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Sample records for macrolides

  1. Macrolides allergy.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Luis; Demoly, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Macrolides are characterised by their basic structure which is made up of a lactonic cycle with 2 osidic chains. They are classified according to the number of carbon atoms in the cycle : 14 membered macrolides (erythromicin, roxithromycin, dirithromycin, clarithromycin), 15 membered (azithromycin) and 16 membered (spiramycin, josamycin, midecamycin) macrolides. Epidemiological studies show that macrolides are amongst the safest antibiotics, but in these series, no drug allergy work up was performed. An immediate IgE dependent hypersensitivity has been shown with erythromycin in some cases. The mechanism is unknown and the skin tests are negative in most other cases. It would appear that the macrolide allergies are unlikely to be class allergies. Eviction is the treatment of choice. Desensitization has been successful in a few cases.

  2. The macrolides.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, Joseph M; DeCarolis, Emidio; Metzler, Kelli L; Hansen, Glen T

    2002-02-01

    Erythromycin, which was introduced over 50 years ago, was the first macrolide to be used clinically. "New" macrolides, for the treatment of patients with various infectious diseases, were not clinically introduced until 40 years later. The pharmacokinetic and adverse events profile of erythromycin initially limited its use to an alternative agent for patients with allergy to beta-lactam agents. However, the emergence of atypical and/or new pathogens and the ongoing escalation of acquired antimicrobial resistance has impacted on the empirical and organism directed therapy of infectious diseases. Azithromycin and clarithromycin were developed by enhancing the basic macrolide structure. Some of the basic features associated with these new agents include a pharmacokinetic profiles that allow once or twice daily dosing with a much lower incidence of side effects and a substantially broader spectrum of activity which includes some Gram-negative bacilli, atypical pathogens and new, unconventional or uncommon pathogens. Clinical trial data has supported the use of "new" macrolides in a wide range of clinical indications, however, some specific indications are currently restricted to treatment with either azithromycin or clarithromycin. Macrolide resistance is a class effect and depending on the mechanism will confer either low or high level resistance. While resistance is problematic, it does not always result in clinical failure. The macrolides are a valuable class of antimicrobial agent and play an important role in the management of infectious diseases.

  3. [Macrolides: pharmacology and clinical use].

    PubMed

    Draganov, V; Nikolov, R; Lazarov, S

    2000-01-01

    Members of macrolides are Erythromycin, Oleandomycin, Spiramycin, Roxithromycin, Josamycin, Midecamycin, Clarithromycin, Azithromycin and Dirithromycin. This review present mechanism of action, pharmacokinetic, adverse drug reactions and main clinical uses of the macrolides.

  4. Fetal Safety of Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Bahat Dinur, Anat; Koren, Gideon; Matok, Ilan; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Uziel, Elia; Gorodischer, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are largely used in pregnancy for different bacterial infections. Their fetal safety has been studied by several groups, yielding opposing results. In particular, there have been studies claiming an association between macrolides and cardiovascular malformations. Exposure in early infancy has been associated with pyloric stenosis and intussusception. This has led to an avoidance in prescribing macrolides to pregnant women in several Scandinavian countries. The Objectives of the present study was to investigate the fetal safety of this class of drug by linking a large administrative database of drug dispensing and pregnancy outcome in Southern Israel. A computerized database of medications dispensed from 1999 to 2009 to all women registered in the Clalit health maintenance organization in southern Israel was linked with two computerized databases containing maternal and infant hospitalization records. Also, medical pregnancy termination data were analyzed. The following confounders were controlled for: maternal age, ethnicity, maternal pregestational diabetes, parity, and the year the mother gave birth or went through medical pregnancy termination. First- and third-trimester exposures to macrolide antibiotics as a group and to individual drugs were analyzed. During the study period there were 105,492 pregnancies among Clalit women that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 104,380 ended in live births or dead fetuses and 1,112 in abortion due to medical reasons. In the first trimester of pregnancy, 1,033 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between macrolides and either major malformations [odds ratio (OR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84 to 1.38)] or specific malformations, after accounting for maternal age, parity, ethnicity, prepregnancy diabetes, and year of exposure. During the third trimester of pregnancy, 959 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between such exposure and perinatal

  5. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  6. [Macrolides and ketolides].

    PubMed

    Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Ateka, Oier; Pitart, Cristina; Vila, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Macrolides and ketolides are two families of antibiotics that share the same mechanism of action. They bind to different bases of the peptidyl transferase center of 23S RNA. The antibacterial spectrum of these drugs virtually overlaps, but dissimilarities in the affinity and number of binding sites results in differences in the intensity of their antibacterial effects (bacteriostatic or bactericidal) and their activity against strains with acquired resistance mechanisms. These agents are active against most gram-positive microorganisms and many intracellular microorganisms. Over the last ten years in Spain, the percentage of macrolide-resistant pneumococci and Streptococcus pyogenes strains has increased substantially. Telithromycin, a ketolide, has maintained the activity against these strains. Macrolides and ketolides are metabolized in the liver through CYP3A4 and they can partially block the activity of the enzyme, interfering with the metabolism of other drugs that use the same metabolic pathway. There is little elimination through the urine, with the exception of clarithromycin. High concentrations are reached in the cellular cytoplasm, but they do not diffuse to cerebrospinal fluid. These agents are included among class B drugs for use during pregnancy. Tolerance to macrolides is good and they have few associated adverse effects. The main clinical indication for these drugs is in empirical treatment of mild to moderate, community-acquired, upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Some patients treated with telithromycin developed severe hepatitis; therefore, its use is limited to community-acquired pneumonia in cases with no other available alternative.

  7. [Macrolides, ketolides and streptogramins].

    PubMed

    Mensa, José; García-Vázquez, Elisa; Vila, Jordi

    2003-04-01

    Macrolides, ketolides and streptogramins are three families of antibiotics with different chemical structures, sharing the same mechanism of action. All three bind to distinct bases of the peptidyl transferase center of ARNr 23S. Their antibacterial spectrum practically overlaps, but dissimilarities in affinity and/or number of binding sites determine differences in the intensity of their antibacterial effects (bacteriostatic or bactericidae) and in their activity against strains with acquired resistance mechanisms. These agents are active against the majority of gram-positive microorganisms and many intracellular microorganisms for growth. Over the last five years in our country, the percentage of macrolide-resistant pneumococci and S. pyogenes strains has increased substantially. Telithromycin (ketolide) and Synercid (streptogramin) have shown maintained activity against these strains. Macrolides, ketolides and streptogramins are metabolized in the liver through CYP 3A4 and they can partially block the activity of the enzyme, interfering with the metabolism of other drugs that use the same metabolic pathway. There is little elimination through the urine, with the exception of clarithromycin. High concentrations are reached in the cellular cytoplasm, but they do not diffuse to the CSF. These agents are included among class B drugs for use during pregnancy. Tolerance to macrolides and telithromycin is good and they have few associated adverse effects. The main clinical indication for these drugs is in empirical treatment of mild to moderate, community-acquired, upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Synercid is indicated in the treatment of infections due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci and glycopeptide-resistant enterococci.

  8. Macrolactam analogues of macrolide natural products.

    PubMed

    Hügel, Helmut M; Smith, Andrew T; Rizzacasa, Mark A

    2016-12-07

    The chemical modification of macrolide natural products into aza- or lactam analogues is a strategy employed to improve their metabolic stability and biological activity. The methods for the synthesis of several lactam analogues of macrolide natural products are highlighted and aspects of their biological properties presented.

  9. Biosensor-guided screening for macrolides.

    PubMed

    Möhrle, V; Stadler, M; Eberz, G

    2007-07-01

    Macrolides are complex polyketides of microbial origin that possess an extraordinary variety of pharmacological properties, paired with an impressive structural diversity. Bioassays for specific detection of such compounds will be of advantage for a class-specific drug screening. The current paper describes a cell-based microbial biosensor, assigning a luminescence response to natural or chemically modified macrolides, independent from their biological activity. This biosensor is based on the coupling of the structural luciferase genes of Vibrio fischeri to the regulatory control mechanism of a bacterial erythromycin resistance operon. The bioassays is easy to handle and can be applied to various screening formats. The feasibility of the test system for natural products screening is exemplified by the isolation and characterization of picromycin from a Streptomyces species. Biosensor-guided screening for macrolides is based on macrolide-promoted expression of lux genes and induction of luminescence (independent of macrolide antibiotic activity).

  10. Diffuse panbronchiolitis: role of macrolides in therapy.

    PubMed

    Keicho, Naoto; Kudoh, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is characterized by chronic sinobronchial infection and diffuse bilateral micronodular pulmonary lesions consisting of inflammatory cells. Studies on disease etiology point to a genetic predisposition unique to Asians. Early therapy for DPB was largely symptomatic. The advent of macrolide antibiotics, including erythromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin, has strikingly changed disease prognosis. Low-dose, long-term macrolide therapy for DPB originated from detailed observations of response to therapy in a single patient. The bactericidal activity of macrolides, particularly erythromycin, is not a significant factor for their clinical efficacy in DPB. Firstly, irrespective of bacterial clearance, clinical improvement is observed in patients treated with erythromycin. Secondly, even in cases with bacterial superinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to macrolides, treatment has proved effective. Thirdly, the recommended dosage of macrolides produces peak levels in tissue that are below the minimum inhibitory concentrations for major pathogenic bacteria that colonize the airway. In the last two decades, the possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of macrolide therapy has been extensively studied. The proposed mechanism of action includes inhibition of excessive mucus and water secretion from the airway epithelium, inhibition of neutrophil accumulation in the large airway, inhibition of lymphocyte and macrophage accumulation around the small airway, and modulation of bacterial virulence. The great success of macrolide therapy in diffuse panbronchiolitis may extend its application to the treatment of other chronic inflammatory disorders. If the anti-inflammatory activity of macrolides is independent of their bactericidal effect, new anti-inflammatory macrolides without antimicrobial activity should be developed to minimize emergence of macrolide-resistant micro-organisms.

  11. Macrolides in Chronic Inflammatory Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alzolibani, Abdullateef A.; Zedan, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    Long-term therapy with the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin was shown to alter the clinical course of diffuse panbronchiolitis in the late 1980s. Since that time, macrolides have been found to have a large number of anti-inflammatory properties in addition to being antimicrobials. These observations provided the rationale for many studies performed to assess the usefulness of macrolides in other inflammatory diseases including skin and hair disorders, such as rosacea, psoriasis, pityriasis rosea, alopecia areata, bullous pemphigoid, and pityriasis lichenoides. This paper summarizes a collection of clinical studies and case reports dealing with the potential benefits of macrolides antibiotics in the treatment of selected dermatoses which have primarily been classified as noninfectious and demonstrating their potential for being disease-modifying agents. PMID:22685371

  12. Natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Populaire, F; Buriánková, K; Weiser, J; Pernodet, J-L

    2002-12-01

    The genus Mycobacterium contains two of the most important human pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. Other mycobacteria are mostly saprophytic organisms, living in soil and water, but some of them can cause opportunistic infections. The increasing incidence of tuberculosis as well as infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in AIDS patients has renewed interest in molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in these pathogens. Mycobacteria show a high degree of intrinsic resistance to most common antibiotics. For instance, species from the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) are intrinsically resistant to macrolides. Nevertheless, some semi-synthetic macrolides as the erythromycin derivatives clarithromycin, azithromycin and most recently the ketolides, are active against NTM, particularly Mycobacterium avium, and some of them are widely used for infection treatment. However, shortly after the introduction of these new drugs, resistant strains appeared due to mutations in the macrolide target, the ribosome. The mycobacterial cell wall with its specific composition and structure is considered to be a major factor in promoting the natural resistance of mycobacteria to various antibiotics. However, to explain the difference in macrolide sensitivity between the MTC and NTM, the synergistic contribution of a specific resistance mechanism might be required, in addition to possible differences in cell wall permeability. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria, gives an overview of potential mechanisms implicated in the intrinsic resistance and brings recent data concerning a macrolide resistance determinant in the MTC.

  13. [Allergy to macrolide antibiotics. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Demoly, P; Benahmed, S; Valembois, M; Sahla, H; Messaad, D; Godard, P; Michel, F B; Bousquet, J

    2000-02-19

    MACROLIDE CLASSES: Macrolides are characterized by their basic structure made up of a lactonic cycle with 2 osidic chains. They are classified according to the number of carbon atoms in the cycle: 14-membered macrolides (erythromycin, troleandomycin, roxithromycin, dirithromycin, clarithromycin), 15-membered macrolides (azithromycin) and 16-membered macrolides (spiramycin, josamycin, midecamycin). MACROLIDE ALLERGY: Allergy to macrolides is extremely rare (0.4% to 3% of treatments). The little information available in the literature is insufficient to establish the usefulness of diagnostic tests. An immediate IgE-dependent hypersensitivity has been shown with erythromycin in some cases but the mechanism remains unknown and skin tests are quite often negative. Clinical manifestations are the same as those encountered with beta-lactams. It would appear that macrolide allergies are unlikely to be class allergies. This is important as eviction advice could be limited to the single causal macrolide.

  14. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoshinori

    1999-06-01

    Macrolides have been used in the treatment of infectious diseases since the late 1950s. Since that time, a finding of antagonistic action between erythromycin and spiramycin in clinical isolates1 led to evidence of the biochemical mechanism and to the current understanding of inducible or constitutive resistance to macrolides mediated by erm genes containing, respectively, the functional regulation mechanism or constitutively mutated regulatory region. These resistant mechanisms to macrolides are recognized in clinically isolated bacteria. (1) A methylase encoded by the erm gene can transform an adenine residue at 2058 (Escherichia coli equivalent) position of 23S rRNA into an 6N, 6N-dimethyladenine. Position 2058 is known to reside either in peptidyltransferase or in the vicinity of the enzyme region of domain V. Dimethylation renders the ribosome resistant to macrolides (MLS). Moreover, another finding adduced as evidence is that a mutation in the domain plays an important role in MLS resistance: one of several mutations (transition and transversion) such as A2058G, A2058C or U, and A2059G, is usually associated with MLS resistance in a few genera of bacteria. (2) M (macrolide antibiotics)- and MS (macrolide and streptogramin type B antibiotics)- or PMS (partial macrolide and streptogramin type B antibiotics)-phenotype resistant bacteria cause decreased accumulation of macrolides, occasionally including streptogramin type B antibiotics. The decreased accumulation, probably via enhanced efflux, is usually inferred from two findings: (i) the extent of the accumulated drug in a resistant cell increases as much as that in a susceptible cell in the presence of an uncoupling agent such as carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and arsenate; (ii) transporter proteins, in M-type resistants, have mutual similarity to the 12-transmembrane domain present in efflux protein driven by proton-motive force, and in MS- or PMS-type resistants

  15. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews

  16. Novel actin depolymerizing macrolide aplyronine A.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Watabe, S; Ozaki, H; Kigoshi, H; Yamada, K; Fusetani, N; Karaki, H

    1996-09-01

    Aplyronine A is a macrolide isolated from Aplysia kurodai. By monitoring fluorescent intensity of pyrenyl-actin, it was found that aplyronine A inhibited both the velocity and the degree of actin polymerization. Aplyronine A also quickly depolymerized F-actin. The kinetics of depolymerization suggest that aplyronine A severs F-actin. The relationship between the concentration of total actin and F-actin at different concentrations of aplyronine A suggests that aplyronine A forms a 1:1 complex with G-actin. From these results, it is concluded that aplyronine A inhibits actin polymerization and depolymerizes F-actin by nibbling. Comparison of the chemical structure of aplyronine A and another actin-depolymerizing macrolide, mycalolide B, suggests that the side-chain but not the macrolide ring of aplyronine A may account for its actin binding and severing activity.

  17. Chemistry and Biology of Macrolide Antiparasitic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Younjoo; Choi, Jun Yong; Fu, Hong; Harvey, Colin; Ravindran, Sandeep; Roush, William R.; Boothroyd, John C.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2011-01-01

    Macrolide antibacterial agents inhibit parasite proliferation by targeting the apicoplast ribosome. Motivated by the long-term goal of identifying antiparasitic macrolides that lack antibacterial activity, we have systematically analyzed the structure-activity relationships among erythromycin analogues and have also investigated the mechanism of action of selected compounds. Two lead compounds, N-benzyl-azithromycin (11) and N-phenylpropyl-azithromycin (30), were identified with significantly higher antiparasitic activity and lower antibacterial activity than erythromycin or azithromycin. Molecular modeling based on the co-crystal structure of azithromycin bound to the bacterial ribosome suggested that a substituent at the N-9 position of desmethyl-azithromycin could improve selectivity due to species-specific interactions with the ribosomal L22 protein. Like other macrolides, these lead compounds display a strong “delayed death phenotype”; however, their early effects on T. gondii replication are more pronounced. PMID:21428405

  18. Review of macrolides and ketolides: focus on respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, G G; Dueck, M; Hoban, D J; Vercaigne, L M; Embil, J M; Gin, A S; Karlowsky, J A

    2001-01-01

    The first macrolide, erythromycin A, demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and was used primarily for respiratory and skin and soft tissue infections. Newer 14-, 15- and 16-membered ring macrolides such as clarithromycin and the azalide, azithromycin, have been developed to address the limitations of erythromycin. The main structural component of the macrolides is a large lactone ring that varies in size from 12 to 16 atoms. A new group of 14-membered macrolides known as the ketolides have recently been developed which have a 3-keto in place of the L-cladinose moiety. Macrolides reversibly bind to the 23S rRNA and thus, inhibit protein synthesis by blocking elongation. The ketolides have also been reported to bind to 23S rRNA and their mechanism of action is similar to that of macrolides. Macrolide resistance mechanisms include target site alteration, alteration in antibiotic transport and modification of the antibiotic. The macrolides and ketolides exhibit good activity against gram-positive aerobes and some gram-negative aerobes. Ketolides have excellent activity versus macrolide-resistant Streptococcus spp. Including mefA and ermB producing Streptococcus pneumoniae. The newer macrolides, such as azithromycin and clarithromycin, and the ketolides exhibit greater activity against Haemophilus influenzae than erythromycin. The bioavailability of macrolides ranges from 25 to 85%, with corresponding serum concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 12 mg/L and area under the concentration-time curves from 3 to 115 mg/L x h. Half-lives range from short for erythromycin to medium for clarithromycin, roxithromycin and ketolides, to very long for dirithromycin and azithromycin. All of these agents display large volumes of distribution with excellent uptake into respiratory tissues and fluids relative to serum. The majority of the agents are hepatically metabolised and excretion in the urine is limited, with the exception of clarithromycin. Clinical trials involving

  19. Macrolide susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H; Morozumi, T; Munthali, G; Mitani, K; Ito, N; Yamamoto, K

    1996-01-01

    Twenty strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis were investigated for their in vitro susceptibilities to 15 antimicrobial agents by broth and agar dilution methods. Two of the 20 field strains showed low susceptibility to 14- and 16-membered macrolide antimicrobial agents tested. The two field strains were considered inducibly resistant to macrolides. PMID:8849222

  20. New macrolides active against Streptococcus pyogenes with inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P B; Baker, W R; Freiberg, L A; Hardy, D J; McDonald, E J

    1989-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant bacteria can be classified as inducibly resistant or constitutively resistant. Inducibly resistant bacteria are resistant to 14-membered macrolides, such as erythromycin and clarithromycin (A-56268), but are susceptible to the 16-membered macrolides, such as tylosin and spiramycin, as well as to clindamycin. Constitutively resistant bacteria are resistant to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. In this study, the MICs of several erythromycin and clarithromycin analogs against macrolide-susceptible and macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains were determined. Four 11,12-carbamate analogs of clarithromycin had lower MICs than erythromycin did against S. pyogenes with the inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance. Five 11,12-carbonate analogs of erythromycin with modifications at the 4" position of cladinose had lower MICs than did erythromycin against S. pyogenes with the constitutive type of resistance, and one of these compounds, which had a naphthyl-glycyl substitution at the 4" position, had a lower MIC than erythromycin against both the inducibly resistant and constitutively resistant strains. Two analogs of erythromycin with a modification on the 4" position of cladinose had lower MICs than erythromycin did against the constitutively resistant organisms but not against the inducibly resistant organisms. Thus, 14-membered macrolides can be modified so as to confer a low MIC when tested in vitro.

  1. Macrolide Resistance in the Syphilis Spirochete, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum: Can We Also Expect Macrolide-Resistant Yaws Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Paštěková, Lenka; Grillová, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA) causes over 10 million new cases of syphilis worldwide whereas T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), the causative agent of yaws, affects about 2.5 million people. Although penicillin remains the drug of choice in the treatment of syphilis, in penicillin-allergic patients, macrolides have been used in this indication since the 1950s. Failures of macrolides in syphilis treatment have been well documented in the literature and since 2000, there has been a dramatic increase in a number of clinical samples with macrolide-resistant TPA. Scarce data regarding the genetics of macrolide-resistant mutations in TPA suggest that although macrolide-resistance mutations have emerged independently several times, the increase in the proportion of TPA strains resistant to macrolides is mainly due to the spread of resistant strains, especially in developed countries. The emergence of macrolide resistance in TPA appears to require a two-step process including either A2058G or A2059G mutation in one copy of the 23S rRNA gene and a subsequent gene conversion unification of both rRNA genes. Given the enormous genetic similarity that was recently revealed between TPA and TPE strains, there is a low but reasonable risk of emergence and spread of macrolide-resistant yaws strains following azithromycin treatment. PMID:26217043

  2. Macrolide Antibiotics and the Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non–cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended. PMID:24707986

  3. Macrolide antibiotics and the risk of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K; Schuller, Joseph L

    2014-05-15

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended.

  4. The general mode of translation inhibition by macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Krishna; Kanabar, Pinal; Schryer, David; Florin, Tanja; Oh, Eugene; Bahroos, Neil; Tenson, Tanel; Weissman, Jonathan S; Mankin, Alexander S

    2014-11-11

    Macrolides are clinically important antibiotics thought to inhibit bacterial growth by impeding the passage of newly synthesized polypeptides through the nascent peptide exit tunnel of the bacterial ribosome. Recent data challenged this view by showing that macrolide antibiotics can differentially affect synthesis of individual proteins. To understand the general mechanism of macrolide action, we used genome-wide ribosome profiling and analyzed the redistribution of ribosomes translating highly expressed genes in bacterial cells treated with high concentrations of macrolide antibiotics. The metagene analysis indicated that inhibition of early rounds of translation, which would be characteristic of the conventional view of macrolide action, occurs only at a limited number of genes. Translation of most genes proceeds past the 5'-proximal codons and can be arrested at more distal codons when the ribosome encounters specific short sequence motifs. The problematic sequence motifs are confined to the nascent peptide residues in the peptidyl transferase center but not to the peptide segment that contacts the antibiotic molecule in the exit tunnel. Therefore, it appears that the general mode of macrolide action involves selective inhibition of peptide bond formation between specific combinations of donor and acceptor substrates. Additional factors operating in the living cell but not functioning during in vitro protein synthesis may modulate site-specific action of macrolide antibiotics.

  5. Mechanism of action of spiramycin and other macrolides.

    PubMed

    Brisson-Noël, A; Trieu-Cuot, P; Courvalin, P

    1988-07-01

    Macrolide antibiotics constitute a group of 12 to 16-membered lactone rings substituted with one or more sugar residues, some of which may be amino sugars. They inhibit bacterial protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro with varying potencies. Macrolides are generally bacteriostatic, although some of these drugs may be bactericidal at very high concentrations. The mechanism of action of macrolides has been a matter of controversy for some time. Spiramycin, a 16-membered macrolide, inhibits translocation by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry. This antibiotic is a potent inhibitor of the binding to the ribosome of both donor and acceptor substrates. Spiramycin induces rapid breakdown of polyribosomes, an effect which has formerly been interpreted as occurring by normal ribosomal run-off followed by an antibiotic-induced block at or shortly after initiation of a new peptide. However, there is now convincing evidence that spiramycin, and probably all macrolides, act primarily by stimulating the dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA from ribosomes during translocation. Although the ribosomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms are susceptible to macrolides, these antibiotics are mainly used against Gram-positive bacteria since they are unable to enter the porins of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance to macrolides in clinical isolates is most frequently due to post-transcriptional methylation of an adenine residue of 23S ribosomal RNA, which leads to co-resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins type B (the so-called MLSB phenotype). Other mechanisms of resistance involving cell impermeability or drug inactivation have been detected in Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli. These strains are resistant to 14-membered macrolides (erythromycin and oleandomycin) but remain susceptible to spiramycin.

  6. Glycosylation of macrolide antibiotics in extracts of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Cundliffe, E

    1992-01-01

    Inducible resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptomyces lividans involves MGT, a macrolide glycosyl transferase that utilizes UDP-glucose as cofactor. Substrates for MGT include macrolides with 12-, 14-, 15-, or 16-atom cyclic polyketide lactones (as in methymycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, or tylosin, respectively), although spiramycin and carbomycin are not apparently modified. The enzyme is specific for the 2'-OH group of saccharidic moieties attached to C-5 of the 16-atom lactone ring (corresponding to C-5 or C-3 in 14- or 12-atom lactones, respectively). PMID:1605601

  7. Parametrization of macrolide antibiotics using the force field toolkit.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Anna; Gumbart, James C

    2015-10-15

    Macrolides are an important class of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome. Computer simulations of macrolides are limited as specific force field parameters have not been previously developed for them. Here, we determine CHARMM-compatible force field parameters for erythromycin, azithromycin, and telithromycin, using the force field toolkit (ffTK) plugin in VMD. Because of their large size, novel approaches for parametrizing them had to be developed. Two methods for determining partial atomic charges, from interactions with TIP3P water and from the electrostatic potential, as well as several approaches for fitting the dihedral parameters were tested. The performance of the different parameter sets was evaluated by molecular dynamics simulations of the macrolides in ribosome, with a distinct improvement in maintenance of key interactions observed after refinement of the initial parameters. Based on the results of the macrolide tests, recommended procedures for parametrizing very large molecules using ffTK are given.

  8. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS WITH ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques.

  9. Spectrophotometric Investigations of Macrolide Antibiotics: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Keskar, Mrudul R; Jugade, Ravin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides, one of the most commonly used class of antibiotics, are a group of drugs produced by Streptomyces species. They belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties. They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different analytical techniques have been reported for the determination of macrolides such as chromatographic methods, flow injection methods, spectrofluorometric methods, spectrophotometric methods, and capillary electrophoresis methods. Among these methods, spectrophotometric methods are sensitive and cost effective for the analysis of various antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations as well as biological samples. This article reviews different spectrophotometric methods for the determination of macrolide antibiotics. PMID:26609215

  10. Spectrophotometric Investigations of Macrolide Antibiotics: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Keskar, Mrudul R; Jugade, Ravin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides, one of the most commonly used class of antibiotics, are a group of drugs produced by Streptomyces species. They belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties. They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different analytical techniques have been reported for the determination of macrolides such as chromatographic methods, flow injection methods, spectrofluorometric methods, spectrophotometric methods, and capillary electrophoresis methods. Among these methods, spectrophotometric methods are sensitive and cost effective for the analysis of various antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations as well as biological samples. This article reviews different spectrophotometric methods for the determination of macrolide antibiotics.

  11. A platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiple, Ian B.; Zhang, Ziyang; Jakubec, Pavol; Langlois-Mercier, Audrey; Wright, Peter M.; Hog, Daniel T.; Yabu, Kazuo; Allu, Senkara Rao; Fukuzaki, Takehiro; Carlsen, Peter N.; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Zhou, Xiang; Condakes, Matthew L.; Szczypiński, Filip T.; Green, William D.; Myers, Andrew G.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical modification of structurally complex fermentation products, a process known as semisynthesis, has been an important tool in the discovery and manufacture of antibiotics for the treatment of various infectious diseases. However, many of the therapeutics obtained in this way are no longer effective, because bacterial resistance to these compounds has developed. Here we present a practical, fully synthetic route to macrolide antibiotics by the convergent assembly of simple chemical building blocks, enabling the synthesis of diverse structures not accessible by traditional semisynthetic approaches. More than 300 new macrolide antibiotic candidates, as well as the clinical candidate solithromycin, have been synthesized using our convergent approach. Evaluation of these compounds against a panel of pathogenic bacteria revealed that the majority of these structures had antibiotic activity, some efficacious against strains resistant to macrolides in current use. The chemistry we describe here provides a platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics and may also serve as the basis for their manufacture.

  12. A platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Seiple, Ian B; Zhang, Ziyang; Jakubec, Pavol; Langlois-Mercier, Audrey; Wright, Peter M; Hog, Daniel T; Yabu, Kazuo; Allu, Senkara Rao; Fukuzaki, Takehiro; Carlsen, Peter N; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Zhou, Xiang; Condakes, Matthew L; Szczypiński, Filip T; Green, William D; Myers, Andrew G

    2016-05-19

    The chemical modification of structurally complex fermentation products, a process known as semisynthesis, has been an important tool in the discovery and manufacture of antibiotics for the treatment of various infectious diseases. However, many of the therapeutics obtained in this way are no longer effective, because bacterial resistance to these compounds has developed. Here we present a practical, fully synthetic route to macrolide antibiotics by the convergent assembly of simple chemical building blocks, enabling the synthesis of diverse structures not accessible by traditional semisynthetic approaches. More than 300 new macrolide antibiotic candidates, as well as the clinical candidate solithromycin, have been synthesized using our convergent approach. Evaluation of these compounds against a panel of pathogenic bacteria revealed that the majority of these structures had antibiotic activity, some efficacious against strains resistant to macrolides in current use. The chemistry we describe here provides a platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics and may also serve as the basis for their manufacture.

  13. Macrolides: a promising pharmacologic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shilin; Zhong, Xiaoning

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there are no effective anti-inflammatory pharmacologic therapies available for COPD so far. Recent evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism has a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Macrolides possess anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects may be helpful in the treatment of COPD. Several clinical studies have shown that long-term use of macrolides reduces the frequency of COPD exacerbations. However, the subgroups that most effectively respond to long-term treatment of macrolides still need to be determined. The potential adverse events to individuals and the microbial resistance in community populations raises great concern on the long-term use of macrolides. Thus, novel macrolides have anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating effects, but without antibiotic effects, and are promising as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of COPD. In addition, the combination of macrolides and other anti-inflammatory pharmacologic agents may be a new strategy for the treatment of COPD.

  14. Fitness of macrolide resistant Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Zeitouni, Salman; Collin, Olivier; Andraud, Mathieu; Ermel, Gwennola; Kempf, Isabelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fitness of macrolide resistant Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni. The in vitro growth, the survival on food matrix, and the in vivo colonization of C. jejuni and C. coli susceptible isolates and their isogenic resistant mutants were studied. In vitro experiments demonstrated that macrolide resistance imposed a fitness cost when the susceptible strains and their isogenic resistant mutants were cultured in competition. When inoculated in food matrix, the resistant C. jejuni mutant was no longer detectable after 3 to 5 days but the susceptible strain remained detectable for over 18 days. No difference in survival in food matrix was observed between susceptible and resistant C. coli. When inoculated in vivo in chickens, the macrolide susceptible and resistant C. coli displayed similar levels of colonization, both in separated inoculations and during competitive assays. Strikingly, when mono-inoculated or co-inoculated into chickens, macrolide susceptible C. jejuni outcompeted the macrolide resistant population. However, a spontaneous mutant that evolved in vivo showed a colonization capacity similar to the susceptible strain. Our findings demonstrate the effect of macrolide resistance on the fitness of Campylobacter but suggest that evolved mutants may be as fit as susceptible strains.

  15. In vitro activity of six macrolides, clindamycin and tetracycline on Streptococcus pneumoniae with different penicillin susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, R L; Knudsen, J D; Petersen, M B; Fuursted, K; Espersen, F; Frimodt-Møller, N

    1996-03-01

    A collection of 99 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, chosen due to their different susceptibilities to penicillin, were investigated with respect to their susceptibility to the macrolides azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin, and to clindamycin and tetracycline by the agar dilution method. We found complete cross resistance among the macrolides. The pneumococci were either susceptible, MIC < or = 0.5 micrograms/ml, or resistant, MIC > or = 16 micrograms/ml, to the tested macrolides, giving a bimodal distribution. In addition, complete cross resistance was observed between clindamycin and macrolides. Pneumococci resistant to macrolides were also resistant to tetracycline, and 26% of the macrolide-susceptible strains were tetracycline resistant.

  16. Ribosomal Mutations Conferring Macrolide Resistance in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Descours, Ghislaine; Ginevra, Christophe; Jacotin, Nathalie; Forey, Françoise; Chastang, Joëlle; Kay, Elisabeth; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gérard; Doublet, Patricia; Jarraud, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring the emergence of antibiotic resistance is a recent issue in the treatment of Legionnaires' disease. Macrolides are recommended as first-line therapy, but resistance mechanisms have not been studied in Legionella species. Our aim was to determine the molecular basis of macrolide resistance in L. pneumophila Twelve independent lineages from a common susceptible L. pneumophila ancestral strain were propagated under conditions of erythromycin or azithromycin pressure to produce high-level macrolide resistance. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on 12 selected clones, and we investigated mutations common to all lineages. We reconstructed the dynamics of mutation for each lineage and demonstrated their involvement in decreased susceptibility to macrolides. The resistant mutants were produced in a limited number of passages to obtain a 4,096-fold increase in erythromycin MICs. Mutations affected highly conserved 5-amino-acid regions of L4 and L22 ribosomal proteins and of domain V of 23S rRNA (G2057, A2058, A2059, and C2611 nucleotides). The early mechanisms mainly affected L4 and L22 proteins and induced a 32-fold increase in the MICs of the selector drug. Additional mutations related to 23S rRNA mostly occurred later and were responsible for a major increase of macrolide MICs, depending on the mutated nucleotide, the substitution, and the number of mutated genes among the three rrl copies. The major mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility to macrolides in L. pneumophila and their dynamics were determined. The results showed that macrolide resistance could be easily selected in L. pneumophila and warrant further investigations in both clinical and environmental settings.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides: applications in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard J; Wallwork, Ben D; Lund, Valerie J

    2009-11-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides are significant. The clinical impact on diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) has improved 10-year survival from 12% to more than 90% for these patients. The immunomodulatory activity of macrolides has been a source of mechanistic research as well as clinical research in non-DPB inflammatory airway disease. Suppression of neutrophilic inflammation of the airways has been demonstrated as the most robust immunomodulatory response from 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides. The inhibition of transcription factors, mainly nuclear factor-kB and activator protein 1, from alterations in intracellular cell signaling drives this mechanism. The suppression of interleukin-8 to a range of endogenous and exogenous challenges characterizes the alterations to cytokine production. The inflammatory mechanisms of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have been a major non-DPB focus. Macrolides have been trialed in more than 14 prospective trials and are the focus of numerous research projects. Evidence for a strong clinical effect in CRS is mounting, but results may be tempered by researchers' inability to characterize the disease process. Eosinophilic dominated CRS is unlikely to respond, based on current research understanding and data from clinical trials. This article discusses the current concepts of macrolides and their application in the management of CRS.

  18. Molecular Control of Polyene Macrolide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Vicente, Cláudia M.; Guerra, Susana M.; Payero, Tamara D.; Martín, Juan F.; Aparicio, Jesús F.

    2011-01-01

    Control of polyene macrolide production in Streptomyces natalensis is mediated by the transcriptional activator PimM. This regulator, which combines an N-terminal PAS domain with a C-terminal helix-turn-helix motif, is highly conserved among polyene biosynthetic gene clusters. PimM, truncated forms of the protein without the PAS domain (PimMΔPAS), and forms containing just the DNA-binding domain (DBD) (PimMDBD) were overexpressed in Escherichia coli as GST-fused proteins. GST-PimM binds directly to eight promoters of the pimaricin cluster, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Assays with truncated forms of the protein revealed that the PAS domain does not mediate specificity or the distinct recognition of target genes, which rely on the DBD domain, but significantly reduces binding affinity up to 500-fold. Transcription start points were identified by 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, and the binding regions of PimMDBD were investigated by DNase I protection studies. In all cases, binding took place covering the −35 hexamer box of each promoter, suggesting an interaction of PimM and RNA polymerase to cause transcription activation. Information content analysis of the 16 sequences protected in target promoters was used to deduce the structure of the PimM-binding site. This site displays dyad symmetry, spans 14 nucleotides, and adjusts to the consensus TVGGGAWWTCCCBA. Experimental validation of this binding site was performed by using synthetic DNA duplexes. Binding of PimM to the promoter region of one of the polyketide synthase genes from the Streptomyces nodosus amphotericin cluster containing the consensus binding site was also observed, thus proving the applicability of the findings reported here to other antifungal polyketides. PMID:21187288

  19. Sequence-dependent elongation dynamics on macrolide-bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Magnus; Chen, Jin; Tsai, Albert; Kornberg, Guy; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2014-06-12

    The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET) has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough.

  20. Macrolide resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae: Focus on azithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Palma, Noemí; Horna, Gertrudis; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2017-02-01

    From its introduction in 1952 onwards, the clinical use of macrolides has been steadily increasing, both in human and veterinary medicine. Although initially designed to the treatment of Gram-positive microorganisms, this antimicrobial family has also been used to treat specific Gram-negative bacteria. Some of them, as azithromycin, are considered in the armamentarium against Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, the facility that this bacterial genus has to gain or develop mechanisms of antibiotic resistance may compromise the future usefulness of these antibiotics to fight against Enterobacteriaceae infections. The present review is focused on the mechanisms of macrolide resistance, currently described in Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. Macrolides for Acute Wheezing Episodes in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's Expert Panel Report 3, Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma does not recommend antibiotics for the management of acute episodes of asthma exacerbation. Macrolides seem to have some potential effect beyond or in addition to their antibacterial effect. It has been reported that macrolides may potentially benefit patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases due to their antibacterial, antiviral, and/or anti-inflammatory effects. This review presents recent data on use of azithromycin in prevention and management of acute exacerbation of respiratory symptoms in infants and young children. PMID:27458539

  2. Macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori: rapid detection of point mutations and assays of macrolide binding to ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Occhialini, A; Urdaci, M; Doucet-Populaire, F; Bébéar, C M; Lamouliatte, H; Mégraud, F

    1997-01-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to macrolides is a major cause of failure of eradication therapies. Single base substitutions in the H. pylori 23S rRNA genes have been associated with macrolide resistance in the United States. Our goal was to extend this work to European strains, to determine the consequence of this mutation on erythromycin binding to H. pylori ribosomes, and to find a quick method to detect the mutation. Seven pairs of H. pylori strains were used, the parent strain being naturally susceptible to macrolides and the second strain having acquired an in vivo resistance during a treatment regimen that included clarithromycin. The identity of the strains was confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA testing with two different primers, indicating that resistance was the result of the selection of variants of the infecting strain. All resistant strains were found to have point mutations at position 2143 (three cases) or 2144 (four cases) but never on the opposite DNA fragment of domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. The mutation was A-->G in all cases except one (A-->C) at position 2143. Using BsaI and BbsI restriction enzymes on the amplified products, we confirmed the mutations of A-->G at positions 2144 and 2143, respectively. Macrolide binding was tested on purified ribosomes isolated from four pairs of strains with [14C]erythromycin. Erythromycin binding increased in a dose-dependent manner for the susceptible strain but not for the resistant one. In conclusion we suggest that the limited disruption of the peptidyltransferase loop conformation, caused by a point mutation, reduces drug binding and consequently confers resistance to macrolides. Finally, the macrolide resistance could be detected without sequencing by performing restriction fragment length polymorphism with appropriate restriction enzymes. PMID:9420046

  3. Macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori: rapid detection of point mutations and assays of macrolide binding to ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, A; Urdaci, M; Doucet-Populaire, F; Bébéar, C M; Lamouliatte, H; Mégraud, F

    1997-12-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to macrolides is a major cause of failure of eradication therapies. Single base substitutions in the H. pylori 23S rRNA genes have been associated with macrolide resistance in the United States. Our goal was to extend this work to European strains, to determine the consequence of this mutation on erythromycin binding to H. pylori ribosomes, and to find a quick method to detect the mutation. Seven pairs of H. pylori strains were used, the parent strain being naturally susceptible to macrolides and the second strain having acquired an in vivo resistance during a treatment regimen that included clarithromycin. The identity of the strains was confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA testing with two different primers, indicating that resistance was the result of the selection of variants of the infecting strain. All resistant strains were found to have point mutations at position 2143 (three cases) or 2144 (four cases) but never on the opposite DNA fragment of domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. The mutation was A-->G in all cases except one (A-->C) at position 2143. Using BsaI and BbsI restriction enzymes on the amplified products, we confirmed the mutations of A-->G at positions 2144 and 2143, respectively. Macrolide binding was tested on purified ribosomes isolated from four pairs of strains with [14C]erythromycin. Erythromycin binding increased in a dose-dependent manner for the susceptible strain but not for the resistant one. In conclusion we suggest that the limited disruption of the peptidyltransferase loop conformation, caused by a point mutation, reduces drug binding and consequently confers resistance to macrolides. Finally, the macrolide resistance could be detected without sequencing by performing restriction fragment length polymorphism with appropriate restriction enzymes.

  4. Macrolides resistance of common bacteria isolated from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1995-12-01

    To determine the susceptibility to macrolides of common pathogenic bacteria isolated from Taiwan, the in vitro activities of erythromycin, roxithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and dirithromycin were tested against 492 clinical isolates of eight different bacteria, collected from the National Taiwan University Hospital. The results showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against most of the tested bacteria. The MIC90s for Staphylococcus aureus (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), coagulase-negative staphylococci (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, enterococci, peptostreptococci, and Bacteroides fragilis were all > or = 256 micrograms/ml. The MIC50s for methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, and enterococci were > or = 256 micrograms/ml. For S. pneumoniae, peptostreptococci, and B. fragilis, the MIC50s were > 8 micrograms/ml. The resistance rates to macrolides were 80% or more in methicillin-resistant staphylococci and about 30% in methicillin-sensitive staphylococci. Around 55% of S. pneumoniae strains and 37 approximately 42% of S. pyogenes strains were resistant to macrolides. Cross-resistance to different macrolides was clearly demonstrated in most of the resistant strains.

  5. Biosynthesis and pathway engineering of antifungal polyene macrolides in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dekun; Lee, Mi-Jin; Lin, Shuangjun; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2013-06-01

    Polyene macrolides are a large family of natural products typically produced by soil actinomycetes. Polyene macrolides are usually biosynthesized by modular and large type I polyketide synthases (PKSs), followed by several steps of sequential post-PKS modifications such as region-specific oxidations and glycosylations. Although known as powerful antibiotics containing potent antifungal activities (along with additional activities against parasites, enveloped viruses and prion diseases), their high toxicity toward mammalian cells and poor distribution in tissues have led to the continuous identification and structural modification of polyene macrolides to expand their general uses. Advances in in-depth investigations of the biosynthetic mechanism of polyene macrolides and the genetic manipulations of the polyene biosynthetic pathways provide great opportunities to generate new analogues. Recently, a novel class of polyene antibiotics was discovered (a disaccharide-containing NPP) that displays better pharmacological properties such as improved water-solubility and reduced hemolysis. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the biosynthesis, pathway engineering, and regulation of polyene antibiotics in actinomycetes.

  6. Expression of the mef(E) gene encoding the macrolide efflux pump protein increases in Streptococcus pneumoniae with increasing resistance to macrolides.

    PubMed

    Wierzbowski, Aleksandra K; Boyd, Dave; Mulvey, Michael; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

    2005-11-01

    Active macrolide efflux is a major mechanism of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae in many parts of the world, especially North America. In Canada, this active macrolide efflux in S. pneumoniae is predominantly due to acquisition of the mef(E) gene. In the present study, we assessed the mef(E) gene sequence as well as mef(E) expression in variety of low- and high-level macrolide-resistant, clindamycin-susceptible (M-phenotype) S. pneumoniae isolates (erythromycin MICs, 1 to 32 microg/ml; clindamycin MICs, < or = 0.25 microg/ml). Southern blot hybridization with mef(E) probe and EcoRI digestion and relative real-time reverse transcription-PCR were performed to study the mef(E) gene copy number and expression. Induction of mef(E) expression was analyzed by Etest susceptibility testing pre- and postincubation with subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, telithromycin, and clindamycin. The macrolide efflux gene, mef(E), was shown to be a single-copy gene in all 23 clinical S. pneumoniae isolates tested, and expression post-macrolide induction increased 4-, 6-, 20-, and 200-fold in isolates with increasing macrolide resistance (erythromycin MICs 2, 4, 8, and 32 microg/ml, respectively). Sequencing analysis of the macrolide efflux genetic assembly (mega) revealed that mef(E) had a 16-bp deletion 153 bp upstream of the putative start codon in all 23 isolates. A 119-bp intergenic region between mef(E) and mel was sequenced, and a 99-bp deletion was found in 11 of the 23 M-phenotype S. pneumoniae isolates compared to the published mega sequence. However, the mef(E) gene was fully conserved among both high- and low-level macrolide-resistant isolates. In conclusion, increased expression of mef(E) is associated with higher levels of macrolide resistance in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  7. Past, present and future of macrolide therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Suzaki, Harumi

    2016-04-01

    In 1984, the effectiveness of low-dose, long-term erythromycin treatment (macrolide therapy) for diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) was first reported in Japan. The 5-year survival rate for DPB improved from 62.9 to 91.4% after implementation of macrolide therapy. The usefulness of this treatment has since been demonstrated in patients with other chronic airway diseases, such as chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchial asthma, and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The new 14-membered macrolides clarithromycin and roxithromycin and the 15-membered macrolide azithromycin are also effective for treating these inflammatory diseases. The mechanism of action of the 14- and 15-membered macrolides may involve anti-inflammatory rather than anti-bacterial activities. Macrolide therapy is now widely used for the treatment of CRS in Japan; it is particularly effective for treating neutrophil-associated CRS and is useful for suppressing mucus hypersecretion. However, macrolide therapy is not effective for eosinophil-predominant CRS, which is characterized by serum and tissue eosinophilia, high serum IgE levels, multiple polyposis, and bronchial asthma. Recent reports have described the clinical efficacy of macrolides in treating other inflammatory diseases and new biological activities (e.g., anti-viral). New macrolide derivatives exhibiting anti-inflammatory but not anti-bacterial activity thus have therapeutic potential as immunomodulatory drugs. The history, current state, and future perspectives of macrolide therapy for treating CRS in Japan will be discussed in this review.

  8. Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin resistance patterns in Clostridium perfringens from animals.

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, G N; Devriese, L A

    1981-01-01

    Different patterns of resistance against commonly used macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin antibiotics were found in Clostridium perfringens of animal origin. The patterns were designated as (i) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin group B generalized resistance, (ii) macrolide-lincosamide generalized resistance, (iii) macrolide-lincosamide inducible resistance, and (iv) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin low-level generalized resistance. The strains of the fourth pattern were able to inactivate pristinamycin and virginiamycin. The macrolide-susceptible strains showed a bimodal distribution of lincomycin and clindamycin susceptibility levels. The susceptible strains were inhibited by 0.25 micrograms of lincomycin per ml and 0.03 micrograms of clindamycin per ml. The low-level resistant strains were inhibited at concentrations of 2 to 4 micrograms of lincomycin per ml and 0.5 to 2 micrograms of clindamycin per ml. PMID:6289728

  9. Nickel-Catalyzed Regiodivergent Approach to Macrolide Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shareef, Abdur-Rafay; Sherman, David H.; Montgomery, John

    2012-01-01

    A strategy for regiochemical reversal of reductive macrocyclizations of aldehydes and terminal alkynes has been developed. Using an advanced synthetic intermediate directed towards the methymycin/neomethymycin class of macrolides, selective endocyclization provides the natural twelve-membered ring series, whereas ligand alteration enables selective exocyclization to provide access to the unnatural eleven-membered ring series. The twelve-membered ring adduct was converted to 10-deoxymethynolide, completing an efficient total synthesis of this natural product. PMID:22737401

  10. Drug interactions and hepatitis produced by some macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pessayre, D; Larrey, D; Funck-Brentano, C; Benhamou, J P

    1985-07-01

    Drug interactions involving macrolides have been mainly reported in subjects receiving troleandomycin and in a few receiving erythromycin derivatives. In rats and in humans, troleandomycin, erythromycin and erythromycin derivatives induce microsomal enzymes; the induced isozymes of cytochrome P-450 have a high activity for these macrolides but a poor activity with several other substrates. These isozymes actively demethylate and oxidize these macrolides into nitrosoalkanes which form stable, inactive complexes with the iron of cytochrome P-450. Eventually, the oxidative metabolism of other drugs may be decreased. These effects are marked after administration of troleandomycin, moderate after administration of erythromycin derivatives and absent (or negligible) after administration of spiramycin, josamycin or midecamycin. A second adverse effect of the administration of troleandomycin or erythromycin derivatives is the possible occurrence of hepatitis. Mild hepatic dysfunction is fairly frequent and may be toxic in type. In contrast, jaundice is common, is frequently associated with hypersensitivity, and promptly recurs when the drug is readministered. Troleandomycin and erythromycin derivatives, which form nitrosoalkanes, produce hepatitis, whereas josamycin, midecamycin and spiramycin, which do not form cytochrome P-450-nitrosoalkane complexes, rarely, if ever, produce hepatitis. Nitrosoalkanes are unstable intermediates which react with glutathione but also with cysteine and might covalently bind to the SH-groups of proteins. The following mechanism might be proposed as a hypothetical attempt to link up these various observations. The macrolide (or its reactive metabolite) may have discrete toxicity; in several subjects, this may produce minor liver lesions and a mildly raised aminotransferase activity. Necrosis of a few hepatocytes may release into the circulation plasma membrane proteins altered by the covalent binding of metabolites. Such modified liver

  11. Part VII. Macrolides, azalides, ketolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins.

    PubMed

    Dang, Van; Nanda, Neha; Cooper, Travis W; Greenfield, Ronald A; Bronze, Michael S

    2007-03-01

    In this article we describe antimicrobials that are grouped by their similar mechanism of action, namely inhibition of protein synthesis at the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit. Macrolides, azalides, and ketolides are primarily used to treat community acquired respiratory tract infections. A lincosamide antibiotic, clindamycin, is primarily used to treat anaerobic infections. A combination of streptogramins, quinupristin/dalfopristin, is used to treat infections due to multiple drug resistant Gram positive cocci.

  12. Transduction of resistance to some macrolide antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    PATTEE, P A; BALDWIN, J N

    1962-11-01

    Pattee, P. A. (Iowa State University, Ames) and J. N. Baldwin. Transduction of resistance to some macrolide antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 84:1049-1055. 1962.-By use of phage 80 of the International Typing Series, propagated on appropriate strains of Staphylococcus aureus, two related markers controlling resistance to certain macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, and carbomycin) were transduced among a variety of strains of S. aureus. Unlike the markers controlling penicillinase production and resistance to chlortetracycline and novobiocin, the determinants of resistance to the macrolide antibiotics were transduced at normal frequencies (at least 300 transductants per 10(9) phage) only to certain of the recipient strains. One of the markers studied appears to control an inducible enzyme system which is specifically induced by sub-inhibitory concentrations of erythromycin and which controls resistance to erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, and carbomycin. The other marker examined confers resistance to erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, and carbomycin, and shows no evidence of being dependent upon an inducible mechanism.

  13. The macrolide immunosuppressants in dermatology: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Alexander M; Griffiths, Christopher E M

    2002-01-01

    Macrolides are xenobiotics, produced by soil fungi, which have immunosuppressant properties. They will probably revolutionise the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses. This article outlines the context and putative mechanisms of action of this novel class of drugs. Cyclosporin, and the structurally distinct macrolides tacrolimus and pimecrolimus (an ascomycin derivative), modulate immune-cell function by inhibiting calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation-activation of specific nuclear factors, thus preventing transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The macrolide rapamycin (sirolimus) acts by abrogating Target of Rapamycin, a key signalling protein that controls activation of a number of proteins which direct progression of the cell cycle in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are small enough molecules to penetrate skin and are available in topical formulations. "Skin-specific" pimecrolimus seems not to cause systemic immunosuppression when given orally. Neither topical tacrolimus nor pimecrolimus are capable of producing skin atrophy. Sirolimus has anti-angiogenic properties that may be beneficial to the treatment of psoriasis and perhaps skin cancer.

  14. Sequence selectivity of macrolide-induced translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amber R.; Gohara, David W.; Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2014-01-01

    The prevailing “plug-in-the-bottle” model suggests that macrolide antibiotics inhibit translation by binding inside the ribosome tunnel and indiscriminately arresting the elongation of every nascent polypeptide after the synthesis of six to eight amino acids. To test this model, we performed a genome-wide analysis of translation in azithromycin-treated Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast to earlier predictions, we found that the macrolide does not preferentially induce ribosome stalling near the 5′ end of mRNAs, but rather acts at specific stalling sites that are scattered throughout the entire coding region. These sites are highly enriched in prolines and charged residues and are strikingly similar to other ligand-independent ribosome stalling motifs. Interestingly, the addition of structurally related macrolides had dramatically different effects on stalling efficiency. Our data suggest that ribosome stalling can occur at a surprisingly large number of low-complexity motifs in a fashion that depends only on a few arrest-inducing residues and the presence of a small molecule inducer. PMID:25313041

  15. [Sparse effect of long-term treatment with macrolides in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jersild Jespersen, Maria; Mygind, Lone H; Vestbo, Jørgen; Sonne, Jesper

    2013-03-04

    Macrolides have been proposed to have a positive effect in patients with inflammatory lung diseases, including patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), who suffer from acute exacerbations. Increased use of macrolides for long-term treatment of patients with COPD has been observed. The evidence of a treatment effect of macrolides in this area is sparse, but some studies suggest that it might be beneficial on the number of exacerbations and the length between them. At present there is not sufficient evidence to issue a general recommendation for prescribing macrolides for the long-term treatment of COPD.

  16. Induction of Efflux-Mediated Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Zhou, Xiaoliu; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S.

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial efflux system encoded by the operon mef(E)-mel on the mobile genetic element MEGA in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria is inducible by macrolide antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. Induction may affect the clinical response to the use of macrolides. We developed mef(E) reporter constructs and a disk diffusion induction and resistance assay to determine the kinetics and basis of mef(E)-mel induction. Induction occurred rapidly, with a >15-fold increase in transcription within 1 h of exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin. A spectrum of environmental conditions, including competence and nonmacrolide antibiotics with distinct cellular targets, did not induce mef(E). Using 16 different structurally defined macrolides, induction was correlated with the amino sugar attached to C-5 of the macrolide lactone ring, not with the size (e.g., 14-, 15- or 16-member) of the ring or with the presence of the neutral sugar cladinose at C-3. Macrolides with a monosaccharide attached to C-5, known to block exit of the nascent peptide from the ribosome after the incorporation of up to eight amino acids, induced mef(E) expression. Macrolides with a C-5 disaccharide, which extends the macrolide into the ribosomal exit tunnel, disrupting peptidyl transferase activity, did not induce it. The induction of mef(E) did not require macrolide efflux, but the affinity of macrolides for the ribosome determined the availability for efflux and pneumococcal susceptibility. The induction of mef(E)-mel expression by inducing macrolides appears to be based on specific interactions of the macrolide C-5 saccharide with the ribosome that alleviate transcriptional attenuation of mef(E)-mel. PMID:21537010

  17. Exploiting the natural metabolic diversity of Streptomyces venezuelae to generate unusual reduced macrolides.

    PubMed

    Park, Je Won; Oh, Hong-Se; Jung, Won Seok; Park, Sung Ryeol; Han, Ah Reum; Ban, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Eun Ji; Kang, Han-Young; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2008-11-30

    An unusual set of reduced macrolide antibiotics was discovered by combination of organic synthesis and a biosynthetic approach using the unique metabolic diversity of Streptomyces venezuelae; two unnatural 16-membered ring macrolides are also created by employing this bio-catalyst.

  18. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Norway: Population Structure and Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Caugant, D. A.; Sangvik, M.; Høiby, E. A.; Sundsfjord, A.; Simonsen, G. S.

    2006-01-01

    A 2.7% prevalence of macrolide resistance in 1,657 Norwegian clinical Streptococcus pyogenes isolates was primarily due to erm(TR) (59%) and mef(A) (20%). Four clonal complexes comprised 75% of the strains. Macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes in Norway is imported as resistant strains or locally selected in internationally disseminated susceptible clones. PMID:16641473

  19. Caught in the act: in vivo development of macrolide resistance to Campylobacter jejuni infection.

    PubMed

    Lindow, J C; Poly, F; Tribble, D R; Guerry, P; Carmolli, M P; Baqar, S; Porter, C K; Pierce, K K; Darsley, M J; Sadigh, K S; Dill, E A; Kirkpatrick, B D

    2010-08-01

    We report the first instance of macrolide resistance developing in vivo following appropriate antibiotic use in a healthy volunteer as a part of a controlled human infection with Campylobacter jejuni. In vivo development of macrolide resistance may be an important contributor to antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni.

  20. Long-term macrolide treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases: risks, benefits and future developments.

    PubMed

    Cameron, E J; McSharry, C; Chaudhuri, R; Farrow, S; Thomson, N C

    2012-09-01

    Macrolide antibiotics were discovered over 50 years ago and following their use as antimicrobials it became apparent that this group of antibiotics also possessed anti-inflammatory properties. Subsequent clinical trials showed benefits of macrolides as long-term adjuncts in the treatment of a spectrum of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases, particularly diffuse panbronchiolitis, cystic fibrosis, post-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans and more recently chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The evidence for efficacy of macrolides in the long-term treatment of chronic asthma and bronchiectasis is less well established. The mechanism(s) of action of macrolides in the treatment of these diseases remains unexplained, but may be due to their antibacterial and/or anti-inflammatory actions, which include reductions in interleukin-8 production, neutrophil migration and/or function. Macrolides have additional potentially beneficial properties including anti-viral actions and an ability to restore corticosteroid sensitivity. The increased prescribing of macrolides for long-term treatment could result in the development of microbial resistance and adverse drug effects. New macrolides have been developed which do not possess any antimicrobial activity and hence lack the ability to produce microbial resistance, but which still retain immunomodulatory effects. Potentially novel macrolides may overcome a significant barrier to the use of this type of drug for the long-term treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  1. Molecular mechanism of macrolide-lincosamide resistance in Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryoichi; Nonaka, Shotaro; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Noboru

    2012-10-01

    We identified a Moraxella catarrhalis strain with high-level resistance to azithromycin (MIC>256 mg l(-1)), NSH1, isolated from nasopharyngeal swab samples from an inpatient with acute bronchitis in a Japanese hospital in 2011 and determined its mechanism of macrolide-lincosamide resistance. Antimicrobial susceptibility of M. catarrhalis strains was determined using the Etest and agar dilution methods. Mutations in the four 23S rRNA alleles, the ribosomal proteins L4 and L22, and methylase genes erm(B) and erm(F) were tested by PCR and/or sequencing. The efflux system was examined using appropriate inhibitors. Transformation experiments were performed using DNA amplicons of the 23S rRNA gene of M. catarrhalis strain NSH1. This strain showed high-level resistance to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, clindamycin (MICs>256 mg l(-1)) and josamycin (MIC = 128 mg l(-1)), and contained the A2058T mutation (Escherichia coli numbering) in four of the 23S rRNA alleles. Mutation of the ribosomal proteins and overproduction of the efflux system were not observed, and methylase genes were not detected. When amplified DNA containing the single A2058T mutation was transformed into M. catarrhalis strains, transformants with three A2058T-mutated 23S rRNA alleles showed high-level resistance to macrolide-lincosamide, similar to strain NSH1. In contrast, transformants with two A2058T-mutated 23S rRNA alleles showed low-level MICs (azithromycin: 0.38-0.5 mg l(-1)). Thus, a single A2058T mutation occurring in at least three 23S rRNA alleles confers high-level resistance to 14-, 15- and 16-membered macrolides and lincosamides in M. catarrhalis possessing four 23S rRNA alleles. This study represents the first evidence, to our knowledge, of this effect in M. catarrhalis.

  2. Palmerolide macrolides from the Antarctic tunicate Synoicum adareanum.

    PubMed

    Noguez, Jaime H; Diyabalanage, Thushara K K; Miyata, Yoshinari; Xie, Xiao-Song; Valeriote, Frederick A; Amsler, Charles D; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2011-11-15

    Palmerolides D-G are new bioactive macrolides isolated from the Antarctic tunicate Synoicum adareanum and are related to the melanoma-selective cytotoxin palmerolide A. Most of these palmerolides are potent V-ATPase inhibitors and have sub-micromolar activity against melanoma. Though palmerolide A remains the most potent of this series of natural products against mammalian V-ATPase, recent data suggests that palmerolide D is the most potent against melanoma. A comparison of the bioactivity data obtained for these natural product palmerolides has provided insight into the substructures necessary to retain V-ATPase inhibition and cytotoxic activity.

  3. Total synthesis of the antimitotic marine macrolide (-)-leiodermatolide.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Ian; Ng, Kenneth K-H; Williams, Simon; Millican, David C; Dalby, Stephen M

    2014-03-03

    Leiodermatolide is an antimitotic macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Leiodermatium sp. whose potentially novel tubulin-targeting mechanism of action makes it an exciting lead for anticancer drug discovery. In pursuit of a sustainable supply, we report a highly stereocontrolled total synthesis (3.2% yield) based on a convergent sequence of palladium-mediated fragment assembly and macrolactonization. Boron-mediated aldol reactions were used to configure the three key fragments 2, 5, and 6 by employing the appropriate enantiomer of the lactate-derived ketone 7.

  4. Total Synthesis of the Antimitotic Marine Macrolide (−)-Leiodermatolide**

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Ian; Ng, Kenneth K-H; Williams, Simon; Millican, David C; Dalby, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Leiodermatolide is an antimitotic macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Leiodermatium sp. whose potentially novel tubulin-targeting mechanism of action makes it an exciting lead for anticancer drug discovery. In pursuit of a sustainable supply, we report a highly stereocontrolled total synthesis (3.2 % yield) based on a convergent sequence of palladium-mediated fragment assembly and macrolactonization. Boron-mediated aldol reactions were used to configure the three key fragments 2, 5, and 6 by employing the appropriate enantiomer of the lactate-derived ketone 7. PMID:24481746

  5. Pathogen- and Host-Directed Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Macrolide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Helen C.; Theron, Annette J.; Cockeran, Riana; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics possess several, beneficial, secondary properties which complement their primary antimicrobial activity. In addition to high levels of tissue penetration, which may counteract seemingly macrolide-resistant bacterial pathogens, these agents also possess anti-inflammatory properties, unrelated to their primary antimicrobial activity. Macrolides target cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as structural cells, and are beneficial in controlling harmful inflammatory responses during acute and chronic bacterial infection. These secondary anti-inflammatory activities of macrolides appear to be particularly effective in attenuating neutrophil-mediated inflammation. This, in turn, may contribute to the usefulness of these agents in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of both microbial and nonmicrobial origin, predominantly of the airways. This paper is focused on the various mechanisms of macrolide-mediated anti-inflammatory activity which target both microbial pathogens and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, with emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22778497

  6. Macrolides as immunomodulatory medications for the therapy of chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    López-Boado, Yolanda S; Rubin, Bruce K

    2008-06-01

    Macrolide antibiotics have potent immunomodulatory activity. The spectrum of action of these antibiotics extends to regulation of leukocyte function and production of inflammatory mediators, control of mucus hypersecretion, resolution of inflammation, and modulation of host defense mechanisms. Macrolides are now being used or investigated to treat chronic lung inflammatory diseases, including diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Intense research is ongoing to further elucidate the targets and mechanism/s of action of macrolides in eukaryotic cells. In this paper, we review recent findings on novel effects of macrolides on epithelial barrier function and resolution of inflammation, which may shed light on the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of macrolides in the clinic.

  7. Interplay between the ribosomal tunnel, nascent chain, and macrolides influences drug inhibition.

    PubMed

    Starosta, Agata L; Karpenko, Viktoriya V; Shishkina, Anna V; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Sumbatyan, Natalia V; Schluenzen, Frank; Korshunova, Galina A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Wilson, Daniel N

    2010-05-28

    Accumulating evidence suggests that, during translation, nascent chains can form specific interactions with ribosomal exit tunnel to regulate translation and promote initial folding events. The clinically important macrolide antibiotics bind within the exit tunnel and inhibit translation by preventing progression of the nascent chain and inducing peptidyl-tRNA drop-off. Here, we have synthesized amino acid- and peptide-containing macrolides, which are used to demonstrate that distinct amino acids and peptides can establish interaction with components of the ribosomal tunnel and enhance the ribosome-binding and inhibitory properties of the macrolide drugs, consistent with the concept that the exit tunnel is not simply a Teflon-like channel. Surprisingly, we find that macrolide antibiotics do not inhibit translation of all nascent chains similarly, but rather exhibit polypeptide-specific inhibitory effects, providing a change to our general mechanistic understanding of macrolide inhibition.

  8. Role of macrolide therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Albert, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The Global Burden of Disease study has concluded that COPD will become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020, and will increase its ranking of disability-adjusted life years lost from 12th to 5th. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are associated with impaired quality of life and pulmonary function. More frequent or severe AECOPDs have been associated with especially markedly impaired quality of life and a greater longitudinal loss of pulmonary function. COPD and AECOPDs are characterized by an augmented inflammatory response. Macrolide antibiotics are macrocyclical lactones that provide adequate coverage for the most frequently identified pathogens in AECOPD and have been generally included in published guidelines for AECOPD management. In addition, they exert broad-ranging, immunomodulatory effects both in vitro and in vivo, as well as diverse actions that suppress microbial virulence factors. Macrolide antibiotics have been used to successfully treat a number of chronic, inflammatory lung disorders including diffuse panbronchiolitis, asthma, noncystic fibrosis associated bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis. Data in COPD patients have been limited and contradictory but the majority hint to a potential clinical and biological effect. Additional, prospective, controlled data are required to define any potential treatment effect, the nature of this effect, and the role of bronchiectasis, baseline colonization, and other cormorbidities. PMID:18990961

  9. Evolution of susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. to quinolones and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Fernández-Baca, V; Díaz, M D; Muñoz, P; Rodríguez-Créixems, M; Bouza, E

    1994-09-01

    Erythromycin, new macrolides, and quinolones are alternatives for the treatment of Campylobacter infections. Concerns related to the emergence of resistance to both groups of drugs have been raised. We studied the evolution of antimicrobial susceptibilities of 275 clinical isolates of microorganisms of the genus Campylobacter isolated in our institution during a 5-year period (1988 to 1992). The microorganisms studied were C. jejuni (n = 230), C. coli (n = 42), and C. fetus (n = 3). The overall resistance rates (determined by the agar dilution method and the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards) were as follows: erythromycin, 2.3%; clarithromycin, 2.3%; azithromycin, 1.9%; ciprofloxacin, 28.5%; norfloxacin, 31%; ofloxacin, 26.3%; and nalidixic acid, 36.8%. The evolution of resistance (percent resistance in 1988 versus percent resistance in 1992) was as follows: erythromycin, 2.6 versus 3.1; clarithromycin, 2.6 versus 3.1; azithromycin, 2.6 versus 3.1; ciprofloxacin, 0 versus 49.5; norfloxacin, 2.6 versus 55.5; ofloxacin, 0 versus 45.6; nalidixic acid, 2.6 versus 56.8. Our data show stable macrolide activity against Campylobacter spp. and the rapid development of quinolone resistance over the last 5 years.

  10. Induction of ermSV by 16-membered-ring macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Kamimiya, S; Weisblum, B

    1997-01-01

    The erm family of 23S rRNA adenine-N6-methyltransferases confers resistance to all macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB (MLS) antibiotics, but not all MLS antibiotics induce synthesis of Erm methyltransferase with equal efficiency in a given organism. The induction efficiency of a test panel of MLS antibiotics was studied by using two translational attenuator-lac reporter gene fusion constructs, one based on ermSV from Streptomyces viridochromogenes NRRL 2860 and the other based on ermC from Staphylococcus aureus RN2442. Four types of responses which were correlated with the macrolide ring size were seen, as follows: group 1, both ermSV and ermC were induced by the 14-membered-ring macrolides erythromycin, lankamycin, and matromycin, as well as by the lincosamide celesticetin; group 2, neither ermSV nor ermC was induced by the 12-membered-ring macrolide methymycin or by the lincosamide lincomycin or the streptogramin type B antibiotic ostreogrycin B; group 3, ermSV was selectively induced over ermC by the 16-membered-ring macrolides carbomycin, chalcomycin, cirramycin, kitasamycin, maridomycin, and tylosin; and group 4, ermC was selectively induced over ermSV by the 14-membered-ring macrolide megalomicin. These data suggest that the leader peptide determines the specificity of induction by different classes of MLS antibiotics and that for a given attenuator, a major factor which determines whether a given macrolide induces resistance is its size. PMID:9055987

  11. Intrinsic Macrolide Resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis Is Conferred by a Novel erm Gene, erm(38)

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin A.

    2003-01-01

    High-level, acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria is conferred by mutation within the 23S rRNA gene. However, several mycobacteria are naturally resistant to macrolides, including the Mycobacterium smegmatis group and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize this resistance. Intrinsic macrolide resistance in M. smegmatis was inducible and showed cross-resistance to lincosamides but not to streptogramin B (i.e., ML resistance). A similar phenotype was found with Mycobacterium microti and macrolide-resistant Mycobacterium fortuitum. A search of the DNA sequence data for M. smegmatis strain mc2155 identified a novel erm gene, erm(38), and expression analysis showed that erm(38) RNA levels increased >10-fold after a 2-h incubation with macrolide. Inducible ML resistance was not expressed by an erm(38) knockout mutant, and complementation of this mutant with intact erm(38) in trans resulted in high-level ML resistance (e.g., clarithromycin MIC of >512 μg/ml). Thus, the results indicate that erm(38) confers the intrinsic ML resistance of M. smegmatis. Southern blot analysis with an erm(38)-specific probe indicated that a similar gene may be present in macrolide-resistant M. fortuitum. This finding, with the presence of the erm(37) gene (Rv1988) in the M. tuberculosis complex, suggests that such genes are widespread in mycobacteria with intrinsic macrolide resistance. PMID:14506008

  12. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Macrolide-Resistant Mycobacterium massiliense Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hayoung; Kim, Su-Young; Lee, Hyun; Jhun, Byung Woo; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Dae Hun; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Lee, Seung-Heon; Shin, Sung Jae; Daley, Charles L; Koh, Won-Jung

    2017-02-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are cornerstones in the treatment of Mycobacterium massiliense lung disease. Despite the emergence of resistance, limited data on macrolide-resistant M massiliense lung disease are available. This study evaluated the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients and the molecular characteristics of macrolide-resistant M massiliense isolates. We performed a retrospective review of medical records and genetic analyses of clinical isolates from 15 patients who had macrolide-resistant M massiliense lung disease between September 2005 and February 2015. Nine patients (60%) had the nodular bronchiectatic form of the disease, and six (40%) had the fibrocavitary form. Before the detection of macrolide resistance, three patients (20%) were treated with macrolide monotherapy, four (27%) with therapy for presumed Mycobacterium avium complex infections, and eight (53%) with combination antibiotic therapy for M massiliense lung disease. The median treatment duration after the detection of resistance was 18.7 months (interquartile range, 11.2 to 39.8 months). Treatment outcomes were poor, with a favorable outcome being achieved for only one patient (7%), who underwent surgery in addition to antibiotic therapy. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year mortality rates were 7, 13, and 33%, respectively. Of the 15 clinical isolates, 14 (93%) had point mutations at position 2058 (n = 9) or 2059 (n = 5) of the 23S rRNA gene, resulting in macrolide resistance. Our study indicates that treatment outcomes are poor and mortality rates are high after the development of macrolide resistance in patients with M massiliense lung disease. Thus, preventing the development of macrolide resistance should be a key consideration during treatment.

  13. Impact of Macrolide Therapy in Patients Hospitalized With Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Laserna, Elena; Sibila, Oriol; Fernandez, Juan Felipe; Maselli, Diego Jose; Mortensen, Eric M.; Anzueto, Antonio; Waterer, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have described a clinical benefit of macrolides due to their immunomodulatory properties in various respiratory diseases. We aimed to assess the effect of macrolide therapy on mortality in patients hospitalized for Pseudomonas aeruginosa community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods: We performed a retrospective population-based study of > 150 hospitals in the US Veterans Health Administration. Patients were included if they had a diagnosis of CAP and P aeruginosa was identified as the causative pathogen. Patients with health-care-associated pneumonia and immunosuppression were excluded. Macrolide therapy was considered when administered within the first 48 h of admission. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed using 30-day mortality as the dependent measure. Results: We included 402 patients with P aeruginosa CAP, of whom 171 (42.5%) received a macrolide during the first 48 h of admission. These patients were older and white. Macrolide use was not associated with lower 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.70-1.83; P = .5). In addition, patients treated with macrolides had no differences in ICU admission, use of mechanical ventilation, use of vasopressors, and length of stay (LOS) compared with patients not treated with macrolides. A subgroup analysis among patients with P aeruginosa CAP in the ICU showed no differences in baseline characteristics and outcomes. Conclusions: Macrolide therapy in the first 48 h of admission is not associated with decreased 30-day mortality, ICU admission, need for mechanical ventilation, and LOS in hospitalized patients with P aeruginosa CAP. Larger cohort studies should address the benefit of macrolides as immunomodulators in patients with P aeruginosa CAP. PMID:24458223

  14. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site. PMID:22926570

  15. Various novel erythromycin derivatives obtained by different modifications: recent advance in macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ma, C; Ma, S

    2010-04-01

    The rapid emergence of drug resistance intensified the search for new antimicrobial agents, leading to lots of novel derivatives obtained from 14- and 15-membered macrolides by chemical modifications. Many of them exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity and expanded antibacterial spectrum. Especially some of them were found to be potent for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant bacterial infections. Besides, the other biological effects of macrolide derivatives were also found. In this article, we reviewed the recent advance in the novel macrolide derivatives designed by different structural modifications on erythronolide skeleton, cladinose and desosamine in the structures.

  16. The design of novel classes of macrolides for neutrophil-dominated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Eraković Haber, Vesna; Bosnar, Martina; Kragol, Goran

    2014-04-01

    Neutrophil-dominated inflammatory diseases, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis obliteras syndrome and non-eosinophilic asthma, present a significant medical problem lacking adequate therapy. Macrolide antibiotics have been reported to be effective in the treatment of the aforementioned diseases, for reasons unrelated to their antibacterial action. This has resulted in research activities aimed at gaining a better understanding of the immunomodulatory actions of macrolides and the synthesis of various novel anti-inflammatory macrolides without antimicrobial activity. Despite the difficult chemistry and lack of an extensive knowledge for their mechanism of action, several interesting molecules from this class, including potential clinical candidates, are on the horizon.

  17. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site.

  18. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean D.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (ΔMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that ΔMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which ΔMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels. PMID:19015512

  19. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  20. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean D; Sauer, Robert T

    2008-11-25

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (DeltaMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that DeltaMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which DeltaMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels.

  1. [Resistance to macrolides in the species Streptococcus pyogenes in the Czech Republic in 1996-2003].

    PubMed

    Urbásková, P; Jakubů, V

    2004-11-01

    The study of the prevalence of erythromycin resistance in 22 169 S. pyogenes strains in the Czech Republic in 1996-2003 on the background of rough data on the nationwide consumption of macrolide antibiotics confirmed that the exponential growth of resistance observed in 1998-2001 copied with a delay the rise in macrolide antibiotic consumption recorded in 1992-1995. The highest frequency of erythromycin resistance was found in 2001 (16.5%) with a subsequent decrease to 14.5% in 2002 and to 9.1% in 2003. The drop in resistance followed the stagnation in macrolide consumption and its decrease by 17% in 2002. Upward and downward trends in macrolide resistance in different regions and age groups copied the nationwide trends with some quantitative differences that could not be analyzed in view of the lack of detailed data on antibiotic consumption. A 99.5% concordance was found between the results of the phenotypic method and those of detection of genes coding for constitutive, inducible and efflux resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB (MLSB) antibiotics. In 2001 when the highest erythromycin resistance was recorded in the Czech Republic, most of the tested strains (91.2%) showed resistance to all MLSB antibiotics, with macrolide efflux (susceptibility to lincosamides and 16-membered macrolides was conserved) being implicated in resistance of 8.8% of the strains only. In 2003, the number of erythromycin resistant strains decreased and the resistance mechanism was ascribed to macrolide efflux in 26.8% of them. Almost all of the strains with constitutive or induced MLSB resistance are also resistant to either tetracycline or bacitracin or both. In the light of S. pyogenes resistance to bacitracin, the bacitracin disk is not usable in preliminary identification any more.

  2. Analysis of macrolide antibiotics, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, in food, biological and environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Macrolides are a group of antibiotics that have been widely used in human medical and veterinary practices. Analysis of macrolides and related compounds in food, biological, and environmental matrices continue to be the focus of scientists for the reasons of food safety, pharmacokinetic studies, and environmental concerns. This article presents an overview on the primary biological properties of macrolides and their associated analytical issues, including extraction, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), method validation, and measurement uncertainty. The main techniques that have been used to extract macrolides from various matrices are solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Conventional liquid chromatography (LC) with C18 columns plays a dominant role for the determination of macrolides, whereas ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) along with sub-2 microm particle C18 columns reduces run time and improves sensitivity. Mass spectrometry (MS), serving as a universal detection technique, has replaced ultraviolet (UV), fluorometric, and electrochemical detection for multi-macrolide analysis. The triple-quadrupole (QqQ), quadrupole ion trap (QIT), triple-quadrupole linear ion trap, time-of-flight (TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometers are current choices for the determination of macrolides, including quantification, confirmation, identification of their degradation products or metabolites, and structural elucidation. LC or UPLC coupled to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode (LC/MS/MS) is the first choice for quantification. UPLC-TOF or UPLC-QqTOF has been recognized as an emerging technique for accurate mass measurement and unequivocal identification of macrolides and their related compounds.

  3. Nationwide Surveillance of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Mika; Akaike, Hiroto; Kato, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Yoko; Saito, Aki; Kondo, Eisuke; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Ogita, Satoko; Tanaka, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Kozo; Nakano, Takashi; Terada, Kihei; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    We conducted nationwide surveillance to investigate regional differences in macrolide-resistant (MR) Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains in Japan. The prevalence of MR M. pneumoniae in pediatric patients gradually increased between 2008 and 2012. Although regional differences were observed, high levels of MR genes were detected in all seven surveillance areas throughout Japan and ranged in prevalence from 50% to 93%. These regional differences were closely related to the previous administration of macrolides. PMID:23716043

  4. Suppressive activity of macrolide antibiotics on nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide stimulation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Hajime; Asano, Kazuhito; Kanai, Ken-ichi; Kyo, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, So; Hisamitsu, Tadashi; Suzaki, Harumi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-dose and long-term administration of macrolide antibiotics into patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases could favorably modify their clinical conditions. However, the therapeutic mode of action of macrolides is not well understood. Free oxygen radicals, including nitric oxide (NO), are well recognized as the important final effector molecules in the development and the maintenance of inflammatory diseases. PURPOSE: The influence of macrolide antibiotics on NO generation was examined in vivo. METHODS: Male ICR mice, 5 weeks of age, were orally administered with either roxithromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin or josamycin once a day for 2-4 weeks. The mice were then injected intraperitoneally with 5.0 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the plasma NO level was examined 6 h later. RESULTS: Although pre-treatment of mice with macrolide antibiotics for 2 weeks scarcely affected NO generation by LPS injection, the administration of macrolide antibiotics, except for josamycin, for 4 weeks significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO generation. The data in the present study also showed that pre-treatment of mice with macrolide antibiotics for 4 weeks significantly suppresses not only production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but also inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expressions, which are enhanced by LPS injection. CONCLUSION: These results strongly suggest that suppressive activity of macrolide antibiotics on NO generation in response to LPS stimulation in vivo may, in part, account for the clinical efficacy of macrolides on chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:14514469

  5. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of Pig Respiratory Bacterial Pathogens with Elevated Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for Macrolides.

    PubMed

    Dayao, Denise Ann Estarez; Seddon, Jennifer M; Gibson, Justine S; Blackall, Patrick J; Turni, Conny

    2016-10-01

    Macrolides are often used to treat and control bacterial pathogens causing respiratory disease in pigs. This study analyzed the whole genome sequences of one clinical isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella multocida, and Bordetella bronchiseptica, all isolated from Australian pigs to identify the mechanism underlying the elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for erythromycin, tilmicosin, or tulathromycin. The H. parasuis assembled genome had a nucleotide transition at position 2059 (A to G) in the six copies of the 23S rRNA gene. This mutation has previously been associated with macrolide resistance but this is the first reported mechanism associated with elevated macrolide MICs in H. parasuis. There was no known macrolide resistance mechanism identified in the other three bacterial genomes. However, strA and sul2, aminoglycoside and sulfonamide resistance genes, respectively, were detected in one contiguous sequence (contig 1) of A. pleuropneumoniae assembled genome. This contig was identical to plasmids previously identified in Pasteurellaceae. This study has provided one possible explanation of elevated MICs to macrolides in H. parasuis. Further studies are necessary to clarify the mechanism causing the unexplained macrolide resistance in other Australian pig respiratory pathogens including the role of efflux systems, which were detected in all analyzed genomes.

  6. Characterization of a glycosyl transferase inactivating macrolides, encoded by gimA from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Gourmelen, A; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Pernodet, J L

    1998-10-01

    In Streptomyces ambofaciens, the producer of the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin, an open reading frame (ORF) was found downstream of srmA, a gene conferring resistance to spiramycin. The deduced product of this ORF had high degrees of similarity to Streptomyces lividans glycosyl transferase, which inactivates macrolides, and this ORF was called gimA. The cloned gimA gene was expressed in a susceptible host mutant of S. lividans devoid of any background macrolide-inactivating glycosyl transferase activity. In the presence of UDP-glucose, cell extracts from this strain could inactivate various macrolides by glycosylation. Spiramycin was not inactivated but forocidin, a spiramycin precursor, was modified. In vivo studies showed that gimA could confer low levels of resistance to some macrolides. The spectrum of this resistance differs from the one conferred by a rRNA monomethylase, such as SrmA. In S. ambofaciens, gimA was inactivated by gene replacement, without any deleterious effect on the survival of the strain, even under spiramycin-producing conditions. But the overexpression of gimA led to a marked decrease in spiramycin production. Studies with extracts from wild-type and gimA-null mutant strains revealed the existence of another macrolide-inactivating glycosyl transferase activity with a different substrate specificity. This activity might compensate for the effect of gimA inactivation.

  7. Characterization of a Glycosyl Transferase Inactivating Macrolides, Encoded by gimA from Streptomyces ambofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Gourmelen, Anne; Blondelet-Rouault, Marie-Hélène; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    In Streptomyces ambofaciens, the producer of the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin, an open reading frame (ORF) was found downstream of srmA, a gene conferring resistance to spiramycin. The deduced product of this ORF had high degrees of similarity to Streptomyces lividans glycosyl transferase, which inactivates macrolides, and this ORF was called gimA. The cloned gimA gene was expressed in a susceptible host mutant of S. lividans devoid of any background macrolide-inactivating glycosyl transferase activity. In the presence of UDP-glucose, cell extracts from this strain could inactivate various macrolides by glycosylation. Spiramycin was not inactivated but forocidin, a spiramycin precursor, was modified. In vivo studies showed that gimA could confer low levels of resistance to some macrolides. The spectrum of this resistance differs from the one conferred by a rRNA monomethylase, such as SrmA. In S. ambofaciens, gimA was inactivated by gene replacement, without any deleterious effect on the survival of the strain, even under spiramycin-producing conditions. But the overexpression of gimA led to a marked decrease in spiramycin production. Studies with extracts from wild-type and gimA-null mutant strains revealed the existence of another macrolide-inactivating glycosyl transferase activity with a different substrate specificity. This activity might compensate for the effect of gimA inactivation. PMID:9756764

  8. Clinical Characteristics, Treatment Outcomes, and Resistance Mutations Associated with Macrolide-Resistant Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong Mi; Park, Hye Yun; Kim, Su-Young; Jhun, Byung Woo; Lee, Hyun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Dae Hun; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Shin, Sung Jae; Daley, Charles L; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-11-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are key components of the multidrug treatment regimen for treating lung disease (LD) due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Despite the emergence of macrolide resistance, limited data are available on macrolide-resistant MAC-LD. This study evaluated the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with macrolide-resistant MAC-LD and the molecular characteristics of the macrolide-resistant isolates. A retrospective review of the medical records of 34 patients with macrolide-resistant MAC-LD who were diagnosed between January 2002 and December 2014 was performed, along with genetic analysis of 28 clinical isolates. Nineteen (56%) patients had the fibrocavitary form of MAC-LD, and 15 (44%) had the nodular bronchiectatic form. M. intracellulare was the etiologic organism in 21 (62%) patients. Approximately two-thirds (22/34 [65%]) of the patients had been treated with currently recommended multidrug regimens that included macrolide, ethambutol, and rifamycin prior to the emergence of macrolide resistance, and none had been treated with macrolide monotherapy. The median duration of treatment after the detection of macrolide resistance was 23.0 months (interquartile range, 16.8 to 45.3 months). Treatment outcomes were poor after the development of macrolide resistance, with favorable treatment outcomes achieved in only five (15%) patients, including two patients who underwent surgical resection. One-, 3-, and 5-year mortality rates were 9, 24, and 47%, respectively. Molecular analysis of 28 clinical isolates revealed that 96% (27/28) had point mutations at position 2058 or 2059 of the 23S rRNA gene. Our analyses indicate that more effective therapy is needed to treat macrolide-resistant MAC-LD and prevent its development.

  9. Clinical outcomes and macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in Scotland, UK.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Graeme D; Gadsby, Naomi J; Henderson, Sarah S; Hardie, Alison; Kalima, Pota; Morris, Andrew Conway; Hill, Adam T; Cunningham, Steve; Templeton, Kate E

    2013-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae has a cyclical, epidemic pattern of infection and the most recent epidemic occurred in Europe in 2011. Macrolides are recommended for the treatment of M. pneumoniae respiratory tract infection, but macrolide resistance has been reported at low levels in Europe. The aim of the study was to examine the clinical impact of the recent M. pneumoniae epidemic in a hospital setting in Scotland and to determine whether macrolide-resistant strains are present. Data were analysed retrospectively for 307 patients with M. pneumoniae respiratory infection diagnosed in 2010 and 2011 in Edinburgh, UK. Genotypic macrolide resistance testing was also carried out in 32 patients in whom resistance was considered most likely, based on their clinical picture. We found that 175 patients (59 %) were admitted to hospital, 20 (7 %) were admitted to critical care and 97 (38 %) required oxygen. All 48 adult patients (100 %) were admitted to hospital, compared with 127 children (51 %). Adults were also more likely to require oxygen [odds ratio (OR) 4.964, P<0.001, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.129-11.803] and to be admitted to critical care (OR 4.909, P = 0.001, 95 % CI 1.735-13.829), compared with children. Macrolide resistance conferred by the 23S rRNA gene mutation was found in samples from 6 out of 32 patients (19 %) in the subset tested. The results suggest that the recent M. pneumoniae epidemic was associated with a significant burden of hospital admission locally. The study also describes the first case series of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in the UK, indicating that macrolide resistance surveillance is warranted in preparation for the next epidemic.

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of high-level macrolide resistance in clinical isolates of Moraxella nonliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Shotaro; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Kazama, Tomoya; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Ida, Yoko; Koyano, Saho; Sonobe, Kazunari; Okamura, Noboru; Saito, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    We investigated antimicrobial susceptibility and the molecular mechanism involved in conferring high-level macrolide resistance in 47 clinical isolates of Moraxella nonliquefaciens from Japan. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using Etest and agar dilution methods. Thirty-two erythromycin-non-susceptible strains were evaluated for the possibility of clonal spreading, using PFGE. To analyse the mechanism related to macrolide resistance, mutations in the 23S rRNA gene and the ribosomal proteins, and the presence of methylase genes were investigated by PCR and sequencing. The efflux system was examined using appropriate inhibitors. Penicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefixime, levofloxacin and antimicrobials containing β-lactamase inhibitors showed strong activity against 47 M. nonliquefaciens isolates. Thirty-two (68.1 %) of the 47 isolates showed high-level MICs to macrolides (MIC ≥128 mg l(-1)) and shared the A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. The geometric mean MIC to macrolides of A2058T-mutated strains was significantly higher than that of WT strains (P<0.0001). Thirty-two isolates with high-level macrolide MICs clustered into 30 patterns on the basis of the PFGE dendrogram, indicating that the macrolide-resistant strains were not clonal. In contrast, no common mutations of the ribosomal proteins or methylase genes, or overproduction of the efflux system were observed in A2058T-mutated strains. Moreover, of the 47 M. nonliquefaciens strains, 43 (91.5 %) were bro-1 and 4 (8.5 %) were bro-2 positive. Our results suggest that most M. nonliquefaciens clinical isolates show high-level macrolide resistance conferred by the A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. This study represents the first characterization of M. nonliquefaciens.

  11. Inhibitory effects of the macrolide antimicrobial tylosin on anaerobic treatment.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Toshio; Zilles, Julie L; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-09-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was operated using a glucose-based synthetic wastewater to study the effects of tylosin, a macrolide antimicrobial commonly used in swine production, on treatment performance. The experimental period was divided into three consecutive phases with different influent tylosin concentrations (0, 1.67, and 167 mg/L). The addition of 1.67 mg/L tylosin to the reactor had negligible effects on the overall treatment performance, that is, total methane production and effluent chemical oxygen demand did not change significantly (P < 0.05), yet analyses of individual ASBR cycles revealed a decrease in the rates of both methane production and propionate uptake after tylosin was added. The addition of 167 mg/L tylosin to the reactor resulted in a gradual decrease in methane production and the accumulation of propionate and acetate. Subsequent inhibition of methanogenesis was attributed to a decrease in the pH of the reactor. After the addition of 167 mg/L tylosin to the reactor, an initial decrease in the rate of glucose uptake during the ASBR cycle followed by a gradual recovery was observed. In batch tests, the specific biogas production with the substrate butyrate was completely inhibited in the presence of tylosin. This study indicated that tylosin inhibited propionate- and butyrate-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria and fermenting bacteria resulting in unfavorable effects on methanogenesis.

  12. Macrolides and lincosamides in cattle and pigs: use and development of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Pyörälä, Satu; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Greko, Christina; Moreno, Miguel A; Pomba, M Constança Matias Ferreira; Rantala, Merja; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Threlfall, E John; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Törneke, Karolina

    2014-05-01

    Macrolides and lincosamides are important antibacterials for the treatment of many common infections in cattle and pigs. Products for in-feed medication with these compounds in combination with other antimicrobials are commonly used in Europe. Most recently approved injectable macrolides have very long elimination half-lives in both pigs and cattle, which allows once-only dosing regimens. Both in-feed medication and use of long-acting injections result in low concentrations of the active substance for prolonged periods, which causes concerns related to development of antimicrobial resistance. Acquired resistance to macrolides and lincosamides among food animal pathogens, including some zoonotic bacteria, has now emerged. A comparison of studies on the prevalence of resistance is difficult, since for many micro-organisms no agreed standards for susceptibility testing are available. With animal pathogens, the most dramatic increase in resistance has been seen in the genus Brachyspira. Resistance towards macrolides and lincosamides has also been detected in staphylococci isolated from pigs and streptococci from cattle. This article reviews the use of macrolides and lincosamides in cattle and pigs, as well as the development of resistance in target and some zoonotic pathogens. The focus of the review is on European conditions.

  13. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C M; Honscha, M; Truong, N D; Holland, R; Hövener, B; Bryskier, A; Lütticken, R; Reinert, R R

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide-resistance was assessed in 216 consecutive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany. Seventeen isolates were resistant to erythromycin: 12 isolates revealed a macrolide (M) phenotype and harbored mefA, and five strains expressed an inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype of which four strains harbored ermA(TR) and one strain contained ermB(AM). Telithromycin (HMR 3647) and quinupristin/dalfopristin remained active particularly against the ermA(TR)-containing S. pyogenes isolates studied. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis identified multiple clones among erythromycin-resistant strains, but did not discriminate beyond the emm-type. mefA was present in three isolates either with emm2, emm12, or emm75, and in nine isolates with emm4. All four strains with ermA(TR) contained emm77, and the single strain with ermB(AM) harbored emm1. Despite the relative low rate of macrolide-resistance, these data suggest that at least three different macrolide-resistance determinants are prevalent in Germany and that mefA has spread rapidly into multiple clones of S. pyogenes.

  14. Valosin containing protein (VCP) interacts with macrolide antibiotics without mediating their anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Nujić, Krunoslav; Smith, Marjorie; Lee, Michael; Belamarić, Daniela; Tomašković, Linda; Alihodžić, Sulejman; Malnar, Ivica; Polančec, Denis; Schneider, Klaus; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-02-29

    In addition to antibacterial activity, some macrolide antibiotics, such as azithromycin and clarithromycin, also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo, although the targets and mechanism(s) of action remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to identify protein targets of azithromycin and clarithromycin which could potentially explain their anti-inflammatory effects. Using chemical proteomics approach, based on compound-immobilized affinity chromatography, valosin containing protein (VCP) was identified as a potential target of the macrolides. Validation studies confirmed the interaction of macrolides and VCP and gave some structural characteristics of this interaction. Cell based assays however, including the use of gene silencing and the study of VCP specific cellular functions in J774.A1 (murine macrophage) and IB3-1 (human cystic fibrotic epithelial) cell lines, failed to confirm an association between the binding of the macrolides to VCP and anti-inflammatory effects. These findings suggest the absence of an abundant high affinity protein target and the potential involvement of other biological molecules in the anti-inflammatory activity of macrolides.

  15. Update on the combination effect of macrolide antibiotics in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Emmet O'Brien, M; Restrepo, Marcos I; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of death from an infectious cause worldwide. Guideline-concordant antibiotic therapy initiated in a timely manner is associated with improved treatment responses and patient outcomes. In the post-antibiotic era, much of the morbidity and mortality of CAP is as a result of the interaction between bacterial virulence factors and host immune responses. In patients with severe CAP, or who are critically ill, there is a lot of emerging observational evidence demonstrating improved survival rates when treatment using combination therapy with a β-lactam and a macrolide is initiated, as compared to other antibiotic regimes without a macrolide. Macrolides in combination with a β-lactam antibiotic provide broader coverage for the atypical organisms implicated in CAP, and may contribute to antibacterial synergism. However, it has been postulated that the documented immunomodulatory effects of macrolides are the primary mechanism for improved patient outcomes through attenuation of bacterial virulence factors and host systemic inflammatory responses. Despite concerns regarding the limitations of observational evidence and the lack of confirmatory randomized controlled trials, the potential magnitude of mortality benefits estimated at 20-50% cannot be overlooked. In light of recent data from a number of trials showing that combination treatment with a macrolide and a suitable second agent is justified in all patients with severe CAP, such treatment should be obligatory for those admitted to an intensive care setting.

  16. [Nonantibiotic properties of macrolides and their role in modulation of the inflammatory reaction].

    PubMed

    Zupanets, I A; Tkachenko, E M; Sakharova, T S

    2012-01-01

    Macrolides is one of the most interesting and promising classes of antibiotics, which occupy one of the first places in the world in the frequency of clinical use. In recent years, new facts have reported about specific features of the mechanism of action and pharmacodynamics of macrolides, in particular, with respect to their anti-inflammatory effect. Unfortunately, many therapists and pharmacists are not familiar with recent advanced in the clinical and pharmacological evidence concerning extra-antibiotic properties characteristic of some macrolides. Macrolides increase defensive mechanisms of the body against infection at the first stage of their action and suppress inflammation at the next stages, which leads to faster resolution of a disease. The immunomodulating properties of macrolides are also discussed and require further investigation. Good prospects are related with combined therapy, in which antibiotics are used jointly with drugs potentiating their extra-antibiotic effect and overwhelming negative effects on the body. This approach will significantly improve the efficiency of therapy, reduce the risk of side effects, and reduce the cost of treatment.

  17. Molecular insights into 14-membered macrolides using the MM-PBSA method.

    PubMed

    Yam, Wai Keat; Wahab, Habibah A

    2009-06-01

    Erythromycin A and roxithromycin are clinically important macrolide antibiotics that selectively act on the bacterial 50S large ribosomal subunit to inhibit bacteria's protein elongation process by blocking the exit tunnel for the nascent peptide away from ribosome. The detailed molecular mechanism of macrolide binding is yet to be elucidated as it is currently known to the most general idea only. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was employed to study their interaction at the molecular level, and the binding free energies for both systems were calculated using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energies for both systems were slightly overestimated compared to the experimental values, but individual energy terms enabled better understanding in the binding for both systems. Decomposition of results into residue basis was able to show the contribution of each residue at the binding pocket toward the binding affinity of macrolides and hence identified several key interacting residues that were in agreement with previous experimental and computational data. Results also indicated the contributions from van der Waals are more important and significant than electrostatic contribution in the binding of macrolides to the binding pocket. The findings from this study are expected to contribute to the understanding of a detailed mechanism of action in a quantitative matter and thus assisting in the development of a safer macrolide antibiotic.

  18. Anti-Cytotoxic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Macrolide Antibiotic Roxithromycin in Sulfur Mustard-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    macrolide antibiotics may serve as potential vesicant respiratory therapeutics through mechanisms independent of their antibacterial activity. 1...macrophages. The subcellular mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of macrolides remains unknown. However, it is well known that the expression...effects of macrolides on NF-κB activation. However, it is now held that the molecular mechanism (s) by which macrolides inhibit pro- inflammatory

  19. Macrolide resistance in microorganisms at antimicrobial-free Swine farms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Raskin, Lutgarde; Zilles, Julie L

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between agricultural antimicrobial use and resistance, a variety of methods for quantification of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance were applied to organic swine farm manure samples. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to indirectly quantify the specific rRNA methylation resulting in MLS(B) resistance. Using this method, an unexpectedly high prevalence of ribosomal methylation and, hence, predicted MLS(B) resistance was observed in manure samples from two swine finisher farms that reported no antimicrobial use (37.6% +/- 6.3% and 40.5% +/- 5.4%, respectively). A culture-based method targeting relatively abundant clostridia showed a lower but still unexpectedly high prevalence of resistance at both farms (27.7% +/- 11.3% and 11.7% +/- 8.6%, respectively), while the prevalence of resistance in cultured fecal streptococci was low at both farms (4.0%). These differences in the prevalence of resistance across microorganisms suggest the need for caution when extrapolating from data obtained with indicator organisms. A third antimicrobial-free swine farm, a breeder-to-finisher operation, had low levels of MLS(B) resistance in manure samples with all methods used (<9%). Tetracycline antimicrobials were detected in manure samples from one of the finisher farms and may provide a partial explanation for the high level of MLS(B) resistance. Taken together, these findings highlight the need for a more fundamental understanding of the relationship between antimicrobial use and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance.

  20. Moraxella catarrhalis Macrolide-Resistant Isolates Are Highly Concentrated in Two MLST Clonal Complexes -CCN10 and CC363.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xu, He-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Sha; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    To gain some insights into the molecular evolution of Moraxella catarrhalis macrolide resistance, PCR and sequencing analysis of the 23S rRNA gene, copB typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed on 181 M. catarrhalis isolates. The isolates were obtained from children (n = 47) and adults (n = 134) presenting with respiratory disease in the years 2010-2014. Macrolide resistance was highly age-related, and nucleotide position alterations at A2330T could be detected in all macrolide-resistant isolates. copB 0 and copB NT (non-typable) were only found in macrolide-susceptible isolates from adults. Furthermore, copB I/III was the main type in adult or macrolide-susceptible isolates, while copB II was the most common type in children or macrolide-resistant isolates. Twenty-two different MLST clusters (sharing 7 of the 8 identical loci) were detected and only four likely primary founders (ST224, ST363, STN08, and STN10) which belong to clonal complex (CC) 224, CC363, CCN08, and CCN10, were detected, respectively. Macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates were highly concentrated in two CCs (CCN10 and CC363), which indicates some potential evolutionary advantage or co-evolution to some extent. However, further studies are needed to fully elucidate the evolution of CCN10 and CC363 in macrolide resistance.

  1. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Klima, Cassidy L.; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  2. Moraxella catarrhalis Macrolide-Resistant Isolates Are Highly Concentrated in Two MLST Clonal Complexes -CCN10 and CC363

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Li; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xu, He-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Sha; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    To gain some insights into the molecular evolution of Moraxella catarrhalis macrolide resistance, PCR and sequencing analysis of the 23S rRNA gene, copB typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed on 181 M. catarrhalis isolates. The isolates were obtained from children (n = 47) and adults (n = 134) presenting with respiratory disease in the years 2010–2014. Macrolide resistance was highly age-related, and nucleotide position alterations at A2330T could be detected in all macrolide-resistant isolates. copB 0 and copB NT (non-typable) were only found in macrolide-susceptible isolates from adults. Furthermore, copB I/III was the main type in adult or macrolide-susceptible isolates, while copB II was the most common type in children or macrolide-resistant isolates. Twenty-two different MLST clusters (sharing 7 of the 8 identical loci) were detected and only four likely primary founders (ST224, ST363, STN08, and STN10) which belong to clonal complex (CC) 224, CC363, CCN08, and CCN10, were detected, respectively. Macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates were highly concentrated in two CCs (CCN10 and CC363), which indicates some potential evolutionary advantage or co-evolution to some extent. However, further studies are needed to fully elucidate the evolution of CCN10 and CC363 in macrolide resistance. PMID:28239374

  3. Research on the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in children by macrolide antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xu-qiang; Deng, Li; Lu, Gen; He, Chun-hui; Wu, Pei-qiong; Xie, Zhi-wei; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    To observe a therapeutic effect of macrolide antibiotics in children with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Fifty-four cases of children with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia were randomly divided into an observation group (n=30) and a control group (n=24). The observation group was treated with macrolide antibiotics and cefoperazone/sulbactam. The control group was treated with cefoperazone/sulbactam during a course of 10–14 days. The total effective rate was 93.3% in the observation group, and 58.3% in the control group, and results in the observation group were superior to the control group notably (P>0.05). There were no significant differences in bacterial clearance rate, adverse reaction rate between two groups (P>0.05). The combined application of cefoperazone/sulbactam with macrolide antibiotics to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in children would be a more effective clinical method. PMID:28352740

  4. [Levofloxacin and macrolides in chronic bronchitis exacerbation: comparative analysis of the treatment efficacy and nonrelapsing periods].

    PubMed

    Dvoretskiĭ, L I; Dubrovskaia, N V; Grudinina, S A; Filimonova, O Iu; Sidorenko, S V; Iakovlev, S V

    2007-01-01

    Clinical and bacteriological efficacies of levofloxacin versus clarithromycin and azithromycin were evaluated in 41 patients with chronic bronchitis infectious exacerbation in the Respiratory-Recovery Centre of Polyclinic No. 7. The effect of the drugs on the nonrelapsing period was estimated as well. With the use of levofloxacin there was observed a more rapid elimination of the clinical signs of the exacerbation as compared to the use of the macrolides. Levofloxacin provided a more pronounced and stable eradication of the main pathogens of the exacerbation as compared to the macrolide antibiotic. Long-term monitoring for 12 months after discontinuation of the treatment showed that the nonrelapsing period in the patients treated with levofloxacin was higher and the frequency of the relapses and their intensity were lower in comparison to the group of the patients treated with the macrolides.

  5. Predominant role of msr(D) over mef(A) in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Isaka, Masanori; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is reported to be increasing. mef(A) gene-positive macrolide-resistant emm1 strains are thought to possibly contribute to the rise in the frequency of STSS. Although analyses of macrolide-resistant mechanisms, including mef(A) resistance, have been performed mainly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the role of this gene in Streptococcus pyogenes has not been completely investigated. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, we established the first mef(A)-knockout strain using an emm1-type S. pyogenes strain, and tested its susceptibility to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities were almost identical to those of the parental strain. Hence, we established a knockout strain for another gene, msr(D), that is located immediately downstream of mef(A). The macrolide resistances of the resulting strain significantly decreased, and were further altered when both mef(A) and msr(D) were knocked out. The introduction of the msr(D) gene into a macrolide-sensitive strain conferred more resistance than the introduction of the mef(A) gene. The erythromycin susceptibilities of knockout strains were further dissected using two additional emm4- and emm75-type S. pyogenes strains. We found almost identical results for both strains except for the mef(A) knockout emm4 type, whose susceptibility was altered, although the change was less than that for the msr(D) knockout. These results suggest that both mef(A) and msr(D) are involved in macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes, and that the msr(D) gene plays a more predominant role in macrolide resistance than mef(A).

  6. Regulatory effects of macrolides on bacterial virulence: potential role as quorum-sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tateda, Kazuhiro; Standiford, Theodore J; Pechere, Jean Claude; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, and this organism is a major cause of pulmonary damage and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) and other forms of bronchiectasis. A break-through in the treatment of DPB and associated chronic P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection was realized when a patient with DPB improved dramatically after treatment with erythromycin for years. Now, long-term macrolide therapy has become a first line of treatment in DPB patients, and the immunomodulatory properties have now been extended to other clinical settings, including CF. An important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic P. aeruginosa infection is a bacterial cell-to-cell signaling mechanism, referred to as "quorum sensing", which enables bacteria to coordinately turn on and off specific virulence genes through the production of autoinducer molecules. Interference or blocking of quorum-sensing systems has been considered an attractive therapeutic strategy. Clinical and basic science data suggests the potential of macrolides as relevant inhibitors of the Pseudomonas quorum-sensing system. In fact, certain macrolides strongly suppressed quorum-sensing associated genes and autoinducer production, in addition to inhibition of a variety of virulence factors. In this review, clinical efficacy of macrolides on DPB and CF patients will be briefly summarized. Additionally, the mechanisms of action of macrolides will be discussed from the standpoint of sub-MIC macrolide effects on P. aeruginosa, particularly the ability of this antibiotic to suppress quorum-sensing systems, which may be crucial in the pathogenesis of chronic P. aeruginosa infection.

  7. Characterization of In Vivo acquired resistance of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to macrolides and lincosamides.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; Minion, F Chris; Peeters, Johan; De Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2005-01-01

    Macrolides and related antibiotics are used to control mycoplasma infections in the pig industry worldwide. Some porcine mycoplasmas, however, survive these treatments by acquiring resistance. The mechanism of acquired resistance to macrolides and lincosamides was studied in more detail for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by comparing both the phenotype and genotype of a resistant field isolate to five susceptible isolates. The MICs were significantly higher for the resistant strain for all antibiotics tested. The MICs for the 16-membered macrolide tylosin ranged from 8 to 16 microg for the resistant strain and from 0.03 to 0.125 microg/ml for the five susceptible strains. The MICs for the 15-membered macrolides and lincosamides were higher than 64 microg/ml for the resistant strain while only 0.06 to 0.5 microg/ml for the susceptible strains. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains are intrinsically resistant to the 14-membered macrolides due to a G 2057 A transition (E. coli numbering) in their 23S rDNA. Therefore, high MICs were observed for all strains, although the MICs for the resistant strain were clearly increased. An additional, acquired A 2058 G point mutation was found in the 23S rRNA gene of the resistant strain. No differences linked to resistance were found in the ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. The present study showed that 23S rRNA mutations resulting in resistance to macrolides and lincosamides as described in other Mycoplasma spp. also occur under field conditions in M. hyopneumoniae.

  8. Molecular Basis of Intrinsic Macrolide Resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Dorson, Olivier; Gondran, Anne; Ghnassia, Jean-Claude; Weiser, Jaroslav; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) to most antibiotics, including macrolides, is generally attributed to the low permeability of the mycobacterial cell wall. However, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are much more sensitive to macrolides than members of the MTC. A search for macrolide resistance determinants within the genome of M. tuberculosis revealed the presence of a sequence encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase. The deduced protein is similar to Erm methyltransferases, which confer macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance by methylation of 23S rRNA, and was named ErmMT. The corresponding gene, ermMT (erm37), is present in all members of the MTC but is absent in NTM species. Part of ermMT is deleted in some vaccine strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, such as the Pasteur strain, which lack the RD2 region. The Pasteur strain was susceptible to MLS antibiotics, whereas MTC species harboring the RD2 region were resistant to them. The expression of ermMT in the macrolide-sensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG Pasteur conferred MLS resistance. The resistance patterns and ribosomal affinity for erythromycin of Mycobacterium host strains expressing ermMT, srmA (monomethyltransferase from Streptomyces ambofaciens), and ermE (dimethyltransferase from Saccharopolyspora erythraea) were compared, and the ones conferred by ErmMT were similar to those conferred by SrmA, corresponding to the MLS type I phenotype. These results suggest that ermMT plays a major role in the intrinsic macrolide resistance of members of the MTC and could be the first example of a gene conferring resistance by target modification in mycobacteria. PMID:14693532

  9. Molecular basis of intrinsic macrolide resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Dorson, Olivier; Gondran, Anne; Ghnassia, Jean-Claude; Weiser, Jaroslav; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) to most antibiotics, including macrolides, is generally attributed to the low permeability of the mycobacterial cell wall. However, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are much more sensitive to macrolides than members of the MTC. A search for macrolide resistance determinants within the genome of M. tuberculosis revealed the presence of a sequence encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase. The deduced protein is similar to Erm methyltransferases, which confer macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance by methylation of 23S rRNA, and was named ErmMT. The corresponding gene, ermMT (erm37), is present in all members of the MTC but is absent in NTM species. Part of ermMT is deleted in some vaccine strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, such as the Pasteur strain, which lack the RD2 region. The Pasteur strain was susceptible to MLS antibiotics, whereas MTC species harboring the RD2 region were resistant to them. The expression of ermMT in the macrolide-sensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG Pasteur conferred MLS resistance. The resistance patterns and ribosomal affinity for erythromycin of Mycobacterium host strains expressing ermMT, srmA (monomethyltransferase from Streptomyces ambofaciens), and ermE (dimethyltransferase from Saccharopolyspora erythraea) were compared, and the ones conferred by ErmMT were similar to those conferred by SrmA, corresponding to the MLS type I phenotype. These results suggest that ermMT plays a major role in the intrinsic macrolide resistance of members of the MTC and could be the first example of a gene conferring resistance by target modification in mycobacteria.

  10. Creation of Customized Bioactivity within a 14-Membered Macrolide Scaffold: Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation Using a Family-18 Chitinase.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akihiro; Maita, Nobuo; Gouda, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Hirose, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Saori; Saito, Yoshifumi; Nakano, Hayato; Kasai, Takako; Nakano, Hirofumi; Shiomi, Kazuro; Hirono, Shuichi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Omura, Satoshi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki

    2015-06-25

    Argifin, a 17-membered pentapeptide, inhibits chitinase. As argifin has properties that render it unsuitable as a drug development candidate, we devised a mechanism to create the structural component of argifin that bestows the chitinase inhibition and introduce it into a 14-membered macrolide scaffold. Here we describe (1) the designed macrolide, which exhibits ∼200-fold more potent chitinase inhibition than argifin, (2) the binding modes of the macrolide with Serratia marcescens chitinase B, and (3) the computed analysis explaining the reason for derivatives displaying increased inhibition compared to argifin, the macrolide aglycone displaying inhibition in a nanomolar range. This promises a class of chitinase inhibitors with novel skeletons, providing innovative insight for drug design and the use of macrolides as adaptable, flexible templates for use in drug discovery research and development.

  11. Macrolides and community-acquired pneumonia: is quorum sensing the key?

    PubMed

    Wise, Matt P; Williams, David W; Lewis, Michael A O; Frost, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Combination therapy with two antimicrobial agents is superior to monotherapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia, and recent data suggest that addition of a macrolide as the second antibiotic might be superior to other combinations. This observation requires confirmation in a randomised control trial, but this group of antibiotics have pleiotropic effects that extend beyond bacterial killing. Macrolides inhibit bacterial cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing, which not only might be an important mechanism of action for these drugs in severe infections but may also provide a novel target for the development of new anti-infective drugs.

  12. Discovery of the butenyl-spinosyn insecticides: novel macrolides from the new bacterial strain Saccharopolyspora pogona.

    PubMed

    Lewer, Paul; Hahn, Donald R; Karr, Laura L; Duebelbeis, Dennis O; Gilbert, Jeffrey R; Crouse, Gary D; Worden, Thomas; Sparks, Thomas C; Edwards, Pat McKamey Rex; Graupner, Paul R

    2009-06-15

    A new bacterium, Saccharopolyspora pogona (NRRL30141) was discovered which produced a series of very potent insecticidal compounds structurally related to the 'classical' (i.e., C-21-ethyl) spinosyns. A series of fermentations gave sufficient extract to allow the isolation and characterization of a total of 31 new metabolites. The majority of these compounds contained a but-1-enyl group at C-21 of the macrolide in place of the ethyl group in the 'classical' spinosyn series, corresponding to an additional acetate group incorporated during their biosynthesis. Additionally a variety of other new functionality was seen including hydroxylations, several novel forosamine sugar replacements, and a novel 14-membered macrolide ring analog.

  13. Differences between Macrolide-Resistant and -Susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes: Importance of Clonal Properties in Addition to Antibiotic Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Costa, C.; Friães, A.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2012-01-01

    A steady decline in macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) in Portugal was reported during 1999 to 2006. This was accompanied by alterations in the prevalence of macrolide resistance phenotypes and in the clonal composition of the population. In order to test whether changes in the macrolide-resistant population reflected the same changing patterns of the overall population, we characterized both macrolide-susceptible and -resistant GAS associated with a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis recovered in the period from 2000 to 2005 in Portugal. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling was the best predictor of emm type and the only typing method that could discriminate clones associated with macrolide resistance and susceptibility within each emm type. Six PFGE clusters were significantly associated with macrolide susceptibility: T3-emm3-ST406, T4-emm4-ST39, T1-emm1-ST28, T6-emm6-ST382, B3264-emm89-ST101/ST408, and T2-emm2-ST55. Four PFGE clusters were associated with macrolide resistance: T4-emm4-ST39, T28-emm28-ST52, T12-emm22-ST46, and T1-emm1-ST28. We found no evidence for frequent ongoing horizontal transfer of macrolide resistance determinants. The diversity of the macrolide-resistant population was lower than that of susceptible isolates. The differences found between the two populations suggest that the macrolide-resistant population of GAS has its own dynamics, independent of the behavior of the susceptible population. PMID:22908153

  14. Intensity of macrolide anti-inflammatory activity in J774A.1 cells positively correlates with cellular accumulation and phospholipidosis.

    PubMed

    Munić, Vesna; Banjanac, Mihailo; Koštrun, Sanja; Nujić, Krunoslav; Bosnar, Martina; Marjanović, Nikola; Ralić, Jovica; Matijašić, Mario; Hlevnjak, Mario; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    Some macrolide antibiotics were reported to inhibit interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE(2)) production by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated J774A.1 cells. Macrolides are also known to accumulate in cells and some were proven inducers of phospholipidosis. In the present study, with a set of 18 mainly 14- and 15-membered macrolides, we have investigated whether these macrolide induced phenomena in J774A.1 cells are connected. In LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells, the extent of inhibition of proinflammatory markers (IL6 and PGE(2)) by macrolides significantly correlated with their extent of accumulation in cells, as well as with the induction of phospholipidosis, and cytotoxic effects in prolonged culture (with correlation coefficients (R) ranging from 0.78 to 0.93). The effects observed were related to macrolide binding to phospholipids (CHI IAM), number of positively charged centres, and were inversely proportional to the number of hydrogen bond donors. Similar interdependence of effects was obtained with chloroquine and amiodarone, whereas for dexamethasone and indomethacin these effects were not linked. The observed macrolide induced phenomena in J774A.1 cells were reversible and elimination of the macrolides from the culture media prevented phospholipidosis and the development of cytotoxicity in long-term cultures. Based on comparison with known clinical data, we conclude that LPS-stimulated J774A.1 cells in presented experimental setup are not a representative cellular model for the evaluation of macrolide anti-inflammatory potential in clinical trials. Nevertheless, our study shows that, at least in in vitro models, binding to biological membranes may be the crucial factor of macrolide mechanism of action.

  15. Disruption of an Enterococcus faecium Species-Specific Gene, a Homologue of Acquired Macrolide Resistance Genes of Staphylococci, Is Associated with an Increase in Macrolide Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kavindra V.; Malathum, Kumthorn; Murray, Barbara E.

    2001-01-01

    The complete sequence (1,479 nucleotides) of msrC, part of which was recently reported by others using a different strain, was determined. This gene was found in 233 of 233 isolates of Enterococcus faecium but in none of 265 other enterococci. Disruption of msrC was associated with a two- to eightfold decrease in MICs of erythromycin azithromycin, tylosin, and quinupristin, suggesting that it may explain in part the apparent greater intrinsic resistance to macrolides of isolates of E. faecium relative to many streptococci. This endogenous, species-specific gene of E. faecium is 53% identical to msr(A), suggesting that it may be a remote progenitor of the acquired macrolide resistance gene found in some isolates of staphylococci. PMID:11120975

  16. [Comparison of the in vitro post-antibiotic effect of C14 macrolides (erythromycin and roxithromycin) and C16 macrolides (josamycin and spiramycin) against Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Rolin, O; Bouanchaud, D H

    1989-05-01

    In vitro post-antibiotic effect (PAE) induced by erythromycin, roxithromycin, josamycin and spiramycin has been compared on Staphylococcus aureus. Three MLSB sensitive and three MLSB inducible resistant S. aureus strains have been used. delta t was the time required for culture to increase by 1 log10 after drug removal in comparison with controls. For erythromycin and roxithromycin delta t ranged from 6 minutes at 1 x MIC to 48 minutes at 4 x MIC (average of the six strains at 4 x MIC: 33 minutes). For josamycin and spiramycin, delta t ranged from 36 at 1/2 x MIC to 138 minutes at 4 x MIC (average at 4 x MIC: 101 minutes). No difference was observed between MLSB sensitive and MLSB inducible resistant S. aureus strains. In our experimental conditions, PAEs observed with josamycin and spiramycin (16-membered-ring macrolides) were 2.5 to 3 times longer than those observed with erythromycin and roxithromycin (14-membered-ring macrolides). These results added to biological differences previously observed between 14-membered-ring and 16-membered-ring macrolides.

  17. Fate and Ecotoxicology of Veterinary Macrolide and Sulfonamide Antibiotics in Surface Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are carried from manured lands and production sites in runoff to surface waters. Our objectives were to assess the environmental fate and ecotoxicology of two macrolide antibiotics (tylosin and erythromycin) and sulfamethazine. Experiments were designed to simulate Midwestern farm pond c...

  18. [In vitro activity of roxithromycin, new semisynthetic macrolide against obligate anaerobes].

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, L; Devos, J; Romond, C; Bryskier, A

    1986-05-01

    The "in vitro" susceptibility to roxithromycin and three other macrolides of 236 anaerobes isolated from clinical samples in 1984/1985 was determined by an agar-dilution method on Wilkins Chalgren medium. 90% of Gram positive cocci were susceptible to both roxithromycin and josamycin (MIC less than 1 mg/l, whereas 1 mg/l erythromycin and 2 mg/l spiramycin were able to inhibit respectively 46 and 86% of the same tested strains. No resistance to the four macrolides was observed among Eubacterium, propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium. Two C. perfringens strains and one C. difficile strain were resistant to all four macrolides, while 97% of Clostridium sp. strains were inhibited by 4 mg/l erythromycin, josamycin or roxithromycin. Against Gram positive anaerobes, roxithromycin was equal or superior to erythromycin and spiramycin. At a concentration of 4 mg/l, roxithromycin inhibited 82% of B. fragilis strains. Roxithromycin and josamycin were more active against Gram negative bacilli that erythromycin and spiramycin. Macrolides had no effect on Fusobacterium strains. In this study, 4 mg/l roxithromycin inhibited 217 of the 236 anaerobic strains investigated (92%).

  19. [In vitro antibacterial activity of a new macrolide: miokamycin. Comparison with erythromycin and josamycin].

    PubMed

    Soussy, C J; Leclercq, R; Duval, J

    1988-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of miokamycin (M) were evaluated by agar dilution, comparatively with erythromycin (E) and josamycin (J) for 81 bacterial strains chosen as a function of susceptibility and resistance to Macrolides-Lincosamides-Streptogramins group (MLS). On Gram positive cocci, mode MIC of E, J, and M for strains sensitive to MLS were respectively (micrograms/ml): Staphylococci: 0.25; 1; 2-Streptococci and Pneumococci: 0.016; 0.03-0.12; 0.06-0.25-Enterococci: 0.5; 0.5-1; 1-2. Activity of the three antibiotics was similar against Staphylococci resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A, those resistant to streptogramins A and B, on Staphylococci and Streptococci only resistant to lincosamides by inactivation. M, as J, was active on coagulase negative (Staphylococci resistant to E by inactivation and on MLBB inducible Staphylococci; on these strains, M is a resistance non-inducible macrolide. Activity of E, J and M was reduced on MLSB inducible Streptococci. The three antibiotics were inactive on Staphylococci Streptococci and Enterococci MLSB resistant constitutive. On Haemophilus, E (2-8 micrograms/ml) was more active than J (2-16) and M (8-32). Thus, M, as J, was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance non-inducing type on MLSB inducible resistant Staphylococci; its activity was slightly inferior to that of J, but very similar to that of spiramycin, other macrolide of this group.

  20. Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS) resistance in cutaneous propionibacteria: definition of phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eady, E A; Ross, J I; Cove, J H; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1989-04-01

    Erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria isolated from the skin of antibiotic-treated acne patients were found to express four different patterns of resistance to a set of eight MLS antibiotics. The majority of isolates (48/89 strains) were constitutively resistant to 14- and 16-membered ring macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B-type antibiotics. MICs of josamycin (0.5-16 mg/l) and spiramycin (0.5-128 mg/l) were lower than those of erythromycin, oleandomycin and tylosin (64 to less than 512 mg/l). Two strains of Propionibacterium granulosum exhibited inducible MLS resistance. Both 14- and 16-membered ring macrolides and virginiamycin S induced clindamycin resistance in these strains. Fifteen isolates demonstrated a similar phenotype to the inducible strains but were non-inducible by erythromycin. A fourth group of strains demonstrated high level resistance to all five macrolides tested (MIC greater than or equal to 128 mg/l) but were sensitive to virginiamycin S. The phenotype displayed by these strains is not compatible with the expression of methylase genes as currently known, nor with the action of an erythromycin esterase which hydrolyses only 14-membered ring macrolides. The resistance patterns of 12 isolates could not be classified into any of the above phenotypic classes. Therefore, the majority of erythromycin resistant propionibacteria express MLS resistance which is phenotypically similar to that coded for by several well characterized RNA methylase (erm) genes.

  1. Macrolide and Tetracycline Resistance and emm Type Distribution of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Recovered from Turkish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sayan, Murat; Tamer, Gulden Sonmez

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the susceptibilities to macrolide and tetracycline antibiotics and emm type distribution of Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated in the Kocaeli University Hospital, Turkey. A total of 127 S. pyogenes clinical isolates were tested. Eleven (9%) isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and 23 (18%) isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Ten of the erythromycin-resistant isolates were also resistant to tetracycline. By the triple-disk test, all erythromycin-resistant isolates showed the inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin-C phenotype and harbored erm(TR) gene. tet(O) was the most common tetracycline resistance gene. Among erythromycin-tetracycline coresistant isolates, seven harbored the tet(O) gene. emm 4, emm 1, emm 2,114, and emm 89 were the most common emm types. These isolates were more susceptible to erythromycin. There was considerable emm type heterogeneity in macrolide or tetracycline resistant isolates. According to our knowledge, this is the first study in which emm type distribution is investigated in Turkey. More comprehensive studies are needed to obtain true information about the epidemiology of macrolide and tetracycline resistance and emm type distribution in Turkey. PMID:20624096

  2. Ribosomal Mutations in Arcanobacterium pyogenes Confer a Unique Spectrum of Macrolide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jost, B. Helen; Trinh, Hien T.; Songer, J. Glenn; Billington, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Four macrolide-resistant Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolates contained A2058T, A2058G, or C2611G (Escherichia coli numbering) mutations in their 23S rRNA genes. While these mutations conferred resistance to erythromycin, oleandomycin, and spiramycin, they did not confer resistance to tylosin. PMID:14982799

  3. Susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to macrolides and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Elharrif, Z; Mégraud, F; Marchand, A M

    1985-01-01

    The susceptibility of 105 thermophilic campylobacters from human and swine origins to eight macrolides and related compounds was tested. Erythromycin, josamycin, clindamycin, and ASE 136 BS (a new erythromycin derivative) were the most active against the human strains. The swine strains were highly resistant, except to pristinamycin. The human Campylobacter coli strains (except for two strains) behaved like the C. jejuni strains. PMID:4091531

  4. Utility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mikailov, Anar; Kane, Ilona; Aronoff, Stephen C; Luck, Raemma; DelVecchio, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate macrolides as an adjunct to an asthma controller regimen in children with asthma. Methods Prospective clinical trials of macrolide therapy in children with asthma using outcome measures of change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or oral corticosteroid requirement were searched for in PubMed up to December 2009. The reference lists of studies were also included in the analysis, as well as those listed in published meta-analyses. Results The literature search yielded 116 studies, six of which were included in this meta-analysis. The change in FEV1 from baseline with adjunctive use of macrolide therapy in all children was not significant (0.25% predicted; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.37, 0.86 predicted, P = 0.43); however, the change in FEV1 among children receiving daily oral corticosteroids was significant (3.89% predicted; 95% CI −0.01, 7.79, P = 0.05). Addition of macrolide therapy to the treatment of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma resulted in a statistically significant decrease in daily corticosteroid dosage (−3.45 mg/day; 95% CI −5.79, −1.09 mg/day, P = 0.004). This reduction in daily corticosteroid dosage was directly proportional to the duration of macrolide therapy (−0.17 mg methylprednisolone per week of macrolide therapy; 95% CI −0.33, −0.021, P = 0.025). Conclusion Addition of macrolides to the treatment regimen of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma improves FEV1 and decreases the daily dosage of corticosteroids required for control in these children. The degree of dose reduction is directly related to the duration of macrolide therapy. Additional large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive macrolide use in children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma are required to verify this observation. PMID:23345983

  5. Macrolide-lincosamide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Lu, Li-Ming; Ren, Gao-Wa Na; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-07-27

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide-lincosamide (ML) resistance in 72 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with clinical mastitis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ML antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution technique, inducible ML resistance phenotype by the D test, and ML resistance genes by PCR assay. The isolates showed a high level of resistance to erythromycin (93.1%), azithromycin (93.1%), spiramycin (41.7%), tylosin (40.3%), tilmicosin (27.8%), and clindamycin (36.1%). Macrolide-lincosamide MIC(90) values were > or = 128 mg/L. Inducible ML resistance (iML) phenotype was detected in 52.8% (38/72) of isolates. In erythromycin-resistant (ER-R) strains, methylase genes ermB and ermC, efflux gene msrA/msrB, and inactivating enzyme genes lnuA and mphC were present alone or in various combinations, with ermB and ermC genes predominating. This is the first report of ML resistance genes ermB, mrsA/mrsB and mphC in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. The occurrence of high levels of resistance to ML antibiotics among the S. aureus isolates, and the high rate of iML phenotype, indicate that appropriate alternative antibiotics should be prescribed for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. Furthermore, significant differences in the conformations of lactone rings of 16- and 14-membered macrolides could explain why some isolates with a constitutive ML resistance (cML) phenotype were sensitive to 16-membered macrolides alone. The different interaction of the 16-membered macrolides with the 50S ribosomal subunit is also presumably the reason why the susceptibility results of tilmcosin differed from those of tylosin and spiramycin.

  6. Correlation between macrolide lung pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Veber, B; Vallée, E; Desmonts, J M; Pocidalo, J J; Azoulay-Dupuis, E

    1993-09-01

    The correlation between the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, spiramycin and azithromycin and their efficacy was investigated in two pneumococcal pneumonia models. Female Swiss and C57B1/6 mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae strain P4241 by the intratracheal per oral route. This virulent strain produces acute pneumonia with death within 3-4 days (Swiss mice), or subacute pneumonia with death within 10 days (C57B1/6 mice) in untreated mice and the outcome of the disease is closely related to progressive weight loss. Swiss mice received three doses of each macrolide 50 mg/kg bd beginning 18 h post-infection. C57B1/6 mice received three doses of each macrolide 25 mg/kg, bd (except azithromycin was 12.5 mg/kg bd) beginning 48 h post-infection. Cure rates were evaluated on the basis of body weight variations recorded daily after the end of treatment. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in infected and non-infected mice after a single dose of each macrolide 50 mg/kg sc. The pharmacokinetics of azithromycin was also determined in leucopenic Swiss mice. We observed a hierarchy of in-vivo efficacy as follows: azithromycin > spiramycin = clarithromycin > roxithromycin = erythromycin which did not correlate with in-vitro MIC or MBC. The same hierarchy was found in terms of the lung T1/2. Lung T1/2s of macrolides could thus be predictive of their efficacy in respiratory tract infections. A reduced tissue AUC of azithromycin was seen in leucopenic mice suggesting leucocytes may help transport macrolides to sites of infection.

  7. Identification, synthesis and mass spectrometry of a macrolide from the African reed frog Hyperolius cinnamomeoventris

    PubMed Central

    Menke, Markus; Peram, Pardha Saradhi; Starnberger, Iris; Hödl, Walter; Jongsma, Gregory FM; Blackburn, David C; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Vences, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The contents of the gular glands of the male African reed frog Hyperolius cinnamomeoventris consist of a mixture of aliphatic macrolides and sesquiterpenes. While the known macrolide gephyromantolide A was readily identified, the structure of another major component was suggested to be a tetradecen-13-olide. The synthesis of the two candidate compounds (Z)-5- and (Z)-9-tetradecen-13-olide revealed the former to be the naturally occurring compound. The synthesis used ring-closing metathesis as key step. While the Hoveyda–Grubbs catalyst furnished a broad range of isomeric products, the (Z)-selective Grubbs catalyst lead to pure (Z)-products. Analysis by chiral GC revealed the natural frog compound to be (5Z,13S)-5-tetradecen-13-olide (1). This compound is also present in the secretion of other hyperoliid frogs as well as in femoral glands of male mantellid frogs such as Spinomantis aglavei. The mass spectra of the synthesized macrolides as well as their rearranged isomers obtained during ring-closing metathesis showed that it is possible to assign the location of the double bond in an unsaturated macrolide on the basis of its EI mass spectrum. The occurrence of characteristic ions can be explained by the fragmentation pathway proposed in the article. In contrast, the localization of a double bond in many aliphatic open-chain compounds like alkenes, alcohols or acetates, important structural classes of pheromones, is usually not possible from an EI mass spectrum. In the article, we present the synthesis and for the first time elucidate the structure of macrolides from the frog family Hyperoliidae. PMID:28144343

  8. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  9. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2011-08-02

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides.

  10. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. Material/Methods Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. Results Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. Conclusions SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  11. Heterogeneity of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes in enterococci.

    PubMed

    Min, Yu-Hong; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Choi, Yun-Jeong; Yun, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Kyungwon; Shim, Mi-Ja; Kwak, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Eung-Chil

    2003-11-01

    We determined the macrolide resistance phenotypes of 241 clinical isolates of erythromycin-resistant enterococci (MICs, > or = 1 microg/ml), including 147 Enterococcus faecalis strains and 94 Enterococcus faecium strains, collected from a hospital in Seoul, Korea, between 1999 and 2000. By the erythromycin (40 micro g)-josamycin (100 microg) double-disk test, 93 strains were assigned to the constitutive macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance (cMLS(B)) phenotype, and the remaining 148 strains were assigned to the inducible MLS(B) resistance (iMLS(B)) phenotype. Of the strains with the iMLS(B) phenotype, 36 exhibited a reversibly inducible MLS(B) (riMLS(B)) phenotype, i.e., blunting of the erythromycin zone of inhibition, which indicates that the 16-membered-ring macrolide josamycin is a more effective inducer than the 14-membered-ring macrolide erythromycin. Sequence analysis of the regulatory regions of the erm(B) genes from all of the strains exhibiting the riMLS(B) phenotype revealed not only erm(Bv) [where v represents variant; previously erm(AMR)] (n = 13), as reported previously, but also three kinds of erm(B) variants, which were designated erm(Bv1) (n = 17), erm(Bv2) (n = 3), and erm(Bv3) (n = 3), respectively. In lacZ reporter gene assays of these variants, the 16-membered-ring macrolide tylosin had stronger inducibility than erythromycin at > or = 0.1 microg/ml. These findings highlight the versatility of erm(B) in induction specificity.

  12. Resistance to macrolides in Group A streptococci from the European section of Turkey: genetic and phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Akata, Filiz; Oztürk, Devrim; Tansel, Ozlem; Tatman-Otkun, Müserref; Otkun, Metin; Fitoussi, Frederic; Bingen, Edouard; Tugrul, Murat

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibilities to macrolides of Group A streptococcal isolates from the European section of Turkey. In the case of resistant isolates, the patterns and genetic mechanisms of erythromycin resistance were studied. Seven (2.7%) of the 260 isolates were resistant to erythromycin. Four of them showed the M phenotype and harboured mefA genes whereas three isolates showed the inducible macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B resistance phenotype and harboured ermTR genes. In the European section of Turkey, the current resistance rate of Group A streptococci to macrolides remains low.

  13. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli: resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, F. M.; Taylor, D. E.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Nachamkin, I.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone resistance in Campylobacter and track resistance trends in human clinical isolates in relation to use of these agents in food animals. Susceptibility data suggest that erythromycin and other macrolides should remain the drugs of choice in most regions, with systematic surveillance and control measures maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions. PMID:11266291

  14. New Fluorescent Macrolide Derivatives for Studying Interactions of Antibiotics and Their Analogs with the Ribosomal Exit Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenkov, A G; Shishkina, A V; Karpenko, V V; Chertkov, V A; Konevega, A L; Kasatsky, P S; Bogdanov, A A; Sumbatyan, N V

    2016-10-01

    Novel fluorescent derivatives of macrolide antibiotics related to tylosin bearing rhodamine, fluorescein, Alexa Fluor 488, BODIPY FL, and nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) residues were synthesized. The formation of complexes of these compounds with 70S E. coli ribosomes was studied by measuring the fluorescence polarization depending on the ribosome amount at constant concentration of the fluorescent substance. With the synthesized fluorescent tylosin derivatives, the dissociation constants for ribosome complexes with several known antibiotics and macrolide analogs previously obtained were determined. It was found that the fluorescent tylosin derivatives containing BODIPY FL and NBD groups could be used to screen the binding of novel antibiotics to bacterial ribosomes in the macrolide-binding site.

  15. Purification and characterization of macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase from a strain of Escherichia coli that is highly resistant to erythromycin.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, K; Kanda, T; Ohmiya, K; Ebisu, T; Kono, M

    1989-01-01

    Macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase [MPH(2')] was purified 90-fold from an erythromycin-resistant strain of Escherichia coli, and its enzymatic properties were investigated. MPH(2') is an inducible intracellular enzyme which showed high levels of activity with 14-member-ring macrolides and extremely low levels with 16-member-ring macrolides. The optimum pH for inactivation of oleandomycin was 8.2, and the optimum temperature of the reaction was 40 degrees C. Enzyme activity was lost by heat treatment at 50 degrees C for 1 min. The isoelectric point and molecular weight of the enzyme were 5.3 and 34,000, respectively. Purine nucleotides, such as GTP, ITP, and ATP, were effective as cofactors in the inactivation of macrolides. Iodine, EDTA, or divalent cations inhibited MPH(2') activity. Images PMID:2478074

  16. Pathological Studies on the Protective Effect of a Macrolide Antibiotic, Roxithromycin, against Sulfur Mustard Inhalation Toxicity in a Rat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    placed in a water-jacketed (37C) glass vapor generator custom fabri - cated by Atmar Glass (Kennett Square, PA). Spontaneously breathing rats were...bronchiectasis, and pul- monary fibrosis (Emad and Rezaian 1997). Macrolide antibio- tics have shown effectiveness in a variety of chronic respiratory diseases ...observed in clinical studies of chronic inflammatory airway diseases (e.g., DPB) after long-term treatment with low dose of macrolides (Rubin 2004). For

  17. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  18. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  19. Macrolones Are a Novel Class of Macrolide Antibiotics Active against Key Resistant Respiratory Pathogens In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Verbanac, Donatella; Padovan, Jasna; Dominis-Kramarić, Miroslava; Kelnerić, Željko; Perić, Mihaela; Banjanac, Mihailo; Ergović, Gabrijela; Simon, Nerrisa; Broskey, John; Holmes, David J.; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    As we face an alarming increase in bacterial resistance to current antibacterial chemotherapeutics, expanding the available therapeutic arsenal in the fight against resistant bacterial pathogens causing respiratory tract infections is of high importance. The antibacterial potency of macrolones, a novel class of macrolide antibiotics, against key respiratory pathogens was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. MIC values against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae strains sensitive to macrolide antibiotics and with defined macrolide resistance mechanisms were determined. The propensity of macrolones to induce the expression of inducible erm genes was tested by the triple-disk method and incubation in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of compounds. In vivo efficacy was assessed in a murine model of S. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in mice were determined. The in vitro antibacterial profiles of macrolones were superior to those of marketed macrolide antibiotics, including the ketolide telithromycin, and the compounds did not induce the expression of inducible erm genes. They acted as typical protein synthesis inhibitors in an Escherichia coli transcription/translation assay. Macrolones were characterized by low to moderate systemic clearance, a large volume of distribution, a long half-life, and low oral bioavailability. They were highly efficacious in a murine model of pneumonia after intraperitoneal application even against an S. pneumoniae strain with constitutive resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. Macrolones are the class of macrolide antibiotics with an outstanding antibacterial profile and reasonable PK parameters resulting in good in vivo efficacy. PMID:27353268

  20. Airborne allergic contact dermatitis from tylosin in pharmacy compounders and cross-sensitization to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Malaiyandi, Viba; Houle, Marie Claude; Skotnicki-Grant, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Tylosin is a broad-spectrum macrolide antibiotic that is restricted to veterinary use. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by tylosin has been reported in the literature from the farming industry and veterinary medicine. It is also reported as the most common antibiotic to cause ACD in the previously mentioned occupational settings. We present 2 cases of airborne ACD from tylosin among veterinary pharmaceutical compounding technicians. To our knowledge, only one other case of patch test-confirmed tylosin ACD has been reported in the manufacturing setting. Based on our results, cross-sensitization to other clinically relevant macrolides does not appear to be a concern. Our cases highlight the importance of patch testing among pharmaceutical compounders where the incidence of an airborne contact may be greater, given that the exposure is to the powdered form of potential allergens.

  1. In vitro susceptibility of Ureaplasma urealyticum clinical isolates to new macrolides.

    PubMed

    Kanamoto, Y; Miyake, Y; Suginaka, H; Usui, T

    1991-01-01

    Nine antimicrobial agents, the new macrolides, rokitamycin and midecamycin acetate, and seven other antibiotics, tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, josamycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, and norfloxacin, were studied for their antimicrobial activity against 100 strains of Ureaplasma urealyticum, using a microtiter broth dilution technique. The new macrolides, rokitamycin and midecamycin acetate, had the highest activity, with the MIC against 90% of isolates tested (MIC90) being less than or equal to 0.05 microgram/ml. MICs90 of erythromycin, josamycin, doxycycline, minocycline and tetracycline ranged from 0.1 to 0.78 micrograms/ml. Norfloxacin was least active, with a MIC90 of 12.5 micrograms/ml. Five of 100 strains tested were resistant (MIC greater than or equal to 12.5 micrograms/ml) to tetracycline, and two were resistant to minocycline and doxycycline; all of these were susceptible to rokitamycin and midecamycin acetate.

  2. [In vitro comparative activity of five macrolides against 190 Branhamella catarrhalis strains].

    PubMed

    Chardon, H; Bellon, O; Bourgeois, F; Lagier, E

    1989-05-01

    We compared the in vitro activity of 5 macrolides against 190 strains of Branhamella catarrhalis; 48 strains were isolated at Centre Hospitalier, Aix-en-Provence, the 142 others were isolated during 1987, in 15 different Centres-Hospitaliers-Généraux in France. 153 strains were betalactamase producing strains; no difference in susceptibility to erythromycin was observed on betalactamase producing and non producing strains. Three active macrolides against 100% of strains were: erythromycin (MIC 50 = 0.25 mg/l - MIC 90 = 0.50 mg/l), roxithromycin (MIC 50 = 0.50 mg/l - MIC 90 = 0.50 mg/l) and josamycin (MIC 50 = 0.50 mg/l - MIC 90 = 1 mg/l); A lower activity was noted on midecamycin (mic 50 = 2 mg/l - MIC 90 = 2 mg/l) and spiramycin (MIC 50 = 4 mg/l - MIC 90 = 8 mg/l).

  3. Biosynthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis of pikromycin-related macrolides in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Sherman, D H

    2001-01-01

    Pikromycin-related macrolides have recently attracted significant research interest because they are structurally related to the semisynthetic ketolide antibiotics that have demonstrated promising potential in combating multi-drug-resistant respiratory pathogens. Cloning and in-depth studies of the pikromycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces venezuelae have led to new avenues in modular polyketide synthases, deoxysugar biosynthesis, cytochrome P450 hydroxylase, secondary metabolite gene regulation, and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, the knowledge and tools used for these studies are proving to be valuable in the development of advanced technologies for combinatorial biosynthesis of new macrolide antibiotics. This review summarizes these new developments and introduces S. venezuelae as a powerful new system for secondary metabolite pathway engineering from bench-top genetic manipulation to product fermentation.

  4. Determination of macrolide antibiotics in chicken tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikin, Jamilah; Abdullah, Aminah

    2013-11-01

    A methodusingliquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)MS) for the simultaneous determination of three macrolides (tylosin, spiramycin and tilmicosin) in poultry muscle has been developed. The drugs were extracted with EDTA McIlvaine buffer, filter through celite 545 and the extracts were cleaned up by SPE Oasis HLB cartridge. Separation was carried out in end-capped silica-based C18 column and mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile with a binary gradient system at a flow rate 0.5 ml/min. Detection was performed by single mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode. Several parameters affecting the mass spectra were studied. Chicken samples from the market were analyzed to check the residue of macrolide antibiotics.

  5. Synthetic mimetics of actin-binding macrolides: rational design of actin-targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    Perrins, Richard D; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Marriott, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Actin polymerization and dynamics are involved in a wide range of cellular processes such as cell division and migration of tumor cells. At sites of cell lysis, such as those occurring during a stroke or inflammatory lung diseases, actin is released into the serum where it polymerizes, leading to problems with clot dissolution and sputum viscosity. Therefore, drugs that target these actin-mediated processes may provide one mechanism to treat these conditions. Marine-organism-derived macrolides, such as reidispongiolide A, can bind to, sever, and inhibit polymerization of actin. Our studies show that the function of these complex macrolides resides in their tail region, whereas the head group stabilizes the actin-drug complex. Synthetic compounds derived from this tail region could therefore be used as a mimetic of the natural product, providing a range of designer compounds to treat actin-associated diseases or as probes to study actin polymerization.

  6. Macrolides and associated antibiotics based on similar mechanism of action like lincosamides in malaria.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Tiphaine; Dormoi, Jérôme; Madamet, Marylin; Pradines, Bruno

    2016-02-12

    Malaria, a parasite vector-borne disease, is one of the biggest health threats in tropical regions, despite the availability of malaria chemoprophylaxis. The emergence and rapid extension of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to various anti-malarial drugs has gradually limited the potential malaria therapeutics available to clinicians. In this context, macrolides and associated antibiotics based on similar mechanism of action like lincosamides constitute an interesting alternative in the treatment of malaria. These molecules, whose action spectrum is similar to that of tetracyclines, are typically administered to children and pregnant women. Recent studies have examined the effects of azithromycin and the lincosamide clindamycin, on isolates from different continents. Azithromycin and clindamycin are effective and well tolerated in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in combination with quinine. This literature review assesses the roles of macrolides and lincosamides in the prophylaxis and treatment of malaria.

  7. Empirical therapy of community-acquired pneumonia: macrolides are not ideal choices.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J G

    1997-12-01

    Macrolides are a rational option for patients with community-acquired pneumonia managed as outpatients. For hospitalized patients, they may be used to supplement other drugs, usually betalactams, because of their excellent activity versus Legionella, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The reason for lack of confidence for macrolides as single agents in hospitalized patients, especially for seriously ill patients, is the lack of studies confirming good results for seriously ill patients, and relatively poor in vitro activity against some important pathogens. Resistance is noted to erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin by 10% to 15% of Streptococcus pneumoniae, about 40% of penicillin resistant S pneumoniae, most Fusobacteria, some Streptococcus aureus, and all gram-negative bacilli.

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Macrolides- and Amoxicillin/Clavulanate-induced Acute Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Pili; Amelio, Justyna; Ballarín, Elena; Sabaté, Mònica; Vidal, Xavi; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Schmiedl, Sven; Laporte, Joan-Ramon; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Antibacterials are frequently associated with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of macrolides and amoxicillin/clavulanate (AMC) on DILI. We conducted a systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis (MA) with studies retrieved from PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Web of Knowledge, clinicaltrials.gov, Livertox and Toxline (1980-2014). We searched for macrolides, AMC and MeSH and synonym terms for DILI. We included all study designs except case reports/series, all population ages and studies with a placebo/non-user comparator. We summarized the evidence with a random-effects MA. Quality of the studies was appraised with a checklist developed for SR of adverse effects. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed with different exploratory tools. We finally included 10 (two randomized clinical trials, six case-control, one cohort and one case-population studies) and 9 (case-population excluded) articles in the SR and MA, respectively. The overall summary relative risk of DILI for macrolides was 2.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.81-4.47], p < 0.0001, I(2) = 57%. Three studies were perceived to be missing in the area of low statistical significance. Year of study and selected exposure window partly explained the variability between studies. For AMC, the risk of DILI was 9.38 (95% CI 0.65-135.41) p = 0.3, I2 = 95%. In conclusion, although spontaneous reports and case series have long established an association between macrolides and AMC with acute liver injury, these SR and MA have assessed the magnitude of this association. The low incidence of DILI and the therapeutic place of these antibiotics might tilt the balance in favour of their benefits.

  9. Brasilinolide A, a new macrolide antibiotic produced by Nocardia brasiliensis: producing strain, isolation and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Komaki, H; Yazawa, K; Mikami, Y; Nemoto, A; Tojyo, T; Kadowaki, K; Shigemori, H; Kobayashi, J

    1997-12-01

    A new 32-membered macrolide antibiotic, brasilinolide A was isolated from the fermentation broth of Nocardia sp. IFM 0406. The producer was identified as Nocardia brasiliensis. The antibiotic was only active against Aspergillus niger, but not active against other fungi including yeasts as well as other filamentous like fungi and bacteria. Brasilinolide A exerted an immunosuppressive activity in the assay system of a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR).

  10. Gene and cytokine profile analysis of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in Fukuoka, Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic data suggest that the prevalence of macrolide resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MR-M. pneumoniae) is increasing rapidly worldwide. This study assessed the present status of M. pneumoniae infection in Japan and clinical end-points to distinguish children with MR-M. pneumoniae. Methods During an outbreak of M. pneumoniae infections in Fukuoka, Japan in 2010–11, a total of 105 children with clinically suspected M. pneumoniae infection were enrolled. M. pneumoniae was analyzed for macrolide resistance in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. Sixty -five patients with PCR positive for M. pneumoniae were analyzed with regard to clinical symptoms, efficacy of several antimicrobial agents and several laboratory data. Results Causative pathogens were detected in 81.0% (85 of 105) and M. pneumoniae was identified 61.9% (65 of 105). The resistance rate of M. pneumoniae was 89.2% (58 of 65) in this general pediatric outpatient setting. Patients infected with MR-M. pneumoniae showed longer times to resolution of fever and required frequent changes of the initially prescribed macrolide to another antimicrobial agent. We observed three different genotypes of M. pneumoniae including the rarely reported A2063T mutation (A2063G: 31 strains, A2063T: 27 strains, no mutation: 7 strains). Drug susceptibility testing showed different antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for each genotype. Serum IFN-gamma, IL-6 and IP-10 levels were higher in patients with MR-genotypes than in those infected with no-mutation strains (p < 0.001). Conclusions Macrolide resistance is more common than previously thought and a small epidemic of rarely reported A2063T mutation was observed in Fukuoka, Japan. Furthermore our results reveal the possibility that levels of certain inflammatory cytokines may be a candidate to predict MR-M.pneumoniae infection. PMID:24330612

  11. Molecular resistance mechanisms of macrolide-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Alaska, 1986 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Karen; Bulkow, Lisa; Bruce, Michael; Zulz, Tammy; Reasonover, Alisa; Harker-Jones, Marcella; Hurlburt, Debby; Hennessy, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains has reduced treatment options. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities, serotype distributions, and molecular resistance mechanisms among macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal isolates in Alaska from 1986 to 2010. We identified cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska from 1986 to 2010 through statewide population-based laboratory surveillance. All invasive pneumococcal isolates submitted to the Arctic Investigations Program laboratory were confirmed by standard microbiological methods and serotyped by slide agglutination and the Quellung reaction. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method, and macrolide-resistant genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. Among 2,923 invasive pneumococcal isolates recovered from 1986 to 2010, 270 (9.2%) were nonsusceptible to erythromycin; 177 (66%) erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates demonstrated coresistance to penicillin, and 167 (62%) were multidrug resistant. The most frequent serotypes among the macrolide-resistant isolates were serotypes 6B (23.3%), 14 (20.7%), 19A (16.7%), 9V (8.9%), 19F (6.3%), 6A (5.6%), and 23F (4.8%). mef and erm(B) genes were detected in 207 (77%) and 32 (12%) of the isolates, respectively. Nineteen (7%) of the erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates contained both mef and erm(B) genotypes; 15 were of serotype 19A. There was significant year-to-year variation in the proportion of isolates that were nonsusceptible to erythromycin (P < 0.001). Macrolide resistance among pneumococcal isolates from Alaska is mediated predominantly by mef genes, and this has not changed significantly over time. However, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of isolates that possess both erm(B) and mef, primarily due to serotype 19A isolates.

  12. In vitro activities of new macrolides and rifapentine against Brucella spp.

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, J A; Muñoz Bellido, J L; Fresnadillo, M J; Trujillano, I

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the in vitro activities of streptomycin, rifampin, tetracyclines, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, four new macrolides (roxithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and dirithromycin), and rifapentine against 62 strains of Brucella spp. Azithromycin and clarithromycin were, respectively, eight- and twofold more active than erythromycins (MIC for 90% of strains = 2, 8, and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively). The activity of rifapentine was similar to that of rifampin (MIC for 90% of strains = 1 microgram/ml). PMID:8494391

  13. Antimicrobial growth promoter ban and resistance to macrolides and vancomycin in enterococci from pigs.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Wissing, A; Aarestrup, F M; Frey, J; Nicolet, J

    2001-11-01

    Ninety-six enterococcus isolates from fecal samples of pigs receiving tylosin as an antimicrobial growth promoter and 59 isolates obtained in the same farms 5 to 6 months after the ban of antimicrobial growth promoters in Switzerland were tested for susceptibility to nine antimicrobial agents. A clear decrease in resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and tetracycline was visible after the ban. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium belonged to the same clonal lineage as vancomycin-resistant isolates previously isolated from Danish pigs.

  14. Macrolides vs. quinolones for community-acquired pneumonia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, K; Yahav, D; Lador, A; Eliakim-Raz, N; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    The relative efficacy, safety and ecological implications of macrolides vs. quinolones in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are debatable. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing any macrolide vs. any quinolone for the treatment of CAP among adult inpatients or outpatients, as monotherapy or both in combination with a beta-lactam. We did not limit inclusion by pneumonia severity, publication status, language or date of publication. The primary outcomes assessed were 30-day all-cause mortality and treatment failure. Two authors independently extracted the data. Fixed effect meta-analysis of risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals was performed. Sixteen trials (4989 patients) fulfilling inclusion criteria were identified, mostly assessing outpatients with mild to moderate CAP. All-cause mortality was not significantly different for macrolides vs. quinolones, RR 1.03 (0.63-1.68, seven trials), with a low event rate (2%). Treatment failure was significantly lower with quinolones, RR 0.78 (0.67-0.91, 16 trials). The definition of failure used in the primary studies was not clearly representative of patients' benefit. Microbiological failure was lower with quinolones, RR 0.63 (0.49-0.81, 13 trials). All adverse events, adverse events requiring discontinuation and any premature antibiotic discontinuation were significantly more frequent with macrolides, mainly on account of gastrointestinal adverse events. Resistance development was not assessed in the trials. Randomized controlled trials show an advantage of quinolones in the treatment of CAP with regard to clinical cure without need for antibiotic modification at end of treatment and gastrointestinal adverse events. The clinical significance of this advantage is unclear.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of macrolide and lincosamide resistance in Streptococcus uberis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Van de Leemput, E; Zadoks, R N

    2007-11-01

    Streptococcus uberis isolates (n = 55) were obtained from milk samples of cases of mild clinical mastitis in 55 dairy cows from 35 herds serviced by one veterinary practice in Mayenne, France. Isolates were tested for macrolide and lincosamide resistance by using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Erythromycin resistance was detected in 12 of the 55 (22%) isolates based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, and was encoded by ermB. This gene also conferred phenotypic resistance to pirlimycin based on MIC measurements, but the D-test was needed for detection of the resistance phenotype in the agar disc diffusion test. Isolates with ermB were also highly resistant to the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin. Seventeen of the 55 isolates (31%) were classified as resistant to spiramcyin only and as having intermediate susceptibility to spiramycin based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, respectively. The genetic mechanism behind this phenotype and its clinical relevance are unknown. The efflux pump gene mefA was not detected in any of the 55 isolates in this study. Pirlimycin resistance without macrolide resistance was encoded by the lincosamide resistance gene linB in 4 isolates. Based on current guidelines, some linB-positive isolates would be classified as susceptible by using phenotypic tests, and alternative values for the interpretation of the agar disc diffusion test are suggested. We conclude that the agar disc diffusion test is a useful indicator for macrolide and lincosamide resistance of Strep. uberis in veterinary practice, provided that the D-test is used for detection of pirlimycin resistance.

  16. [Phenotypes and genetic mechanisms of resistance to macrolides and lincosamides in viridans group streptococci].

    PubMed

    Artiles Campelo, F; Horcajada Herrera, I; Alamo Antúnez, I; Cãnas Pedrosa, A; Lafarga Capuz, B

    2007-09-01

    Viridans group streptococci (VGS) are part of the oropharyngeal, intestinal and genital flora, but they may cause endocarditis and bacteremia in susceptible patients. Penicillin- and macrolide-resistant strains are increasing every year. The aim of this study was to investigate genetic mechanisms of resistance to macrolides in clinically relevant isolates. We identified 85 isolates from January 2004 to June 2006. Susceptibility to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, clindamycin and gentamycin was determined. A resistance phenotype was assigned according to the disk approximation test (erythromycin-clindamycin). The mechanism of resistance was determined by PCR for the following genes: ermB, ermA, ermC, ermA (TR) and mefA/E. We identified 51 isolates belonging to Streptococcus anginosus species, most of which were obtained from abdominal abscesses, and 34 isolates belonging to other species, most of which were obtained from blood cultures. The macrolide resistance rate was 28.2% (24/85). The MLS(B) phenotype was observed in 66.7% of the isolates, primarily in the S. anginosus group. The M phenotype was predominant in S. mitis and S. oralis. Isolates that expressed the constitutive MLS(B) phenotype carried the ermB gene, and those that expressed the inducible MLSB phenotype carried the ermA gene. Isolates that expressed the M phenotype carried the mefA/E gene. There was coresistance with penicillin in 20.8% (5/24) of the isolates. Coresistance with penicillin was low. These results suggest that screening for macrolide resistance in VGS would be desirable because of the potential transmission of resistance genes to other pathogenic streptococci.

  17. Macrolide Antibiotics Improve Phagocytic Capacity and Reduce Inflammation In Sulfur Mustard-Exposed Monocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    improving SM inhalation injuries. In this study, the effects of four FDA- approved macrolide antibiotics, i.e., azithromycin , clarithromycin , erythromycin...from Sigma (St. Louis, MO). Azithromycin and clarithromycin were kindly provided by William Ellis of the Department of Chemical Information, WRAIR...0.001). Treatment with 10 µM of azithromycin , clarithromycin , erythromycin, or roxithromycin increased phagocytotic cells to 64.5%, 63.4%, 62.0

  18. Development, stability, and molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Dave Bryson; Wang, Ying; Lin, Jun

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter were primarily focused on strains from various origins or used in vitro systems. In this study, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo experiments to examine the development, stability, and genetic basis of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni using erythromycin-resistant (Ery(r)) mutants derived from the same parent strain. Chickens inoculated with low-level Ery(r) mutants (MIC = 32 or 64 microg/ml) at 15 days old did not shed highly Ery(r) mutants (MIC > 512 microg/ml) after prolonged exposure to a low dose of tylosin. The low-level Ery resistance was not stable in vitro or in vivo in the absence of macrolide selection pressure. However, high-level Ery resistance displayed remarkable stability in vitro and in vivo. Ribosomal sequence analysis of 69 selected Ery(r) mutants showed that specific point mutations (A2074G or A2074C) occurred in all highly Ery(r) mutants. No mutations in ribosomal protein L4 were observed in any of the in vitro-selected Ery(r) mutants. However, three specific mutations in L4, G74D, G57D, and G57V, were widely found among in vivo-selected Ery(r) mutants. Insertion of three amino acids, TSH, at position 98 in ribosomal protein L22 was observed only in mutants selected in vitro. Inactivation of the CmeABC efflux pump dramatically reduced Ery MICs in Ery(r) mutants. Together, these findings suggest that multiple factors contribute to the emergence of highly Ery(r) Campylobacter in chicken, reveal resistance level-dependent stability of macrolide resistance in C. jejuni, and indicate that C. jejuni utilizes complex and different mechanisms to develop Ery resistance in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Nucleotide sequence of ermA, a macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B determinant in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, E

    1985-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of ermA, the prototype macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene from Staphylococcus aureus, has been determined. The sequence predicts a 243-amino-acid protein that is homologous to those specified by ermC, ermAM, and ermD, resistance determinants from Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sanguis, and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively. The ermA transcript, identified by Northern analysis and S1 mapping, contains a 5' leader sequence of 211 bases which has the potential to encode two short peptides of 15 and 19 amino acids; the second, longer peptide has 13 amino acids in common with the putative regulatory leader peptide of ermC. The coding sequence for this peptide is deleted in several mutants in which macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance is constitutively expressed. Potential secondary structures available to the leader sequence of the wild-type (inducible) transcript and to constitutive deletion, insertion, and point mutations provide additional support for the translational attenuation model for induction of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance. Images PMID:2985541

  20. Prevalence and Molecular Genetics of Macrolide Resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected in Finland in 2002

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Huikko, S.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide resistance among 1,007 clinical pneumococcal isolates collected in Finland were investigated. Of these, 217 (21.5%) were resistant to erythromycin and 11% to clindamycin. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, mef(E) was present in 95 isolates (44%), mef(A) was present in 12 isolates (6%), and erm(B) was present in 90 isolates (41%). A double mechanism, mef(E) and erm(B), was detected in five isolates (2%). Ribosomal mutation was detected in 14 (6%) macrolide-resistant isolates in which no other determinant was found. Based on the telithromycin MICs, two groups of isolates were formed: 83.3% of the isolates belonged to a major group for which the telithromycin MIC range was ≤0.008 to 0.063 μg/ml, and 16.7% belonged to a minor group for which the telithromycin MIC range was 0.125 to 8 μg/ml. All except three isolates in the minor population carried a macrolide resistance gene. PMID:16189096

  1. The enhancement of cardiac toxicity by concomitant administration of Berberine and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Duo; Feng, Pan-Feng; Sun, Jia-Liang; Guo, Fengfeng; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Li, Bao-Xin

    2015-08-30

    As is well-known, hERG plays an essential role in phase III repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Blocking of hERG channels can lead to LQTS. Inhibition of the metabolism of CYPs activities may elevate plasma levels, to further increase accumulation of drug on cardiac. The elevated serum levels may however elicit unexpected toxicities. Therefore, the inhibition tests of hERG and CYP are central to the preclinical studies because they may lead to severe cardiac toxicity. Berberine is widely used as an antibacterial agent and often combined with macrolides to treat gastropathy. Our objective was to assess cardiac toxicity during the combined use of Berberine with macrolides. (1) Azithromycin reduced hERG currents by accelerated channel inactivation. (2) The combination of Berberine with Azithromycin reduced hERG currents, producing an inhibitive effect stronger than use of a single drug alone, due to the high binding affinity for the onset of inactivation. (3) When cells were perfused concomitantly with Berberine and Clarithromycin, they showed a stronger inhibitive effect on hERG currents by decreasing the time constant for the onset of inactivation. (4) The combined administration of Berberine with Clarithromycin had a powerful inhibitive effect on CYP3A activities than use of a single drug alone. Collectively, these results demonstrated that concomitant use of Berberine with macrolides may require close monitoring because of potential drug toxicities, especially cardiac toxicity.

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance in streptococci isolated from adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christina S; Grinwis, Margot E; Sibley, Christopher D; Parkins, Michael D; Rabin, Harvey R; Surette, Michael G

    2015-11-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airways are colonized by polymicrobial communities with high bacterial load and are influenced by frequent antibiotic exposures. This community includes diverse streptococci, some of which have been directly or indirectly associated with pulmonary exacerbations. As many streptococci are naturally competent, horizontal transfer of antibiotic-resistant determinants coupled with frequent and/or chronic antibiotic exposure may contribute to high resistance rates. In this study, we assessed antibiotic resistance in 413 streptococcal isolates from adult CF patients against nine antibiotics relevant in CF treatment. We observed very low rates of cephalosporin resistance [cefepime and ceftriaxone ( < 2%)], and higher rates of resistance to tetracycline (∼34%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (∼45%). The highest rate of antibiotic resistance was to the macrolides [azithromycin (56.4%) and erythromycin (51.6%)]. We also investigated the molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance and found that only half of our macrolide-resistant streptococci isolates contained the mef (efflux pump) or erm (methylation of 23S ribosomal target site) genes. The majority of isolates were, however, found to have point mutations at position 2058 or 2059 of the 23S ribosomal subunit - a molecular mechanism of resistance not commonly reported in the non-pyogenic and non-pneumococcal streptococci, and unique in comparison with previous studies. The high rates of resistance observed here may result in poor outcomes where specific streptococci are contributing to CF airway disease and serve as a reservoir of resistance genes within the CF airway microbiome.

  3. Prevalence and mechanism of resistance against macrolides and lincosamides in Streptococcus suis isolates.

    PubMed

    Martel, A; Baele, M; Devriese, L A; Goossens, H; Wisselink, H J; Decostere, A; Haesebrouck, F

    2001-11-26

    Eighty-seven Streptococcus suis isolates recovered in 1999-2000 from diseased pigs, all from different farms, were screened for resistance against macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics by the disk diffusion and agar dilution test and a PCR assay, amplifying the ermB gene and the mefA/E gene. Seventy-one percent of the isolates showed constitutive resistance to macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics (MLS(B)-phenotype). All these isolates were positive for the ermB gene in the PCR, but negative for the mefA/E gene. For all strains minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against five other antimicrobial agents were determined. All strains were susceptible to penicillin. Ninety-nine percent of the isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin and tiamulin. Eighty-five percent of the strains were resistant to doxycycline. A 540bp fragment of the ermB genes of eight S. suis strains was sequenced and compared with ermB genes of five S. pneumoniae and five S. pyogenes strains of human origin. A 100% homology was found between these fragments in seven S. suis, one S. pneumoniae and three of the S. pyogenes isolates. This study demonstrates that resistance against macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B is widespread in S. suis and mediated by ribosome methylation, encoded by the ermB gene.

  4. In vitro reconstitution of EryCIII activity for the preparation of unnatural macrolides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Chung, Hak Suk; Leimkuhler, Catherine; Walsh, Christopher T; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2005-10-19

    EryCIII is a desosaminyltransferase that converts an inactive macrolide precursor to a biologically active antibiotic. It may have potential for the synthesis of unnatural macrolides with useful biological activities. However, it has been difficult to reconstitute the activity of EryCIII in vitro. We report here that purified, inactive EryCIII can be converted to an active catalyst by the addition of another protein encoded in the same gene cluster, EryCII. The EryCII-treated protein retains activity even when EryCII is removed. We also show that AknT, an activator protein from an unrelated gene cluster, is capable of activating EryCIII. Although the mechanism of activation is not yet understood, we have concluded from these experiments that these antibiotic Gtf activator proteins do not function to deliver substrates to EryCIII and do not exert their effects by forming stable complexes with the Gtf during the glycosyltransfer reaction. We report that activated EryCIII is capable of utilizing an alternative sugar donor, so these results lay the groundwork for the production of novel macrolides.

  5. Structure-activity relationships and mechanism of action of macrolides derived from erythromycin as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian-Hua; Han, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Enormous efforts were focused on the 3-descladinosyl erythromycin derivatives which led to 3-keto (ketolides), 3-O-acyl (acylides), 3-O-carbamate (carbamolides), and 3-O-alkyl (alkylides) and cladinosyl-containing erythromycin derivatives such as 4"-O-acyl, 4"-O-carbamate, and 4"-O-alkyl derivatives as recently exemplified by macrolones (macrolide-quinolone hybrids). Ketolides acquire activity against MLSB-resistant pathogens via a featured arylalkyl extension suspended on the macrolide core, which interacts with a base pair formed by A752Ec and U2609Ec located in the nascent peptide release tunnel of the bacterial rRNA. A base pair formed by C2610Ec and G2505Ec probably is another novel binding site for 3-descladinosyl non-ketolides. It is believed that 4"-derived compounds perhaps interfere with the formation of polypeptide because the extension oriented into peptidyl transferase center (PTC) region. Although macrolones are hybrids of macrolides and quinolones, they do not have dual modes of action, and serve only as protein synthesis inhibitors.

  6. Microbiological assay for the analysis of certain macrolides in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, A; Fourar, R E-A; Boukhechem, M S; Zarkout, S

    2015-08-01

    Clarithromycin (CLA) and roxithromycin (ROX) are macrolide antibiotics with an expanded spectrum of activity that are commercially available as tablets. A microbiological assay, applying the cylinder-plate method and using a strain of Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 as test organism, has been used and validated for the quantification of two macrolide drugs; CLA and ROX in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The validation of the proposed method was carried out for linearity, precision, accuracy and specificity. The linear dynamic ranges were from 0.1 to 0.5μg/mL for both compounds. Logarithmic calibration curve was obtained for each macrolide (r>0.989) with statistically equal slopes varying from 3.275 to 4.038, and a percentage relative standard deviation in the range of 0.24-0.92%. Moreover, the method was applied successfully for the assay of the studied drugs in pharmaceutical tablet dosage forms. Recovery from standard addition experiments in commercial products was 94.71-96.91% regarding clarithromycin and 93.94-98.12% regarding roxithromycin, with a precision (%RSD) 1.32-2.11%. Accordingly, this microbiological assay can be used for routine quality control analysis of titled drugs in tablet formulations.

  7. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness.

  8. A possible mechanism of macrolide resistance among multiple resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from Thai children during 1991-2000.

    PubMed

    Serichantalergs, Oralak; Jensen, L B; Pitarangsi, C; Mason, C J; Dalsgaard, A

    2007-05-01

    A total of 495 Campylobacterjejuni and 122 C. coli isolated from Thai children were screened for macrolide (erythromycin and azithromycin) resistance by disk diffusion assay. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for erythromycin, azithromycin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, streptomycin, gentamicin and chloramphenicol were further determined for these macrolide-resistant Campylobacter isolates. Presence of known point mutations resulting in reduced susceptibility to macrolides was investigated by PCR and DNA sequencing. Seventeen percent (23/122) of C. coli and 2.4% (12/495) of C. jejuni isolates were resistant to macrolides. By sequencing domain V of the 23S ribosomal DNA from all 35 macrolide-resistant isolates, a known point mutation of 23S rRNA associated with reduced susceptibility to macrolides was detected in all isolates except one. Among the macrolide-resistant isolates, all were multiply resistant to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, of which the latter is the preferred antimicrobial used for diarrheal treatment in Thailand. Furthermore, most macrolide-resistant isolates were also resistant to tetracycline and streptomycin. The spread of macrolide and quinolone resistant Campylobacter should be monitored closely in Thailand and elsewhere as these antimicrobials are preferred drugs for treatment of diarrhea.

  9. Multiplex Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Macrolide Resistance Using PlexZyme and PlexPrime Technology

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tan, Lit Y.; Walker, Samantha; Twin, Jimmy; Poljak, Marin; Bradshaw, Catriona S.; Fairley, Christopher K.; Bissessor, Melanie; Mokany, Elisa; Todd, Alison V.; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a cause of non-gonoccocal urethritis (NGU) in men and cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. Recent international data also indicated that the first line treatment, 1 gram stat azithromycin therapy, for M. genitalium is becoming less effective, with the corresponding emergence of macrolide resistant strains. Increasing failure rates of azithromycin for M. genitalium has significant implications for the presumptive treatment of NGU and international clinical treatment guidelines. Assays able to predict macrolide resistance along with detection of M. genitalium will be useful to enable appropriate selection of antimicrobials to which the organism is susceptible and facilitate high levels of rapid cure. One such assay recently developed is the MG 23S assay, which employs novel PlexZyme™ and PlexPrime™ technology. It is a multiplex assay for detection of M. genitalium and 5 mutations associated with macrolide resistance. The assay was evaluated in 400 samples from 254 (186 males and 68 females) consecutively infected participants, undergoing tests of cure. Using the MG 23S assay, 83% (331/440) of samples were positive, with 56% of positives carrying a macrolide resistance mutation. Comparison of the MG 23S assay to a reference qPCR method for M. genitalium detection and high resolution melt analysis (HRMA) and sequencing for detection of macrolide resistance mutations, resulted in a sensitivity and specificity for M. genitalium detection and for macrolide resistance of 99.1/98.5% and 97.4/100%, respectively. The MG 23S assay provides a considerable advantage in clinical settings through combined diagnosis and detection of macrolide resistance. PMID:27271704

  10. In vivo evaluation of drug-drug interaction via mechanism-based inhibition by macrolide antibiotics in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Akihito; Negishi, Isao; Kozakai, Kazumasa; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2009-11-01

    Irreversible inhibition, characterized as mechanism-based inhibition (MBI), of cytochrome P450 in drugs has to be avoided for their safe use. A comprehensive assessment of drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential is important during the drug discovery process. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of macrolide antibiotics, erythromycin (ERM), clarithromycin (CAM), and azithromycin (AZM), which are mechanism-based inhibitors of CYP3A, on biotransformation of midazolam (MDZ) in monkeys. These macrolides inhibited the formation of 1'-hydroxymidazolam in monkey microsomes as functions of incubation time and macrolide concentration. Furthermore, the inactivation potentials of macrolides (k(inact)/K(I): CAM congruent with ERM > AZM) were as effective as that observed in human samples. In in vivo studies, MDZ was administered orally (1 mg/kg) without or with multiple oral dosing of macrolides (15 mg/kg, twice a day on days 1-3). On day 3, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of MDZ increased 7.0-, 9.9-, and 2.0-fold with ERM, CAM, and AZM, respectively, compared with MDZ alone. Furthermore, the effects of ERM and CAM on the pharmacokinetics of MDZ were also observed on the day (day 4) after completion of macrolide treatments (AUC changes: 7.3- and 7.3-fold, respectively). Because the plasma concentrations of macrolides immediately before MDZ administration on day 4 were much lower than the IC(50) values for reversible CYP3A inhibition, the persistent effects may be predominantly caused by CYP3A inactivation. These results suggest that the monkey might be a suitable animal model to predict DDIs caused by MBI of CYP3A.

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin against macrolide-resistant and macrolide-sensitive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Naoko; Kaiho, Miki; Ariga, Tadashi; Kikuta, Hideaki; Togashi, Takehiro; Oba, Koji; Morita, Keisuke; Nagano, Naoko; Nakanishi, Masanori; Hara, Kazuya; Hazama, Kyosuke; Watanabe, Toru; Yamanaka, Tatsuru; Sasaki, Satoshi; Furuyama, Hideto; Shibata, Mutsuo; Shida, Satoru; Ishizaka, Akihito; Tabata, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Hayato; Naito, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Mikio; Horino, Atsuko; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To clarify therapeutic effects of azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin against macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) pneumonia and against macrolide-sensitive Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MSMP) pneumonia in pediatric patients. Methods A prospective, multicenter observational study was conducted from July 2013 to August 2015. The therapeutic effects of azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin were evaluated in 59 patients with pneumonia caused by MRMP and in 50 patients with pneumonia caused by MSMP. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents against isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were also measured. Results Mean durations of fever following commencement of treatment in patients infected with MRMP and MSMP were 5.2 and 1.9 days, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). Among patients infected with MRMP, mean durations of fever were 4.6, 5.5, 1.0 and 7.5 days for patients treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). Among patients infected with MSMP, mean durations of fever were 2.5, 1.7, 0.9 and 4.3 days for patients treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin, respectively (log-rank test, P = 0.0162). The MIC90s of azithromycin and clarithromycin among the 27 isolates of MRMP were 64 and 256 μg/ml, respectively, and those among the 23 isolates of MSMP were <0.000125 and 0.001 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC90s of minocycline and tosufloxacin among the 27 isolates of MRMP were 1.0 and 0.25 μg/ml, respectively, and those among the 23 isolates of MSMP were 1.0 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion Both minocycline and tosufloxacin showed good in vitro activities against MRMP. Minocycline, but not tosufloxacin, shortened the duration of fever in pediatric patients infected with MRMP compared to the duration of fever in patients treated with macrolides. PMID:28288170

  12. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R.; Hecht, David W.; Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain. PMID:26525793

  13. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T; Lopansri, Bert K; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R; Hecht, David W; Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart

    2015-11-02

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain.

  14. Suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems by macrolides: a promising strategy or an oriental mystery?

    PubMed

    Tateda, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Kimura, Soichiro; Horikawa, Manabu; Miyairi, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2007-12-01

    A breakthrough in antibiotic chemotherapy for patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections was brought about by findings in a patient with diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), who had been treated with erythromycin over a period of years. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that long-term macrolide therapy can be used not only for DPB patients but also for those with other chronic infections, including patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The pathogenesis of chronic P. aeruginosa infection is considered to arise from a bacterial cell-to-cell signaling mechanism, named "quorum-sensing", which enables the bacteria to coordinately turn on and off their virulence genes through the production of autoinducer molecules. Accumulating evidence from clinical and basic science fields suggests the potential of macrolides as Pseudomonas quorum-sensing inhibitors. In this review, we briefly summarize the data on the clinical efficacy of macrolides in DPB and CF patients. Then we discuss the mechanisms of action of macrolides from the viewpoint of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) macrolide effects on P. aeruginosa, particularly the potential activity of this antibiotic to suppress the bacterial quorum-sensing system.

  15. [In vitro antibacterial activity of rokitamycin, a new macrolide antibiotic. Results of a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Soussy, C J; Le Van Thoi, J; Meyran, M; Joly, B; Derlot, E; Morel, C

    1990-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of rokitamycin (R) were evaluated by agar dilution for 914 bacterial strain isolated in 4 hospitals and classed as a function of susceptibility and resistance to Macrolides-Lincosamides-Streptogramines group (MLS). MICs of R ranged from 0.06 to 1 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.25-0.5) on Staphylococci susceptible to MLS and on MLSB inducible strains; R was inactive on MLSB constitutive strains. MICs of R ranged from 0.008 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.06 to 0.25) for Streptococci and Pneumococci susceptible to erythromycin (E) and from 0.06 to greater than 128 for strains resistant to E. Enterococci susceptible to E were inhibited by 0.06 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.5) and strains resistant to E by 0.25 to greater than 128. Haemophilus were inhibited by 0.5 to 0.65 microgram/ml (mode MICs of R ranged generally from 0.016 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.12) for C. perfringens and from 0.016 to 1 (mode MIC 0.06) for B. fragilis. Thus, R was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance strains. Its activity was superior to that of other products of this group spiramycin, josamycin, miokamycin, particularly on Gram positive cocci. R had a good activity on Neisseria, Branhamella, anaerobes and, as others macrolides, was poorly active on Haemophilus.

  16. In-vitro activities of 14-, 15- and 16-membered macrolides against gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Miller, J M

    1992-02-01

    The in-vitro activities of the 14-membered macrolides erythromycin, dirithromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, the 15-membered compound azithromycin and the 16-membered macrolides (16 MM) josamycin, spiramycin and midecamycin acetate (MOM) have been compared against staphylococci, enterococci and streptococci. Results have been analysed separately according to the sensitivity status of the tested strains to erythromycin, namely sensitive (S), inducibly resistant (IR) or constitutively resistant (CR). 14- and 15-membered macrolides were active only against S strains; the order of potency in vitro was clarithromycin = erythromycin greater than azithromycin = roxithromycin greater than dirithromycin. The 16 MM were slightly less active against S strains than were the 14- and 15-membered compounds, and inhibited most IR strains; MOM and josamycin were about twice as potent as spiramycin. IR and S Staphylococcus aureus strains were equally sensitive to 16 MM, while IR strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci were less sensitive than were S strains. All CR strains of S. aureus were resistant to 16 MM, as were most of the other CR strains. However, 5/21 CR coagulase-negative staphylococci and 2/20 CR enterococci tested were sensitive to 16 MM. The seven CR strains showing anomalous sensitivity to the 16 MM (five Staphylococcus haemolyticus and two enterococci) were only 'moderately resistant' to erythromycin (MIC 8-64 mg/L), while all the other CR strains were 'highly resistant' (MIC greater than 128 mg/L). These results indicate that it may be difficult to predict the sensitivity of Gram-positive cocci to 16 MM, and therefore individual sensitivity testing to specific compounds is essential.

  17. [In vitro antibacterial activity of a new macrolide, miokamycin. Results of a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Soussy, C J; Thabaut, A; Bismuth, R; Morel, C; Berthelot, G; Chanal, M; Derlot, E

    1989-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of miokamycin (M) were evaluated by agar dilution for 1,024 bacterial strains isolated in 6 hospitals and classed as a function of susceptibility and resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins group (MLS). MIC of M ranged from 0.25 to 4 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1-2) on Staphylococcus susceptible to MLS and on MLSB inducible strains; M was inactive on MLSB constitutive strains. MIC of M ranged from 0.016 to 4 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 0.12 to 0.5) for Streptococci and Pneumococci susceptible to erythromycin (E) and from 0.12 to greater than 128 for strains resistant to E. Enterococci susceptible to E were inhibited by 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1) and strains resistant to E by 4 to greater than 128. Haemophilus were inhibited by 2 to 64 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 32), Neisseria by 0.12 to 4 (mode MIC 0.5-1) and B. catarrhalis by 0.12 to 8 (mode MIC 1). L. pneumophila was very susceptible to M: MIC 0.016 to 0.12 (mode MIC 0.06). MIC of M ranged generally from 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1) for C. perfringens and from 0.03 to 2 (mode MIC 1) for B. fragilis. Thus, M was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance non-inducing type on MLSB inducible resistance strains. Its activity was similar to that of spiramycin slightly superior on Staphylococci, slightly inferior on Streptococci and Enterococci, similar on Pneumococci, very superior on Neisseria, Legionella and anaerobes. M had a good activity on Branhamella and, as others macrolides, was poorly active on Haemophilus.

  18. Genetic analysis of a pediatric clinical isolate of Moraxella catarrhalis with resistance to macrolides and quinolones.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    During the surveillance conducted in 2012 by the Drug-resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease, we isolated a strain of Moraxella catarrhalis that demonstrated resistance to both macrolides and quinolones from a male pediatric patient aged 1.5 years who had developed acute bronchitis. Then we evaluated the susceptibility of this strain to different types of antibacterial agents and conducted a genetic analysis. The results of the susceptibility evaluation showed that the MIC values of azithromycin, clarithromycin, and rokitamycin were >64 μg/mL, >64 μg/mL, and 4 μg/mL, respectively; clearly demonstrating resistance to macrolides. The MIC values of the quinolones levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, and garenoxacin were 4 μg/mL, 2 μg/mL, and 1 μg/mL, respectively; indicating decreased susceptibility. The genetic analysis of this strain revealed one mutation in 23s rRNA with a replacement of adenine by thymine at nucleotide position 2330 (A2330T) and another mutation in gyrB at nucleotide position 1481 by replacement of adenine with guanine (A1481G) that caused a substitution of the 494 th asparagine acid by glycine, as being associated with the observed resistance to macrolides and quinolones, respectively. Similar to drug-resistant bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, the prevalence of which has recently increased, the treatment of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis infections is considered difficult due to the development of resistance to different types of antibacterial agents. It is vital to maintain an unwavering focus on the trend toward an increasing number of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis strains and ensure the proper use of each antibacterial agent.

  19. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis.

  20. 13-Deoxytedanolide, a marine sponge-derived antitumor macrolide, binds to the 60S large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Yoshida, Minoru; Hirota, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-17

    13-Deoxytedanolide is a potent antitumor macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Mycale adhaerens. In spite of its remarkable activity, the mode of action of 13-deoxytedanolide has not been elucidated. [11-3H]-(11S)-13-Deoxydihydrotedanolide derived from the macrolide was used for identifying the target molecule from the yeast cell lysate. Fractionation of the binding protein revealed that the labeled 13-deoxytedanolide derivative strongly bound to the 80S ribosome as well as to the 60S large subunit, but not to the 40S small subunit. In agreement with this observation, 13-deoxytedanolide efficiently inhibited the polypeptide elongation. Interestingly, competition studies demonstrated that 13-deoxytedanolide shared the binding site on the 60S large subunit with pederin and its marine-derived analogues. These results indicate that 13-deoxytedanolide is a potent protein synthesis inhibitor and is the first macrolide to inhibit the eukaryotic ribosome.

  1. CONFLEX/MM3 search/minimization study of the conformations of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Petko M.

    2002-03-01

    The conformations of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotic tylosin were studied with the MM3 force field. The CONFLEX conformational search procedure was used for finding low-energy conformations. The computed data are indicative for the existence of several conformations in equilibrium. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds play an important role for the preferred geometry of the macroring and the conformations of the side chains. The present results provide further insight into the most probable conformations of tylosin and compliment an earlier analysis based on NMR techniques.

  2. X-ray powder diffraction patterns for certain beta-lactam, tetracycline and macrolide antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Thangadurai, S; Abraham, J T; Srivastava, A K; Moorthy, M Nataraja; Shukla, S K; Anjaneyulu, Y

    2005-07-01

    X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) data for eight beta-lactam viz., ampicillin sodium, ampicillin trihydrate, penicillin G procaine, benzathine penicillin, benzyl penicillin sodium, cefalexin, cefotaxime sodium and ceftriaxone sodium; three tetracyclines viz., doxycycline hydrochloride, oxytetracycline dihydrate and tetracycline hydrochloride; and two macrolide viz., azithromycin and erythromycin estolate antibiotic drugs were obtained using a powder diffractometer. The drugs were scanned from Bragg angles (2theta) of 10 degrees to 70 degrees. The obtained data were tabulated in terms of the lattice spacing (A) and relative line intensities (I/I(I)). This new information may be useful for identifying these drugs from confiscated materials, which has been frequently encountered in forensic laboratories.

  3. Macrolide resistance gene mreA of Streptococcus agalactiae encodes a flavokinase.

    PubMed

    Clarebout, G; Villers, C; Leclercq, R

    2001-08-01

    The mreA gene from Streptococcus agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta, resistant to macrolides and clindamycin by active efflux, has recently been cloned in Escherichia coli, where it was reported to confer macrolide resistance (J. Clancy, F. Dib-Hajj, J. W. Petitpas, and W. Yuan, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:2719--2723, 1997). Cumulative data suggested that the mreA gene was located on the chromosome of S. agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of mreA revealed significant homology with several bifunctional flavokinases/(flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) synthetases, which convert riboflavin to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and FMN to FAD, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography experiments showed that the mreA gene product had a monofunctional flavokinase activity, similar to that of RibR from Bacillus subtilis. Sequences identical to those of the mreA gene and of a 121-bp upstream region containing a putative promoter were detected in strains of S. agalactiae UCN4, UCN5, and UCN6 susceptible to macrolides. mreA and its allele from S. agalactiae UCN4 were cloned on the shuttle vector pAT28. Both constructs were introduced into E. coli, where they conferred a similar two- to fourfold increase in the MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, and clindamycin. The MICs of a variety of other molecules, including crystal violet, acriflavin, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and antibiotics, such as certain cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, nalidixic acid, novobiocin, and rifampin, were also increased. In contrast, resistance to these compounds was not detected when the constructs were introduced into E. faecalis JH2-2. In conclusion, the mreA gene was probably resident in S. agalactiae and may encode a metabolic function. We could not provide any evidence that it was responsible for macrolide resistance in S. agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta; broad-spectrum resistance conferred by the gene in E. coli could involve multidrug efflux pumps

  4. Recombineering reveals a diverse collection of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 that confer resistance to macrolide antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Elie J.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 confer resistance to erythromycin and other macrolide antibiotics in a variety of bacteria. L4 and L22 have elongated loops whose tips converge in the peptide exit tunnel near the macrolide binding site, and resistance mutations typically affect residues within these loops. Here, we use bacteriophage λ Red-mediated recombination, or “recombineering”, to uncover new L4 and L22 alleles that confer macrolide resistance in Escherichia coli. We randomized residues at the tips of the L4 and L22 loops using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries, and selected the mutagenized cells for erythromycin-resistant mutants. These experiments led to the identification of 341 different resistance mutations encoding 278 unique L4 and L22 proteins – the overwhelming majority of which are novel. Many resistance mutations were complex, involving multiple missense mutations, in-frame deletions, and insertions. Transfer of L4 and L22 mutations into wild-type cells by phage P1-mediated transduction demonstrated that each allele was sufficient to confer macrolide resistance. Although L4 and L22 mutants are typically resistant to most macrolides, selections carried out on different antibiotics revealed macrolide-specific resistance mutations. L22 Lys90Trp is one such allele, which confers resistance to erythromycin, but not tylosin or spiramycin. Purified L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes show reduced erythromycin binding, but have the same affinity for tylosin as wild-type ribosomes. Moreover, DMS methylation protection assays demonstrated that L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes bind tylosin more readily than erythromycin in vivo. This work underscores the exceptional functional plasticity of the L4 and L22 proteins, and highlights the utility of Red-mediated recombination in targeted genetic selections. PMID:19150357

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Macrolide-Resistant Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Collected from Blood and Respiratory Specimens in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Sangvik, M.; Caugant, D. A.; Høiby, E. A.; Simonsen, G. S.; Sundsfjord, A.

    2005-01-01

    Norway has a low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, including macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MRSP). In a nationwide surveillance program, a total of 2,200 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from blood cultures and respiratory tract specimens. Macrolide resistance was detected in 2.7%. M-type macrolide resistance was found in 60% of resistant isolates, and these were mainly mef(A)-positive, serotype-14 invasive isolates. The erm(B)-encoded macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) type dominated among the noninvasive isolates. One strain had an A2058G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Coresistance to other antibiotics was seen in 96% of the MLSB-type isolates, whereas 92% of the M-type isolates were susceptible to other commonly used antimicrobial agents. Serotypes 14, 6B, and 19F accounted for 84% of the macrolide-resistant isolates, with serotype 14 alone accounting for 67% of the invasive isolates. A total of 29 different sequence types (STs) were detected by multilocus sequence typing. Twelve STs were previously reported international resistant clones, and 75% of the macrolide-resistant isolates had STs identical or closely related to these clones. Eleven isolates displayed 10 novel STs, and 7/11 of these “Norwegian strains” coexpressed MLSB and tetracycline resistance, indicating the presence of Tn1545. The invasive serotype-14 isolates were all classified as ST9 or single-locus variants of this clone. ST9 is a mef-positive M-type clone, commonly known as England14-9, reported from several European countries. These observations suggest that the import of major international MRSP clones and the local spread of Tn1545 are the major mechanisms involved in the evolution and dissemination of MRSP in Norway. PMID:15872231

  6. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  7. Mandelalides A-D, cytotoxic macrolides from a new Lissoclinum species of South African tunicate.

    PubMed

    Sikorska, Justyna; Hau, Andrew M; Anklin, Clemens; Parker-Nance, Shirley; Davies-Coleman, Michael T; Ishmael, Jane E; McPhail, Kerry L

    2012-07-20

    Mandelalides A-D are variously glycosylated, unusual polyketide macrolides isolated from a new species of Lissoclinum ascidian collected from South Africa, Algoa Bay near Port Elizabeth and the surrounding Nelson Mandela Metropole. Their planar structures were elucidated on submilligram samples by comprehensive analysis of 1D and 2D NMR data, supported by mass spectrometry. The assignment of relative configuration was accomplished by consideration of homonuclear and heteronuclear coupling constants in tandem with ROESY data. The absolute configuration was assigned for mandelalide A after chiral GC-MS analysis of the hydrolyzed monosaccharide (2-O-methyl-α-L-rhamnose) and consideration of ROESY correlations between the monosaccharide and aglycone in the intact natural product. The resultant absolute configuration of the mandelalide A macrolide was extrapolated to propose the absolute configurations of mandelalides B-D. Remarkably, mandelalide B contained the C-4' epimeric 2-O-methyl-6-dehydro-α-L-talose. Mandelalides A and B showed potent cytotoxicity to human NCI-H460 lung cancer cells (IC(50), 12 and 44 nM, respectively) and mouse Neuro-2A neuroblastoma cells (IC(50), 29 and 84 nM, respectively).

  8. Hydrolysis of amphenicol and macrolide antibiotics: Chloramphenicol, florfenicol, spiramycin, and tylosin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon M; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotics that enter the environment can present human and ecological health risks. An understanding of antibiotic hydrolysis rates is important for predicting their environmental persistence as biologically active contaminants. In this study, hydrolysis rates and Arrhenius constants were determined as a function of pH and temperature for two amphenicol (chloramphenicol and florfenicol) and two macrolide (spiramycin and tylosin) antibiotics. Antibiotic hydrolysis rates in pH 4-9 buffer solutions at 25°C, 50°C, and 60°C were quantified, and degradation products were characterized. All of the antibiotics tested remained stable and exhibited no observable hydrolysis under ambient conditions typical of aquatic ecosystems. Acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis occurred at elevated temperatures (50-60°C), and hydrolysis rates increased considerably below pH 5 and above pH 8. Hydrolysis rates also increased approximately 1.5- to 2.9-fold for each 10°C increase in temperature. Based on the degradation product masses found, the functional groups that underwent hydrolysis were alkyl fluoride, amide, and cyclic ester (lactone) moieties; some of the resultant degradation products may remain bioactive, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. The results of this research demonstrate that amphenicol and macrolide antibiotics persist in aquatic systems under ambient temperature and pH conditions typical of natural waters. Thus, these antibiotics may present a risk in aquatic ecosystems depending on the concentration present.

  9. Detection of the macrolide-efflux protein A gene mef(A) in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Karin; Hölzel, Christina; Bauer, Johann

    2011-09-01

    The mef(A) gene codes for an efflux protein that conveys resistance to 14- and 15-membered macrolides. Enterococci are emerging pathogens, as well as indicator and reservoir bacteria that are known to have a strong tendency to acquire resistance genes. A total of 485 Enterococcus faecalis strains of porcine (n = 239) and human origin (n = 246) were screened for the presence of the mef(A) gene by using polymerase chain reaction. In total, 29 E. faecalis of porcine (n = 10) and human (n = 19) origin were positive for the presence of the mef(A) gene. Most of the mef(A)-containing strains were isolated from fecal samples of healthy individuals; only one strain originated from a stool sample of a diseased pig. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of the mef(A) gene in E. faecalis apart from mating experiments. The main clinical relevance of this study is that donor E. faecalis might transfer the mef(A) gene to recipients that are usually combated with macrolides. Hence, the role of E. faecalis as a resistance reservoir with respect to limited treatment options are a cause for concern.

  10. In vitro synergy testing of macrolide-quinolone combinations against 41 clinical isolates of Legionella.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S J; Pendland, S L; Chen, C; Schreckenberger, P; Danziger, L H

    1996-01-01

    Combination antimicrobial therapy against Legionella species has not been well studied. Several quinolones have activity against Legionella strains, which prompted this in vitro search for a synergistic combination with the macrolides. By a checkerboard assay, erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin, each in combination with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, were tested for synergy against 46 isolates of Legionella. The agar dilution method was employed using buffered charcoal-yeast extract media. A final inoculum of 10(4) CFU per spot was prepared from 24-h growth of each isolate. Plates were incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h. Synergy, partial synergy, additive effect, or indifference was observed for all combinations of antibiotics tested. There was no antagonism observed. Synergy occurred to a significantly greater extent for the clarithromycin-levofloxacin (P = 0.0001) and azithromycin-levofloxacin (P = 0.003) combinations versus erythromycin-levofloxacin. The azithromycin-ciprofloxacin combination demonstrated significantly greater synergy than did either erythromycin-ciprofloxacin (P = 0.003) or clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin (P = 0.001). The newer macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin may be more active in combination with a fluoroquinolone than is erythromycin. PMID:8726012

  11. Mandelalides A-D, cytotoxic macrolides from a new Lissoclinum species of South African tunicate

    PubMed Central

    Sikorska, Justyna; Hau, Andrew M.; Anklin, Clemens; Parker-Nance, Shirley; Davies-Coleman, Michael T.; Ishmael, Jane E.; McPhail, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Mandelalides A-D are variously glycosylated, unusual polyketide macrolides isolated from a new species of Lissoclinum ascidian collected from South Africa, Algoa Bay near Port Elizabeth and the surrounding Nelson Mandela Metropole. Their planar structures were elucidated on sub-milligram samples by comprehensive analysis of 1D and 2D NMR data, supported by mass spectrometry. The assignment of relative configuration was accomplished by consideration of homonuclear and heteronuclear coupling constants in tandem with ROESY data. The absolute configuration was assigned for mandelalide A after chiral GC-MS analysis of the hydrolyzed monosaccharide (2-O-methyl-α-L-rhamnose) and consideration of ROESY correlations between the monosaccharide and aglycone in the intact natural product. The resultant absolute configuration of the mandelalide A macrolide was extrapolated to propose the absolute configurations of mandelalides B-D. Remarkably, mandelalide B contained the C-4′ epimeric 2-O-methyl-6-dehydro-α-L-talose. Mandelalides A and B showed potent cytotoxicity to human NCI-H460 lung cancer cells (IC50, 12 and 44 nM, respectively) and mouse Neuro-2A neuroblastoma cells (IC50, 29 and 84 nM, respectively). PMID:22712890

  12. Functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis of acquired and intrinsic macrolide phosphotransferases in the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Sui, Zhihai; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Meilin; Chen, Weiqi; Feng, Jie

    2015-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group is composed of Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria of clinical and ecological importance. More than 200 B. cereus group isolates have been sequenced. However, there are few reports of B. cereus group antibiotic resistance genes. This study identified two functional classes of macrolide phosphotransferases (Mphs) in the B. cereus group. Cluster A Mphs inactivate 14- and 15-membered macrolides while Cluster B Mphs inactivate 14-, 15- and 16-membered compounds. The genomic region surrounding the Cluster B Mph gene is related to various plasmid sequences, suggesting that this gene is an acquired resistance gene. In contrast, the Cluster A Mph gene is located in a chromosomal region conserved among all B. cereus group isolates, and data indicated that it was acquired early in the evolution of the group. Therefore, the Cluster A gene can be considered an intrinsic resistance gene. However, the gene itself is not present in all strains and our comparative genomics analyses showed that it is exchanged among strains of the B. cereus group by the mean of homologous recombination. These results provide an alternative mechanism to intrinsic resistance.

  13. Reaction of some macrolide antibiotics with the ribosome. Labeling of the binding site components

    SciTech Connect

    Tejedor, F.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1986-11-18

    Radioactive carbomycin A, niddamycin, tylosin, and spiramycin, but not erythromycin, can be covalently bound to Escherichia coli ribosomes by incubation at 37 degrees C. The incorporation of radioactivity into the particles is inhibited by SH- and activated double bond containing compounds but not by amino groups, suggesting that the reactions may take place by addition to the double bond present in the reactive antibiotics. This thermic reaction must be different from the photoreaction described for some of these macrolides (Tejedor, F., and Ballesta, J. P. G. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 467-472) since tylosin, which is not photoincorporated, is thermically bound to ribosomes. Most of the radioactivity is incorporated into the ribosomal proteins. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled by carbomycin A, niddamycin, and tylosin indicates that about 40% of the radioactivity is bound to protein L27; the rest is distributed among several other proteins such as L8, L2, and S12, to differing extents depending on the drug used. These results indicate, in accordance with previous data, that protein L27 plays an important role in the macrolide binding site, confirming that these drugs bind near the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

  14. In vitro synergy testing of macrolide-quinolone combinations against 41 clinical isolates of Legionella.

    PubMed

    Martin, S J; Pendland, S L; Chen, C; Schreckenberger, P; Danziger, L H

    1996-06-01

    Combination antimicrobial therapy against Legionella species has not been well studied. Several quinolones have activity against Legionella strains, which prompted this in vitro search for a synergistic combination with the macrolides. By a checkerboard assay, erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin, each in combination with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, were tested for synergy against 46 isolates of Legionella. The agar dilution method was employed using buffered charcoal-yeast extract media. A final inoculum of 10(4) CFU per spot was prepared from 24-h growth of each isolate. Plates were incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h. Synergy, partial synergy, additive effect, or indifference was observed for all combinations of antibiotics tested. There was no antagonism observed. Synergy occurred to a significantly greater extent for the clarithromycin-levofloxacin (P = 0.0001) and azithromycin-levofloxacin (P = 0.003) combinations versus erythromycin-levofloxacin. The azithromycin-ciprofloxacin combination demonstrated significantly greater synergy than did either erythromycin-ciprofloxacin (P = 0.003) or clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin (P = 0.001). The newer macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin may be more active in combination with a fluoroquinolone than is erythromycin.

  15. Nationwide monitoring of selected antibiotics: Distribution and sources of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and macrolides in Japanese rivers.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ayako; Takada, Hideshige; Mutoh, Kunihiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Harada, Arata; Nakada, Norihide

    2011-11-15

    We report the results of a nationwide survey of commonly used human and veterinary antibiotics (7 sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and 4 macrolides) in 37 Japanese rivers. Concentrations of the sum of the 12 target antibiotics ranged from undetectable to 626 ng/L, with a median of 7.3 ng/L for the 37 rivers. Antibiotics concentrations were higher in urban rivers than in rural rivers and were correlated with those of molecular markers of sewage (crotamiton and carbamazepine). Macrolides were dominant over sulfonamides in urban rivers. Sulfonamides, especially sulfamethazine (used in animals), were dominant in a few rivers in whose catchment animal husbandry is active. However, these signals of veterinary antibiotics were overwhelmed by those of human antibiotics in lower reaches of most rivers. The analysis of the antibiotics in all 88 samples showed that the target antibiotics in Japanese rivers are derived mainly from urban sewage, even though larger amounts of antibiotics are used in livestock. Most of the livestock waste-derived antibiotics are unlikely to be readily discharged to surface waters.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bovine digital dermatitis treponemes identifies macrolides for in vivo efficacy testing.

    PubMed

    Evans, N J; Brown, J M; Hartley, C; Smith, R F; Carter, S D

    2012-12-07

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a major infectious lameness of dairy cattle and sheep considered to be caused by treponemes. The aim of this study was to identify antibiotics effective against DD treponemes that might be useful in the treatment of ruminant DD in the future or to identify antibiotics useful in isolation studies. Here, a microdilution method was used to identify in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of treponemes cultured from DD lesions to eight relevant antibiotics. DD treponemes exhibited highest susceptibility to amoxicillin, azithromycin and gamithromycin. Unfortunately, amoxicillin whilst having potential for DD treatment in other animals (e.g. sheep) would require milk withhold periods in dairy cattle. DD treponemes were not particularly susceptible to two cephalosporins: cefalexin and ceftiofur, which do not require milk withhold. The bacteria demonstrated low susceptibility to trimethoprim and especially colistin suggesting these antimicrobials may be particularly useful in isolation of DD treponemes. The most promising high susceptibility results for macrolides indicate a rationale to consider veterinary licensed macrolides as DD treatments. Furthermore, given the DD treponeme antibiotic susceptibility similarities to established treatments for human treponematoses, identification of treponemacidal, long acting β-lactam analogues not requiring milk withhold may allow for development of a successful treatment for dairy cattle DD.

  17. Macrolide and Clindamycin Resistance in Group a Streptococci Isolated From Children With Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory P; Sterkel, Alana K; Kubica, Phillip A; Duster, Megan N; Reed, Kurt D; Wald, Ellen R

    2017-03-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for 15%-30% of cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Macrolides such as azithromycin have become popular for treating GAS pharyngitis. We report macrolide resistance rates in a primary care setting in our geographic area over the past 5 years and discuss the implications of resistance in making treatment decisions. Throat swabs were collected from children with pharyngitis from May 2011 to May 2015 in a primary care setting in Madison, Wisconsin. Susceptibility testing was performed for erythromycin and clindamycin using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. GAS was identified on 143 throat cultures. Overall, 15% of GAS isolates demonstrated nonsusceptibility for both clindamycin and erythromycin. Inducible resistance (positive D-test) was detected in 17 isolates (12%). The rate of detection of nonsusceptibility in each year of the study did not change over time. Azithromycin should only be used for patients with pharyngitis and substantial manifestations of penicillin hypersensitivity and when used, susceptibility testing should always be performed.

  18. ESBL-Producing and Macrolide-Resistant Shigella sonnei Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2015.

    PubMed

    Mook, Piers; McCormick, Jacquelyn; Bains, Manpreet; Cowley, Lauren A; Chattaway, Marie A; Jenkins, Claire; Mikhail, Amy; Hughes, Gwenda; Elson, Richard; Day, Martin; Manuel, Rohini; Dave, Jayshree; Field, Nigel; Godbole, Gauri; Dallman, Timothy; Crook, Paul

    2016-11-01

    In England in 2015, Shigella sonnei isolates from men who have sex with men produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases and exhibited macrolide resistance. Whole-genome sequencing showed a close relationship among the isolates, which harbored a plasmid that was previously identified in a shigellosis outbreak among this population but has acquired a mobile element.

  19. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  20. Bioconversion of 12-, 14-, and 16-membered ring aglycones to glycosylated macrolides in an engineered strain of Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Seok; Han, Ah Reum; Hong, Jay Sung Joong; Park, Sung Ryeol; Choi, Cha Yong; Park, Je Won; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2007-10-01

    To develop a system for combinatorial biosynthesis of glycosylated macrolides, Streptomyces venezuelae was genetically manipulated to be deficient in the production of its macrolide antibiotics by deletion of the entire biosynthetic gene cluster encoding the pikromycin polyketide synthases and desosamine biosynthetic enzymes. Two engineered deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways for the biosynthesis of thymidine diphosphate (TDP)-D-quinovose or TDP-D-olivose in conjunction with the glycosyltransferase-auxiliary protein pair DesVII/DesVIII derived from S. venezuelae were expressed in the mutant strain. Feeding the representative 12-, 14-, and 16-membered ring macrolactones including 10-deoxymethynolide, narbonolide, and tylactone, respectively, to each mutant strain capable of producing TDP-D-quinovose or TDP-D-olivose resulted in the successful production of the corresponding quinovose- and olivose-glycosylated macrolides. In mutant strains where the DesVII/DesVIII glycosyltransferase-auxiliary protein pair was replaced by TylMII/TylMIII derived from Streptomyces fradiae, quinovosyl and olivosyl tylactone were produced; however, neither glycosylated 10-deoxymethynolide nor narbonolide were generated, suggesting that the glycosyltransferase TylMII has more stringent substrate specificity toward its aglycones than DesVII. These results demonstrate successful generation of structurally diverse hybrid macrolides using a S. venezuelae in vivo system and provide further insight into the substrate flexibility of glycosyltransferases.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of quinolone, macrolide, and tetracycline resistance among Campylobacter isolates from initial stages of broiler production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, D; Herrera-León, S; García-Peña, F J; Abad-Moreno, J C; Echeita, M A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance mechanisms of quinolones, macrolides and tetracycline in campylobacter isolates from grandparent and parent broiler breeders in Spain. Twenty-six isolates were investigated for quinolone resistance, three isolates for macrolide resistance and 39 for tetracycline resistance. All of the quinolone-resistant isolates possessed the mutation Thr86Ile in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA and one isolate possessed the mutation Pro104Ser. Only one Campylobacter coli population (defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction of flaA and pulsed field gel electrophoresis) was resistant to erythromycin, and the mutation A2075G (23S rDNA) was responsible for macrolide resistance. The tetO gene was found in all of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. Twenty-two out of the 39 isolates investigated by Southern blot possessed chromosomic location of tetO and 17 were located on plasmids. Most of the plasmids with tetO were of around 60 kb and conjugation was demonstrated in a selection of them. In conclusion, we showed that Thr86Ile is highly prevalent in quinolone-resistant isolates as well as mutation A2075G in macrolide-resistant isolates of poultry origin. More variability was found for tetO. The possibility of horizontal transmission of tetO among campylobacter isolates is also an issue of concern in public health.

  2. A stochastic assessment of the public health risks of the use of macrolide antibiotics in food animals.

    PubMed

    Hurd, H Scott; Malladi, Sasidhar

    2008-06-01

    Campylobacteriosis is an important food-borne illness with more than a million U.S. cases annually. Antibiotic treatment is usually not required. However, erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, is recommended for the treatment of severe cases. Therefore, it is considered a critically important antibiotic and given special attention as to the risk that food animal use will lead to resistant infections and compromised human treatment. To assess this risk, we used a retrospective approach; estimating the number of campylobacteriosis cases caused by specific meat consumption utilizing the preventable fraction. We then determined the number of cases with macrolide resistance Campylobacter spp. based on a linear model relating the resistance fraction to on-farm macrolide use. In this article, we considered the uncertainties in the parameter estimates, utilized a more elaborate model of resistance development and separated C. coli and C. jejuni. There are no published data for the probability of compromised treatment outcome due to macrolide resistance. Therefore, our estimates of compromised treatment outcome were based on data for fluoroquinolone-resistant infections. The conservative results show the human health risks are extremely low. For example, the predicted risk of suboptimal human treatment of infection with C. coli from swine is only 1 in 82 million; with a 95% chance it could be as high as 1 in 49 million. Risks from C. jejuni in poultry or beef are even less. Reduced antibiotic use can adversely impact animal health. These low human risks should be weighed against the alternative risks.

  3. ESBL-Producing and Macrolide-Resistant Shigella sonnei Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2015

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Jacquelyn; Bains, Manpreet; Cowley, Lauren A.; Chattaway, Marie A.; Jenkins, Claire; Mikhail, Amy; Hughes, Gwenda; Elson, Richard; Day, Martin; Manuel, Rohini; Dave, Jayshree; Field, Nigel; Godbole, Gauri; Dallman, Timothy; Crook, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In England in 2015, Shigella sonnei isolates from men who have sex with men produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases and exhibited macrolide resistance. Whole-genome sequencing showed a close relationship among the isolates, which harbored a plasmid that was previously identified in a shigellosis outbreak among this population but has acquired a mobile element. PMID:27767929

  4. Non-antibiotic 12-membered macrolides: design, synthesis and biological evaluation in a cigarette-smoking model.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akihiro; Shima, Hideaki; Sueki, Akito; Hirose, Tomoyasu; Matsui, Hidehito; Nakano, Hayato; Hanaki, Hideaki; Akagawa, Kiyoko S; Ōmura, Satoshi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    The 14-membered macrolide erythromycin A expresses three distinct biological properties, including antibacterial activity, gastrointestinal motor-stimulating activity and anti-inflammatory and/or immunomodulatory effects. Although low-dose, long-term therapy using 14- and 15-membered macrolides displaying anti-inflammatory and/or immunomodulatory activity effectively treats diffuse panbronchiolitis and chronic sinusitis, bacterial resistance may emerge. To address this issue, we developed the 12-membered non-antibiotic macrolide (8R,9S)-8,9-dihydro-6,9-epoxy-8,9-anhydropseudoerythromycin A (EM900) that promotes monocyte to macrophage differentiation, a marker for anti-inflammatory and/or immunomodulatory effects, without possessing antibacterial activity. In this article, we report that the new macrolide derivative (8R,9S) -de(3'-N-methyl)-3'-N-(p-chlorobenzyl)-de(3-O-cladinosyl)-3-dehydro-8,9-dihydro-6,9-epoxy-8,9-anhydropseudoerythromycin A 12,13-carbonate (EM939) exhibited stronger promotive activity for monocyte to macrophage differentiation than that of the parent compound EM900 in addition to reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 cells and antibacterial inactivity. In a cigarette-smoking model used to simulate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the EM900 derivatives significantly attenuated lung and alveolar inflations, functionally and histologically, via oral administration. Because of these marked therapeutic effects, non-antibiotic EM900 derivatives may become central to the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as COPD.

  5. mef(A) is the predominant macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bley, Christine; van der Linden, Mark; Reinert, Ralf René

    2011-05-01

    In this study, macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Germany were carefully characterised by susceptibility testing, phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of macrolides resistance genes, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Of 2045 S. pneumoniae and 352 S. pyogenes isolates, 437 (21.4%) and 29 (8.2%), respectively, were found to be macrolide-resistant. Amongst the S. pneumoniae isolates, the most prevalent resistance marker was mef(A) (57.7%) followed by erm(B) (27.0%) and mef(E) (11.2%). Of note, the dual resistance mechanism mef(E)+erm(B) was found in a relatively high proportion (4.1%) of pneumococcal isolates. Amongst the S. pyogenes isolates, 31.0% carried mef(A), 34.5% erm(B) and 13.8% erm(A). Dissemination of a single clone [mef(A)-positive England(14)-9] has significantly contributed to the emergence of macrolide resistance amongst pneumococci in Germany.

  6. A CASE STUDY: CROP (LETTUCE, SPINACH, AND CARROTS) UPTAKE OF THREE MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS (AZITHROMYCIN, CLINDAMYCIN AND ROXITHROMYCIN) AND OTHER DRUGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that human-use macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, clindamycin, and roxithromycin) are environmentally available in wastewaters, source waters, and biosolids. In order to better understand the fate of these compounds into food crops via root migration, we condu...

  7. Characterization of Streptomyces padanus JAU4234, a Producer of Actinomycin X2, Fungichromin, and a New Polyene Macrolide Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Jiang-Huai; Wei, Sai-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Strain JAU4234, identified as Streptomyces padanus, was isolated from soil collected in Jiangxi Province, China. It produced actinomycin X2, fungichromin, and a new polyene macrolide compound with antifungal activity, antifungalmycin 702. Antifungalmycin 702 had good general antifungal activity and may have potential future agricultural and/or clinical applications. PMID:22057866

  8. D test: a simple test with big implication for Staphylococcus aureus macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB resistance pattern.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Rana, S S

    2014-09-01

    D test is a simple disc diffusion test giving high throughput results. It is used to study the macrolide lincosamide streptogramin resistance (MLSB), both constitutive and inducible as well as macrolide streptogramin resistance (MSB) in Staphylococcus aureus. In this test, erythromycin (macrolide) and clindamycin (lincosamide derivative) discs are placed adjacent to each other over the Mueller Hinton agar medium inoculated with the test organism. The growth of the organism up to the edges of the disc, flattening of the clindamycin zone (D test positive) near the erythromycin disc (resistant) and susceptible to both antibiotics implicate that the organism is having constitutive MLSB (CMLSB), inducible MLSB (IMLSB) and no resistance respectively. Further, the organism susceptible to clindamycin without any flattening of the zone (D test negative) near clindamycin disc (resistant) implicates that the organism is having macrolide streptogramin resistance (MSB). The test is performed in the same MHA plate in which the antibiotic sensitivity test is being done, taking into consideration that the discs are placed adjacent to each other maintaining the distance. Since clindamycin and streptogramin are among the few drugs of choice in the treatment of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, knowing the resistance to these antibiotics is imperative.

  9. Macrolide antibiotics promote the LPS-induced upregulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and thus attenuate macrolide suppression of IL-6 production.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshinori; Kaneko, Kenichi; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    2007-03-01

    We studied the influence of the inhibitory effect of clarithromycin (CAM) and erythromycin (EM) on the production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), as well as PGE(2) receptor (EP(2)) expression, by LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Production of IL-6 was significantly decreased by treatment with CAM or EM in a dose-dependent manner, but the inhibitory effect of CAM was significantly weaker than that of EM. In contrast, the production of MIP-2 and PGE(2) was inhibited to the same extent by CAM and EM. LPS induced the expression of EP(2) mRNA and its expression was promoted further by treatment with CAM or EM. In particular, CAM significantly upregulated EP(2) mRNA expression compared with that after stimulation by LPS alone. After treatment with a nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor (indomethacin), a selective COX-2 inhibitor (NS398), or an EP(2)/EP(4) receptor antagonist (AH6809), the inhibitory effect of CAM and EM on LPS-induced IL-6 production was equalized. These results indicate that macrolide antibiotics upregulate the expression of EP(2), which then attenuates the suppressive effect on IL-6 production of these antibiotics, suggesting that these drugs have a variable anti-inflammatory effect that could influence host defenses.

  10. Effect of Fluoroquinolones and Macrolides on Eradication and Resistance of Haemophilus influenzae in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Tsuji, Brian T.; Gent, Janneane F.; Kong, Yong; Holden, Patricia N.; Sethi, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of antibiotics on eradication of carriage and development of resistance in Haemophilus influenzae in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our goals were to assess antibiotic susceptibilities, prevalence of resistance genes, and development of resistance in H. influenzae and to evaluate the effect of macrolide and fluoroquinolone administration on H. influenzae eradication. Data were from a 15-year longitudinal study of COPD. Genome sequence data were used to determine genotype and identify resistance genes. MICs of antibiotics were determined by reference broth microdilution. Generalized linear mixed models were used to evaluate associations between antibiotic use and H. influenzae eradication. We examined 267 H. influenzae isolates from 77 individuals. All newly acquired H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to azithromycin. Five of 27 (19%) strains developed 4-fold increases in azithromycin MICs and reached or exceeded the susceptibility breakpoint (≤4 μg/ml) during exposure. H. influenzae isolates were uniformly susceptible to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin (MIC90s of 0.015, 0.015, and 0.06, respectively); there were no mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. Fluoroquinolone administration was associated with increased H. influenzae eradication compared to macrolides (odds ratio [OR], 16.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.67 to 104.09). There was no difference in H. influenzae eradication when comparing macrolide administration to no antibiotic (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 0.43 to 8.30). Fluoroquinolones are effective in eradicating H. influenzae in individuals with COPD. Macrolides are ineffective in eradicating H. influenzae, and their use in COPD patients may lead to decreased macrolide susceptibility and resistance. PMID:27139476

  11. In vitro effects of four macrolides (roxithromycin, spiramycin, azithromycin (CP-62,993), and A-56268) on Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.R.; Pechere, J.C.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of four macrolides against intracellular Toxoplasma gondii was determined in three different in vitro systems. Unactivated murine peritoneal macrophages were infected with the virulent RH strain of T. gondii. The activity of the macrolides was first measured with (/sup 3/H)uracil, which is incorporated by the parasite but not the host cell. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and 95% confidence limits were calculated at 54 (38 to 73), 140 (98 to 201), 147 (101 to 214), and 246 (187 to 325) micron for roxithromycin, azithromycin (CP-62,993), A-56268, and spiramycin, respectively. Inhibition of Toxoplasma growth was confirmed by microscopic examination of the infected macrophages after treatment with roxithromycin. Compared with untreated controls, roxithromycin concentrations near the IC50s decreased the number of infected cells, the number of tachyzoites per vacuole, and the number of cells containing rosettes (i.e., clusters of more than eight tachyzoites). After treatment with the four macrolides, tachyzoites were released from the macrophages and subcultured in HeLa cells, which are nonprofessional phagocytes, to assess the viability of the remaining parasites. This showed that the macrolides at concentrations corresponding to four times their 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC90s) had no significant killing effect. At 8 times the IC90, roxithromycin showed an incomplete killing effect, similar to that of the combination of pyrimethamine (0.41 microM)-sulfadiazine (99.42 microM). All macrolides tested showed inhibitory effects against intracellular T. gondii, but amounts of azithromycin and A-56268 corresponding to the IC90 appeared to be toxic against the host macrophages, which might have had nonspecific activity against Toxoplasma metabolism.

  12. Two New Mechanisms of Macrolide Resistance in Clinical Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Eastern Europe and North America

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A.; Davies, T.; Appelbaum, P. C.; Depardieu, F.; Courvalin, P.; Petitpas, J.; Wondrack, L.; Walker, A.; Jacobs, M. R.; Sutcliffe, J.

    2000-01-01

    Resistance to macrolides in pneumococci is generally mediated by methylation of 23S rRNA via erm(B) methylase which can confer a macrolide (M)-, lincosamide (L)-, and streptogramin B (SB)-resistant (MLSB) phenotype or by drug efflux via mef(A) which confers resistance to 14- and 15-membered macrolides only. We studied 20 strains with unusual ML or MSB phenotypes which did not harbor erm(B) or mef(A). The strains had been isolated from patients in Eastern Europe and North America from 1992 to 1998. These isolates were found to contain mutations in genes for either 23S rRNA or ribosomal proteins. Three strains from the United States with an ML phenotype, each representing a different clone, were characterized as having an A2059G (Escherichia coli numbering) change in three of the four 23S rRNA alleles. Susceptibility to macrolides and lincosamides decreased as the number of alleles in isogenic strains containing A2059G increased. Sixteen MSB strains from Eastern Europe were found to contain a 3-amino-acid substitution (69GTG71 to TPS) in a highly conserved region of the ribosomal protein L4 (63KPWRQKGTGRAR74). These strains formed several distinct clonal types. The single MSB strain from Canada contained a 6-amino-acid L4 insertion (69GTGREKGTGRAR), which impacted growth rate and also conferred a 500-fold increase in MIC on the ketolide telithromycin. These macrolide resistance mechanisms from clinical isolates are similar to those recently described for laboratory-derived mutants. PMID:11083646

  13. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  14. Generation of multiple bioactive macrolides by hybrid modular polyketide synthases in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeo Joon; Beck, Brian J; Kim, Beom Seok; Kang, Han Young; Reynolds, Kevin A; Sherman, David H

    2002-02-01

    The plasmid-based replacement of the multifunctional protein subunits of the pikromycin PKS in S. venezuelae by the corresponding subunits from heterologous modular PKSs resulted in recombinant strains that produce both 12- and 14-membered ring macrolactones with predicted structural alterations. In all cases, novel macrolactones were produced and further modified by the DesVII glycosyltransferase and PikC hydroxylase, leading to biologically active macrolide structures. These results demonstrate that hybrid PKSs in S. venezuelae can produce a multiplicity of new macrolactones that are modified further by the highly flexible DesVII glycosyltransferase and PikC hydroxylase tailoring enzymes. This work demonstrates the unique capacity of the S. venezuelae pikromycin pathway to expand the toolbox of combinatorial biosynthesis and to accelerate the creation of novel biologically active natural products.

  15. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption. PMID:25161741

  16. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum.

    PubMed

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  17. Simultaneous determination of five tetracycline and macrolide antibiotics in feeds using HPCE.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Rao, Qinxiong; Zhu, Kui; Jiang, Zhigang; Ding, Shuangyang

    2009-12-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of HPCE in the analysis of antibiotics in a complex matrix such as feedstuffs. Using 20 mM citric acid-40 mM Na(2)HPO(4) buffer (pH 2.65), the five antibiotics, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, tilmicosin, and tylosin were successfully separated at 30 kV in a 64.5 cm x 75 microm id capillary. Good repeatability, stability, and reliability of the method were supported by <10% CV with mean recoveries of >70%, and the limit of detection of the five analytes was 0.5-1 mg/kg. It was for the first time that a capillary electrophoretic method was employed to simultaneously detect five tetracycline and macrolide antibiotics in animal feeds.

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Macrolide Rokitamycin and Chlorpromazine against Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Biancu, G.; Alberti, L.; Accardo, A.; Delogu, G.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2004-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the in vitro effectiveness of the macrolide rokitamycin and the phenothiazine compound chlorpromazine against Acanthamoeba castellanii. Growth curve evaluations revealed that both drugs inhibit trophozoite growth in dose- and time-dependent ways. The effects of both drugs when they were used at the MICs at which 100% of isolates are inhibited were amoebistatic, but at higher doses they were amoebicidal as well as cysticidal. Experiments showed that when rokitamycin was associated with chlorpromazine or amphotericin B, rokitamycin enhanced their activities. Furthermore, low doses of rokitamycin and chlorpromazine, alone or in combination, blocked the cytopathic effect of A. castellanii against WKD cells derived from the human cornea. These results may have important significance in the development of new anti-Acanthamoeba compounds. PMID:15561820

  19. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F.; Baldor, Linda C.; Howe, Alan K.; Ebert, Alicia M.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M.; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans. PMID:26271225

  20. Engineered biosynthesis of hybrid macrolide polyketides containing D-angolosamine and D-mycaminose moieties.

    PubMed

    Schell, Ursula; Haydock, Stephen F; Kaja, Andrew L; Carletti, Isabelle; Lill, Rachel E; Read, Eliot; Sheehan, Lesley S; Low, Lindsey; Fernandez, Maria-Jose; Grolle, Friederike; McArthur, Hamish A I; Sheridan, Rose M; Leadlay, Peter F; Wilkinson, Barrie; Gaisser, Sabine

    2008-09-21

    The glycosylation of natural product scaffolds with highly modified deoxysugars is often essential for their biological activity, being responsible for specific contacts to molecular targets and significantly affecting their pharmacokinetic properties. In order to provide tools for the targeted alteration of natural product glycosylation patterns, significant strides have been made to understand the biosynthesis of activated deoxysugars and their transfer. We report here efforts towards the production of plasmid-borne biosynthetic gene cassettes capable of producing TDP-activated forms of D-mycaminose, D-angolosamine and D-desosamine. We additionally describe the transfer of these deoxysugars to macrolide aglycones using the glycosyl transferases EryCIII, TylMII and AngMII, which display usefully broad substrate tolerance.

  1. In vitro activity of telithromycin against Spanish Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with characterized macrolide resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Morosini, M I; Cantón, R; Loza, E; Negri, M C; Galán, J C; Almaraz, F; Baquero, F

    2001-09-01

    The susceptibilities to telithromycin of 203 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates prospectively collected during 1999 and 2000 from 14 different geographical areas in Spain were tested and compared with those to erythromycin A, clindamycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, and levofloxacin. Telithromycin was active against 98.9% of isolates (MICs, < or =0.5 microg/ml), with MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited being 0.06 microg/ml, irrespective of the resistance genotype. The corresponding values for erythromycin were 61.0% (MICs, < or =0.25 microg/ml) and >64 microg/ml. The erm(B) gene (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotype) was detected in 36.4% (n = 74) of the isolates, which corresponded to 93.6% of erythromycin-intermediate and -resistant isolates, whereas the mef(A) gene (M phenotype [resistance to erythromycin and susceptibility to clindamycin and spiramycin without blunting]) was present in only 2.4% (n = 5) of the isolates. One of the latter isolates also carried erm(B). Interestingly, in one isolate for which the erythromycin MIC was 2 microg/ml, none of these resistance genes could be detected. Erythromycin MICs for S. pneumoniae erm(B)-positive isolates were higher (range, 0.5 to >64 microg/ml) than those for erm(B)- and mef(A)-negative isolates (range, 0.008 to 2 microg/ml). The corresponding values for telithromycin were lower for both groups, with ranges of 0.004 to 1 and 0.002 to 0.06 microg/ml, respectively. The erythromycin MIC was high for a large number of erm(B)-positive isolates, but the telithromycin MIC was low for these isolates. These results indicate the potential usefulness of telithromycin for the treatment of infections caused by erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant S. pneumoniae isolates when macrolides are indicated.

  2. Inhibition of Nef- and phorbol ester-induced CD4 degradation by macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, T; Anderson, S J; Garcia, J V

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the causative agent of AIDS. The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) causes a similar syndrome in macaques. The product of the nef gene of SIV has been shown to be important for virus replication and disease progression in vivo. In vitro, both SIV and HIV Nef downregulate surface expression of CD4 and accelerate total CD4 turnover. The mechanism by which Nef downregulates CD4 has not been established. A current model suggests that Nef enhances cell surface CD4 endocytosis and degradation in lysosomes. However, this was recently challenged when CD4 was found to accumulate in early endosomes of cells expressing Nef. Because inhibition of Nef function might halt virus replication and disease progression, we tested two macrolide antibiotics for their ability to inhibit Nef function. Concanamycin B (ConB) and bafilomycin A1 (BFLA1) are specific inhibitors of acidification of cell endosomes and lysosomes and, unlike other inhibitors, do not affect transport. Although ConB (25 nM) and BFLA1 (100 nM) blocked phorbol myristate acetate- and Nef-induced CD4 degradation in human monocyte U937 cells, CD4 surface expression was not recovered. Instead, CD4 accumulated in lysosomes. To determine if Nef is directly responsible for CD4 degradation or if they bind to each other in a manner similar to Vpu, transcripts of human CD4 and HIV-1 nef were cotranslated in vitro. Our results indicate that under our experimental conditions, Nef does not affect CD4 stability and does not associate with CD4 in this in vitro system. Our data suggest that (i) CD4 downregulation by Nef results in degradation of CD4 in lysosomes, (ii) inhibition of CD4 degradation by macrolide antibiotics does not restore surface expression, and (iii) the inhibition of CD4 expression by Nef appears to be indirect and is likely to involve cellular factors. PMID:8627671

  3. Development of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter in broilers administered subtherapeutic or therapeutic concentrations of tylosin.

    PubMed

    Ladely, Scott R; Harrison, Mark A; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Berrang, Mark E; Englen, Mark D; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2007-08-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animal production, particularly those commonly used to treat infections in humans, has become a source of debate in recent years. However, limited data are available regarding the development of resistance following the subtherapeutic or therapeutic administration of antimicrobials in animal production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the administration of therapeutic and subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin on the erythromycin susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from the ceca of treated broilers. In three replicated studies, day-of-hatch chicks were exposed to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni or C. coli. At 2 weeks of age, tylosin was administered at subtherapeutic (22 ppm, continuously in the diet) or therapeutic concentrations (529 ppm, in the drinking water for 5 days). Broilers were sacrificed weekly. Total and erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter spp. were enumerated from individual ceca plus cecal contents. Overall erythromycin resistance was observed at a higher frequency (P < 0.01) among C. coli isolates (70.8%) than among C. jejuni isolates (36.8%) following tylosin administration. Across Campylobacter species, erythromycin resistance was observed at a higher frequency (P < 0.001) when tylosin was administered at subtherapeutic (62.7%) than at therapeutic (11.4%) concentrations. Subtherapeutic administration resulted in the recovery of 83.3 and 56.1% erythromycin-resistant isolates compared with only 33.3 and 7.9% of the isolates expressing erythromycin resistance following the administration of therapeutic concentrations for C. coli and C. jejuni, respectively. Further studies are needed to determine the factors involved in the apparent difference in the acquisition of macrolide resistance in C. coli compared with C. jejuni.

  4. Macrolide Efflux in Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Mediated by a Dual Efflux Pump (mel and mef) and Is Erythromycin Inducible

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karita D.; Nisbet, Rebecca; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae due to efflux has emerged as an important worldwide clinical problem over the past decade. Efflux is mediated by the genes of the genetic element mega (macrolide efflux genetic assembly) and related elements, such as Tn1207.1. These elements contain two adjacent genes, mef (mefE or mefA) and the closely related mel gene (msrA homolog), encoding a proton motive force pump and a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog, and are transcribed as an operon (M. Del Grosso et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 40:774-778, 2004; K. Gay and D. S. Stephens, J. Infect. Dis. 184:56-65, 2001; and M. Santagati et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:2585-2587, 2000). Previous studies have shown that Mef is required for macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; however, the contribution of Mel has not been fully determined. Independent deletions were constructed in mefE and mel in the serotype 14 macrolide-resistant strains GA16638 (erythromycin [Em] MIC, 8 to 16 μg/ml) and GA17719 (Em MIC, 2 to 4 μg/ml), which contain allelic variations in the mega element. The MICs to erythromycin were significantly reduced for the independent deletion mutants of both mefE and mel compared to those of the parent strains and further reduced threefold to fourfold to Em MICs of <0.15 μg/ml with mefE mel double mutants. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, the expression of mefE in the mel deletion mutants was increased more than 10-fold. However, in the mefE deletion mutants, the expression of mel did not differ significantly from the parent strains. The expression of both mefE and mel was inducible by erythromycin. These data indicate a requirement for both Mef and Mel in the novel efflux-mediated macrolide resistance system in S. pneumoniae and other gram-positive bacteria and that the system is inducible by macrolides. PMID:16189099

  5. The AcrAB-TolC pump is involved in macrolide resistance but not in telithromycin efflux in Enterobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Renaud; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Bryskier, André; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2004-09-01

    The role of the AcrAB-TolC pump in macrolide and ketolide susceptibility in Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes was studied. Efflux pump inhibitor restored erythromycin, clarithromycin, and telithromycin susceptibilities to multidrug-resistant isolates. No modification of telithromycin accumulation was detected in E. aerogenes acrAB or tolC derivatives compared to that in the parental strain. Two independent efflux pumps, inhibited by phenylalanine arginine beta-naphthylamide, expel macrolides and telithromycin in E. aerogenes.

  6. Prospective evaluation of ResistancePlus™ MG, a new multiplex qPCR assay for the detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and macrolide resistance.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, S N; Su, J; Bradshaw, C S; Fairley, C K; Walker, S; Tan, L Y; Mokany, E; Garland, S M

    2017-04-05

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a significant pathogen for which first-line treatment is becoming less effective due to increased resistance to macrolides. As conventional culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not feasible for routine detection of this pathogen, molecular markers such as detection of mutations in the 23S rRNA gene have been described to predict resistance. Recently a novel multiplex qPCR assay, ResistancePlus™ MG, has been described for the simultaneous detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and macrolide resistance. In the current study, the clinical performance of the assay was evaluated on 1089 consecutive urine and anogenital swab samples in symptomatic and asymptomatic male and female patients. Overall, 6.0% were positive for M. genitalium, with 63.1% having macrolide resistance associated mutations. When compared to the laboratory validated qPCR method targeting the 16S rRNA gene and Sanger sequencing to determine 23S rRNA mutations, sensitivity/specificity of M. genitalium detection was 98.5%/100%, and for detection of macrolide resistance mutation was 100.0%/96.2%, respectively. This assay offers a considerable advantage in clinical settings for M. genitalium testing by making the results of macrolide resistance mutation simultaneously available, which is increasingly important with escalating macrolide resistance.

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes resistant to macrolides but sensitive to clindamycin: a common resistance pattern mediated by an efflux system.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, J; Tait-Kamradt, A; Wondrack, L

    1996-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Finland, Australia, and the United Kingdom and, more recently, Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes strains from the United States were shown to have an unusual resistance pattern to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B antibiotics. This pattern, referred to as M resistance, consists of susceptibility to clindamycin and streptogramin B antibiotics but resistance to 14- and 15-membered macrolides. An evaluation of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes among our streptococcal strains collected from 1993 to 1995 suggested that this unusual resistance pattern is not rare. Eighty-five percent (n = 66) of the S. pneumoniae and 75% (n = 28) of the S. pyogenes strains in our collection had an M phenotype. The mechanism of M resistance was not mediated by target modification, as isolated ribosomes from a pneumococcal strain bearing the M phenotype were fully sensitive to erythromycin. Further, the presence of an erm methylase was excluded with primers specific for an erm consensus sequence. However, results of studies that determined the uptake and incorporation of radiolabeled erythromycin into cells were consistent with the presence of a macrolide efflux determinant. The putative efflux determinant in streptococci seems to be distinct from the multicomponent macrolide efflux system in coagulase-negative staphylococci. The recognition of the prevalence of the M phenotype in streptococci has implications for sensitivity testing and may have an impact on the choice of antibiotic therapy in clinical practice. PMID:8843287

  8. The in-vitro activity of clarithromycin and other macrolides against the type strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR).

    PubMed

    Ridgway, G L; Mumtaz, G; Fenelon, L

    1991-02-01

    The activity of oxytetracycline and seven macrolide antibiotics was investigated against a prototype strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae in cell culture. Following incubation, inoculated cell monolayers were fixed in methanol and stained with a genus specific immunofluorescent monoclonal antibody before examination for inhibition of inclusion formation. The most active agent was clarithromycin (MIC 0.007 mg/l), followed by erythromycin (0.06 mg/l). Other macrolides were less active; josamycin and roxithromycin (0.25 mg/l), midecamycin acetate and azithromycin (0.5 mg/l) and spiramycin (4.0 mg/l). The MIC of oxytetracycline was 0.25 mg/l. Clinical evaluation of clarithromycin for C. pneumoniae lower respiratory infection is indicated.

  9. PM100117 and PM100118, new antitumor macrolides produced by a marine Streptomyces caniferus GUA-06-05-006A.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Marta; Schleissner, Carmen; Fernández, Rogelio; Rodríguez, Pilar; Reyes, Fernando; Zuñiga, Paz; de la Calle, Fernando; Cuevas, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Two new bioactive polyhydroxyl macrolide lactones PM100117 (1) and PM100118 (2) were isolated from the culture broth of the marine-derived Streptomyces caniferus GUA-06-05-006A. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic methods, mainly one-dimensional and 2D NMR and HRESI-MS. They consist of 36-membered macrolides with a side chain containing three deoxy sugars and a 1,4-naphthoquinone chromophore. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed potent cytotoxicity against three human tumor cell lines with GI50 values in the micromolar range, as well as slight antifungal activity against Candida albicans ATCC10231. In addition, both compounds alter the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing loss of membrane integrity and subsequent cell permeabilization leading to a fast and dramatic necrotic cell death.

  10. Surface-coated wooden-tip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for determination of trace fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in water.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiewei; Yu, Tiantian; Yao, Yao; Peng, Qi; Luo, Lijuan; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Xiaowei; Yang, Yunyun; Luan, Tiangang

    2017-02-15

    In this study, a surface-coated wooden-tip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (SCWT-ESI-MS) method was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of trace fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in water. First, a SCWT solid-phase microextration (SPME) probe was prepared, via silanization and sulfonation for modification of a layer of adsorbent containing both C8-chain and sulfo group on the surface of wooden tips. Then, the SCWT-SPME probe was applied for extraction of trace fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in water. The specially designed adsorbent gave the probe desirable enrichment capacity towards fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics, with enrichment factors of approximately 100-500 folds for six target analytes. After extraction, the loaded SCWT-SPME probe was directly applied for ambient MS analysis. With the application of a high voltage and some spray solvent on the SCWT-SPME probe, analytes enriched on the probe was desorbed and ionized for mass spectrometric analysis under ambient and open-air conditions. The method was sensitive, with limits of detection and quantification of 1.8-4.5 ng/L and 5.9-15.1 ng/L, respectively. The method also showed good linearity, with correlation coefficient values (r(2)) of no less than 0.9940 for six target analytes. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of six fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in tap and river water samples, and no antibiotic was found in tap water but some antibiotics were detected in river water with concentrations at dozens to hundreds nanogram-per-liter level. Standard addition experiments were also performed, and the obtained recoveries were 89-102% for tap waters and 82-92% for river waters, respectively. All the experimental results demonstrated that our proposed SCWT-ESI-MS method was rapid, sensitive, and reliable for analyzing trace antibiotics in water.

  11. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  12. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    PubMed

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  13. Comparison of charcoal- and starch-based media for testing susceptibilities of Legionella species to macrolides, azalides, and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Pendland, S L; Martin, S J; Chen, C; Schreckenberger, P C; Danziger, L H

    1997-01-01

    We compared growth characteristics of 46 Legionella strains grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract alpha (BCYE alpha) agar and buffered starch yeast extract (BSYE) agar and MICs of macrolides, azalides, and fluoroquinolones for these organisms. Growth was poor and not reproducible on BSYE agar. Growth was excellent on BCYE alpha, and MICs were easy to interpret. BCYE alpha is superior to BSYE for testing susceptibilities of Legionella species by agar dilution. PMID:9350781

  14. Novel mechanism of resistance to oxazolidinones, macrolides, and chloramphenicol in ribosomal protein L4 of the pneumococcus.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Nicole; Smith, Anthony M; Farrell, David J; Schaffner, William; Moore, Matthew; Whitney, Cynthia G; Jorgensen, James H; Klugman, Keith P

    2005-08-01

    Two clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, identified as resistant to macrolides and chloramphenicol and nonsusceptible to linezolid, were found to contain 6-bp deletions in the gene encoding riboprotein L4. The gene transformed susceptible strain R6 so that it exhibited such resistance, with the transformants also showing a fitness cost. We demonstrate a novel bacterial mechanism of resistance to chloramphenicol and nonsusceptibility to linezolid.

  15. Use of next generation sequence to investigate potential novel macrolide resistance mechanisms in a population of Moraxella catarrhalis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Li; Li, Dong-Fang; Xu, He-Ping; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ge; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Gong, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Xin; Wu, Hong-Long; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have confirmed that 23S rRNA gene mutation could be responsible for most of macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis, a recent study suggested otherwise. Next generation sequence based comparative genomics has revolutionized the mining of potential novel drug resistant mechanisms. In this study, two pairs of resistant and susceptible M. catarrhalis isolates with different multilocus sequence types, were investigated for potential differential genes or informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identified genes and SNPs were evaluated in 188 clinical isolates. From initially 12 selected differential genes and 12 informative SNPs, 10 differential genes (mboIA, mcbC, mcbI, mboIB, MCR_1794, MCR_1795, lgt2B/C, dpnI, mcbB, and mcbA) and 6 SNPs (C619T of rumA, T140C of rplF, G643A of MCR_0020, T270G of MCR_1465, C1348A of copB, and G238A of rrmA) were identified as possibly linked to macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis. Most of the identified differential genes and SNPs are related to methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or DNA, especially MCR_0020 and rrmA. Further studies are needed to determine the function and/or evolution process, of the identified genes or SNPs, to establish whether some novel or combined mechanisms are truly involved in M. catarrhalis macrolide resistance mechanism. PMID:27774989

  16. Efficacy of moxifloxacin for treatment of penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, C; Torres, A; Choudhri, S; Haverstock, D; Herrington, J; Ambler, J

    2005-11-01

    This pooled analysis of six prospective, multicentre trials aimed to determine the efficacy of moxifloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MDRSP). At a central laboratory, isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility determined (microbroth dilution). MDRSP was defined as resistance > or =3 drug classes. Patients received oral or sequential intravenous/oral 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily for 7-14 days. The primary endpoint was clinical success at test-of-cure for efficacy-valid patients with proven pretherapy S. pneumoniae infection. Of 140 S. pneumoniae isolated (112 respiratory, 28 blood), 23 (16.4%) were penicillin resistant, 26 (18.6%) macrolide resistant and 31 (22.1%) MDRSP. The moxifloxacin MIC90 was 0.25 microg/ml. Clinical cure with moxifloxacin was 95.4% (125/131) overall, and 100% (21/21) for penicillin-, 95.7% (22/23) for macrolide- and 96.4% (27/28) for multidrug-resistant strains. Moxifloxacin provided excellent clinical and bacteriological cure rates in CAP due to drug-resistant pneumococci.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from multiple provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    KONG, Ling-Cong; GAO, Duo; JIA, Bo-Yan; WANG, Zi; GAO, Yun-Hang; PEI, Zhi-Hua; LIU, Shu-Ming; XIN, Jiu-Qing; MA, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has spread widely throughout the world via animal movement and has become an important pathogen of bovine respiratory disease. However, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials for Mycoplasma bovis have not been studied in China. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolated from young cattle with respiratory infection in China. Mycoplasma bovis was detected in 32/45 bovine respiratory infection outbreaks at beef farms in 8 provinces in China. The isolates were susceptible or had medium sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and doxycycline, but were frequently resistant to macrolides (13/32, 41%). An A2058G (Escherichia coli Numbering) mutation located in the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA was observed in strains that were resistant to macrolides. This single mutations at the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA may play an important role in the resistance of Mycoplasma bovis strains to macrolides. PMID:26346744

  18. Prediction of the in vivo interaction between midazolam and macrolides based on in vitro studies using human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyomi; Ogihara, Kanako; Kanamitsu, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Tomoo

    2003-07-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that plasma concentrations of midazolam after oral administration are greatly increased by coadministration of erythromycin and clarithromycin, whereas azithromycin has little effect on midazolam concentrations. Several macrolide antibiotics are known to be mechanism-based inhibitors of CYP3A, a cytochrome P450 isoform responsible for midazolam hydroxylation. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively predict in vivo drug interactions in humans involving macrolide antibiotics with different inhibitory potencies based on in vitro studies. alpha- and 4-Hydroxylation of midazolam by human liver microsomes were evaluated as CYP3A-mediated metabolic reactions, and the effect of preincubation with macrolides was examined. The hydroxylation of midazolam was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner following preincubation with macrolides in the presence of NADPH, whereas almost no inhibition was observed without preincubation. The kinetic parameters for enzyme inactivation (K'app and kinact) involved in midazolam alpha-hydroxylation were 12.6 microM and 0.0240 min-1, respectively, for erythromycin, 41.4 microM and 0.0423 min-1, respectively, for clarithromycin, and 623 microM and 0.0158 min-1, respectively, for azithromycin. Similar results were obtained for the 4-hydroxylation pathway. These parameters and the reported pharmacokinetic parameters of midazolam and macrolides were then used to simulate in vivo interactions based on a physiological flow model. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of midazolam after oral administration was predicted to increase 2.9- or 3.0-fold following pretreatment with erythromycin (500 mg t.i.d. for 5 or 6 days, respectively) and 2.1- or 2.5-fold by clarithromycin (250 mg b.i.d. for 5 days or 500 mg b.i.d. for 7 days, respectively), whereas azithromycin (500 mg o.d. for 3 days) was predicted to have little effect on midazolam AUC. These results agreed well with the reported

  19. The influence of macrolide antibiotics on the uptake of organic anions and drugs mediated by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3.

    PubMed

    Seithel, Annick; Eberl, Sonja; Singer, Katrin; Auge, Daniel; Heinkele, Georg; Wolf, Nadine B; Dörje, Frank; Fromm, Martin F; König, Jörg

    2007-05-01

    Macrolides may cause severe drug interactions due to the inhibition of metabolizing enzymes. Transporter-mediated uptake of drugs into cells [e.g., by members of the human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) family] is a determinant of drug disposition and a prerequisite for subsequent metabolism. However whether macrolides are also inhibitors of uptake transporters, thereby providing an additional mechanism of drug interactions, has not been systematically studied. The human OATP family members OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 mediate the uptake of endogenous substances and drugs such as antibiotics and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) into hepatocytes. In this study we investigated the potential role of these uptake transporters on macrolide-induced drug interactions. By using sulfobromophthalein (BSP) and the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin as substrates, the effects of the macrolides azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and roxithromycin and of the ketolide telithromycin on the OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated uptake were analyzed. These experiments demonstrated that the OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated uptake of BSP and pravastatin can be inhibited by increasing concentrations of all macrolides except azithromycin. The IC50 values for the inhibition of OATP1B3-mediated BSP uptake were 11 microM for telithromycin, 32 microM for clarithromycin, 34 microM for erythromycin, and 37 microM for roxithromycin. These IC50 values were lower than the IC50 values for inhibition of OATP1B1-mediated BSP uptake (96-217 microM). These macrolides also inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated uptake of pravastatin. In summary, these results indicate that alterations of uptake transporter function by certain macrolides/ketolides have to be considered as a potential additional mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions.

  20. Macrolide Antibiotics Exhibit Cytotoxic Effect under Amino Acid-Depleted Culture Condition by Blocking Autophagy Flux in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Shota; Miyahara, Kana; Kazama, Hiromi; Hirota, Ayako; Takemura, Jun; Abe, Akihisa; Inazu, Masato; Hiramoto, Masaki; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, a self-digestive system for cytoplasmic components, is required to maintain the amino acid pool for cellular homeostasis. We previously reported that the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin (AZM) and clarithromycin (CAM) have an inhibitory effect on autophagy flux, and they potently enhance the cytocidal effect of various anticancer reagents in vitro. This suggests that macrolide antibiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy. Since cancer cells require a larger metabolic demand than normal cells because of their exuberant growth, upregulated autophagy in tumor cells has now become the target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we examined whether macrolides exhibit cytotoxic effect under an amino acid-starving condition in head and neck squamous cancer cell lines such as CAL 27 and Detroit 562 as models of solid tumors with an upregulated autophagy in the central region owing to hypovascularity. AZM and CAM induced cell death under the amino acid-depleted (AAD) culture condition in these cell lines along with CHOP upregulation, although they showed no cytotoxicity under the complete culture medium. CHOP knockdown by siRNA in the CAL 27 cells significantly suppressed macrolide-induced cell death under the AAD culture condition. CHOP-/- murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines also attenuated AZM-induced cell death compared with CHOP+/+ MEF cell lines. Using a tet-off atg5 MEF cell line, knockout of atg5, an essential gene for autophagy, also induced cell death and CHOP in the AAD culture medium but not in the complete culture medium. This suggest that macrolide-induced cell death via CHOP induction is dependent on autophagy inhibition. The cytotoxicity of macrolide with CHOP induction was completely cancelled by the addition of amino acids in the culture medium, indicating that the cytotoxicity is due to the insufficient amino acid pool. These data suggest the possibility of using macrolides for “tumor-starving therapy”. PMID

  1. Lower mortality among patients with community-acquired pneumonia treated with a macrolide plus a beta-lactam agent versus a beta-lactam agent alone.

    PubMed

    García Vázquez, E; Mensa, J; Martínez, J A; Marcos, M A; Puig, J; Ortega, M; Torres, A

    2005-03-01

    A cohort of 1,391 patients with community-acquired pneumonia of unknown etiology, atypical pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila pneumonia, viral pneumonia, or pneumococcal pneumonia was studied according to a standard protocol to analyse whether the addition of a macrolide to beta-lactam empirical treatment decreases mortality rates. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit were excluded. Severity was assessed using the PORT score. An etiological diagnosis was achieved in 498 (35.8%) patients (292 infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae). Treatment was chosen by the attending physician according to his/her own criteria: beta-lactam agent in 270 and beta-lactam agent plus a macrolide in 918 cases. The mortality rate was 13.3% in the group treated with a beta-lactam agent alone and 6.9% in the group treated with a beta-lactam agent plus a macrolide (p=0.001). The percentage of PORT-group V patients was 32.6% in the group treated with a beta-lactam agent alone compared to 25.7% in the group who received a beta-lactam agent plus a macrolide (p=0.02). After controlling for PORT score, the odds of fatal outcome was two times higher in patients treated with a beta-lactam agent alone than in those treated with a beta-lactam agent plus a macrolide (adjusted OR = 2, 95%CI 1.24-3.23). The results suggest that the addition of a macrolide to an initial beta-lactam-based antibiotic regimen is associated with lower mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, independent of severity of infection, thus supporting the recommendation of a beta-lactam-agent plus a macrolide as empirical therapy.

  2. [Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of cyclines, macrolides and fluoroquinolones against Chlamydia trachomatis].

    PubMed

    Dailloux, M; Villemain, P

    1992-05-01

    The in vitro activity of minocycline, doxycycline, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin, pefloxacin, and ofloxacin against ten C. trachomatis strains recovered from human genital tract specimens was evaluated. Mac Coy cell monolayers in 24-microwell plates were used. The C. trachomatis inoculum was 10(4) IFU/well. Appropriate dilutions of antibiotic were added and inclusions were detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies. MICs were determined after 48 hours of exposure to each antimicrobial. The MIC90 for cyclines was 0.2 mg/l. Among tested macrolides, roxithromycin had a lower MIC than erythromycin (0.2 versus 0.4 mg/l) whereas spiramycin inhibited growth only in a concentration of 2 mg/l. Ofloxacin showed better activity than pefloxacin. Bactericidal activity was evaluated by determining two parameters: MBC1 (without transfer to new cells) measured the ability of a C. trachomatis particle to persist in a latent form within cells exposed to an antibiotic and to grow again following removal of the antibiotic, whereas MBC2 (with transfer to new cells) reflected infectivity of the bacteria after 48 hours exposure to the antimicrobial. None of the tested antibiotics was bactericidal according to both parameters. The ability of C. trachomatis to remain within antibiotic-exposed cells in a latent form was clearly demonstrated by the high MBC1 values. This feature may explain why recurrences are common in clinical practice.

  3. Structure and Function of the Macrolide Biosensor Protein, MphR(A), with and without Erythromycin

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianting; Sagar, Vatsala; Smolinsky, Adam; Bourke, Chase; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Cropp, T. Ashton

    2009-09-02

    The regulatory protein MphR(A) has recently seen extensive use in synthetic biological applications, such as metabolite sensing and exogenous control of gene expression. This protein negatively regulates the expression of a macrolide 2{prime}-phosphotransferase I resistance gene (mphA) via binding to a 35-bp DNA operator upstream of the start codon and is de-repressed by the presence of erythromycin. Here, we present the refined crystal structure of the MphR(A) protein free of erythromycin and that of the MphR(A) protein with bound erythromycin at 2.00- and 1.76-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. We also studied the DNA binding properties of the protein and identified mutants of MphR(A) that are defective in gene repression and ligand binding in a cell-based reporter assay. The combination of these two structures illustrates the molecular basis of erythromycin-induced gene expression and provides a framework for additional applied uses of this protein in the isolation and engineered biosynthesis of polyketide natural products.

  4. The suppression of enhanced bitterness intensity of macrolide dry syrup mixed with an acidic powder.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Toshihiko; Okada, Sachie; Takemoto, Eri; Tokuyama, Emi; Tsuji, Eriko; Mukai, Junji; Uchida, Takahiro

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a medicine which strongly enhanced the bitterness of clarithromycin dry syrup (CAMD) when administered concomitantly and to develop a method to suppress this enhanced bitterness. The bitterness enhancement was evaluated not only by gustatory sensation tests but also using pH and taste sensor measurements of the mixed sample. A remarkable bitterness enhancement was found when CAMD was mixed with the acidic powder L-carbocysteine. The acidic pH (pH 3.40) of the suspension made from these two preparations, seemed to be due to enhanced release of clarithromycin caused by the dissolution of the alkaline polymer film-coating. Several methods for preventing this bitterness enhancement were investigated. Neither increasing the volume of water taken with the mixture, nor changing the ratio of CAMD:L-carbocysteine in the mixture, were effective in reducing the bitterness intensity of the CAMD/L-carbocysteine mixture. The best way to achieve taste masking was to first administer CAMD mixed with chocolate jelly, which has a neutral pH, followed by the L-carbocysteine suspension. Similar results were obtained for the bitterness suppression of azithromycin fine granules with L-carbocysteine. The chocolate jelly will be useful for taste masking of bitter macrolide drug formulations, when they need to be administered together with acidic drug formulations.

  5. Structural and biochemical studies of actin in complex with synthetic macrolide tail analogues.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose H; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Hoepker, Alexander C; Moriarty, Nigel W; Fink, Sarah J; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Adams, Paul D; Marriott, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    The actin filament-binding and filament-severing activities of the aplyronine, kabiramide, and reidispongiolide families of marine macrolides are located within the hydrophobic tail region of the molecule. Two synthetic tail analogues of aplyronine C (SF-01 and GC-04) are shown to bind to G-actin with dissociation constants of (285±33) and (132±13) nM, respectively. The crystal structures of actin complexes with GC-04, SF-01, and kabiramide C reveal a conserved mode of tail binding within the cleft that forms between subdomains (SD) 1 and 3. Our studies support the view that filament severing is brought about by specific binding of the tail region to the SD1/SD3 cleft on the upper protomer, which displaces loop-D from the lower protomer on the same half-filament. With previous studies showing that the GC-04 analogue can sever actin filaments, it is argued that the shorter complex lifetime of tail analogues with F-actin would make them more effective at severing filaments compared with plasma gelsolin. Structure-based analyses are used to suggest more reactive or targetable forms of GC-04 and SF-01, which may serve to boost the capacity of the serum actin scavenging system, to generate antibody conjugates against tumor cell antigens, and to decrease sputum viscosity in children with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Regulation of the biosynthesis of the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin in Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Karray, Fatma; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Gagnat, Josette; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens synthesizes the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin. The biosynthetic gene cluster for spiramycin has been characterized for S. ambofaciens. In addition to the regulatory gene srmR (srm22), previously identified (M. Geistlich et al., Mol. Microbiol. 6:2019-2029, 1992), three putative regulatory genes had been identified by sequence analysis. Gene expression analysis and gene inactivation experiments showed that only one of these three genes, srm40, plays a major role in the regulation of spiramycin biosynthesis. The disruption of srm22 or srm40 eliminated spiramycin production while their overexpression increased spiramycin production. Expression analysis was performed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for all the genes of the cluster in the wild-type strain and in the srm22 (srmR) and srm40 deletion mutants. The results from the expression analysis, together with the ones from the complementation experiments, indicated that Srm22 is required for srm40 expression, Srm40 being a pathway-specific activator that controls most, if not all, of the spiramycin biosynthetic genes.

  7. Organization of the biosynthetic gene cluster for the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin in Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Karray, Fatma; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Dominguez, Hélène; Tuphile, Karine; Gagnat, Josette; Blondelet-Rouault, Marie-Hélène; Gerbaud, Claude; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2007-12-01

    Spiramycin, a 16-membered macrolide antibiotic used in human medicine, is produced by Streptomyces ambofaciens; it comprises a polyketide lactone, platenolide, to which three deoxyhexose sugars are attached. In order to characterize the gene cluster governing the biosynthesis of spiramycin, several overlapping cosmids were isolated from an S. ambofaciens gene library, by hybridization with various probes (spiramycin resistance or biosynthetic genes, tylosin biosynthetic genes), and the sequences of their inserts were determined. Sequence analysis showed that the spiramycin biosynthetic gene cluster spanned a region of over 85 kb of contiguous DNA. In addition to the five previously described genes that encode the type I polyketide synthase involved in platenolide biosynthesis, 45 other genes have been identified. It was possible to propose a function for most of the inferred proteins in spiramycin biosynthesis, in its regulation, in resistance to the produced antibiotic or in the provision of extender units for the polyketide synthase. Two of these genes, predicted to be involved in deoxysugar biosynthesis, were inactivated by gene replacement, and the resulting mutants were unable to produce spiramycin, thus confirming their involvement in spiramycin biosynthesis. This work reveals the main features of spiramycin biosynthesis and constitutes a first step towards a detailed molecular analysis of the production of this medically important antibiotic.

  8. In vitro activity of ABT-773 versus macrolides and quinolones against resistant respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; St -Pierre, C

    2001-01-01

    ABT-773, a novel ketolide, was compared to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and gemifloxacin against antibiotic-resistant strains recently isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections. MICs were determined by agar dilution using standard NCCLS methodology. ABT-773 (MIC(90) 0.06 mg/L) was more active than the macrolides (MIC(90) > or = 2 mg/L) and fluoroquinolones (MIC(90) > or = 0.5 mg/L) against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The fluoroquinolones were the most active agents tested against beta-lactamase-positive Haemophilus influenzae (MIC(90) < or = 0.01-0.06 mg/L), against which ABT-773 (MIC(90) 4 mg/L) was comparable to azithromycin and two- and four-fold more active than erythromycin and clarithromycin, respectively. Against beta-lactamase positive Moraxella catarrhalis, the activity of ABT-773 (MIC(90) 0.06 mg/L) was comparable to gemifloxacin, trovafloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin (MIC(90) 0.03-0.06 mg/L) and 4- to eightfold greater than that of clarithromycin, gatifloxacin, and erythromycin. These data suggest ABT-773 could be a valuable compound for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, including those resistant to usual oral therapy.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Studies of Actin in Complex with Synthetic Macrolide Tail Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jose H.; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Fink, Sarah J.; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Adams, Paul D.; Marriott, Gerard

    2014-07-22

    The actin filament-binding and filament-severing activities of the aplyronine, kabiramide, and reidispongiolide families of marine macrolides are located within the hydrophobic tail region of the molecule. Two synthetic tail analogues of aplyronine C (SF-01 and GC-04) are shown to bind to G-actin with dissociation constants of (285±33) and (132±13) nM, respectively. The crystal structures of actin complexes with GC-04, SF-01, and kabiramide C reveal a conserved mode of tail binding within the cleft that forms between subdomains (SD) 1 and 3. Our studies support the view that filament severing is brought about by specific binding of the tail region to the SD1/SD3 cleft on the upper protomer, which displaces loop-D from the lower protomer on the same half-filament. With previous studies showing that the GC-04 analogue can sever actin filaments, it is argued that the shorter complex lifetime of tail analogues with F-actin would make them more effective at severing filaments compared with plasma gelsolin. In conclusion, structure-based analyses are used to suggest more reactive or targetable forms of GC-04 and SF-01, which may serve to boost the capacity of the serum actin scavenging system, to generate antibody conjugates against tumor cell antigens, and to decrease sputum viscosity in children with cystic fibrosis.

  10. Assessing antibiotic sorption in soil: a literature review and new case studies on sulfonamides and macrolides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increased use of veterinary antibiotics in modern agriculture for therapeutic uses and growth promotion has raised concern regarding the environmental impacts of antibiotic residues in soil and water. The mobility and transport of antibiotics in the environment depends on their sorption behavior, which is typically predicted by extrapolating from an experimentally determined soil-water distribution coefficient (Kd). Accurate determination of Kd values is important in order to better predict the environmental fate of antibiotics. In this paper, we examine different analytical approaches in assessing Kd of two major classes of veterinary antibiotics (sulfonamides and macrolides) and compare the existing literature data with experimental data obtained in our laboratory. While environmental parameters such as soil pH and organic matter content are the most significant factors that affect the sorption of antibiotics in soil, it is important to consider the concentrations used, the analytical method employed, and the transformations that can occur when determining Kd values. Application of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry can facilitate accurate determination of Kd at environmentally relevant concentrations. Because the bioavailability of antibiotics in soil depends on their sorption behavior, it is important to examine current practices in assessing their mobility in soil. PMID:24438473

  11. Regulation of the Biosynthesis of the Macrolide Antibiotic Spiramycin in Streptomyces ambofaciens ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Karray, Fatma; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Gagnat, Josette; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens synthesizes the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin. The biosynthetic gene cluster for spiramycin has been characterized for S. ambofaciens. In addition to the regulatory gene srmR (srm22), previously identified (M. Geistlich et al., Mol. Microbiol. 6:2019-2029, 1992), three putative regulatory genes had been identified by sequence analysis. Gene expression analysis and gene inactivation experiments showed that only one of these three genes, srm40, plays a major role in the regulation of spiramycin biosynthesis. The disruption of srm22 or srm40 eliminated spiramycin production while their overexpression increased spiramycin production. Expression analysis was performed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for all the genes of the cluster in the wild-type strain and in the srm22 (srmR) and srm40 deletion mutants. The results from the expression analysis, together with the ones from the complementation experiments, indicated that Srm22 is required for srm40 expression, Srm40 being a pathway-specific activator that controls most, if not all, of the spiramycin biosynthetic genes. PMID:20817767

  12. Heat treatment effects on the antimicrobial activity of macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in milk.

    PubMed

    Zorraquino, M A; Althaus, R L; Roca, M; Molina, M P

    2011-02-01

    Antibiotic residues in milk can cause serious problems for consumers and the dairy industry. Heat treatment of milk may diminish the antimicrobial activity of these antibiotic residues. This study analyzed the effect of milk processing (60 °C for 30 min, 120 °C for 20 min, and 140 °C for 10 s) on the antimicrobial activity of milk samples fortified with three concentrations of three macrolides (erythromycin: 20, 40 and 80 μg/liter; spiramycin: 100, 200, and 400 μg/liter; and tylosin: 500, 1,000, and 2,000 μg/liter) and one lincosamide (lincomycin: 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 μg/liter). To measure the loss of antimicrobial activity, a bioassay based on the growth inhibition of Micrococcus luteus was done. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model. The results indicate that treatment at 120 °C for 20 min produces inactivation percentages of 93% (erythromycin), 64% (spiramycin), 51% (tylosin), and 5% (lincomycin), while treatment at 140 °C for 10 s results in generally lower percentages (30% erythromycin, 35% spiramycin, 12% tylosin, and 5% lincomycin). The lowest loss or lowest reduction of antimicrobial activity (21% erythromycin and 13% spiramycin) was obtained by treatment at 60 °C for 30 min.

  13. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    SciTech Connect

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  14. Macrolide analog F806 suppresses esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by blocking β1 integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Yan; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Yang-Min; Liao, Lian-Di; Cao, Hui-Hui; Xu, Xiu-E; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Fa-Min; Zhang, Ying-Li; Du, Ze-Peng; Chen, Hong; Huang, Wei; Jia, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Xie, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2015-06-30

    The paucity of new drugs for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) limits the treatment options. This study characterized the therapeutic efficacy and action mechanism of a novel natural macrolide compound F806 in human ESCC xenograft models and cell lines. F806 inhibited growth of ESCC, most importantly, it displayed fewer undesirable side effects on normal tissues in two human ESCC xenograft models. F806 inhibited proliferation of six ESCC cells lines, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging from 9.31 to 16.43 μM. Furthermore, F806 induced apoptosis of ESCC cells, contributing to its growth-inhibitory effect. Also, F806 inhibited cell adhesion resulting in anoikis. Mechanistic studies revealed that F806 inhibited the activation of β1 integrin in part by binding to a novel site Arg610 of β1 integrin, suppressed focal adhesion formation, decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and eventually triggered apoptosis. We concluded that F806 would potentially be a well-tolerated anticancer drug by targeting β1 integrin, resulting in anoikis in ESCC cells.

  15. Structural and Biochemical Studies of Actin in Complex with Synthetic Macrolide Tail Analogues

    DOE PAGES

    Pereira, Jose H.; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Hoepker, Alexander C.; ...

    2014-07-22

    The actin filament-binding and filament-severing activities of the aplyronine, kabiramide, and reidispongiolide families of marine macrolides are located within the hydrophobic tail region of the molecule. Two synthetic tail analogues of aplyronine C (SF-01 and GC-04) are shown to bind to G-actin with dissociation constants of (285±33) and (132±13) nM, respectively. The crystal structures of actin complexes with GC-04, SF-01, and kabiramide C reveal a conserved mode of tail binding within the cleft that forms between subdomains (SD) 1 and 3. Our studies support the view that filament severing is brought about by specific binding of the tail region tomore » the SD1/SD3 cleft on the upper protomer, which displaces loop-D from the lower protomer on the same half-filament. With previous studies showing that the GC-04 analogue can sever actin filaments, it is argued that the shorter complex lifetime of tail analogues with F-actin would make them more effective at severing filaments compared with plasma gelsolin. In conclusion, structure-based analyses are used to suggest more reactive or targetable forms of GC-04 and SF-01, which may serve to boost the capacity of the serum actin scavenging system, to generate antibody conjugates against tumor cell antigens, and to decrease sputum viscosity in children with cystic fibrosis.« less

  16. Characterization and molecular analysis of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae clinical isolates obtained in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Mayumi; Narita, Mitsuo; Okazaki, Norio; Ohya, Hitomi; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Suzuki, Isao; Andoh, Tomoaki; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Yuko; Horino, Atsuko; Shintani, Miharu; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Sasaki, Tsuguo

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains that are clinically resistant to macrolide antibiotics have occasionally been encountered in Japan. Of 76 strains of M. pneumoniae isolated in three different areas in Japan during 2000 to 2003, 13 strains were erythromycin (ERY) resistant. Of these 13 strains, 12 were highly ERY resistant (MIC, > or =256 microg/ml) and 1 was weakly resistant (MIC, 8 microg/ml). Nucleotide sequencing of domains II and V of 23S rRNA and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22, which are associated with ERY resistance, showed that 10 strains had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (corresponding to 2058 in Escherichia coli numbering), 1 strain showed A-to-C transversion at position 2063, 1 strain showed an A-to-G transition at position 2064, and the weakly ERY-resistant strain showed C-to-G transversion at position 2617 (corresponding to 2611 in E. coli numbering) of domain V. Domain II and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 were not involved in the ERY resistance of these clinical M. pneumoniae strains. In addition, by using our established restriction fragment length polymorphism technique to detect point mutations of PCR products for domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of M. pneumoniae, we found that 23 (24%) of 94 PCR-positive oral samples taken from children with respiratory infections showed A2063G mutation. These results suggest that ERY-resistant M. pneumoniae infection is not unusual in Japan.

  17. Quantifying potential human health impacts of animal antibiotic use: enrofloxacin and macrolides in chickens.

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony; Popken, Douglas A

    2006-02-01

    Use of similar or identical antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine has come under increasing scrutiny by regulators concerned that bacteria resistant to animal antibiotics will infect people and resist treatment with similar human antibiotics, leading to excess illnesses and deaths. Scientists, regulators, and interest groups in the United States and Europe have urged bans on nontherapeutic and some therapeutic uses of animal antibiotics to protect human health. Many regulators and public health experts have also expressed dissatisfaction with the perceived limitations of quantitative risk assessment and have proposed alternative qualitative and judgmental approaches ranging from "attributable fraction" estimates to risk management recommendations based on the precautionary principle or on expert judgments about the importance of classes of compounds in human medicine. This article presents a more traditional quantitative risk assessment of the likely human health impacts of continuing versus withdrawing use of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in production of broiler chickens in the United States. An analytic framework is developed and applied to available data. It indicates that withdrawing animal antibiotics can cause far more human illness-days than it would prevent: the estimated human BENEFIT:RISK health ratio for human health impacts of continued animal antibiotic use exceeds 1,000:1 in many cases. This conclusion is driven by a hypothesized causal sequence in which withdrawing animal antibiotic use increases illnesses rates in animals, microbial loads in servings from the affected animals, and hence human health risks. This potentially important aspect of human health risk assessment for animal antibiotics has not previously been quantified.

  18. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus saprophyticus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Le Bouter, Anne; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics as well as to assess the molecular basis of this resistance amongst 72 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 in University Hospital of Caen (France). Of the 72 strains studied, 33 (45.8%) were resistant to at least one MLS antibiotic, including 24 (72.7%) with an M phenotype, 5 (15.2%) with an inducible MLS(B) phenotype, 3 (9.1%) with a combined M+L phenotype and 1 (3.0%) with an L phenotype. All isolates were susceptible to the combination of streptogramins A and B. The resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), msr(A) and lnu(A) were detected alone in 0, 0, 5 (15.2%), 24 (72.7%) and 1 (3.0%) of the 33 MLS-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas 2 strains (6.1%) were positive for both msr(A) and lnu(A). All msr(A)-positive isolates exhibited an M phenotype, whereas all five erm(C)-positive and all three lnu(A)-positive strains displayed, respectively, an inducible MLS(B) phenotype and an L phenotype with a positive Hodge test. Plasmid analysis indicated that erm(C) and lnu(A) genes were borne by small-size plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb), whereas larger plasmids (30-90 kb) harboured msr(A). In conclusion, these findings show a high prevalence of MLS resistance in S. saprophyticus, which was mainly associated with the presence of the msr(A) gene. Since S. saprophyticus colonises the gastrointestinal tract, it may constitute an unexpected reservoir for MLS resistance genes, in particular msr(A), amongst coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  19. Different Dynamic Patterns of β-Lactams, Quinolones, Glycopeptides and Macrolides on Mouse Gut Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; M, Prabhakar; Wang, Shan; Liao, Shuo-Xi; Peng, Xin; He, Yan; Chen, Yi-Ran; Shen, Hua-Fang; Su, Jin; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The adverse impact of antibiotics on the gut microbiota has attracted extensive interest, particularly due to the development of microbiome research techniques in recent years. However, a direct comparison of the dynamic effects of various types of antibiotics using the same animal model has not been available. In the present study, we selected six antibiotics from four categories with the broadest clinical usage, namely, β-lactams (Ceftriaxone Sodium, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam and meropenem), quinolones (ofloxacin), glycopeptides (vancomycin), and macrolides (azithromycin), to treat BALB/c mice. Stool samples were collected during and after the administration of antibiotics, and microbial diversity was analyzed through Illumina sequencing and bioinformatics analyses using QIIME. Both α and β diversity analyses showed that ceftriaxone sodium, cefoperazone/sulbactam, meropenem and vancomycin changed the gut microbiota dramatically by the second day of antibiotic administration whereas the influence of ofloxacin was trivial. Azithromycin clearly changed the gut microbiota but much less than vancomycin and the β-lactams. In general, the community changes induced by the three β-lactam antibiotics showed consistency in inhibiting Papillibacter, Prevotella and Alistipes while inducing massive growth of Clostridium. The low diversity and high Clostridium level might be an important cause of Clostridium difficile infection after usage of β-lactams. Vancomycin was unique in that it inhibited Firmicutes, mainly the genus Clostridium. On the other hand, it induced the growth of Escherichia and effect lasted for months afterward. Azithromycin and meropenem induced the growth of Enterococcus. These findings will be useful for understanding the potential adverse effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome and ensuring their better usage.

  20. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms.

  1. Polyene macrolide biosynthesis in streptomycetes and related bacteria: recent advances from genome sequencing and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Patrick; De Poire, Eimear; Sheehan, James; Sweeney, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The polyene macrolide group includes important antifungal drugs, to which resistance does not arise readily. Chemical and biological methods have been used in attempts to make polyene antibiotics with fewer toxic side effects. Genome sequencing of producer organisms is contributing to this endeavour, by providing access to new compounds and by enabling yield improvement for polyene analogues obtained by engineered biosynthesis. This recent work is also enhancing bioinformatic methods for deducing the structures of cryptic natural products from their biosynthetic enzymes. The stereostructure of candicidin D has recently been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Genes for the corresponding polyketide synthase have been uncovered in several different genomes. Analysis of this new information strengthens the view that protein sequence motifs can be used to predict double bond geometry in many polyketides.Chemical studies have shown that improved polyenes can be obtained by modifying the mycosamine sugar that is common to most of these compounds. Glycoengineered analogues might be produced by biosynthetic methods, but polyene glycosyltransferases show little tolerance for donors other than GDP-α-D-mycosamine. Genome sequencing has revealed extending glycosyltransferases that add a second sugar to the mycosamine of some polyenes. NppY of Pseudonocardia autotrophica uses UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-glucosamine as donor whereas PegA from Actinoplanes caeruleus uses GDP-α-D-mannose. These two enzymes show 51 % sequence identity and are also closely related to mycosaminyltransferases. These findings will assist attempts to construct glycosyltransferases that transfer alternative UDP- or (d)TDP-linked sugars to polyene macrolactones.

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates from Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, are predominantly susceptible to aminoglycosides and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Podin, Yuwana; Sarovich, Derek S; Price, Erin P; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Hii, KingChing; Ngian, Hieung; Wong, SeeChang; Wong, IngTien; Wong, JinShyan; Mohan, Anand; Ooi, MongHow; Fam, TemLom; Wong, Jack; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul; Giffard, Philip M; Currie, Bart J

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is a potentially fatal disease caused by the saprophytic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Resistance to gentamicin is generally a hallmark of B. pseudomallei, and gentamicin is a selective agent in media used for diagnosis of melioidosis. In this study, we determined the prevalence and mechanism of gentamicin susceptibility found in B. pseudomallei isolates from Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We performed multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing on 44 B. pseudomallei clinical isolates from melioidosis patients in Sarawak district hospitals. Whole-genome sequencing was used to identify the mechanism of gentamicin susceptibility. A novel allelic-specific PCR was designed to differentiate gentamicin-sensitive isolates from wild-type B. pseudomallei. A reversion assay was performed to confirm the involvement of this mechanism in gentamicin susceptibility. A substantial proportion (86%) of B. pseudomallei clinical isolates in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, were found to be susceptible to the aminoglycoside gentamicin, a rare occurrence in other regions where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Gentamicin sensitivity was restricted to genetically related strains belonging to sequence type 881 or its single-locus variant, sequence type 997. Whole-genome sequencing identified a novel nonsynonymous mutation within amrB, encoding an essential component of the AmrAB-OprA multidrug efflux pump. We confirmed the role of this mutation in conferring aminoglycoside and macrolide sensitivity by reversion of this mutation to the wild-type sequence. Our study demonstrates that alternative B. pseudomallei selective media without gentamicin are needed for accurate melioidosis laboratory diagnosis in Sarawak. This finding may also have implications for environmental sampling of other locations to test for B. pseudomallei endemicity.

  3. Effect of macrolide usage on emergence of erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter isolates in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Yan, Meiguan; Sahin, Orhan; Pereira, Sonia; Chang, Yun-Juan; Zhang, Qijing

    2007-05-01

    In this work we conducted both in vitro and in vivo experiments to examine the development and mechanisms of erythromycin (Ery) resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. In vitro plating revealed that both Campylobacter species had similar but low spontaneous mutation frequencies (3 x 10(-9) to <5.41 x 10(-10)) for Ery resistance. Chickens infected with C. jejuni or C. coli were subjected to single or multiple treatments with medicated water containing tylosin (0.53 g/liter), which transiently reduced the level of Campylobacter colonization but did not select for Ery-resistant (Ery(r)) mutants in the treated birds. However, when tylosin was given to the chickens in feed at a growth-promoting dose (0.05 g/kg feed), Ery(r) mutants emerged in the birds after prolonged exposure to the antibiotic. The vast majority of the in vitro- and in vivo-selected Campylobacter mutants with Ery MICs of 8 to 256 microg/ml lacked the known resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA gene, while the highly resistant mutants (Ery MIC > 512 microg/ml) had the A2074G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Inactivation of CmeABC, a multidrug efflux pump, dramatically reduced the Ery MIC in all of the examined mutants regardless of the presence of the A2074G mutation. Together, these results reveal distinct features associated with Ery resistance development in Campylobacter, demonstrate the significant role of CmeABC in Ery resistance, and suggest that long-term use of a macrolide as a growth promoter selects for the emergence of Ery(r) Campylobacter in animal reservoirs.

  4. Rapid and specific detection of Helicobacter pylori macrolide resistance in gastric tissue by fluorescent in situ hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Trebesius, K; Panthel, K; Strobel, S; Vogt, K; Faller, G; Kirchner, T; Kist, M; Heesemann, J; Haas, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The development of macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori is considered an essential reason for failure of antibiotic eradication therapies. The predominant mechanism of resistance to macrolides, particularly clarithromycin, is based on three defined mutations within 23S rRNA, resulting in decreased binding of the antibiotic to the bacterial ribosome.
AIM—To develop an rRNA based whole cell hybridisation method to detect Helicobacter species in situ within gastric tissue, simultaneously with its clarithromycin resistance genotype.
METHODS—A set of fluorescent labelled oligonucleotide probes was developed, binding either to H pylori 16S rRNA or 23S rRNA sequences containing specific point mutations responsible for clarithromycin resistance. After hybridisation and stringent washing procedures, labelling of intact single bacteria was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The new approach was compared with PCR based assays, histology, and microbiological culture.
RESULTS—In comparison with the phenotypic resistance measurement by E test, the genotypic clarithromycin resistance correlated perfectly (100%) for 35 H pylori isolates analysed. In a set of gastric biopsy specimens (27) H pylori infection was confirmed by histology (17/27) and correctly detected by whole cell hybridisation. Five clarithromycin resistant strains were identified in gastric tissue specimens directly. Furthermore, non-cultivable coccoid forms of H pylori were easily detectable by whole cell hybridisation.
CONCLUSIONS—Whole cell hybridisation of rRNA holds great promise for cultivation independent, reliable, and rapid (three hours) genotypic determination of clarithromycin resistance in H pylori. Compared with PCR techniques it is independent of nucleic acid preparations, not prone to inhibition, and allows semiquantitative visualisation of the bacteria within intact tissue samples.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; macrolide resistance; clarithromycin; in

  5. Ribosome-Templated Azide-Alkyne Cycloadditions: Synthesis of Potent Macrolide Antibiotics by In Situ Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Glassford, Ian; Teijaro, Christiana N; Daher, Samer S; Weil, Amy; Small, Meagan C; Redhu, Shiv K; Colussi, Dennis J; Jacobson, Marlene A; Childers, Wayne E; Buttaro, Bettina; Nicholson, Allen W; MacKerell, Alexander D; Cooperman, Barry S; Andrade, Rodrigo B

    2016-03-09

    Over half of all antibiotics target the bacterial ribosome-nature's complex, 2.5 MDa nanomachine responsible for decoding mRNA and synthesizing proteins. Macrolide antibiotics, exemplified by erythromycin, bind the 50S subunit with nM affinity and inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the passage of nascent oligopeptides. Solithromycin (1), a third-generation semisynthetic macrolide discovered by combinatorial copper-catalyzed click chemistry, was synthesized in situ by incubating either E. coli 70S ribosomes or 50S subunits with macrolide-functionalized azide 2 and 3-ethynylaniline (3) precursors. The ribosome-templated in situ click method was expanded from a binary reaction (i.e., one azide and one alkyne) to a six-component reaction (i.e., azide 2 and five alkynes) and ultimately to a 16-component reaction (i.e., azide 2 and 15 alkynes). The extent of triazole formation correlated with ribosome affinity for the anti (1,4)-regioisomers as revealed by measured Kd values. Computational analysis using the site-identification by ligand competitive saturation (SILCS) approach indicated that the relative affinity of the ligands was associated with the alteration of macrolactone+desosamine-ribosome interactions caused by the different alkynes. Protein synthesis inhibition experiments confirmed the mechanism of action. Evaluation of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) quantified the potency of the in situ click products and demonstrated the efficacy of this method in the triaging and prioritization of potent antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome. Cell viability assays in human fibroblasts confirmed 2 and four analogues with therapeutic indices for bactericidal activity over in vitro mammalian cytotoxicity as essentially identical to solithromycin (1).

  6. Determination of Macrolide Antibiotics Using Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Thomas C.; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2012-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of macrolide antibiotics using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection was developed. Acetone and dichloromethane were used as the disperser solvent and extraction solvent, respectively. A mixture of extraction solvent and disperser solvent were rapidly injected into a 1.0 mL aqueous sample to form a cloudy solution. After the extraction, macrolide antibiotics were detected using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI/MS) with colloidal silver as the matrix. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 2, 3, 3, and 2 nM for erythromycin (ERY), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TILM), and tylosin (TYL), respectively. This developed method was successfully applied to the determination of macrolide antibiotics in human urine samples.

  7. First report of macrolide resistance gene erm(T) harbored by a novel small plasmid from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Chun-Mei; Pan, Yun; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Lei, Chang-Wei; Peng, Lin-Yao; Li, Qing-Zhou; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2015-04-01

    The macrolide resistance gene erm(T) was identified for the first time in a porcine Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolate from swine in China. The novel 3,749-bp small plasmid pER29, which carries erm(T), had a G+C content of 31% and four distinct open reading frames. The presence of pER29 increased by at least 128-fold the MICs of clindamycin and erythromycin for E. rhusiopathiae. The fitness cost of pER29 could be responsible for the low frequency of erm(T) in E. rhusiopathiae.

  8. First Report of Macrolide Resistance Gene erm(T) Harbored by a Novel Small Plasmid from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Chun-Mei; Pan, Yun; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Lei, Chang-Wei; Peng, Lin-Yao; Li, Qing-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The macrolide resistance gene erm(T) was identified for the first time in a porcine Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolate from swine in China. The novel 3,749-bp small plasmid pER29, which carries erm(T), had a G+C content of 31% and four distinct open reading frames. The presence of pER29 increased by at least 128-fold the MICs of clindamycin and erythromycin for E. rhusiopathiae. The fitness cost of pER29 could be responsible for the low frequency of erm(T) in E. rhusiopathiae. PMID:25666150

  9. A mechanism of resistance to partial macrolide and streptogramin B antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus clinically isolated in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, M; Endou, K; Saitoh, S; Katoh, M; Nakajima, Y

    1995-11-01

    A plasmid pEP2104 originated from Staphylococcus aureus was clinically isolated in Hungary during 1977. The plasmid mediates inducible resistance to PMS-antibiotics; partial macrolide [the 14-membered macrolides, erythromycin (EM) and oleandomycin and the 16-membered macrolides mycinamicin I (MCM I) and mycinamicin II (MCM II)and type B streptogramin (MKM-B) antibiotics. The sequence of 31 amino acid residues obtained by N-terminal analysis of the 63kDa protein (MsrSA) present in the membrane from 8325(pEP2104) cells whose PMS-resistance was induced by a concentration of 1.35 micrograms EM/ml [EM-induced 8325(pEP2104)], was identical to the corresponding sequence in a membrane protein MsrA related to promoting efflux of [14C]EM [Ross J.I., et al., Mol. Microbiol., 4, 1207 (1990)]. A constitutive PMS-resistant strain 8325(pMC38) was obtained from the 8325( pEP2104) strain in the presence of 1 microgram MCMI/ml. No inactivation of EM in EM-induced 8325(pEP2104) was observed. Moreover, poly (A)-directed polylysine synthesis by a cell-free system containing ribosomes from EM-induced 8325 (pEP2104) cells and S100 from Escherichia coli was inhibited by not only EM but spiramycin and MKM-B [Matsuoka M., et al., Biol. Pharm. Bull., 16, 1288 (1993)]. In addition, ribosomes from both EM-induced 8325 (pEP2104) and 8325(pMC38) strains showed about the same affinity as those from the host stain. NCTC8325. These results suggest, that like MsrA protein, active drug-efflux due to MsrSA protein may be responsible for PMS-resistance. How can the 8325 (pMC38) strain discriminate PMS-antibiotics from most of 16-membered macrolides and lincosamides? A possible explanation is discussed in terms of the pKa-value related to the physicochemical nature of the antibiotics.

  10. Synthesis of antimicrofilament marine macrolides: synthesis and configurational assignment of a C5-C16 degradation fragment of reidispongiolide A.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Ian; Britton, Robert; Ashton, Kate; Knust, Henner; Stafford, Jonathan

    2004-08-17

    Reidispongiolide A is a representative member of the sphinxolide/reidispongiolide group of cytotoxic 26-membered macrolides of marine origin. By interacting with actin in the cell cytoskeleton, the reidispongiolides and sphinxolides are potent microfilament destabilizing agents that represent a promising mechanism of action for developing novel anticancer drugs. An aldol-based synthesis of a library of diastereomers of C(8)-C(16) and C(5)-C(16) fragments and detailed NMR comparison with a reported degradation fragment enabled a configurational assignment for a major part of the reidispongiolide macrocyclic core, thus setting a solid foundation for ongoing synthetic efforts.

  11. In Vitro Activity of the New Ketolide Telithromycin Compared with Those of Macrolides against Streptococcus pyogenes: Influences of Resistance Mechanisms and Methodological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bemer-Melchior, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Tassin, Sandrine; Bryskier, Andre; Schito, Gian Carlo; Drugeon, Henri-B.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes, 80 susceptible to macrolides and 27 resistant to erythromycin A (MIC >0.5 μg/ml), were examined. The erythromycin A-lincomycin double-disk test assigned 7 resistant strains to the M-phenotype, 8 to the inducible macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance (iMLSB) phenotype, and 12 to the constitutive MLSB resistance (cMLSB) phenotype. MICs of erythromycin A, clarithromycin, azithromycin, roxithromycin, and clindamycin were determined by a broth microdilution method. MICs of telithromycin were determined by three different methods (broth microdilution, agar dilution, and E-test methods) in an ambient air atmosphere and in a 5 to 6% CO2 atmosphere. Erythromycin A resistance genes were investigated by PCR in the 27 erythromycin A-resistant isolates. MICs of erythromycin A and clindamycin showed six groups of resistant strains, groups A to F. iMLSB strains (A, B, and D groups) are characterized by two distinct patterns of resistance correlated with genotypic results. A- and B-group strains were moderately resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and highly susceptible to telithromycin. All A- and B-group isolates harbored erm TR gene, D-group strains, highly resistant to macrolides and intermediately resistant to telithromycin (MICs, 1 to 16 μg/ml), were all characterized by having the ermB gene. All M-phenotype isolates (C group), resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and susceptible to clindamycin and telithromycin, harbored the mefA gene. All cMLSB strains (E and F groups) with high level of resistance to macrolides, lincosamide, and telithromycin had the ermB gene. The effect of 5 to 6% CO2 was remarkable on resistant strains, by increasing MICs of telithromycin from 1 to 6 twofold dilutions against D-E- and F-group isolates. PMID:11036012

  12. Inducible Expression of both ermB and ermT Conferred High Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meixia; Cai, Chao; Chen, Juan; Cheng, Changwei; Cheng, Guofu; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus is an under-recognized pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in humans. Despite increasing recognition of this subspecies as a cause for human infectious diseases, limited information is known about its antibiotic resistance mechanism. In this study, we aim to identify the molecular mechanism underlying the high macrolide resistance of six S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates from dead ducklings collected in several natural outbreaks in China during 2010–2013. All isolates exhibited multi-drug resistance including high macrolide resistance (MIC ≥ 1024 mg/L for erythromycin, and 512 mg/L for clarithromycin). Efflux-encoding mefA and mefE genes were not detectable in these isolates. The presence of 23S rRNA mutations in specific isolates did not significantly change macrolide MICs. No nucleotide substitutions were found in genes encoding ribosomal proteins L4 or L22. The ermB and ermT genes were found in the genomes of all isolates. These two genes were acquired independently in one highly virulent isolate AL101002, and clustered with Tn916 and IS1216, respectively. The expression of both ermB and ermT in all isolates was erythromycin inducible and yielded comparable macrolide MICs in all six isolates. Taken together, inducible expression of both ermB and ermT conferred high macrolide resistance in these S. gallolyticus subsp. pasterianus isolates. Our findings reveal new macrolide resistance features in S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus by both ermB and ermT. PMID:27669217

  13. Characterization of a new erm-related macrolide resistance gene present in probiotic strains of Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Leclercq, Roland

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B was studied in four Bacillus clausii strains that are mixed in a probiotic administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic chemotherapy and in three reference strains of B. clausii, DSM8716, ATCC 21536, and ATCC 21537. An 846-bp gene called erm(34), which is related to the erm genes conferring resistance to these antibiotics by ribosomal methylation, was cloned from total DNA of B. clausii DSM8716 into Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence presented 61% identity with that of Erm(D) from B. licheniformis, B. halodurans, and B. anthracis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI, followed by hybridization with an erm(34)-specific probe, indicated a chromosomal location of the gene in all B. clausii strains. Repeated attempts to transfer resistance to macrolides by conjugation from B. clausii strains to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium HM1070, and B. subtilis UCN19 were unsuccessful.

  14. Macrolide resistance mechanisms and virulence factors in erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter species isolated from chicken and swine feces and carcasses

    PubMed Central

    LIM, Suk-Kyung; MOON, Dong-Chan; CHAE, Myung Hwa; KIM, Hae Ji; NAM, Hyang-Mi; KIM, Su-Ran; JANG, Gum-Chan; LEE, Kichan; JUNG, Suk-Chan; LEE, Hee-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobials was measured in 73 isolates of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and 121 isolates of Campylobacter coli (C. coli) from chicken and swine feces and carcasses in Korea. Both bacterial species showed the highest resistance to (fluoro) quinolones (ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid) out of the nine antimicrobials tested. Erythromycin resistance was much higher in C. coli (19.0%, 23/121) than in C. jejuni (6.8%, 5/73). The mutation in the 23S rRNA gene was primarily responsible for macrolide resistance in Campylobacter isolates. Several amino acid substitutions in the L4 and L22 ribosomal proteins may play a role in the mechanism of resistance, but the role requires further evaluation. A total of eight virulence genes were detected in 28 erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter isolates. All C. jejuni isolates carried more than four such genes, while C. coli isolates carried fewer than three such genes. The high rate of resistance highlights the need to employ more prudent use of critically important antimicrobials, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, in swine and poultry production, and to more carefully monitor antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter isolates in food animals. PMID:27593510

  15. Determination of macrolide antibiotics in meat and fish using pressurized liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berrada, Houda; Borrull, Francesc; Font, Guillermina; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2008-10-24

    We developed a method for determining the quantities of seven macrolide antibiotics in meat and fish by using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (LC-(ESI)MS). The PLE was optimized with regard to solvents, temperature, pressure, extraction time and number of cycles. The optimum conditions were: methanol as the extraction solvent; a temperature of 80 degrees C; a pressure of 1500psi; an extraction time of 15min; 2 cycles; a flush volume of 150% and a purge time of 300s. All recoveries for macrolide antibiotics were over 77% at 200mug/kg, except for erythromycin, which was 58%. The repeatability and reproducibility on days in between, expressed as %RSD (n=12), were lower than 10% and 12%, respectively. The quantification limits of all compounds were 25mug/kg of dry weight of animal muscle except for troleandomycin (50mug/kg). The method was applied to determine the pharmaceuticals in real samples taken from 18 meat and fish samples. The results showed that PLE is quantitative short time consuming technique, with use of smaller initial sample sizes. Greater specificity and selectivity in extraction and increased potential for automation were shown.

  16. Emergence of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains in chicken meat in Poland and the resistance mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Rożynek, Elżbieta; Maćkiw, Elżbieta; Kamińska, Wanda; Tomczuk, Katarzyna; Antos-Bielska, Małgorzata; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Korsak, Dorota

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in erythromycin resistance in the first resistant Campylobacter strains isolated from chicken meat in Poland, and analyzed their genetic relatedness. A total of 297 samples of raw chicken meat and giblets from retail trade in the Warsaw area collected between 2006 and 2009 were examined. Among 211 Campylobacter strains (52 C. jejuni and 159 C. coli), 10 C. coli isolates (4.7%) were resistant to erythromycin. All the C. jejuni strains were susceptible. Among the high-level macrolide-resistant isolates, two different point mutations within the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene were observed. Eight of the strains had adenine→guanine transitions at position 2075, two other isolates at position 2074. Sequence analysis of ribosomal proteins L4 (rplD) and L22 (rplV) indicated that ribosomal protein modifications did not contribute to macrolide resistance. A mutation in the inverted repeat in the cmeR and cmeABC intergenic region was found in a single resistant strain. The genetic relatedness of Campylobacter isolates showed that two resistant strains obtained from the same production plant in a 2-month interval were genetically identical. The risk of transmission of resistant strains via the food chain highlights the need for constant monitoring of resistance in Campylobacter isolates of human and animal hosts.

  17. The mechanism of action of macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B reveals the nascent peptide exit path in the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tenson, Tanel; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2003-07-25

    The macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B class (MLS) of antibiotics contains structurally different but functionally similar drugs, that all bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit. It has been suggested that these compounds block the path by which nascent peptides exit the ribosome. We have studied the mechanisms of action of four macrolides (erythromycin, josamycin, spiramycin and telithromycin), one lincosamide (clindamycin) and one streptogramin B (pristinamycin IA). All these MLS drugs cause dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA from the ribosome. Josamycin, spiramycin and clindamycin, that extend to the peptidyl transferase center, cause dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs containing two, three or four amino acid residues. Erythromycin, which does not reach the peptidyl transferase center, induces dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs containing six, seven or eight amino acid residues. Pristinamycin IA causes dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs with six amino acid residues and telithromycin allows polymerisation of nine or ten amino acid residues before peptidyl-tRNA dissociates. Our data, in combination with previous structural information, suggest a common mode of action for all MLS antibiotics, which is modulated by the space available between the peptidyl transferase center and the drug.

  18. Macrolide antibiotics removal using a circulating TiO2-coated paper photoreactor: parametric study and hydrodynamic flow characterization.

    PubMed

    Ounnar, Amel; Bouzaza, Abdelkrim; Favier, Lidia; Bentahar, Fatiha

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigates the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of biorecalcitrant macrolide antibiotics in a circulating tubular photoreactor. As target pollutants, spiramycin (SPM) and tylosin (TYL) were considered in this study. The photoreactor leads to the use of an immobilized titanium dioxide on non-woven paper under artificial UV-lamp irradiation. Maximum removal efficiency was achieved at the optimum conditions of natural pH, low pollutant concentration and a 0.35 L min(-1) flow rate. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was used to fit experimental results and the model constants were determined. Moreover, the total organic carbon analysis reveals that SPM and TYL mineralization is not complete. In addition, the study of the residence time distribution allowed us to investigate the flow regime of the reactor. Electrical energy consumption for photocatalytic degradation of macrolides using circulating TiO2-coated paper photoreactor was lower compared with some reported photoreactors used for the elimination of pharmaceutic compounds. A repetitive reuse of the immobilized catalyst was also studied in order to check its photoactivity performance.

  19. In vitro activities of eight macrolide antibiotics and RP-59500 (quinupristin-dalfopristin) against viridans group streptococci isolated from blood of neutropenic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, F; Carratala, J; Liñares, J; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1996-09-01

    From January 1988 to December 1994, 66 consecutive blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci collected from febrile neutropenic cancer patients were tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities by the agar dilution method. The antibiotics studied were erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, dirithromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, diacetyl-midecamycin, spiramycin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 26 (39.4%) strains were resistant to erythromycin with an MIC range of 0.5 to > 128 micrograms/ml. The strains were classified into three groups according to their penicillin susceptibility: 42 (63.6%) were susceptible, 8 (12.1%) were intermediately resistant, and 16 (24.3%) were highly resistant. The percentages of erythromycin-resistant strains in each group were 23.8, 62.5, and 68.8%, respectively. Streptococcus mitis was the species most frequently isolated (83.3%) and showed the highest rates of penicillin (40%) and erythromycin (43.6%) resistance. MICs of all macrolide antibiotics tested and of quinupristin-dalfopristin were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for penicillin-susceptible strains. All macrolide antibiotics tested had cross-resistance to erythromycin, which was not observed with quinupristin-dalfopristin. Our study shows a high rate of macrolide resistance among viridans group streptococci isolated from blood samples of neutropenic cancer patients, especially those infected with penicillin-resistant strains. These findings make macrolides unsuitable prophylactic agents against viridans group streptococcal bacteremia in this patient population.

  20. Resistance to the macrolide antibiotic tylosin is conferred by single methylations at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058 acting in synergy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingfu; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic tylosin has been used extensively in veterinary medicine and exerts potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Tylosin-synthesizing strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces fradiae protect themselves from their own product by differential expression of four resistance determinants, tlrA, tlrB, tlrC, and tlrD. The tlrB and tlrD genes encode methyltransferases that add single methyl groups at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058, respectively. Here we show that methylation by neither TlrB nor TlrD is sufficient on its own to give tylosin resistance, and resistance is conferred by the G748 and A2058 methylations acting together in synergy. This synergistic mechanism of resistance is specific for the macrolides tylosin and mycinamycin that possess sugars extending from the 5- and 14-positions of the macrolactone ring and is not observed for macrolides, such as carbomycin, spiramycin, and erythromycin, that have different constellations of sugars. The manner in which the G748 and A2058 methylations coincide with the glycosylation patterns of tylosin and mycinamycin reflects unambiguously how these macrolides fit into their binding site within the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12417742

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, Producer of the Methymycin/Pikromycin Family of Macrolide Antibiotics, Using PacBio Technology

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingxuan; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a producer of the methymycin/pikromycin family of macrolide antibiotics and a model host for natural product studies, obtained exclusively using PacBio sequencing technology. The 9.03-Mbp genome harbors 8,775 genes and 11 polyketide and nonribosomal peptide natural product gene clusters. PMID:27151802

  2. In vitro activities of eight macrolide antibiotics and RP-59500 (quinupristin-dalfopristin) against viridans group streptococci isolated from blood of neutropenic cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, F; Carratala, J; Liñares, J; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1996-01-01

    From January 1988 to December 1994, 66 consecutive blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci collected from febrile neutropenic cancer patients were tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities by the agar dilution method. The antibiotics studied were erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, dirithromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, diacetyl-midecamycin, spiramycin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 26 (39.4%) strains were resistant to erythromycin with an MIC range of 0.5 to > 128 micrograms/ml. The strains were classified into three groups according to their penicillin susceptibility: 42 (63.6%) were susceptible, 8 (12.1%) were intermediately resistant, and 16 (24.3%) were highly resistant. The percentages of erythromycin-resistant strains in each group were 23.8, 62.5, and 68.8%, respectively. Streptococcus mitis was the species most frequently isolated (83.3%) and showed the highest rates of penicillin (40%) and erythromycin (43.6%) resistance. MICs of all macrolide antibiotics tested and of quinupristin-dalfopristin were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for penicillin-susceptible strains. All macrolide antibiotics tested had cross-resistance to erythromycin, which was not observed with quinupristin-dalfopristin. Our study shows a high rate of macrolide resistance among viridans group streptococci isolated from blood samples of neutropenic cancer patients, especially those infected with penicillin-resistant strains. These findings make macrolides unsuitable prophylactic agents against viridans group streptococcal bacteremia in this patient population. PMID:8878591

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, Producer of the Methymycin/Pikromycin Family of Macrolide Antibiotics, Using PacBio Technology.

    PubMed

    He, Jingxuan; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P; Schilkey, Faye D; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Melançon, Charles E

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a producer of the methymycin/pikromycin family of macrolide antibiotics and a model host for natural product studies, obtained exclusively using PacBio sequencing technology. The 9.03-Mbp genome harbors 8,775 genes and 11 polyketide and nonribosomal peptide natural product gene clusters.

  4. Ultra-Trace Analysis of Nine Macrolides, including Tulathromycin A (Draxxin), in Edible Animal Tissues with Mini-Column Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of 9 macrolides is presented, including tulathromycin A (Draxxin), in beef, poultry and pork muscle with a simple multi-residue extraction and analysis method using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The extraction method inv...

  5. Resistance to the macrolide antibiotic tylosin is conferred by single methylations at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058 acting in synergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingfu; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2002-11-12

    The macrolide antibiotic tylosin has been used extensively in veterinary medicine and exerts potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Tylosin-synthesizing strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces fradiae protect themselves from their own product by differential expression of four resistance determinants, tlrA, tlrB, tlrC, and tlrD. The tlrB and tlrD genes encode methyltransferases that add single methyl groups at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058, respectively. Here we show that methylation by neither TlrB nor TlrD is sufficient on its own to give tylosin resistance, and resistance is conferred by the G748 and A2058 methylations acting together in synergy. This synergistic mechanism of resistance is specific for the macrolides tylosin and mycinamycin that possess sugars extending from the 5- and 14-positions of the macrolactone ring and is not observed for macrolides, such as carbomycin, spiramycin, and erythromycin, that have different constellations of sugars. The manner in which the G748 and A2058 methylations coincide with the glycosylation patterns of tylosin and mycinamycin reflects unambiguously how these macrolides fit into their binding site within the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit.

  6. Characterization of macrolide efflux pump mef subclasses detected in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated between 1999 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Blackman Northwood, J; Del Grosso, M; Cossins, L R; Coley, M D; Creti, R; Pantosti, A; Farrell, D J

    2009-05-01

    The macrolide efflux mechanism of resistance, mef, was characterized in community-acquired respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pyogenes. Fifty-four (4.6%) M phenotype isolates were screen tested as negative for mef(A). Of these 54 isolates, 5 (0.4%), 27 (2.3%), and 1 (0.1%) were considered to be mef(I) positive, a novel mosaic variant of mef, or a novel subclass of mef, respectively. This study shows (i) the definitive presence of mef(E) in S. pyogenes and its global distribution, (ii) the presence of a mosaic variant of mef composed of mef(A) and mef(E), (iii) the previously undescribed presence of mef(I) in S. pyogenes, and (iv) the presence of a novel subclass of mef in S. pyogenes.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Panday, Prashant N.; Pranger, Arianna D.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs. PMID:24309312

  8. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Panday, Prashant N; Pranger, Arianna D; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2011-11-18

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs.

  9. Prevalence and molecular mechanism of macrolide and lincosamide resistance in staphylococci isolated from subclinical bovine mastitis in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aslantaş, Özkan; Öztürk, Fatma; Ceylan, Ahmet

    2011-12-01

    Macrolide and lincosamide (ML) resistance and the related resistance genes of staphylococci were assessed from cases of bovine subclinical mastitis. Of the 104 Staphylococcus aureus and 62 coagulase negative staphylococcus (CoNS) isolates, 26 (25%) and 12 (19.4%) were resistant to ML, respectively. While constitutive ML resistance phenotype accounted for 15.4% (16/104) of S. aureus and 8.1% (5/62) of CoNS, inducible ML resistance phenotype accounted for 2.9% (3/104) of S. aureus and 3.2% (2/62) of CoNS. Among erythromycin-resistant isolates, single or various combination of different resistance genes were detected. The results of this study showed that ML resistance was prevalent among staphylococci from subclinical bovine mastitis cases in Hatay, Turkey. Therefore, a continuous surveillance is necessary to minimise the spread of antimicrobial-resistant staphylococci.

  10. Fluoroquinolone–macrolide combination therapy for chronic bacterial prostatitis: retrospective analysis of pathogen eradication rates, inflammatory findings and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Vittorio; Montanari, Emanuele; Škerk, Višnja; Markotić, Alemka; Marras, Emanuela; Restelli, Antonella; Naber, Kurt G; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the safety and efficacy of fluoroquinolone–macrolide combination therapy in category II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP). The aim of this study is to retrospectively compare the microbiological and clinical findings of two treatment schemes for CBP based on the combination of azithromycin (500 mg, thrice-weekly) with a once-daily 500- or 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin (Cipro-500 or Cipro-750 cohort, respectively). Combined administration of azithromycin (1500 mg week−1) with ciprofloxacin at the rate of 750 mg day−1 for 4 weeks rather than at 500 mg day−1 for 6 weeks increased the eradication rates from 62.35% to 77.32% and the total bacteriological success from 71.76% to 85.57%. A significant decrease in pain and voiding signs/symptoms and a significant reduction in inflammatory leukocyte counts and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were sustained throughout an 18-month follow-up period in both groups. Ejaculatory pain, haemospermia and premature ejaculation were significantly attenuated on microbiological eradication in both groups, but the latter subsided more promptly in the Cipro-750 cohort. In total, 59 Cipro-750 patients showed mild-to-severe erectile dysfunction (ED) at baseline, while 22 patients had no ED on microbiological eradication and throughout the follow-up period. In conclusion fluoroquinolone–macrolide therapy resulted in pathogen eradication and CBP symptom attenuation, including pain, voiding disturbances and sexual dysfunction. A once-daily 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin for 4 weeks showed enhanced eradication rates and lower inflammatory white blood cell counts compared to the 500-mg dose for 6 weeks. Our results are open to further prospective validation. PMID:21765442

  11. Ribosome-templated azide–alkyne cycloadditions: synthesis of potent macrolide antibiotics by in situ click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Glassford, Ian; Teijaro, Christiana N.; Daher, Samer S.; Weil, Amy; Small, Meagan C.; Redhu, Shiv K.; Colussi, Dennis J.; Jacobson, Marlene A.; Childers, Wayne E.; Buttaro, Bettina; Nicholson, Allen W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.

    2016-01-01

    Over half of all antibiotics target the bacterial ribosome—Nature's complex, 2.5 MDa nanomachine responsible for decoding mRNA and synthesizing proteins. Macrolide antibiotics, exemplified by erythromycin, bind the 50S subunit with nM affinity and inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the passage of nascent oligopeptides. Solithromycin (1), a third-generation semi-synthetic macrolide discovered by combinatorial copper-catalyzed click chemistry, was synthesized in situ by incubating either E. coli 70S ribosomes or 50S subunits with macrolidefunctionalized azide 2 and 3-ethynylaniline (3) precursors. The ribosome-templated in situ click method was expanded from a binary reaction (i.e., one azide and one alkyne) to a six-component reaction (i.e., azide 2 and five alkynes) and ultimately to a sixteen-component reaction (i.e., azide 2 and fifteen alkynes). The extent of triazole formation correlated with ribosome affinity for the anti (1,4)-regioisomers as revealed by measured Kd values. Computational analysis using the Site-Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) approach indicated that the relative affinity of the ligands was associated with the alteration of macrolactone+desosamine-ribosome interactions caused by the different alkynes. Protein synthesis inhibition experiments confirmed the mechanism of action. Evaluation of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) quantified the potency of the in situ click products and demonstrated the efficacy of this method in the triaging and prioritization of potent antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome. Cell viability assays in human fibroblasts confirmed 2 and four analogs with therapeutic indices for bactericidal activity over in vitro mammalian cytotoxicity as essentially identical to solithromycin (1). PMID:26878192

  12. Macrolides and lincomycin susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and variable mutation of domain II and V in 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Nakajima, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yuka; Eguchi, Masashi; Hata, Eiji; Yamamoto, Koshi

    2005-08-01

    A total of 151 strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from porcine lung lesions (weaned pigs, n=71, and finishers, n=80) were investigated for their in vitro susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial agents. Thirty-one strains (28 from weaned pigs and 3 from finishers) showed resistance to 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and lincomycin. The prevalence of the 16-membered macrolide-resistant M. hyorhinis strain in weaned pigs from Japanese herds has approximately quadrupled in the past 10 years. Several of the 31 strains were examined for mutations in the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). All field strains tested showed a transition of A to G at position 2059 of 23S rRNA-rendered Escherichia coli. On the other hand, individual tylosin- and lincomycin-resistant mutants of M. hyorhinis were selected in vitro from the susceptible type strain BTS7 by 3 to 9 serial passages in subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic. The 23S rRNA sequences of both tylosin and lincomycin-resistant mutants were compared with that of the radical BTS7 strain. The BTS7 mutant strain selected by tylosin showed the same transition as the field-isolated strains of A2059G. However, the transition selected in lincomycin showed mutations in domains II and V of 23S rRNA, G2597U, C2611U in domain V, and the addition of an adenine at the pentameric adenine loop in domain II. The strain selected by lincomycin showed an additional point mutation of A2062G selected by tylosin.

  13. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in the Pediatric Population in Germany during 2000-2001

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Lütticken, Rudolf; Bryskier, André; Al-Lahham, Adnan

    2003-01-01

    In a nationwide study in Germany covering 13 clinical microbiology laboratories, a total of 307 Streptococcus pyogenes (mainly pharyngitis) and 333 Streptococcus pneumoniae (respiratory tract infections) strains were collected from outpatients less than 16 years of age. The MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin A, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were determined by the microdilution method. In S. pyogenes isolates, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin, 0%; erythromycin A, 13.7%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin showed good activity against S. pyogenes isolates (MIC90 = 0.25 μg/ml; MIC range, 0.016 to 16 μg/ml). Three strains were found to be telithromycin-resistant (MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml). Erythromycin-resistant strains were characterized for the underlying resistance genotype, with 40.5% having the efflux type mef(A), 38.1% having the erm(A), and 9.5% having the erm(B) genotypes. emm typing of macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes isolates showed emm types 4 (45.2%), 77 (26.2%), and 12 (11.9%) to be predominant. In S. pneumoniae, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin intermediate, 7.5%; penicillin resistant, 0%; erythromycin A, 17.4%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin was highly active against pneumococcal isolates (MIC90 ≤ 0.016 μg/ml; range, 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml). The overall resistance profile of streptococcal respiratory tract isolates is still favorable, but macrolide resistance is of growing concern in Germany. PMID:12543648

  14. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  15. Decreased Susceptibility to Macrolide-Lincosamide in Mycoplasma synoviae Is Associated with Mutations in 23S Ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Flaminio, Barbara; Catania, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism responsible for acquired decreased susceptibility to macrolides (14-membered erythromycin [Ery], 16-membered tylosin [Ty] and tilmicosin [Tm]) and to lincosamides (lincomycin [Ln]) was investigated in Mycoplasma synoviae, a pathogen that causes respiratory infections and synovitis in chicken and turkey. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 49 M. synoviae isolates, M. synoviae type strain WVU1853, and reference strain FMT showing minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to Ty (≤ 0.015 to 2 μg/ml), Tm (0.03 to ≥ 8 μg/ml), and Ln (0.125 to 8 μg/ml); MICs to Ery ranged from 32 to ≥ 128 μg/ml. Our results showed that the nucleotide substitution G748A (Escherichia coli numbering) in domain II of one or both 23S rRNA alleles may account for a slight increase in MICs to Ty and Tm (up to 0.5 and 2 μg/ml, respectively). No correlation between the presence of G748A and decreased susceptibility to Ln was found. However, the presence of the point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with a more significant decrease in susceptibility to Ty (1-2 μg/ml), Tm (≥ 8 μg/ml), and Ln (≥ 8 μg/ml). All M. synoviae isolates tested had a G2057A transition in the 23S rRNAs consistent with previously described intrinsic resistance to Ery. Mutations G64E (one isolate) and Q90K/H (two isolates) were identified in the L4 and L22 proteins, respectively, but their impact on decreased susceptibility to macrolides and lincomycin was not clear.

  16. Identification of novel macrolides with antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and type I and III IFN-augmenting activity in airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Porter, James D.; Watson, Jennifer; Roberts, Lee R.; Gill, Simren K.; Groves, Helen; Dhariwal, Jaideep; Almond, Mark H.; Wong, Ernie; Walton, Ross P.; Jones, Lyn H.; Tregoning, John; Kilty, Iain; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Edwards, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma and COPD are triggered by rhinoviruses. Uncontrolled inflammatory pathways, pathogenic bacterial burden and impaired antiviral immunity are thought to be important factors in disease severity and duration. Macrolides including azithromycin are often used to treat the above diseases, but exhibit variable levels of efficacy. Inhaled corticosteroids are also readily used in treatment, but may lack specificity. Ideally, new treatment alternatives should suppress unwanted inflammation, but spare beneficial antiviral immunity. Methods In the present study, we screened 225 novel macrolides and tested them for enhanced antiviral activity against rhinovirus, as well as anti-inflammatory activity and activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Primary bronchial epithelial cells were grown from 10 asthmatic individuals and the effects of macrolides on rhinovirus replication were also examined. Another 30 structurally similar macrolides were also examined. Results The oleandomycin derivative Mac5, compared with azithromycin, showed superior induction (up to 5-fold, EC50 = 5–11 μM) of rhinovirus-induced type I IFNβ, type III IFNλ1 and type III IFNλ2/3 mRNA and the IFN-stimulated genes viperin and MxA, yet had no effect on IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA. Mac5 also suppressed rhinovirus replication at 48 h, proving antiviral activity. Mac5 showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae; however, it did not have any antibacterial properties compared with azithromycin when used against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (as a model organism) and also the respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Further non-toxic Mac5 derivatives were identified with various anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial activities. Conclusions The data support the idea that macrolides have antiviral properties through a mechanism that is yet to be ascertained. We also provide

  17. Activities of a New Fluoroketolide, HMR 3787, and Its (Des)-Fluor Derivative RU 64399 Compared to Those of Telithromycin, Erythromycin A, Azithromycin, Clarithromycin, and Clindamycin against Macrolide-Susceptible or -Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kensuke; Davies, Todd A.; Ednie, Lois M.; Bryskier, Andre; Palavecino, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 were compared to those of three macrolides, telithromycin, and clindamycin against 175 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates and 121 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates. HMR3787 and telithromycin were the most active compounds tested against pneumococci. Telithromycin and RU 64399 were equally active against macrolide-susceptible (MICs, 0.008 to 0.06 μg/ml) and -resistant S. pyogenes isolates, but HMR 3787 had lower MICs for ermB strains. PMID:11600391

  18. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and mutations associated with macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae from respiratory clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Nummi, Maaret; Mannonen, Laura; Puolakkainen, Mirja

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in clinical specimens by developing a multiplex real-time PCR assay that includes identification of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Novel assays targeting a M. pneumoniae conserved hypothetical protein gene, M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene mutations associated with macrolide resistance and human β-globin gene (an endogenous internal control) were designed and combined with a previously published C. pneumoniae PCR targeting ompA gene. The resulting quadraplex PCR was validated with a panel of clinical specimens supplemented with external quality assessment specimens, simulated specimens and various bacterial and viral strains. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by reference PCRs or confirmed by sequencing (typing of macrolide resistance). The novel multiplex PCR assay was in 100 % agreement with reference PCRs. Four M. pneumoniae strains with macrolide resistance-associated mutations were identified among 42 strains, which comprises 9.5 % of the study material. Amplification of an internal control excluded sample-derived inhibition possibly leading to false-negative reporting. In conclusion, we have developed a resources conserving multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae and the most common mutations leading to macrolide resistance in M. pneumoniae. The assay is a widely useful tool for detection of these respiratory pathogens and will also shed light on the occurrence of macrolide resistance in M. pneumoniae.

  19. Restoration of APC gene function in colorectal cancer cells by aminoglycoside- and macrolide-induced read-through of premature termination codons.

    PubMed

    Zilberberg, Alona; Lahav, Lital; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2010-04-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a multifunctional tumour suppressor protein that negatively regulates the Wnt signalling pathway. The APC gene is ubiquitously expressed in tissues and organs, including the large intestine and central nervous system. The majority of patients with sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancer have mutations in the gene encoding APC. Approximately 30% of these mutations are single nucleotide changes that result in premature stop codons (nonsense mutations). A potential therapeutic approach for treatment of this subset of patients is the use of aminoglycosides and macrolides that induce nonsense mutation read-through and restore levels of full-length protein. We have used reporter plasmids and colorectal cancer cell lines to demonstrate that several aminoglycosides and tylosin, a member of the macrolide family, induced read-through of nonsense mutations in the APC gene. In xenograft experiments and in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model, these compounds ameliorated the tumorigenic clinical symptoms caused by nonsense mutations in the APC gene.

  20. A Novel erm(44) Gene Variant from a Human Staphylococcus saprophyticus Isolate Confers Resistance to Macrolides and Lincosamides but Not Streptogramins.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Hu, Yanmin; Coates, Anthony; Perreten, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    A novel erm(44) gene variant, erm(44)v, has been identified by whole-genome sequencing in a Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolate from the skin of a healthy person. It has the particularity to confer resistance to macrolides and lincosamides but not to streptogramin B when expressed in S. aureus The erm(44)v gene resides on a 19,400-bp genomic island which contains phage-associated proteins and is integrated into the chromosome of S. saprophyticus.

  1. Transcriptional attenuation controls macrolide inducible efflux and resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in other Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr(D)) elements.

    PubMed

    Chancey, Scott T; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F; Daugherty, Sean C; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5'-TATACT-3') and -35 (5'-TTGAAC-3') boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5' region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5' of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements.

  2. Functional interplay between the ATP binding cassette Msr(D) protein and the membrane facilitator superfamily Mef(E) transporter for macrolide resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Samudio, Virginia; Chesneau, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Macrolides have wide clinical applications in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, among which streptococci are the most frequent causative agents. An active efflux-based mechanism of macrolide resistance, referred to as the M phenotype in streptococcal isolates, has been associated with the presence of mef genes that encode a subset of major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters like Mef(E). An msr(D) gene, adjacent to and co-transcribed with mef in the presence of erythromycin, has also been implicated in drug efflux, but its role remains elusive. Msr(D) belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins and harbors two fused nucleotide-binding domains with no membrane-spanning domains. The present work indicates that the major resistance traits of the M phenotype in Escherichia coli may be due to Msr(D) and not to Mef(E). Fluorescence microscopy using Mef(E) tagged with GFP linked low efficacy of the chimera in conferring macrolide resistance with improper subcellular localization. The active role of Msr(D) in directing Mef(E)-GFP to the cell poles was demonstrated, as was synergistic effect in terms of levels of resistance when both proteins were expressed. A trans-dominant negative mutation within ABC Msr(D) affecting MFS Mef(E) strongly suggests that both proteins can interact in vivo, and such a physical interaction was supported in vitro. This is the first reported example of a functional interplay between an ABC component and an MFS transporter. The direct involvement of Msr(D) in the efflux of macrolides remains to be demonstrated.

  3. Transcriptional Attenuation Controls Macrolide Inducible Efflux and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Other Gram-Positive Bacteria Containing mef/mel(msr(D)) Elements

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5′-TATACT-3′) and -35 (5′-TTGAAC-3′) boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5’ region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5’ of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements. PMID:25695510

  4. Macrolide-resistance mechanisms in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Chinese children in association with genes of tetM and integrase of conjugative transposons 1545.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xuzhuang; Yang, Hui; Yu, Shangjie; Yao, Kaihu; Wang, Yonghong; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yonghong

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by Beijing children presenting with respiratory tract infections. Nasopharyngeal S. pneumoniae strains were tested for sensitivity with 15 antibiotics and further analyzed for phenotypes of macrolide-resistant strains and by PCR for the macrolide-resistant genes ermB, mefA, tetM, and integrase of conjugative transposon (Tn1545) intTn. We found 185 strains of S. pneumoniae relatively highly resistant to erythromycin (78.9%), clindamycin (76.2%), tetracycline (86%), and SMZ-TMP (78.7%) but with relatively low resistance to amoxicillin (2.2%), cefaclor (15.5%), ceftriaxone (2.8%), and cefuroxime (14.1%). The 146 strains of erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae showed extensive cross-resistance to other macrolides like azithromycin (100%), clarithromycin (100%), acetylspiramycin (95.2%), and clindamycin (95.9%). Genes ermB and mefA were detected in all erythromycin-resistant strains, with ermB(+) 79.5%, ermB + mefA(+) 17.8%, and mefA(+) 2.7%. About 96.9% of tetracycline-resistant isolates were positive for tetM, compared to 26.9% of sensitive strains. Ninety percent of tetracycline-resistant strains were also erythromycin-resistant versus 11.5% of tetracycline-sensitive strains. The intTn gene was present in 87.6% of S. pneumoniae strains and correlated with erythromycin and tetracycline resistance. The close relationship between the conjugative transposon Tn1545 and the genes ermB and tetM is probably one of the important mechanisms explaining the multiple drug resistance of S. pneumoniae.

  5. Mutations in 23S rRNA and Ribosomal Protein L4 Account for Resistance in Pneumococcal Strains Selected In Vitro by Macrolide Passage

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A.; Davies, T.; Cronan, M.; Jacobs, M. R.; Appelbaum, P. C.; Sutcliffe, J.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants, selected from susceptible strains by serial passage in azithromycin, were investigated. These mutants were resistant to 14- and 15-membered macrolides, but resistance could not be explained by any clinically relevant resistance determinant [mef(A), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(TR), msr(A), mph(A), mph(B), mph(C), ere(A), ere(B)]. An investigation into the sequences of 23S rRNAs in the mutant and parental strains revealed individual changes of C2611A, C2611G, A2058G, and A2059G (Escherichia coli numbering) in four mutants. Mutations at these residues in domain V of 23S rRNA have been noted to confer erythromycin resistance in other species. Not all four 23S rRNA alleles have to contain the mutation to confer resistance. Some of the mutations also confer coresistance to streptogramin B (C2611A, C2611G, and A2058G), 16-membered macrolides (all changes), and clindamycin (A2058G and A2059G). Interestingly, none of these mutations confer high-level resistance to telithromycin (HMR-3647). Further, two of the mutants which had no changes in their 23S rRNA sequences had changes in a highly conserved stretch of amino acids (63KPWRQKGTGRAR74) in ribosomal protein L4. One mutant contained a single amino acid change (G69C), while the other mutant had a 6-base insert, resulting in two amino acids (S and Q) being inserted between amino acids Q67 and K68. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mutations in 23S rRNA genes or ribosomal proteins in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae strains. PMID:10898684

  6. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia.

  7. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A'. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A'. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them.

  8. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A’. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A’. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them. PMID:27008373

  9. On the mechanism of action of 9-O-arylalkyloxime derivatives of 6-O-mycaminosyltylonolide, a new class of 16-membered macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Karahalios, Panagiotis; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L; Fu, Hong; Katz, Leonard; Wilson, Daniel N; Dinos, George P

    2006-10-01

    New 16-membered 9-aryl-alkyl oxime derivatives of 5-O-mycaminosyl-tylonolid (OMT) have recently been prepared and were found to exhibit high activity against macrolide-resistant strains. In this study, we show that these compounds do not affect the binding of tRNAs to ribosomes in a cell-free system derived from Escherichia coli and that they cannot inhibit peptidyltransferase, peptidyl-tRNA translocation, or poly(U)-dependent poly(Phe) synthesis. However, they severely inhibit poly(A)-dependent poly(Lys) synthesis and compete with erythromycin or tylosin for binding to common or partially overlapping sites in the ribosome. According to footprinting analysis, the lactone ring of these compounds seems to occupy the classic binding site of macrolides that is located at the entrance of the exit tunnel, whereas the extending alkyl-aryl side chain seems to penetrate deeper in the tunnel, where it protects nucleoside A752 in domain II of 23S rRNA. In addition, this side chain causes an increased affinity for mutant ribosomes that may be responsible for their effectiveness against macrolide resistant strains. As revealed by detailed kinetic analysis, these compounds behave as slow-binding ligands interacting with functional ribosomal complexes through a one-step mechanism. This type of inhibitor has several attractive features and offers many chances in designing new potent drugs.

  10. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for the determination of ten macrolide drugs residues in animal muscles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuqin; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Qingying; Zhang, Meiyu; Meng, Chenying; Li, Jiufeng; He, Limin

    2016-10-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of the residues of ten macrolide drugs in swine, cattle and chicken muscles samples. The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized using tylosin as a template and methacrylic acid as a functional monomer. Samples were extracted with sodium borate buffer solution and ethyl acetate, and purified by the MIP cartridge. The results showed that the cartridge exhibited good recognition performance for macrolides, and better purification effect than the traditional solid-phase extraction cartridges. Recoveries of analytes at three spiking levels 1, 5 and 20μgkg(-1) ranged from 60.7% to 100.3% with the relative standard deviations less than 14%. The limits of detection of the method were between 0.1 and 0.4μgkg(-1). The method is useful for the routine monitoring of the residues of macrolide drugs in animal muscles.

  11. [Comparative study of intramacrophagic penetration and action on phagocytosis of a macrolide (spiramycin) and a fluoroquinolone (pefloxacin)].

    PubMed

    Desnottes, J F; Diallo, N

    1990-04-01

    Antibiotic-phagocyte interaction is an important parameter involved in the elimination process of intracellular bacteria. The aim of the present study was to compare, using the same model, the phagocytic uptake and the intracellular activity of a macrolide and a quinolone. Accumulation of spiramycin and pefloxacin by guinea pig peritoneal macrophages (GPpM) was studied by means of a velocity-gradient centrifugation technique and expression of the ratio of the cellular concentration of antibiotic to the extracellular concentration (IC-EC). Three aspects of Staphylococcus aureus (209-P) phagocytosis were studied: 1) the phagocytic capacity (PC), mean number of ingested cocci by GpPM; 2) the phagocytic activity (PA), percentage of phagocyting GpPM with at least one bacterium; 3) the number of intracellular viable bacteria (IVB). Phagocytic capacity and phagocytic activity were determined by fluorescence microscopy using S. aureus stained with acridine orange. Intracellular viable bacteria were quantified by standard colony counts (CFU). The ratios of intracellular to extracellular concentration of pefloxacin and spiramycin are respectively 9 and 23. Pretreatment of guinea-pig peritoneal macrophages with 10 mg/l of each antibiotic does not modify phagocytic capacity and phagocytic activity, but lead to a decrease of intracellular viable bacteria. S. aureus pretreatment with 1/4 the MIC of each antibiotic increased phagocytic capacity and phagocytic activity and decrease intracellular viable bacteria (especially spiramycin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. A New, Potent, and Placenta-Permeable Macrolide Antibiotic, Solithromycin, for the Prevention and Treatment of Bacterial Infections in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Payne, Matthew S.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Ireland, Demelza J.; Newnham, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection–inflammation is a major cause of early preterm birth and subsequent neonatal mortality and acute or long-term morbidity. Antibiotics can be administered in pregnancy to prevent preterm birth either prophylactically to women at high risk for preterm delivery, or to women with diagnosed intrauterine infection, prelabor rupture of membranes, or in suspected preterm labor. The therapeutic goals of each of these scenarios are different, with different pharmacological considerations, although effective antimicrobial therapy is an essential requirement. An ideal antibiotic for these clinical indications would be (a) one that is easily administered and orally bioactive, (b) has a favorable adverse effect profile (devoid of reproductive toxicity or teratogenicity), (c) is effective against the wide range of microorganisms known to be commonly associated with intra-amniotic infection, (d) provides effective antimicrobial protection within both the fetal and amniotic compartments after maternal delivery, (e) has anti-inflammatory properties, and (f) is effective against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Here, we review the evidence from clinical, animal, and ex vivo/in vitro studies that demonstrate that a new macrolide-derived antibiotic – solithromycin – has all of these properties and, hence, may be an ideal antibiotic for the treatment and prevention of intrauterine infection-­related pregnancy complications. While this evidence is extremely encouraging, it is still preliminary. A number of key studies need to be completed before solithromycin’s true potential for use in pregnancy can be ascertained. PMID:27066004

  13. Genomic Epidemiology of Gonococcal Resistance to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins, Macrolides, and Fluoroquinolones in the United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Yonatan H.; Harris, Simon R.; Kirkcaldy, Robert D.; Green, Anna G.; Marks, Debora S.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Trees, David; Lipsitch, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is empirical and based on population-wide susceptibilities. Increasing antimicrobial resistance underscores the potential importance of rapid diagnostic tests, including sequence-based tests, to guide therapy. However, the usefulness of sequence-based diagnostic tests depends on the prevalence and dynamics of the resistance mechanisms. Methods. We define the prevalence and dynamics of resistance markers to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones in 1102 resistant and susceptible clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected from 2000 to 2013 via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project. Results. Reduced extended-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility is predominantly clonal and associated with the mosaic penA XXXIV allele and derivatives (sensitivity 98% for cefixime and 91% for ceftriaxone), but alternative resistance mechanisms have sporadically emerged. Reduced azithromycin susceptibility has arisen through multiple mechanisms and shows limited clonal spread; the basis for resistance in 36% of isolates with reduced azithromycin susceptibility is unclear. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae has arisen multiple times, with extensive clonal spread. Conclusions. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae and reduced cefixime susceptibility appear amenable to development of sequence-based diagnostic tests, whereas the undefined mechanisms of resistance to ceftriaxone and azithromycin underscore the importance of phenotypic surveillance. The identification of multidrug-resistant isolates highlights the need for additional measures to respond to the threat of untreatable gonorrhea. PMID:27638945

  14. Novel spectrophotometric method for determination of some macrolide antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations using 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Safwan; Bayram, Roula

    2012-12-01

    New, simple and rapid spectrophotometric method has been developed and validated for the assay of two macrolide drugs, azithromycin (AZT) and erythromycin (ERY) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method was based on the reaction of AZT and ERY with sodium 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) in alkaline medium at 25 °C to form an orange-colored product of maximum absorption peak at 452 nm. All variables were studied to optimize the reaction conditions and the reaction mechanism was postulated. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 1.5-33.0 and 0.92-8.0 μg mL-1 with limit of detection values of 0.026 and 0.063 μg mL-1 for AZT and ERY, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 4.3 × 104 and 12.3 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for AZT and ERY, respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the determination of AZT and ERY in formulations and the results tallied well with the label claim. The results were statistically compared with those of an official method by applying the Student's t-test and F-test. No interference was observed from the concomitant substances normally added to preparations.

  15. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-01-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis. PMID:23549852

  16. Genetic basis of the association of resistance genes mef(I) (macrolides) and catQ (chloramphenicol) in streptococci.

    PubMed

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Brenciani, Andrea; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-01-01

    In streptococci mef(I) and catQ, two relatively uncommon macrolide and chloramphenicol resistance genes, respectively, are typically linked in a genetic module designated IQ module. Though variable, the module consistently encompasses, and is sometimes reduced to, a conserved ∼5.8-kb mef(I)-catQ fragment. The prototype IQ module was described in Streptococcus pneumoniae. IQ-like modules have subsequently been detected in Streptococcus pyogenes and in different species of viridans group streptococci, where mef(E) may be found instead of mef(I). Three genetic elements, one carrying the prototype IQ module from S. pneumoniae and two carrying different, defective IQ modules from S. pyogenes, have recently been characterized. All are integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) belonging to the Tn5253 family, and have been designated ICESpn529IQ, ICESpy029IQ and ICESpy005IQ, respectively. ICESpy029IQ and ICESpy005IQ were the first Tn5253 family ICEs to be described in S. pyogenes. A wealth of new information has been obtained by comparing their genetic organization, chromosomal integration, and transferability. The origin of the IQ module is unknown. The mechanism by which it spreads in streptococci is discussed.

  17. Occurrence of sulfonamide-, tetracycline-, plasmid-mediated quinolone- and macrolide-resistance genes in livestock feedlots in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Mu, Quanhua; Li, Jin; Sun, Yingxue; Mao, Daqing; Wang, Qing; Luo, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock feedlots deserve attention because they are prone to transfer to human pathogens and thus pose threats to human health. In this study, the occurrence of 21 ARGs, including tetracycline (tet)-, sulfonamide (sul)-, plasmid-mediated quinolone (PMQR)- and macrolide-resistance (erm) genes were investigated in feces and adjacent soils from chicken, swine, and cattle feedlots in Northern China. PMQR and sul ARGs were the most prevalent and account for over 90.0 % of the total ARGs in fecal samples. Specifically, PMQR genes were the most prevalent, accounting for 59.6 % of the total ARGs, followed by sul ARGs (34.2 %). The percentage of tet ARGs was 3.4 %, and erm ARGs accounted for only 1.9 %. Prevalence of PMQR and sul ARGs was also found in swine and cattle feces. The overall trend of ARG concentrations in feces of different feeding animals was chicken > swine > beef cattle in the studied area. In soils, sul ARGs had the highest concentration and account for 71.1 to 80.2 % of the total ARGs, which is possibly due to the widely distributed molecular carriers (i.e., class one integrons), facilitating sul ARG propagation. Overall, this study provides integrated profiles of various types of ARGs in livestock feedlots and thus provides a reference for the management of antibiotic use in livestock farming.

  18. Investigation of Channel-Forming Activity of Polyene Macrolide Antibiotics in Planar Lipid Bilayers in the Presence of Dipole Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, S. S.; Schagina, L. V.; Ostroumova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    The role of membrane components, sterols, phospholipids and sphingolipids in the formation and functioning of ion-permeable nanopores formed by antifungal macrolide antibiotics, amphotericin B, nystatin and filipin in planar lipid bilayers was studied. Dipole modifiers, flavonoids and styryl dyes, were used as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms of polyene channel-forming activity. The introduction of dipole modifiers into the membrane bathing solutions was shown to change the conductance of single channels and the steadystate transmembrane current induced by polyene antibiotics in the sterol-containing phospholipid-bilayers. The conductance of single amphotericin B channels was found to depend on the dipole potential of the membrane. The experiments with various phospholipids, sterols, and polyenes led to the assumption that the shape of a phospholipid molecule, the presence of double bonds at the positions 7 and 22 of a sterol molecule, the number of conjugated double bonds, and the presence of an amino sugar in the polyene antibiotic molecule are important factors impacting the stability of polyene-lipid complexes forming ion-permeable pores. Experimental and literature data presented in the paper suggest that the channel-forming activity of polyene antibiotics is also affected by the physicochemical properties of polyene-enriched ordered membrane domains. PMID:25558397

  19. Total synthesis of (-)-ulapualide A, a novel tris-oxazole macrolide from marine nudibranchs, based on some biosynthesis speculation.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Gerald; Ashweek, Neil J; Baker-Glenn, Charles A G; Kempson, James; Walker, Gary M; Yee, James G K

    2008-04-21

    A new, second generation, total synthesis of ulapualide A (1), whose stereochemistry was recently determined from X-ray analysis of its complex with the protein actin, is described. The synthesis is designed and based on some speculation of the biosynthetic origin of the contiguous tris-oxazole unit in ulapualide A, alongside that of the related co-metabolites that contain only two oxazole rings, e.g. 6 and 7. The mono-oxazole carboxylic acid 67b and the mono-oxazole secondary 55b alcohol which, together, contain all of the 10 asymmetric centres in the natural metabolite, were first elaborated using a combination of contemporary asymmetric synthesis protocols. Esterification of 67b with 55b under Yamaguchi conditions gave the ester 77 which was then converted into the omega-amino acid 18a following simultaneous deprotection of the t-butyl ester and the N-Boc protecting groups. Macrolactamisation of 18a, using HATU, now gave the key intermediate macrolactam 17, containing two of the three oxazole rings in ulapualide A (1). A number of procedures were used to introduce the third oxazole ring in ulapualide A from 17, including: a) cyclodehydration to the oxazoline 78a followed by oxidation using nickel peroxide leading to 76; b) dehydration to the enamide 79, followed by conversion into the methoxyoxazoline 78b, via 80, and elimination of methanol from 78b using camphorsulfonic acid. The tris-oxazole macrolide 76 was next converted into the aldehyde 82b in four straightforward steps, which was then reacted with N-methylformamide, leading to the E-alkenylformamide 83. Removal of the TBDPS protection at C3 in 83 finally gave (-)-ulapualide A, whose 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic data were indistinguishable from those obtained for naturally derived material. It is likely that the tris-oxazole unit in ulapualide A (1) is derived in nature from a cascade of cyclodehydrations from an acylated tris-serine precursor, e.g.9, followed by oxidation of the resulting tris

  20. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure.

    PubMed

    Luby, Elizabeth M; Moorman, Thomas B; Soupir, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water, which may contribute to the increase in antibiotic resistance in non-agricultural settings. We compared losses of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and macrolide-resistance (erm and msrA) genes in water draining from plots with or without swine manure application under chisel plow and no till conditions. Concentrations of ermB, ermC and ermF were all >10(9)copies g(-1) in manure from tylosin-treated swine, and application of this manure resulted in short-term increases in the abundance of these genes in soil. Abundances of ermB, ermC and ermF in manured soil returned to levels identified in non-manured control plots by the spring following manure application. Tillage practices yielded no significant differences (p>0.10) in enterococci or erm gene concentrations in drainage water and were therefore combined for further analysis. While enterococci and tylosin-resistant enterococci concentrations in drainage water showed no effects of manure application, ermB and ermF concentrations in drainage water from manured plots were significantly higher (p<0.01) than concentrations coming from non-manured plots. ErmB and ermF were detected in 78% and 44%, respectively, of water samples draining from plots receiving manure. Although ermC had the highest concentrations of the three genes in drainage water, there was no effect of manure application on ermC abundance. MsrA was not detected in manure, soil or water. This study is the first to report significant increases in abundance of resistance genes in waters draining from agricultural land due to manure application.

  1. The structure of DesR from Streptomyces venezuelae, a β-glucosidase involved in macrolide activation.

    PubMed

    Zmudka, Matthew W; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2013-07-01

    Antibiotics have, indeed, altered the course of human history as is evidenced by the increase in human life expectancy since the 1940s. Many of these natural compounds are produced by bacteria that, by necessity, must have efficient self-resistance mechanisms. The methymycin/pikromycin producing species Streptomyces venezuelae, for example, utilizes β-glucosylation of its macrolide products to neutralize their effects within the confines of the cell. Once released into the environment, these compounds are activated by the removal of the glucose moiety. In S. venezuelae, the enzyme responsible for removal of the sugar from the parent compound is encoded by the desR gene and referred to as DesR. It is a secreted enzyme containing 828 amino acid residues, and it is known to be a retaining glycosidase. Here, we describe the structure of the DesR/D-glucose complex determined to 1.4-Å resolution. The overall architecture of the enzyme can be envisioned in terms of three regions: a catalytic core and two auxiliary domains. The catalytic core harbors the binding platform for the glucose ligand. The first auxiliary domain adopts a "PA14 fold," whereas the second auxiliary domain contains an immunoglobulin-like fold. Asp 273 and Glu 578 are in the proper orientation to function as the catalytic base and proton donor, respectively, required for catalysis. The overall fold of the core region places DesR into the GH3 glycoside hydrolase family of enzymes. Comparison of the DesR structure with the β-glucosidase from Kluyveromyces marxianus shows that their PA14 domains assume remarkably different orientations.

  2. Occurrence and distribution of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides, and nitrofurans in livestock manure and amended soils of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Wan, Weining; Mao, Daqing; Wang, Chong; Mu, Quanhua; Qin, Songyan; Luo, Yi

    2015-03-01

    A feasible and rapid analysis for the simultaneous determination of sulfonamides (SAs), tetracyclines (TCs), fluoroquinolones (FQs), macrolides (MACs) and nitrofurans (NFs) in livestock manure and soils was established by solid-phase extraction (SPE)-ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). A total of 32 manure and 17 amended soil samples from the Liaoning and Tianjin areas in Northern China were collected for analysis. The largest detected frequencies and concentrations in manure samples were those of TCs (3326.6 ± 12,302.6 μg/kg), followed by FQs (411.3 ± 1453.4 μg/kg), SAs (170.6 ± 1060.2 μg/kg), NFs (85.1 ± 158.1 μg/kg), and MACs (1.4 ± 4.8 μg/kg). In general, veterinary antibiotics (VAs) were detected with higher concentrations in swine and chicken manure than in cattle manure, reflecting the heavy usage of VAs in swine and chicken husbandry in the studied area. Furthermore, higher residues of antibiotics were found in piglet and fattening swine manure than in sow manure. In addition, TCs were the most frequently (100%) detected antibiotics in amended soil with higher concentrations (up to 10,967.1 μg/kg) than any other VAs. The attenuation of SAs was more obvious than TCs in amended soil after fertilization, which can most likely be attributed to the stronger sorption of TCs than SAs to soil organic matter through cation exchange. This study illustrated the prevalence of TCs detected in both animal manure and fertilized agricultural soils in Northern China, which may increase the risk to human health through the food chain. Thus, TCs should be given more attention in the management of veterinary usage in livestock husbandry.

  3. Macrolide efflux genes mef(A) and mef(E) are carried by different genetic elements in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, M; Iannelli, F; Messina, C; Santagati, M; Petrosillo, N; Stefani, S; Pozzi, G; Pantosti, A

    2002-03-01

    Susceptibilities to macrolides were evaluated in 267 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, of which 182 were from patients with invasive diseases and 85 were from healthy carriers. Of the 98 resistant isolates, 20 strains showed an M phenotype and carried mef. Strains that carried both mef(A) and mef(E) were found: 17 strains carried mef(A) and 3 carried mef(E). The characteristics of the strains carrying the mef genes and the properties of the mef-containing elements were studied. Strains carrying mef(A) belonged to serotype 14, were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested except erythromycin, and appeared to be clonally related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The three mef(E) strains belonged to different serotypes, showed different susceptibility profiles, and did not appear to be related by PFGE. The sequences of a fragment of the mef-containing element, which encompassed mef and the msr(A) homolog, were identical among the three mef(E)-positive strains and among the three mef(A)-positive strains, although there were differences between the sequences for the two variants at 168 positions. In all mef(A)-positive strains, the mef element was inserted in celB, which led to impairment of the competence of the strains. In line with insertion of the mef(E) element at a different site, the competence of the mef(E)-positive strains was maintained. Transfer of erythromycin resistance by conjugation was obtained from two of three mef(A) strains but from none of three mef(E) strains. Due to the important different characteristics of the strains carrying mef(A) or mef(E), we suggest that the distinction between the two genes be maintained.

  4. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P < 0.05), implying the presence of SPM could induce the production of MLS resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation.

  5. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    PubMed

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone.

  6. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus hominis strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Makowska, Nicoletta; Bosacka, Karolina; Słotwińska, Anna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most frequently isolated bacteria from the blood and the predominant cause of nosocomial infections. Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, especially erythromycin and clindamycin, are important therapeutic agents in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci infections. Among CoNS, Staphylococcus hominis represents the third most common organism. In spite of its clinical significance, very little is known about its mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics, especially MLSB. Fifty-five S. hominis isolates from the blood and the surgical wounds of hospitalized patients were studied. The erm(C) gene was predominant in erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates. The methylase genes, erm(A) and erm(B), were present in 15 and 25% of clinical isolates, respectively. A combination of various erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes was detected in 15% S. hominis isolates. The efflux gene msr(A) was detected in 18% of isolates, alone in four isolates, and in different combinations in a further six. The lnu(A) gene, responsible for enzymatic inactivation of lincosamides was carried by 31% of the isolates. No erythromycin resistance that could not be attributed to the genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C) and msr(A) was detected. In S. hominis, 75 and 84%, respectively, were erythromycin resistant and clindamycin susceptible. Among erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates, 68% of these strains showed the inducible MLSB phenotype. Four isolates harbouring the msr(A) genes alone displayed the MSB phenotype. These studies indicated that resistance to MLSB in S. hominis is mostly based on the ribosomal target modification mechanism mediated by erm genes, mainly the erm(C), and enzymatic drug inactivation mediated by lnu(A).

  7. In vivo spread of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance--a model study in chickens.

    PubMed

    Marosevic, D; Cervinkova, D; Vlkova, H; Videnska, P; Babak, V; Jaglic, Z

    2014-07-16

    The influence of specific and non-specific antibiotic pressure on in vivo spread of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance was evaluated in this study. Chickens repeatedly inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis harbouring the plasmid pAMβ1 carrying the erm(B) gene were perorally treated for one week with tylosin, lincomycin (both specific antibiotic pressure) and chlortetracycline (non-specific antibiotic pressure). Antibiotic non-treated but E. faecalis inoculated chickens served as a control. To quantify the erm(B) gene and characterise intestinal microflora, faecal DNA was analysed by qPCR and 454-pyrosequencing. Under the pressure of antibiotics, a significant increase in erm(B) was observed by qPCR. However, at the final stage of the experiment, an increase in erm(B) was also observed in two out of five non-treated chickens. In chickens treated with tylosin and chlortetracycline, the increase in erm(B) was accompanied by an increase in enterococci. However, E. faecalis was at the limit of detection in all animals. This suggests that the erm(B) gene spread among the gut microbiota other than E. faecalis. Pyrosequencing results indicated that, depending on the particular antibiotic pressure, different bacteria could be responsible for the spread of MLSB resistance. Different species of MLSB-resistant enterococci and streptococci were isolated from cloacal swabs during and after the treatment. PFGE analysis of MLSB-resistant enterococci revealed four clones, all differing from the challenge strain. All of the MLSB-resistant isolates harboured a plasmid of the same size as pAMβ1. This study has shown that MLSB resistance may spread within the gut microbiota under specific and non-specific pressure and even in the absence of any antimicrobial pressure. Finally, depending on the particular antibiotic pressure, different bacterial species seems to be involved in the spread of MLSB resistance.

  8. Comparative study of bactericidal activities, postantibiotic effects, and effects of bacterial virulence of penicillin G and six macrolides against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fuursted, K; Knudsen, J D; Petersen, M B; Poulsen, R L; Rehm, D

    1997-04-01

    In this report, we present MIC, bactericidal activity, postantibiotic effect (PAE), and in vivo infectivity data for postantibiotic-phase pneumococci. We compared and evaluated penicillin G and six macrolides, erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin, roxithromycin, and spiramycin, against 10 strains of pneumococci with various levels of susceptibility to penicillin. All of the agents, except azithromycin, exhibited a bactericidal effect (a > or = 3 log10 decrease in the number of CFU per milliliter) after 4 h of exposure to a concentration equal to 10 times the MIC, displaying the following hierarchy: spiramycin = penicillin G = erythromycin = dirithromycin = clarithromycin = roxithromycin > azithromycin. The bactericidal rate of penicillin G was significantly lower for resistant strains (MIC, > or = 2 microg/ml), while bactericidal rates of macrolides were unaffected by penicillin susceptibility. A PAE was induced in all of the strains by all of the antibiotics after exposure for 1 h to a concentration equivalent to 10 times the MIC. The mean duration of PAEs varied between 2.3 and 3.9 h, showing the following hierarchy: spiramycin = dirithromycin = clarithromycin = erythromycin = roxithromycin > azithromycin > penicillin G. Virulence studies were performed with immunocompetent mice by intraperitoneal inoculation of virulent, penicillin-susceptible serotype 3 pneumococci which had been pre-exposed to penicillin G or a macrolide for 1 h. A significant decrease in the virulence of postantibiotic-phase pneumococci was induced only by erythromycin, azithromycin, dirithromycin, and spiramycin, displaying 5.9-, 7.1-, 4.2-, and 3.6-fold increases in the 50% lethal dose (LD50) compared to a control suspension, respectively. No significant correlation could be demonstrated between the LD50 and the MIC, bactericidal activity, or PAE duration. These results suggest that antimicrobial interaction with host defenses in terms of virulence might be a

  9. Direct detection of Helicobacter pylori resistance to macrolides by a polymerase chain reaction/DNA enzyme immunoassay in gastric biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Marais, A; Monteiro, L; Occhialini, A; Pina, M; Lamouliatte, H; Megraud, F

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The increasing use of macrolides especially in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection has led to an increase in resistant strains. The resistance of H pylori to macrolides, especially clarithromycin, is one of the major causes of eradication failure. In H pylori, clarithromycin resistance is due to point mutations localised in domain V of 23S rRNA. 
AIM—To develop a molecular technique based on amplification of a relevant fragment of the 23S rRNA and colorimetric hybridisation in liquid phase to detect directly in biopsy specimens the type of mutation associated with resistance of H pylori to clarithromycin. 
METHODS—Gastric biopsy samples from 61 patients were submitted to this test. The results were compared with standard methods (determination of minimal inhibition concentration, polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism, and/or DNA sequencing) in order to evaluate the test and to define the cut off values, specificity, and sensitivity. 
RESULTS—The 14 biopsy samples in which H pylori was not detected did not give a positive result in any assay, and the 14 samples harbouring strains susceptible to clarithromycin gave a positive result with the wild type probe as expected. The 33 biopsy specimens containing resistant strains always gave a positive signal with one of the probes detecting resistant organisms, but in eight cases they also reacted with the wild type probe, indicating that a mixture of resistant and susceptible organisms was present. 
CONCLUSION—The importance of this new assay is that it allows the detection of multiple genotypes corresponding to either heterogeneous genotypes or mixed infections. Moreover, it allows in a single step not only the detection of H pylori but also the determination of its susceptibility to clarithromycin directly in biopsy specimens without the need for culture. 

 Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; resistance; clarithromycin; macrolide; polymerase chain

  10. Distribution of macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and mef(A) among 160 penicillin-intermediate clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in southern France.

    PubMed

    Marchandin, H; Jean-Pierre, H; Jumas-Bilak, E; Isson, L; Drouillard, B; Darbas, H; Carrière, C

    2001-09-01

    Two prevalent mechanisms of macrolide resistance are currently described in pneumococci: production of rRNA methylase that modify 23S ribosomal RNA resulting in MLSB phenotype, and an active efflux system resulting in M-phenotype. These two mechanisms are mediated by erm(B) and mef(A) genes respectively. Several studies reported a predominance of mef(A) gene in United-States and Canada. In European countries, erm(B) determinant is prevalent and mef(A)-mediated erythromycin resistance was recently reported in about 10% of strains in Belgium and Italy. In order to evaluate implication of mef(A) gene in pneumococci erythromycin resistance, 160 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with low-level of penicillin resistance and resistance to macrolides recovered between April 1999 and April 2000 were collected. These isolates were tested for their macrolide susceptibility by disc diffusion method, 155 showed the MLSB phenotype and 5 the M phenotype. Genotypic analysis was performed by erm(B) and mef(A) specific-mediated PCR: erm(B) gene was detected in 154 isolates, mef(A) gene in 5 isolates, and both genes in one strain. The phenotype seems to be well correlated to the genotyping result except for strain harboring both resistance determinants. Molecular typing of isolates harboring mef(A) gene performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after restriction by Smal shows these strains to be epidemiologically unrelated. Our results show the predominance of the erm(B) gene in erythromycin resistant S. pneumoniae isolates. mef(A)-mediated resistance is effective in Southern France (3.7%) but this rate is the lowest published from European countries.

  11. Comparison of pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing, and melting curve analysis for detection of low-frequency macrolide-resistant mycoplasma pneumoniae quasispecies in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwok-Hung; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Betsy W K; Li, Clara P Y; Chiu, Susan S; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ho, Pak-Leung

    2013-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is emerging worldwide and has been associated with treatment failure. In this study, we used pyrosequencing to detect low-frequency MRMP quasispecies in respiratory specimens, and we compared the findings with those obtained by Sanger sequencing and SimpleProbe PCR coupled with a melting curve analysis (SimpleProbe PCR). Sanger sequencing, SimpleProbe PCR, and pyrosequencing were successfully performed for 96.7% (88/91), 96.7% (88/91), and 93.4% (85/91) of the M. pneumoniae-positive specimens, respectively. The A-to-G transition at position 2063 was the only mutation identified. Pyrosequencing identified A2063G MRMP quasispecies populations in 78.8% (67/88) of the specimens. Only 38.8% (26/67) of these specimens with the A2063G quasispecies detected by pyrosequencing were found to be A2063G quasispecies by Sanger sequencing or SimpleProbe PCR. The specimens that could be detected by SimpleProbe PCR and Sanger sequencing had higher frequencies of MRMP quasispecies (51% to 100%) than those that could not be detected by those two methods (1% to 44%). SimpleProbe PCR correctly categorized all specimens that were identified as wild type or mutant by Sanger sequencing. The clinical characteristics of the patients were not significantly different when they were grouped by the presence or absence of MRMP quasispecies, while patients with MRMP identified by Sanger sequencing more often required a switch from macrolides to an alternative M. pneumoniae-targeted therapy. The clinical significance of mutant quasispecies should be investigated further with larger patient populations and with specimens obtained before and after macrolide therapy.

  12. Prevalence of resistance mechanisms against macrolides and lincosamides in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in the Czech Republic and occurrence of an undefined mechanism of resistance to lincosamides.

    PubMed

    Novotna, Gabriela; Adamkova, Václava; Janata, Jiri; Melter, Oto; Spizek, Jaroslav

    2005-08-01

    High occurrence of the non-macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance genes msrA (53%) and linA/linA' (30%) was found among 98 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci additionally resistant to macrolides and/or lincosamides. The gene msrA predominated in Staphylococcus haemolyticus (43 of 62 isolates). In Staphylococcus epidermidis, it was present in 7 of 27 isolates. A novel mechanism of resistance to lincosamides appears to be present in 10 genetically related isolates of S. haemolyticus in the absence of ermA, ermC, msrA, and linA/linA'.

  13. Genetically engineered biosynthesis of macrolide derivatives including 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-L-glucose from Streptomyces venezuelae YJ003-OTBP3.

    PubMed

    Pageni, Binod Babu; Oh, Tae-Jin; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Two sugar biosynthetic cassette plasmids were used to direct the biosynthesis of a deoxyaminosugar. The pOTBP1 plasmid containing TDP-glucose synthase (desIII), TDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase (desIV), and glycosyltransferase (desVII/desVIII) was constructed and transformed into S. venezuelae YJ003, a strain in which the entire gene cluster of desosamine biosynthesis is deleted. The expression plasmid pOTBP3 containing 4-aminotransferase (gerB) and 3,5-epimerase (orf9) was transformed again into S. venezuelae YJ003- OTBP1 to obtain S. venezuelae YJ003-OTBP3 for the production of 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-L-glucose derivatives. The crude extracts obtained from S. venezuelae ATCC 15439, S. venezuelae YJ003, and S. venezuelae YJ003-OTBP3 were further analyzed by TLC, bioassay, HPLC, ESI/MS, LC/MS, and MS/MS. The results of our study clearly shows that S. venezuelae YJ003-OTBP3 constructs other new hybrid macrolide derivatives including 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-L-glycosylated YC-17 (3, [M+ Na+] m/z=464.5), methymycin (4, m/z=480.5), novamethymycin (6, m/z=496.5), and pikromycin (5, m/z=536.5) from a 12- membered ring aglycon (10-deoxymethynolide, 1) and 14-membered ring aglycon (narbonolide, 2). These results suggest a successful engineering of a deoxysugar pathway to generate novel hybrid macrolide derivatives, including deoxyaminosugar.

  14. Enhanced heterologous production of desosaminyl macrolides and their hydroxylated derivatives by overexpression of the pikD regulatory gene in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Seok; Jeong, Soon Jeong; Park, Sung Ryeol; Choi, Cha Yong; Park, Byoung Chul; Park, Je Won; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2008-04-01

    To elevate the production level of heterologous polyketide in Streptomyces venezuelae, an additional copy of the positive regulatory gene pikD was introduced into the pikromycin (Pik) polyketide synthase (PKS) deletion mutant of S. venezuelae ATCC 15439 expressing tylosin PKS genes. The resulting mutant strain showed enhanced production of both tylactone (TL) and desosaminyl tylactone (DesTL) of 2.7- and 17.1-fold, respectively. The notable increase in DesTL production strongly suggested that PikD upregulates the expression of the desosamine (des) biosynthetic gene cluster. In addition, two hydroxylated forms of DesTL were newly detected from the extract of this mutant. These hydroxylated forms presumably resulted from a PikD-dependent increase in expression of the pikC gene that encodes P450 hydroxylase. Gene expression analysis by reverse transcriptase PCR and bioconversion experiments of 10-deoxymethynolide, narbonolide, and TL into the corresponding desosaminyl macrolides indicated that PikD is a positive regulator of the des and pikC genes, as well as the Pik PKS genes. These results demonstrate the role of PikD as a pathway-specific positive regulator of the entire Pik biosynthetic pathway and its usefulness in the development of a host-vector system for efficient heterologous production of desosaminyl macrolides and novel hydroxylated compounds.

  15. SmaI macrorestriction analysis of Italian isolates of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes and correlations with macrolide-resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ripa, S; Zampaloni, C; Vitali, L A; Giovanetti, E; Montanari, M P; Prenna, M; Varaldo, P E

    2001-01-01

    High rates of erythromycin resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes strains have been reported in Italy in the last few years. In this study, 370 erythromycin-resistant (MIC, > or = 1 microg/mL) Italian isolates of this species obtained in 1997-1998 from throat swabs from symptomatic patients were typed by analyzing SmaI macrorestriction fragment patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the typable isolates (n = 341; the genomic DNA of the remaining 29 isolates was not restricted by SmaI), 48 distinct PFGE types were recognized, of which 31 were recorded in only one isolate (one-strain types). Fifty-two percent of typable isolates fell into three type clusters and 75% into six, suggesting that erythromycin-resistant group A streptococci circulating in Italy are polyclonal, but the majority of them probably derives from the spread of a limited number of clones. In parallel experiments, the 370 test strains were characterized for the macrolide resistance phenotype: 80 were assigned to phenotype cMLS, 89 to phenotype iMLS-A, 33 to phenotype iMLS-B, 11 to phenotype iMLS-C, and 157 to phenotype M. There was a close correlation between these phenotypic data and the genotypic results of PFGE analysis, the vast majority of the isolates assigned to individual PFGE classes belonging usually to a single phenotype of macrolide resistance. All of the 29 untypable isolates belonged to the M phenotype. Further correlations were observed with tetracycline resistance.

  16. Interaction of anisole with 3α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid macrolides. Part 1. Comparative 1H NMR spectral investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappalainen, Kari V.; Kolehmainen, Erkki T.; Šaman, David

    1995-08-01

    1H NMR spectral investigation on the interaction of anisole (methoxybenzene) with five different (varying by ring size and substitution) cyclic 3α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid macrolides were performed. For 3α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (lithocholic acid) macrolides (from triolide to pentolide) no effect was observed. In contrast, for 7α-trifluoroacetyloxy (7α-TFA) substituted lithocholate triolide obtained from chenodeoxycholic acid and for 12α-trifluoroacetyloxy (12α-TFA) substituted lithocholate triolide obtained from deoxycholic acid, clear site specific effects were observed. In the case of the 7α-TFA derivative, the aromatic guest causes the strongest up-field shift on the angular methyl 19 at the A/B ring junction of the steroid unit, and in 12α-TFA isomer the strongest effect is directed at the angular methyl 18 located at the C/D ring junction of the steroid skeleton. These findings are discussed in terms of steric factors and the size and flexibility of the cavity of the host molecule. Molecular mechanics is used in modeling the structures of three triolides.

  17. Reconstitution of the Escherichia coli macrolide transporter: the periplasmic membrane fusion protein MacA stimulates the ATPase activity of MacB.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Elena B; Devroy, Vishakha K; Lau, Sze Yi; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2007-02-01

    Periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) are essential components of the type I protein secretion systems and drug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies suggested that MFPs connect the inner and outer membrane components of the transport systems and by this means co-ordinate the transfer of substrates across the two membranes. In this study, we purified and reconstituted the macrolide transporter MacAB from Escherichia coli. Here, MacA is a periplasmic MFP and MacB is an ABC-type transporter. Similar to other MFP-dependent transporters from E. coli, the in vivo function of MacAB requires the outer membrane channel TolC. The purified MacB displayed a basal ATPase activity in detergent micelles. This activity conformed to Michaelis-Menten kinetics but was unresponsive to substrates or accessory proteins. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of MacB was strictly dependent on MacA. The catalytic efficiency of MacAB ATPase was more than 45-fold higher than the activity of MacB alone. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of MacA were essential for this activity. MacA stimulated MacB ATPase only in phospholipid bilayers and did not need the presence of macrolides. Our results suggest that MacA is a functional subunit of the MacB transporter.

  18. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC.

  19. Trace analysis of trimethoprim and sulfonamide, macrolide, quinolone, and tetracycline antibiotics in chlorinated drinking water using liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ye, Z.; Weinberg, H.S.; Meyer, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    A multirun analytical method has been developed and validated for trace determination of 24 antibiotics including 7 sulfonamides, 3 macrolides, 7 quinolones, 6 tetracyclines, and trimethoprim in chlorine-disinfected drinking water using a single solid-phase extraction method coupled to liquid chromatography with positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection. The analytes were extracted by a hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced resin and eluted with acidified methanol (0.1% formic acid), resulting in analyte recoveries generally above 90%. The limits of quantitation were mostly below 10 ng/L in drinking water. Since the concentrated sample matrix typically caused ion suppression during electrospray ionization, the method of standard addition was used for quantitation. Chlorine residuals in drinking water can react with some antibiotics, but ascorbic acid was found to be an effective chlorine quenching agent without affecting the analysis and stability of the antibiotics in water. A preliminary occurrence study using this method revealed the presence of some antibiotics in drinking waters, including sulfamethoxazole (3.0-3.4 ng/L), macrolides (1.4-4.9 ng/L), and quinolones (1.2-4.0 ng/L). ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  20. In vitro activity of beta-lactams, macrolides, telithromycin, and fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation between drug resistance and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Hashikita, Giichi; Takahashi, Shun; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2005-10-01

    The in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined using 16 strains of penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) and 26 strains of penicillin intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) in Japan. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of potent antibiotics, including eight beta-lactams (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotiam, cefepime, cefditoren, faropenem, panipenem, and biapenem), three macrolides (erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), telithromycin, and three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin), were determined. Twenty-three strains exhibited genetic variations at pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b, which are genetic-PRSP (g-PRSP). g-PISP strains accounted for 62.5% (10/16) of the PSSP strains. The existence of an abnormal pbp gene conferred not only penicillin resistance but resistance to cephems; however, panipenem and biapenem had potent in vitro efficacy against alterations. Regarding the macrolide resistance mechanisms (mefA or ermB): 16 isolates had only mefA, 18 isolates had ermB, and 2 isolates had both mefA and ermB. There was no correlation between the existence of an abnormal pbp gene and the existence of the mefA gene or the ermB gene.

  1. Investigation of drug-drug interaction via mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A by macrolides in dexamethasone-treated female rats.

    PubMed

    Kanazu, Takushi; Sato, Norihito; Kadono, Kyoko; Touchi, Akira; Takeda, Yuri; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Baba, Takahiko

    2012-05-01

    The in vitro and in vivo inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A with mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) by macrolides was investigated using dexamethasone-treated female rats (DEX-female rats). In the in vitro CYP inhibition studies using erythromycin (ERM) and clarithromycin (CAM), similar inhibition responses were observed between human and DEX-female rat liver microsomes, however, there were fewer effects in intact male rats. The ex vivo study showed that midazolam (MDZ) metabolism in liver microsomes of DEX-female rats was reduced by ERM administration and the inhibitory effect was increased with increasing ERM doses, indicating that metabolite intermediate complex formation caused irreversible inhibition of CYP3A activity in DEX-female rats as well as in humans. In the in vivo studies, ERM and CAM significantly increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve of MDZ and decreased the total clearance in DEX-female rats. It was concluded that the DDIs via MBI of CYP3A following macrolide administration in humans could be reproduced in female rats, suggesting that DEX-female rats can serve as an in vivo model for assessing this DDI in humans.

  2. A rapid loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of the macrolide-streptogramin type B resistance gene msrA in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiao-Qin; Liu, Bin-Bin; Hui, Ephraim; Huang, William; Yao, Li-Chen; Duo, Li-Bo; Sun, Wen-Ying; Li, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Fu-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-12-01

    Macrolide-streptogramin type B resistance (the MSB phenotype) is a multidrug resistance phenotype in Staphylococcus aureus conferred by the resistance gene msrA. However, bacteria having the MSB phenotype are susceptible to lincosamides and 16-membered ring macrolides, which makes profiling resistance genes necessary and urgent for timely and appropriate use of antimicrobials. In this study, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was optimized for prompt detection of the msrA gene. msrA gene sequences were obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database and primers were designed using the LAMP primer designing software PrimerExplorer v.4, which together recognize seven distinct regions of the msrA gene. The specific LAMP primer set designed in this study could amplify the msrA gene within 25min at an isothermal temperature of 62°C. More importantly, the msrA gene could be detected at a sensitivity as low as 100pg. Furthermore, this optimized LAMP assay provided swift detection of the msrA gene even directly from human specimens. In conclusion, this assay may have great clinical application potential for detection of the msrA gene.

  3. The macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes characterized by using a specifically deleted, antibiotic-sensitive strain of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Pernodet, J L; Fish, S; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Cundliffe, E

    1996-01-01

    Genes conferring resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS) antibiotics via ribosomal modification are widespread in bacteria, including clinical isolates and MLS-producing actinomycetes. Such erm-type genes encode enzymes that mono- or dimethylate residue A-2058 of 23S rRNA. The different phenotypes resulting from monomethylation (MLS-I phenotype, conferred by erm type I genes) or dimethylation (MLS-II phenotype due to erm type II genes) have been characterized by introducing tlrD or ermE, respectively, into an MLS-sensitive derivative of Streptomyces lividans TK21. This strain (designated OS456) was generated by specific replacement of the endogenous resistance genes lrm and mgt. The MLS-I phenotype is characterized by high-level resistance to lincomycin with only marginal resistance to macrolides such as chalcomycin or tylosin, whereas the MLS-II phenotype involves high-level resistance to all MLS drugs. Mono- and dimethylated ribosomes were introduced into a cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from S. lividans and compared with unmodified particles in their response to antibiotics. There was no simple correlation between the relative potencies of MLS drugs at the level of the target site (i.e., the ribosome) and their antibacterial activities expressed as MICs. PMID:8851574

  4. The macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes characterized by using a specifically deleted, antibiotic-sensitive strain of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Fish, S; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Cundliffe, E

    1996-03-01

    Genes conferring resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS) antibiotics via ribosomal modification are widespread in bacteria, including clinical isolates and MLS-producing actinomycetes. Such erm-type genes encode enzymes that mono- or dimethylate residue A-2058 of 23S rRNA. The different phenotypes resulting from monomethylation (MLS-I phenotype, conferred by erm type I genes) or dimethylation (MLS-II phenotype due to erm type II genes) have been characterized by introducing tlrD or ermE, respectively, into an MLS-sensitive derivative of Streptomyces lividans TK21. This strain (designated OS456) was generated by specific replacement of the endogenous resistance genes lrm and mgt. The MLS-I phenotype is characterized by high-level resistance to lincomycin with only marginal resistance to macrolides such as chalcomycin or tylosin, whereas the MLS-II phenotype involves high-level resistance to all MLS drugs. Mono- and dimethylated ribosomes were introduced into a cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from S. lividans and compared with unmodified particles in their response to antibiotics. There was no simple correlation between the relative potencies of MLS drugs at the level of the target site (i.e., the ribosome) and their antibacterial activities expressed as MICs.

  5. Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin type B antibiotics due to a mutation in an rRNA operon of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Boccard, F; Alegre, M T; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Guérineau, M

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens produces spiramycin, a macrolide antibiotic and expresses an inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLS). From a mutant of S.ambofaciens exhibiting a constitutive MLS resistance phenotype a resistance determinant was cloned on a low copy number vector (pIJ61) through its expression in Streptomyces lividans. Further characterization has shown that this determinant corresponded to a mutant rRNA operon with a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. In different organisms, mutations leading to MLS resistance have been located at a position corresponding to the adenine 2058 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. In the 23S rRNA from S.ambofaciens a similar position for the mutation has been postulated and DNA sequencing of this region has shown an adenine to guanine transition at a position corresponding to 2058. S.ambofaciens possesses four rRNA operons which we have cloned. In Streptomyces, contrary to other bacteria, a mutation in one among several rRNA operons confers a selectable MLS resistance phenotype. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed.

  6. Macrolide- and tetracycline-adjustable siRNA-mediated gene silencing in mammalian cells using polymerase II-dependent promoter derivatives.

    PubMed

    Malphettes, Laetitia; Fussenegger, Martin

    2004-11-20

    RNA interference has emerged as a powerful technology for downregulation of specific genes in cells and animals. We have pioneered macrolide- and tetracycline-adjustable short interfering RNA (siRNA) expression for conditional target gene translation fine-tuning in mammalian/human cell lines based on modified RNA polymerase II promoters. Established macrolide- and tetracycline-dependent transactivators/trans-silencers bound and activated modified target promoters tailored for optimal siRNA expression in response to clinical antibiotics' dosing regimes and modulated desired target genes in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells with high precision. Further optimization of adjustable RNA polymerase II-based siRNA-specific promoters as well as their combination with various transmodulators enabled near-perfect regulation configurations in specific cell types. Devoid of major genetic constraints compared to basic RNA polymerase III-based siRNA-specific promoters, we expect RNA polymerase II counterparts to significantly advance siRNA-based molecular interventions in biopharmaceutical manufacturing and gene-function analysis as well as gene therapy and tissue engineering.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of the Two Unrelated Macrolide-Resistant Corynebacterium argentoratense Strains CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, Isolated from Patients in the University Hospital of León, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francisco; Acedo, Alberto; Hernandez, Marta; Tauch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium argentoratense has been associated mainly with infections in the human respiratory tract. Genome sequencing of two unrelated clinical macrolide-resistant strains, CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, revealed the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene erm(X) allocated to a specific genomic region with 100% similarity to the widely distributed transposable element Tn5432. PMID:26159536

  8. [Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance phenotypes in clinical Staphylococcus isolates and investigation of telithromycin activity].

    PubMed

    Uzun, Berrin; Güngör, Serdar; Pektaş, Bayram; Aksoy Gökmen, Ayşegül; Yula, Erkan; Koçal, Funda; Kaya, Selçuk

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococci are one of the most common pathogens isolated from nosocomial and community acquired infections. Antibiotics such as clindamycin and erythromycin have been useful options for treating skin and soft-tissue infections caused by staphylococci. However, expression of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (MLSB) can limit the effectiveness of these drugs. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and phenotypes of MLSB resistance in staphylococcus strains isolated from clinical samples and to determine the telithromycin activity against these isolates. A total of 218 strains [92 Staphylococcus aureus and 126 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS)] isolated from different clinical samples (wound, abscess, blood, sterile body fluids, catheter, upper respiratory tract samples) between February 2011 to December 2012 were included in the study. The isolates were identified by using conventional methods and automated bacterial identification system (BD Phoenix 100™ System, Becton Dickinson, USA). Methicillin resistance of the isolates was determined with the use of cefoxitin (30 µg) disk and telithromycin (15 µg) activity was detected by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. MLSB resistance phenotypes were investigated by the D-test method using erythromycin (15 µg) and clindamycin (2 µg) disks. Of 92 S.aureus isolates, 23 were methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and 69 were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), whereas 78 of 126 CNS isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRCNS) and 48 were methicillin-susceptible (MSCNS). Hundred and seventy-two (79%) isolates were found as erythromycin-resistant, and the rates of erythromycin resistance in MRSA, MSSA, MRCNS and MSCNS strains were 83%, 71%, 95% and 63%, respectively. Inducible type of MLSB resistance (iMLSB type) was observed in 26%, 6%, 51% and 33%; chromosomal resistance (cMLSB type) in 32%, 27%, 27% and 17% and efflux pump connected resistance (MSB type) in 42%, 67%, 22% and 50% of the MRSA

  9. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in the Czech Republic during 2011 to 2013: Increased Prevalence of Identified Genotypes and of Isolates with Macrolide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Grillová, Linda; Pĕtrošová, Helena; Mikalová, Lenka; Strnadel, Radim; Dastychová, Eliška; Kuklová, Ivana; Kojanová, Martina; Kreidlová, Miluše; Vaňousová, Daniela; Hercogová, Jana; Procházka, Přemysl; Zákoucká, Hana; Krchňáková, Alena; Vašků, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, a total of 262 samples, from 188 patients suspected of having syphilis were tested for the presence of treponemal DNA by PCR amplification of five chromosomal loci, including the polA (TP0105), tmpC (TP0319), TP0136, TP0548, and 23S rRNA genes. Altogether, 146 samples from 103 patients were PCR positive for treponemal DNA. A set of 81 samples from 62 PCR-positive patients were typeable, and among them, nine different genotypes were identified. Compared to a previous study in the Czech Republic during 2004 to 2010, the number of genotypes detected among syphilis patients in a particular year increased to six in both 2012 and 2013, although they were not the same six. The proportion of macrolide-resistant clinical isolates in this 3-year study was 66.7%. PMID:25100820

  10. Performance characterization of a quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for 12 macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in salmon, shrimp and tilapia.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Leslie C

    2014-09-15

    This paper describes an extension and performance characterization of a quantitative confirmatory multi-residue liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for residues of macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics, originally validated for application to bovine kidney tissues, to tissues of salmon, shrimp and tilapia. The 12 analytes include clindamycin, erythromycin A, gamithromycin, josamycin, lincomycin, neospiramycin 1, oleandomycin, pirlimycin, spiramycin 1, tildipirosin, tilmicosin and tylosin A. The limit of detection was 0.5 μg/kg. Within-laboratory precision evaluated over the analytical range of 5.0-50.0 μg/kg ranged from 4 to 17%. The accuracy of the method ranged from 80 to 112%. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 99% with all but one recovery above 60%. This is the first report of a quantitative confirmatory method for gamithromycin, pirlimycin and tildipirosin in fish and shrimp.

  11. The mechanism of antifungal action of a new polyene macrolide antibiotic antifungalmycin 702 from Streptomyces padanus JAU4234 on the rice sheath blight pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Tu, Xiao-Rong; Wei, Sai-Jin; Huang, Lin; Li, Xun-Hang; Lu, Hui; Tu, Guo-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Antifungalmycin 702, a new polyene macrolide antibiotic produced by Streptomycespadanus JAU4234, has a broad antifungal activity and may have potential future agricultural and/or clinical applications. However, the mechanism of antifungal action of antifungalmycin 702 remains unknown. Antifungalmycin 702 strongly inhibited mycelial growth and sclerotia formation/germination of Rhizoctonia solani. When treated with antifungalmycin 702, the hyphae morphology of R. solani became more irregular. The membrane and the cellular organelles were disrupted and there were many vacuoles in the cellular space. The lesion in the plasma membrane was detected through the increase of membrane permeability, lipid peroxidation and leakage of cell constituents. In summary, antifungalmycin 702 may exert its antifungal activity against R. solani by changing the structure of cell membranes and the cytoskeleton and interacting with the organelles.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effect of prophylactic macrolides on children with chronic lung disease: a protocol for a double-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Ricardo A; Gomez-Rubio, Ana M; Harris, Tomika; Yadav, Aravind; McBeth, Katrina; Gonzales, Traci; Jon, Cindy; Stark, James; Avritscher, Elenir; Pedroza, Claudia; Smith, Keely; Colasurdo, Giuseppe; Wootton, Susan; Piedra, Pedro; Tyson, Jon E; Samuels, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies suggest that the high mortality rate of respiratory viral infections is a result of an overactive neutrophilic inflammatory response. Macrolides have anti-inflammatory properties, including the ability to downregulate the inflammatory cascade, attenuate excessive cytokine production in viral infections, and may reduce virus-related exacerbations. In this study, we will test the hypothesis that prophylactic macrolides will reduce the severity of respiratory viral illness in children with chronic lung disease by preventing the full activation of the inflammatory cascade. Methods and analysis A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial that will enrol 92 children to receive either azithromycin or placebo for a period of 3–6 months during two respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons (2015–2016 and 2016–2017). We expect a reduction of at least 20% in the total number of days of unscheduled face-to-face encounters in the treatment group as compared with placebo group. Standard frequentist and Bayesian analyses will be performed using an intent-to-treat approach. Discussion We predict that the prophylactic use of azithromycin will reduce the morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections during the winter season in patients with chronic lung disease as evidenced by a reduction in the total number of days with unscheduled face-to-face provider encounters. Ethics and dissemination This research study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston on 9 October 2014. On completion, the results will be published. Trial registration number NCT02544984. PMID:27638496

  13. Identification and quantification of five macrolide antibiotics in several tissues, eggs and milk by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dubois, M; Fluchard, D; Sior, E; Delahaut, P

    2001-04-05

    We present an electrospray high-performance liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS-MS) method capable of determining in several tissues (muscle, kidney, liver), eggs and milk the following five macrolides: tylosin, tilmicosin, spiramycin, josamycin, erythromycin. Roxithromycin was used as an internal standard. The method uses extraction in a Tris buffer at pH 10.5, followed by protein precipitation with sodium tungstate and clean-up on an Oasis solid-phase extraction column. The HPLC separation was performed on a Purospher C18 column (125 x 3 mm I.D.) protected by a guard column, with a gradient of aqueous 0.1 M ammonium acetate-acetonitrile as the mobile phase at a flow-rate of 0.7 ml min(-1). Protonated molecules served as precursor ions for electrospray ionisation in the positive ion mode and four product ions were chosen for each analyte for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). A validation study was conducted to confirm the five macrolides by MRM HPLC-MS-MS analysis of a negative control and fortified samples. All of the samples analysed were confirmed with four ions. The ion ratio reproducibility limit ranged from 2.4 to 15%. All compounds could be detected and quantified at half-maximum residue limits (MRLs). The method is specific, quantitative and reproducible enough to conform to European Union recommendations within the concentration range 0.5 MRL-2 MRL (accuracy: 80 to 110%, relative standard deviation: 2 to 13%). This whole method allows extraction and analysis of up to 50 samples per day.

  14. Prevalence and mechanism of resistance against macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins among Enterococcus faecium isolates from food-producing animals and hospital patients in Belgium.

    PubMed

    De Graef, E M; Decostere, A; De Leener, E; Goossens, H; Baele, M; Haesebrouck, F

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of acquired resistance to streptogramins, macrolides, and lincosamides and the genetic background of this resistance was investigated in Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from food-producing animals and hospital patients 4-5 years after the ban of streptogramins as growth promoters. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D), virginiamycin M1 (virgM1), erythromycin (ery), tylosin (tyl), and lincomycin (lin) were determined by the agar dilution method for E. faecium isolates derived from pigs (80), broilers (45), and hospitalized patients (103). Resistance or susceptibility was interpreted using a microbiological criterion and breakpoints recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), if available. The isolates were also screened by PCR for erm(B), lnu(A), lnu(B), mef(A/E), vat(D), vat(E), vga(A), vga(B), and vgb(A) genes. Acquired resistance to Q/D, virgM1, ery, tyl, and lin was detected in 34%, 96%, 46%, 46%, and 69% of the porcine strains, respectively. For broiler strains this was 15% (Q/D), 98% (virgM1), 69% (ery), 71% (tyl), and 89% (lin) and for human strains 23% (Q/D), 65% (virgM1), 54% (ery), 52% (tyl), and 60% (lin). Strains showing cross-resistance against macrolides and lincosamides almost always carried the erm(B) gene. This gene was present in 64% of the Q/D-resistant isolates. Only in two human and three broiler Q/D- and virgM1-resistant isolates, a combination of the erm(B) and vat(D) or vat(E) genes was found. The genetic background of resistance could not be determined in the other Q/D- or virgM1-resistant strains. This study demonstrates that streptogramin resistance is frequently present in strains from hospitalized patients and food-producing animals, but the genetic basis hitherto mostly remains obscure.

  15. Rapid and reliable real-time PCR assay for detection of the macrolide efflux gene and subsequent discrimination between its distinct subclasses mef(A) and mef(E).

    PubMed

    Klomberg, Debby M; de Valk, Hanneke A; Mouton, Johan W; Klaassen, Corné H W

    2005-02-01

    A real-time PCR assay is described for detection of the macrolide efflux gene, mef. Following amplification, unambiguous discrimination between the two mef subclasses, mef(A) and mef(E), is easily established using a melting curve analysis. The results of this novel assay were 100% concordant with a conventional PCR-RFLP approach but requires far less hands-on time. Furthermore, the real-time format offers semiquantitative results allowing identification of contaminated cultures and/or DNA preparations.

  16. [Investigation of macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples by phenotypical and genotypical methods].

    PubMed

    Aydeniz Ozansoy, Fatma; Cevahir, Nural; Kaleli, İlknur

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common cause of both community and healthcare-associated infections. As staphylococci have developed resistance to various antibiotics, initially to penicillins then to methicillin and glycopeptides and have the ability to cause epidemics, they continue to be a major problem from past to present. Methicillin resistance gave rise to the use of alternative antibiotics such as macrolides, however worldwide development of macrolide resistance limited the use of these antibiotics. Macrolide resistance occurs either through target site modification (MLS(B) phenotype, encoded by erm genes), efflux pumps (MS phenotype, encoded by msrA/B genes) or decreased cell wall permeability. The aim of this study was to investigate the MLS(B) resistance of clinical S.aureus strains with phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 404 S.aureus strains isolated from different clinical samples (50% wound, 15% tracheal aspirate and 35% other samples) of inpatients (93.3%) and outpatients (6.7%) were included in the study. Double disc synergy test (D-test) was used for the phenotypical research and PCR was used for the genotypical research of MLS(B) resistance of isolates. One hundred fifty eight (39.1%) of the S.aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and 246 (60.9%) were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). By the use of D-test, constitutive (cMLS(B)) and inducible (iMLS(B)) clindamycin resistance were detected in 19 and 111 isolates, respectively, while five isolates were MS phenotype and 268 isolates were S phenotype (susceptible to erythromycin and clindamycin). The resistance genes of 136 isolates with MLS(B) resistance phenotype were determined genotypically and among 111 isolates showing iMLS(B) phenotype ermA gene was found in 81.9% (83 MRSA, 8 MSSA), ermC gene in 10.8% (7 MRSA, 5 MSSA), msrA gene in 10.8% (11 MRSA, 1 MSSA), msrB gene in 1.8% (2 MRSA) and ermB gene in 0.9% (1 MRSA). Among 19 strains with cMLS(B) phenotype, ermA was

  17. Development of an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the Mycoplasma pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and distinguish the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Seto, Junji; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Yahagi, Kazue; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Hongo, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae harboring a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is increasing, and rapid detection assays are needed for clinical management. We developed an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and determine the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063 (A2063G, A2063T and A2063C mutations). This A2063B genotyping assay detected more than 50 copies/reaction of the M. pneumoniae gene in every nucleotide mutation at position 2063. Of 42 clinical specimens, 3 were positive without mutation, 6 were positive with the A2063G mutation, and 33 were negative. The results were confirmed using nested PCR with the sequencing of the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene, and a high sensitivity (90%), specificity (100%), and coincidence ratio (kappa coefficient=0.93) were obtained. Therefore, the A2063B genotyping assay is useful for the rapid discrimination of macrolide resistance mutations at position 2063.

  18. A Sorangium cellulosum (myxobacterium) gene cluster for the biosynthesis of the macrolide antibiotic soraphen A: cloning, characterization, and homology to polyketide synthase genes from actinomycetes.

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, T; Toupet, C; Cluzel, B; Neff, S; Hill, S; Beck, J J; Ligon, J M

    1995-01-01

    A 40-kb region of DNA from Sorangium cellulosum So ce26, which contains polyketide synthase (PKS) genes for synthesis of the antifungal macrolide antibiotic soraphen A, was cloned. These genes were detected by homology to Streptomyces violaceoruber genes encoding components of granaticin PKS, thus extending this powerful technique for the identification of bacterial PKS genes, which has so far been applied only to actinomycetes, to the gram-negative myxobacteria. Functional analysis by gene disruption has indicated that about 32 kb of contiguous DNA of the cloned region contains genes involved in soraphen A biosynthesis. The nucleotide sequence of a 6.4-kb DNA fragment, derived from the region with homology to granaticin PKS genes, was determined. Analysis of this sequence has revealed the presence of a single large open reading frame beginning and ending outside the 6.4-kb fragment. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates the presence of a domain with a high level of similarity to beta-ketoacyl synthases that are involved in polyketide synthesis. Other domains with high levels of similarity to regions of known polyketide biosynthetic functions were identified, including those for acyl transferase, acyl carrier protein, ketoreductase, and dehydratase. We present data which indicate that soraphen A biosynthesis is catalyzed by large, multifunctional enzymes analogous to other bacterial PKSs of type I. PMID:7601830

  19. Presence and distribution of Macrolides-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes and potential indicator ARGs in the university ponds in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mianzhi; Sun, Jing; Zhong, Weixin; Xiong, Wenguang; Zeng, Zhenling; Sun, Yongxue

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the occurrence, abundance, and variation of seven Macrolides-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes (ereB, ermA, ermB, ermF, mefA, vatB, mphA) and six potential indicator ARGs (tet (B), sul1, qnrS, fexA, IntI1, ermB) from three ponds at university by quantitative PCR and assess the impacts on the surroundings. Solid samples (fish feces, soil and sediment) and water samples were tested. All the genes were found at low levels in soil samples. For the MLS resistance genes, only two MLS genes (ermB, ermF) were detected in all samples and significant correlations between ermB and Σ MLS (R = 0.91 in solid samples; R = 0.86 in water samples, p < 0.01) were found. For the potential indicators, intl1 and sul1 were present at high levels in the three different ponds while the other genes showed varying levels. These findings show that the ermB gene can probably be served as an indicator to evaluate the overall level of MLS resistance genes. The fairly low abundance of all the tested resistance genes in soil samples and the moderate levels in other samples suggests that the university ponds kept a good state and did not have a significant impact on their surroundings.

  20. Demonstration of staphylococci with inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB ) resistance in sewage and river water and of the capacity of anhydroerythromycin to induce MLSB.

    PubMed

    Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococci causing diseases in humans and animals are well described, whereas not very much is known about the staphylococci in natural ecosystems. Due to increased consumption of antibiotics, multiresistant species are released with excrements. Therefore, 1048 staphylococci from raw and treated sewage and from receiving water bodies were isolated, identified and tested for resistance against erythromycin, clindamycin, oxacillin and ciprofloxacin. More resistant staphylococci were present in raw sewage (33.8%) than in treated sewage (24.9%) or river water (10.9%). Of all isolates, 20.2% were resistant against the macrolide erythromycin which can induce cross-resistance against lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (iMLSB ). Erythromycin is metabolized to anhydroerythromycin and excreted with urine into sewage. The question arises whether anhydroerythromycin can also induce resistance against MLSB antibiotics in staphylococci. This was investigated with antibiotic susceptibility tests (D-tests) and macrodilution assays. Staphylococci with iMLSB phenotype in river water were more numerous (27.8%) than in treated sewage (18.9%). The most common MLSB resistance gene was ermC. Traces of erythromycin and anhydroerythromycin (1 ng L(-1) ) induced already resistance against clindamycin after only 10 min exposure. This is reported for the first time and is relevant for risk assessment.

  1. Structure Elucidation at the Nanomole-Scale. 1. Trisoxazole Macrolides and Thiazole-containing Cyclic Peptides from the Nudibranch Hexabranchus sanguineus

    PubMed Central

    Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Rogers, Evan W.; Edison, Arthur S.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2009-01-01

    A single specimen of Hexabranchus sanguineus, a nudibranch from the Indo-Pacific that is known to sequester kabiramides B, C and other trisoxazole macrolides, yielded new kabiramide analogs – 9-desmethylkabiramide B and 33-methyltetrahydrohalichondramide – and two new unexpected thiazole-containing cyclic peptides in sub-micromole amounts. The structures of these cyclic peptides were determined by analyses of 1D and 2D NMR spectra recorded with a state-of-the-art 1-mm 1H NMR high-temperature superconducting micro-cryoprobe, together with mass spectra. In addition to two proline residues, each peptide contains a thiazole- or oxazole-modified amino acid residue, together with conventional amino acid residues. All of the amino acid residues were L- as determined by Marfey’s analysis of the acid hydrolysates of the peptides. This is the first report of cyclic thiazole peptides from H. sanguineus. Since thiazole-oxazole modified peptides are typically associated with cyanobacteria and tunicates, the finding may imply a dietary component of the H. sanguineus that was previously overlooked. PMID:19254038

  2. Prevalence and antibacterial susceptibility of mef(A)-positive macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae over 4 years (2000 to 2004) of the PROTEKT US Study.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; File, Thomas M; Jenkins, Stephen G

    2007-02-01

    In the United States, approximately 30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates are macrolide (erythromycin [ERY]) resistant (ERSP), most commonly due to expression of the mef(A) gene previously associated with lower-level ERY resistance (ERYr; MIC=1 to 4 microg/ml). The data from the PROTEKT US surveillance study were analyzed to evaluate the prevalence and antibacterial susceptibility of mef(A)-positive ERSP. In all, 26,634 isolates of S. pneumoniae were collected in the United States between 2000 and 2004 from centers common to all years. ERYr was stable at approximately 29% over the 4 years, but the proportion of ERSP isolates positive for mef(A) alone decreased (year 1 [2000 to 2001], 69.0%; year 4 [2003 to 2004], 60.7%), with the sharpest declines seen in isolates from patients from 0 to 2 years of age. Conversely, the proportion isolates positive for both erm(B) and mef(A) increased over the duration of the present study (year 1, 9.3%; year 4, 19.1%), a change that was again most marked in patients aged

  3. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes.

  4. A phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide sensitive multidrug efflux pump involved in intrinsic and acquired resistance of Campylobacter to macrolides.

    PubMed

    Mamelli, Laurent; Amoros, Jean-Pierre; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Bolla, Jean-Michel

    2003-09-01

    The macrolide erythromycin is the antibiotic of choice in the management of Campylobacter infections. Although mutation has been reported to account for resistance to the antibiotic, resistance may also be due to an efflux pump that extrudes the drug prior to reaching its target. Moreover, the efflux pump may be one that accommodates resistance to other related or unrelated drugs (multidrug resistance). We examined the possibility that resistance to erythromycin may involve an efflux pump whose presence may be identified by the use of the unique commercial inhibitor of the previously described efflux pumps phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphtylamide (PAbetaN). We showed that PAbetaN is able to significantly increase the susceptibility of the reference strain NCTC 11168 to erythromycin, suggesting that an efflux pump functions at a basal level in the reference wild type strain. Erythromycin-resistant isolates were tested for their response to PAbetaN treatment. Among the strains tested, resistance of three isolates to erythromycin was reduced to a level comparable to that of the susceptible strain when the strains were grown in the presence of this inhibitor. To conclude, besides mutations, erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter may also be due to an efflux mechanism sensitive to PAbetaN.

  5. Invasive pneumococci before the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Turkey: antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype distribution, and molecular identification of macrolide resistance.

    PubMed

    Altun, Hatice Uludag; Hascelik, Gülsen; Gür, Deniz; Eser, Özgen Köseoglu

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluates the antimicrobial susceptibilities and serotype distributions of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) isolates identified in a Turkish hospital before the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). The susceptibilities of all isolates were determined by evaluating six antibiotics: penicillin (PEN), ceftriaxone (CRO), levofloxacin (LEV), erythromycin (ERY), clindamycin (CD), and vancomycin (VAN). Serotyping and amplification of macrolide resistance genes were performed. Sixteen (50%) and four (2%) isolates were resistant to PEN and LEV, respectively. No isolates demonstrated VAN resistance. Intermediate resistance to CRO was found in 4% of all invasive isolates. Twenty-three (12.6%) isolates were resistant to ERY. Four (2%) invasive SP isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Serogroups 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 23 were the most common in both age groups. The potential coverage rates of PCV7 and PCV13 were 44.1 and 66.1% in children and 39.8 and 71.5% in adults, respectively. Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is required.

  6. The anti-biofilm effect of macrolides in a rat model of S. aureus foreign-body infection: Might it be of clinical relevance?

    PubMed

    El Haj, Cristina; Murillo, Oscar; Ribera, Alba; Garcia-Somoza, Dolors; Tubau, Fe; Cabellos, Carmen; Cabo, Javier; Ariza, Javier

    2017-02-01

    Using a tissue cage infection rat model, we test the anti-biofilm effect of clarithromycin on the efficacy of daptomycin and a daptomycin + rifampicin combination against methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In vitro: kill curves, daptomycin exposure studies and clarithromycin activity against biofilm were studied. In vivo: the efficacies of clarithromycin, daptomycin or daptomycin + clarithromycin, daptomycin + rifampicin and daptomycin + rifampicin + clarithromycin combinations were evaluated. In vitro: the addition of clarithromycin to daptomycin improved its activity only against one MRSA strain. Changes in daptomycin MIC values appeared more quickly in MSSA than in MRSA strain, and this was not modified by clarithromycin. Clarithromycin prevented biofilm formation but did not eradicate it. In vivo: the daptomycin + rifampicin combination was the most effective treatment and was not improved by the addition of clarithromycin. Daptomycin and daptomycin + clarithromycin had similar effectiveness; the combination protected against the appearance of daptomycin resistance only in one MRSA strain. Using a staphylococcal foreign-body infection model, we observed a slight effect with the addition of clarithromycin to daptomycin, which resulted in protection against the appearance of daptomycin-resistant strains. However, efficacy was not improved. Overall, our findings do not support a relevant clinical role for macrolides in treating device-related staphylococcal infections based on their anti-biofilm effect.

  7. Kinetics and quantification of antibacterial effects of beta-lactams, macrolides, and quinolones against gram-positive and gram-negative RTI pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schaper, K-J; Schubert, S; Dalhoff, A

    2005-12-01

    Traditionally, the in vitro activity of antibacterial agents is characterized by their minimal inhibitory concentrations. However, these endpoints are, by nature, discrete and do not provide information on time-dependent killing of the bacteria during the incubation period. Nevertheless, the pharmacodynamic characteristics of antibacterial agents are almost always defined by correlating a static endpoint describing the antibacterial activity of an agent with the pharmacokinetics, describing the time-dependent fluctuation of drug concentrations. This approach is basically a contradiction in itself. Therefore, it would be more logical to correlate pharmacokinetics to in vitro parameters describing the time- and concentration-dependent antibacterial action of an agent. Thus, experimental methods and mathematical models quantifying the decrease in growth rate of a bacterial population due to the action of an antibacterial agent as a function of time and drug concentration have been applied to quantitate their pharmacodynamics. The effect of nine antibacterial agents representing drug classes of penicillins, cephalosporins, penems, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones were mathematically analyzed by using three different but related models. The kill rate, maximal kill, the 50%-effective concentration (EC50), the Hill coefficient, and concentrations and times needed to obtain a 1,000-fold decrease of the initial number of viable counts were calculated. Both the phenotypic description of the time-kill curves and these five parameters mirror the bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity of all nine agents studied as a function of time and concentration. Therefore, it would be more logical to correlate a parameter quantifying the kinetics of antibacterial in vitro activity with the pharmacokinetics of the drug, thus, replacing static endpoints like minimal inhibitory concentrations.

  8. A novel generic dipstick-based technology for rapid and precise detection of tetracycline, streptogramin and macrolide antibiotics in food samples.

    PubMed

    Link, Nils; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-02-20

    Excessive use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and as growth promoters in stock farming has been associated with the dramatically increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant human pathogenic bacteria. European community legislators have therefore restricted the veterinary use of antibiotics and banned them as growth-promoting food additives in stock breeding (1831/2003/EC). The monitoring of such legislation requires technology for precise and straightforward on-site quantification of antibiotics in farm samples and food products without the need for extensive laboratory equipment and trained personnel. Capitalizing on bacterial transcriptional regulators (TetR, PIP, E), which are dose-dependently released from their cognate operators (tetO, PIR, ETR) upon binding of specific classes of antibiotics (tetracycline, streptogramins, macrolides) we have designed an easy-to-handle dipstick-based assay for detection of antibiotic levels in serum, meat and milk whose detection limits are up to 40-fold below licensed threshold values. The generic dipstick consists of either nitrocellulose, nylon or polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF) membrane strips coated with streptavidin and immobilized biotinylated operator DNA, which acts as capture DNA to bind hexa-histidine (His(6))-tagged bacterial biosensors. Antibiotics present in specific samples triggered the dose-dependent release of the capture DNA-biosensor interaction, which, after dipping into two different solutions, results in a correlated conversion of a chromogenic substrate by a standard His(6)-targeted enzyme complex. This can be quantified by comparison of the dipstick to a standardized color scale or by assessing the terminal solution at 450nm. As demonstrated using serum, meat and milk samples spiked with 14 different antibiotics, the dipstick technology provided sensitive detection in a rapid assay format, and could be employed to monitor non-authorized use of antibiotics and to discover novel antibiotics.

  9. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-09

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled.

  10. Hierarchical Control on Polyene Macrolide Biosynthesis: PimR Modulates Pimaricin Production via the PAS-LuxR Transcriptional Activator PimM

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Vicente, Cláudia M.; Payero, Tamara D.; Martín-Sánchez, Lara; Cañibano, Carmen; Martín, Juan F.; Aparicio, Jesús F.

    2012-01-01

    Control of polyene macrolide production in Streptomyces natalensis is mediated by the transcriptional activator PimR. This regulator combines an N-terminal domain corresponding to the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family of transcriptional activators with a C-terminal half homologous to guanylate cyclases and large ATP-binding regulators of the LuxR family. The PimR SARP domain (PimRSARP) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)–fused protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GST-PimRSARP binds a single target, the intergenic region between the regulatory genes pimR and pimMs in the pimaricin cluster. The PimRSARP-binding site was investigated by DNaseI protection studies, revealing that it contains three heptameric direct repeats adjusting to the consensus 5′-CGGCAAG-3′. Transcription start points of pimM and pimR promoters were identified by 5′-RACE, revealing that unlike other SARPs, PimRSARP does not interact with the -35 region of its target promoter. Quantitative transcriptional analysis of these regulatory genes on mutants on each of them has allowed the identification of the pimM promoter as the transcriptional target for PimR. Furthermore, the constitutive expression of pimM restored pimaricin production in a pimaricin-deficient strain carrying a deletion mutant of pimR. These results reveal that PimR exerts its positive effect on pimaricin production by controlling pimM expression level, a regulator whose gene product activates transcription from eight different promoters of pimaricin structural genes directly. PMID:22693644

  11. Enrofloxacin and Macrolides Alone or in Combination with Rifampicin as Antimicrobial Treatment in a Bovine Model of Acute Chlamydia psittaci Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prohl, Annette; Lohr, Markus; Ostermann, Carola; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Berndt, Angela; Schroedl, Wieland; Rothe, Michael; Schubert, Evelyn; Sachse, Konrad; Reinhold, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic bacterium with a wide host range that can cause respiratory disease in humans and cattle. In the present study, effects of treatment with macrolides and quinolones applied alone or in combination with rifampicin were tested in a previously established bovine model of respiratory C. psittaci infection. Fifty animals were inoculated intrabronchially at the age of 6–8 weeks. Seven served as untreated controls, the others were assigned to seven treatment groups: (i) rifampicin, (ii) enrofloxacin, (iii) enrofloxacin + rifampicin, (iv) azithromycin, (v) azithromycin + rifampicin, (vi) erythromycin, and (vii) erythromycin + rifampicin. Treatment started 30 hours after inoculation and continued until 14 days after inoculation (dpi), when all animals were necropsied. The infection was successful in all animals and sufficient antibiotic levels were detected in blood plasma and tissue of the treated animals. Reisolation of the pathogen was achieved more often from untreated animals than from other groups. Nevertheless, pathogen detection by PCR was possible to the same extent in all animals and there were no significant differences between treated and untreated animals in terms of local (i.e. cell count and differentiation of BALF-cells) and systemic inflammation (i.e. white blood cells and concentration of acute phase protein LBP), clinical signs, and pathological findings at necropsy. Regardless of the reduced reisolation rate in treated animals, the treatment of experimentally induced respiratory C. psittaci infection with enrofloxacin, azithromycin or erythromycin alone or in combination with rifampicin was without obvious benefit for the host, since no significant differences in clinical and pathological findings or inflammatory parameters were detected and all animals recovered clinically within two weeks. PMID:25768665

  12. Disk diffusion susceptibility testing of two macrolide antimicrobial agents: revised interpretive criteria for erythromycin and preliminary guidelines for roxithromycin (RU 965).

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R N; Barry, A L; Fuchs, P C; Thornsberry, C

    1986-01-01

    The 15-micrograms erythromycin disk was twice evaluated for interpretive accuracy against 417 and then 266 strains of gram-positive cocci, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae by using the criteria suggested by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. These studies suggest a revision of streptococcal and Staphylococcus sp. interpretive guidelines to criteria (greater than or equal to 23 mm = susceptible, less than or equal to 13 mm = resistant) that are more compatible with in vivo erythromycin concentrations. It is also recommended that zone diameters be modified for H. influenzae (greater than or equal to 23 mm = susceptible, less than 22 mm = resistant) and that meningococci not be tested. A wide moderately susceptible category (1.0 to 4.0 micrograms/ml) would primarily include enterococcus strains and those organisms that would then respond only to parenteral administration of erythromycin. Roxithromycin (RU 965 or RU 28965), a new oxime ether erythromycin derivative, was also evaluated by investigator-prepared 15-micrograms disks and later with 30- and 60-micrograms commercial disks. Although roxithromycin was comparable to erythromycin in activity and regression line statistics, changes in the susceptible disk criteria were necessary because of superior roxithromycin serum concentrations and a longer serum half-life. Preliminary susceptible breakpoint criteria were greater than 21 mm = susceptible, 10 to 20 mm = indeterminate, and less than or equal to 9 mm = resistant. By using the recommended interpretive criteria for both macrolides, less than 98% absolute agreement was obtained, therefore suggesting the application of a spectrum class concept. PMID:3091634

  13. Total Synthesis of the GRP78-Downregulatory Macrolide (+)-Prunustatin A, the Immunosuppressant (+)-SW-163A, and a JBIR-04 Diastereoisomer That Confirms JBIR-04 Has Nonidentical Stereochemistry to (+)-Prunustatin A.

    PubMed

    Manaviazar, Soraya; Nockemann, Peter; Hale, Karl J

    2016-06-17

    A unified total synthesis of the GRP78-downregulator (+)-prunustatin A and the immunosuppressant (+)-SW-163A based upon [1 + 1 + 1 + 1]-fragment condensation and macrolactonization between O(4) and C(5) is herein described. Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation was used to set the C(2) stereocenter present in both targets. In like fashion, coupling of the (+)-prunustatin A macrolide amine with benzoic acid furnished a JBIR-04 diastereoisomer whose NMR spectra did not match those of JBIR-04, thus confirming that it has different stereochemistry than (+)-prunustatin A.

  14. Combined application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets and charged aerosol detection for the simple and sensitive quantification of macrolide antibiotics in human urine.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shaodong; Li, Jing; Park, So-Ra; Ryu, Yeonsuk; Park, Il Ho; Park, Jeong Hill; Hong, Soon-Sun; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2013-12-01

    A novel analytical method combining dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) and liquid chromatography with charged aerosol detection (LC-CAD) was established. For the first time, CAD was applied for the detection of macrolide antibiotics lacking chromophores. Parameters influencing the microextraction efficiency were systematically investigated, and the optimized microextraction conditions yielded high enrichment factors in the range of 60-106. The combined application of DLLME-SFO and LC-CAD provided the sensitivity of the method, expressed as the limit of detection (LOD), as low as 10 to 40ngmL(-1) and intra-day and inter-day precisions below 8.7% and 12.6%, respectively. The measured absolute recovery values were approximately 100%, indicating that the extraction efficiency was very high. Direct comparisons of the liquid-liquid extraction and organic solvent precipitation methods demonstrated that the proposed method was more sensitive, specific, rapid, and environmentally friendly for the determination of five macrolide antibiotics in human urine. The results suggest that the combined use of DLLME-SFO and LC-CAD may be applicable to the analysis of various compounds with poor to no chromophores in complex matrices.

  15. Genotypes of macrolide-resistant pneumococci from children in southwestern Japan: raised incidence of strains that have both erm(B) and mef(A) with serotype 6B clones.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masaaki; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Gotoh, Kenji; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Koga, Hiroyasu; Masunaga, Kenji; Nagai, Kensuke; Tsumura, Naoki; Appelbaum, Peter C; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2008-09-01

    MICs of penicillin G, erythromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin, and telithromycin were tested for 189 clinical isolates collected during 2002 to 2005 from children in southwestern Japan. Serotyping and polymerase chain reaction for presence of erm(B) and mef(A) were performed. All strains with erm(B) + mef(A) were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and compared to 3 global clones: Spain(23F)-1; Spain(9V)-3 and its variant -14; a South Korean strain same as Taiwan (19F)-14 clone and 5 strains with erm(B) + mef(A) from other countries. Of the 173 macrolide-resistant (erythromycin MIC > or =0.5 microg/mL) strains, 104 (60.1%) had erm(B), 47 (27.2%) had mef(A), and 22 (12.7%) had erm(B) + mef(A). Strains expressing erm(B) or both erm(B) and mef(A) had high macrolide MIC(90)s (>64 microg/mL), except telithromycin (MIC(90), 0.25 microg/mL). Of the 22 erm(B) + mef(A) strains, 10 had 4 distinct PFGE patterns and were mainly serotype 6B clones, which differed from those described in previous reports; 5 other strains had unique profiles.

  16. Innovative mixture of salts in the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method for the extraction of residual macrolides in milk followed by analysis with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Rafaela Pinto; Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Pereira, Mararlene Ulberg; Monteiro, Mychelle Alves; Ferreira, Rosana Gomes; da Nóbrega, Armi Wanderley

    2015-11-01

    A simple extraction technique has been developed for seven macrolide antibiotics in milk. The procedure involves a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method based on acetonitrile extraction, followed by the addition of a mixture of salts (sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, and potassium carbonate) not yet reported in literature. The method was validated for tylosin and was selective, free of matrix effect, and linear in the range of 0.78-18.75 ng/mL in the final extract, corresponding to 0.125-3 times the maximum residue limit. The limit of detection, limit of quantification, decision limit, and detection capability were, respectively, 0.84, 2.79, 58.4, and 71.7 μg/kg. The overall average recovery at 25, 50, and 75 μg/kg ranged from 89-97%. Repeatability and intermediate precision expressed by relative standard deviations were below 10.5 and 12%, respectively. The extension of the validation for spiramycin, throleandomycin, oleandomycin, roxithromycin, erythromycin, and clarithromycin is under consideration since the procedure proved to be able to efficiently extract all studied macrolides, with recoveries from 74-104% at 50 μg/kg for tylosin, erythromycin, spiramycin, and oleandomycin and 20 μg/kg for throleandomycin, roxithromycin, and clarithromycin.

  17. Technical note: Occurrence in fecal microbiota of genes conferring resistance to both macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B and tetracyclines concomitant with feeding of beef cattle with tylosin.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Fluharty, F L; St-Pierre, N; Morrison, M; Yu, Z

    2008-09-01

    Development of antimicrobial resistance in food animals receiving antimicrobials has been well documented among bacterial isolates, especially pathogens, but information on development of antimicrobial resistance at the microbial community level during long-term feeding of antimicrobials is lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the association between inclusion of tylosin in feed and occurrence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) in the entire fecal microbial communities of beef cattle over a feeding study of 168 d. A completely randomized design included 6 pens housed together in 1 barn, with each pen housing 10 to 11 steers. The control and tylosin groups each had 3 pens, with the former receiving no antimicrobial whereas the latter received both tylosin and monensin (11 and 29.9 mg/ kg of feed, respectively, DM) in feed. The abundance of genes conferring resistance to MLS(B) (erm genes) and tetracyclines (tet genes) were quantified using class-specific, real-time PCR assays. The abundances of erm and tet genes were analyzed with pens as experimental units using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Correlations between abundance of different resistance genes were calculated using the CORR procedure of SAS. We identified 4 classes (B, F, T, and X) of erm genes in fresh fecal samples collected at wk 2, 17, and 21 of feeding. From wk 2 to 17, the abundance of erm(T) and erm(X) increased (P < 0.05), whereas that of erm(B) and erm(F) did not. The abundance of the erm genes did not further change from wk 17 to 21. The tet(A/C), tet(G), and tet gene variants encoding ribosomal protection proteins (including classes M, O, P, Q, S, T, and W) appeared to be co-selected by tylosin feeding. Such co-selection of multiresistance at community level by one antimicrobial drug used in animals has the important implication that future studies should examine resistance to not only the antimicrobials used in animals, but also other antimicrobials

  18. A Low Prevalence of Inducible Macrolide, Lincosamide, and Streptogramin B Resistance Phenotype among Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Malaysian Patients and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mesbah Elkammoshi, Asma; Ghasemzadeh-Moghaddam, Hamed; Amin Nordin, Syafinaz; Mohd Taib, Niazlin; Kumar Subbiah, Suresh; Neela, Vasanthakumari; Awang Hamat, Rukman

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance among Staphylococcus aureus is of great concern worldwide. This resistance is further complicated by the ability of S. aureus to confer cross-resistance to other antibiotics due to the presence of resistance genes, such as erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes, which render the bacterium resistant to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics. Resistance to these antibiotics can lead to therapeutic failure, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with S. aureus infections. Objectives This study was performed to examine the distribution of MLSB-resistant strains of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), which were obtained from hospitalized patients and normal healthy individuals (carriers) using phenotypic methods, such as the double-disk diffusion (D-test) and the genotypic method by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods A total of 183 nonduplicative MSSA isolates obtained from hospitalized patients (133) and carriers (50) in our previous studies were randomly selected for the D-test. The guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) were used for the interpretation of the results of this test. The detection of ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes by PCR was performed for isolates that had positive D-test results and that were resistant to erythromycin. Results Of the 183 MSSA isolates, 97.2% and 98.4% were highly susceptible to erythromycin and clindamycin, respectively. MSLB resistance was detected in four isolates (2.2%). Of the 133 MSSA isolated from hospitalized patients, only 3.0% (4/133) and 2.3% (3/133) exhibited resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin, respectively. With regard to the MLSB resistance phenotypes, only 1.6% and 0.6% exhibited inducible MLSB (iMLSB) and MS phenotypes, respectively. The ermC gene was detected in all three iMLSB phenotypes, and the msrA gene was detected in the MS phenotype. Surprisingly, all MSSA isolates (100%) from

  19. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under the Contact Field. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews for media, responding to public inquirie

  20. Study of immunological aspects of aspergillosis in mice and effect of polyene macrolide antibiotic (SJA-95) and IFN-γ: a possible role of IFN-γ as an adjunct in antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Naik, Suresh R; Thakare, Vishnu N; Desai, Sandhya K; Rahalkar, Prabhakar R

    2011-12-30

    New polyene macrolide antibiotic SJA-95 in free as well as liposomal (lip.) forms, with and without interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was studied in mice model of aspergillosis using biological and biochemical parameters viz. colony forming units (CFU) in liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain, and serum IgG, and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Treatment with free and lip SJA-95 along with IFN-γ prolonged the survival time, reduced CFU in vital organs, decreased serum IgG and IL-4 levels. SJA-95 lip form showed greater antifungal activity as compared to free form. The combined treatment of lip SJA-95 with IFN-γ showed further enhancement in antifungal activity of SJA-95 (lip). The present experimental findings demonstrated IFN-γ might act as a potent modulator in immune reaction during fungal infection and can be a useful adjunctive in antifungal therapy in the management of deep seated systemic mycoses.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of conjugative prophage Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) carrying the mef(A)/msr(D) genes for efflux resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, Francesco; Santagati, Maria; Santoro, Francesco; Oggioni, Marco R; Stefani, Stefania; Pozzi, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Genetic element Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) is a prophage of Streptococcus pyogenes which carries the macrolide efflux resistance genes mef(A)/msr(D) and is capable of conjugal transfer among streptococci. Complete nucleotide sequence showed that Φ1207.3 is 52,491 bp in length and contained 58 open reading frames (ORFs). A manual homology-based annotation with functional prediction of the hypothetical gene product was possible only for 34 out of 58 ORFs. Φ1207.3 codes for two different C-methylation systems, several phage structural genes, a lysis cassette (composed by a holin and a peptidoglycan hydrolase), and three site-specific resolvases of the serine recombinase family.

  2. Is β-Lactam Plus Macrolide More Effective than β-Lactam Plus Fluoroquinolone among Patients with Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia?: a Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adding either macrolide or fluoroquinolone (FQ) to β-lactam has been recommended for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, due to the limited evidence available, there is a question as to the superiority of the two combination therapies. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched for systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of eight trials were analyzed. The total number of patients in the β-lactam plus macrolide (BL-M) and β-lactam plus fluoroquinolone (BL-F) groups was 2,273 and 1,600, respectively. Overall mortality of the BL-M group was lower than that of the BL-F group (19.4% vs. 26.8%), which showed statistical significance (odds ratio [OR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49 to 0.94; P = 0.02). Length of hospital stay was reduced in the BL-M group compared to the BL-F group (mean difference, −3.05 days; 95% CI, −6.01 to −0.09; P = 0.04). However, there was no significant difference in length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay between the two groups. Among patients with severe CAP, BL-M therapy may better reduce overall mortality and length of hospital stay than BL-F therapy. However, we could not elicit strong conclusions from the available trials due to high risk of bias and methodological limitations. PMID:27914135

  3. Erythromycin Resistance-Conferring Plasmid pRSB105, Isolated from a Sewage Treatment Plant, Harbors a New Macrolide Resistance Determinant, an Integron-Containing Tn402-Like Element, and a Large Region of Unknown Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, A.; Szczepanowski, R.; Kurz, N.; Schneiker, S.; Krahn, I.; Pühler, A.

    2007-01-01

    The erythromycin resistance plasmid pRSB105 was previously isolated from an activated sludge bacterial community of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Compilation of the complete pRSB105 nucleotide sequence revealed that the plasmid is 57,137 bp in size and has a mean G+C content of 56.66 mol%. The pRSB105 backbone is composed of two different replication and/or partitioning modules and a functional mobilization region encoding the mobilization genes mobCDE and mobBA. The first replicon (Rep1) is nearly identical to the corresponding replication module of the multiresistance plasmid pRSB101 isolated from an unknown activated sludge bacterium. Accordingly, pRSB101 and pRSB105 are sister plasmids belonging to a new plasmid family. The second replicon (Rep2) of pRSB105 was classified as a member of the IncP-6 group. While Rep1 confers replication ability only in γ-proteobacteria, Rep2 extents the host range of the plasmid since it is also functional in the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha. Plasmid pRSB105 harbors the macrolide resistance genes mel and mph, encoding, respectively, a predicted ABC-type efflux permease and a macrolide-2′-phosphotransferase. Erythromycin resistance is mainly attributed to mel, whereas mph contributes to erythromycin resistance to a lesser extent. The second resistance region, represented by an integron-containing Tn402-like element, includes a β-lactam (oxa10) and a trimethoprim (dfrB2) resistance gene cassette. In addition to antibiotic resistance modules, pRSB105 encodes a functional restriction/modification system and two nonresistance regions of unknown function. The presence of different mobile genetic elements that flank resistance and nonresistance modules on pRSB105 indicates that these elements were involved in acquisition of accessory plasmid modules. Comparative genomics of pRSB105 and related plasmids elucidated that pRSB105 evolved by integration of distinct modules from different plasmid sources, including

  4. Genome mining of the biosynthetic gene cluster of the polyene macrolide antibiotic tetramycin and characterization of a P450 monooxygenase involved in the hydroxylation of the tetramycin B polyol segment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bo; Yao, Fen; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Cui, Dongbing; Shao, Yucheng; Zhu, Changxiong; Deng, Zixin; You, Delin

    2012-10-15

    A polyene macrolide antibiotic tetramycin biosynthetic gene cluster was identified by genome mining and isolated from Streptomyces hygrospinosus var. beijingensis. Genetic and in silico analyses gave insights into the mechanism of biosynthesis of tetramycin, and a model of the tetramycin biosynthetic pathway is proposed. Inactivation of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene, tetrK, resulted in the production of a tetramycin B precursor: tetramycin A, which lacks a hydroxy group in its polyol region. TetrK was subsequently overexpressed heterologously in E. coli with a His(6) tag, and purified TetrK efficiently hydroxylated tetramycin A to afford tetramycin B. Kinetic studies revealed no inhibition of TetrK by substrate or product. Surprisingly, sequence-alignment analysis showed that TetrK, as a hydroxylase, has much higher homology with epoxidase PimD than with hydroxylases NysL and AmphL. The 3D structure of TetrK was then constructed by homology modeling with PimD as reference. Although TetrK and PimD catalyzed different chemical reactions, homology modeling indicated that they might share the same catalytic sites, despite also possessing some different sites correlated with substrate binding and substrate specificity. These findings offer good prospects for the production of improved antifungal polyene analogues.

  5. The α-barrel tip region of Escherichia coli TolC homologs of Vibrio vulnificus interacts with the MacA protein to form the functional macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Hyun-Lee; Song, Saemee; Joo, Minju; Lee, Seunghwa; Kim, Daeyoung; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2013-04-01

    TolC and its homologous family of proteins are outer membrane factors that are essential for exporting small molecules and toxins across the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. Two open reading frames in the Vibrio vulnificus genome that encode proteins homologous to Escherichia coli TolC, designated TolCV1 and TolCV2, have 51.3% and 29.6% amino acid identity to TolC, respectively. In this study, we show that TolCV1 and TolCV2 functionally and physically interacted with the membrane fusion protein, MacA, a component of the macrolide-specific MacAB-TolC pump of E. coli. We further show that the conserved residues located at the aperture tip region of the α-hairpin of TolCV1 and TolCV2 played an essential role in the formation of the functional MacAB-TolC pump using site-directed mutational analyses. Our findings suggest that these outer membrane factors have conserved tip-to-tip interaction with the MacA membrane fusion protein for action of the drug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Functional implications of an intermeshing cogwheel-like interaction between TolC and MacA in the action of macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongbin; Song, Saemee; Moeller, Arne; Kim, Nahee; Piao, Shunfu; Sim, Se-Hoon; Kang, Mooseok; Yu, Wookyung; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Kangseok; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2011-04-15

    Macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC has been identified in diverse gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli. The inner membrane transporter MacB requires the outer membrane factor TolC and the periplasmic adaptor protein MacA to form a functional tripartite complex. In this study, we used a chimeric protein containing the tip region of the TolC α-barrel to investigate the role of the TolC α-barrel tip region with regard to its interaction with MacA. The chimeric protein formed a stable complex with MacA, and the complex formation was abolished by substitution at the functionally essential residues located at the MacA α-helical tip region. Electron microscopic study delineated that this complex was made by tip-to-tip interaction between the tip regions of the α-barrels of TolC and MacA, which correlated well with the TolC and MacA complex calculated by molecular dynamics. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the MacA hexamer interacts with TolC in a tip-to-tip manner, and implies the manner by which MacA induces opening of the TolC channel.

  7. An efficient, convenient synthesis of novel medium-sized 13H-dibenzo[d,h][1,3,7]oxadiazecine-8,14-dione macrolides as anticipated antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafez, Atef Abdel-Monem

    2002-07-01

    A series of novel medium-sized 13H-dibenzo[d,h][1,3,7]oxadiazecine-8,14-dione macrolides (18-27, 30, 32) were synthesized in an ongoing effort to develop new antineoplastic agents. The synthon 2-(2-aminobenzoylamino)-benzoic acid (7), for preparation of the target compounds, was prepared via the reaction of isatoic anhydride 5 and anthranilic acid 6. Nine compounds (18-20, 24-27, 30, 32) were subjected to National Cancer Institute (NCI) in vitro disease-oriented human cells screening panel assay. Among the compounds tested, 6-benzyl-13H-dibenzo[d,h][1,3,7]oxadiazecine-8,14-dione (26, NSC 721327), bearing the benzyl group at position 6, showed cytotoxic activity and subpanel selectivity against leukemia (CCRF-CEM), colon (HCC-2998), CNS (SNB-75) and melanoma (UACC-257) panels at log(10) GI(50) (M), compound concentration that inhibits 50% of cell growth, ranging from -4.08 to -4.59.

  8. Macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics enhance C3b deposition on the surface of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains by a LytA autolysin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Rodríguez-Sosa, Cinthya; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Giménez, María-José; Olmedillas, Eduardo; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Yuste, Jose

    2012-11-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains displaying high levels of multidrug resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for the outcome of the infection. Modifications of the bacterial envelope by antibiotics may assist the recognition and clearance of the pathogen by the host immune system. Recognition of S. pneumoniae resistant strains by the complement component C3b was increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and subinhibitory concentrations of different macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics for all the strains investigated. However, C3b levels were unchanged in the presence of serum containing specific antibodies and sub-MICs of levofloxacin. To investigate whether LytA, the main cell wall hydrolase of S. pneumoniae, might be involved in this process, lytA-deficient mutants were constructed. In the presence of antibiotics, loss of LytA was not associated with enhanced C3b deposition on the pneumococcal surface, which confirms the importance of LytA in this interaction. The results of this study offer new insights into the development of novel therapeutic strategies using certain antibiotics by increasing the efficacy of the host immune response to efficiently recognize pneumococcal resistant strains.

  9. Quantitative determination of the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, roxithromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography using pre-column derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sastre Toraño, J; Guchelaar, H J

    1998-12-11

    A validated, highly sensitive and precise high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of the macrolides erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin in human serum is described. A diethyl ether extract, obtained from serum using a saturated sodium carbonate solution, was treated with 9-fluorenylmethyl-oxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl) for 40 min at 40 degrees C and chromatographed on a base-deactivated octadecyl column, maintained at 50 degrees C during elution, using an eluent composed of acetonitrile-hydrogenphosphate buffer, pH 7.5, with 0.125% triethylamine (3:2, v/v). Fluorescence detection was used at an excitation wavelength of 255 nm and an emission wavelength of 315 nm. Erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin and azithromycin were found to have retention times of 8.8, 15.7, 17.1 and 20.7 min, respectively. Recoveries ranging from 93 to 104% were found with reproducibility coefficients of variation of 1.1-5%. Mean correlation coefficients of 0.9997, 0.9998, 0.9996 and 0.9994 were found for the linear calibration curves (n = 2) of erythromycin (0.320-16.1 mg/l), roxithromycin (3.24-19.4 mg/l), clarithromycin (0.190-19.4 mg/l) and azithromycin (0.0988-4.94 mg/l), respectively.

  10. High-throughput method for macrolides and lincosamides antibiotics residues analysis in milk and muscle using a simple liquid-liquid extraction technique and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Jank, Louise; Martins, Magda Targa; Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Campos Motta, Tanara Magalhães; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara

    2015-11-01

    A fast and simple method for residue analysis of the antibiotics classes of macrolides (erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, tilmicosin and spiramycin) and lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) was developed and validated for cattle, swine and chicken muscle and for bovine milk. Sample preparation consists in a liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with acetonitrile, followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS), without the need of any additional clean-up steps. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a C18 column and a mobile phase composed by acidified acetonitrile and water. The method was fully validated according the criteria of the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Validation parameters such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity, accuracy, repeatability, specificity, reproducibility, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) were evaluated. All calculated values met the established criteria. Reproducibility values, expressed as coefficient of variation, were all lower than 19.1%. Recoveries range from 60% to 107%. Limits of detection were from 5 to 25 µg kg(-1).The present method is able to be applied in routine analysis, with adequate time of analysis, low cost and a simple sample preparation protocol.

  11. Development and application of real-time PCR assays for quantification of erm genes conferring resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B in livestock manure and manure management systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Yu, Zhongtang; Michel, Frederick C; Wittum, Thomas; Morrison, Mark

    2007-07-01

    Erythromycin and tylosin are commonly used in animal production, and such use is perceived to contribute to the overall antimicrobial resistance (AR) reservoirs. Quantitative measurements of this type of AR reservoir in microbial communities are required to understand AR ecology (e.g., emergence, persistence, and dissemination). We report here the development, validation, and use of six real-time PCR assays for quantifying six classes of erm genes (classes A through C, F, T, and X) that encode the major mechanism of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLS(B)). These real-time PCR assays were validated and used in quantifying the six erm classes in five types of samples, including those from bovine manure, swine manure, compost of swine manure, swine waste lagoons, and an Ekokan upflow biofilter system treating hog house effluents. The bovine manure samples were found to contain much smaller reservoirs of each of the six erm classes than the swine manure samples. Compared to the swine manure samples, the composted swine manure samples had substantially reduced erm gene abundances (by up to 7.3 logs), whereas the lagoon or the biofilter samples had similar erm gene abundances. These preliminary results suggest that the methods of manure storage and treatment probably have a substantial impact on the persistence and decline of MLS(B) resistance originating from food animals, thus likely affecting the dissemination of such resistance genes into the environment. The abundances of these erm genes appeared to be positively correlated with those of the tet genes determined previously among these samples. These real-time PCR assays provide a rapid, quantitative, and cultivation-independent measurement of six major classes of erm genes, which should be useful for ecological studies of AR.

  12. Randomized, non-inferiority trial comparing a nitric oxide releasing solution with a macrolide antibiotic for control of bovine respiratory disease in beef feedlot calves at high-risk of developing respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Crepieux, T; Miller, C; Regev-Shoshani, G; Schaefer, A; Dorin, C; Alexander, T; Timsit, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide, a molecule produced in most mammalian cells, has bactericidal and virucidal properties. Nasal instillation of a nitric oxide releasing solution (NORS) on arrival at the feedlot was recently reported as non-inferior to a parenteral injection of a macrolide antibiotic, tilmicosin, for control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle at low-to-moderate risk of developing BRD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether NORS was non-inferior to tilmicosin for control of BRD in cattle at high-risk of developing BRD (the target population for many BRD control programs). High-risk Angus-cross heifers (n=840) were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups on arrival at a feedlot and received either NORS or tilmicosin for BRD control. Non-inferiority was assessed by calculating the difference in prevalence of heifers diagnosed with BRD during the first 40 d after arrival between NORS and tilmicosin treatment groups. The non-inferiority margin (δ) was set at 8.5%. Thirty-six and 19% of heifers were diagnosed with BRD in the NORS and tilmicosin groups, respectively. Because the lower bound of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in BRD prevalence between the 2 treatment groups (17%; 95% CI=11-23%) was higher than δ, an inferiority of NORS was concluded. Although on-arrival nasal administration of NORS can be viewed as a more rational control strategy than parental injection of antibiotics, further research is needed to improve NORS efficacy before it can be recommended to prevent BRD in high-risk cattle.

  13. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Clarithromycin against Macrolide-Resistant [PCR-Positive mef(A) or erm(B)] Streptococcus pneumoniae Simulating Clinically Achievable Serum and Epithelial Lining Fluid Free-Drug Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Noreddin, Ayman M.; Roberts, Danielle; Nichol, Kim; Wierzbowski, Aleksandra; Hoban, Daryl J.; Zhanel, George G.

    2002-01-01

    The association between macrolide resistance mechanisms and clinical outcomes remains understudied. The present study, using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, assessed clarithromycin (CLR) activity against mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates by simulating free-drug concentrations in serum and both total (protein-bound and free) and free drug in epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Five mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative strains, one mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-positive strain, and a control [mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-negative] strain of S. pneumoniae were tested. CLR was modeled using a one-compartment model, simulating a dosage of 500 mg, per os, twice a day (in serum, free-drug Cp maximum of 2 μg/ml, t1/2 of 6 h; in ELF, CELF(total) maximum of 35μg/ml, t1/2 of 6 h; CELF(free) maximum of 14 μg/ml, t1/2 of 6 h). Starting inocula were 106 CFU/ml in Mueller-Hinton broth with 2% lysed horse blood. With sampling at 0, 4, 8, 12, 20, and 24 h, the extent of bacterial killing was assessed. Achieving CLR T/MIC values of ≥90% (AUC0-24/MIC ratio, ≥61) resulted in bacterial eradication, while T>MIC values of 40 to 56% (AUC0-24/MIC ratios of ≥30.5 to 38) resulted in a 1.2 to 2.0 log10 CFU/ml decrease at 24 h compared to that for the initial inoculum. CLR T/MIC values of ≤8% (AUC0-24/MIC ratio, ≤17.3) resulted in a static effect or bacterial regrowth. The high drug concentrations in ELF that were obtained clinically with CLR may explain the lack of clinical failures with mef(A)-producing S. pneumoniae strains, with MICs up to 8 μg/ml. However, mef(A) isolates for which MICs are ≥16 μg/ml along with erm(B) may result in bacteriological failures. PMID:12435719

  14. Pharmacodynamic modeling of clarithromycin against macrolide-resistant [PCR-positive mef(A) or erm(B)] Streptococcus pneumoniae simulating clinically achievable serum and epithelial lining fluid free-drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Noreddin, Ayman M; Roberts, Danielle; Nichol, Kim; Wierzbowski, Aleksandra; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

    2002-12-01

    The association between macrolide resistance mechanisms and clinical outcomes remains understudied. The present study, using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, assessed clarithromycin (CLR) activity against mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates by simulating free-drug concentrations in serum and both total (protein-bound and free) and free drug in epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Five mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative strains, one mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-positive strain, and a control [mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-negative] strain of S. pneumoniae were tested. CLR was modeled using a one-compartment model, simulating a dosage of 500 mg, per os, twice a day (in serum, free-drug C(p) maximum of 2 micro g/ml, t(1/2) of 6 h; in ELF, C(ELF(total)) maximum of 35 micro g/ml, t(1/2) of 6 h; C(ELF(free)) maximum of 14 micro g/ml, t(1/2) of 6 h). Starting inocula were 10(6) CFU/ml in Mueller-Hinton broth with 2% lysed horse blood. With sampling at 0, 4, 8, 12, 20, and 24 h, the extent of bacterial killing was assessed. Achieving CLR T/MIC values of > or =90% (AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio, > or =61) resulted in bacterial eradication, while T>MIC values of 40 to 56% (AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios of > or =30.5 to 38) resulted in a 1.2 to 2.0 log(10) CFU/ml decrease at 24 h compared to that for the initial inoculum. CLR T/MIC values of < or =8% (AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio, < or =17.3) resulted in a static effect or bacterial regrowth. The high drug concentrations in ELF that were obtained clinically with CLR may explain the lack of clinical failures with mef(A)-producing S. pneumoniae strains, with MICs up to 8 micro g/ml. However, mef(A) isolates for which MICs are > or =16 micro g/ml along with erm(B) may result in bacteriological failures.

  15. Chemical modification of antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, S. E.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2011-02-01

    The review summarizes advances in the methods for the synthesis of polyene antibiotics (amphotericin B, partricin A, etc.) and investigations of the structure-activity relationship made in the last 15 years. State-of-the-art approaches based on the combination of the chemical synthesis and genetic engineering are considered. Emphasis is given to the design of semisynthetic antifungal agents against chemotherapy-resistant pathogens having the highest therapeutic indices. Recent results of research on the mechanisms of action of polyenes are outlined.

  16. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution.

  17. [Macrolides in the treatment of children with Mediterranean spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia

    2002-09-01

    Till now there is not a gold standard therapy for Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) in children. Standard treatment for MSF is the administration of tetracycline or chloramphenicol, however both these drugs can cause significant adverse effects in children (tetracyclines can cause staining of teeth, chloramphenicol severe hematological adverse events such as aplastic anemia, gray baby syndrome and hemolytic anemia in patients with the Mediterranean form of G6PD deficiency). We conducted two randomized clinical trials; the first compared clarithromycin versus chloramphenicol: mean time to defervescence was 36.7 +/- 18.1 h in the clarithromycin group and 47.1+/- 21.9 h in the chloramphenicol group (P= 0.047). The second trial compared clarithromycin versus azithromycin and did not show any statistically significant difference: mean time to defervescence was 46.2 +/- 36.4 h in the clarithromycin group and 39.3 +/- 31.3 h in the azithromycin group (P= 0.34). On the basis of these studies we think that clarithromycin and azithromycin could constitute an acceptable alternative to chloramphenicol and to tetracyclines for the treatment of MSF in children

  18. Clonal expansion of the macrolide resistant ST386 within pneumococcal serotype 6C in France.

    PubMed

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002-2003) to the PCV13 era (2010-2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter.

  19. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  20. Resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes in France in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bingen, E; Fitoussi, F; Doit, C; Cohen, R; Tanna, A; George, R; Loukil, C; Brahimi, N; Le Thomas, I; Deforche, D

    2000-06-01

    A total of 1,500 recent throat isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 1996 and 1999 from children throughout France were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, clindamycin, and streptogramin B. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were further studied for their genetic mechanism of resistance, by means of PCR. The clonality of these strains was also investigated by means of serotyping and ribotyping. In all, 6.2% of the strains were erythromycin resistant, and 3.4 and 2.8% expressed the constitutive MLS(B) and M resistance phenotypes and harbored the ermB and mefA genes, respectively; ermTR was recovered from one isolate which also harbored the ermB gene. Ten serotypes and 8 ribotypes were identified, but we identified 17 strains by combining serotyping with ribotyping. Among the eight ribotypes, the mefA gene was recovered from six clusters, one being predominant, while the ermB gene was recovered from four clusters, of which two were predominant.

  1. [Emergence of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains in pediatric patients in France].

    PubMed

    Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Doit, C; Deforche, D; Brahimi, N; Francois, M; Van den Abbeele, T; Bingen, E

    2004-10-01

    A total of 206 recent throat isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 2002 and 2004 from children were tested for their susceptibility to penicillin, amoxycillin, erythromycin, clarythromycin and clindamycin. The erythromycin resistant isolates were further studied for their genetic mechanism of resistance by means of PCR. In all, 14.5% of the strains were erythromycin resistant and 13.5 and 1% expressed the constitutive MLS(B) and M resistance phenotypes and harbored the ermB and mef A genes respectively.

  2. [Immuno-modulating properties of a macrolide antibiotic "Z-factor"].

    PubMed

    Suskova, V S; Emets, V I; Suskov, S I; Kaldaeva, A A; Asanov, A Iu

    2003-01-01

    Zi-Factor is a trade mark of azithromycin made in Russia by ZAO Veropharm. The in vitro modulating action of Zi-Factor (ZF) on neutrophil functional activity and production of immunity mediators was studied. The direct modulating effect of ZF in a concentration of 50 mcg/ml corresponding to the single therapeutic dose of 500 mg/70 kg body weight on the neutrophil oxidase activity evident from increased production of active oxygen and higher myeloperoxidase activity was shown. The immunomodulating effect of ZF on modulation of intracellular oxidative metabolism depended on the initial state of the phagocyte system (secondary insufficiency or activation). When the neutrophil oxidase system is exhausted and there is no response to the antigen stimulus, it is advisable to combine the use of ZF with immunomodulating therapy.

  3. Tracing the Sources of Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs into the Lower Colorado River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters across the United States. Antibiotics present in the environment can produce resistance in microorganisms, which could potentially have adverse effects on human health. In addition, while the ecotoxicological signif...

  4. Effects of the macrolide drug tylosin on chronic diarrhea in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Rebecca S; Tarara, Ross P; Christe, Kari L; Spinner, Abigail; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2008-02-01

    Diarrhea is the gastrointestinal disease most frequently encountered in captive rhesus macaques. The precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying chronic diarrhea in nonhuman primates are not well understood, but a persistent inflammatory component has been implicated strongly. This study evaluated the inflammatory changes in the colon of macaques with diarrhea and assessed the efficacy of a 10-d course of tylosin in a cohort of 21 animals with chronic diarrhea. Stool quality was evaluated daily, and fecal consistency was scored. Colonoscopies were performed; biopsy samples were characterized histologically and assayed for expression of TNFalpha mRNA. Blood samples collected pre-, mid-, and post-treatment were assayed for C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicated that 63% of the animals receiving tylosin showed improvement in stool quality, compared with 10% in the sham-treated group. Histologically, 82% of animals in the tylosin-treated group had a reduction in the severity of colonic lesions post-treatment, compared with 40% of animals in the sham group. The amount of TNFalpha mRNA before treatment did not differ from that afterward in either tylosin- or sham-treated animals. CRP levels serially decreased in tylosin-treated monkeys; the average post-treatment CRP value for tylosin-treated animals was 11.96 +/- 3.86 microg/ml compared with 26.48 +/- 4.86 microg/ml for sham-treated controls. In conclusion, tylosin significantly improved the fecal consistency score, significantly decreased colonic inflammation, and significantly decreased serum CRP levels post-treatment in rhesus macaques with chronic diarrhea.

  5. [In vitro activity of roxithromycin compared to 5 other macrolides against staphylococci].

    PubMed

    Brun, Y; Coulet, M; Forey, F; Fleurette, J

    1988-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the bacteriostatic activity of roxithromycin (RU) to those of erythromycin (ERY), troleandomycin (TAO), spiramycin (SPI), josamycin (JOS) and midekamycin (MID) against staphylococci strains. 239 strains of hospital origin were analysed: S. aureus (139), coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) (100). The MIC were determined by the agar dilution method. The modal MIC, the MIC 50 and 90 observed for the both groups of strains are given according to species and antibiotics. This study gives the opportunity to classify the 6 antibiotics in a decreasing order considering their antistaphylococcal activity: RU = ERY, TAO = SPI, JOS = MID. No difference was noticeable between S. aureus and CNS strains.

  6. In-vitro comparison of macrolides, lincosamides and synergistins on Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Thabaut, A; Meyran, M; Huerre, M

    1985-07-01

    The MIC of erythromycin, oleandomycin, spiramycin, josamycin, lincomycin and pristinamycin was determined for 100 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from cases of acute urethritis in men. The method of dilution in agar was used: blood agar with the addition of 'Polyvitex' and an innoculum of 10(3)-10(4) bacteria per spot. With respect to the break points defined by the C.F.A. all the strains of N. gonorrhoeae studied are sensitive to erythromycin, spiramycin, josamycin and pristinamycin, 12% strains are resistant to oleandomycin and 75% to lincomycin. The active antibiotics are classified as follows according to the active weight expressed by the MIC50: erythromycin, pristinamycin, 0.125 mg/l; josamycin, 0.5 mg/l; spiramycin, oleandomycin, 2 mg/l.

  7. Heterologous expression of tylosin polyketide synthase and production of a hybrid bioactive macrolide in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Seok; Lee, Sang Kil; Hong, Jay Sung Joong; Park, Sung Ryeol; Jeong, Soon Jeong; Han, Ah Reum; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Kim, Byung Gee; Choi, Cha Yong; Sherman, David H; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2006-10-01

    Tylosin polyketide synthase (Tyl PKS) was heterologously expressed in an engineered strain of Streptomyces venezuelae bearing a deletion of pikromycin PKS gene cluster using two compatible low-copy plasmids, each under the control of a pikAI promoter. The mutant strain produced 0.5 mg/l of the 16-membered ring macrolactone, tylactone, after a 4-day culture, which is a considerably reduced culture period to reach the maximum production level compared to other Streptomyces hosts. To improve the production level of tylactone, several precursors for ethylmalonyl-CoA were fed to the growing medium, leading to a 2.8-fold improvement (1.4 mg/ml); however, switching the pikAI promoter to an actI promoter had no observable effect. In addition, a small amount of desosamine-glycosylated tylactone was detected from the extract of the mutant strain, revealing that the native glycosyltransferase DesVII displayed relaxed substrate specificity in accepting the 16-membered ring macrolactone to produce the glycosylated tylactone. These results demonstrate a successful attempt for a heterologous expression of Tyl PKS in S. venezuelae and introduce S. venezuelae as a rapid heterologous expression system for the production of secondary metabolites.

  8. Macrolide biosynthesis. 7. Incorporation of polyketide chain elongation intermediates into methymycin

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, D.E.; Lambalot, R.H.; Prabhakaran, P.C.; Ott, W.R. )

    1993-01-27

    Administration of [1-[sup 13]C]propionate to cultures of Streptomyces venezuelae SC 2366 gave methymycin (1), which was shown by [sup 13]C NMR analysis to be labeled at the predicted sites, C-1, C-3, C-5, C-9, and C-11. Similarly, incorporation of [1,2-[sup 13]C]acetate gave methymycin labeled at C-7 and C-8. A series of presumptive intermediates of polyketide chain elongation was also successfully incorporated. Thus, feeding of (2S,3R)-[2,3-[sup 13]C[sub 2

  9. Differential Trypanocidal Activity of Novel Macrolide Antibiotics; Correlation to Genetic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Seco, Elena Maria; Escudero, Leticia; Corvo, Laura; Soto, Manuel; Fresno, Manuel; Malpartida, Francisco; Bonay, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the systematic study of the anti-trypanocidal activity of some new products derived from S. diastatus on 14 different T. cruzi strains spanning the six genetic lineages of T. cruzi. As the traditional growth inhibition curves giving similar IC50 showed great differences on antibiotic and lineage tested, we decided to preserve the wealth of information derived from each inhibition curve and used an algorithm related to potency of the drugs, combined in a matrix data set used to generate a cluster tree. The cluster thus generated based just on drug susceptibility data closely resembles the phylogenies of the lineages derived from genetic data and provides a novel approach to correlate genetic data with phenotypes related to pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Furthermore we provide clues on the drugs mechanism of action. PMID:22859958

  10. Desmethyl Macrolides: Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,8-Didesmethyl Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need for novel sources of antibiotics to address the incessant and inevitable onset of bacterial resistance. To this end, we have initiated a structure-based drug design program that features a desmethylation strategy (i.e., replacing methyl groups with hydrogens). Herein, we report the total synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of 4,8-didesmethyl telithromycin (5), a novel desmethyl analogue of the third-generation ketolide antibiotic telithromycin (2), which is an FDA-approved semisynthetic derivative of erythromycin (1). We found 5 to be eight times more active than previously prepared 4,8,10-tridesmethyl congener (3) and two times more active than 4,10-didesmethyl regioisomer (4) in MIC assays. While less potent than telithromycin (2) and paralleling the observations made in the previous study of 4,10-didesmethyl analogue (4), the inclusion of a single methyl group improves biological activity, thus supporting its role in antibiotic activity. PMID:24015325

  11. Integrin-mediated targeting of protein polymer nanoparticles carrying a cytostatic macrolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Pu

    Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and offtarget side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or nonpolymeric. This chapter summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins. This chapter explores an alternative encapsulation strategy based on high-specificity avidity between a small molecule drug and its cognate protein target fused to the corona of protein polymer nanoparticles. With the new strategy, the drug associates tightly to the carrier and releases slowly, which may decrease toxicity and promote tumor accumulation via the enhanced permeability and retention effect. To test this hypothesis, the drug Rapamycin (Rapa) was selected for its potent anti-proliferative properties, which give it immunosuppressant and anti-tumor activity. Despite its potency, Rapa has low solubility, low oral bioavailability, and rapid systemic clearance, which make it an excellent candidate for nanoparticulate drug delivery. To explore this approach, genetically engineered diblock copolymers were constructed from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) that assemble small nanoparticles. ELPs are protein polymers of the sequence (Val-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly)n, where the identity of Xaa and n determine their assembly properties. Initially, a screening assay for model drug encapsulation in ELP nanoparticles was developed, which showed that Rose Bengal and Rapa have high non-specific encapsulation in the core of ELP nanoparticles with a sequence where Xaa = Ile or Phe. While excellent at entrapping these drugs, their release was relatively fast compared to their intended mean residence time in the human body. Having determined that Rapa can be non-specifically entrapped in the core of ELP nanoparticles, FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP), which is the cognate protein target of Rapa, was genetically fused to the surface of these nanoparticles (FSI) to enhance their avidity towards Rapa. The fusion of FKBP to these nanoparticles slowed the terminal half-life of drug release to 57.8 h. To determine if this class of drug carriers has potential applications in vivo, FSI/Rapa was administered to mice carrying a human breast cancer model (MDA-MB-468). Compared to free drug, FSI encapsulation significantly decreased gross toxicity and enhanced the anti-cancer activity. In conclusion, protein polymer nanoparticles decorated with the cognate receptor of a high potency, low solubility drug (Rapa) efficiently improved drug loading capacity and its release. This approach has applications to the delivery of Rapa and its analogs; furthermore, this strategy has broader applications in the encapsulation, targeting, and release of other potent small molecules. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are genetically encoded protein polymers that reversibly phase separate in response to stimuli. They respond sharply to small shifts in temperature and form dense microdomains in the living eukaryotic cytosol. This chapter illustrates how to tune the ELP sequence and architecture for either coassembly or sorting of distinct proteins into microdomains within a living cell. Passive tumor targeting utilizing enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect has limited efficiency in targeting non-leaky tumors such as MDA-MB-468 breast tumor; however, an RGD tri-peptide decorated micelle nanoparticle can effectively accumulate in tumor site via integrin-mediated active tumor targeting. Different from inefficient and cytotoxic chemical linkage reactions, an elastin-based multi-functional nanocarrier can be assembled by genetic protein fusion and micelle co-assembly technology. The novel drug carrier contains the cognate Rapamycin (Rapa) receptor -- FK506 binding protein (FKBP) as the high-avidity drug binding domain and an RGD peptide as the active tumor targeting domain. Here we show that by co-assembling FKBP and RGD contained protein polymers into mixed micelle nanoparticles, they not only competently targeted endothelial and tumor cells in cell assays, but specifically delivered the drug with a slow release half-life of 38h. It was demonstrated that the active tumor targeting formulation of Rapa more effectively suppressed tumor growth compared to the passive tumor targeting formulation and free drug in tumor regression studies of mouse MDA-MB-468 xenografts. We believe that the exciting results will provide a new tool for the development of next-generation "smart" multi-functional drug carriers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  12. Pharmacokinetics of clarithromycin, a new macrolide, after single ascending oral doses.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S Y; Sennello, L T; Bunnell, S T; Varga, L L; Wilson, D S; Sonders, R C

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of single ascending doses of clarithromycin (6-0-methylerythromycin A) were assessed in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial with 39 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were randomized to receive single doses of either placebo or 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, or 1,200 mg of clarithromycin. Blood and urine collections were performed over the 24 h following administration of the test preparation. Biological specimens were analyzed for clarithromycin and 14(R)-hydroxyclarithromycin content by a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique. The pharmacokinetics of clarithromycin appeared to be dose dependent, with terminal disposition half-life ranging from 2.3 to 6.0 h and mean +/- standard deviation area under the concentration-versus-time curve from time 0 to infinity for plasma ranging from 1.67 +/- 0.48 to 3.72 +/- 1.26 mg/liter.h per 100-mg dose over the 100- to 1,200-mg dose range. Similar dose dependency was noted in the pharmacokinetics of the 14(R)-hydroxy metabolite. Mean urinary excretion of clarithromycin and its 14(R)-hydroxy metabolite ranged from 11.5 to 17.5% and 5.3 to 8.8% of the administered dose, respectively. Urinary excretion data and plasma metabolite/parent compound concentration ratio data suggested that capacity-limited formation of the active metabolite may account, at least in part, for the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of clarithromycin. No substantive dose-related trend was observed for the renal clearance of either compound. There were no clinically significant drug-related alterations in laboratory and nonlaboratory safety parameters. In addition, there was no significant difference between placebo and clarithromycin recipients in the incidence or severity of adverse events. Clarithromycin appears to be safe and well tolerated. PMID:1489187

  13. [Anti Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis (exclusion of macrolides)].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Ferroni, A; Vrielinck, S; Lebourgeois, M; Chedevergne, F; Lenoir, G

    2006-10-01

    Antibiotherapy is one of the main treatment in cystic fibrosis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is one of the main causes of pulmonary degradation. The chronic sputum colonisation is characterized by the emergence of the mucoid phenotype, the formation of biofilm and the induction of excessive inflammatory response and consecutive tissue lesion. The choice of antibiotics depends on quantitative and qualitative analysis of sputum, bacteria resistance phenotypes and severity of infection. Treatment of P. aeruginosa is different in case of first colonization or chronic infection. In the first case, parenteral antibiotherapy (beta-lactams-aminoglycosids) followed by inhaled antibiotherapy may eradicate the germ. In the other case, superinfections can be treated with parenteral biantibiothérapy (beta-lactams or quinolons and aminoglycosides) during 15 to 21 days. This is associated with a better nutritional and respiratory status and a prolonged survival. Inhaled antibiotics between the courses have decreased the number of superinfections. This prolonged antibiotherapy must be monitored because of possible induction of bacterial resistance, nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity of aminosids and allergy to beta-lactams.

  14. Activity of grepafloxacin and other fluoroquinones and newer macrolides against recent clinical isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Roblin, P M; Kutlin, A; Reznik, T; Hammerschlag, M R

    1999-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a frequent cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infection including pneumonia and bronchitis. Quinolones have attracted interest as potential therapy for community-acquired respiratory tract infections because they are active against a wide range of pathogens including C. pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The in vitro susceptibilities of C. pneumoniae were determined for grepafloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. Isolates of C. pneumoniae tested included two reference strains, TW-183 and CM-1, and 12 recent clinical isolates from adults with community-acquired pneumonia. Susceptibility testing was performed in HEp-2 cells grown in 96-well microtiter plates. The MIC was the lowest antibiotic concentration at which no inclusions were seen. The MBC was the lowest concentration which resulted in no inclusions after passage in antibiotic-free medium. Grepafloxacin was the most active quinolone tested with an MIC50 of 0.125 mg/l, MIC90 and MBC90 of 0.5 mg/l. Grepafloxacin may have a role in the treatment of C. pneumoniae infections, but prospective clinical studies utilizing culture are lacking.

  15. The Structural Determinants of Macrolide-Actin Binding: In Silico Insights

    PubMed Central

    Melville, James L.; Moal, Iain H.; Baker-Glenn, Charles; Shaw, Peter E.; Pattenden, Gerald; Hirst, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    By the use of x-ray structures and flexible docking, we have developed the first in silico ligand-based view of the structural determinants of the binding of small molecule mimics of gelsolin, natural products bound to actin. Our technique highlights those residues on the actin binding site forming important hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the ligands. Significantly, through the flexible docking of toxin fragments, we have also identified potential residues on the actin binding site that have yet to be exploited. Guided by these observations, we have demonstrated that kabiramide C can be modified to produce a structure with a predicted binding energy increased by 20% while the molecular mass is reduced by 20%, clearly indicating the potential for future elaboration of structures targeting this important component of the cytoskeleton. PMID:17351011

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae: the evolution of antimicrobial resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Cornick, J E; Bentley, S D

    2012-07-01

    Multi drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae constitute a major public health concern worldwide. In this review we discuss how the transformable nature of the pneumococcus, in parallel with antimicrobial induced stress, contributes to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance; and how the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has affected the situation.

  17. Development of macrolide lactone antibiotic brefeldin A fermentation process with Eupenicillium brefeldianum ZJB082702.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jun; Xue, Feng; Wu, Ye-Fei; Xue, Ya-Ping; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2012-09-01

    In this work, a robust brefeldin A-synthesizing fungus, Eupenicillium brefeldianum ZJB082702, was bred from a Murraya paniculata endophytic fungus E. brefeldianum A1163. Using one-factor-at-a-time experimental design, optimization of media composition for E. brefeldianum ZJB082702 fermenting brefeldin A was conducted. Outcomes indicated that mixed carbon source and mixed nitrogen source were of c ritical importance to brefeldin A fermentation. After 6d culture in the optimized fermentation media, composed of (gl(-1)) 13.33 starch, 26.67 glucose, 1.0 yeast extract powder, 1.0 corn steep liquor, 0.5 soybean meal, 0.75 NaNO(3), 2.5 malt extract, 6.0 CaCO(3), 3.0 MgSO(4), 4.0 KH(2)PO(4), 1.0 × 10(-2) CuSO(4), brefeldin A yield peaked at 1304.7 mgl(-1), 648.2 mgl(-1) in 500 ml baffled flask and 15 l stirred fermentor respectively, formed as a growth associated type of secondary metabolite based on fermentation profile analysis.

  18. The thuggacins, novel antibacterial macrolides from Sorangium cellulosum acting against selected Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Irschik, Herbert; Reichenbach, Hans; Höfle, Gerhard; Jansen, Rolf

    2007-12-01

    In our screening program we found an activity against some Gram-positive bacteria, including mycobacteria in the culture supernatant of Sorangium cellulosum strain So ce895. The antibiotic responsible for this activity was isolated and named thuggacin. Initial studies towards the mechanism of action showed that thuggacin A inhibits a late step of the respiratory chain of some bacteria.

  19. Radioimmunoassay for metabolites of 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin, a macrolide antibiotic

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, N.; Ueda, T.; Yokoshima, T.; Umemura, K.; Shomura, T.

    1982-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay system has been developed for the measurement of two major metabolites of 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin, Mb-6 and Mb-12. A radioimmunoassay for Mb-6 was performed by using anti-Mb-6 serum and a (/sup 125/I)tyramined Mb-6 derivative as a radiolabeled antigen. The labeled antigen was prepared by the chloramine T method. The antiserum was obtained from a rabbit immunized with Mb-6 conjugated to bovine serum albumin. The obtained antiserum was cross-reactive with two other metabolites of 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin, Mb-2 and Mb-12, in addition to Mb-6. This Mb-6 radioimmunoassay system could detect Mb-6 concentrations as low as 100 pg/ml of serum. The coefficients of variation were 4.5% (intra-assay) and 5.1% (inter-assay). A radioimmunoassay for Mb-12, using anti-midecamycin serum and a (/sup 125/I)tyramined-Mb-12 derivative, has also been developed. The antiserum was cross-reactive only with Mb-12 among the 9,3''-diacetylmidecamycin metabolites. This Mb-12 radioimmunoassay system could detect Mb-12 concentrations as low as 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-assay variances were 5.9 and 5.8%, respectively.

  20. Interspecies Complementation of the LuxR Family Pathway-Specific Regulator Involved in Macrolide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mo, SangJoon; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-01-01

    PikD is a widely known pathway-specific regulator for controlling pikromycin production in Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, which is a representative of the large ATP-binding regulator of the LuxR family (LAL) in Streptomyces sp. RapH and FkbN also belong to the LAL family of transcriptional regulators, which show greatest homology with the ATP-binding motif and helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of PikD. Overexpression of pikD and heterologous expression of rapH and fkbN led to enhanced production of pikromycin by approximately 1.8-, 1.6-, and 1.6-fold in S. venezuelae, respectively. Cross-complementation of rapH and fkbN in the pikD deletion mutant (ΔpikD) restored pikromycin and derived macrolactone production. Overall, these results show that heterologous expression of rapH and fkbN leads to the overproduction of pikromycin and its congeners from the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway in S. venezuelae, and they have the same functionality as the pathwayspecific transcriptional activator for the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway in the ΔpikD strain. These results also show extensive "cross-communication" between pathway-specific regulators of streptomycetes and suggest revision of the current paradigm for pathwayspecific versus global regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces species.

  1. Rapid Determination of Macrolide and Lincosamide Resistance in Group B Streptococcus Isolated from Vaginal-Rectal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Dela Cruz, Wilfred P.; Richardson, Joann Y.; Broestler, Judith M.; Thornton, Jennifer A.; Danaher, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Our objective was to assess the ability of real-time PCR to predict in vitro resistance in isolates of group B streptococcus (GBS). Methods. The first real-time PCR assays for the genes known to confer resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin in GBS were developed. Three hundred and forty clinical GBS isolates were assessed with these assays and compared with conventional disk diffusion. Results. The presence of an erythromycin ribosome methylation gene (ermB or ermTR variant A) predicted in vitro constitutive or inducible resistance to clindamycin with a sensitivity of 93% (95% CI 86%–97%), specificity of 90% (95% CI 85%–93%), positive predictive value of 76% (95% CI 67%–84%), and negative predictive value of 97% (95% CI 94%–99%). Conclusion. This rapid and simple assay can predict in vitro susceptibility to clindamycin within two hours of isolation as opposed to 18–24 hours via disk diffusion. The assay might also be used to screen large numbers of batched isolates to establish the prevalence of resistance in a given area. PMID:17710240

  2. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water. Manure concentrations for ermB, ermC and ermF were all >109 copy g-1. Manure contained 1.76 x 105 CFUg-1 enterococci w...

  3. Contamination Profiles and Mass Loadings of Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs from a Small Urban Wastewater Treatment Plant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is limited regarding sources, distribution, environmental behavior, and fate of prescribed and illicit drugs. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can be one of the sources of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCP) into streams, rivers and lakes. The ...

  4. Fate and transport of tylosin and macrolide-resistance genes following manure applications in tile-drained landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of antibiotics in swine production leads to antibiotic-resistance in gastrointestinal bacteria. Application of swine manure to drained agricultural fields introduces elevated levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and residual antibiotics. The persistence and transport of these agents are g...

  5. Contemporary Strategies for the Synthesis of Tetrahydropyran Derivatives: Application to Total Synthesis of Neopeltolide, a Marine Macrolide Natural Product.

    PubMed

    Fuwa, Haruhiko

    2016-03-25

    Tetrahydropyrans are structural motifs that are abundantly present in a range of biologically important marine natural products. As such, significant efforts have been paid to the development of efficient and versatile methods for the synthesis of tetrahydropyran derivatives. Neopeltolide, a potent antiproliferative marine natural product, has been an attractive target compound for synthetic chemists because of its complex structure comprised of a 14-membered macrolactone embedded with a tetrahydropyran ring, and twenty total and formal syntheses of this natural product have been reported so far. This review summarizes the total and formal syntheses of neopeltolide and its analogues, highlighting the synthetic strategies exploited for constructing the tetrahydropyran ring.

  6. Stereochemistry of ulapualides, a new family of tris-oxazole-containing macrolide ionophores from marine nudibranchs. A molecular mechanics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddock, John; Pattenden, Gerald; Wight, Paul G.

    1993-10-01

    A molecular mechanics study of the marine metabolite ulapualide A, which is suggested to have ionophorie properties, has been carried out on various metal chelated complexes in order to predict the stereochemistry of the natural product. The results suggest a stereochemistry for ulapualide A which is closely similar to structurally related marine metabolites, whose stereochemistries have been established by X-ray crystallography and by partial synthesis.

  7. Contemporary Strategies for the Synthesis of Tetrahydropyran Derivatives: Application to Total Synthesis of Neopeltolide, a Marine Macrolide Natural Product

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydropyrans are structural motifs that are abundantly present in a range of biologically important marine natural products. As such, significant efforts have been paid to the development of efficient and versatile methods for the synthesis of tetrahydropyran derivatives. Neopeltolide, a potent antiproliferative marine natural product, has been an attractive target compound for synthetic chemists because of its complex structure comprised of a 14-membered macrolactone embedded with a tetrahydropyran ring, and twenty total and formal syntheses of this natural product have been reported so far. This review summarizes the total and formal syntheses of neopeltolide and its analogues, highlighting the synthetic strategies exploited for constructing the tetrahydropyran ring. PMID:27023567

  8. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass me...

  9. Separation and determination of the macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, spiramycin and oleandomycin) by capillary electrophoresis coupled with fast reductive voltammetric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Chen, Y; Cassidy, R

    2000-04-01

    Separation and determination of erythromycin, spiramycin and oleandomycin by capillary zone electrophoresis coupled with fast reductive voltammetric detection using an Hg-film electrode was investigated in a simple aqueous phosphate buffer system. The influence of pH, concentration of phosphate, applied voltage, capillary length and dimension on the separation was examined and optimized. The entire separation of erythromycin, spiramycin, and oleandomycin was achieved in a 0.2 mol/L phosphate buffer system without organic modifiers. The electrochemical detection parameters, such as electrode material, applied waveform, scan rate, preconcentration potentials and preconcentration times, were investigated and discussed. This approach provides high separation efficiency and high sensitivity for all compounds, with detection limits (3 x peak-to-peak baseline noise) of 7.5 x 10(-8) mol/L for spiramycin, and 3 x 10(-7) mol/ L for erythromycin and oleandomycin. The calibration plot of peak areas for each separated peak vs. concentration of analyte was found to be linear over three orders of magnitude.

  10. A field study of household attack rates and the effectiveness of macrolide antibiotics in reducing household transmission of pertussis.

    PubMed

    Terry, Janet B; Flatley, Christopher J; van den Berg, Debra J; Morgan, Geoffrey G; Trent, Marianne; Turahui, John A; Greenwood, Michelle C; Corben, Paul W; Bell, Greg J

    2015-03-31

    Bordetella pertussis (whooping cough) is an endemic, highly contagious bacterial respiratory infection, which is notifiable to Australian state and territory health departments. Between 2008 and 2011 there was a substantial outbreak in New South Wales with an initial increase in cases occurring in North Coast New South Wales from late 2007. During September and October 2011 the North Coast Public Health Unit conducted a household study of secondary attack rates to assess the effectiveness of pertussis vaccination as well as the timely use of antibiotics in preventing household transmission. At the time the study was commenced, notified cases included a large proportion of individuals with a documented history of vaccination against pertussis. We found lower attack rates amongst vaccinated compared with non-vaccinated subjects in all age groups, with the exception of the 5-11 years age group, who were also primarily responsible for the introduction of pertussis into the household. There was an increased risk of pertussis transmission from the household first primary case to contacts when antibiotic treatment was commenced later than 7 days after the onset of symptoms compared with within 7 days. This protective effect of timely antibiotic treatment in relation to transmission highlights the need to control for antibiotic treatment in field studies of pertussis. The benefits of timely diagnosis and use of antibiotics in preventing household transmission underscore the importance of early presentation and diagnosis of pertussis cases, particularly in households with susceptible occupants.

  11. Molecular typing of Treponema pallidum isolates from Buenos Aires, Argentina: Frequent Nichols-like isolates and low levels of macrolide resistance.

    PubMed

    Gallo Vaulet, Lucía; Grillová, Linda; Mikalová, Lenka; Casco, Ricardo; Rodríguez Fermepin, Marcelo; Pando, María A; Šmajs, David

    2017-01-01

    A total of 54 clinical samples, including genital lesion swabs, whole blood and cerebrospinal fluid from patients diagnosed with syphilis were collected in 2006 and in 2013 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Treponemal DNA was detected in 43 of the analyzed samples (79.6%) and further analyzed using Sequencing-based molecular typing (SBMT) and Enhanced CDC-typing (ECDCT). By SBMT, 10 different Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA) genotypes were found, of which six were related to the TPA SS14 strain, and four to the TPA Nichols strain. The 23S rRNA gene was amplified in samples isolated from 42 patients, and in six of them (14.3%), either the A2058G (four patients, 9.5%) or the A2059G (two patients, 4.8%) mutations were found. In addition to Taiwan, Madagascar and Peru, Argentina is another country where the prevalence of Nichols-like isolates (26.8%) is greater than 10%.

  12. Comparing HPLC-ESI-ITMS and UPLC-ESI-OA-TOF-MS in Characterizing Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs in Complex Environmental Matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the challenges of characterizing emerging contaminants in complex environmental matrices (e.g., biosolids, sewage, or wastewater) are the co-eluting interferences. For example, surfactants, fats, and humic acids, can be preferentially ionized instead of the analyte(s) of in...

  13. Calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors and immunosuppressant macrolides rapamycin and FK506 inhibit progestin- and glucocorticosteroid receptor-mediated transcription in human breast cancer T47D cells.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, S; Marsaud, V; Mercier-Bodard, C; Baulieu, E E; Mader, S; White, J H; Renoir, J M

    1998-07-01

    The effects of immunosuppressants and inhibitors of specific calcium/calmodulin kinase (CaMK) of types II and IV on progestin/glucocorticosteroid-induced transcription were studied in two human stably transfected breast cancer T47D cell lines. The lines contain the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene under control either of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (T47D-MMTV-CAT), or the minimal promoter containing five glucocorticosteroid/progestin hormone response elements [T47D-(GRE)5-CAT]. Progestin- and triamcinolone acetonide (TA)-induced CAT gene expression was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in both lines by preincubation with rapamycin (Rap) and, to a lesser extent, with FK506, but not with cyclosporin A. CaMK II and/or IV inhibitors KN62 and KN93 also inhibited progestin- and TA-stimulated transcription in both lines. None of these drugs had any effect on basal transcription. The antagonist RU486 inhibited all the effects of both progestin and TA, suggesting that progesterone receptor (PR)-, as well as glucocorticosteroid receptor (GR)- mediated transactivation are targets of immunosuppressants and CaMKs in T47D cells. Indeed, Northern analysis showed that Rap, KN62, and, to a lesser degree, FK506 inhibited progestin stimulation of Cyclin D1 mRNA levels, but not those of the non-steroid-regulated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene. Addition of Rap or KN62 after exposure of cells to progesterone agonist Org 2058 had no effect on induction of CAT activity. Taken together, these data indicate that Rap and FK506, as well as CaMK inhibitors, inhibit steroid-induced activities of exogenous, as well as of some endogenous, steroid receptor-regulated genes by a mechanism preceding hormone-induced receptor activation. Rap appeared to stabilize a 9S form of [3H]Org 2058-PR complexes isolated from T47D (GRE)5CAT cell nuclei. By contrast, the progesterone receptor (PR) was isolated from cells treated with KN62 as a 5S entity, undistinguishable from the 5S PR species extracted from cells treated with progestin only. The nuclear 9S-[3H]Org2058-PR resulting from cells exposed to Rap, contained, in addition to the heat shock proteins of 90 kDa and 70 kDa (hsp90 and hsp70), the FK506-binding immunophilin FKBP52 but not FKBP51, although the latter was part of unliganded PR heterocomplex associated with hsp90. These results suggest that Rap and KN62 act upon the PR by distinct mechanisms, with only Rap impeding progestin-induced PR transformation. FKBP51 appeared to dissociate from the receptor heterocomplex, but not from hsp90, after hormone binding to PR in vitro and in vivo, whether in the presence or not of Rap and KN62. Immunoprecipitation experiments distinguished two PR- and glucocorticosteroid (GR)-associated molecular chaperone complexes, containing hsp90 and hsp70 and FKBP52 or FKBP51. Another complex identified in T47D cytosol contained hsp90 and the cyclosporin A-binding cyclophilin of 40 kDa, CYP40, but not hsp70, PR, or GR. These observations support the concept that FKBP51 and FKBP52 can act as regulators of Rap and FK506 activity upon PR and GR-mediated transcription, a mechanism that could be also regulated by type II and/or type IV CaMKs.

  14. Deoxyribozyme-based, semisynthetic access to stable peptidyl-tRNAs exemplified by tRNAVal carrying a macrolide antibiotic resistance peptide.

    PubMed

    Graber, Dagmar; Trappl, Krista; Steger, Jessica; Geiermann, Anna-Skrollan; Rigger, Lukas; Moroder, Holger; Polacek, Norbert; Micura, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    We present a protocol for the reliable synthesis of non-hydrolyzable 3'-peptidyl-tRNAs that contain all the respective genuine nucleoside modifications. The approach is exemplified by tRNA(Val)-3'-NH-VFLVM-NH(2) and relies on commercially available Escherichia coli tRNA(Val). This tRNA was cleaved site-specifically within the TΨC loop using a 10-23 type DNA enzyme to obtain a 58 nt tRNA 5'-fragment which contained the modifications. After cleavage of the 2',3'-cyclophosphate moiety from the 5'-fragment, it was ligated to the 18 nt RNA-pentapeptide conjugate which had been chemically synthesized. By this methodology, tRNA(Val)-3'-NH-VFLVM-NH(2) is accessible in efficient manner. Furthermore, we point out that the approach is applicable to other types of tRNA.

  15. Molecular typing of Treponema pallidum isolates from Buenos Aires, Argentina: Frequent Nichols-like isolates and low levels of macrolide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gallo Vaulet, Lucía; Grillová, Linda; Mikalová, Lenka; Casco, Ricardo; Rodríguez Fermepin, Marcelo; Pando, María A.; Šmajs, David

    2017-01-01

    A total of 54 clinical samples, including genital lesion swabs, whole blood and cerebrospinal fluid from patients diagnosed with syphilis were collected in 2006 and in 2013 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Treponemal DNA was detected in 43 of the analyzed samples (79.6%) and further analyzed using Sequencing-based molecular typing (SBMT) and Enhanced CDC-typing (ECDCT). By SBMT, 10 different Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA) genotypes were found, of which six were related to the TPA SS14 strain, and four to the TPA Nichols strain. The 23S rRNA gene was amplified in samples isolated from 42 patients, and in six of them (14.3%), either the A2058G (four patients, 9.5%) or the A2059G (two patients, 4.8%) mutations were found. In addition to Taiwan, Madagascar and Peru, Argentina is another country where the prevalence of Nichols-like isolates (26.8%) is greater than 10%. PMID:28235102

  16. Modular synthesis of polyene side chain analogues of the potent macrolide antibiotic etnangien by a flexible coupling strategy based on hetero-bis-metallated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Altendorfer, Mario; Raja, Aruna; Sasse, Florenz; Irschik, Herbert; Menche, Dirk

    2013-04-07

    An efficient procedure for the concise synthesis of hetero-bis-metallated alkenes as useful building blocks for the modular access to highly elaborate polyenes and stabilized analogues is reported. By applying these bifunctional olefins in convergent Stille/Suzuki-Miyaura couplings, novel, carefully selected side chain analogues of the potent RNA polymerase inhibitor etnangien were synthesized by a modular late stage coupling strategy and evaluated for antibacterial and antiproliferative activities.

  17. Synergistic activities of macrolide antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saiman, Lisa; Chen, Yunhua; Gabriel, Pablo San; Knirsch, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Azithromycin and clarithromycin were paired with other antibiotics to test synergistic activity against 300 multidrug-resistant pathogens isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Clarithromycin-tobramycin was most active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and inhibited 58% of strains. Azithromycin-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, azithromycin-ceftazidime, and azithromycin-doxycycline or azithromycin-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole inhibited 40, 20, and 22% of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia complex, and Achromobacter (Alcaligenes) xylosoxidans strains, respectively.

  18. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on growth and macrolide antibiotic resistance of indicator and anaerobic swine manure bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural plant compounds, such as the chlorophyll a catabolites pheophorbide a (php) and pyropheophorbide a (pyp), are potentially active in the gastrointestinal tracts and wastes of livestock as antimicrobial resistance-modifying agents through inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps. To investigate w...

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance of Invasive Pneumococci in Finland in 1999-2000

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajamäki, Marja; Jalava, Jari; Huovinen, Pentti; Kotilainen, Pirkko

    2003-01-01

    The resistance patterns and macrolide resistance mechanisms of 910 Finnish invasive pneumococci isolated during 1999 and 2000 were studied. Macrolide resistance was detected in 6.9% of isolates. Penicillin resistance was detected in 1.5% of isolates, and penicillin intermediate resistance was detected in 4.0% of isolates. Active macrolide efflux, mediated by the mef(A) gene, was the most common macrolide resistance mechanism. Four macrolide-resistant isolates had mutations in rRNA or ribosomal protein L22. PMID:12760855

  20. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis to Two Ketolides (HMR 3004 and HMR 3647), Four Macrolides (Azithromycin, Clarithromycin, Erythromycin A, and Roxithromycin), and Two Ansamycins (Rifampin and Rifapentine)

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Jörg E.; Bryskier, André

    1998-01-01

    When tested by agar dilution on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% horse blood, the ketolides HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 were slightly more active (MIC at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited [MIC90], 0.03 μg/ml) against Bordetella pertussis than azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin A, and roxithromycin. Azithromycin (MIC90, 0.06 μg/ml) was the most active compound against B. parapertussis. Rifampin and rifapentine were considerably less active. PMID:9559823

  1. Two Molecules of Lobophorolide Cooperate to Stabilize an Actin Dimer Using Both Their 'Ring' and 'Tail' Region

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, J.; Mok, Y; Kubanek, J; Allingham, J

    2010-01-01

    Actin filament-disrupting marine macrolides are promising templates from which to design therapeutics against cancer and other diseases that co-opt the actin cytoskeleton. Typically, these macrolides form either a 1:1 or 2:1 actin-macrolide complex where their aliphatic side chain, or 'tail', has been reported to convey the major determinant of cytotoxicity. We now report the structure of the marine macrolide lobophorolide bound to actin with a unique 2:2 stoichiometry in which two lobophorolide molecules cooperate to form a dimerization interface that is composed entirely of the macrolide 'ring' region, and each molecule of lobophorolide interacts with both actin subunits via their ring and tail regions to tether the subunits together. This binding mode imposes multiple barriers against microfilament stability and holds important implications for development of actin-targeting drugs and the evolution of macrolide biosynthetic enzymes.

  2. Inhibition of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction by the mycarose moiety of the antibiotics carbomycin, spiramycin and tylosin.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, S M; Kofoed, C; Vester, B

    2000-12-01

    Many antibiotics, including the macrolides, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to ribosomes. Only some of the macrolides affect the peptidyl transferase reaction. The 16-member ring macrolide antibiotics carbomycin, spiramycin, and tylosin inhibit peptidyl transferase. All these have a disaccharide at position 5 in the lactone ring with a mycarose moiety. We have investigated the functional role of this mycarose moiety. The 14-member ring macrolide erythromycin and the 16-member ring macrolides desmycosin and chalcomycin do not inhibit the peptidyl transferase reaction. These drugs have a monosaccharide at position 5 in the lactone ring. The presence of mycarose was correlated with inhibition of peptidyl transferase, footprints on 23 S rRNA and whether the macrolide can compete with binding of hygromycin A to the ribosome. The binding sites of the macrolides to Escherichia coli ribosomes were investigated by chemical probing of domains II and V of 23 S rRNA. The common binding site is around position A2058, while effects on U2506 depend on the presence of the mycarose sugar. Also, protection at position A752 indicates that a mycinose moiety at position 14 in 16-member ring macrolides interact with hairpin 35 in domain II. Competitive footprinting of ribosomal binding of hygromycin A and macrolides showed that tylosin and spiramycin reduce the hygromycin A protections of nucleotides in 23 S rRNA and that carbomycin abolishes its binding. In contrast, the macrolides that do not inhibit the peptidyl transferase reaction bind to the ribosomes concurrently with hygromycin A. Data are presented to argue that a disaccharide at position 5 in the lactone ring of macrolides is essential for inhibition of peptide bond formation and that the mycarose moiety is placed near the conserved U2506 in the central loop region of domain V 23 S rRNA.

  3. 75 FR 1798 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of V-ATPase Inhibitor Compounds for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ..., Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is notice, in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(c.... Provisional Patent Application No. 60/220,270 filed July 24, 2000 entitled ``Biologically Active Macrolides... entitled ``Biologically Active Macrolides, Compositions, and Uses Thereof'' ; US Patent No....

  4. [A comparative evaluation of modern antibacterial preparations in the treatment of a severe degree of periodontitis at a stage of exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, L A; Tsarev, V N; Romanov, A E; Filatova, N A; Chernyshova, S B; Sechko, O N

    1998-01-01

    Sensitivities of peptostreptococci, streptococci, Actinomyces, bacteroid, and fusobacterial strains pathogenic for the periodontium to wide-spectrum penicillines, cephalosporines, lincomycin, macrolides, metronidasole, and nitasole are compared. New macrolide antibiotics rulide. Macropene, gramicidin C, levomycetin, and rifampicin are highly effective. Some narrow-spectrum drugs, e.g. augmentin, cephalexin, and vancomycin (towards actinomycetes) were highly effective, too.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Erythromycin- and Oxytetracycline-Sensitive Nocardia seriolae Strain U-1 (NBRC 110359)

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Masaki; Shimizu, Masato; Yamane, Jin; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Oshima, Syun-ichirou

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the emergence of macrolide- and oxytetracycline-resistant strains of Nocardia seriolae has previously been reported. Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of N. seriolae strain U-1, isolated in 2011 from a diseased yellowtail in Kagoshima Prefecture. The draft genome does not have any genes responsible for macrolide and tetracycline resistance. PMID:26798107

  6. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  7. Differing effects of clarithromycin and azithromycin on cytokine production by murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, K; Shirai, R; Mukae, H; Ishimoto, H; Nagata, T; Sakamoto, N; Ishii, H; Nakayama, S; Yanagihara, K; Mizuta, Y; Kohno, S

    2007-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotics are now well known to have anti-inflammatory effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate immune responses, we examined the in vitro effects of clarithromycin (CAM), azithromycin (AZM) and midecamycin (MDM) on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and production of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12p40, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] of murine bone marrow-derived DCs by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. A 15-membered macrolide, AZM, and a 14-membered macrolide, CAM, significantly enhanced the intensity of a co-stimulatory molecule, CD80, on DCs but not CD86 and CD40. AZM significantly increased the production of IL-10 and CAM significantly inhibited the production of IL-6 by DCs. However, a 16-membered macrolide, MDM, did not have any significant effect on these surface markers and cytokine productions. Moreover, AZM increased IL-10 and CAM decreased IL-2 productions significantly, when naive T cells derived from spleen were co-cultured with DCs treated in advance with LPS and these macrolides. These findings suggest that 14-membered and 15-membered, but not 16-membered macrolides play as anti-inflammatory agents, at least in part, through modulating the functions of DCs. However, each macrolide affects them in different ways. PMID:17302905

  8. Pharmaceuticals in Surface Waters and Potential Transfer to Irrigated Food Crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of selected pharmaceuticals (macrolidic antibiotics and pseudoephedrine) and illicit drugs (methamphetamine, Ecstasy) in surface wat...

  9. PHARMACEUTICALS IN WASTE STREAMS AND SURFACE WATERS OF THE COLORADO RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pharmaceuticals have been detected in surface waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of selected pharmaceuticals (macrolidic antibiotics and pseudoephedrine) and illicit drugs (methamphetamine and Ecstasy) in surface ...

  10. A convergent synthesis of the C1-C16 segment of goniodomin A via palladium-catalyzed organostannane-thioester coupling.

    PubMed

    Fuwa, Haruhiko; Nakajima, Motohiro; Shi, Jinglu; Takeda, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Makoto

    2011-03-04

    A convergent synthesis of the C1-C16 segment of goniodomin A, an actin-targeting marine polyether macrolide natural product, has been achieved via a 2-fold application of palladium-catalyzed organostannane-thioester coupling.

  11. Fidaxomicin

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile; a type of bacteria that my cause severe or life-threatening diarrhea.) ... medications called macrolide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria in the intestines.Fidaxomicin will not treat infections ...

  12. Multi-class determination and confirmation of antibiotic residues in honey using LC-MS/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-class method was developed for the determination and confirmation in honey of tetracyclines (chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, and sarafloxacin), macrolides (tylosin), lincosamides (lin...

  13. Clinical ergotism with lingual ischemia induced by clarithromycin-ergotamine interaction.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, R S; Dart, R C; Gomez, H F

    1996-02-26

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including erythromycin and troleandomycin, is associated with clinically significant adverse drug interactions. This results from macrolide inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism of numerous xenobiotics, resulting in elevated serum drug levels and clinical intoxication. Animal studies, however, suggest that clarithromycin, the newest approved macrolide antibiotic, has has less potential for adverse drug reactions. We describe a patient who, on her fifth day of clarithromycin therapy, developed clinical ergotism (i.e., hypertension, lingual ischemia, and peripheral cyanosis) several hours after administration of her usual 2-mg dose of ergotamine tartrate. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical ergotism precipitated by clarithromycin-ergotamine interaction and suggests that, like other macrolide antibiotics, ergot preparations should be avoided in patients who are taking clarithromycin.

  14. Fate of antibiotics during wastewater treatment and antibiotic distribution in the effluent-receiving waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmin; Liu, Pengxiao; Feng, Yujie; Yang, Fenglin

    2013-08-15

    Antibiotics including three β-lactams, two fluoroquinolones and two macrolides, which were the top seven most prescribed antibiotics in Dalian, China, were selected to investigate their occurrence in six municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and their distribution in the effluent-receiving waters of the Yellow Sea. Four WWTPs employing different treatment technologies were selected to explore the mechanism of antibiotics elimination during wastewater treatment. Results showed that fluoroquinolones and macrolides were dominant species in both WWTPs effluents and the surveyed coastal waters. Biodegradation was the main pathway for β-lactams removal, however, primary treatment performed better than biological treatment for fluoroquinolones removal. Concentrations of macrolides increased dramatically after the biological treatment, which was probably due to the release of macrolides enclosed in feces particles. In the surveyed coastal waters, reduction of antibiotic concentration with distance was observed. Potential environmental risk caused by the occurrence of these antibiotics should be evaluated in future work.

  15. Total Synthesis of (−)-4,8,10-Tridesmethyl Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Velvadapu, Venkata; Paul, Tapas; Wagh, Bharat; Glassford, Ian; DeBrosse, Charles; Andrade, Rodrigo B.

    2011-01-01

    Novel sources of antibiotics are required to address the serious problem of antibiotic resistance. Telithromycin (2) is a third-generation macrolide antibiotic prepared from erythromycin (1) and used clinically since 2004. Herein we report the details of our efforts that ultimately led to the total synthesis of (−)-4,8,10-tridesmethyl telithromycin (3) wherein methyl groups have been replaced with hydrogens. The synthesis of desmethyl macrolides has emerged as a novel strategy for preparing bioactive antibiotics. PMID:21815685

  16. The use of erythromycin as a gastrointestinal prokinetic agent in adult critical care: benefits versus risks.

    PubMed

    Hawkyard, Catherine V; Koerner, Roland J

    2007-03-01

    Erythromycin A, the first macrolide, was introduced in the 1950s and after years of clinical experience it still remains a commonly relied upon antibiotic. In the past, pharmacodynamic characteristics of macrolides beyond antimicrobial action such as anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties have been of scientific and clinical interest. The function of erythromycin as a prokinetic agent has also been investigated for a range of gastrointestinal motility disorders and more recently within the context of critically ill patients. Prokinetic agents are drugs that increase contractile force and accelerate intraluminal transit. Whilst the anti-inflammatory action may be a desirable side effect to its antibiotic action, using erythromycin A merely for its prokinetic effect alone raises the concern about promoting emergence of macrolide resistance. The objectives of this review article are: (i) to briefly summarize the modes and epidemiology of macrolide resistance, particularly in respect to that found in the Streptococcus species (a potential reservoir for the dissemination of macrolide resistance on the critical care unit); (ii) to discuss in this context the evidence for conditions promoting bacterial resistance against macrolides; and (iii) to assess the potential clinical benefit of using erythromycin A as a prokinetic versus the risks of promoting emergence of macrolide resistance in the clinical setting. We conclude, that in view of the growing weight of evidence demonstrating the potential epidemiological impact of the increased use of macrolides upon the spread of resistance, versus a lack of sufficient and convincing evidence that erythromycin A is a superior prokinetic agent to potential alternatives in the critically ill patient population, at this stage we do not advocate the use of erythromycin A as a prokinetic agent in critically ill patients unless they have failed all other treatment for impaired gastrointestinal dysmotility and are intolerant

  17. Comparative erythromycin and tylosin susceptibility testing of streptococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Entorf, Monika; Feßler, Andrea T; Kaspar, Heike; Kadlec, Kristina; Peters, Thomas; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    Tylosin, a 16-membered macrolide, is - besides other indications - used for the treatment of bovine mastitis. So far, there is only limited information available on the tylosin susceptibility of streptococci isolated from mastitis. The aim of the present study was to comparatively investigate 303 streptococci from bovine mastitis, including 101 Streptococcus agalactiae, 100 Streptococcus dysgalactiae and 102 Streptococcus uberis, for their tylosin and erythromycin susceptibility by broth microdilution and agar disk diffusion. Both tests followed the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). For erythromycin, the results were interpreted using the CLSI-approved clinical breakpoints. Moreover, erythromycin-resistant isolates were tested for the presence of macrolide resistance genes and for inducible macrolide resistance. In general, both testing methods showed a good correlation for the three streptococcal species, although for the erythromycin susceptibility testing 11 S. uberis isolates fell into the very major error category. All but one of the erythromycin-resistant isolates harbored at least one macrolide resistance gene, with the erm(B) gene being most common. Moreover, single isolates of S. agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae proved to be inducibly macrolide-resistant. Since inducible macrolide resistance can easily switch to constitutive resistance, tylosin should not be used for the treatment of infections caused by inducibly resistant streptococci.

  18. An association of particulate air pollution and traffic exposure with mortality after lung transplantation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ruttens, David; Verleden, Stijn E; Bijnens, Esmée M; Winckelmans, Ellen; Gottlieb, Jens; Warnecke, Gregor; Meloni, Federica; Morosini, Monica; Van Der Bij, Wim; Verschuuren, Erik A; Sommerwerck, Urte; Weinreich, Gerhard; Kamler, Markus; Roman, Antonio; Gomez-Olles, Susana; Berastegui, Cristina; Benden, Christian; Holm, Are Martin; Iversen, Martin; Schultz, Hans Henrik; Luijk, Bart; Oudijk, Erik-Jan; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M; Jaksch, Peter; Klepetko, Walter; Kneidinger, Nikolaus; Neurohr, Claus; Corris, Paul; Fisher, Andrew J; Lordan, James; Meachery, Gerard; Piloni, Davide; Vandermeulen, Elly; Bellon, Hannelore; Hoffmann, Barbara; Vienneau, Danielle; Hoek, Gerard; de Hoogh, Kees; Nemery, Benoit; Verleden, Geert M; Vos, Robin; Nawrot, Tim S; Vanaudenaerde, Bart M

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution from road traffic is a serious health risk, especially for susceptible individuals. Single-centre studies showed an association with chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) and survival after lung transplantation, but there are no large studies.13 lung transplant centres in 10 European countries created a cohort of 5707 patients. For each patient, we quantified residential particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm (PM10) by land use regression models, and the traffic exposure by quantifying total road length within buffer zones around the home addresses of patients and distance to a major road or freeway.After correction for macrolide use, we found associations between air pollution variables and CLAD/mortality. Given the important interaction with macrolides, we stratified according to macrolide use. No associations were observed in 2151 patients taking macrolides. However, in 3556 patients not taking macrolides, mortality was associated with PM10 (hazard ratio 1.081, 95% CI 1.000-1.167); similarly, CLAD and mortality were associated with road lengths in buffers of 200-1000 and 100-500 m, respectively (hazard ratio 1.085- 1.130). Sensitivity analyses for various possible confounders confirmed the robustness of these associations.Long-term residential air pollution and traffic exposure were associated with CLAD and survival after lung transplantation, but only in patients not taking macrolides.

  19. Gram-positive resistance: challenge for the development of new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F

    1997-05-01

    The incidence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive organisms is increasing despite advances in antibacterial therapy over the last 20 years. As the pathogens causing these infections are frequently resistant to most currently available antibacterials, they are extremely difficult to treat. Problematic pathogens include strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to beta-lactams and macrolides, viridans group streptococci resistant to beta-lactams and aminoglycosides, enterococci resistant to vancomycin and teicoplanin and highly resistant to penicillins and aminoglycosides, and Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin, other beta-lactams, macrolides, lincosamides and aminoglycosides. Other important pathogens include Streptococcus pyogenes resistant to macrolides (and suspected to be resistant to penicillin), macrolide-resistant streptococci of groups B, C, and G, coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, lincosamides and glycopeptides, multiresistant strains of Listeria and Corynebacterium and Gram-positive anaerobes, such as Peptostreptococcus and Clostridium, resistant to penicillins and macrolides. Thus, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial agents that are able to overcome multidrug-resistant mechanisms. The novel semisynthetic injectable streptogramin quinupristin/dalfopristin offers the prospect of effective treatment against many of the above pathogens.

  20. Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaoli; Sun, Hongmei; Liu, Fei; Feng, Yanling; Zhao, Hanqing; Xue, Guanhua; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cases of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae have increased rapidly since 2000, especially in Asia. Patients infected with macrolide-resistant M pneumoniae usually present with severe M pneumoniae pneumonia. The aim of this study was to identify indicators for whether children at an early stage of M pneumoniae infection develop mild or severe pneumonia. Case Summary: Herein, we retrospectively reviewed 2 pediatric cases caused by macrolide-resistant M pneumoniae, but with markedly different severity of pneumonia. First, we compared the clinical courses of the patients, then isolated the pathogens and tested their response to macrolides, then finally, carried out whole genome sequencing of these isolates. Despite the difference in clinical presentation of the infection, both isolates exhibited a high level of resistance to macrolide antibiotics. Analysis of clinical data showed that the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in blood samples of the patients in the early stages of disease varied greatly. Genome sequence analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms mainly focused on adhesin P1, which is involved in the pathogenicity of M pneumoniae. Conclusion: The differences of erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the early stage of M pneumoniae pneumonia and mutations in P1 protein may help us to distinguish between severe or mild disease after infection with macrolide-resistant M pneumoniae. These findings could lead to the development of screening assays that will allow us to distinguish severe or mild M pneumoniae pneumonia early. PMID:27661056

  1. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins’ progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds—macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides. PMID:27598215

  2. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis.

  3. Azithromycin anaphylaxis in children.

    PubMed

    Mori, F; Pecorari, L; Pantano, S; Rossi, M E; Pucci, N; De Martino, M; Novembre, E

    2014-01-01

    Allergic reactions associated to the use of macrolides are uncommon; in particular only two cases of anaphylaxis with erithromycin and clarithromycin have been reported to date. The aim of this study was to investigate macrolide-induced anaphylaxis. Between December 2007 and December 2011, 136 consecutive children were referred to the Allergy Unit of A. Meyer Children's Hospital because of a past history of reactions to macrolides. Allergy work-ups were carried out according to the European Network for Drug Allergy protocol. Anaphylaxis was diagnosed according to the clinical criteria proposed by Sampson et al. and graded according to Brown SGA et al. Sixty-six out of 136 patients completed the allergologic work-up and among them we investigated three cases of anaphylaxis due to azithromycin which included one child with anaphylaxis to both clarithromycin and azithromycin. In two of the children with anaphylaxis, the diagnosis was only confirmed with the skin prick test, the third was positive to the Intradermal Test. The azithromycin allergy shows a surprisingly high sensitivity to the in-vivo tests. Moreover, this study shows that cross-reactivity may occur between different macrolidic molecules; it has even been suggested that macrolide allergies are unlikely to be class allergies.

  4. Antibiotics as immunomodulant agents in COPD.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Mantero, Marco; Aliberti, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that some antibiotics have activities beyond their direct antibacterial effects. Macrolide is the antibiotic class with more convincing studies and evidence on its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. Different clinical studies have shown that macrolide prophylaxis in patients with moderate-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can have a significant impact on the exacerbation rate reducing morbidity and, potentially, mortality of the disease. Other antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, demonstrate a variety of immunomodulatory effects but only few clinical data are available in COPD. New macrolide derivatives devoid of antibacterial activity have been synthetized. This review analyses the relevance of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of antibiotics in the management of COPD.

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of gallium maltolate against virulent Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Michelle; Kuskie, Kyle; Liu, Mei; Chaffin, Keith; Libal, Melissa; Giguère, Steeve; Bernstein, Lawrence; Cohen, Noah

    2010-11-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of gallium maltolate (GaM) against Rhodococcus equi. A total of 98 virulent bacterial isolates from equine clinical cases were examined, of which 19 isolates were known to be resistant to macrolides and rifampin. Isolates were cultured with various concentrations of GaM and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined after 24 and 48 h. Both the MIC(50) and the MIC(90) after 24h of growth were 558 ng/mL (8 μM) and after 48 h of growth were 2230 ng/mL (32 μM). There were no apparent differences between MICs of macrolide-resistant and macrolide-susceptible isolates.

  6. The basophil activation test: a sensitive test in the diagnosis of allergic immediate hypersensitivity to pristinamycin.

    PubMed

    Viel, Sébastien; Garnier, Lorna; Joly, Elodie; Rouzaire, Paul; Nosbaum, Audrey; Pralong, Pauline; Faudel, Amélie; Rioufol, Catherine; Bienvenu, Françoise; Bienvenu, Jacques; Berard, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity (IHS) reactions to macrolides and to macrolide-derived antibiotics like pristinamycin are uncommon. In this context, there is little data available to appreciate the true value of biological tools regarding the diagnosis of immediate allergy to pristinamycin. Here we assess the clinical usefulness of the basophil activation test (BAT) to differentiate allergic from nonallergic IHS to pristinamycin. Thirty-six patients were tested with skin tests as the gold standard and BAT. The BAT achieved a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 100%, implying an absence of false positive results. Multicenter studies remain to be performed to better define the sensitivity, specificity and interlaboratory variation of BAT in the diagnosis of allergy to pristinamycin and macrolides.

  7. The activity of grepafloxacin against respiratory pathogens in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wise, R; Andrews, J M

    1997-12-01

    The in-vitro activity of grepafloxacin was compared with that of other antimicrobials against respiratory tract pathogens collected from 15 UK laboratories over the winter of 1995-96. Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae was not encountered, but macrolide resistance was seen in approximately 10% of strains. Grepafloxacin (MIC90 0.25 mg/L) was four- to eight-fold more active than ciprofloxacin. Twelve percent of Haemophilus influenzae were beta-lactamase producers, macrolides were relatively inactive yet fluoroquinolones were highly active. Moraxella catarrhalis were highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones and macrolides. The activity of grepafloxacin against respiratory tract pathogens should make it a useful agent in the treatment of infections at this site.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolated from Children with Diarrhea in Thailand and Japan.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngan Thi Kim; Thongprachum, Aksara; Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Nishimura, Shuichi; Shimizu-Onda, Yuko; Trinh, Quang Duy; Khamrin, Pattara; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Kongsricharoern, Tipachan; Komine-Aizawa, Shihoko; Okitsu, Shoko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A total of 29 Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli strains were isolated from Thai and Japanese children with diarrhea using the Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification method. The samples were evaluated for mutations in gyrA and 23S rRNA in order to assess resistance against fluoroquinolones and macrolides, respectively. Among the isolated strains, 9 (8 C. jejuni and 1 C. coli) were from Thai children, and the other 20 (C. jejuni) were isolated from Japanese children. High fluoroquinolone resistance rates were observed in Thai (66.7%) and Japanese (90%) children. Macrolide resistance was not observed in Japanese children but was observed at a considerable rate of 12.5% of C. jejuni isolated in the Thai cohort. The results indicate that continuous monitoring of resistance of Campylobacter strains to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is definitely necessary.

  9. Antipneumococcal Activity of ABT-773 Compared to Those of 10 Other Agents

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Todd A.; Ednie, Lois M.; Hoellman, Dianne M.; Pankuch, Glenn A.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    MICs, time-kills, and postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of ABT-773 (a new ketolide) and 10 other agents were determined against 226 pneumococci. Against 78 ermB- and 44 mefE-containing strains, ABT-773 MICs at which 50% of the isolates tested were inhibited (MIC50s) and MIC90s were 0.016 to 0.03 and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively. Clindamycin was active only against macrolide-resistant strains containing mefE (MIC50, 0.06 μg/ml; MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml). Activities of pristinamycin (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) and vancomycin (MIC90, 0.25 μg/ml) were unaffected by macrolide or penicillin resistance, while β-lactam MICs rose with those of penicillin G. Against 19 strains with L4 ribosomal protein mutations and two strains with mutations in domain V of 23S rRNA, ABT-773 MICs were 0.03 to 0.25 μg/ml, while macrolide and azalide MICs were all ≥16.0 μg/ml. ABT-773 was bactericidal at twice the MIC after 24 h for 8 of 12 strains (including three strains with erythromycin MICs greater than or equal to 64.0 μg/ml). Kill kinetics of erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and roxithromycin against macrolide-susceptible strains were slower than those of ABT-773. ABT-773 had longer PAEs than macrolides, azithromycin, clindamycin, or β-lactams, including against ermB-containing strains. ABT-773, therefore, shows promising in vitro activity against macrolide-susceptible as well as -resistant pneumococci. PMID:10858350

  10. Associations between antimicrobial exposure and resistance in fecal Campylobacter spp. from grow-finish pigs on-farm in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Leigh B; Waldner, Cheryl L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Valdivieso-Garcia, Alfonso

    2009-03-01

    Campylobacter spp. (n = 405), isolated from the feces of apparently healthy grow-finish pigs in 20 herds, were tested for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials representing seven classes. Twelve percent of the isolates were susceptible to all drugs, while 64% were resistant to two or more antimicrobial classes. Resistance was most common to clindamycin, azithromycin, and erythromycin (71% each), and 10% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. An antimicrobial use risk-factor analysis and a variance analysis explored the connection between antimicrobial resistance and the herd. The antimicrobial exposure of each production phase of each herd, through feed and water, was evaluated as a potential risk factor for resistance to macrolides and quinolones. Every 100,000 pig days of macrolide exposure in nursery pigs increased the odds of resistance to macrolides by a factor of 1.3. In contrast, the odds of resistance to a quinolone were nine times higher in Campylobacter from herds without beta-lactam exposure in grow-finish pigs compared with those with exposure. The variance analysis identified remarkably high clustering between isolates within herds; the intraclass correlations for resistances ranged from 0.52 to 0.82. Such extreme clustering demonstrates the potential for herd-level interventions to influence antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter. The three key findings of this study, i.e., the prevalent resistance to macrolides, the association between macrolide exposure and Campylobacter resistance to macrolides, and the high clustering of resistance within herds, illustrate the need for continued study of antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter on pig farms and the importance of judicious antimicrobial use in pork production.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from vaccinated and non-vaccinated patients with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Lismond, Ann; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Verhaegen, Jan; Schatt, Patricia; De Bel, Annelies; Jordens, Paul; Jacobs, Frédérique; Dediste, Anne; Verschuren, Frank; Huang, Te-Din; Tulkens, Paul M; Glupczynski, Youri; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the in vitro susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from patients with confirmed community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) to β-lactams, macrolides and fluoroquinolones and the association of non-susceptibility and resistance with serotypes/serogroups (STs/SGs), patient's risk factors and vaccination status. Samples (blood or lower respiratory tract) were obtained in 2007-2009 from 249 patients (from seven hospitals in Belgium) with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of CAP [median age 61 years (11.6% aged <5 years); 85% without previous antibiotic therapy; 86% adults with level II Niederman's severity score]. MIC determination (EUCAST breakpoints) showed for: (i) amoxicillin, 6% non-susceptible; cefuroxime (oral), 6.8% resistant; (ii) macrolides: 24.9% erythromycin-resistant [93.5% erm(B)-positive] but 98.4% telithromycin-susceptible; and (iii) levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, all susceptible. Amongst SGs: ST14, all resistant to macrolides and most intermediate to β-lactams; SG19 (>94% ST19A), 73.5% resistant to macrolides and 18-21% intermediate to β-lactams; and SG6, 33% resistant to clarithromycin. Apparent vaccine failures: 3/17 for 7-valent vaccine (children; ST6B, 23F); 16/29 for 23-valent vaccine (adults ST3, 7F, 12F, 14, 19A, 22F, 23F, 33F). Isolates from nursing home residents, hospitalised patients and patients with non-respiratory co-morbidities showed increased MICs for amoxicillin, all β-lactams, and β-lactams and macrolides, respectively. Regarding antibiotic susceptibilities: (i) amoxicillin is still useful for empirical therapy but with a high daily dose; (ii) cefuroxime axetil and macrolides (but not telithromycin) are inappropriate for empirical therapy; and (iii) moxifloxacin and levofloxacin are the next 'best empirical choice' (no resistant isolates) but levofloxacin will require 500 mg twice-daily dosing for effective coverage.

  12. Comparative In Vitro Activities of Linezolid, Quinupristin-Dalfopristin, Moxifloxacin, and Trovafloxacin against Erythromycin-Susceptible and -Resistant Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Betriu, Carmen; Redondo, Montserrat; Palau, M. Luisa; Sánchez, Ana; Gómez, María; Culebras, Esther; Boloix, Ana; Picazo, Juan J.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro activities of the new agents linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, moxifloxacin, and trovafloxacin were determined and compared with those of penicillin, clindamycin, and four macrolides against 53 erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, 117 S. pyogenes (64 erythromycin-susceptible and 53 -resistant), and 101 S. agalactiae (53 erythromycin-susceptible and 48 -resistant) isolates. Differentiation of macrolide resistance phenotypes was performed by the double-disk method. The genetic basis for macrolide resistance in 52 strains was also determined. The M phenotype was found in 84.9, 6.3, and 1.9% of S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, and S. pneumoniae isolates, respectively. These strains were susceptible to miocamycin and clindamycin. Strains with the inducible phenotype accounted for 27.1% of S. agalactiae isolates and 9.4% each of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae isolates. All erythromycin-resistant isolates were also resistant to the 14- and 15-membered macrolides tested. Strains with all three phenotypes were susceptible to ≤2 μg of linezolid per ml. Quinupristin-dalfopristin exhibited good in vitro activity against all strains, irrespective of their resistance to erythromycin (MICs at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited [MIC90s], 0.2 to 1 μg/ml). Against the erythromycin-resistant S. pyogenes and S. agalactiae strains, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin were the most active agents (MIC90s, 0.1 μg/ml). The new antimicrobials evaluated may be alternative agents to treat infections caused by macrolide-resistant as well as macrolide-susceptible streptococci. PMID:10858339

  13. Antibacterial Neurymenolides from the Fijian Red Alga Neurymenia fraxinifolia

    PubMed Central

    Stout, E. Paige; Hasemeyer, Adam P.; Lane, Amy L.; Davenport, Theresa M.; Engel, Sebastian; Hay, Mark E.; Fairchild, Craig R.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Le Roch, Karine; Aalbersberg, William

    2009-01-01

    Two novel α-pyrone macrolides, neurymenolides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the Fijian red alga Neurymenia fraxinifolia and characterized using a combination of NMR and mass spectral analyses. These molecules represent only the second example of α-pyrone macrolides, with 1 existing as interchanging atropisomers due to restricted rotation about the α-pyrone ring system. Neurymenolide A (1) displayed moderately potent activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF). PMID:19053716

  14. In Vitro Activity of Solithromycin against Bordetella pertussis, an Emerging Respiratory Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Vicino, David; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of pertussis cases reported since the introduction of the acellular pertussis vaccine. While children that present with pertussis have a characteristic whooping cough, adults can simply have a persistent, nonspecific cough and remain undiagnosed. Macrolide antibiotics, such as azithromycin, are the currently recommended treatment for pertussis. Solithromycin is a new macrolide and the first fluoroketolide with broad activity against a wide spectrum of bacterial pathogens and has completed clinical development for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. This study reports the potent in vitro activity of solithromycin against a collection of recent isolates of Bordetella pertussis. PMID:27620481

  15. [Serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing acute exacerbations and pneumonia in children with chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Altınkanat Gelmez, Gülşen; Soysal, Ahmet; Kuzdan, Canan; Karadağ, Bülent; Hasdemir, Ufuk; Bakır, Mustafa; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained from children with chronic respiratory diseases admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of acute exacerbations between 2008-2010 at Marmara University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Sixty one S.pneumoniae strains isolated from the respiratory samples of patients were studied for erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracyline, trimethoprim-sulphametoxazole (TMP-SMX), vancomycin, levofloxacin susceptibilities by disk diffusion method; MIC values of penicillin and ceftriaxone were determined by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Results were evaluated according to the CLSI standards. The erythromycin-clindamycin double disc method was applied for the detection of macrolide resistance phenotypes. The presence of macrolide resistance genes, ermB, mef(A)/(E), ermTR were determined by PCR using specific primers for each gene. The serotypes were determined by multiplex PCR using specific primers for 40 different serotypes. According to CLSI criteria, penicillin resistance in S.pneumoniae isolates were found to be 8.2% (5/61) and intermediate resistance rate was 54% (33/61) for oral penicillin. Penicillin resistance were found to be only 1.6% (1/61) for parenteral penicillin. Resistance rates of erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracyline, TMP-SMX were detected as 55.8%, 46%, 47.5% and 67.2%; respectively. No resistance was detected to vancomycin and levofloxacin. Constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (cMLSB) phenotype and M phenotype were observed in 82.4% (n= 28) and 17.6% (n= 6) of the macrolide resistant isolates, respectively. Inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (iMLSB) phenotype was not detected. The macrolid resistance genotypes, ermB, mef(A)/(E), were positive 50% and 14.7%; respectively. Both ermB and mef(A)/(E) genes were detected 35.3% of the macrolid resistant isolates. None of the isolates were positive for ermTR gene. The most

  16. A case of diffuse panbronchiolitis, associated with severe pulmonary hypertension, managed with bilateral lung transplantation from a brain-dead donor.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Yasutaka; Kawamura, Tetsuji; Morimoto, Akie; Nakahara, Yasuharu; Mochizuki, Yoshiro; Miyoshi, Kentaroh; Oto, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a chronic respiratory disease that mainly involves the respiratory bronchioles, and has historically been associated with a very poor prognosis. The development of long-term low dose macrolide therapy in the 1980s has dramatically improved the prognosis of DPB. Nevertheless, some cases are resistant to macrolide therapy, and ultimately develop severe respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension; in such cases lung transplantation is a viable treatment option. Here we report the case of a 40-year-old patient with a 20-year history of DPB, who underwent bilateral lung transplantation due to severe respiratory failure with pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  18. Development of an Analytical Method to Extract and Detect Pharmaceuticals in Plant Matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that human-use macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, clindamycin, and roxithromycin) are environmentally available in wastewaters, source waters, and biosolids. Since some water authorities use the treated wastewater effluent for non-potable water reuse such as f...

  19. Insights into the Mode of Action of Novel Fluoroketolides, Potent Inhibitors of Bacterial Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krokidis, Marios G.; Márquez, Viter; Wilson, Daniel N.; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L.

    2014-01-01

    Ketolides, the third generation of expanded-spectrum macrolides, have in the last years become a successful weapon in the endless war against macrolide-resistant pathogens. Ketolides are semisynthetic derivatives of the naturally produced macrolide erythromycin, displaying not only improved activity against some erythromycin-resistant strains but also increased bactericidal activity as well as inhibitory effects at lower drug concentrations. In this study, we present a series of novel ketolides carrying alkyl-aryl side chains at the C-6 position of the lactone ring and, additionally, one or two fluorine atoms attached either directly to the lactone ring at the C-2 position or indirectly via the C-13 position. According to our genetic and biochemical studies, these novel ketolides occupy the known macrolide binding site at the entrance of the ribosomal tunnel and exhibit lower MIC values against wild-type or mutant strains than erythromycin. In most cases, the ketolides display activities comparable to or better than the clinically used ketolide telithromycin. Chemical protection experiments using Escherichia coli ribosomes bearing U2609C or U754A mutations in 23S rRNA suggest that the alkyl-aryl side chain establishes an interaction with the U2609-A752 base pair, analogous to that observed with telithromycin but unlike the interactions formed by cethromycin. These findings reemphasize the versatility of the alkyl-aryl side chains with respect to species specificity, which will be important for future design of improved antimicrobial agents. PMID:24189263

  20. Mycoplasma genitalium in Toronto, Ont

    PubMed Central

    Gesink, Dionne; Racey, C. Sarai; Seah, Christine; Zittermann, Sandra; Mitterni, Leo; Juzkiw, Jerry; Jamieson, Heather; Greer, Jane; Singh, Sudesh; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Allen, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in Toronto, Ont; detect mutations associated with macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance; and describe treatment outcomes. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Setting A sexual health clinic in Toronto. Participants A consecutive sample of men and women attending the sexual health clinic between September 1, 2013, and December 20, 2013. Interventions Participants underwent testing for M genitalium, along with standard sexually transmitted infection screening. All samples that had positive results for M genitalium were tested for mutations associated with resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Mycoplasma genitalium treatment was based on resistance profile and verified with a test of cure. Main outcome measures Positive results for M genitalium and antibiotic resistance. Results A total of 1193 men and women participated in the study. Overall, 4.5% of the 884 men and 3.2% of the 309 women had positive test results for M genitalium. Asymptomatic infection was common (52.0%). Macrolide resistance–mediating mutations were found in 58.0% of the M genitalium infections. No treatment failure was observed for azithromycin-treated cases. Treatment failure was suspected for 16.7% of cases treated with moxifloxacin. Conclusion Mycoplasma genitalium is present in Canada, with a prevalence comparable to chlamydia and gonorrhea, and has high macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:27331225

  1. Calibration and controlled flume evaluation of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) for tylosin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, the occurrence and fate of emerging contaminants such as antibiotics in the environment have become a concern. One of these is tylosin, a macrolide antibiotic that is used extensively in the swine industry as a growth promoter. The monitoring of these emerging contaminants for asses...

  2. Impact of Infectious Diseases Society of America/Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society guidelines on treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Ross, Rachael K; Hersh, Adam L; Kronman, Matthew P; Newland, Jason G; Metjian, Talene A; Localio, A Russell; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    We examined the impact of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines that recommend ampicillin or amoxicillin for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Prescribing of ampicillin/amoxicillin increased following guideline publication, but remains low. Cephalosporin and macrolide prescribing decreased but remains common. Further studies exploring outcomes of and reasons for compliance with guidelines are warranted.

  3. Potential Use of Fosfomycin-Tromethamine for Treatment of Recurrent Campylobacter Species Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pardo, Dolors; Larrosa, María Nieves; Rodríguez-Garrido, Virginia; Sihuay-Diburga, Denisse; Almirante, Benito

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 cases of recurrent Campylobacter coli enteritis caused by macrolide- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains in 2 patients with hypogammaglobulinemia, successfully treated with a prolonged course of fosfomycin-tromethamine with no side effects. Fosfomycin-tromethamine may be a feasible alternative therapy for recurrent enteritis caused by Campylobacter species resistant to first-line drugs. PMID:27161640

  4. Topical azithromycin and clarithromycin inhibit acute and chronic skin inflammation in sensitized mice, with apparent selectivity for Th2-mediated processes in delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ivetić Tkalčević, Vanesa; Cužić, Snježana; Kramarić, Miroslava Dominis; Parnham, Michael J; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-02-01

    Macrolide antibiotics inhibit the secretion of Th1 cytokines while their effects on the release of Th2 cytokines are variable. We investigated molecular and cellular markers of Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory mechanisms and the anti-inflammatory activity of azithromycin and clarithromycin in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and oxazolone (OXA)-induced skin inflammation. Dexamethasone (50 μg/ear), azithromycin, and clarithromycin (500 μg/ear) reduced TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-1β concentration in ear tissue by inhibiting inflammatory cell accumulation in PMA-induced inflammation. In OXA-induced early delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), the macrolides (2 mg/ear) and dexamethasone (25 μg/ear) reduced ear tissue inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion of IL-4 while clarithromycin also decreased IFN-γ concentration. Macrolides showed better activity when administered after the challenge. In OXA-induced chronic DTH, azithromycin (1 mg/ear) reduced the number of ear tissue mast cells and decreased the concentration of IL-4 in ear tissue and of immunoglobulin (Ig)E in serum. Clarithromycin (1 mg/ear) reduced serum IgE concentration, possibly by a mechanism independent of IL-4, while both macrolides attenuated mast cell degranulation. In conclusion, azithromycin and clarithromycin attenuate pro-inflammatory cytokine production and leukocyte infiltration during innate immune reactions, while selectively affecting Th2 rather than Th1 immunity in DTH reactions.

  5. Total synthesis and related studies of large, strained, and bioactive natural products

    PubMed Central

    HIRAMA, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Our chemical syntheses and related scientific investigations of natural products with complex architectures and powerful biological activities are described, focusing on the very large 3 nm-long polycyclic ethers called the ciguatoxins, highly strained and labile chromoprotein antitumor antibiotics featuring nine-membered enediyne cores, and extremely potent anthelmintic macrolides called the avermectins. PMID:27725470

  6. Bordetella trematum bacteremia in an infant: a cause to look for.

    PubMed

    Saksena, R; Manchanda, V; Mittal, M

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella trematum spp. nov. has been isolated from wounds, ear infections and diabetic ulcers. We report a case of a 7-month-old infant with fever, vomiting and abnormal body movements with bacteremia caused by this novel species. The infant responded to fluoroquinolone and macrolide combination therapy.

  7. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on erythromycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a reduce erythromycin resistance of reference strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria with multidrug or macrolide efflux pumps, as indicative of their effect on bacteria indigenous to anaerobic swine ...

  8. Inference of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Among Diverse Group A Streptococcus Strains Using emm Sequencing and Multilocus Genotyping Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-04

    pneumonia . Less frequently, it can cause severe symptoms such as toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis, and sterile rheumatic sequelae [1]. Penicillin ... Pneumonia outbreak associated with group A Streptococcus at a military training facility. Clin Infect Dis 40: 511–518. 17. Lamagni TL, Neal S, Keshishian C...Macrolide resistance and erythromycin resistance determinants among Belgian Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. J Antimicrob

  9. Divergolide congeners illuminate alternative reaction channels for ansamycin diversification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Franke, Jakob; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-02-14

    Isolation and structure elucidation of six new divergolides reveal unusual ansamycin diversification reactions including formation of the unusual isobutenyl side chain from a branched polyketide synthase extender unit, azepinone ring closure, macrolide ring contraction and formation of a seco variant by a neighboring group-assisted decarboxylation.

  10. [Side effects of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R

    1975-03-01

    The clinically severe and newer forms of antibiotic side effects are reviewed. The study covers the following antibiotics: penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and polymyxins, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, macrolides and lincomycin, rifamycins and sulfonamides. Special reference is made to (1) hematologic side effects, and (2) general evaluation of drug reactions. The relationship between reaction time and clinical symptoms is of particular practical significance.

  11. Multiple Strategy Bio-Detection Sensor Platforms Made from Carbon and Polymer Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    regimens have been chosen for future studies: (1) Aminoglycosides, (2) Penicillins and Cephalosporins, (3) Macrolides , (4) Quinolones 10 and...different conditions were obtained with the developed analytical method. The results showed the releas