Cláudia M.; Payero, Tamara D.; Martín-Sánchez, Lara; Cañibano, Carmen; Martín, Juan F.; Aparicio, Jesús F.

    2012-01-01

    Control of polyene macrolide production in Streptomyces natalensis is mediated by the transcriptional activator PimR. This regulator combines an N-terminal domain corresponding to the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family of transcriptional activators with a C-terminal half homologous to guanylate cyclases and large ATP-binding regulators of the LuxR family. The PimR SARP domain (PimRSARP) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)–fused protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GST-PimRSARP binds a single target, the intergenic region between the regulatory genes pimR and pimMs in the pimaricin cluster. The PimRSARP-binding site was investigated by DNaseI protection studies, revealing that it contains three heptameric direct repeats adjusting to the consensus 5′-CGGCAAG-3′. Transcription start points of pimM and pimR promoters were identified by 5′-RACE, revealing that unlike other SARPs, PimRSARP does not interact with the -35 region of its target promoter. Quantitative transcriptional analysis of these regulatory genes on mutants on each of them has allowed the identification of the pimM promoter as the transcriptional target for PimR. Furthermore, the constitutive expression of pimM restored pimaricin production in a pimaricin-deficient strain carrying a deletion mutant of pimR. These results reveal that PimR exerts its positive effect on pimaricin production by controlling pimM expression level, a regulator whose gene product activates transcription from eight different promoters of pimaricin structural genes directly. PMID:22693644

  3. Enrofloxacin and Macrolides Alone or in Combination with Rifampicin as Antimicrobial Treatment in a Bovine Model of Acute Chlamydia psittaci Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prohl, Annette; Lohr, Markus; Ostermann, Carola; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Berndt, Angela; Schroedl, Wieland; Rothe, Michael; Schubert, Evelyn; Sachse, Konrad; Reinhold, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic bacterium with a wide host range that can cause respiratory disease in humans and cattle. In the present study, effects of treatment with macrolides and quinolones applied alone or in combination with rifampicin were tested in a previously established bovine model of respiratory C. psittaci infection. Fifty animals were inoculated intrabronchially at the age of 6–8 weeks. Seven served as untreated controls, the others were assigned to seven treatment groups: (i) rifampicin, (ii) enrofloxacin, (iii) enrofloxacin + rifampicin, (iv) azithromycin, (v) azithromycin + rifampicin, (vi) erythromycin, and (vii) erythromycin + rifampicin. Treatment started 30 hours after inoculation and continued until 14 days after inoculation (dpi), when all animals were necropsied. The infection was successful in all animals and sufficient antibiotic levels were detected in blood plasma and tissue of the treated animals. Reisolation of the pathogen was achieved more often from untreated animals than from other groups. Nevertheless, pathogen detection by PCR was possible to the same extent in all animals and there were no significant differences between treated and untreated animals in terms of local (i.e. cell count and differentiation of BALF-cells) and systemic inflammation (i.e. white blood cells and concentration of acute phase protein LBP), clinical signs, and pathological findings at necropsy. Regardless of the reduced reisolation rate in treated animals, the treatment of experimentally induced respiratory C. psittaci infection with enrofloxacin, azithromycin or erythromycin alone or in combination with rifampicin was without obvious benefit for the host, since no significant differences in clinical and pathological findings or inflammatory parameters were detected and all animals recovered clinically within two weeks. PMID:25768665

  4. Cloning and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of 16-membered macrolide antibiotic FD-891: involvement of a dual functional cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzing epoxidation and hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Motegi, Atsushi; Mizoue, Kazutoshi; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2010-07-26

    FD-891 is a 16-membered cytotoxic antibiotic macrolide that is especially active against human leukemia such as HL-60 and Jurkat cells. We identified the FD-891 biosynthetic (gfs) gene cluster from the producer Streptomyces graminofaciens A-8890 by using typical modular type I polyketide synthase (PKS) genes as probes. The gfs gene cluster contained five typical modular type I PKS genes (gfsA, B, C, D, and E), a cytochrome P450 gene (gfsF), a methyltransferase gene (gfsG), and a regulator gene (gfsR). The gene organization of PKSs agreed well with the basic polyketide skeleton of FD-891 including the oxidation states and alpha-alkyl substituent determined by the substrate specificities of the acyltransferase (AT) domains. To clarify the involvement of the gfs genes in the FD-891 biosynthesis, the P450 gfsF gene was inactivated; this resulted in the loss of FD-891 production. Instead, the gfsF gene-disrupted mutant accumulated a novel FD-891 analogue 25-O-methyl-FD-892, which lacked the epoxide and the hydroxyl group of FD-891. Furthermore, the recombinant GfsF enzyme coexpressed with putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase converted 25-O-methyl-FD-892 into FD-891. In the course of the GfsF reaction, 10-deoxy-FD-891 was isolated as an enzymatic reaction intermediate, which was also converted into FD-891 by GfsF. Therefore, it was clearly found that the cytochrome P450 GfsF catalyzes epoxidation and hydroxylation in a stepwise manner in the FD-891 biosynthesis. These results clearly confirmed that the identified gfs genes are responsible for the biosynthesis of FD-891 in S. graminofaciens.

  5. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  6. MacB ABC Transporter Is a Dimer Whose ATPase Activity and Macrolide-binding Capacity Are Regulated by the Membrane Fusion Protein MacA*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Frankish, Helen M.; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Robinson, Carol V.; Borges-Walmsley, M. Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  7. Characterization of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococcus faecium (GRE) from Broilers and Pigs in Denmark: Genetic Evidence that Persistence of GRE in Pig Herds Is Associated with Coselection by Resistance to Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    Glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) from broilers and pigs were characterized to investigate the background for the persistence of GRE in pig herds. All porcine isolates belonged to closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoretic (PFGE) types, with the ermB and vanA genes located on the same transferable genetic element. Broiler isolates belonged to different PFGE types. The persistence of GRE in Danish pig herds after the ban of glycopeptides may be explained by the genetic link between ermB and vanA and coselection by use of macrolides for treatment and growth promotion. PMID:10878086

  8. Do drug transporter (ABCB1) SNPs and P-glycoprotein function influence cyclosporine and macrolides exposure in renal transplant patients? Results of the pharmacogenomic substudy within the symphony study.

    PubMed

    Llaudó, Inés; Colom, Helena; Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita; Torras, Joan; Caldés, Anna; Sarrias, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M; Oppenheimer, Federico; Sánchez-Plumed, Jaime; Gentil, Miguel Ángel; Ekberg, Henrik; Grinyó, Josep M; Lloberas, Núria

    2013-02-01

    The function of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) should be considered as important tools to deepen knowledge of drug nephrotoxicity and disposition mechanisms. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of C3435T, G2677T, C1236T, and T129C ABCB1 SNPs with Pgp activity and exposure to different immunosuppressive drugs in renal transplant patients. Patients included in the Symphony Pharmacogenomic substudy were genotyped for ABCB1 SNPs. According to the design, patients were randomized into four immunosuppressive regimens: low and standard dose of cyclosporine (n = 30), tacrolimus (n = 13), and sirolimus (n = 23) concomitantly with mycophenolate and steroids. Pgp activity was evaluated in PBMC using the Rhodamine 123 efflux assay. TT carrier patients on C3435T, G2677T, and C1236T SNPs (Pgp-low pumpers) showed lower Pgp activity than noncarriers. Pgp-high pumpers treated with cyclosporine showed lower values of Pgp function than macrolides. There was a negative correlation between cyclosporine AUC and Pgp activity at 3 months. Results did not show any correlation between tacrolimus and sirolimus AUC and Pgp activity at 3 months. We found an important role of the ABCB1 SNPs Pgp function in CD3(+) peripheral blood lymphocytes from renal transplant recipients. Pgp activity was influenced by cyclosporine but not macrolides exposure.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of conjugative prophage Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) carrying the mef(A)/msr(D) genes for efflux resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, Francesco; Santagati, Maria; Santoro, Francesco; Oggioni, Marco R; Stefani, Stefania; Pozzi, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Genetic element Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) is a prophage of Streptococcus pyogenes which carries the macrolide efflux resistance genes mef(A)/msr(D) and is capable of conjugal transfer among streptococci. Complete nucleotide sequence showed that Φ1207.3 is 52,491 bp in length and contained 58 open reading frames (ORFs). A manual homology-based annotation with functional prediction of the hypothetical gene product was possible only for 34 out of 58 ORFs. Φ1207.3 codes for two different C-methylation systems, several phage structural genes, a lysis cassette (composed by a holin and a peptidoglycan hydrolase), and three site-specific resolvases of the serine recombinase family.

  10. Study of immunological aspects of aspergillosis in mice and effect of polyene macrolide antibiotic (SJA-95) and IFN-γ: a possible role of IFN-γ as an adjunct in antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Naik, Suresh R; Thakare, Vishnu N; Desai, Sandhya K; Rahalkar, Prabhakar R

    2011-12-30

    New polyene macrolide antibiotic SJA-95 in free as well as liposomal (lip.) forms, with and without interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was studied in mice model of aspergillosis using biological and biochemical parameters viz. colony forming units (CFU) in liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain, and serum IgG, and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Treatment with free and lip SJA-95 along with IFN-γ prolonged the survival time, reduced CFU in vital organs, decreased serum IgG and IL-4 levels. SJA-95 lip form showed greater antifungal activity as compared to free form. The combined treatment of lip SJA-95 with IFN-γ showed further enhancement in antifungal activity of SJA-95 (lip). The present experimental findings demonstrated IFN-γ might act as a potent modulator in immune reaction during fungal infection and can be a useful adjunctive in antifungal therapy in the management of deep seated systemic mycoses.

  11. High-throughput method for macrolides and lincosamides antibiotics residues analysis in milk and muscle using a simple liquid-liquid extraction technique and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Jank, Louise; Martins, Magda Targa; Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Campos Motta, Tanara Magalhães; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara

    2015-11-01

    A fast and simple method for residue analysis of the antibiotics classes of macrolides (erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, tilmicosin and spiramycin) and lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) was developed and validated for cattle, swine and chicken muscle and for bovine milk. Sample preparation consists in a liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with acetonitrile, followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS), without the need of any additional clean-up steps. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a C18 column and a mobile phase composed by acidified acetonitrile and water. The method was fully validated according the criteria of the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Validation parameters such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity, accuracy, repeatability, specificity, reproducibility, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) were evaluated. All calculated values met the established criteria. Reproducibility values, expressed as coefficient of variation, were all lower than 19.1%. Recoveries range from 60% to 107%. Limits of detection were from 5 to 25 µg kg(-1).The present method is able to be applied in routine analysis, with adequate time of analysis, low cost and a simple sample preparation protocol.

  12. Macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics enhance C3b deposition on the surface of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains by a LytA autolysin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Rodríguez-Sosa, Cinthya; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Giménez, María-José; Olmedillas, Eduardo; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Yuste, Jose

    2012-11-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains displaying high levels of multidrug resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for the outcome of the infection. Modifications of the bacterial envelope by antibiotics may assist the recognition and clearance of the pathogen by the host immune system. Recognition of S. pneumoniae resistant strains by the complement component C3b was increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and subinhibitory concentrations of different macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics for all the strains investigated. However, C3b levels were unchanged in the presence of serum containing specific antibodies and sub-MICs of levofloxacin. To investigate whether LytA, the main cell wall hydrolase of S. pneumoniae, might be involved in this process, lytA-deficient mutants were constructed. In the presence of antibiotics, loss of LytA was not associated with enhanced C3b deposition on the pneumococcal surface, which confirms the importance of LytA in this interaction. The results of this study offer new insights into the development of novel therapeutic strategies using certain antibiotics by increasing the efficacy of the host immune response to efficiently recognize pneumococcal resistant strains.

  13. Macrolides and β-Lactam Antibiotics Enhance C3b Deposition on the Surface of Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains by a LytA Autolysin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Rodríguez-Sosa, Cinthya; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Giménez, María-José; Olmedillas, Eduardo; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains displaying high levels of multidrug resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for the outcome of the infection. Modifications of the bacterial envelope by antibiotics may assist the recognition and clearance of the pathogen by the host immune system. Recognition of S. pneumoniae resistant strains by the complement component C3b was increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and subinhibitory concentrations of different macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics for all the strains investigated. However, C3b levels were unchanged in the presence of serum containing specific antibodies and sub-MICs of levofloxacin. To investigate whether LytA, the main cell wall hydrolase of S. pneumoniae, might be involved in this process, lytA-deficient mutants were constructed. In the presence of antibiotics, loss of LytA was not associated with enhanced C3b deposition on the pneumococcal surface, which confirms the importance of LytA in this interaction. The results of this study offer new insights into the development of novel therapeutic strategies using certain antibiotics by increasing the efficacy of the host immune response to efficiently recognize pneumococcal resistant strains. PMID:22890762

  14. The α-barrel tip region of Escherichia coli TolC homologs of Vibrio vulnificus interacts with the MacA protein to form the functional macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Hyun-Lee; Song, Saemee; Joo, Minju; Lee, Seunghwa; Kim, Daeyoung; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2013-04-01

    TolC and its homologous family of proteins are outer membrane factors that are essential for exporting small molecules and toxins across the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. Two open reading frames in the Vibrio vulnificus genome that encode proteins homologous to Escherichia coli TolC, designated TolCV1 and TolCV2, have 51.3% and 29.6% amino acid identity to TolC, respectively. In this study, we show that TolCV1 and TolCV2 functionally and physically interacted with the membrane fusion protein, MacA, a component of the macrolide-specific MacAB-TolC pump of E. coli. We further show that the conserved residues located at the aperture tip region of the α-hairpin of TolCV1 and TolCV2 played an essential role in the formation of the functional MacAB-TolC pump using site-directed mutational analyses. Our findings suggest that these outer membrane factors have conserved tip-to-tip interaction with the MacA membrane fusion protein for action of the drug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23625214

  15. Chemical modification of antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, S. E.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2011-02-01

    The review summarizes advances in the methods for the synthesis of polyene antibiotics (amphotericin B, partricin A, etc.) and investigations of the structure-activity relationship made in the last 15 years. State-of-the-art approaches based on the combination of the chemical synthesis and genetic engineering are considered. Emphasis is given to the design of semisynthetic antifungal agents against chemotherapy-resistant pathogens having the highest therapeutic indices. Recent results of research on the mechanisms of action of polyenes are outlined.

  16. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution. PMID:24347399

  17. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution.

  18. Desmethyl Macrolides: Synthesis and Evaluation of 4-Desmethyl Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Novel sources of antibiotics are needed to address the serious threat of bacterial resistance. Accordingly, we have launched a structure-based drug design program featuring a desmethylation strategy wherein methyl groups have been replaced with hydrogens. Herein we report the total synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of 4-desmethyl telithromycin (6), a novel desmethyl analogue of the third-generation ketolide antibiotic telithromycin (2) and our final analogue in this series. While 4-desmethyl telithromycin (6) was found to be equipotent with telithromycin (2) against wild-type bacteria, it was 4-fold less potent against the A2058G mutant. These findings reveal that strategically replacing the C4-methyl group with hydrogen (i.e., desmethylation) did not address this mechanism of resistance. Throughout the desmethyl series, the sequential addition of methyls to the 14-membered macrolactone resulted in improved bioactivity. Molecular modeling methods indicate that changes in conformational flexibility dominate the increased biological activity; moreover, they reveal 6 adopts a different conformation once bound to the A2058G ribosome, thus impacting noncovalent interactions reflected in a lower MIC value. Finally, fluorescence polarization experiments of 6 with E. coli ribosomes confirmed 6 is indeed binding the ribosome. PMID:25221660

  19. Induction of nitric oxide production by the cytostatic macrolide apicularen A [2,4-heptadienamide, N-[(1E)-3-[(3S,5R,7R,9S)-3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10-octahydro-7,14 dihydroxy-1-oxo-5,9-epoxy-1H-2-benzoxacyclododecin-3-yl]-1 propenyl]-, (2Z,4Z)-(9CI)] and possible role of nitric oxide in apicularen A-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, JangJa; Yokomakura, Aya; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Ban, Hyun Seung; Ishihara, Kenji; Ahn, Jong-Woong; Zee, OkPyo; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    We previously reported that apicularen A [2,4-heptadienamide, N-[(1E)-3-[(3S,5R,7R,9S)-3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10-octahydro-7,14 dihydroxy-1-oxo-5,9-epoxy-1H-2-benzoxacyclododecin-3-yl]-1 propenyl]-, (2Z,4Z)-(9CI)], a highly cytostatic macrolide isolated from the myxobacterial genus Chondromyces, induces apoptosis in the mouse leukemic monocyte cell line RAW 264.7. To analyze the action mechanism of apicularen A for the induction of apoptosis, effects of apicularen A on nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 cells were examined. It was demonstrated that apicularen A at 10 and 100 nM induced nitrite production, whereas apicularen B [2,4-heptadienamide, N-[(1E)-3-[(3S,5R,7R,9S)-7-[[2-(acetylamino)-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl]oxy]-3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10-octahydro-14-hydroxy-1-oxo-5,9-epoxy-1H-2-benzoxacyclododecin-3-yl]-1 propenyl]-, (2Z,4Z)-(9CI)], an N-acetyl-glucosamine glycoside of apicularen A, had no effect at 100 nM. The apicularen A-induced nitrite production was accompanied by an increase in the level of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and its mRNA and was suppressed by the NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine acetate (l-NMMA). In addition, apicularen A activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) and decreased the level of IkappaB-alpha and increased that of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Furthermore, the apicularen A-induced nitrite production was suppressed by the NF-kappaB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 [(E)-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-2-propenenitrile] and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 [anthra[1,9-cd]pyrazol-6(2H)-one]. These findings suggested that apicularen A activates NF-kappaB and AP-1, thus triggering the expression of iNOS mRNA and iNOS protein and induces NO production. Finally, apicularen A decreased cell growth and survival and cell viability and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential. The addition of l-NMMA partially recovered the apicularen A-induced decrease in cell growth and survival and cell

  20. Haemolytic activity of aromatic heptaenes. A group of polyene macrolide antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Cybulska, B; Mazerski, J; Borowski, E; Gary-Bobo, C M

    1984-01-01

    The aromatic heptaene vacidin A induces ion selective channels in human red blood cells. The ion flux induced leads to a secondary effect--colloid osmotic haemolysis. Molecular variations at ionizable polar groups of the antibiotic modify the properties of the permeability pathway concerning intercationic selectivity and the symmetry of ion flux. PMID:6704143

  1. Resistance to Macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes in France in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, Edouard; Fitoussi, Frederic; Doit, Catherine; Cohen, Robert; Tanna, Asha; George, Robert; Loukil, Chawki; Brahimi, Naima; Le Thomas, Isabelle; Deforche, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    A total of 1,500 recent throat isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 1996 and 1999 from children throughout France were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, clindamycin, and streptogramin B. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were further studied for their genetic mechanism of resistance, by means of PCR. The clonality of these strains was also investigated by means of serotyping and ribotyping. In all, 6.2% of the strains were erythromycin resistant, and 3.4 and 2.8% expressed the constitutive MLSB and M resistance phenotypes and harbored the ermB and mefA genes, respectively; ermTR was recovered from one isolate which also harbored the ermB gene. Ten serotypes and 8 ribotypes were identified, but we identified 17 strains by combining serotyping with ribotyping. Among the eight ribotypes, the mefA gene was recovered from six clusters, one being predominant, while the ermB gene was recovered from four clusters, of which two were predominant. PMID:10817692

  2. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  3. Integrin-mediated targeting of protein polymer nanoparticles carrying a cytostatic macrolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Pu

    Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and offtarget side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or nonpolymeric. This chapter summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins. This chapter explores an alternative encapsulation strategy based on high-specificity avidity between a small molecule drug and its cognate protein target fused to the corona of protein polymer nanoparticles. With the new strategy, the drug associates tightly to the carrier and releases slowly, which may decrease toxicity and promote tumor accumulation via the enhanced permeability and retention effect. To test this hypothesis, the drug Rapamycin (Rapa) was selected for its potent anti-proliferative properties, which give it immunosuppressant and anti-tumor activity. Despite its potency, Rapa has low solubility, low oral bioavailability, and rapid systemic clearance, which make it an excellent candidate for nanoparticulate drug delivery. To explore this approach, genetically engineered diblock copolymers were constructed from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) that assemble small nanoparticles. ELPs are protein polymers of the sequence (Val-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly)n, where the identity of Xaa and n determine their assembly properties. Initially, a screening assay for model drug encapsulation in ELP nanoparticles was developed, which showed that Rose Bengal and Rapa have high non-specific encapsulation in the core of ELP nanoparticles with a sequence where Xaa = Ile or Phe. While excellent at entrapping these drugs, their release was relatively fast compared to their intended mean residence time in the human body. Having determined that Rapa can be non-specifically entrapped in the core of ELP nanoparticles, FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP), which is the cognate protein target of Rapa, was genetically fused to the surface of these nanoparticles (FSI) to enhance their avidity towards Rapa. The fusion of FKBP to these nanoparticles slowed the terminal half-life of drug release to 57.8 h. To determine if this class of drug carriers has potential applications in vivo, FSI/Rapa was administered to mice carrying a human breast cancer model (MDA-MB-468). Compared to free drug, FSI encapsulation significantly decreased gross toxicity and enhanced the anti-cancer activity. In conclusion, protein polymer nanoparticles decorated with the cognate receptor of a high potency, low solubility drug (Rapa) efficiently improved drug loading capacity and its release. This approach has applications to the delivery of Rapa and its analogs; furthermore, this strategy has broader applications in the encapsulation, targeting, and release of other potent small molecules. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are genetically encoded protein polymers that reversibly phase separate in response to stimuli. They respond sharply to small shifts in temperature and form dense microdomains in the living eukaryotic cytosol. This chapter illustrates how to tune the ELP sequence and architecture for either coassembly or sorting of distinct proteins into microdomains within a living cell. Passive tumor targeting utilizing enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect has limited efficiency in targeting non-leaky tumors such as MDA-MB-468 breast tumor; however, an RGD tri-peptide decorated micelle nanoparticle can effectively accumulate in tumor site via integrin-mediated active tumor targeting. Different from inefficient and cytotoxic chemical linkage reactions, an elastin-based multi-functional nanocarrier can be assembled by genetic protein fusion and micelle co-assembly technology. The novel drug carrier contains the cognate Rapamycin (Rapa) receptor -- FK506 binding protein (FKBP) as the high-avidity drug binding domain and an RGD peptide as the active tumor targeting domain. Here we show that by co-assembling FKBP and RGD contained protein polymers into mixed micelle nanoparticles, they not only competently targeted endothelial and tumor cells in cell assays, but specifically delivered the drug with a slow release half-life of 38h. It was demonstrated that the active tumor targeting formulation of Rapa more effectively suppressed tumor growth compared to the passive tumor targeting formulation and free drug in tumor regression studies of mouse MDA-MB-468 xenografts. We believe that the exciting results will provide a new tool for the development of next-generation "smart" multi-functional drug carriers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  4. Total Synthesis and Complete Stereostructure of a Marine Macrolide Glycoside, (-)-Lyngbyaloside B.

    PubMed

    Fuwa, Haruhiko; Yamagata, Naoya; Okuaki, Yuta; Ogata, Yuya; Saito, Asami; Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-05-10

    We have described in detail the total synthesis of both the proposed and correct structures of (-)-lyngbyaloside B, which facilitated the elucidation of the complete stereostructure of this natural product. Our study began with the total synthesis of 13-demethyllyngbyaloside B, in which an esterification/ring-closing metathesis (RCM) strategy was successfully used for the efficient construction of the macrocycle. We also established reliable methods for the introduction of the conjugated diene side chain and the l-rhamnose residue onto the macrocyclic framework. However, the esterification/RCM strategy proved ineffective for the parent natural product because of the difficulties in acylating the sterically encumbered C-13 tertiary alcohol; macrolactionization of a seco-acid was also extensively investigated under various conditions without success. We finally completed the total synthesis of the proposed structure of (-)-lyngbyaloside B by means of a macrolactonization that involves an acyl ketene as the reactive species. However, the NMR spectroscopic data of our synthetic material did not match those of the authentic material, which indicated that the proposed structure must be re-examined. Inspection of the NMR spectroscopic data of the natural product and molecular mechanics calculations led us to postulate that the configuration of the C-10, C-11, and C-13 stereogenic centers had been incorrectly assigned in the proposed structure. Finally, our revised structure of (-)-lyngbyaloside B was unambiguously verified through total synthesis. PMID:27112323

  5. Tracing the Sources of Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs into the Lower Colorado River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters across the United States. Antibiotics present in the environment can produce resistance in microorganisms, which could potentially have adverse effects on human health. In addition, while the ecotoxicological signif...

  6. Clonal expansion of the macrolide resistant ST386 within pneumococcal serotype 6C in France.

    PubMed

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002-2003) to the PCV13 era (2010-2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter.

  7. Radioimmunoassay for metabolites of 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin, a macrolide antibiotic

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, N.; Ueda, T.; Yokoshima, T.; Umemura, K.; Shomura, T.

    1982-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay system has been developed for the measurement of two major metabolites of 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin, Mb-6 and Mb-12. A radioimmunoassay for Mb-6 was performed by using anti-Mb-6 serum and a (/sup 125/I)tyramined Mb-6 derivative as a radiolabeled antigen. The labeled antigen was prepared by the chloramine T method. The antiserum was obtained from a rabbit immunized with Mb-6 conjugated to bovine serum albumin. The obtained antiserum was cross-reactive with two other metabolites of 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin, Mb-2 and Mb-12, in addition to Mb-6. This Mb-6 radioimmunoassay system could detect Mb-6 concentrations as low as 100 pg/ml of serum. The coefficients of variation were 4.5% (intra-assay) and 5.1% (inter-assay). A radioimmunoassay for Mb-12, using anti-midecamycin serum and a (/sup 125/I)tyramined-Mb-12 derivative, has also been developed. The antiserum was cross-reactive only with Mb-12 among the 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin metabolites. This Mb-12 radioimmunoassay system could detect Mb-12 concentrations as low as 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-assay variances were 5.9 and 5.8%, respectively.

  8. Integrin-mediated targeting of protein polymer nanoparticles carrying a cytostatic macrolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Pu

    Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and offtarget side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or nonpolymeric. This chapter summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins. This chapter explores an alternative encapsulation strategy based on high-specificity avidity between a small molecule drug and its cognate protein target fused to the corona of protein polymer nanoparticles. With the new strategy, the drug associates tightly to the carrier and releases slowly, which may decrease toxicity and promote tumor accumulation via the enhanced permeability and retention effect. To test this hypothesis, the drug Rapamycin (Rapa) was selected for its potent anti-proliferative properties, which give it immunosuppressant and anti-tumor activity. Despite its potency, Rapa has low solubility, low oral bioavailability, and rapid systemic clearance, which make it an excellent candidate for nanoparticulate drug delivery. To explore this approach, genetically engineered diblock copolymers were constructed from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) that assemble small nanoparticles. ELPs are protein polymers of the sequence (Val-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly)n, where the identity of Xaa and n determine their assembly properties. Initially, a screening assay for model drug encapsulation in ELP nanoparticles was developed, which showed that Rose Bengal and Rapa have high non-specific encapsulation in the core of ELP nanoparticles with a sequence where Xaa = Ile or Phe. While excellent at entrapping these drugs, their release was relatively fast compared to their intended mean residence time in the human body. Having determined that Rapa can be non-specifically entrapped in the core of ELP nanoparticles, FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP), which is the cognate protein target of Rapa, was genetically fused to the surface of these nanoparticles (FSI) to enhance their avidity towards Rapa. The fusion of FKBP to these nanoparticles slowed the terminal half-life of drug release to 57.8 h. To determine if this class of drug carriers has potential applications in vivo, FSI/Rapa was administered to mice carrying a human breast cancer model (MDA-MB-468). Compared to free drug, FSI encapsulation significantly decreased gross toxicity and enhanced the anti-cancer activity. In conclusion, protein polymer nanoparticles decorated with the cognate receptor of a high potency, low solubility drug (Rapa) efficiently improved drug loading capacity and its release. This approach has applications to the delivery of Rapa and its analogs; furthermore, this strategy has broader applications in the encapsulation, targeting, and release of other potent small molecules. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are genetically encoded protein polymers that reversibly phase separate in response to stimuli. They respond sharply to small shifts in temperature and form dense microdomains in the living eukaryotic cytosol. This chapter illustrates how to tune the ELP sequence and architecture for either coassembly or

  9. Targeting the spliceosome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with the macrolides FD-895 and pladienolide-B.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Manoj K; Kumar, Deepak; Villa, Reymundo; La Clair, James J; Benner, Chris; Sasik, Roman; Jones, Harrison; Ghia, Emanuela M; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Burkart, Michael D; Castro, Januario E

    2015-07-01

    RNA splicing plays a fundamental role in human biology. Its relevance in cancer is rapidly emerging as demonstrated by spliceosome mutations that determine the prognosis of patients with hematologic malignancies. We report studies using FD-895 and pladienolide-B in primary leukemia cells derived from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. We found that FD-895 and pladienolide-B induce an early pattern of mRNA intron retention - spliceosome modulation. This process was associated with apoptosis preferentially in cancer cells as compared to normal lymphocytes. The pro-apoptotic activity of these compounds was observed regardless of poor prognostic factors such as Del(17p), TP53 or SF3B1 mutations and was able to overcome the protective effect of culture conditions that resemble the tumor microenvironment. In addition, the activity of these compounds was observed not only in vitro but also in vivo using the A20 lymphoma murine model. Overall, these findings give evidence for the first time that spliceosome modulation is a valid target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and provide an additional rationale for the development of spliceosome modulators for cancer therapy.

  10. Antennally active macrolide from the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis emitted predominantly by females.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Robert J; Cossé, Allard A; Zilkowski, Bruce W; Fraser, Ivich

    2007-07-01

    The macrocyclic lactone (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide was identified from the emissions of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, feeding on ash foliage. The compound was detected from both sexes but was ca. 10 times more abundant from females. It was readily sensed by antennae of both males and females. Identification was confirmed by synthesis. The behavioral effects of the lactone remain unstudied in A. planipennis, but a verified pheromonal function could lead to improved monitoring for this invasive pest. The lactone is part of the pheromone of Cryptolestes pusillus, an unrelated beetle species.

  11. Preparation, relative toxicity, chemotherapeutic activity, and pharmacokinetics of liposomal SJA-95: a new polyene macrolide antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sandhya K; Naik, Suresh R

    2008-01-01

    The research work was designed to compare the relative toxicity, chemotherapeutic activity, and pharmacokinetic parameters of liposomal incorporated SJA-95 with that of free SJA-95, with an objective to reduce toxicity and improve therapeutic activity in vivo. Liposomal-incorporated SJA-95 (Lip SJA-95), prepared using the proliposome method, was found to exhibit a higher LD(50) value in mice, and the relative toxicity was about 2.5 times lower than that of the free drug. Lip SJA-95 treatment in experimental mice model of Candidiasis showed increased survival and reduced fungal loads in various organs. The pharmacokinetic profile of the free and liposomal drug was evaluated by administration of free and Lip SJA-95 intravenously to healthy albino rabbits in a crossover fashion. Lip SJA-95 showed an initial fall in plasma levels and longer half-life. The improved microbial clearance following treatment with Lip SJA-95 could be attributed partly to an increased tissue uptake, which was reflected in a marked increase in volume of distribution (V(d)) and longer half-life (T(1/2)). The present results clearly indicated that Lip SJA-95 treatment led to prolonged survival time, effective microbiological clearance, and reduced toxicity in the mice model of Candidiasis.

  12. Prevalence of Macrolide Resistance Genes in Clinical Isolates of the Streptococcus anginosus (“S. milleri”) Group

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jan A.; van Baar, Gilles J.; London, Nancy H. H. J.; Tjhie, Jeroen H. T.; Schouls, Leo M.; Stobberingh, Ellen E.

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-two unrelated erythromycin-resistant anginosus group strains (3.2% resistance rate) were assessed for mechanisms of resistance. Streptococcus anginosus accounted for 16 of the 22 isolates. Fifteen isolates harbored the erm(B) gene. The erm(TR) and the mef(E) genes were carried by two isolates each. In three isolates, none of these resistance genes was detected by PCR. PMID:11451701

  13. Contamination Profiles and Mass Loadings of Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs from a Small Urban Wastewater Treatment Plant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is limited regarding sources, distribution, environmental behavior, and fate of prescribed and illicit drugs. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can be one of the sources of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCP) into streams, rivers and lakes. The ...

  14. A field study of household attack rates and the effectiveness of macrolide antibiotics in reducing household transmission of pertussis.

    PubMed

    Terry, Janet B; Flatley, Christopher J; van den Berg, Debra J; Morgan, Geoffrey G; Trent, Marianne; Turahui, John A; Greenwood, Michelle C; Corben, Paul W; Bell, Greg J

    2015-03-01

    Bordetella pertussis (whooping cough) is an endemic, highly contagious bacterial respiratory infection, which is notifiable to Australian state and territory health departments. Between 2008 and 2011 there was a substantial outbreak in New South Wales with an initial increase in cases occurring in North Coast New South Wales from late 2007. During September and October 2011 the North Coast Public Health Unit conducted a household study of secondary attack rates to assess the effectiveness of pertussis vaccination as well as the timely use of antibiotics in preventing household transmission. At the time the study was commenced, notified cases included a large proportion of individuals with a documented history of vaccination against pertussis. We found lower attack rates amongst vaccinated compared with non-vaccinated subjects in all age groups, with the exception of the 5-11 years age group, who were also primarily responsible for the introduction of pertussis into the household. There was an increased risk of pertussis transmission from the household first primary case to contacts when antibiotic treatment was commenced later than 7 days after the onset of symptoms compared with within 7 days. This protective effect of timely antibiotic treatment in relation to transmission highlights the need to control for antibiotic treatment in field studies of pertussis. The benefits of timely diagnosis and use of antibiotics in preventing household transmission underscore the importance of early presentation and diagnosis of pertussis cases, particularly in households with susceptible occupants.

  15. Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of dirithromycin (AS-E 136; LY237216), a new macrolide antibiotic derived from erythromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Counter, F T; Ensminger, P W; Preston, D A; Wu, C Y; Greene, J M; Felty-Duckworth, A M; Paschal, J W; Kirst, H A

    1991-01-01

    Dirithromycin is a 9-N-11-O-oxazine derivative which is formed by condensation of 9(S)-erythromycylamine with 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)acetaldehyde. Dirithromycin is hydrolyzed, either under acidic conditions or in vivo, to its major active metabolite, 9(S)-erythromycylamine. The antimicrobial spectrum of dirithromycin is similar to that of erythromycin; both antibiotics are active against gram-positive bacteria, Legionella spp., Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Comparable results were obtained for each antibiotic in MIC and MBC determinations and in the potential development of resistance in vitro. The effects of human serum, bacterial growth media, test methodology, and inoculum size on MICs were similar for each antibiotic. In standard mouse protection studies, dirithromycin was more efficacious than erythromycin against experimental infections after subcutaneous administration of antibiotic. These results were consistent with pharmacokinetic studies in rodents, which showed that dirithromycin gave more persistent concentrations of antibiotic in serum and tissues than were achieved with erythromycin. These studies indicate that dirithromycin possesses antimicrobial activity comparable to that of erythromycin in vitro but is more active than erythromycin in vivo, which may be attributable to the persistence of antimicrobial activity in the tissue(s) of the test animals. PMID:1929252

  16. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass me...

  17. Contemporary Strategies for the Synthesis of Tetrahydropyran Derivatives: Application to Total Synthesis of Neopeltolide, a Marine Macrolide Natural Product

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydropyrans are structural motifs that are abundantly present in a range of biologically important marine natural products. As such, significant efforts have been paid to the development of efficient and versatile methods for the synthesis of tetrahydropyran derivatives. Neopeltolide, a potent antiproliferative marine natural product, has been an attractive target compound for synthetic chemists because of its complex structure comprised of a 14-membered macrolactone embedded with a tetrahydropyran ring, and twenty total and formal syntheses of this natural product have been reported so far. This review summarizes the total and formal syntheses of neopeltolide and its analogues, highlighting the synthetic strategies exploited for constructing the tetrahydropyran ring. PMID:27023567

  18. Synthesis of two subunits of the macrolide domain of the immunosuppressive agent sanglifehrin a and assembly of a macrolactone precursor. application of masamune anti-aldol condensation.

    PubMed

    Suttisintong, Khomson; White, James D

    2015-02-20

    Asymmetric anti-aldol coupling of a norephedrine-derived ester with an α-chiral aldehyde was used to synthesize a carboxylic acid representing the C13-C19 segment of the macrocyclic domain present in the immunosuppressive agent sanglifehrin A. Felkin addition set configuration at the C14-C17 stereotetrad in this unit in which hydroxyl functions at C15 and C17 were masked as an internal ketal. The carboxyl group of this segment was coupled to the N-terminus of the tripeptide portion (C1-N12) of sanglifehrin A macrolactone to assemble the C1-C19 domain. Synthesis of the C20-C25 subunit of sanglifehrin A containing a (23S) alcohol was completed via asymmetric allylation of (E)-3-iodo-2-methylprop-2-enal followed by oxidative cleavage of the terminal vinyl appendage and a Takai olefination with pinacol dichloromethylboronate. Esterification of this alcohol with a C1-C19 carboxylic acid furnished an open C1-C25 macrolactone precursor, but this substance failed to undergo macrocyclization via intramolecular Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. PMID:25584782

  19. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on growth and macrolide antibiotic resistance of indicator and anaerobic swine manure bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural plant compounds, such as the chlorophyll a catabolites pheophorbide a (php) and pyropheophorbide a (pyp), are potentially active in the gastrointestinal tracts and wastes of livestock as antimicrobial resistance-modifying agents through inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps. To investigate w...

  20. The effect of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin on microbial diversity in the canine small intestine as demonstrated by massive parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that the fecal microbiota is generally resilient to short-term antibiotic administration, but some bacterial taxa may remain depressed for several months. Limited information is available about the effect of antimicrobials on small intestinal microbiota, an important contributor to gastrointestinal health. The antibiotic tylosin is often successfully used for the treatment of chronic diarrhea in dogs, but its exact mode of action and its effect on the intestinal microbiota remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tylosin on canine jejunal microbiota. Tylosin was administered at 20 to 22 mg/kg q 24 hr for 14 days to five healthy dogs, each with a pre-existing jejunal fistula. Jejunal brush samples were collected through the fistula on days 0, 14, and 28 (14 days after withdrawal of tylosin). Bacterial diversity was characterized using massive parallel 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Results Pyrosequencing revealed a previously unrecognized species richness in the canine small intestine. Ten bacterial phyla were identified. Microbial populations were phylogenetically more similar during tylosin treatment. However, a remarkable inter-individual response was observed for specific taxa. Fusobacteria, Bacteroidales, and Moraxella tended to decrease. The proportions of Enterococcus-like organisms, Pasteurella spp., and Dietzia spp. increased significantly during tylosin administration (p < 0.05). The proportion of Escherichia coli-like organisms increased by day 28 (p = 0.04). These changes were not accompanied by any obvious clinical effects. On day 28, the phylogenetic composition of the microbiota was similar to day 0 in only 2 of 5 dogs. Bacterial diversity resembled the pre-treatment state in 3 of 5 dogs. Several bacterial taxa such as Spirochaetes, Streptomycetaceae, and Prevotellaceae failed to recover at day 28 (p < 0.05). Several bacterial groups considered to be sensitive to tylosin increased in their proportions. Conclusion Tylosin may lead to prolonged effects on the composition and diversity of jejunal microbiota. However, these changes were not associated with any short-term clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease in healthy dogs. Our results illustrate the complexity of the intestinal microbiota and the challenges associated with evaluating the effect of antibiotic administration on the various bacterial groups and their potential interactions. PMID:19799792

  1. Prevalence of macrolide-non-susceptible isolates among β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae in a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Seyama, Shoji; Nakamura, Yuka; Kashima, Chihiro; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Ushio, Masanobu; Fujii, Takeshi; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-09-01

    β-Lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) Haemophilus influenzae account for a large portion of H. influenzae clinical isolates in Japan. The aim of this study was to clarify the antimicrobial susceptibility of BLNAR H. influenzae clinical isolates as well as the annual changes in susceptibility. BLNAR H. influenzae isolates were collected from a tertiary care hospital from 2007 to 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and resistance mechanisms were analysed. All of the isolates (n=304) had amino acid substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) and isolates were classified by these amino acid substitutions: R517H or N526K (class I); S385T and R517H (class II); and S385T and N526K (class III). Classes I, II and III represented 8.2% (n=25), 9.5% (n=29) and 81.6% (n=248) of the isolates, respectively; 2 isolates could not be classified because they had a PBP3 with a substantially mutated FtsI transpeptidase domain. All of the isolates were highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones and carbapenems. The number of clarithromycin (CAM)-non-susceptible [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥16μg/mL] H. influenzae isolates increased significantly between 2010 and 2012. Moreover, CAM-non-susceptible H. influenzae isolates were prevalent among class II and class III BLNAR H. influenzae. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the CAM-resistant (MIC ≥32μg/mL) H. influenzae isolates showed that they were not specific sequence types, suggesting that CAM resistance may occur in any isolates. These results raise concern regarding the occurrence of multidrug-resistant BLNAR H. influenzae.

  2. Direct Detection of Helicobacter pylori Mutations Associated with Macrolide Resistance in Gastric Biopsy Material Taken from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Scarpellini, Paolo; Carrera, Paola; Cavallero, Annalisa; Cernuschi, Massimo; Mezzi, Gianni; Testoni, Pier Alberto; Zingale, Anna; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2002-01-01

    One hundred forty gastric biopsies were tested by microbiological methods and by amplifying a sequence of 23S rRNA and identifying mutations associated to clarithromycin resistance. Seventy-six specimens were positive for Helicobacter pylori. Mutational analysis revealed alterations in 18 (39.1%) of 46 and 2 (8.7%) of 23 samples from human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and -seronegative persons, respectively. The results of the mutational analysis fully correlated with those of the susceptibility tests. PMID:12037095

  3. In vitro activity of A-56268 (TE-031), a new macrolide, compared with that of erythromycin and clindamycin against selected gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, C A; Segreti, J; Beaudette, F E; Hines, D W; Goodman, L J; Kaplan, R L; Trenholme, G M

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro activity of A-56268 was determined and compared with that of erythromycin and clindamycin against a limited spectrum of 401 gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. A-56268 was quite active against erythromycin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Listeria monocytogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and group B streptococci and was moderately active against Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus. A-56268 was consistently bactericidal only for S. pneumoniae. The activity of A-56268 was comparable to that of erythromycin against most organisms tested. PMID:2952063

  4. Comparing HPLC-ESI-ITMS and UPLC-ESI-OA-TOF-MS in Characterizing Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs in Complex Environmental Matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the challenges of characterizing emerging contaminants in complex environmental matrices (e.g., biosolids, sewage, or wastewater) are the co-eluting interferences. For example, surfactants, fats, and humic acids, can be preferentially ionized instead of the analyte(s) of in...

  5. Prevalence of macrolide-non-susceptible isolates among β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae in a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Seyama, Shoji; Nakamura, Yuka; Kashima, Chihiro; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Ushio, Masanobu; Fujii, Takeshi; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-09-01

    β-Lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) Haemophilus influenzae account for a large portion of H. influenzae clinical isolates in Japan. The aim of this study was to clarify the antimicrobial susceptibility of BLNAR H. influenzae clinical isolates as well as the annual changes in susceptibility. BLNAR H. influenzae isolates were collected from a tertiary care hospital from 2007 to 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and resistance mechanisms were analysed. All of the isolates (n=304) had amino acid substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) and isolates were classified by these amino acid substitutions: R517H or N526K (class I); S385T and R517H (class II); and S385T and N526K (class III). Classes I, II and III represented 8.2% (n=25), 9.5% (n=29) and 81.6% (n=248) of the isolates, respectively; 2 isolates could not be classified because they had a PBP3 with a substantially mutated FtsI transpeptidase domain. All of the isolates were highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones and carbapenems. The number of clarithromycin (CAM)-non-susceptible [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥16μg/mL] H. influenzae isolates increased significantly between 2010 and 2012. Moreover, CAM-non-susceptible H. influenzae isolates were prevalent among class II and class III BLNAR H. influenzae. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the CAM-resistant (MIC ≥32μg/mL) H. influenzae isolates showed that they were not specific sequence types, suggesting that CAM resistance may occur in any isolates. These results raise concern regarding the occurrence of multidrug-resistant BLNAR H. influenzae. PMID:27530834

  6. [Severe haemolysis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Bohr, Anne Lisbeth; Aagaard, Thomas Granum; Birgens, Henrik; Søborg, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is naturally resistant to betalactamase antibiotics but is sensitive to macrolides. Occasionally, infections with M. pneumoniae can lead to severe anaemia due to its ability to cause haemolysis when cold agglutination occurs. Increasing bacterial resistance to macrolid antibiotics is a growing concern worldwide. We present two cases where infection with M. pneumoniae caused severe haemolysis, one of which was macrolide-resistant.

  7. Clonal dissemination of macrolide-resistant and penicillin-susceptible serotype 3 and penicillin-resistant Taiwan 19F-14 and 23F-15 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan: a pilot surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi; Uno, Kenji; Takahashi, Ken; Konishi, Mitsuru; Yoshimoto, Eiichiro; Murakawa, Koichi; Kita, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Large-scale surveillance studies using molecular techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have revealed that the spread of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci is due to clonal spread. However, in Japan, surveillance studies using such molecular techniques have never been done. Therefore, we conducted a pilot surveillance study to elucidate the present situation in Japan. Among the 145 isolates examined, the most prevalent serotype was type 19F (20%), for which most isolates were not susceptible to penicillin (86.2%) but were positive for the mef(A)/mef(E) gene (89.7%). The secondmost prevalent was serotype 3 (16.6%), for which most isolates were susceptible to penicillin (87.5%) and positive for the erm(B) gene (91.7%). PFGE analysis showed that both serotypes consisted mainly of clonally identical or related isolates and, in particular, 38% of the type 19F isolates were indistinguishable from or closely related to the Taiwan 19F-14 clone. In addition, some of the Japanese type 23F isolates with the erm(B) gene were indistinguishable from or related to the Taiwan 23F-15 clone as analyzed by PFGE. Based on the results of our pilot study performed in a single institution, it is likely that international antibiotic-resistant clones have already spread in Japan; therefore, a nationwide surveillance study should be urgently conducted. PMID:15814978

  8. Two Molecules of Lobophorolide Cooperate to Stabilize an Actin Dimer Using Both Their 'Ring' and 'Tail' Region

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, J.; Mok, Y; Kubanek, J; Allingham, J

    2010-01-01

    Actin filament-disrupting marine macrolides are promising templates from which to design therapeutics against cancer and other diseases that co-opt the actin cytoskeleton. Typically, these macrolides form either a 1:1 or 2:1 actin-macrolide complex where their aliphatic side chain, or 'tail', has been reported to convey the major determinant of cytotoxicity. We now report the structure of the marine macrolide lobophorolide bound to actin with a unique 2:2 stoichiometry in which two lobophorolide molecules cooperate to form a dimerization interface that is composed entirely of the macrolide 'ring' region, and each molecule of lobophorolide interacts with both actin subunits via their ring and tail regions to tether the subunits together. This binding mode imposes multiple barriers against microfilament stability and holds important implications for development of actin-targeting drugs and the evolution of macrolide biosynthetic enzymes.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Erythromycin- and Oxytetracycline-Sensitive Nocardia seriolae Strain U-1 (NBRC 110359)

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Masaki; Shimizu, Masato; Yamane, Jin; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Oshima, Syun-ichirou

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the emergence of macrolide- and oxytetracycline-resistant strains of Nocardia seriolae has previously been reported. Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of N. seriolae strain U-1, isolated in 2011 from a diseased yellowtail in Kagoshima Prefecture. The draft genome does not have any genes responsible for macrolide and tetracycline resistance. PMID:26798107

  10. Enhancement of antimicrobial activities of cefteram or clavulanic acid/amoxicillin against cefixime-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the presence of clarithromycin or azithromycin.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Shoichi; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Endo, Katsuhisa; Suzuki, Hiroo; Hosobe, Takahide; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Egawa, Shin; Kobayashi, Intetsu

    2006-08-01

    We investigated the enhancement of the antimicrobial activities of beta-lactams against cefixime (CFIX)-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the presence of macrolides. Ten strains of CFIX-resistant N. gonorrhoeae, isolated between 2000 and 2003 from male patients with urethritis at Jikei University Affiliated Hospital and its related clinics in the Tokyo metropolitan area, were tested. The fractional inhibitory concentrations of clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (CVA/AMPC), CFIX, or cefteram (CFTM), in the presence of clarithromycin (CAM) or azithromycin (AZM), against these strains were determined. Synergism, partial synergism, or additivity was recognized between CVA/AMPC or CFTM and macrolides against nine strains. Additivity and partial synergism between CFTM and macrolides against nine and ten strains, respectively, were also recognized. On the other hand, antagonism between CFIX and macrolides was recognized. These results indicate that combination antimicrobial chemotherapy, using CFTM or CVA/AMPC with macrolides, is a possible alternative treatment for CFIX-resistant N. gonorrhoeae infections.

  11. Utility of sequencing the erm(41) gene in isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus with low and intermediate clarithromycin MICs.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Howard, Susan T; Nash, Kevin; Parodi, Nicholas; Strong, Anita; Gee, Martha; Smith, Terry; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    The erm(41) gene confers inducible macrolide resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus, calling into question the usefulness of macrolides for treating M. abscessus subsp. abscessus infections. With an extended incubation (14 days), isolates with MICs of ≥8 μg/ml are considered macrolide resistant by current CLSI guidelines. Our goals were to determine the incidence of macrolide susceptibility in U.S. isolates, the validity of currently accepted MIC breakpoints, and the erm(41) sequences associated with susceptibility. Of 349 isolates (excluding those with 23S rRNA gene mutations), 85 (24%) had clarithromycin MICs of ≤8 μg/ml. Sequencing of the erm(41) genes from these isolates, as well as from isolates with MICs of ≥16 μg/ml, including ATCC 19977T, revealed 10 sequevars. The sequence in ATCC 19977T was designated sequevar (type) 1; most macrolide-resistant isolates were of this type. Seven sequevars contained isolates with MICs of >16 μg/ml. The T28C substitution in erm(41), previously associated with macrolide susceptibility, was identified in 62 isolates (18%) comprising three sequevars, with MICs of ≤2 (80%), 4 (10%), and 8 (10%) μg/ml. No other nucleotide substitution was associated with macrolide susceptibility. We recommend that clarithromycin susceptibility breakpoints for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus be changed from ≤2 to ≤4 μg/ml and that isolates with an MIC of 8 μg/ml have repeat MIC testing or erm sequencing performed. Our studies suggest that macrolides are useful for treating approximately 20% of U.S. isolates of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. Sequencing of the erm gene of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus will predict inducible macrolide susceptibility. PMID:25653399

  12. Utility of Sequencing the erm(41) Gene in Isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus with Low and Intermediate Clarithromycin MICs

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Howard, Susan T.; Nash, Kevin; Parodi, Nicholas; Strong, Anita; Gee, Martha; Smith, Terry; Wallace, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The erm(41) gene confers inducible macrolide resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus, calling into question the usefulness of macrolides for treating M. abscessus subsp. abscessus infections. With an extended incubation (14 days), isolates with MICs of ≥8 μg/ml are considered macrolide resistant by current CLSI guidelines. Our goals were to determine the incidence of macrolide susceptibility in U.S. isolates, the validity of currently accepted MIC breakpoints, and the erm(41) sequences associated with susceptibility. Of 349 isolates (excluding those with 23S rRNA gene mutations), 85 (24%) had clarithromycin MICs of ≤8 μg/ml. Sequencing of the erm(41) genes from these isolates, as well as from isolates with MICs of ≥16 μg/ml, including ATCC 19977T, revealed 10 sequevars. The sequence in ATCC 19977T was designated sequevar (type) 1; most macrolide-resistant isolates were of this type. Seven sequevars contained isolates with MICs of >16 μg/ml. The T28C substitution in erm(41), previously associated with macrolide susceptibility, was identified in 62 isolates (18%) comprising three sequevars, with MICs of ≤2 (80%), 4 (10%), and 8 (10%) μg/ml. No other nucleotide substitution was associated with macrolide susceptibility. We recommend that clarithromycin susceptibility breakpoints for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus be changed from ≤2 to ≤4 μg/ml and that isolates with an MIC of 8 μg/ml have repeat MIC testing or erm sequencing performed. Our studies suggest that macrolides are useful for treating approximately 20% of U.S. isolates of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus. Sequencing of the erm gene of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus will predict inducible macrolide susceptibility. PMID:25653399

  13. Postantibiotic Effect and Postantibiotic Sub-MIC Effect of Levofloxacin Compared to Those of Ofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin, Azithromycin, and Clarithromycin against 20 Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Sheila K.; Lin, Gengrong; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    The postantibiotic effect (PAE) (10 times the MIC of quinolones, 5 times the MIC of macrolides) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PAE-SME) at 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 times the MIC were determined for levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin against 20 pneumococci. Quinolone PAEs ranged between 0.5 and 6.5 h, and macrolide PAEs ranged between 1 and 6 h. Measurable PAE-SMEs (in hours) at the three concentrations were 1 to 5, 1 to 8, and 1 to 8, respectively, for quinolones and 1 to 8, 1 to 8, and 1 to 6, respectively, for macrolides. PMID:9593160

  14. Postantibiotic effect and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect of levofloxacin compared to those of ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin against 20 pneumococci.

    PubMed

    Spangler, S K; Lin, G; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1998-05-01

    The postantibiotic effect (PAE) (10 times the MIC of quinolones, 5 times the MIC of macrolides) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PAE-SME) at 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 times the MIC were determined for levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin against 20 pneumococci. Quinolone PAEs ranged between 0.5 and 6.5 h, and macrolide PAEs ranged between 1 and 6 h. Measurable PAE-SMEs (in hours) at the three concentrations were 1 to 5, 1 to 8, and 1 to 8, respectively, for quinolones and 1 to 8, 1 to 8, and 1 to 6, respectively, for macrolides. PMID:9593160

  15. Fate of antibiotics during wastewater treatment and antibiotic distribution in the effluent-receiving waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmin; Liu, Pengxiao; Feng, Yujie; Yang, Fenglin

    2013-08-15

    Antibiotics including three β-lactams, two fluoroquinolones and two macrolides, which were the top seven most prescribed antibiotics in Dalian, China, were selected to investigate their occurrence in six municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and their distribution in the effluent-receiving waters of the Yellow Sea. Four WWTPs employing different treatment technologies were selected to explore the mechanism of antibiotics elimination during wastewater treatment. Results showed that fluoroquinolones and macrolides were dominant species in both WWTPs effluents and the surveyed coastal waters. Biodegradation was the main pathway for β-lactams removal, however, primary treatment performed better than biological treatment for fluoroquinolones removal. Concentrations of macrolides increased dramatically after the biological treatment, which was probably due to the release of macrolides enclosed in feces particles. In the surveyed coastal waters, reduction of antibiotic concentration with distance was observed. Potential environmental risk caused by the occurrence of these antibiotics should be evaluated in future work.

  16. PHARMACEUTICALS IN WASTE STREAMS AND SURFACE WATERS OF THE COLORADO RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of selected pharmaceuticals (macrolidic antibiotics and pseudoephedrine) and illicit drugs (methamphetamine and Ecstasy) in surface ...

  17. Pharmaceuticals in Surface Waters and Potential Transfer to Irrigated Food Crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of selected pharmaceuticals (macrolidic antibiotics and pseudoephedrine) and illicit drugs (methamphetamine, Ecstasy) in surface wat...

  18. Multi-class determination and confirmation of antibiotic residues in honey using LC-MS/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-class method was developed for the determination and confirmation in honey of tetracyclines (chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, and sarafloxacin), macrolides (tylosin), lincosamides (lin...

  19. Fidaxomicin

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile; a type of bacteria that my cause severe or life-threatening diarrhea.) ... medications called macrolide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria in the intestines.Fidaxomicin will not treat infections ...

  20. Psittacosis

    MedlinePlus

    The infection is treated with antibiotics. Doxycycline is used first. Other antibiotics that may be prescribed include: Macrolides Fluoroquinolones Other tetracycline antibiotics Note: Tetracycline and doxycycline by mouth are ...

  1. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins’ progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds—macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides. PMID:27598215

  2. Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaoli; Sun, Hongmei; Liu, Fei; Feng, Yanling; Zhao, Hanqing; Xue, Guanhua; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cases of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae have increased rapidly since 2000, especially in Asia. Patients infected with macrolide-resistant M pneumoniae usually present with severe M pneumoniae pneumonia. The aim of this study was to identify indicators for whether children at an early stage of M pneumoniae infection develop mild or severe pneumonia. Case Summary: Herein, we retrospectively reviewed 2 pediatric cases caused by macrolide-resistant M pneumoniae, but with markedly different severity of pneumonia. First, we compared the clinical courses of the patients, then isolated the pathogens and tested their response to macrolides, then finally, carried out whole genome sequencing of these isolates. Despite the difference in clinical presentation of the infection, both isolates exhibited a high level of resistance to macrolide antibiotics. Analysis of clinical data showed that the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in blood samples of the patients in the early stages of disease varied greatly. Genome sequence analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms mainly focused on adhesin P1, which is involved in the pathogenicity of M pneumoniae. Conclusion: The differences of erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the early stage of M pneumoniae pneumonia and mutations in P1 protein may help us to distinguish between severe or mild disease after infection with macrolide-resistant M pneumoniae. These findings could lead to the development of screening assays that will allow us to distinguish severe or mild M pneumoniae pneumonia early. PMID:27661056

  3. Structure-property relationship for cellular accumulation of macrolones in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

    PubMed

    Munić Kos, Vesna; Koštrun, Sanja; Fajdetić, Andrea; Bosnar, Martina; Kelnerić, Željko; Stepanić, Višnja; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2013-05-13

    Macrolones are a new class of antimicrobial compounds consisting of a macrolide scaffold linked to a 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid moiety via C(4″) position of a macrolide. As macrolides are known to possess favorable pharmacokinetic properties by accumulating in inflammatory cells, in this study we determined the intensity of accumulation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of 57 compounds of the macrolone class and analyzed the relationship between the molecular structure and this cellular pharmacokinetic property. Accumulation of macrolones ranged from 0 to 5.5-fold higher than the standard macrolide azithromycin. Distinct structural features in all three considered molecule parts: the macrolide scaffold, quinolone moiety and the linker, affect cellular accumulation. Interestingly, while the parent macrolide, azithromycin, accumulates approximately 3-fold more than clarithromycin, among macrolones all clarithromycin derivatives accumulated in PMNs significantly more than their azithromycin counterparts. Modeling cellular accumulation of macrolones with simple molecular descriptors, as well as with the measured octanol-water distribution coefficient, revealed that the number of hydrogen bond donors and secondary amide groups negatively contribute to macrolone accumulation, while lipophilicity makes a positive contribution.

  4. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins' progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds-macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides.

  5. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins' progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds-macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides. PMID:27598215

  6. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis.

  7. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis. PMID:26038763

  8. Distribution of serotypes and evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility among human and bovine Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated in Brazil between 1980 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Tatiana Castro Abreu; Costa, Natália Silva; Vianna Souza, Aline Rosa; Silva, Ligia Guedes da; Corrêa, Ana Beatriz de Almeida; Fernandes, Flavio Gimenis; Oliveira, Ivi Cristina Menezes; Mattos, Marcos Corrêa de; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Benchetrit, Leslie Claude

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a common agent of clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis and an important cause of human infections, mainly among pregnant women, neonates and nonpregnant adults with underlying diseases. The present study describes the genetic and phenotypic diversity among 392 S. agalactiae human and bovine strains isolated between 1980 and 2006 in Brazil. The most prevalent serotypes were Ia, II, III and V and all the strains were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin and levofloxacin. Resistance to clindamycin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, rifampicin and tetracycline was observed. Among the erythromycin resistant strains, mefA/E, ermA and, mainly, ermB gene were detected, and a shift of prevalence from the macrolide resistance phenotype to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotype over the years was observed. The 23 macrolide-resistant strains showed 19 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Regarding macrolide resistance, a major concern in S. agalactiae epidemiology, the present study describes an increase in erythromycin resistance from the 80s to the 90s followed by a decrease in the 2000-2006 period. Also, the genetic heterogeneity described points out that erythromycin resistance in Brazil is rather due to horizontal gene transmission than to spreading of specific macrolide-resistant clones. PMID:23453948

  9. Antibiotic Resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolated from Children with Diarrhea in Thailand and Japan.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngan Thi Kim; Thongprachum, Aksara; Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Nishimura, Shuichi; Shimizu-Onda, Yuko; Trinh, Quang Duy; Khamrin, Pattara; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Kongsricharoern, Tipachan; Komine-Aizawa, Shihoko; Okitsu, Shoko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A total of 29 Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli strains were isolated from Thai and Japanese children with diarrhea using the Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification method. The samples were evaluated for mutations in gyrA and 23S rRNA in order to assess resistance against fluoroquinolones and macrolides, respectively. Among the isolated strains, 9 (8 C. jejuni and 1 C. coli) were from Thai children, and the other 20 (C. jejuni) were isolated from Japanese children. High fluoroquinolone resistance rates were observed in Thai (66.7%) and Japanese (90%) children. Macrolide resistance was not observed in Japanese children but was observed at a considerable rate of 12.5% of C. jejuni isolated in the Thai cohort. The results indicate that continuous monitoring of resistance of Campylobacter strains to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is definitely necessary.

  10. [Immunosuppressives to prevent rejection reactions after allogeneic corneal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lapp, T; Maier, P; Birnbaum, F; Schlunck, G; Reinhard, T

    2014-03-01

    In order to prevent rejection of an allogeneic corneal transplant after perforating (high risk) keratoplasty, active agents from different classes of pharmacological substances are used, as with solid organ transplantation. In addition to glucocorticoids, antiproliferative agents, small molecule inhibitors and antibodies, those belonging to the group of macrolides with their many derivatives represent an interesting class of substances in this context. As a supplement to cyclosporin A (CSA) the most successful macrolide in transplantation medicine, animal experiments are currently being carried out to test newer macrolide derivatives, such as sanglifehrin A (SFA). This overview describes the classes of drugs and modes of action of currently administered standard medications in the clinical routine and new developments are presented.

  11. Antibiotics as immunomodulant agents in COPD.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Mantero, Marco; Aliberti, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that some antibiotics have activities beyond their direct antibacterial effects. Macrolide is the antibiotic class with more convincing studies and evidence on its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. Different clinical studies have shown that macrolide prophylaxis in patients with moderate-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can have a significant impact on the exacerbation rate reducing morbidity and, potentially, mortality of the disease. Other antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, demonstrate a variety of immunomodulatory effects but only few clinical data are available in COPD. New macrolide derivatives devoid of antibacterial activity have been synthetized. This review analyses the relevance of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of antibiotics in the management of COPD.

  12. Immunomodulatory Role of Clarithromycin in Acinetobacter baumannii Infection via Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Theocharis; Kambas, Konstantinos; Mitsios, Alexandros; Panopoulou, Maria; Tsironidou, Victoria; Dellaporta, Erminia; Kouklakis, Georgios; Arampatzioglou, Athanasios; Angelidou, Iliana; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Skendros, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics have been shown to act as immunomodulatory molecules in various immune cells. However, their effect on neutrophils has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we investigated the role of macrolide antibiotics in the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). By assessing ex vivo and in vivo NET formation, we demonstrated that clarithromycin is able to induce NET generation both in vitro and in vivo. Clarithromycin utilizes autophagy in order to form NETs, and these NETs are decorated with antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Clarithromycin-induced NETs are able to inhibit Acinetobacter baumannii growth and biofilm formation in an LL-37-dependent manner. Additionally, LL-37 antimicrobial function depends on NET scaffold integrity. Collectively, these data expand the knowledge on the immunomodulatory role of macrolide antibiotics via the generation of LL-37-bearing NETs, which demonstrate LL-37-dependent antimicrobial activity and biofilm inhibition against A. baumannii. PMID:26643338

  13. Synthesis of macrolones with central piperazine ring in the linker and its influence on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kapić, Samra; Cipčić Paljetak, Hana; Palej Jakopović, Ivana; Fajdetić, Andrea; Ilijaš, Marina; Stimac, Vlado; Brajša, Karmen; Holmes, David J; Berge, John; Alihodžić, Sulejman

    2011-12-01

    Three macrolides, clarithromycin, azithromycin and 11-O-Me-azithromycin have been selected for the construction of a series of new macrolone derivatives. Quinolone-linker intermediates are prepared by Sonogashira-type C(6)-alkynylation of 6-iodoquinolone precursors. The final macrolones, differing by macrolide moiety and substituents at the position N-1 of the quinolone or by the presence of an ethyl ester or free acid on the quinolone unit attached via a linker. The linker comprises of a central piperazine ring bonded to the 4″-O position of cladinose by 3-carbon ester or ether functionality. Modifications of the linker did not improve antibacterial properties compared to the previously reported macrolone compounds. Linker flexibility seems to play an important role for potency against macrolide resistant respiratory pathogens.

  14. Salinipyrone and Pacificanone Are Biosynthetic By-products of the Rosamicin Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Awakawa, Takayoshi; Crüsemann, Max; Munguia, Jason; Ziemert, Nadine; Nizet, Victor; Fenical, William; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-07-01

    Salinipyrones and pacificanones are structurally related polyketides from Salinispora pacifica CNS-237 that are proposed to arise from the same modular polyketide synthase (PKS) assembly line. Genome sequencing revealed a large macrolide PKS gene cluster that codes for the biosynthesis of rosamicin A and a series of new macrolide antibiotics. Mutagenesis experiments unexpectedly correlated salinipyrone and pacificanone biosynthesis to the rosamicin octamodule Spr PKS. Remarkably, this bifurcated polyketide pathway illuminates a series of enzymatic domain- and module-skipping reactions that give rise to natural polyketide product diversity. Our findings enlarge the growing knowledge of polyketide biochemistry and illuminate potential challenges in PKS bioengineering.

  15. Synthesis, activity and pharmacokinetics of novel antibacterial 15-membered ring macrolones.

    PubMed

    Fajdetić, Andrea; Vinter, Adrijana; Paljetak, Hana Čipčić; Padovan, Jasna; Jakopović, Ivana Palej; Kapić, Samra; Alihodžić, Sulejman; Filić, Darko; Modrić, Marina; Košutić-Hulita, Nada; Antolović, Roberto; Schoenfeld, Zrinka Ivezić; Mutak, Stjepan; Eraković Haber, Vesna; Spaventi, Radan

    2011-08-01

    Synthesis, antibacterial activity and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of macrolide antibiotics-macrolones-derived from azithromycin, comprising oxygen atom(s) in the linker and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, are reported. Selected compounds showed excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin resistant respiratory pathogens. However, the majority of compounds lacked good bioavailability. The isopropyl ester, compound 35, and a macrolone derivative with an elongated linker 29 showed the best oral bioavailability in rats, both accompanied with an excellent overall microbiology profile addressing inducible and constitutive MLSb as well as efflux mediated macrolide resistance in streptococci, while compound 29 is more potent against staphylococci.

  16. The Relationship between Antimicrobial Use and Antimicrobial Resistance in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cars, Otto; Buchholz, Udo; Mölstad, Sigvard; Goettsch, Wim; Veldhuijzen, Irene K.; Kool, Jacob L.; Sprenger, Marc J.W.; Degener, John E.

    2002-01-01

    In Europe, antimicrobial resistance has been monitored since 1998 by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). We examined the relationship between penicillin nonsusceptibility of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (an indicator organism) and antibiotic sales. Information was collected on 1998-99 resistance data for invasive isolates of S. pneumoniae to penicillin, based on surveillance data from EARSS and on outpatient sales during 1997 for beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. Our results show that in Europe antimicrobial resistance is correlated with use of beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. PMID:11927025

  17. Seasonal Variations in Clostridium difficile Infections Are Associated with Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity Independently of Antibiotic Prescriptions: a Time Series Analysis in Québec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Élise; Frenette, Charles; Longtin, Yves; Gourdeau, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal variations in Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), with a higher incidence occurring during winter months, have been reported. Although winter epidemics of respiratory viruses may be temporally associated with an increase in CDAD morbidity, we hypothesized that this association is mainly due to increased antibiotic use for respiratory infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the two most frequent respiratory viruses (influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus [RSV]) and antibiotics prescribed for respiratory infections (fluoroquinolones and macrolides) on the CDAD incidence in hospitals in the province of Québec, Canada. A multivariable Box-Jenkins transfer function model was built to relate monthly CDAD incidence to the monthly percentage of positive tests for influenza virus and RSV and monthly fluoroquinolone and macrolide prescriptions over a 4-year period (January 2005 to December 2008). Analysis showed that temporal variations in CDAD incidence followed temporal variations for influenza virus (P = 0.043), RSV (P = 0.004), and macrolide prescription (P = 0.05) time series with an average delay of 1 month and fluoroquinolone prescription time series with an average delay of 2 months (P = 0.01). We conclude that influenza virus and RSV circulation is independently associated with CDAD incidence after controlling for fluoroquinolone and macrolide use. This association was observed at an aggregated level and may be indicative of other phenomena occurring during wintertime. PMID:22106208

  18. Seasonal variations in Clostridium difficile infections are associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus activity independently of antibiotic prescriptions: a time series analysis in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Rodica; Fortin, Elise; Frenette, Charles; Longtin, Yves; Gourdeau, Marie

    2012-02-01

    Seasonal variations in Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), with a higher incidence occurring during winter months, have been reported. Although winter epidemics of respiratory viruses may be temporally associated with an increase in CDAD morbidity, we hypothesized that this association is mainly due to increased antibiotic use for respiratory infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the two most frequent respiratory viruses (influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus [RSV]) and antibiotics prescribed for respiratory infections (fluoroquinolones and macrolides) on the CDAD incidence in hospitals in the province of Québec, Canada. A multivariable Box-Jenkins transfer function model was built to relate monthly CDAD incidence to the monthly percentage of positive tests for influenza virus and RSV and monthly fluoroquinolone and macrolide prescriptions over a 4-year period (January 2005 to December 2008). Analysis showed that temporal variations in CDAD incidence followed temporal variations for influenza virus (P = 0.043), RSV (P = 0.004), and macrolide prescription (P = 0.05) time series with an average delay of 1 month and fluoroquinolone prescription time series with an average delay of 2 months (P = 0.01). We conclude that influenza virus and RSV circulation is independently associated with CDAD incidence after controlling for fluoroquinolone and macrolide use. This association was observed at an aggregated level and may be indicative of other phenomena occurring during wintertime.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain (New Sequence Type 2357) Carrying Tn3926.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xing-Bei; Mi, Zu-Huang; Wang, Chun-Xin; Zhu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing sequence type 2357 (ST2357) strain, NB60, which contains drug-resistant genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, colistin, macrolides, and tetracycline. Strain NB60 was isolated from human blood, making it an important tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:27660779

  20. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  1. Separation of cyclosporins and other antibiotics by HSCCC.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Applications of high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) for the separations of antibiotics, cyclosporins and isoflavones, by a marine Micromonospora and macrolides including tacrolimus, ascomycin, and dihydroFk-506 are described. The application of silver ion HSCCC technique in the separation of tacrolimus from its components is also described.

  2. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  3. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a promising cell factory for production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Yeon; Yoo, Young Ji; Lim, Si-Kyu; Cha, Sun Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun; Roe, Jung-Hye; Kim, Jihyun F; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-02-10

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, which produces 12- and 14-membered ring macrolide antibiotics, is a platform strain for heterologous expression of secondary metabolites. Its 9.05-Mb genome sequence revealed an abundance of genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and their precursors, which should be useful for the production of bioactive compounds. PMID:26718561

  4. Intestinal microbiome is related to lifetime antibiotic use in Finnish pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Virta, Lauri J; Kekkonen, Riina A; Forslund, Kristoffer; Bork, Peer; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-01-01

    Early-life antibiotic use is associated with increased risk for metabolic and immunological diseases, and mouse studies indicate a causal role of the disrupted microbiome. However, little is known about the impacts of antibiotics on the developing microbiome of children. Here we use phylogenetics, metagenomics and individual antibiotic purchase records to show that macrolide use in 2-7 year-old Finnish children (N=142; sampled at two time points) is associated with a long-lasting shift in microbiota composition and metabolism. The shift includes depletion of Actinobacteria, increase in Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, decrease in bile-salt hydrolase and increase in macrolide resistance. Furthermore, macrolide use in early life is associated with increased risk of asthma and predisposes to antibiotic-associated weight gain. Overweight and asthmatic children have distinct microbiota compositions. Penicillins leave a weaker mark on the microbiota than macrolides. Our results support the idea that, without compromising clinical practice, the impact on the intestinal microbiota should be considered when prescribing antibiotics. PMID:26811868

  5. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a promising cell factory for production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Yeon; Yoo, Young Ji; Lim, Si-Kyu; Cha, Sun Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun; Roe, Jung-Hye; Kim, Jihyun F; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-02-10

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, which produces 12- and 14-membered ring macrolide antibiotics, is a platform strain for heterologous expression of secondary metabolites. Its 9.05-Mb genome sequence revealed an abundance of genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and their precursors, which should be useful for the production of bioactive compounds.

  6. [Torsade de pointes in the management of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Urtubia Palacios, A; Usieto López, L; Fernández Esteban, M I; Puértolas Ortega, M

    2014-01-01

    Torsade de pointes is a frequent cause of sudden death of cardiac origin, with uncertain mechanisms of actions and very diverse origins. A case is presented of a patient with a bronchial condition on pharmacological treatment with macrolides, and who, as well as having atrial fibrillation, suffered an episode of self-limiting torsade de pointes that abated spontaneously with no associated clinical complications.

  7. Drug-susceptibility of isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated from colonic mucosal specimens of pigs collected from slaughter houses in Japan in 2009

    PubMed Central

    KAJIWARA, Keita; KOZAWA, Midori; KANAZAWA, Takuya; UETSUKA, Kouji; NAKAJIMA, Hiromi; ADACHI, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Twenty nine isolates identified as Brachyspira hyodysenteriae were most susceptible to carbadox and metronidazole, whereas they were resistant to macrolides. The isolates showed intermediate susceptibility to tiamulin, lincomycin, penicillin G, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, enrofloxacin and valnemulin, with MIC50 values ranging from 0.39 to 3.13. PMID:26596637

  8. Insights into the Mode of Action of Novel Fluoroketolides, Potent Inhibitors of Bacterial Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krokidis, Marios G.; Márquez, Viter; Wilson, Daniel N.; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L.

    2014-01-01

    Ketolides, the third generation of expanded-spectrum macrolides, have in the last years become a successful weapon in the endless war against macrolide-resistant pathogens. Ketolides are semisynthetic derivatives of the naturally produced macrolide erythromycin, displaying not only improved activity against some erythromycin-resistant strains but also increased bactericidal activity as well as inhibitory effects at lower drug concentrations. In this study, we present a series of novel ketolides carrying alkyl-aryl side chains at the C-6 position of the lactone ring and, additionally, one or two fluorine atoms attached either directly to the lactone ring at the C-2 position or indirectly via the C-13 position. According to our genetic and biochemical studies, these novel ketolides occupy the known macrolide binding site at the entrance of the ribosomal tunnel and exhibit lower MIC values against wild-type or mutant strains than erythromycin. In most cases, the ketolides display activities comparable to or better than the clinically used ketolide telithromycin. Chemical protection experiments using Escherichia coli ribosomes bearing U2609C or U754A mutations in 23S rRNA suggest that the alkyl-aryl side chain establishes an interaction with the U2609-A752 base pair, analogous to that observed with telithromycin but unlike the interactions formed by cethromycin. These findings reemphasize the versatility of the alkyl-aryl side chains with respect to species specificity, which will be important for future design of improved antimicrobial agents. PMID:24189263

  9. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  10. In Vitro Capability of Faropenem To Select for Resistant Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain (New Sequence Type 2357) Carrying Tn3926

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase–producing sequence type 2357 (ST2357) strain, NB60, which contains drug-resistant genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, colistin, macrolides, and tetracycline. Strain NB60 was isolated from human blood, making it an important tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:27660779

  12. Diversity-oriented synthesis leads to an effective class of bifunctional linchpins uniting anion relay chemistry (ARC) with benzyne reactivity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amos B; Kim, Won-Suk

    2011-04-26

    In conjunction with the construction of a diversity-oriented synthesis library of 10-membered ring "natural product-like" macrolides, the design, synthesis, and validation of a unique class of bifunctional linchpins, uniting benzyne reactivity initiated by type II anion relay chemistry (ARC) has been achieved, permitting access to diverse [2+2], [3+2], and [4+2] cycloadducts.

  13. In vitro susceptibilities of Mycoplasma genitalium to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Renaudin, H; Tully, J G; Bebear, C

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibilities of seven clinical isolates of Mycoplasma genitalium and three strains of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to a variety of antibiotics were examined by an agar dilution method. Macrolides, pristinamycin, and tetracyclines were very active against both species. Sparfloxacin was the most active quinolone tested. None of the 21 antibiotics tested had differential activity toward the two organisms. PMID:1503451

  14. Total synthesis of a library of designed hybrids of the microtubule-stabilising anticancer agents taxol, discodermolide and dictyostatin.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Ian; Naylor, Guy J; Fujita, Takeshi; Guzmán, Esther; Wright, Amy E

    2010-01-14

    A hybrid library of the marine natural products dictyostatin and discodermolide, incorporating the taxol or taxotere side chains, were synthesised; preliminary biological evaluation in the PANC-1 cancer cell line revealed significant antiproliferative activity, demonstrating that a macrolide scaffold is an effective surrogate for the baccatin core of taxol.

  15. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on erythromycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a reduce erythromycin resistance of reference strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria with multidrug or macrolide efflux pumps, as indicative of their effect on bacteria indigenous to anaerobic swine ...

  16. Total Synthesis of Mycalolides A and B through Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masaki; Oka, Hirotaka; Usui, Akihiro; Ishitsuka, Tomoya; Mogi, Yuzo; Watanabe, Hidekazu; Tsunoda, Masaki; Kigoshi, Hideo

    2015-11-16

    An asymmetric total synthesis of the trisoxazole marine macrolides mycalolides A and B is described. This synthesis involves the convergent assembly of highly functionalized C1-C19 trisoxazole and C20-C35 side-chain segments through the use of olefin metathesis and esterification as well as Julia-Kocienski olefination and enamide formation as key steps.

  17. Anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of azithromycin in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells.

    PubMed

    Banjanac, Mihailo; Munić Kos, Vesna; Nujić, Krunoslav; Vrančić, Mila; Belamarić, Daniela; Crnković, Slaven; Hlevnjak, Mario; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-10-01

    Azithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic with well-described anti-inflammatory properties which can be attributed, at least partially, to its action on macrophages. We have previously shown, with 18 different macrolide molecules, that IL-6 and PGE₂ inhibition correlates with macrolide accumulation, as well as with their binding to phospholipids in J774A.1 cells. The present study was performed in order to substantiate the hypothesis that biological membranes are a target for macrolide anti-inflammatory activity. By analyzing the effect of azithromycin on overall eicosanoid production, we found that in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells, azithromycin, like indomethacin, inhibited the synthesis of all eicosanoids produced downstream of COX. Upstream of COX, azithromycin inhibited arachidonic acid release in the same way as a cPLA₂ inhibitor, while indomethacin had no effect. Further comparison revealed that in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells, the cPLA₂ inhibitor showed the same profile of inhibition as azithromycin in inhibiting PGE₂, IL-6, IL-12p40 and arachidonic acid release. Therefore, we propose that the anti-inflammatory activity of azithromycin in this model may be due to interactions with cPLA₂, causing inadequate translocation of the enzyme or disturbing physical interactions with its substrates.

  18. Inhibition of Toxoplasma gondii protein synthesis by azithromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, J; Garneau, V; Chamberland, S

    1993-01-01

    Azithromycin was shown to specifically inhibit the protein synthesis of Toxoplasma gondii in experimental systems by using free tachyzoites and T. gondii-infected mouse macrophages. RNA synthesis of the parasite was not affected by azithromycin. Inhibition of protein synthesis was also proportional to the relative anti-Toxoplasma activity of three macrolides. PMID:8215287

  19. Development of an Analytical Method to Extract and Detect Pharmaceuticals in Plant Matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that human-use macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, clindamycin, and roxithromycin) are environmentally available in wastewaters, source waters, and biosolids. Since some water authorities use the treated wastewater effluent for non-potable water reuse such as f...

  20. Two Cases of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia with A2063G Mutation in the 23S rRNA Gene in Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Joo Hee; Chun, Jin Kyong; Oh, Ki Jin; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2013-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of pneumonia caused by the same macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in siblings. M. pneumoniae was identified using real-time PCR. Direct sequence analysis of the 23S rRNA gene revealed a point mutation in V domain (A2063G) of the 23S rRNA gene. PMID:23301225

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Mycoplasma Hominis and Ureaplasma Urealyticum Isolated During a Population-Based Study Concerning Women Infertility in Northeast Romania

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Mareş; Valentin, Năstasă; Bogdan, Doroftei; Carmen, Chifiriuc Mariana; Coralia, Bleotu; Demetra, Socolov

    2011-01-01

    The study was carried out on 1068 infertile women under initial evaluation. For Mycoplasma hominis, the highest resistance rates were registered for ciprofloxacin (72.22%), followed by macrolides and ofloxacin. For Ureaplasma urealyticum, the ciprofloxacin resistance was also high (51.72%), while the resistance rates to other tested antibiotics were significantly lower. PMID:24031629

  2. Bacteria evade immune recognition via TLR13 and binding of their 23S rRNA by MLS antibiotics by the same mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hochrein, Hubertus; Kirschning, Carsten J.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system recognizes pathogens and other danger by means of pattern recognition receptors. Recently, we have demonstrated that the orphan Toll-like receptor 13 (TLR13) senses a defined sequence of the bacterial rRNA and that bacteria use specific mechanisms to evade macrolide lincosamide streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics detection via TLR13. PMID:23802068

  3. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a cause of febrile hemolytic anemia in travelers].

    PubMed

    Ficko, C; Andriamanantena, D; Flateau, F; Mangouka, L; Soler, C; Carmoi, T; Rapp, C

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause varied hematologic manifestations that are frequently associated with lower respiratory tract infections. Acute febrile hemolysis without respiratory symptoms is quite rare. We describe the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for acute fever with hemolysis, after returning from Djibouti. M. pneumoniae infection was proved by serological testing. A favorable outcome followed macrolide treatment. PMID:23352983

  4. Total Synthesis of Mycalolides A and B through Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masaki; Oka, Hirotaka; Usui, Akihiro; Ishitsuka, Tomoya; Mogi, Yuzo; Watanabe, Hidekazu; Tsunoda, Masaki; Kigoshi, Hideo

    2015-11-16

    An asymmetric total synthesis of the trisoxazole marine macrolides mycalolides A and B is described. This synthesis involves the convergent assembly of highly functionalized C1-C19 trisoxazole and C20-C35 side-chain segments through the use of olefin metathesis and esterification as well as Julia-Kocienski olefination and enamide formation as key steps. PMID:26450520

  5. Microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin on human colonic microflora in chemostats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Yao, Junping; Wu, Qinghua; Wei, Yajing; Dai, Menghong; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiological safety of tilmicosin on human intestinal microflora, four chemostat models of healthy human colonic ecosystems were exposed to tilmicosin (0, 0.436, 4.36, and 43.6 μg/mL) for 7 days. Prior to and during drug exposure, three microbiological endpoints were monitored daily including short-chain fatty acids, bacterial counts and macrolide susceptibility. Colonization resistance of each community was determined by 3 successive daily challenges of Salmonella typhimurium. Genes associated with virulence and macrolide resistance in Enterococcus faecalis were determined by PCR. Transcriptional expression of the virulence gene (gelE) in E. faecalis was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Our results showed that different concentrations of tilmicosin did not disrupt the colonization resistance in each chemostat. During exposure to 4.36 and 43.6 μg/mL tilmicosin, the Bacteroides fragilis population was significantly decreased while the proportion of resistant Enterococci increased. After long-term exposure to the highest concentration (43.6 μg/mL) of tilmicosin, the gelE gene was significantly up-regulated in the high-level macrolide resistant strains that also contained the ermB resistance gene. This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin using a chemostat model. These findings also provide new insight into the co-occurrence of macrolide resistance and virulence in E. faecalis under tilmicosin selective pressure.

  6. Intestinal microbiome is related to lifetime antibiotic use in Finnish pre-school children

    PubMed Central

    Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Virta, Lauri J.; Kekkonen, Riina A.; Forslund, Kristoffer; Bork, Peer; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Early-life antibiotic use is associated with increased risk for metabolic and immunological diseases, and mouse studies indicate a causal role of the disrupted microbiome. However, little is known about the impacts of antibiotics on the developing microbiome of children. Here we use phylogenetics, metagenomics and individual antibiotic purchase records to show that macrolide use in 2–7 year-old Finnish children (N=142; sampled at two time points) is associated with a long-lasting shift in microbiota composition and metabolism. The shift includes depletion of Actinobacteria, increase in Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, decrease in bile-salt hydrolase and increase in macrolide resistance. Furthermore, macrolide use in early life is associated with increased risk of asthma and predisposes to antibiotic-associated weight gain. Overweight and asthmatic children have distinct microbiota compositions. Penicillins leave a weaker mark on the microbiota than macrolides. Our results support the idea that, without compromising clinical practice, the impact on the intestinal microbiota should be considered when prescribing antibiotics. PMID:26811868

  7. [Streptococcus pyogenes: penicillin and erythromycin susceptibility in the cities of Neuquen and Cipolletti].

    PubMed

    Soriano, S V; Brasili, S; Saiz, M; Carranza, C; Vidal, P; Calderón, J; Lopardo, H A

    2000-01-01

    Penicillin resistance has not yet been detected in Streptococcus pyogenes. However macrolide-resistant streptococci have emerged in several countries. Only low rates of erythromycin-resistant S. pyogenes were reported in Argentina, with the exception of a 11.1% observed in Mendoza. The aim of the present study was to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and to erythromycin of 251 consecutive clinically-significant isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from four centers of Cipolletti and Neuquén during the period April-December 1998. The double disk test with erythromycin and clindamycin disks was employed as a screening method to detect ERY-resistant streptococci and to determine the phenotype of macrolide resistance. Disk diffusion was also employed for determining penicillin susceptibility. Macrolide-resistant isolates were also tested for penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, clindamycin and azithromycin susceptibility by the agar dilution method. Additionally they were also tested for erythromycin susceptibility by E-test (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden). All streptococci studied were susceptible to penicillin and thirty of them (12.0%) were resistant to erythromycin. All these resistant isolates were also resistant to azithromycin but susceptible to ceftriaxone and clindamycin. They showed the phenotype M (probably efflux-mediated mechanism) and the MICs of erythromycin ranged between 8 and 16 micrograms/ml. According to these results we conclude that in spite of universal susceptibility to penicillin in S. pyogenes, macrolide resistance is a matter of concern in Neuquén and Cipolletti. At least in those cities it appears to be necessary to routinely perform macrolide susceptibility tests in beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  8. Comparative estimated effectiveness of antibiotic classes as initial and secondary treatments of respiratory tract infections: longitudinal analysis of routine data from UK primary care 1991-2012.

    PubMed

    Berni, Ellen; Butler, Chris C; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; de Voogd, Hanka; Ouwens, Mario; Morgan, Christopher Ll; Currie, Craig J

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To compare the estimated effectiveness of seven frequently prescribed antibiotic classes as initial and secondary treatments of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) 1991-2012. The main outcome measure was a surrogate for estimated antibiotic effectiveness. Methods Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Having established standardized criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure, estimated treatment effectiveness rates were calculated as one minus the treatment failure rate. For each year from 1991 to 2012, estimated effectiveness rates by treatment line, indication, and sub-indication were calculated. These were presented by antibiotic class, with a sub-analysis for the macrolide clarithromycin. Findings From approximately 58 million antibiotic prescriptions in CPRD, we analyzed 8,654,734 courses of antibiotic monotherapy: 4,825,422 courses (56%) were associated with URTI; 3,829,312 (44%) were associated with LRTI. Amino-penicillins (4,148,729 [56%]), penicillins (1,304,561 [18%]), and macrolides (944,622 [13%]) predominated as initial treatments; macrolides (375,903 [32%]), aminopenicillins (275,866 [23%]), and cephalosporins (159,954 [14%]) as secondary treatments. Macrolides and aminopenicillins had estimated effectiveness rates ≥80% across the study period as initial treatments of URTI and LRTI. In secondary use, only macrolides maintained these rates: 80.7% vs. 79.8% in LRTI, 85.1% vs. 84.5% in throat infections, 80.7% vs. 82.3% in nasal infections, 83.5% vs. 83.8% in unspecified URTI in 1991 and 2012, respectively. Implications After more than two decades, macrolides remained amongst the most effective antibiotic classes for both URTI and LRTI in initial and secondary antibiotic treatment when a further antibiotic course was prescribed. Limitations Antibiotic treatments were classified as intention to treat. It is unknown whether the

  9. Lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of lactones to polyesters and its mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, S; Suda, S; Uyama, H; Kobayashi, S

    1999-01-01

    Lipase catalysis induced a ring-opening polymerization of lactones with different ring-sizes. Small-size (four-membered) and medium-size lactones (six- and seven-membered) as well as macrolides (12-, 13-, 16-, and 17-membered) were subjected to lipase-catalyzed polymerization. The polymerization behaviors depended primarily on the lipase origin and the monomer structure. The macrolides showing much lower anionic polymerizability were enzymatically polymerized faster than epsilon-caprolactone. The granular immobilized lipase derived from Candida antartica showed extremely efficient catalysis in the polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone. Single-step terminal functionalization of the polyester was achieved by initiator and terminator methods. The enzymatic polymerizability of lactones was quantitatively evaluated by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. PMID:10416661

  10. Apralactone A and a New Stereochemical Class of Curvularins from the Marine-Derived Fungus Curvularia sp

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Hendrik; Schupp, Peter J.; Eguereva, Ekaterina; Kehraus, Stefan; Kelter, Gerhard; Maier, Armin; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert; König, Gabriele M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical investigations of the cytotoxic extract of the marine-derived fungus Curvularia sp. (strain no. 768), isolated from the red alga Acanthophora spicifera, yielded the novel macrolide apralactone A (1), as well as the antipodes of curvularin macrolides 2–7. Compound 8, a dimeric curvularin was recognised as an artefact. The structures of 1–8 were elucidated by interpretation of their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, CD, MS, UV and IR). Apralactone A (1) is a 14-membered phenyl acetic acid macrolactone, and the first such compound with a 4-chromanone substructure. Compounds 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 were found to be cytotoxic towards human tumor cell lines with mean IC50 values in the range of 1.25 to 30.06 µM. PMID:24260014

  11. World Health Organization Ranking of Antimicrobials According to Their Importance in Human Medicine: A Critical Step for Developing Risk Management Strategies to Control Antimicrobial Resistance From Food Animal Production.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Peter C; Conly, John M; Andremont, Antoine; McEwen, Scott A; Aidara-Kane, Awa

    2016-10-15

    Antimicrobial use in food animals selects for antimicrobial resistance in bacteria, which can spread to people. Reducing use of antimicrobials-particularly those deemed to be critically important for human medicine-in food production animals continues to be an important step for preserving the benefits of these antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization ranking of antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine was recently updated. Antimicrobials considered the highest priority among the critically important antimicrobials were quinolones, third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, macrolides and ketolides, and glycopeptides. The updated ranking allows stakeholders in the agriculture sector and regulatory agencies to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine. In particular, the current large-scale use of fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and third-generation cephalosporins and any potential use of glycopeptides and carbapenems need to be addressed urgently.

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Mediates Fatal Immunopathology in Mice During Treatment of Secondary Pneumococcal Pneumonia Following Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Karlström, Åsa; Heston, Sarah M.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2011-01-01

    Host inflammatory responses contribute to the significant immunopathology that occurs during treatment of secondary bacterial pneumonia following influenza. We undertook the present study to determine the mechanisms underlying disparate outcomes in a mouse model with β-lactam and macrolide antibiotics. Lysis of superinfecting bacteria by ampicillin caused an extensive influx of neutrophils into the lungs resulting in a consolidative pneumonia, necrotic lung damage, and significant mortality. This was mediated through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and was independent of TLR4 and the Streptococcus pneumoniae cytotoxin pneumolysin. Treatment with azithromycin prevented neutrophil accumulation and rescued mice from subsequent mortality. This effect was independent of the antibacterial activity of this macrolide since dual therapy with ampicillin and azithromycin against an azithromycin-resistant strain also was able to cure secondary pneumonia. These data suggest that strategies for eliminating bacteria without lysis coupled with immunomodulation of inflammation should be pursued clinically. PMID:21900488

  13. Antimicrobial resistance in campylobacter: susceptibility testing methods and resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Wang, Fei; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Most Campylobacter infections are self-limiting but antimicrobial treatment (e.g., macrolides, fluoroquinolones) is necessary in severe or prolonged cases. Susceptibility testing continues to play a critical role in guiding therapy and epidemiological monitoring of resistance. The methods of choice for Campylobacter recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) are agar dilution and broth microdilution, while a disk diffusion method was recently standardized by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Macrolides, quinolones, and tetracyclines are among the common antimicrobials recommended for testing. Molecular determination of Campylobacter resistance via DNA sequencing or PCR-based methods has been performed. High levels of resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin are frequently reported by many national surveillance programs, but resistance to erythromycin and gentamicin in Campylobacter jejuni remains low. Nonetheless, variations in susceptibility observed over time underscore the need for continued public health monitoring of Campylobacter resistance from humans, animals, and food.

  14. Structure of the Glycosyltransferase EryCIII in Complex with its Activating P450 Homologue EryCII

    PubMed Central

    Moncrieffe, Martin C.; Fernandez, Maria-Jose; Spiteller, Dieter; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Gay, Nicholas J.; Luisi, Ben F.; Leadlay, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In the biosynthesis of the clinically important antibiotic erythromycin D, the glycosyltransferase (GT) EryCIII, in concert with its partner EryCII, attaches a nucleotide-activated sugar to the macrolide scaffold with high specificity. To understand the role of EryCII, we have determined the crystal structure of the EryCIII·EryCII complex at 3.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals a heterotetramer with a distinctive, elongated quaternary organization. The EryCIII subunits form an extensive self-complementary dimer interface at the center of the complex, and the EryCII subunits lie on the periphery. EryCII binds in the vicinity of the putative macrolide binding site of EryCIII but does not make direct interactions with this site. Our biophysical and enzymatic data support a model in which EryCII stabilizes EryCIII and also functions as an allosteric activator of the GT. PMID:22056329

  15. Minimal biofilm eradication concentration of antimicrobial agents against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolated from middle ear fluids of intractable acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Takei, Shin; Hotomi, Muneki; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2013-06-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) makes the clinical course of acute otitis media (AOM) intractable by forming a biofilm that may hamper the clearance of the bacteria from middle ear cavity. In this study, we evaluated the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of antimicrobial agents against biofilm-forming NTHi strains. Twelve NTHi strains isolated from middle ear fluids of Japanese children with intractable AOM before antimicrobial treatment were evaluated for MBEC of fluoroquinolones in comparison with those of β-lactams and macrolides. AMPC and CDTR required much higher concentration, i.e., high MBECs, to suppress the biofilm formation of NTHi. In contrast, fluoroquinolones followed by macrolides showed lower MBECs. MBEC would be a good parameter to infer the efficacies of antimicrobials against NTHi in biofilm.

  16. Lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of lactones to polyesters and its mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, S; Suda, S; Uyama, H; Kobayashi, S

    1999-01-01

    Lipase catalysis induced a ring-opening polymerization of lactones with different ring-sizes. Small-size (four-membered) and medium-size lactones (six- and seven-membered) as well as macrolides (12-, 13-, 16-, and 17-membered) were subjected to lipase-catalyzed polymerization. The polymerization behaviors depended primarily on the lipase origin and the monomer structure. The macrolides showing much lower anionic polymerizability were enzymatically polymerized faster than epsilon-caprolactone. The granular immobilized lipase derived from Candida antartica showed extremely efficient catalysis in the polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone. Single-step terminal functionalization of the polyester was achieved by initiator and terminator methods. The enzymatic polymerizability of lactones was quantitatively evaluated by Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

  17. Metabolic and metagenomic outcomes from early-life pulsed antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Yael R.; Cox, Laura M.; Kirigin, Francis F.; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Yamanishi, Shingo; Teitler, Isabel; Chung, Jennifer; Sohn, Jiho; Barber, Cecily M.; Goldfarb, David S.; Raju, Kartik; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Ruiz, Victoria E.; Li, Huilin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Weinstock, George M.; Sodergren, Erica; Blaser, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian species have co-evolved with intestinal microbial communities that can shape development and adapt to environmental changes, including antibiotic perturbation or nutrient flux. In humans, especially children, microbiota disruption is common, yet the dynamic microbiome recovery from early-life antibiotics is still uncharacterized. Here we use a mouse model mimicking paediatric antibiotic use and find that therapeutic-dose pulsed antibiotic treatment (PAT) with a beta-lactam or macrolide alters both host and microbiota development. Early-life PAT accelerates total mass and bone growth, and causes progressive changes in gut microbiome diversity, population structure and metagenomic content, with microbiome effects dependent on the number of courses and class of antibiotic. Whereas control microbiota rapidly adapts to a change in diet, PAT slows the ecological progression, with delays lasting several months with previous macrolide exposure. This study identifies key markers of disturbance and recovery, which may help provide therapeutic targets for microbiota restoration following antibiotic treatment. PMID:26123276

  18. Synthesis of photoreactive ivermectin B1a derivatives and their actions on Haemonchus and Bombyx glutamate-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Toshinori; Ikeda, Izumi; Kita, Tomo; Furutani, Shogo; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2015-05-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors that are present only in invertebrates such as nematodes and insects. These channels are important targets of insecticidal, acaricidal, and anthelmintic macrolides such as avermectins, ivermectin (IVM), and milbemycins. To identify the amino acid residues that interact with IVM in GluCls, three IVM B1a derivatives with different photoreactive substitutions at C-13 were synthesized in the present study. These derivatives displayed low- or subnanomolar affinity for parasitic nematode (Haemonchus contortus) and silkworm (Bombyx mori) GluCls expressed in COS-1 cells. The derivatives also activated homomeric H. contortus GluCls expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The results indicate that synthesized photoreactive IVM B1a derivatives have superior affinity and functionality for chemically labeling the macrolide-binding site in GluCls. .

  19. Minimal biofilm eradication concentration of antimicrobial agents against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolated from middle ear fluids of intractable acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Takei, Shin; Hotomi, Muneki; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2013-06-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) makes the clinical course of acute otitis media (AOM) intractable by forming a biofilm that may hamper the clearance of the bacteria from middle ear cavity. In this study, we evaluated the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of antimicrobial agents against biofilm-forming NTHi strains. Twelve NTHi strains isolated from middle ear fluids of Japanese children with intractable AOM before antimicrobial treatment were evaluated for MBEC of fluoroquinolones in comparison with those of β-lactams and macrolides. AMPC and CDTR required much higher concentration, i.e., high MBECs, to suppress the biofilm formation of NTHi. In contrast, fluoroquinolones followed by macrolides showed lower MBECs. MBEC would be a good parameter to infer the efficacies of antimicrobials against NTHi in biofilm. PMID:23549738

  20. Structure and conformational analysis of spiroketals from 6-O-methyl-9(E)-hydroxyiminoerythronolide A

    PubMed Central

    Ćaleta, Irena; Žiher, Dinko; Vine, Mark B; Elenkov, Ivaylo J; Dukši, Marko; Gembarovski, Dubravka; Ilijaš, Marina; Dragojević, Snježana; Malnar, Ivica; Alihodžić, Sulejman

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three novel spiroketals were prepared by a one-pot transformation of 6-O-methyl-9(E)-hydroxyiminoerythronolide A. We present the formation of a [4.5]spiroketal moiety within the macrolide lactone ring, but also the unexpected formation of a 10-C=11-C double bond and spontaneous change of stereochemistry at position 8-C. As a result, a thermodynamically stable structure was obtained. The structures of two new diastereomeric, unsaturated spiroketals, their configurations and conformations, were determined by means of NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The reaction kinetics and mechanistic aspects of this transformation are discussed. These rearrangements provide a facile synthesis of novel macrolide scaffolds. PMID:26425201

  1. Synthesis of photoreactive ivermectin B1a derivatives and their actions on Haemonchus and Bombyx glutamate-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Toshinori; Ikeda, Izumi; Kita, Tomo; Furutani, Shogo; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2015-05-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors that are present only in invertebrates such as nematodes and insects. These channels are important targets of insecticidal, acaricidal, and anthelmintic macrolides such as avermectins, ivermectin (IVM), and milbemycins. To identify the amino acid residues that interact with IVM in GluCls, three IVM B1a derivatives with different photoreactive substitutions at C-13 were synthesized in the present study. These derivatives displayed low- or subnanomolar affinity for parasitic nematode (Haemonchus contortus) and silkworm (Bombyx mori) GluCls expressed in COS-1 cells. The derivatives also activated homomeric H. contortus GluCls expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The results indicate that synthesized photoreactive IVM B1a derivatives have superior affinity and functionality for chemically labeling the macrolide-binding site in GluCls. . PMID:25987225

  2. Total Synthesis of Iejimalide B§

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingshou; Schweitzer, Dirk; Kane, John; Jo Davisson, V.; Helquist, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Iejimalide B, a structurally unique 24-membered polyene macrolide having a previously underutilized mode of anticancer activity, was synthesized according to a strategy employing Julia-Kocienski olefinations, a palladium-catalyzed Heck reaction, a palladium-catalyzed Marshall propargylation, a Keck-type esterification, and a palladium-catalyzed macrolide-forming, intramolecular Stille coupling of a highly complex cyclization substrate. The overall synthesis is efficient (19.5% overall yield for 15 linear steps) and allows for more practical scaled-up synthesis than previously reported strategies that differed in the order of assembly of key subunits and in the method of macrocyclization. The present synthesis paves the way for efficient preparation of analogues for drug development efforts. PMID:21488673

  3. Erythromycin and azithromycin transport into Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 under conditions of depressed proton motive force (delta mu H)

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, J.O.; Goldman, R.C. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of collapsing the electrochemical proton gradient (delta mu H) on ({sup 3}H)erythromycin and ({sup 14}C)azithromycin transport in Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 was studied. The proton gradient and membrane potential were determined from the distribution of (2-{sup 14}C)dimethadione and rubidium-86, respectively. delta mu H was reduced from 124 to 3 mV in EDTA-valinomycin-treated cells at 22{degrees}C with 150 mM KCl and 0.1 mM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. During the collapse of delta mu H, macrolide uptake increased. Erythromycin efflux studies strongly suggested that this increase was not due to an energy-dependent efflux pump but was likely due to increased outer membrane permeability. These data indicated that macrolide entry was not a delta mu H-driven active transport process but rather a passive diffusion process.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of the Exotoxin Mycolactone, the Main Virulence Factor Produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Philipp; Hug, Melanie N.; Bieri, Raphael; Bomio, Claudio; Li, Jun; Huber, Sylwia; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone, the macrolide exotoxin produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, causes extensive tissue destruction by inducing apoptosis of host cells. In this study, we aimed at the production of antibodies that could neutralize the cytotoxic activities of mycolactone. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the B cell hybridoma technology, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for mycolactone from spleen cells of mice immunized with the protein conjugate of a truncated synthetic mycolactone derivative. L929 fibroblasts were used as a model system to investigate whether these antibodies can inhibit the biological effects of mycolactone. By measuring the metabolic activity of the fibroblasts, we found that anti-mycolactone mAbs can completely neutralize the cytotoxic activity of mycolactone. Conclusions/Significance The toxin neutralizing capacity of anti-mycolactone mAbs supports the concept of evaluating the macrolide toxin as vaccine target. PMID:27351976

  5. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp abscessus lung disease: 'trouble ahead, trouble behind…'.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David E

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus subsp abscessus is the most common respiratory pathogen among the rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and is also the most feared due to its well-deserved reputation for being refractory to antibiotic therapy. M. abscessus subsp abscessus has multiple innate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, but the most important one described so far is an inducible erythromycin methylase (erm) gene. M. abscessus subsp abscessus isolates may appear macrolide susceptible on initial in vitro testing but become macrolide resistant after exposure to macrolide. It is therefore very important to test clinically significant M. abscessus subsp abscessus isolates for erm gene activity. Remarkably, controversy still exists about the taxonomy and nomenclature of M. abscessus subspecies including subsp abscessus, subsp massiliense and subsp bolletii. Identification of these subspecies is not moot as M. abscessus subsp massiliense does not have an active erm gene resulting in both in vitro and in vivo susceptibility to macrolide. It is imperative from the clinician's perspective that mycobacterial laboratories correctly and rapidly identify M. abscessus to the subspecies level. Unfortunately, there are no reliably or predictably effective treatment regimens for M. abscessus subsp abscessus and better, more effective antimicrobial agents are badly needed. Surgical resection of involved lung tissue as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy is beneficial in selected patients but cannot be broadly applied. Overall, M. abscessus subsp abscessus remains a formidable respiratory mycobacterial pathogen, one that we are only beginning to understand microbiologically and one that as yet consistently evades our best efforts at successful therapeutic outcomes. 'trouble ahead, trouble behind, and you know that notion just crossed my mind'.Casey Jones, Grateful Dead (1970). PMID:25580261

  6. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of glanders) determined by broth microdilution and E-test.

    PubMed

    Heine, H S; England, M J; Waag, D M; Byrne, W R

    2001-07-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the First NDM-1-Producing Providencia stuartii Strain Isolated in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Manageiro, Vera; Sampaio, Daniel A; Pereira, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Paulo; Vieira, Luís; Palos, Carlos; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the first NDM-1-producing Providencia stuartii strain isolated in Portugal. Sequence analyses revealed the presence of an incompatibility group A/C2 (IncA/C2) plasmid and of diverse acquired genes conferring resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracycline, macrolides, chloramphenicol, and sulfonamides. This sequence contributes to the evaluation of the spread of NDM-1 producers. PMID:26404603

  8. Emergence of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate highly resistant to telithromycin and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Faccone, Diego; Andres, Patricia; Galas, Marcelo; Tokumoto, Marta; Rosato, Adriana; Corso, Alejandra

    2005-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen causing community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis. Macrolides, fluoroquinolones (FQs), and, recently, telithromycin (TEL) constitute primary therapeutic options, and rare cases of resistance have been reported. In this report, we describe the emergence of an S. pneumoniae clinical isolate with high-level TEL resistance (MIC, 256 microg/ml) and simultaneous resistance to FQs. Ongoing studies are oriented to elucidate the precise mechanism of resistance to TEL.

  9. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  10. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut.

  11. Synthesis of macrosphelides with a thiazole side chain: new antitumor candidates having apoptosis-inducing property.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, Yuji; Kawaguchi, Takanori; Ishihara, Kentaro; Ahmed, Kanwal; Zhao, Qing-Li; Kondo, Takashi; Nemoto, Hideo

    2006-09-28

    Hybrid compounds of macrosphelides and epothilones, both of which are natural macrolides having a 16-membered skeleton, were designed and synthesized using a ring-closing metathesis (RCM) strategy. Some of these hybrids were found to exhibit notable apoptosis-inducing activity against human lymphoma cells with higher potency than parent natural macrosphelides, and to be a promising lead compound for development of a new antitumor agent.

  12. Derivatives of Salarin A, Salarin C and Tulearin A—Fascaplysinopsis sp. Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Goren Zur, Lee; Bishara, Ashgan; Aknin, Maurice; Neumann, Drorit; Ben-Califa, Nathalie; Kashman, Yoel

    2013-01-01

    Derivatives of salarin A, salarin C and tulearin A, three new cytotoxic sponge derived nitrogenous macrolides, were prepared and bio-evaluated as inhibitors of K562 leukemia cells. Interesting preliminary SAR (structure activity relationship) information was obtained from the products. The most sensitive functionalities were the 16,17-vinyl epoxide in both salarins, the triacylamino group in salarin A and the oxazole in salarin C (less sensitive). Regioselectivity of reactions was also found for tulearin A. PMID:24284425

  13. Erythromycin resistance genes in group A streptococci in Finland. The Finnish Study Group for Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kataja, J; Huovinen, P; Skurnik, M; Seppälä, H

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes isolates (group A streptococcus) of different erythromycin resistance phenotypes were collected from all over Finland in 1994 and 1995 and studied; they were evaluated for their susceptibilities to 14 antimicrobial agents (396 isolates) and the presence of different erythromycin resistance genes (45 isolates). The erythromycin-resistant isolates with the macrolide-resistant but lincosamide- and streptogramin B-susceptible phenotype (M phenotype) were further studied for their plasmid contents and the transferability of resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial agents other than macrolides, clindamycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol was not found. When compared to our previous study performed in 1990, the rate of resistance to tetracycline increased from 10 to 93% among isolates with the inducible resistance (IR) phenotype of macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance. Tetracycline resistance was also found among 75% of the MLSB-resistant isolates with the constitutive resistance (CR) phenotype. Resistance to chloramphenicol was found for the first time in S. pyogenes in Finland; 3% of the isolates with the IR phenotype were resistant. All the chloramphenicol-resistant isolates were also resistant to tetracycline. Detection of erythromycin resistance genes by PCR indicated that, with the exception of one isolate with the CR phenotype, all M-phenotype isolates had the macrolide efflux (mefA) gene and all the MLSB-resistant isolates had the erythromycin resistance methylase (ermTR) gene; the isolate with the CR phenotype contained the ermB gene. No plasmid DNA could be isolated from the M-phenotype isolates, but the mefA gene was transferred by conjugation.

  14. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  15. Trends in the resistance to antimicrobial agents of Streptococcus suis isolates from Denmark and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Rasmussen, S R; Artursson, K; Jensen, N E

    1998-08-28

    This study was conducted to determine the MIC values of historical and contemporary Streptoccocus suis (serotypes 2 and 7) from Denmark and S. suis (serotype 2) from Sweden. A total of 52 isolates originating from 1967 through 1981 and 156 isolates from 1992 through 1997 in Denmark and 13 isolates from Sweden were examined for their MICs against 20 different antimicrobial agents. Most antimicrobials were active against most isolates. A frequent occurrence of resistance to sulphamethoxazole was observed, with most resistance among historic isolates of serotype 7 and least resistance among isolates from Sweden. A large number of the isolates was resistant to macrolides. However, all historic serotype 2 isolates from Denmark were susceptible, whereas 20.4% of the contemporary isolates were resistant. Among serotype 7 isolates 23.3% of the historic isolates were resistant to macrolides, whereas resistance was found in 44.8% of the contemporary isolates. All isolates from Sweden were susceptible to macrolides. Time-associated frequency of resistance to tetracycline was also found. Only a single historic isolate of serotype 2 was resistant to tetracycline, whereas 43.9% of the contemporary serotype 2 isolates and 15.5% of the contemporary serotype 7 isolates were resistant. Only one (7.7%) of the isolates from Sweden was resistant. The differences in resistance between historic and contemporary isolates from Denmark were statistically significant. This study demonstrated a significant serotype-associated difference in the susceptibility to macrolides and tetracycline and demonstrated that an increase in resistance among S. suis isolates has taken place during the last 15 years to the two most commonly used antimicrobial agents (tylosin and tetracycline) in pig production in Denmark. PMID:9810623

  16. Synthesis of E-Alkyl Alkenes from Terminal Alkynes via Ni-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Alkyl Halides with B-Alkenyl-9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes.

    PubMed

    Di Franco, Thomas; Epenoy, Alexandre; Hu, Xile

    2015-10-01

    The first Ni-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of alkyl halides with alkenyl-(9-BBN) reagents is reported. Both primary and secondary alkyl halides including alkyl chlorides can be coupled. The coupling method can be combined with hydroboration of terminal alkynes, allowing the expedited synthesis of functionalized alkyl alkenes from readily available alkynes with complete (E)-selectivity in one pot. The method was applied to the total synthesis of (±)-Recifeiolide, a natural macrolide.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  18. Total Synthesis and Structural Reassignment of Lyngbyaloside C Highlighted by Intermolecular Ketene Esterification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Fu; Stefan, Eric; Taylor, Richard E

    2015-07-20

    Lyngbyaloside C, a classic macrolide, isolated from Lyngbya bouilloni, has shown moderate anticancer activity against several cancer cell lines. Here, we report the first total synthesis and stereochemical configuration reassignment of lyngbyaloside C. The synthesis highlights a one-pot intermolecular ketene esterification reaction to form the crucial tertiary ester and tetrahydropyran. In addition, a novel and concise synthetic pathway towards the 1,3-syn secondary, tertiary diol fragment is described using a regio- and stereospecific electrophilic ether transfer reaction.

  19. The management of skin and skin structure infections in children, adolescents and adults: a review of empiric antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S E

    1998-09-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis and management of mild-to-moderate skin and skin structure infections in children, adolescents and adults in a general practice setting. Therapies reviewed are those in current use: penicillins; beta-lactamase stable penicillins, including flucloxacillin, oxacillin, and amoxicillin-clavulanate; oral quinolones; macrolides; and oral cephalosporins. Consideration is given to duration of therapy, side-effect profile and compliance.

  20. Mycoplasma genitalium infection: current treatment options, therapeutic failure, and resistance-associated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Couldwell, Deborah L; Lewis, David A

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, cervicitis, and related upper genital tract infections. The efficacy of doxycycline, used extensively to treat non-gonococcal urethritis in the past, is relatively poor for M. genitalium infection; azithromycin has been the preferred treatment for several years. Research on the efficacy of azithromycin has primarily focused on the 1 g single-dose regimen, but some studies have also evaluated higher doses and longer courses, particularly the extended 1.5 g regimen. This extended regimen is thought to be more efficacious than the 1 g single-dose regimen, although the regimens have not been directly compared in clinical trials. Azithromycin treatment failure was first reported in Australia and has subsequently been documented in several continents. Recent reports indicate an upward trend in the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. genitalium infections (transmitted resistance), and cases of induced resistance following azithromycin therapy have also been documented. Emergence of antimicrobial-resistant M. genitalium, driven by suboptimal macrolide dosage, now threatens the continued provision of effective and convenient treatments. Advances in techniques to detect resistance mutations in DNA extracts have facilitated correlation of clinical outcomes with genotypic resistance. A strong and consistent association exists between presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations and azithromycin treatment failure. Fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and sitafloxacin remain highly active against most macrolide-resistant M. genitalium. However, the first clinical cases of moxifloxacin treatment failure, due to bacteria with coexistent macrolide-associated and fluoroquinolone-associated resistance mutations, were recently published by Australian investigators. Pristinamycin and solithromycin may be of clinical benefit for such multidrug-resistant infections. Further clinical studies are required to

  1. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections.

  2. Lack of Adherence to Evidence-based Treatment Guidelines for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prevots, D. Rebecca; Gallagher, Jack; Heap, Kylee; Gupta, Renu; Griffith, David

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recommend that patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or M. abscessus be treated with a macrolide-based multidrug antibiotic regimen until sputum culture negative for 1 year. After 6 years, the degree of adherence to recommended guidelines among physicians remains unknown. Objective: To describe antibiotic treatment practices among physicians treating patients with PNTM in the United States. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 1,286 U.S. physicians was contacted in December 2011 through January 2012; 582 of the responding physicians were treating patients with PNTM and were eligible to participate. Physicians were asked to extract medical record data on the last four patients they treated in the past year with PNTM disease from either MAC or M. abscessus. Treatment patterns were assessed for all patients by NTM species and physician specialty, and compared with the 2007 recommended ATS/IDSA guidelines. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 349 physicians on 915 patients with PNTM, including 744 (81%) with MAC and 174 (19%) with M. abscessus; 3 patients were positive for both. Physicians treated 76 (44%) patients with M. abscessus and 411 (55%) patients with MAC. Only 13% of antibiotic regimens prescribed to patients with MAC met ATS/IDSA guidelines, 56% did not include a macrolide, and 16% were for macrolide monotherapy. Among patients with M. abscessus, 64% of regimens prescribed did not include a macrolide. Conclusions: Adherence to the 2007 ATS/IDSA guidelines for treating PNTM disease is poor. Across all physician specialties evaluated, suboptimal or potentially harmful antibiotic regimens were commonly prescribed. PMID:24236749

  3. N'-methylniphimycin, a novel minor congener of niphimycin from Streptomyces spec. 57-13.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V; Schlegel, R; Dornberger, K

    1998-01-01

    A novel natural niphimycin analog, N'-methylniphimycin was isolated from the culture broth of the Streptomyces spec. 57-13. The chemical constitution was elucidated from the physico-chemical properties, NMR techniques and mass spectrometry to be a 36-membered macrolide related to azalomycin F5a, shurimycin B and RS-22C. N'-methylniphimycin displayed moderate activity against some yeasts and filamentous fungi.

  4. Toward the Total Synthesis of Amphidinolide N: Synthesis of the C8-C29 Fragment.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yuki; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    A synthesis of the C8-C29 fragment of amphidinolide N, a potent cytotoxic macrolide isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Amphidinium sp., has been achieved. The key features of the synthesis involve a convergent union of the C9-C15 and C16-C29 fragments by Steglich esterification and the construction of a pyran unit through a Tebbe methylenation/ring-closing metathesis sequence. PMID:27116189

  5. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  6. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections. PMID:27648402

  7. Conformational analysis of oleandomycin and its 8-methylene-9-oxime derivative by NMR and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Novak, Predrag; Tomisić, Zrinka Banić; Tepes, Predrag; Lazarevski, Gorjana; Plavec, Janez; Turkalj, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Conformations of the 14-membered macrolide antibiotic oleandomycin and its 8-methylene-9-oxime derivative were determined in various solvents. The experimental NMR data--coupling constants and NOE contacts--were compared with the results of molecular modelling--molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational changes, on the right-hand side of the 14-membered ring, affected mostly the 3JH2,H3 values and NOE crosspeaks H3 or H4 to H11. Oleandomycin was found to be present predominantly in the C3-C5 folded-in conformations in DMSO-d6 solution, whereas in buffered D2O, acetone-d6 and CDCl3, there was a mixture of folded-in and folded-out conformational families. The predominant conformation of the 8-methylene-oleandomycin-9-oxime derivative in solution was a folded-out one although different amounts of folded-in conformation were also present depending on the solvent. Oleandrose and desosamine sugar moieties adopted the usual and expected chair conformation. The conformation around the glycosidic bonds, governing the relative orientation of sugars vs. the lactone ring, showed a certain flexibility within two conformationally close families. We believe that by combining the experimental NMR data and the molecular modelling techniques, as reported in this paper, we have made significant progress in understanding the conformational behaviour and properties of macrolides. Our belief is based on our own current studies on oleandomycins as well as on the previously reported results and best practices concerning other macrolides. A rational for macrolide conformational studies and advances in methodology has been suggested accordingly. PMID:15602597

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xing-Bei; Mi, Zu-Huang; Wang, Chun-Xin; Zhu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  9. Propensity Score-Based Approaches to Confounding by Indication in Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis: Non-Standardized Treatment for Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Gregory J.; Benedetti, Andrea; Mitnick, Carole D.; Pai, Madhukar; Menzies, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background In the absence of randomized clinical trials, meta-analysis of individual patient data (IPD) from observational studies may provide the most accurate effect estimates for an intervention. However, confounding by indication remains an important concern that can be addressed by incorporating individual patient covariates in different ways. We compared different analytic approaches to account for confounding in IPD from patients treated for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Methods Two antibiotic classes were evaluated, fluoroquinolones—considered the cornerstone of effective MDR-TB treatment—and macrolides, which are known to be safe, yet are ineffective in vitro. The primary outcome was treatment success against treatment failure, relapse or death. Effect estimates were obtained using multivariable and propensity-score based approaches. Results Fluoroquinolone antibiotics were used in 28 included studies, within which 6,612 patients received a fluoroquinolone and 723 patients did not. Macrolides were used in 15 included studies, within which 459 patients received this class of antibiotics and 3,670 did not. Both standard multivariable regression and propensity score-based methods resulted in similar effect estimates for early and late generation fluoroquinolones, while macrolide antibiotics use was associated with reduced treatment success. Conclusions In this individual patient data meta-analysis, standard multivariable and propensity-score based methods of adjusting for individual patient covariates for observational studies yielded produced similar effect estimates. Even when adjustment is made for potential confounding, interpretation of adjusted estimates must still consider the potential for residual bias. PMID:27022741

  10. emm Types, Virulence Factors, and Antibiotic Resistance of Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates from Italy: What Has Changed in 11 Years?▿

    PubMed Central

    Creti, Roberta; Imperi, Monica; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Pataracchia, Marco; Recchia, Simona; Alfarone, Giovanna; Orefici, Graziella

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiology and characteristics of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease over 11 years in Italy, this study compared the emm types and the superantigen toxin genes speA and speC as well as the erythromycin, clindamycin, and tetracycline susceptibilities of 207 invasive GAS strains collected during two national enhanced surveillance periods (1994 to 1996 and 2003 to 2005) and the time between each set of surveillance periods. The present study demonstrated that emm1 strains were consistently responsible for about 20% of invasive GAS infections, while variations in the frequencies of the other types were noted, although the causes of most cases of invasive infections were restricted to emm1, emm3, emm4, emm6, emm12, and emm18. During the 1994 to 1996 surveillance period, an emm89 epidemic clone spread across the northern part of Italy. A restricted macrolide resistance phenotype-type distribution of the bacteriophage-encoded speA toxin as well as of macrolide resistance genes was noted over time. Indeed, the recent acquisition of macrolide resistance in previously susceptible emm types was observed. PMID:17494723

  11. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents among bovine mastitis pathogens isolated from North American dairy cattle, 2002-2010.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Cynthia J; Portis, Ellen; Johansen, Lacie; Mullins, Lisa M; Stoltman, Gillian A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately 8,000 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, isolated by 25 veterinary laboratories across North America between 2002 and 2010, were tested for in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the beta-lactam drugs remained low against most of the Gram-positive strains tested, and no substantial changes in the MIC distributions were seen over time. Of the beta-lactam antimicrobial agents tested, only ceftiofur showed good in vitro activity against E. coli. The MICs of the macrolides and lincosamides also remained low against Gram-positive mastitis pathogens. While the MIC values given by 50% of isolates (MIC50) for erythromycin and pirlimycin and the streptococci were all low (≤0.5 µg/ml), the MIC values given by 90% of isolates (MIC90) were higher and more variable, but with no apparent increase over time. Staphylococcus aureus showed little change in erythromycin susceptibility over time, but there may be a small, numerical increase in pirlimycin MIC50 and MIC90 values. Overall, the results suggest that mastitis pathogens in the United States and Canada have not shown any substantial changes in the in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs tested over the 9 years of the study.

  12. Faeriefungin: a new broad-spectrum antibiotic from Streptomyces griseus var. autotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Nair, M G; Putnam, A R; Mishra, S K; Mulks, M H; Taft, W H; Keller, J E; Miller, J R; Zhu, P P; Meinhart, J D; Lynn, D G

    1989-01-01

    Faeriefungin, a polyol polyene macrolide lactone antibiotic, was isolated from the mycelium of Streptomyces griseus var. autotrophicus, MSU-32058/ATCC 53668, collected from the soil sample of a fairy ring in an old lawn in Lansing, Michigan. Faeriefungin has some properties similar to the previously reported polyene macrolides, mycoticin and flavofungin, but possesses different physiochemical and biological properties. Aspergillus, Fusarium, Microsporum, Trichophyton, and Alternaria spp. were completely inhibited by faeriefungin at 3.2 micrograms/ml, Candida spp. at 5.5 micrograms/ml, and Pythium, Phialophora, Leptosphaeria spp., and some selected Gram-negative penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae at 16.0 micrograms/ml. At a concentration of 100 ppm, it caused 100% mortality of mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti, Rockefeller strain) and free-living nematodes (Panagrellus redivivus). Unlike the related polyene macrolides, faeriefungin is crystalline and stable with broad-spectrum antimicrobial and insecticidal activity. Preliminary cytotoxicity studies with human erythrocytes and rat liver epithelial cells indicated that faeriefungin and amphotericin B have comparable toxicity. Solution nmr study has indicated that faeriefungin is a mixture of two compounds, faerifungins A [1] and B [2], and that they differ in the attachment of a H or an Me at C-33. PMID:2509636

  13. Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCrackin, M A; Helke, Kristi L; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-10-01

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan® in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.

  14. Association of community antibiotic consumption with clinically active trachoma in rural Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayele, Berhan; Belay, Tesfaye; Gebre, Teshome; Zerihun, Mulat; Amere, Abayneh; Assefa, Yared; Habte, Dereje; Loh, Allison R.; Stoller, Nicole E.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Community antibiotic utilization and its relationship with trachoma has been poorly characterized in areas with endemic trachoma. A survey of all drug-dispensing facilities in an area of rural Ethiopia was conducted. Antibiotic use was calculated using both retrospective and prospective methodology, and expressed as defined daily doses (DDDs). Overall antibiotic consumption estimates ranged from 2.91 to 3.07 DDDs per 1000 person days. Macrolide antibiotics accounted for 0.01 to 0.02 DDDs per 1000 person days. Each additional DDD of antibiotic use per 1000 person days was associated with a 15.0% (95% CI −19.7 to −10.3) decrease in the prevalence of clinically active trachoma among children under 10 years of age after adjusting for age, gender, altitude and the distance to nearest town. Increased background community antibiotic use may therefore be an aspect of socioeconomic development that can partially explain why trachoma prevalence has decreased in some areas in the absence of a trachoma program. The low volume of macrolide consumption in this area suggests that selection for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal macrolide resistance after mass azithromycin treatments likely has little clinical significance. PMID:22247750

  15. High Prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) Genes in Nosocomial-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Tertiary Care Hospitals in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bidya; Singh, Winny; Raj, V. Samuel; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Mohapatra, Tribhuban Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the important virulence determinant, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), is an emerging infectious pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections as well as life-threatening invasive diseases. In carrying out the first PVL prevalence study in Nepal, we screened 73 nosocomial isolates of S. aureus from 2 tertiary care Nepali hospitals and obtained an overall PVL-positivity rate of 35.6% among the hospital isolates: 26.1% of MRSA and 51.9% of methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were found to be positive for the PVL genes. PVL prevalence was not associated with a specific (i) infection site, (ii) age group, or (iii) hospital of origin. It was found to be positively associated with heterogeneous MRSA (73.3%) compared to homogeneous MRSA (3.2%) and MSSA (51.9%); negatively associated with multiresistant MRSA (22%) compared to nonmultiresistant MRSA (60%) and MSSA (51.9%); and positively associated with macrolide-streptogramin B resistance (93.8%) compared to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (0%) and no-resistance (45.8%) types. Macrolide-streptogramin B resistance was confirmed by the presence of msr(A) gene. Restriction pattern analyses provided evidence to support the circulation of a limited number of clones of PVL-positive MRSA, arguing for the adaptability of these isolates to a hospital setting. PMID:25045702

  16. Structural Analysis of the Streptomyces avermitilis CYP107W1-Oligomycin A Complex and Role of the Tryptophan 178 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A. A previous study reported that CYP107W1 regioselectively hydroxylated C12 of oligomycin C to produce oligomycin A, and the crystal structure of ligand free CYP107W1 was determined. Here, we analyzed the structural properties of the CYP107W1-oligomycin A complex and characterized the functional role of the Trp178 residue in CYP107W1. The crystal structure of the CYP107W1 complex with oligomycin A was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Oligomycin A is bound in the substrate access channel on the upper side of the prosthetic heme mainly by hydrophobic interactions. In particular, the Trp178 residue in the active site intercalates into the large macrolide ring, thereby guiding the substrate into the correct binding orientation for a productive P450 reaction. A Trp178 to Gly mutation resulted in the distortion of binding titration spectra with oligomycin A, whereas binding spectra with azoles were not affected. The Gly178 mutant’s catalytic turnover number for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C was highly reduced. These results indicate that Trp178, located in the open pocket of the active site, may be a critical residue for the productive binding conformation of large macrolide substrates. PMID:26883908

  17. [A study on the veterinary antibiotics contamination in groundwater of Jiaxing].

    PubMed

    Lü, Xing; Yu, Wei-juan; Lan, Ya-qiong; Li, Li; Lü, Sheng; Ye, Zhao-xia; Zhang, Yong-ming; Liu, Rui; Chen, Lü-jun

    2013-09-01

    Liquid chromatography and tandem mass (LC-MS/MS) followed with solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for simultaneously determining four classes (tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides and sulfonamides) of ten commonly used veterinary antibiotics in groundwater of Jiaxing city, an important pig breeding base in the Yangtze River Delta region. Samples were taken from 10 typical rural river sections and 21 main urban river sections. Results revealed severe pollution existed in the rural river environment. The total concentration of ten antibiotics was as high as 65.6-467.0 ng x L(-1), among which tetracyclines and sulfonamides respectively ranged in 40.8-253.0 ng x L(-1) and undetected (nd)- 165.0 ng x L(-1), macrolides and quinolones respectively ranged in 3.1-14.68 ng x L(-1) and nd-14.54 ng x L(-1). By comparison, the pollution level in urban rivers was much lower. The total concentration of ten antibiotics ranged in 20.1 ng x L(-1) to 61.2 ng x L(-1), among with tetracyclines varied from undetected to 44.0 ng x L(-1), while sulfonamides, macrolides and quinolones were respectively below 2.7 ng x L(-1), 6.3 ng x L(-1) and 21.6 ng x L(-1).

  18. Oral Therapeutics for Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2016-01-01

    Oral therapeutics for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) include oral corticosteroids (OCS), antibiotics, antifungals and anti-leukotrienes. Of these treatments, the strongest evidence exists to support the use of a short course of OCS for treatment of CRSwNP, and OCS are the most consistently recommended oral therapy in practice guidelines. Antibiotics have demonstrated some utility, which appears more likely related to an anti-inflammatory rather than antimicrobial effect. The non-macrolide antibiotics lack sufficient evidence to support their use, though among this class doxycycline has some limited evidence of benefit in CRSwNP. Greater evidence exists for the use of macrolide antibiotics which have shown reduction of subjective and objective measures of CRSwNP severity. A short course of a macrolide should be considered as an option. Oral antifungals are not recommended in the treatment of CRSwNP given disappointing results and known potential adverse effects, except in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis where they may play a role. Leukotriene antagonists have demonstrated some promise in the treatment of CRSwNP, though studies are limited, but should be considered a potentially useful oral therapeutic. The current level of evidence for these oral therapeutic options for CRSwNP is reviewed in this chapter. PMID:27466856

  19. Azithromycin-Resistant Syphilis-Causing Strains in Sydney, Australia: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jeoffreys, Neisha; Tagg, Kaitlin; Guy, Rebecca J.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.; Donovan, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Azithromycin has shown high efficacy in randomized trials when used for treating infectious syphilis in Africa. However, its use in clinical practice has been limited by the development of antimicrobial drug resistance. Resistance has not previously been reported from Australasia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for azithromycin-resistant syphilis-causing strains in Sydney, Australia. We evaluated 409 samples that were PCR positive for Treponema pallidum DNA collected between 2004 and 2011 for the presence of the A2058G mutation, which confers resistance to macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin. Overall, 84% of samples harbored the mutation. The prevalence of the mutation increased during the study period (P trend, 0.003). We also collected clinical and demographic data on 220 patients from whom these samples had been collected to determine factors associated with the A2058G mutation; 97% were from men who have sex with men. Reporting sex in countries other than Australia was associated with less macrolide resistance (adjusted odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.09 to 0.66; P = 0.005), with other study factors showing no association (age, HIV status, recent macrolide use, stage of syphilis, or history of prior syphilis). Azithromycin cannot be recommended as an alternative treatment for syphilis in Sydney. PMID:24850356

  20. Tilmicosin and tylosin have anti-inflammatory properties via modulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression and production of cytokines in LPS-induced macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xing-Yuan; Dong, Mei; Shen, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Bei-Bei; Wu, Cong-Ming; Du, Xiang-Dang; Wang, Zhuo; Qi, Yi-Tao; Li, Bing-Yu

    2006-05-01

    Macrolides have been reported to modify the host immune and inflammatory responses both in vivo and in vitro. We examined the in vitro effect of the macrolides tilmicosin and tylosin, which are only used in the veterinary clinic, on the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and cytokines by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and mouse peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Compared with 5 microg/mL, tilmicosin and tylosin concentrations of 10 microg/mL and 20 microg/mL significantly decreased the production of 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha) (6-keto-PGF(1alpha)), PGE(2), NO, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, and increased IL-10 production. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression were also significantly reduced. These results support the opinion that macrolides may exert an anti-inflammatory effect through modulating the synthesis of several mediators and cytokines involved in the inflammatory process.

  1. Effects of tylosin, tilmicosin and tulathromycin on inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Er, Ayse; Yazar, Enver

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides through kinetic parameters in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. Rats were divided into four groups: lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS + tylosin, LPS + tilmicosin and LPS + tulathromycin. BALF samples were collected at sampling times. TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2α (PGM) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analysed. Area under the curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values of inflammatory mediators were determined by a pharmacokinetic computer programme. When inflammatory mediator concentrations were compared between the LPS group and other groups for each sampling time, the three macrolides had no pronounced depressor effect on cytokine levels, but they depressed PGM and CRP levels. In addition, tylosin and tilmicosin decreased the AUC0-24 level of TNF, while tilmicosin decreased the AUC0-24 level of IL-10. Tylosin and tulathromycin decreased the AUC0-24 of PGM, and all three macrolides decreased the AUC0-24 of CRP. Especially tylosin and tulathromycin may have more expressed anti-inflammatory effects than tilmicosin, via depressing the production of inflammatory mediators in the lung. The AUC may be used for determining the effects of drugs on inflammation. In this study, the antiinflammatory effects of these antibiotics were evaluated with kinetic parameters as a new and different approach.

  2. Immuno-modulation and anti-inflammatory benefits of antibiotics: the example of tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Buret, André G

    2010-01-01

    Exaggerated immune responses, such as those implicated in severe inflammatory reactions, are costly to the metabolism. Inflammation and pro-inflammatory mediators negatively affect production in the food animal industry by reducing growth, feed intake, reproduction, milk production, and metabolic health. An ever-increasing number of findings have established that antibiotics, macrolides in particular, may generate anti-inflammatory effects, including the modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the alteration of neutrophil function. The effects are time- and dose-dependent, and the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain incompletely understood. Recent studies, mostly using the veterinary macrolide tilmicosin, may have shed new light on the mode of action of some macrolides and their anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, research findings demonstrate that this compound, amongst others, induces neutrophil apoptosis, which in turn provides anti-inflammatory benefits. Studies using tilmicosin model systems in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that this antibiotic has potent immunomodulatory effects that may explain why at least parts of its clinical benefits are independent of anti-microbial effects. More research is needed, using this antibiotic and others that may have similar properties, to clarify the biological mechanisms responsible for antibiotic-induced neutrophil apoptosis, and how this, in turn, may provide enhanced clinical benefits. Such studies may help establish a rational basis for the development of novel, efficacious, anti-microbial compounds that generate anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their antibacterial effects.

  3. Association of community antibiotic consumption with clinically active trachoma in rural Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Berhan; Belay, Tesfaye; Gebre, Teshome; Zerihun, Mulat; Amere, Abayneh; Assefa, Yared; Habte, Dereje; Loh, Allison R; Stoller, Nicole E; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2011-12-01

    Community antibiotic utilization and its relationship with trachoma has been poorly characterized in areas with endemic trachoma. A survey of all drug-dispensing facilities in an area of rural Ethiopia was conducted. Antibiotic use was calculated using both retrospective and prospective methodology, and expressed as defined daily doses (DDDs). Overall antibiotic consumption estimates ranged from 2.91 to 3.07 DDDs per 1000 person days. Macrolide antibiotics accounted for 0.01 to 0.02 DDDs per 1000 person days. Each additional DDD of antibiotic use per 1000 person days was associated with a 15.0% (95% CI -19.7 to -10.3) decrease in the prevalence of clinically active trachoma among children under 10 years of age after adjusting for age, gender, altitude and the distance to nearest town. Increased background community antibiotic use may therefore be an aspect of socioeconomic development that can partially explain why trachoma prevalence has decreased in some areas in the absence of a trachoma program. The low volume of macrolide consumption in this area suggests that selection for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal macrolide resistance after mass azithromycin treatments likely has little clinical significance. PMID:22247750

  4. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents among bovine mastitis pathogens isolated from North American dairy cattle, 2002-2010.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Cynthia J; Portis, Ellen; Johansen, Lacie; Mullins, Lisa M; Stoltman, Gillian A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately 8,000 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, isolated by 25 veterinary laboratories across North America between 2002 and 2010, were tested for in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the beta-lactam drugs remained low against most of the Gram-positive strains tested, and no substantial changes in the MIC distributions were seen over time. Of the beta-lactam antimicrobial agents tested, only ceftiofur showed good in vitro activity against E. coli. The MICs of the macrolides and lincosamides also remained low against Gram-positive mastitis pathogens. While the MIC values given by 50% of isolates (MIC50) for erythromycin and pirlimycin and the streptococci were all low (≤0.5 µg/ml), the MIC values given by 90% of isolates (MIC90) were higher and more variable, but with no apparent increase over time. Staphylococcus aureus showed little change in erythromycin susceptibility over time, but there may be a small, numerical increase in pirlimycin MIC50 and MIC90 values. Overall, the results suggest that mastitis pathogens in the United States and Canada have not shown any substantial changes in the in vitro susceptibility to beta-lactam, macrolide, and lincosamide drugs tested over the 9 years of the study. PMID:23907894

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance among Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Canada during 2000

    PubMed Central

    Low, Donald E.; de Azavedo, Joyce; Weiss, Karl; Mazzulli, Tony; Kuhn, Magdalena; Church, Deirdre; Forward, Kevin; Zhanel, George; Simor, Andrew; McGeer, A.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 2,245 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were collected from 63 microbiology laboratories from across Canada during 2000 and characterized at a central laboratory. Of these isolates, 12.4% were not susceptible to penicillin (penicillin MIC, ≥0.12 μg/ml) and 5.8% were resistant (MIC, ≥2 μg/ml). Resistance rates among non-β-lactam agents were the following: macrolides, 11.1%; clindamycin, 5.7%; chloramphenicol, 2.2%; levofloxacin, 0.9%; gatifloxacin, 0.8%; moxifloxacin, 0.4%; and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 11.3%. The MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited (MIC90s) of the fluoroquinolones were the following: gemifloxacin, 0.03 μg/ml; BMS-284756, 0.06 μg/ml; moxifloxacin, 0.12 μg/ml; gatifloxacin, 0.25 μg/ml; levofloxacin, 1 μg/ml; and ciprofloxacin, 1 μg/ml. Of 578 isolates from the lower respiratory tract, 21 (3.6%) were inhibited at ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml. None of the 768 isolates from children were inhibited at ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml, compared to 3 of 731 (0.6%) from those ages 15 to 64 (all of these >60 years old), and 27 of 707 (3.8%) from those over 65. The MIC90s for ABT-773 and telithromycin were 0.015 μg/ml for macrolide-susceptible isolates and 0.12 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively, for macrolide-resistant isolates. The MIC of linezolid was ≤2 μg/ml for all isolates. Many of the new antimicrobial agents tested in this study appear to have potential for the treatment of multidrug-resistant strains of pneumococci. PMID:11959559

  6. Absence of a functional erm gene in isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group, based on in vitro clarithromycin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E Susan; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  7. Enhancing Effects on Vacuole-Targeting Fungicidal Activity of Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Akira; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are major threats for immunocompromised patients as well as for those undergoing cancer chemotherapy. Amphotericin B (AmB), a classical antifungal drug with a polyene macrolide structure, is widely used for the control of serious fungal infections. However, the clinical use of this antifungal drug is limited by its side effects and the emergence of drug-resistant strains. AmB lethality has been generally attributed to alterations in plasma membrane ion permeability due to its specific binding to plasma membrane ergosterol. Recent studies with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans reveal the vacuole disruptive action as another cause of AmB lethality on the basis of marked amplification of its activity in combination with allicin, an allyl-sulfur compound from garlic. The enhancing effect of allicin is dependent on the inhibition of ergosterol-trafficking from the plasma membrane to the vacuole membrane, which is considered to be a cellular response to protect against disintegration of the vacuole membrane. The polyol macrolide niphimycin (NM) also possesses vacuole-targeting fungicidal activity, which is greater than that of AmB and nystatin. The alkyl side chain attached to the macrolide ring of NM is considered to possess an allicin-like inhibitory effect on the intracellular trafficking of ergosterol. The vacuole-targeting fungicidal activity was additionally detected with a bactericidal cyclic peptide polymyxin B (PMB), and was markedly enhanced when administered together with allicin, monensin, or salinomycin. The synergistic fungicidal activities of AmB and allicin may have significant implications for the development of vacuole-targeting chemotherapy against fungal infections. PMID:22457662

  8. Occurrence of antibiotics and their impacts to primary productivity in fishponds around Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Zhang, Cong; Fan, Limin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Hu, Gengdong; Kamira, Barry; Chen, Jiazhang

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used to improve the health and yields of farmed animals, including fish, but their use is accompanied by undesirable ecological effects. Relatively little is known about the water-body burden of antibiotics and their influence on primary productivity in aquaculture ecosystem. In this study, antibiotics usage within 24 fishponds, covering 4 areas, sampled 5 times, and having 5 fish species, was investigated surrounding Tai Lake in China. The study analyzed 15 antibiotics (including 5 sulfonamides, 2 quinolones, 3 β-lactams, 3 tetracyclines, 1 amphenicol, and 1 macrolide), and all of them were detected in water samples, with a detection frequency of 2-60%. Sulfonamides were the most prevalent, and concentrations of sulfamethoxazole, sulfamonomethoxine, and florfenicol being over 2000 ng L(-1) in some samples, while the other antibiotics levels ranged from ND (no detection) to 551.18 ng L(-1). Significant differences were observed in antibiotic burden among different regions for total antibiotics, sulfonamides, quinolones, and amphenicols; among time points for quinolones, β-lactams, and tetracyclines; and among species for quinolones and macrolides. Furthermore, basing on the risk quotient (RQ) method, the assessment revealed that florfenicol was of highest risk to algae with RQ values exceeding 0.1, while macrolide erythromycin posed the second highest risk. The partial correlation coefficient between total antibiotics and chlorophyll (a) was -0.035 that clearly indicated total antibiotics were detrimental to green algae growth, while the nutrient input and other physical - chemical factors were much more beneficial. Overall, holistic far-reaching measures of antibiotics control are recommended to preserve aquaculture ecosystem health. PMID:27424054

  9. Absence of a Functional erm Gene in Isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum Group, Based on In Vitro Clarithromycin Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A.; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E. Susan; Wallace, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  10. FK506 maturation involves a cytochrome p450 protein-catalyzed four-electron C-9 oxidation in parallel with a C-31 O-methylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Lihan; Pang, Bo; Chen, Jing; Xu, Zhinan; Abe, Ikuro; Liu, Wen

    2013-05-01

    FK506, structurally similar to FK520 and rapamycin, is an α-keto amide bonding-containing, macrolide natural product that exhibits potent immunosuppressive activity and moderate antifungal activity. FK506 biosynthesis requires a hybrid polyketide synthase (PKS)-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) system to construct the skeleton of the macrolide. The mechanism for tailoring this macrolide to furnish FK506 remains poorly understood. In this study, we report a maturation paradigm common for FK506, FK520, and rapamycin, by characterizing two conserved regiospecific, post-PKS-NRPS modifications in an FK506-producing Streptomyces tsukubaensis strain. A cytochrome P450 protein, FkbD, catalyzes a less common, four-electron oxidation at C-9 to give a rarely found α-keto amide group, whereas a methyltransferase, FkbM, is responsible for O-methylation at C-31 to afford a methoxy group. Both FkbD and FkbM are highly tolerant in their substrate choice; therefore, the order of FkbD- and FkbM-catalyzed reactions is interchangeable in the FK506 biosynthetic pathway. Inactivation of fkbD produced a new intermediate, 9-deoxo-FK506, which displayed antifungal activity lower than that of FK506. Taking previously reported bioassay results regarding the intermediates 9-deoxo-31-O-demethyl-FK506 and 31-O-demethyl-FK506 into account, it is clear that the modifications catalyzed by FkbD and FkbM are of importance to reach the full biological activity of FK506 by forming a key structure motif that is necessary for interaction of the molecule with the receptor and, subsequently, the downstream intracellular responses. PMID:23435975

  11. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Gretchen L; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, "walking" pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  12. Tylosin resistance in Arcanobacterium pyogenes is encoded by an erm X determinant.

    PubMed

    Jost, B Helen; Field, Adam C; Trinh, Hien T; Songer, J Glenn; Billington, Stephen J

    2003-11-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a commensal on the mucous membranes of many economically important animal species, is also a pathogen, causing abscesses of the skin, joints, and visceral organs as well as mastitis and abortion. In food animals, A. pyogenes is exposed to antimicrobial agents used for growth promotion, prophylaxis, and therapy, notably tylosin, a macrolide antibiotic used extensively for the prevention of liver abscessation in feedlot cattle in the United States. Of 48 A. pyogenes isolates, 11 (22.9%) exhibited inducible or constitutive resistance to tylosin (MIC of > or = 128 microg/ml). These isolates also exhibited resistance to other macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics, suggesting a macrolide-lincosamide resistance phenotype. Of the 11 resistant isolates, genomic DNA from nine hybridized to an erm(X)-specific probe. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the A. pyogenes erm(X) gene indicated that it was >95% similar to erm(X) genes from Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium spp. Eight of the erm(X)-containing A. pyogenes isolates exhibited inducible tylosin resistance, which was consistent with the presence of a putative leader peptide upstream of the erm(X) open reading frame. For at least one A. pyogenes isolate, 98-4277-2, erm(X) was present on a plasmid, pAP2, and was associated with the insertion sequence IS6100. pAP2 also carried genes encoding the repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system determinant Tet 33. The repA gene from pAP2 was nonfunctional in Escherichia coli and at least one A. pyogenes isolate, suggesting that there may be host-encoded factors required for replication of this plasmid. PMID:14576111

  13. In vitro pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin against Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John D; Goh, Shan; McKellar, Quintin A; McKeever, Declan J

    2013-09-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), which is responsible for major economic losses in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control relies on live attenuated vaccines, which are of limited efficacy, and antimicrobials are now being assessed as an alternative or adjunct to vaccination. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro effector kinetics of the macrolide antimicrobial, gamithromycin, against MmmSC in artificial medium and adult bovine serum. Furthermore, it was determined if any differences in gamithromycin activity between these two matrices were mirrored by the older macrolides, tylosin and tilmicosin. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin against MmmSC strains B237 and Tan8 were determined in artificial medium and serum. Time-kill curves were constructed at concentrations corresponding to multiples of the MIC for all three macrolides in artificial medium and for gamithromycin in serum. Data were fitted to sigmoid Emax models. Post-antibiotic effects (PAE) were established by exposing strain B237 to antimicrobials at 10× MIC for 1h and monitoring mycoplasma growth thereafter. MICs for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin were 64-, 8- and 64-fold lower, respectively, in serum than in artificial medium at an inoculum size of 10(6)cfu/mL B237. A similar pattern emerged for Tan8. All three antimicrobials were mycoplasmastatic with maximum effects of -0.44, -0.32 and -0.49log10(cfu/mL) units for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin, respectively, against B237 in artificial medium. Tylosin and tilmicosin elicited longer PAEs than gamithromycin. In conclusion, gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin all demonstrated in vitro efficacy against MmmSC and represent potential candidates for clinical studies to assess their therapeutic effect against CBPP. PMID:23810743

  14. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  15. Impact of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy with Azithromycin-Containing Regimens on Maternal Nasopharyngeal Carriage and Antibiotic Sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus: a Cross-Sectional Survey at Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Holger W.; Aho, Celestine; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina A.; Umbers, Alexandra J.; Jack, Wanda; Lafana, Alice; Michael, Audrey; Hanieh, Sarah; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhill, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus azithromycin (AZ) (SPAZ) has the potential for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp), but its use could increase circulation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with severe pediatric infections. We evaluated the effect of monthly SPAZ-IPTp compared to a single course of SP plus chloroquine (SPCQ) on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus at delivery among 854 women participating in a randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea. Serotyping was performed, and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and Etest. Potential risk factors for carriage were examined. Nasopharyngeal carriage at delivery of S. pneumoniae (SPAZ, 7.2% [30/418], versus SPCQ, 19.3% [84/436]; P < 0.001) and H. influenzae (2.9% [12/418] versus 6.0% [26/436], P = 0.028), but not S. aureus, was significantly reduced among women who had received SPAZ-IPTp. The number of macrolide-resistant pneumococcal isolates was small but increased in the SPAZ group (13.3% [4/30], versus SPCQ, 2.2% [2/91]; P = 0.033). The proportions of isolates with serotypes covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were similar (SPAZ, 10.3% [3/29], versus SPCQ, 17.6% [16/91]; P = 0.352). Although macrolide-resistant isolates were rare, they were more commonly detected in women who had received SPAZ-IPTp, despite the significant reduction of maternal carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae observed in this group. Future studies on SPAZ-IPTp should evaluate carriage and persistence of macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and other pathogenic bacteria in both mothers and infants and assess the clinical significance of their circulation. PMID:25673788

  16. Impact of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with azithromycin-containing regimens on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cross-sectional survey at delivery.

    PubMed

    Unger, Holger W; Aho, Celestine; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina A; Umbers, Alexandra J; Jack, Wanda; Lafana, Alice; Michael, Audrey; Hanieh, Sarah; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhill, Andrew R; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus azithromycin (AZ) (SPAZ) has the potential for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp), but its use could increase circulation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with severe pediatric infections. We evaluated the effect of monthly SPAZ-IPTp compared to a single course of SP plus chloroquine (SPCQ) on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus at delivery among 854 women participating in a randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea. Serotyping was performed, and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and Etest. Potential risk factors for carriage were examined. Nasopharyngeal carriage at delivery of S. pneumoniae (SPAZ, 7.2% [30/418], versus SPCQ, 19.3% [84/436]; P<0.001) and H. influenzae (2.9% [12/418] versus 6.0% [26/436], P=0.028), but not S. aureus, was significantly reduced among women who had received SPAZ-IPTp. The number of macrolide-resistant pneumococcal isolates was small but increased in the SPAZ group (13.3% [4/30], versus SPCQ, 2.2% [2/91]; P=0.033). The proportions of isolates with serotypes covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were similar (SPAZ, 10.3% [3/29], versus SPCQ, 17.6% [16/91]; P=0.352). Although macrolide-resistant isolates were rare, they were more commonly detected in women who had received SPAZ-IPTp, despite the significant reduction of maternal carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae observed in this group. Future studies on SPAZ-IPTp should evaluate carriage and persistence of macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and other pathogenic bacteria in both mothers and infants and assess the clinical significance of their circulation. PMID:25673788

  17. Ureaplasma parvum undergoes selection in utero resulting in genetically diverse isolates colonizing the chorioamnion of fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Polglase, Graeme R; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H; Knox, Christine L

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasmas are the microorganisms most frequently isolated from the amniotic fluid of pregnant women and can cause chronic intrauterine infections. These tiny bacteria are thought to undergo rapid evolution and exhibit a hypermutatable phenotype; however, little is known about how ureaplasmas respond to selective pressures in utero. Using an ovine model of chronic intraamniotic infection, we investigated if exposure of ureaplasmas to subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin could induce phenotypic or genetic indicators of macrolide resistance. At 55 days gestation, 12 pregnant ewes received an intraamniotic injection of a nonclonal, clinical Ureaplasma parvum strain followed by (i) erythromycin treatment (intramuscularly, 30 mg/kg/day, n = 6) or (ii) saline (intramuscularly, n = 6) at 100 days gestation. Fetuses were then delivered surgically at 125 days gestation. Despite injecting the same inoculum into all the ewes, significant differences between amniotic fluid and chorioamnion ureaplasmas were detected following chronic intraamniotic infection. Numerous polymorphisms were observed in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of ureaplasmas isolated from the chorioamnion (but not the amniotic fluid), resulting in a mosaiclike sequence. Chorioamnion isolates also harbored the macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and msr(D) and were associated with variable roxithromycin minimum inhibitory concentrations. Remarkably, this variability occurred independently of exposure of ureaplasmas to erythromycin, suggesting that low-level erythromycin exposure does not induce ureaplasmal macrolide resistance in utero. Rather, the significant differences observed between amniotic fluid and chorioamnion ureaplasmas suggest that different anatomical sites may select for ureaplasma subtypes within nonclonal, clinical strains. This may have implications for the treatment of intrauterine ureaplasma infections.

  18. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers

    PubMed Central

    Beukers, Alicia G.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V.; Ward, Michael P.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of eryR and tylR enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of eryR and tylR resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of eryR E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of eryR enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate reflects

  19. Infection with and Carriage of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Children

    PubMed Central

    Meyer Sauteur, Patrick M.; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Nadal, David; Berger, Christoph; Vink, Cornelis; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.

    2016-01-01

    “Atypical” pneumonia was described as a distinct and mild form of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) already before Mycoplasma pneumoniae had been discovered and recognized as its cause. M. pneumoniae is detected in CAP patients most frequently among school-aged children from 5 to 15 years of age, with a decline after adolescence and tapering off in adulthood. Detection rates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or serology in children with CAP admitted to the hospital amount 4–39%. Although the infection is generally mild and self-limiting, patients of every age can develop severe or extrapulmonary disease. Recent studies indicate that high rates of healthy children carry M. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract and that current diagnostic PCR or serology cannot discriminate between M. pneumoniae infection and carriage. Further, symptoms and radiologic features are not specific for M. pneumoniae infection. Thus, patients may be unnecessarily treated with antimicrobials against M. pneumoniae. Macrolides are the first-line antibiotics for this entity in children younger than 8 years of age. Overall macrolides are extensively used worldwide, and this has led to the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, which may be associated with severe clinical features and more extrapulmonary complications. This review focuses on the characteristics of M. pneumoniae infections in children, and exemplifies that simple clinical decision rules may help identifying children at high risk for CAP due to M. pneumoniae. This may aid physicians in prescribing appropriate first-line antibiotics, since current diagnostic tests for M. pneumoniae infection are not reliably predictive. PMID:27047456

  20. Occurrence of antibiotics in the aquatic environment of Jianghan Plain, central China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lei; Huang, Shuangbing; Wang, Yanxin; Liu, Hui; Li, Minjing

    2014-11-01

    The occurrence of 19 antibiotics (sulfonamide, fluoroquinolone, tetracycline and macrolide) was studied in surface water and groundwater samples collected from Shahu County of Jianghan Plain, central China, in autumn (dry season) and spring (wet season). In autumn, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline and enrofloxacin were the three antibiotics with the highest concentrations and high relevance ratios in all of the water samples. The concentration of chlorotetracycline was greatest in surface water at 122.3 n gL(-1) and was as high as 86.6 ng L(-1) in groundwater, which are among the highest values reported worldwide. In spring, tetracycline was found to be more than 100 ng L(-1) in groundwater and surface water, which also contained high concentrations of ofloxacin (135.1 ng L(-1)), norfloxacin (134.2 ng L(-1)) and erythromycin dehydrate (381.5 ng L(-1)). Most of the SMs were observed at higher detection frequencies in spring than in autumn, which can be ascribed to surface runoff by rain water during the wet season (spring). The average concentrations of compounds in the fluoroquinolone and tetracycline categories were far higher than those in the sulfonamide and macrolide categories, which had concentrations of less than 16 ng L(-1) in groundwater (except erythromycin dehydrate), while macrolides were found in all samples, except erythromycin dehydrate. The main antibiotics present in groundwater were also the dominant compounds found in surface water, with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.97 in autumn and spring, respectively, indicating the potential contamination of groundwater by the infiltration of contaminated surface water.

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Recent Cuban Mycoplasma genitalium Isolates Determined by a Modified Cell-Culture-Based Method

    PubMed Central

    Mondeja, Brian A.; Rodríguez, Nadia M.; Barroto, Brenda; Blanco, Orestes

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of Mycoplasma genitalium from clinical specimens remains difficult and few strains are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We describe the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. genitalium strains grown in Vero cell culture with first- and second- line antibiotics, using a modified cell-culture-based method. Macrolide- and -fluoroquinolone resistance determinants were detected by sequencing of the 23S and parC genes, respectively. Seven strains were examined, including three new, genetically distinct M. genitalium strains isolated from endocervical and urethral swab specimens from Cuban patients together with four reference strains isolated from specimens collected from men in Denmark, Sweden and Australia. Azithromycin was the most active drug against two of the Cuban M. genitalium strains with MICs values of 0.008 mg/liter, however, one strain was macrolide resistant with an MIC of >8 mg/liter, and the A2059G resistant genotype. Ciprofloxacin was the least active antimicrobial drug and moxifloxacin was the most active fluoroquinolone against the new clinical strains, although an MIC of 1 mg/l was found for two strains. However, no relevant parC mutations were detected. MICs for tetracyclines were 0.5–4 mg/liter. Although the number of Cuban strains was low, the results suggest that a single-dose azithromycin treatment could be ineffective, and that a second-line treatment with moxifloxacin, should become an option in Cuba. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and antibiotic susceptibility testing of M. genitalium strains from the Latin-American region, and the first detection of macrolide resistance in such strains. PMID:27679992

  2. Tilmicosin-induced bovine neutrophil apoptosis is cell-specific and downregulates spontaneous LTB4 synthesis without increasing Fas expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wilson D; Flynn, Andrew N; LeBlanc, Justin M; Merrill, John K; Dick, Paul; Morck, Douglas W; Buret, Andre G

    2004-01-01

    The pathology of bacterial pneumonia, such as seen in the bovine lung infected with Mannheimia haemolytica, is due to pathogen virulence factors and to inflammation initiated by the host. Tilmicosin is a macrolide effective in treating bacterial pneumonia and recent findings suggest that this antibiotic may provide anti-inflammatory benefits by inducing polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocyte (PMN) apoptosis. Using an in vitro bovine system, we examined the cell-specificity of tilmicosin, characterized the changes in spontaneous leukotriene B4 (LTB4) synthesis by PMN exposed to the macrolide, and assessed its effects on PMN Fas expression. Previous findings demonstrated that tilmicosin is able to induce PMN apoptosis. These results were confirmed in this study by the Annexin-V staining of externalized phosphatidylserine and the analysis with flow cytometry. The cell-specificity of tilmicosin was assessed by quantification of apoptosis in bovine PMN, mononuclear leukocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts cultured with the macrolide. The effect of tilmicosin on spontaneous LTB4 production by PMN was evaluated via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, the mechanisms of tilmicosin-induced PMN apoptosis were examined by assessing the effects of tilmicosin on surface Fas expression on PMN. Tilmicosin-induced apoptosis was found to be at least partially cell-specific, as PMN were the only cell type tested to die via apoptosis in response to incubation with tilmicosin. PMN incubated with tilmicosin under conditions that induce apoptosis spontaneously produced less LTB4, but did not exhibit altered Fas expression. In conclusion, tilmicosin-induced apoptosis is specific to PMN, inhibits spontaneous LTB4 production, and occurs through a pathway independent of Fas upregulation.

  3. In vitro pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin against Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John D; Goh, Shan; McKellar, Quintin A; McKeever, Declan J

    2013-09-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), which is responsible for major economic losses in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control relies on live attenuated vaccines, which are of limited efficacy, and antimicrobials are now being assessed as an alternative or adjunct to vaccination. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro effector kinetics of the macrolide antimicrobial, gamithromycin, against MmmSC in artificial medium and adult bovine serum. Furthermore, it was determined if any differences in gamithromycin activity between these two matrices were mirrored by the older macrolides, tylosin and tilmicosin. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin against MmmSC strains B237 and Tan8 were determined in artificial medium and serum. Time-kill curves were constructed at concentrations corresponding to multiples of the MIC for all three macrolides in artificial medium and for gamithromycin in serum. Data were fitted to sigmoid Emax models. Post-antibiotic effects (PAE) were established by exposing strain B237 to antimicrobials at 10× MIC for 1h and monitoring mycoplasma growth thereafter. MICs for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin were 64-, 8- and 64-fold lower, respectively, in serum than in artificial medium at an inoculum size of 10(6)cfu/mL B237. A similar pattern emerged for Tan8. All three antimicrobials were mycoplasmastatic with maximum effects of -0.44, -0.32 and -0.49log10(cfu/mL) units for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin, respectively, against B237 in artificial medium. Tylosin and tilmicosin elicited longer PAEs than gamithromycin. In conclusion, gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin all demonstrated in vitro efficacy against MmmSC and represent potential candidates for clinical studies to assess their therapeutic effect against CBPP.

  4. Impact of recent antibiotics on nasopharyngeal carriage and lower airway infection in Indigenous Australian children with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Leach, A J; Morris, P S; Smith-Vaughan, H; Torzillo, P; Bauert, P; Cheng, A C; McDonald, M I; Brown, N; Chang, A B; Grimwood, K

    2012-10-01

    Indigenous Australian children have increased rates of bronchiectasis. Despite a lack of high-level evidence on effectiveness and antibiotic resistance, these children often receive long-term antibiotics. In this study, we determined the impact of recent macrolide (primarily azithromycin) and β-lactam antibiotic use on nasopharyngeal colonisation, lower airway infection (>10(4) CFU/mL of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid culture) and antibiotic resistance in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolates from 104 Indigenous children with radiographically confirmed bronchiectasis. Recent antibiotic use was associated with significantly reduced nasopharyngeal carriage, especially of S. pneumoniae in 39 children who received macrolides [odds ratio (OR)=0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.63] and 26 children who received β-lactams (OR=0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.32), but had no significant effect on lower airway infection involving any of the three pathogens. Children given macrolides were significantly more likely to carry (OR=4.58, 95% CI 1.14-21.7) and be infected by (OR=8.13, 95% CI 1.47-81.3) azithromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae. Children who received β-lactam antibiotics may be more likely to have lower airway infection with β-lactamase-positive ampicillin-resistant NTHi (OR=4.40, 95% CI 0.85-23.9). The risk of lower airway infection by antibiotic-resistant pathogens in children receiving antibiotics is of concern. Clinical trials to determine the overall benefit of long-term antibiotic therapy are underway.

  5. Is antimicrobial resistance also subject to globalization?

    PubMed

    Schito, G C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years one of the more alarming aspects of clinical microbiology has been the dramatic increase in the incidence of resistance to antibacterial agents among pathogens causing nosocomial as well as community-acquired infections. There are profound geographic differences in the incidence of resistance among pathogens of the respiratory tract, only some of which can be explained by the local use of antibiotics. A high percentage of Moraxella catarrhalis strains produce beta-lactamase and are thus resistant to many beta-lactam antibiotics. In contrast, beta-lactamase production among strains of Haemophilus influenzae rarely reaches more than 30% around the world. Methicillin-resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a common and increasing problem in hospitals but its extent varies both locally and nationally. Resistance is usually associated with the local spread of resistant strains. High standards of hygiene in hospitals can prevent the spread of such strains but once established they can be difficult to eradicate. Although Streptococcus pyogenes remains highly susceptible to penicillins, even after many decades of their use, resistance to macrolides has occurred. This resistance can rise and fall. Although the increase of macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes can often be associated with an increase in the use of these drugs, this is not always so. In some cases it has been shown to be caused by the spread of one or more resistant clones. Eradication of these clones can reduce the level of resistance markedly. Resistance to both macrolides and penicillins among strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae is seen world-wide but is highly variable from country to country. Local habits of drug usage may play a part. In Italy, for example, there is preference for the use of parenteral third-generation cephalosporins for some severe infections and there is a corresponding low level of penicillin-resistance among pneumococci.

  6. Multicenter cross-sectional observational study of antibiotic resistance and the genotypes of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from Chinese patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yukun; Hao, Fei; Wang, Weizhen; Lu, Yonghong; He, Li; Wang, Gang; Chen, Wenchieh

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are widely applied in management of acne vulgaris, which raises the issue of antibiotic resistance. Due to improper application and supervision of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance has become a serious problem in China. So, the efficacy of antimicrobial therapy in acne is unclear without an objective monitor of antibiotic resistance of Propionibacterium acnes. This cross-sectional, multicenter observational study is aimed at understanding the status of antibiotic resistance in P. acnes, investigating the measures of acne management in China and analyzing the genotypes of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. acnes. Altogether, 312 strains of P. acnes were collected from patients in five medical centers across central China after reviewing the corresponding medical history in detail. The samples underwent antibiotic susceptibility assays by agar dilution method with a total of 11 classes of antibiotics being tested. The antibiotic-resistant strains were screened and further analyzed by investigation of the genotypes regarding 23S rRNA, 16S rRNA and erm(X). The predominant resistance occurred in macrolides and lincomycin with an overall resistance rate of 47.8%. The resistance to tetracyclines was scarce with only two cases identified. The emergence of minimum inhibitory concentration elevation for tetracyclines is associated with its application history (P < 0.005). The genotypes of the reported macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance strains were also spotted in Chinese subjects while other resistance determinants may also exist. The tetracyclines have been proved to be vastly susceptible while macrolides and lincomycin face a serious resistance status in China.

  7. Comparative analysis of the antibacterial activity of a novel peptide deformylase inhibitor, GSK1322322.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Karen; Hackel, Meredith; Hightower, Sarah; Hoban, Daryl; Bouchillon, Samuel; Qin, Donghui; Aubart, Kelly; Zalacain, Magdalena; Butler, Deborah

    2013-05-01

    GSK1322322 is a novel peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitor being developed for the intravenous and oral treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. The activity of GSK1322322 was tested against a global collection of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae (n = 2,370), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 115), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 947), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 617), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 940), including strains resistant to one or more marketed antibiotics. GSK1322322 had an MIC(90) of 1 μg/ml against M. catarrhalis and 4 μg/ml against H. influenzae, with 88.8% of β-lactamase-positive strains showing growth inhibition at that concentration. All S. pneumoniae strains were inhibited by ≤ 4 μg/ml of GSK1322322, with an MIC(90) of 2 μg/ml. Pre-existing resistance mechanisms did not affect its potency, as evidenced by the MIC(90) of 1 μg/ml for penicillin, levofloxacin, and macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae. GSK1322322 was very potent against S. pyogenes strains, with an MIC(90) of 0.5 μg/ml, irrespective of their macrolide resistance phenotype. This PDF inhibitor was also active against S. aureus strains regardless of their susceptibility to methicillin, macrolides, or levofloxacin, with an MIC(90) of 4 μg/ml in all cases. Time-kill studies showed that GSK1322322 had bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, S. pyogenes, and S. aureus, demonstrating a ≥ 3-log(10) decrease in the number of CFU/ml at 4× MIC within 24 h in 29 of the 33 strains tested. Given the antibacterial potency demonstrated against this panel of organisms, GSK1322322 represents a valuable alternative therapy for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by drug-resistant pathogens.

  8. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Geisla Mary Silva; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes; FERES, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections. PMID:22858695

  9. Azithromycin for the Prevention of COPD Exacerbations: The Good, Bad, and Ugly.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie Parks; Sellers, Eric; Taylor, Brice T

    2015-12-01

    Long-term azithromycin therapy has been shown to reduce exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and is recommended by recent society guidelines for use in COPD patients who are at risk for recurrent exacerbations. However, concerns about adverse effects have limited its widespread adoption. Physicians deciding whether to use long-term azithromycin therapy must weigh each patient's individual risk of cardiovascular complications and both the individual and population impact of macrolide resistance against the expected benefit. This review will summarize evidence on the effectiveness and safety of chronic azithromycin for the prevention of COPD exacerbations.

  10. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis x Von Zumbusch’s pustular psoriasis: A diagnostic challenge in a psoriatic patient*

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Aline Soares; Lara, Osório Alves Corrêa de Castro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Marchioro, Gláucia Silva Simioni; Tebcherani, Antonio José

    2015-01-01

    Severe cutaneous drug reactions include a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from mild morbilliform cutaneous rash, to severe forms of hypersensitivity. Special attention is given in this report to the acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), induced in 90% of cases by the use of systemic drugs, especially aminopenicillins and macrolides. The incidence of the disease is low, 1-5 cases per million patients / year. The main differential diagnosis is Von Zumbusch's Pustular Psoriasis. The prognosis is generally good and the disease self limited, after withdrawal of the triggering drug. In this report the authors describe a case of AGEP, triggered by ceftriaxone in a patient with psoriasis vulgaris. PMID:26375226

  11. High-throughput multiclass method for antibiotic residue analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chico, J; Rúbies, A; Centrich, F; Companyó, R; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2008-12-12

    A simple and rapid method has been developed for the residue analysis of 39 antibiotics (tetracyclines, quinolones, penicillins, sulfonamides and macrolides) in foodstuffs of animal origin. The method combines an effective extraction technique, which uses water-methanol as extracting solvent, with ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, allowing both confirmation and quantification in a single chromatographic run. The multiresidue method has been validated in chicken muscle matrix according to European Union Decision 2002/657/EC. It has been implemented as a routine method in a Public Health Laboratory, instead of the five plates test and LC methods previously used.

  12. New insights into the pathogenesis and detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections

    PubMed Central

    Balish, Mitchell F; Atkinson, T Prescott

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in persons of all ages and may be responsible for up to 40% of community-acquired pneumonias. A wide array of extrapulmonary events may accompany the infections caused by this organism, related to autommunity or direct spread. This review includes a discussion of the latest knowledge concerning the molecular pathological basis of mycoplasmal respiratory disease, how the organism interacts with the host immune system and its association with the development of chronic conditions such as asthma, recent emergence of macrolide resistance and the status of laboratory diagnostic methods. PMID:19072181

  13. The Role of Spongia sp. in the Discovery of Marine Lead Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Máximo, Patrícia; Ferreira, Luísa M.; Branco, Paula; Lima, Pedro; Lourenço, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive review on the chemistry of Spongia sp. is here presented, together with the biological activity of the isolated compounds. The compounds are grouped in sesquiterpene quinones, diterpenes, C21 and other linear furanoterpenes, sesterterpenes, sterols (including secosterols), macrolides and miscellaneous compounds. Among other reports we include studies on the intraspecific diversity of a Mediterranean species, compounds isolated from associated sponge and nudibranch and compounds isolated from S. zimocca and the red seaweed Laurentia microcladia. Under biological activity a table of the reported biological activities of the various compounds and the biological screening of extracts are described. The present review covers the literature from 1971 to 2015. PMID:27455286

  14. In vitro immunosuppressive activity of tacrolimus dihydrodiol precursors obtained by chemical oxidation and identification of a new metabolite of SDZ-RAD by electrospray and electrospray-linked scan mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lhoëst, G; Hertsens, R; Verbeeck, R K; Maton, N; Wallemacq, P; Dehoux, J P; Latinne, D

    2001-08-01

    Different tacrolimus epoxides and dihydrodiol epoxides arising from the chemical oxidation of the parent drug are described. Open-chain tautomeric forms involving the lactone function were identified for the tacrolimus epoxides. Moreover, the identification by electrospray and electrospray linked scan mass spectrometry of an SDZ-RAD C16-C27 O-demethyl 17, 18-19, 20-21, 22 tris-epoxide new metabolite isolated from pig liver microsomes is reported. The in vitro immunosuppressive activity, using mixed lymphocyte reactions of the two macrolide reported oxidation compounds are discussed. PMID:11523088

  15. Exploiting Pseudo C2-Symmetry for an Efficient Synthesis of the F-Ring of the Spongistatins

    PubMed Central

    Tanis, Paul S.; Infantine, Joshua R.; Leighton, James L.

    2013-01-01

    A concise and efficient synthesis of the F-ring fragment of the potent anti-mitotic marine macrolide spongistatin 1 has been developed. The key sequence involves double cross-metathesis/Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation reactions to establish four stereocenters in a pseudo C2-symmetric array, followed by a selective protection reaction that breaks the pseudo-symmetry, establishes a fifth stereocenter, and effectively differentiates the ester termini. Overall, the six contiguous stereocenters in the C(37)–C(45) F-ring fragment are established in just seven steps. PMID:24111885

  16. [Pregnancy and breast feeding: antibiotics, irrigation and pastes].

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. The reader should gain security in the election of the proper drugs for antibiotic therapy and rinsing solutions. Antibiotics as penicillins are the first choice in case of dental infections in pregnancy. In allergic patients, macrolides may be an alternative. Wound and mouth rinsing solutions containing chlorhexidine should be preferred in pregnancy. Ledermix(®) in endodontic treatment should be avoided in the pregnant woman. Solcoseryl(®) can be used for wound healing. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period.

  17. [Pregnancy and lactation: antibiotics. mouthwashes and pastes or ointments.

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. The reader should gain security in the election of the proper drugs for antibiotic therapy and rinsing solutions. Antibiotics as penicillins are the first choice in case of dental infections in pregnancy. In allergic patients, macrolides may be an alternative. Wound and mouth rinsing solutions containing chlorhexidine should be preferred in pregnancy. Ledermix(®) in endodontic treatment should be avoided in the pregnant woman. Solcoseryl(®) can be used for wound healing. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period.

  18. Streptococcus agalactiae in Brazil: serotype distribution, virulence determinants and antimicrobial susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis and is also associated with invasive and noninvasive infections in pregnant women and non-pregnant adults, elderly and patients with underlying medical conditions. Ten capsular serotypes have been recognized, and determination of their distribution within a specific population or geographical region is important as they are major targets for the development of vaccine strategies. We have evaluated the characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from individuals with infections or colonization by this microorganism, living in different geographic regions of Brazil. Methods A total of 434 isolates were identified and serotyped by conventional phenotypic tests. The determination of antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by the disk diffusion method. Genes associated with resistance to erythromycin (ermA, ermB, mefA) and tetracycline (tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO) as well as virulence-associated genes (bac, bca, lmb, scpB) were investigated using PCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to examine the genetic diversity of macrolide-resistant and of a number of selected macrolide-susceptible isolates. Results Overall, serotypes Ia (27.6%), II (19.1%), Ib (18.7%) and V (13.6%) were the most predominant, followed by serotypes IV (8.1%) and III (6.7%). All the isolates were susceptible to the beta-lactam antimicrobials tested and 97% were resistant to tetracycline. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were found in 4.1% and 3% of the isolates, respectively. Among the resistance genes investigated, tetM (99.3%) and tetO (1.8%) were detected among tetracycline-resistant isolates and ermA (39%) and ermB (27.6%) were found among macrolide-resistant isolates. The lmb and scpB virulence genes were detected in all isolates, while bac and bca were detected in 57 (13.1%) and 237 (54.6%) isolates, respectively. Molecular typing by PFGE showed that resistance to erythromycin was associated

  19. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  20. Phosphate tether-mediated approach to the formal total synthesis of (-)-salicylihalamides A and B.

    PubMed

    Chegondi, Rambabu; Tan, Mary M L; Hanson, Paul R

    2011-05-20

    A concise formal synthesis of the cytotoxic macrolides (-)-salicylihalamides A and B is reported. Key features of the synthetic strategy include a chemoselective hydroboration, highly regio- and diastereoselective methyl cuprate addition, Pd-catalyzed formate reduction, and an E-selective ring-closing metathesis to construct the 12-membered macrocycle subunit. Overall, two routes have been developed from a readily prepared bicyclic phosphate (4 steps), a 13-step route and a more efficient 9-step sequence relying on regioselective esterification of a key diol.

  1. [T serotypes distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes in children with pharyngotonsillitis in Asahikawa].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Between June 2006 and April 2007, I measured T serotypes and antibiotic susceptibilities of 367 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from children with pharyngotonsillitis in Asahikawa. Prevalent serotypes were 12 (33.8%), 1 (22.9%), and 28 (12.5%). The MIC90s of beta-lactams were 0.008 microg/ml in penicillin G, cefcapene, cefditoren, cefteram, cefdinir and faropenem, and 0.015 microg/ml in amoxicillin. Of 367 isolates, macrolide-resistant (erythromycin > 0.5 micro/ml) strains account for 42 (11.4%). PMID:19288853

  2. Efficient syntheses of 25,26-dihydrodictyostatin and 25,26-dihydro-6-epi-dictyostatin, two potent new microtubule-stabilizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, María; Zhu, Wei; Vogt, Andreas; Day, Billy W

    2011-01-01

    Summary The dictyostatins are powerful microtubule-stabilizing agents that have shown antiproliferative activity against a variety of human cancer cell lines. Two highly active analogs of dictyostatin, 25,26-dihydrodictyostatin and 25,26-dihydro-6-epi-dictyostatin, were prepared by a new streamlined total synthesis route. Three complete carbon fragments were prepared to achieve maximum convergency. These were coupled by a Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons reaction sequence and an esterification. A late stage Nozaki–Hiyama–Kishi reaction was then used to form the 22-membered macrolide. The stereoselectivity of this reaction depended on the configurations of the nearby stereocenter at C6. PMID:22043248

  3. High-throughput multiclass method for antibiotic residue analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chico, J; Rúbies, A; Centrich, F; Companyó, R; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2008-12-12

    A simple and rapid method has been developed for the residue analysis of 39 antibiotics (tetracyclines, quinolones, penicillins, sulfonamides and macrolides) in foodstuffs of animal origin. The method combines an effective extraction technique, which uses water-methanol as extracting solvent, with ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, allowing both confirmation and quantification in a single chromatographic run. The multiresidue method has been validated in chicken muscle matrix according to European Union Decision 2002/657/EC. It has been implemented as a routine method in a Public Health Laboratory, instead of the five plates test and LC methods previously used. PMID:18992888

  4. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. The reader should gain security in the election of the proper drugs for antibiotic therapy and rinsing solutions. Antibiotics as penicillins are the first choice in case of dental infections in pregnancy. In allergic patients, macrolides may be an alternative. Wound and mouth rinsing solutions containing chlorhexidine should be preferred in pregnancy. Ledermix(®) in endodontic treatment should be avoided in the pregnant woman. Solcoseryl(®) can be used for wound healing. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period. PMID:27377565

  5. The Role of Spongia sp. in the Discovery of Marine Lead Compounds.

    PubMed

    Máximo, Patrícia; Ferreira, Luísa M; Branco, Paula; Lima, Pedro; Lourenço, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive review on the chemistry of Spongia sp. is here presented, together with the biological activity of the isolated compounds. The compounds are grouped in sesquiterpene quinones, diterpenes, C21 and other linear furanoterpenes, sesterterpenes, sterols (including secosterols), macrolides and miscellaneous compounds. Among other reports we include studies on the intraspecific diversity of a Mediterranean species, compounds isolated from associated sponge and nudibranch and compounds isolated from S. zimocca and the red seaweed Laurentia microcladia. Under biological activity a table of the reported biological activities of the various compounds and the biological screening of extracts are described. The present review covers the literature from 1971 to 2015. PMID:27455286

  6. Acquired scalp alopecia. Part II: A review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J R; Kossard, S

    1999-05-01

    The neutrophil-associated and infiltrative scarring alopecias are reviewed including folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, acne keloidalis and follicular degeneration syndrome. The management of acquired scalp alopecia is also reviewed including newer, promising therapies. More specific agents targeting components of the androgen system will make the treatment of androgenetic alopecia more rewarding. Similarly new immunomodulatory therapies show great promise for the lymphocyte-associated alopecias and include a new generation of macrolide immunosuppressives (tacrolimus, SDZ ASM 981, and SDZ 281-240), some of which appear to have good transcutaneous absorption. PMID:10333615

  7. Mycobacterium avium-Intracellulare Complex (MAC) Producing a Periportal Pseudotumor in a Patient With HIV and a Normal CD4 Count

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jessica; Driscoll, Meghan; Cohen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) is an opportunistic infection typically associated with profound immunosuppression, such as AIDS. The presentation of disseminated MAC can be subtle and mimic systemic symptoms associated with lymphoma; abdominal pseudotumor is an exceptionally rare presentation. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), opportunistic infections are increasingly rare, and secondary prophylaxis for MAC may be discontinued after adequate therapy and immune reconstitution. Recurrence of disseminated MAC after adequate therapy may be due to macrolide resistance, but with an adequate CD4 T-cell count and undetectable HIV viral load, recurrence raises questions of more subtle immune dysregulation. PMID:27807554

  8. Are prophylactic antibiotics useful in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Arenas, Alex; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-11-10

    Bacterial infections are one of the main causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, so the use of prophylactic antibiotics, especially macrolides, has been proposed in these patients. However, it is unclear whether antibiotics use is worth the risk and cost. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded prophylactic antibiotics probably decrease exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but have no effect on hospitalizations or mortality.

  9. Airway biofilms: implications for pathogenesis and therapy of respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The differentiation of bacterial biofilms in the airway environment, the pathogenesis of airway biofilm, and possible therapeutic methods are discussed. Biofilm diseases that characteristically involve the respiratory system include cystic fibrosis (CF), diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), and bronchiectasia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection. There is evidence to suggest that almost all strains of P. aeruginosa have the genetic capacity to synthesize alginate, a main matrix of biofilms, when ecological conditions are unfavorable for their survival. The bacteria inside the mature biofilm show increased resistance to both antibacterials and phagocytic cells, express fewer virulence factors because of their stationary state of growth, and are less stimulatory to the mucosa because of the 'sandwich binding'. These factors facilitate both the colonization of bacteria and their extended survival even under unfavorable conditions. Since the biofilm limits colonization to a latent form, the clinical symptoms in this situation are unremarkable. However, the clinical progression of both CF and DPB proceeds in two characteristic directions. The first is an acute exacerbation caused by planktonic bacteria that have germinated from the biofilm. The second is a slow progression of disease that is induced by harmful immune reactions. The harmful reactions are mediated by alginate, which induces antigen antibody reactions around the airways, as well as formation of circulating immune complexes that are deposited on lung tissue. Furthermore, the highest titer of bacterial permeability increasing anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (BPI-ANCA) is observed in association with highly impaired pulmonary function in patients with CF and DPB, as well as in patients with a lengthy period of colonization with P. aeruginosa. BPI-ANCA subsequently makes chronic airway infection even more intractable. The long-term use of 14- or 15-ring membered macrolides results in a

  10. Cytotoxic Bryostatin Derivatives from the South China Sea Bryozoan Bugula neritina.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Bing; Yang, Fan; Li, Yan-Yun; Gan, Jian-Hong; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2015-05-22

    Four new macrocyclic lactones, bryostatin 21 (1) and 9-O-methylbryostatins 4, 16, and 17 (2-4), together with three known related compounds, bryostatins 4, 16, and 17 (5-7), have been isolated from an extract of the South China Sea bryozoan Bugula neritina. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated using detailed spectroscopic analysis. Structurally, the presence of a single methyl group at C-18 in compound 1 has not been observed before for known bryostatins. The isolated macrolides exhibited inhibitory effects against a small panel of human cancer cell lines.

  11. Total synthesis and development of bioactive natural products

    PubMed Central

    TATSUTA, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    The first total synthesis and development of a variety of bioactive natural products have been accomplished by using carbohydrates as a chiral source. In addition, practically useful intermediates have been created, analogs of natural products have been prepared, their structure-activity relationships studied, and the large-scale preparations of medicinally useful compounds established. The key target molecules have been the “Big Four” antibiotics (macrolides, aminoglycosides, β-lactams and tetracyclines), pyranonaphthoquinone antibiotics, glycosidase inhibitors, and a side-chain of cephem antibiotics. PMID:18941289

  12. Evaluation of the ability of tilmicosin to prevent adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cilia using a differentiated swine respiratory epithelial culture system.

    PubMed

    Thacker, E L; Young, T F; Erickson, B Z; DeBey, M C

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasmal pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a serious economic problem for swine producers in the United States. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonizes ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. The organism has been shown to be sensitive to tilmicosin, a synthetic macrolide, in antibiotic sensitivity assays. The efficacy of tilmicosin to inhibit adherence of M. hyopneumoniae to ciliated epithelial cells without direct contact between the antibiotic and the organism was evaluated using in vitro methods. The study demonstrated that tilmicosin inhibited the adherence of M. hyopneumoniae at the highest level tested in the system (2 microg/ml) suggesting that tilmicosin may be efficacious against mycoplasmal pneumonia.

  13. Cytotoxic Bryostatin Derivatives from the South China Sea Bryozoan Bugula neritina.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Bing; Yang, Fan; Li, Yan-Yun; Gan, Jian-Hong; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2015-05-22

    Four new macrocyclic lactones, bryostatin 21 (1) and 9-O-methylbryostatins 4, 16, and 17 (2-4), together with three known related compounds, bryostatins 4, 16, and 17 (5-7), have been isolated from an extract of the South China Sea bryozoan Bugula neritina. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated using detailed spectroscopic analysis. Structurally, the presence of a single methyl group at C-18 in compound 1 has not been observed before for known bryostatins. The isolated macrolides exhibited inhibitory effects against a small panel of human cancer cell lines. PMID:25932671

  14. A new 24-membered lactone and a new polyene delta-lactone from the marine bacterium Bacillus marinus.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chunmei; Tian, Li; Xu, Minjuan; Deng, Zhiwei; Lin, Wenhan

    2008-11-01

    A new 24-membered macrolide macrolactin T (1), and a new polyene delta-lactone macrolactin U (2), along with macrolactins A, B, D, O, and S, were isolated from the cultured broth of the bacterium Bacillus marinus, which was isolated from Suaeda salsa collected in the coastline of Bohai Sea of China. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic data analyses. The inhibitory activity of macrolactins T, B and D against fungi Pyricularia oryzae and Alternaria solani, and bacteria Staphylococcus aureus is reported. PMID:19168981

  15. [Pregnancy and breast feeding: antibiotics, irrigation and pastes].

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. The reader should gain security in the election of the proper drugs for antibiotic therapy and rinsing solutions. Antibiotics as penicillins are the first choice in case of dental infections in pregnancy. In allergic patients, macrolides may be an alternative. Wound and mouth rinsing solutions containing chlorhexidine should be preferred in pregnancy. Ledermix(®) in endodontic treatment should be avoided in the pregnant woman. Solcoseryl(®) can be used for wound healing. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period. PMID:27277144

  16. Two Novel Salmonella Genomic Island 1 Variants in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Swine Farms in China

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Yang, Li-Qin; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Four different Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) variants, including two novel variants, were characterized in one Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen sequence type ST1917 isolate and three Proteus mirabilis isolates from swine farms in China. One novel variant was derived from SGI1-B with the backbone gene S021 disrupted by a 12.72-kb IS26 composite transposon containing the dfrA17-aadA5 cassettes and macrolide inactivation gene cluster mphA-mrx-mphR. The other one was an integron-free SGI1 and contained a 183-bp truncated S025 next to IS6100 and S044. PMID:25918148

  17. Unusually low prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in urine samples from infertile men and healthy controls: a prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    Plecko, Vanda; Zele-Starcevic, Lidija; Tripkovic, Vesna; Skerlev, Mihael; Ljubojevic, Suzana; Plesko, Sanja; Marekovic, Ivana; Jensen, Jorgen Skov

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect Mycoplasma genitalium in urine samples of infertile men and men without any signs of infection in order to investigate whether M. genitalium and other genital mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma spp) are found more often in urine samples of infertile men than in asymptomatic controls and to determine resistance to macrolides. Methods The study included first void urine samples taken from 145 infertile men and 49 men with no symptoms of urethritis. M. genitalium, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were detected by commercial PCR. Trichomonas vaginalis was detected by microscopy and culture. M. hominis and Ureaplasma spp were detected by culture. M. genitalium was detected by in-house conventional and real-time PCR. Results Two M. genitalium positive samples were found among samples obtained from infertile men. All asymptomatic men were M. genitalium negative. Macrolide resistance was not found in either of the two positive samples. Conclusions In comparison with reported data, an unusually low prevalence of M. genitalium was found in infertile men. The reasons for this unexpected result are not known; possibly, local demographic and social characteristics of the population influenced the result. Further studies to investigate M. genitalium in infertile and other groups of patients are needed. PMID:25157184

  18. Lack of effect of spiramycin on cyclosporin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Vernillet, L; Bertault-Peres, P; Berland, Y; Barradas, J; Durand, A; Olmer, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The influence of spiramycin coadministration on cyclosporin pharmacokinetics was studied in five renal transplant patients. The plasma concentrations of cyclosporin were measured both by non-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). 2. The kinetics of cyclosporin were followed before treatment, and after 1 day and then 2 weeks of oral treatment with spiramycin (3 X 10(6) iu, twice daily). The main pharmacokinetic parameters (the area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve, the maximum plasma drug concentration and the time to reach it) obtained both by RIA and h.p.l.c. were not modified by spiramycin cotreatment after 1 day, nor after 2 weeks of spiramycin administration. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin (parent drug and parent drug plus metabolites) are not influenced by the coadministration of spiramycin macrolide at therapeutic dosage. 3. Spiramycin may be preferable to other macrolide antibiotics known to interact with cyclosporin such as erythromycin or josamycin. PMID:2667601

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed. PMID:27134484

  20. Removal of emerging contaminants from municipal wastewater with an integrated membrane system, MBR-RO.

    PubMed

    Dolar, Davor; Gros, Meritxell; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Moreno, Jordi; Comas, Joaquim; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Barceló, Damià

    2012-11-15

    The presence of emerging contaminants in the aquatic environment and their potential effects on living organisms has become an issue of growing concern. Among emerging contaminants, pharmaceuticals may enter the aquatic environment due to their high consumption and their incomplete removal in conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The main goal of this study was the assessment of the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals found in municipal wastewater of a coastal WWTP (Castell-Platja d'Aro, Spain) using an integrated pilot scale membrane system (MBR-RO). Twenty multiple-class pharmaceuticals (including psychiatric drugs, macrolide antibiotics, β-blockers, sulfonamide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics, histamine H2 receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatories, nitroimidazole, β-agonist and antiplatelet agent) were measured in real influent with the lowest average concentration for psychiatric drugs (0.017 μg L(-1)) to the highest for macrolide antibiotics (2.02 μg L(-1)). Although some contaminants were in relatively high concentrations (even up to 2.90 μg L(-1) in the case of ofloxacin). The combination of MBR and RO treatment showed excellent overall removal of target emerging contaminants with removal rates above 99% for all of them. For some compounds (metronidazole, hydrocodone, codein, ranitidine) MBR provided high removal efficiency (up to 95%). Additionally RO membrane showed removal rates always higher than 99%.

  1. Entry of poliovirus into cells does not require a low-pH step.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, L; Carrasco, L

    1993-01-01

    The requirement of a low-pH step during poliovirus entry was investigated by using the macrolide antibiotic bafilomycin A1, which is a powerful and selective inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-ATPases. Thus, viruses such as Semliki Forest virus and vesicular stomatitis virus that enter cells through endosomes and need their acidification, are potently inhibited by bafilomycin A1, whereas poliovirus infection is not affected by the antibiotic. The presence of lysosomotropic agents such as chloroquine, amantadine, dansylcadaverine, and monensin during poliovirus entry did not inhibit infection, further supporting the idea that poliovirus does not depend on a low-pH step to enter the cytoplasm. The effect of bafilomycin A1 on other members of the Picornaviridae family was also assayed. Encephalomyocarditis virus entry into HeLa cells was not affected by the macrolide antibiotic, whereas rhinovirus was sensitive. Coentry of toxins, such as alpha-sarcin, with viral particles was potently inhibited by bafilomycin A1, indicating that an active vacuolar proton-ATPase is necessary for the early membrane permeabilization (coentry of alpha-sarcin) induced by poliovirus to take place. Images PMID:8392597

  2. Temporal relationship between decrease in antimicrobial prescription for Danish pigs and the "Yellow Card" legal intervention directed at reduction of antimicrobial use.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F; de Knegt, L V; Andersen, V D; Wingstrand, A

    2014-12-01

    The potential effects of the "Yellow Card" intervention, enforced by Danish authorities in December 2010, on the antimicrobial prescription in the Danish pig production were investigated. Data on antimicrobial prescription for pigs during 2002-2012 was obtained from the national database on veterinary prescribed medicines, VetStat. Descriptive analysis of temporal trends in quantitative antimicrobial prescription for pigs on national level was performed for each administration route, age group and disease group. In addition, prescription patterns of the three most prescribed antimicrobial classes (tetracyclines, macrolides and pleuromutilins) for weaners and finishers were studied at herd level. A 25% decline in the total antimicrobial use per pig produced occurred between 2009 and 2011. A decline was observed both in sows and piglets (31%), weaners (34%) and finishers (19%). Reduced prescription of tetracycline, macrolides and pleuromutilins for oral use, mainly for gastrointestinal disease (GI) in weaners and finishers, explained 76% of the total reduction. In 2012, the overall antimicrobial use increased by 10%, as a partial reversal of the preceding changes in prescription pattern. On herd level, the decline and subsequent increase was mainly related to changes in number of herds receiving regular monthly prescriptions. This study demonstrated that the steep decrease in antimicrobial use in the Danish pig production was temporally related with the announcement and introduction of the Yellow Card intervention. PMID:25263135

  3. Emergence of scarlet fever Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 clones in Hong Kong is associated with toxin acquisition and multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark R; Holden, Matthew T; Coupland, Paul; Chen, Jonathan H K; Venturini, Carola; Barnett, Timothy C; Zakour, Nouri L Ben; Tse, Herman; Dougan, Gordon; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Walker, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    A scarlet fever outbreak began in mainland China and Hong Kong in 2011 (refs. 1-6). Macrolide- and tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 isolates represent the majority of clinical cases. Recently, we identified two mobile genetic elements that were closely associated with emm12 outbreak isolates: the integrative and conjugative element ICE-emm12, encoding genes for tetracycline and macrolide resistance, and prophage ΦHKU.vir, encoding the superantigens SSA and SpeC, as well as the DNase Spd1 (ref. 4). Here we sequenced the genomes of 141 emm12 isolates, including 132 isolated in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2011. We found that the introduction of several ICE-emm12 variants, ΦHKU.vir and a new prophage, ΦHKU.ssa, occurred in three distinct emm12 lineages late in the twentieth century. Acquisition of ssa and transposable elements encoding multidrug resistance genes triggered the expansion of scarlet fever-associated emm12 lineages in Hong Kong. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant ssa-harboring scarlet fever strains should prompt heightened surveillance within China and abroad for the dissemination of these mobile genetic elements.

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Human Campylobacter jejuni Isolates and Association with Phylogenetic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Wonhee; Mosci, Rebekah; Wengert, Samantha L.; Singh, Pallavi; Newton, Duane W.; Salimnia, Hossein; Lephart, Paul; Khalife, Walid; Mansfield, Linda S.; Rudrik, James T.; Manning, Shannon D.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic pathogen and the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. With the increase of antibiotic resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides, the drugs of choice for treatment, C. jejuni was recently classified as a serious antimicrobial resistant threat. Here, we characterized 94 C. jejuni isolates collected from patients at four Michigan hospitals in 2011 and 2012 to determine the frequency of resistance and association with phylogenetic lineages. The prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones (19.1%) and macrolides (2.1%) in this subset of C. jejuni isolates from Michigan was similar to national reports. High frequencies of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates, however, were recovered from patients with a history of foreign travel. A high proportion of these resistant isolates were classified as multilocus sequence type (ST)-464, a fluoroquinolone-resistant lineage that recently emerged in Europe. A significantly higher prevalence of tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni was also found in Michigan and resistant isolates were more likely to represent ST-982, which has been previously recovered from ruminants and the environment in the U.S. Notably, patients with tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni infections were more likely to have contact with cattle. These outcomes prompt the need to monitor the dissemination and diversification of imported fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni strains and to investigate the molecular epidemiology of C. jejuni recovered from cattle and farm environments to guide mitigation strategies. PMID:27199922

  5. Changes in enterococcal populations and related antibiotic resistance along a medical center-wastewater treatment plant-river continuum.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Roland; Oberlé, Kenny; Galopin, Sébastien; Cattoir, Vincent; Budzinski, Hélène; Petit, Fabienne

    2013-04-01

    To determine if hospital effluent input has an ecological impact on downstream aquatic environment, antibiotic resistance in Enterococcus spp. along a medical center-retirement home-wastewater treatment plant-river continuum in France was determined using a culture-based method. Data on antibiotic consumption among hospitalized and general populations and levels of water contamination by antibiotics were collected. All isolated enterococci were genotypically identified to the species level, tested for in vitro antibiotic susceptibility, and typed by multilocus sequence typing. The erm(B) and mef(A) (macrolide resistance) and tet(M) (tetracycline resistance) genes were detected by PCR. Along the continuum, from 89 to 98% of enterococci, according to the sampled site, were identified as Enterococcus faecium. All E. faecium isolates from hospital and retirement home effluents were multiply resistant to antibiotics, contained erm(B) and mef(A) genes, and belonged to hospital-adapted clonal complex 17 (CC17). Even though this species remained dominant in the downstream continuum, the relative proportion of CC17 isolates progressively decreased in favor of other subpopulations of E. faecium that were more diverse, less resistant to antibiotics, and devoid of the classical macrolide resistance genes and that belonged to various sequence types. Antibiotic concentrations in waters were far below the MICs for susceptible isolates. CC17 E. faecium was probably selected in the gastrointestinal tract of patients under the pressure of administered antibiotics and then excreted together with the resistance genes in waters to progressively decrease along the continuum.

  6. Characterization of the nocardiopsin biosynthetic gene cluster reveals similarities to and differences from the rapamycin and FK-506 pathways.

    PubMed

    Bis, Dana M; Ban, Yang H; James, Elle D; Alqahtani, Norah; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Lane, Amy L

    2015-04-13

    Macrolide-pipecolate natural products, such as rapamycin (1) and FK-506 (2), are renowned modulators of FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs). The nocardiopsins, from Nocardiopsis sp. CMB-M0232, are the newest members of this structural class. Here, the biosynthetic pathway for nocardiopsins A-D (4-7) is revealed by cloning, sequencing, and bioinformatic analyses of the nsn gene cluster. In vitro evaluation of recombinant NsnL revealed that this lysine cyclodeaminase catalyzes the conversion of L-lysine into the L-pipecolic acid incorporated into 4 and 5. Bioinformatic analyses supported the conjecture that a linear nocardiopsin precursor is equipped with the hydroxy group required for macrolide closure in a previously unobserved manner by employing a P450 epoxidase (NsnF) and limonene epoxide hydrolase homologue (NsnG). The nsn cluster also encodes candidates for tetrahydrofuran group biosynthesis. The nocardiopsin pathway provides opportunities for engineering of FKBP-binding metabolites and for probing new enzymology in nature's polyketide tailoring arsenal. PMID:25755076

  7. Withdrawal of growth-promoting antibiotics in Europe and its effects in relation to human health.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ian

    2007-08-01

    The glycopeptide avoparcin, bacitracin, the macrolides spiramycin and tylosin, and the streptogramin virginiamycin were withdrawn as growth promoters in the European Union between 1995 and 1999 on the basis of the Precautionary Principle. Relevant resistance thereupon diminished among enterococci (the indicator organisms) isolated from animal and human faeces. However, animal enterococci were shown to differ from those that caused human infections, although their resistance genes were sometimes indistinguishable and thus probably have a common origin. Before the ban, human clinical isolates of enterococci resistant to vancomycin or teicoplanin were uncommon in many, but not all, parts of Europe and resistance to quinupristin/dalfopristin in the case of Enterococcus faecium was very rare. After the ban, these resistances increased in prevalence almost universally, to the detriment of human health. Campylobacters, normally susceptible to macrolides, increased in prevalence before and after the ban. Analyses suggest that the added risk to human health from resistance among enterococci and campylobacters selected by growth promoter use is small, whilst the benefit to human health from their use, hitherto largely ignored, might more than counterbalance this. PMID:17467959

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci strains isolated from slaughter animals on the data of Hungarian resistance monitoring system from 2001 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Kaszanyitzky, E J; Tenk, M; Ghidán, A; Fehérvári, G Y; Papp, M

    2007-04-01

    Isolates of Enterococcus spp. were collected from January 2001 to December 2004 from caecal samples of slaughtered poultry, swine and cattle in Hungary. The isolates were identified by their growth and biochemical properties and with PCR. The antibiotic susceptibility of a total number of 1272 isolates was tested with disk diffusion test to ampicillin, gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, erythromycin and vancomycin. It was established that although ampicillin and amoxicillin are often used in veterinary practice its resistance rate was relatively low. In the case of tetracyclines and macrolides, a high incidence of resistance was found. Susceptibility of strains to tetracyclines and/or macrolides reduced in both 2003 and 2004 in all animal species, which may be due to the more frequent usage of these drugs in the veterinary practice following the ban of growth promoters. The annual data of vancomycin resistance point to an association between the recovery of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates and the use of avoparcin. This study indicates that reducing antimicrobial resistance in food animals could be possible with lower usage of antibiotics, although variations can occur with different strains. PMID:17126441

  9. Comparison of two treatments for the removal of selected organic micropollutants and bulk organic matter: conventional activated sludge followed by ultrafiltration versus membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sahar, E; Ernst, M; Godehardt, M; Hein, A; Herr, J; Kazner, C; Melin, T; Cikurel, H; Aharoni, A; Messalem, R; Brenner, A; Jekel, M

    2011-01-01

    The potential of membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems to remove organic micropollutants was investigated at different scales, operational conditions, and locations. The effluent quality of the MBR system was compared with that of a plant combining conventional activated sludge (CAS) followed by ultrafiltration (UF). The MBR and CAS-UF systems were operated and tested in parallel. An MBR pilot plant in Israel was operated for over a year at a mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) range of 2.8-10.6 g/L. The MBR achieved removal rates comparable to those of a CAS-UF plant at the Tel-Aviv wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) for macrolide antibiotics such as roxythromycin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin and slightly higher removal rates than the CAS-UF for sulfonamides. A laboratory scale MBR unit in Berlin - at an MLSS of 6-9 g/L - showed better removal rates for macrolide antibiotics, trimethoprim, and 5-tolyltriazole compared to the CAS process of the Ruhleben sewage treatment plant (STP) in Berlin when both were fed with identical quality raw wastewater. The Berlin CAS exhibited significantly better benzotriazole removal and slightly better sulfamethoxazole and 4-tolyltriazole removal than its MBR counterpart. Pilot MBR tests (MLSS of 12 g/L) in Aachen, Germany, showed that operating flux significantly affected the resulting membrane fouling rate, but the removal rates of dissolved organic matter and of bisphenol A were not affected. PMID:21330721

  10. [Micromonospora resistence to definite antibiotics and their ability to produce structurally analogous antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Bibikova, M V; Ivanitskaia, L P; Tikhonova, A S

    1980-01-01

    Thirty six cultures of Micromonospora freshly isolated from soil samples were studied with respect to their sensitivity to a number of antibiotics of various structures and modes of action. It was found that all of them were highly sensitive to penicillin, ristomycin, tetracycline, rifampicin, streptomycin, olivomycin, carminomycin and dactinomycin. Significant differences in sensitivity of the Micromonospora cultures were revealed only with respect to gentamicin, tobramicin, erythromycin and lincomycin. Seven cultures were resistant to gentamicin and tobramicin and sensitive to all of the other antibiotics. Broad spectrum antibiotics were isolated from these cultures. The study of the antibiotic chemistry showed that they were 2-desoxystreptamine-containing aminoglycosides. Two cultures proved to be resistant to erythromycin and lincomycin. When identified with the use of antibiotic resistant staphylococcal strains, the crude antibiotic substances isolated from these cultures appeared to be not active against staphylococci resistant to erythromycin and lincomycin. By their chromatograpi- behaviour the antibiotics were close to macrolides. Therefore, it was found that production of aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics was most characteristic of Micromonospora. A certain correlation between resistance of Micromonospora to these 2 antibiotic groups and capacity for their production was shown. PMID:7356302

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  12. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolated in Israel from local and imported cattle.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2009-06-12

    Monitoring of susceptibility to antibiotics in field isolates of pathogenic bovine mycoplasmas is important for appropriate choice of treatment. Our study compared in vitro susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma bovis clinical strains, isolated during 2005-2007 from Israeli and imported calves. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for macrolides by the microbroth dilution test, for aminoglycosides by commercial Etest, and for fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines by both methods. Notably, although correlation between the methods was generally good, it was not possible to determine the MIC endpoint for enrofloxacin-resistant strains (MIC > or =2.5 microg/ml in the microtest) by Etest. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility profiles between local and imported M. bovis strains revealed that local strains were significantly more resistant to macrolides than most isolates from imported animals, with MIC(50) of 128 microg/ml vs. 2 microg/ml for tilmicosin and 8 microg/ml vs. 1 microg/ml for tylosin, respectively. However, local strains were more susceptible than most imported strains to fluoroquinolones and spectinomycin. Difference in susceptibility to tetracycline, doxycycline and oxytetracycline between local and imported strains was expressed in MIC(90) values for imported strains in the susceptible range compared to intermediate susceptibility for local strains. The marked difference in susceptibility profiles of M. bovis strains isolated from different geographical regions seen in this study emphasizes the necessity for performing of the antimicrobial susceptibility testing periodically and on a regional basis. PMID:19250777

  13. Determination of 76 pharmaceutical drugs by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in slaughterhouse wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bing; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Yongning; Sun, Chengjun

    2009-11-20

    A multi-residue method for the analysis of 76 pharmaceutical agents of nine classes of drugs (tetracyclines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, beta-agonists, beta-blockers, diuretics, sedatives, sulfonamides and chloramphenicol) in slaughterhouse wastewater and a receiving river is presented. After simultaneous extraction with an Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and further purification using an amino SPE cartridge, analytes were detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry in positive or negative ion mode. Standard addition was used for quantification to overcome unavoidable matrix effects during ESI-MS analysis. Recoveries for most analytes based on matrix-matched calibration in different test matrices were >60%. The method quantification limits of 76 pharmaceuticals were in the range 0.2-30 ng/L. Nineteen compounds of 76 drugs were found in raw and treated slaughterhouse wastewater from four main slaughterhouses in Beijing. Sulfanamides (sulfanilamide, sulfameter), fluoroquenones (ofloxacin, pefloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin), tetracyclines (tetracycline, oxytetracycline) and macrolides (kitasamycin, tylosin, erythromycin) were most frequently detected, with the highest levels up to approximately 3 microg/L in slaughterhouse wastewater and approximately 1 microg/L in treated wastewater. Illicit drugs for animal feeding such as clenbuterol and diazepam were commonly detected in slaughterhouse wastewater. These analytes were also observed in a river receiving slaughterhouse wastewater, with a highest level of up to 0.2 microg/L.

  14. Effect of natamycin on cytochrome P450 enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Aránzazu; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Castellano, Victor; Martínez, Marta; Ares, Irma; Romero, Alejandro; Anadón, Arturo

    2013-12-01

    Natamycin is a polyene macrolide antibiotic widely used in the food industry as a feed additive to prevent mold contamination of foods. There are many contradictory results on the genotoxic effects of macrolides which could suggest a potential risk for humans. In the present study, the effects of natamycin on the activities of some drug metabolizing enzymes in rat liver microsomes were determined in vivo. Rats were treated orally with natamycin at doses of 0.3, 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 6 days. Determinations of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activities were carried out in hepatic microsomes isolated from rats treated. The activities of CYP2E1, CYP1A1/2 CYP2B1/2 and CYP4A1/2 enzymes significantly decreased after treatment with 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg bw/day, in a dose-dependent manner as compared to control. This effect was not observed after natamycin treatment at dose of 0.3 mg/kg bw/day. Our results suggest that natamycin may not potentiate the toxicity of many xenobiotics via metabolic activation and/or accumulation of reactive metabolites but also might affect the clearance of other xenobiotics detoxified by the studied CYP enzymes.

  15. In vitro induction of resistance by tissue concentrations of azithromycin, clarithromycin, cefixime and amoxicillin/clavulanate in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    De Vecchi, E; Nicola, L; Zucchetti, E; Drago, L

    2006-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of exposure to serum, tonsils and breakpoint drug concentrations of clarithromycin, azithromycin, cefixime and amoxicillin/clavulanate on Streptococcus pyogenes susceptibility. Frequency of mutation and development of resistance after ten passages on antibiotic gradient plates, followed by ten passages without antibiotic, were determined. Phenotypes of macrolide-resistant strains grown at the end of multi-step selection were also determined. Azithromycin induced a surge of resistant strains more rapidly and frequently than clarithromycin, particularly at tonsils concentrations. With amoxicillin/clavulanate no strains showed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) higher than the susceptibility breakpoint. Mutational frequencies were higher for azithromycin, at serum and breakpoint drug concentrations, than for the other drugs. Most of the macrolide resistant strains showed an MLS(B) phenotype. In conclusion, the ability to prevent the occurrence of resistance in clinical isolates of S. pyogenes was similar for amoxicillin/clavulanate and clarithromycin followed by cefixime > azithromycin when tonsil drug concentrations were considered, and greater for amoxicillin/clavulanate followed by clarithromycin > cefixime> azithromycin, at breakpoint and serum concentrations.

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Intake Modifies Preschool Children’s Intestinal Microbiota, Alleviates Penicillin-Associated Changes, and Reduces Antibiotic Use

    PubMed Central

    Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Virta, Lauri J.; Kumpu, Minna; Kekkonen, Riina A.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic use is considered among the most severe causes of disturbance to children’s developing intestinal microbiota, and frequently causes adverse gastrointestinal effects ranging from mild and transient diarrhoea to life-threatening infections. Probiotics are commonly advocated to help in preventing antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal symptoms. However, it is currently unknown whether probiotics alleviate the antibiotic-associated changes in children’s microbiota. Furthermore, it is not known how long-term probiotic consumption influences the developing microbiota of children. We analysed the influence of long-term Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG intake on preschool children’s antibiotic use, and antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal complaints in a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial with 231 children aged 2–7. In addition, we analysed the effect of L. rhanmosus GG on the intestinal microbiota in a subset of 88 children. The results show that long-term L. rhamnosus GG supplementation has an influence on the composition of the intestinal microbiota in children, causing an increase in the abundance of Prevotella, Lactococcus, and Ruminococcus, and a decrease in Escherichia. The treatment appeared to prevent some of the changes in the microbiota associated with penicillin use, but not those associated with macrolide use. The treatment, however, did reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complaints after a macrolide course. Finally, the treatment appeared to prevent certain bacterial infections for up to 3 years after the trial, as indicated by reduced antibiotic use. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014676 PMID:27111772

  17. Afebrile pneumonia (whooping cough) syndrome in infants at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, 2001-2007

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Dolly; Echandía-Villegas, Connie Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, also called infant pneumonitis, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens or whooping cough syndrome is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in young infants, both in developing countries and in developed countries. Objective: To describe children with afebrile pneumonia syndrome. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study, we reviewed the medical records of children diagnosed with afebrile pneumonia treated at Hospital Universitario del Valle, a reference center in southwestern Colombia, between June 2001 and December 2007. We obtained data on maternal age and origin, prenatal care, the childs birth, breastfeeding, vaccination status, symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment, and complications. Results: We evaluated 101 children with this entity, noting a stationary presentation: June-August and November- December. A total of 73% of the children were under 4 months of age; the most common symptoms were: cyanotic and spasmodic cough (100%), respiratory distress (70%), and unquantified fever (68%). The most common findings: rales (crackles) (50%), wheezing and expiratory stridor (37%); 66% were classified as mild and of the remaining 33%, half of them required attention in the intensive care unit. In all, there was clinical diagnosis of afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, but no etiologic diagnosis was made and despite this, 94% of the children received macrolides. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that most of these patients acquired the disease by airway, possibly caused by viral infection and did not require the indiscriminate use of macrolides. PMID:24893051

  18. Identification of an integron containing the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 in Shewanella xiamenensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Mu, Xiao-dong; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Xi, Lijun; Xiao, Zijun

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated multidrug resistance in Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from an estuarine water sample in China during 2014. This strain displayed resistance or decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, kanamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The antimicrobial resistance genes aacA3, blaOXA-199, qnrA1 and sul1 were identified by PCR amplification and by sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA hybridization experiments showed that the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 was chromosomally located. qnrA1 was located in a complex class 1 integron, downstream from an ISCR1, and bracketed by two copies of qacEΔ1-sul1 genes. This integron is similar to In825 with four gene cassettes aacA3, catB11c, dfrA1z and aadA2az. An IS26-mel-mph2-IS26 structure was also detected in the flanking sequences, conferring resistance to macrolides. This is the first identification of the class 1 integron in S. xiamenensis. This is also the first identification of the qnrA1 gene and IS26-mediated macrolide resistance genes in S. xiamenensis. Presence of a variety of resistance genetic determinants in environmental S. xiamenensis suggests the possibility that this species may serve as a potential vehicle of antimicrobial resistance genes in aquatic environments.

  19. [Investigation of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric outpatients nationwide with a respiratory tract infection at the first consultation (2002-2003)--proportion of resistant strains and sensitivity to oral antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2005-11-01

    The propotions of resistant strains and sensitivity to oral antibacterial agents were determined for 468 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 557 strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric outpatients with a respiratory tract infection at the first consultation at 20 medical institutions nationwide in the predefined 4-week period during November 2002 and June 2003. PRSP of the S. pneumoniae strains, accounted for 27%, and BLNAR accounted for 35% of the H. influenzae strains. Against the S. pneumoniae strains, faropenem showed the best MIC90 value, 0.5 microg/mL, of the beta-lactam antibacterial agents, followed by cefditoren-pivoxil, and among the macrolide and ketolide antibacterial agents, telithromycin showed the best MIC90 value, 0.12 microg/mL. Against the H. influenzae strains, cefditoren-pivoxil showed the best MIC90 value, 0.25 microg/mL, among the beta-lactam antibacterial agents, and among the macrolide and ketolide antibacterial agents, azithromycin showed the best activity, followed by telithromycin. It seems necessary to take these results into consideration when choosing drugs for treatment. It will be necessary to survey the trends in resistant strains and the clinical efficacy of various oral antibacterial agents in the future. PMID:16366360

  20. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L. , Decatur, GA )

    1990-06-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes.