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Sample records for macromolecules dna rna

  1. The spectral properties of DNA and RNA macromolecules at low temperatures: fundamental and applied aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy M.; Kudrya, Vladislav Yu

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of studies of the spectral properties—optical absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence—of DNA and RNA macromolecules and synthetic poly-, oligo- and mono-nucleotides, which have been carried out in our laboratory. The system of first excited singlet and triplet energy levels for DNA and RNA is evaluated using low-temperature (4.2 K-77 K) luminescent measurements. The traps of the singlet and triplet electronic excitations in these compounds are identified. An important self-protection mechanism against photo-damage of DNA and RNA by UV photons or penetrative radiation based on the capture of triplet electronic-energy excitations by the most photostable centers—in DNA, the complex formed by neighboring adenosine (A) and thymidine (T) links; in RNA, the adenosine links—is described. It is confirmed that despite similarities in the chemical and partly energy structures DNA is more stable than RNA. The spectral manifestation of the telomeres (the important functional system) in DNA macromolecules is examined. The results obtained on telomere fragments provide the possibility of finding the configuration peculiarities of the triplet excitations traps in DNA macromolecules. The resulting spreading length of the migrating singlet (l s) and triplet (l t) excitations for DNA and RNA macromolecules are evaluated.

  2. Antibodies against RNA hydrolyze RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Krasnorutskii, Michael A; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2008-01-01

    Immunization of animals with DNA leads to the production of anti-DNA antibodies (Abs) demonstrating both DNase and RNase activities. It is currently not known whether anti-RNA Abs can possess nuclease activities. In an attempt to address this question, we have shown that immunization of three rabbits with complex of RNA with methylated BSA (mBSA) stimulates production of IgGs with RNase and DNase activities belonging to IgGs, while polyclonal Abs from three non-immunized rabbits and three animals immunized with mBSA are catalytically inactive. Affinity chromatography of IgGs from the sera of autoimmune (AI) patients on DNA-cellulose usually demonstrates a number of fractions, all of which effectively hydrolyze both DNA and RNA, while rabbit catalytic IgGs were separated into Ab subfractions, some of which demonstrated only DNase activity, while others hydrolyzed RNA faster than DNA. The enzymic properties of the RNase and DNase IgGs from rabbits immunized with RNA distinguish them from all known canonical RNases and DNases and DNA- and RNA-hydrolyzing abzymes (Abzs) from patients with different AI diseases. In contrast to RNases and AI RNA-hydrolyzing Abs, rabbit RNase IgGs catalyze only the first step of the hydrolysis reaction but cannot hydrolyze the formed terminal 2',3'-cyclophosphate. The data indicate that Abzs of AI patients hydrolyzing nucleic acids in part may be Abs against RNA and its complexes with proteins.

  3. Target Biological Structures: The Cell, Organelles, DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Holst, Marcelis; Grant, Maxine P.; Aldrich-Wright, Janice

    Living organisms are self replicating molecular factories of staggering complexity [1]. As a result, we are often overwhelmed when trying to identify potential targets for therapeutics. Water, inorganic ions and a large array of relatively small organic molecules (e.g., sugars, vitamins and fatty acids) account for approximately 80% of living matter, with water being the most abundant. Macromolecules such as proteins, polysaccharides, ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) constitute the rest. The majority of potential therapeutic targets are found within the cell. Small molecules which are vital for cellular function are imported into the cell by a variety of mechanisms but unlike smaller molecules, macromolecules are assembled within the cell itself. Drugs are usually designed to target cellular macromolecules, as they perform very specific roles in the metabolic processes.

  4. Linear and ring DNA macromolecules moderately and strongly confined in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Peter; Benkova, Zuzana; Bleha, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA extension in nanochannels is necessary for interpretation of experiments in nanofluidic channel devices that are conducted recently not only with linear but also with ring chains. Except reviewing the situation with linear chains we analyze here the experimental results and simulations for the channel-induced extension (linearization) of ring chains. Results of simulations for confined rings indicate that similar transition between moderate and strong confinement as in the case of linear chains exists also for rings. Due to stronger self-avoidance in confined rings the transition and relative chain extension is shifted in comparison to linear DNA. We suggest that similar relation as used in experiments for the extension of linear chains may be used also for circular DNA. For linear DNA in channel relatively stable distinctive events due to chain backfolding, which complicate chain linearization experiments, are analyzed. The abundance of DNA chains folded at the chain ends and in the chain interior was analyzed as a function of the channel width. Z. Benkova, P.Cifra, Macromolecules 45, 2597-2608 (2012) P. Cifra, T.Bleha, Soft Matter 8, 9022-9028 (2012) We acknowledge the support from grant SRDA-0451-11, VEGA grants 2/0093/12 and 2/0079/12 and by the FCT postdoc (Z.B.) co-financed by the Europ. Soc. Found, grant number SFRH/BPD/63568/2009

  5. Inosine in DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2014-06-01

    Deamination of the nucleobases in DNA and RNA is a result of spontaneous hydrolysis, endogenous or environmental factors as well as deaminase enzymes. Adenosine is deaminated to inosine which is miscoding and preferentially base pairs with cytosine. In the case of DNA, this is a premutagenic event that is counteracted by DNA repair enzymes specifically engaged in recognition and removal of inosine. However, in RNA, inosine is an essential modification introduced by specialized enzymes in a highly regulated manner to generate transcriptome diversity. Defect editing is seen in various human disease including cancer, viral infections and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Enzymes catalyzing the deaminase reaction are well characterized and recently an unexpected function of Endonuclease V in RNA processing was revealed. Whereas bacterial Endonuclease V enzymes are classified as DNA repair enzymes, it appears that the mammalian enzymes are involved in processing of inosine in RNA. This yields an interesting yet unexplored, link between DNA and RNA processing. Further work is needed to gain understanding of the impact of inosine in DNA and RNA under normal physiology and disease progression.

  6. Specific DNA-RNA hybrid recognition by TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Pan, Xiaojing; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Yan, Nieng; Shi, Yigong

    2012-10-25

    The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector targets specific host promoter through its central DNA-binding domain, which comprises multiple tandem repeats (TALE repeats). Recent structural analyses revealed that the TALE repeats form a superhelical structure that tracks along the forward strand of the DNA duplex. Here, we demonstrate that TALE repeats specifically recognize a DNA-RNA hybrid where the DNA strand determines the binding specificity. The crystal structure of a designed TALE in complex with the DNA-RNA hybrid was determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å. Although TALE repeats are in direct contact with only the DNA strand, the phosphodiester backbone of the RNA strand is inaccessible by macromolecules such as RNases. Consistent with this observation, sequence-specific recognition of an HIV-derived DNA-RNA hybrid by an engineered TALE efficiently blocked RNase H-mediated degradation of the RNA strand. Our study broadens the utility of TALE repeats and suggests potential applications in processes involving DNA replication and retroviral infections.

  7. Hairpins under tension: RNA versus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bercy, Mathilde; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to control the folding and unfolding of individual DNA and RNA hairpins by force. Four hairpin molecules are studied in comparison: two DNA and two RNA ones. We observe that the conformational dynamics is slower for the RNA hairpins than for their DNA counterparts. Our results indicate that structures made of RNA are dynamically more stable. This difference might contribute to the fact that DNA and RNA play fundamentally different biological roles in spite of chemical similarity. PMID:26323319

  8. RNA Study Using DNA Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Masubuchi, Takeya; Ueda, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is one of the fundamental steps of gene expression, where RNA polymerases (RNAPs) bind to their template genes and make RNAs. In addition to RNAP and the template gene, many molecules such as transcription factors are involved. The interaction and the effect of these factors depend on the geometry. Molecular layout of these factors, RNAP and gene is thus important. DNA nanotechnology is a promising technology that allows controlling of the molecular layout in the range of nanometer to micrometer scale with nanometer resolution; thus, it is expected to expand the RNA study beyond the current limit.

  9. Electrophoretic transfer of DNA, RNA and protein onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) - paper.

    PubMed Central

    Stellwag, E J; Dahlberg, A E

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed for the electrophoretic transfer of DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from a variety of gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) - paper. Conditions for the electrophoretic transfer of these macromolecules have been optimized to allow for nearly quantitative transfer and covalent coupling. DNA and RNA electrophoretically transferred to DBM-paper retain their ability to hybridize with specific probes. The high efficiency of transfer and the high capacity of DBM-paper for nucleic acids makes possible the sensitive detection of specific nucleotide sequences. Similar efficiency is achieved in electrophoretic transfer and covalent coupling of proteins to DBM-paper. Macromolecules can also be electrophoretically transferred and bound to DBM-paper incapable of covalent bond formation. Their elution from the paper in high salt provides a new and useful preparative method for isolation of DNA, RNA and protein. Images PMID:6158735

  10. Chloroplast DNA codes for transfer RNA.

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, J M; Hershberger, C L

    1976-01-01

    Transfer RNA's were isolated from Euglena gracilis. Chloroplast cistrons for tRNA were quantitated by hybridizing tRNA to ct DNA. Species of tRNA hybridizing to ct DNA were partially purified by hybridization-chromatography. The tRNA's hybridizing to ct DNA and nuclear DNA appear to be different. Total cellular tRNA was hybridized to ct DNA to an equivalent of approximately 25 cistrons. The total cellular tRNA was also separated into 2 fractions by chromatography on dihydroxyboryl substituted amino ethyl cellulose. Fraction I hybridized to both nuclear and ct DNA. Hybridizations to ct DNA indicated approximately 18 cistrons. Fraction II-tRNA hybridized only to ct DNA, saturating at a level of approximately 7 cistrons. The tRNA from isolated chloroplasts hybridized to both chloroplast and nuclear DNA. The level of hybridization to ct DNA indicated approximately 18 cistrons. Fraction II-type tRNA could not be detected in the isolated chloroplasts. PMID:823529

  11. RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aufsatz, Werner; Mette, M. Florian; van der Winden, Johannes; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2002-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA that is processed to short RNAs ≈21–24 nt in length can trigger two types of epigenetic gene silencing. Posttranscriptional gene silencing, which is related to RNA interference in animals and quelling in fungi, involves targeted elimination of homologous mRNA in the cytoplasm. RNA-directed DNA methylation involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues within a region of RNA–DNA sequence identity. RNA-directed DNA methylation is presumed to be responsible for the methylation observed in protein coding regions of posttranscriptionally silenced genes. Moreover, a type of transcriptional gene silencing and de novo methylation of homologous promoters in trans can occur if a double-stranded RNA contains promoter sequences. Although RNA-directed DNA methylation has been described so far only in plants, there is increasing evidence that RNA can also target genome modifications in other organisms. To understand how RNA directs methylation to identical DNA sequences and how changes in chromatin configuration contribute to initiating or maintaining DNA methylation induced by RNA, a promoter double-stranded RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing system has been established in Arabidopsis. A genetic analysis of this system is helping to unravel the relationships among RNA signals, DNA methylation, and chromatin structure. PMID:12169664

  12. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  13. Curcumin binding to DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Adelzadeh, Maryam; Norouzi, Zeinab; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi

    2009-04-01

    Curcumin, the yellow pigment from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, is a widely studied phytochemical with a variety of biological activities. The ongoing research and clinical trials have proved that this natural phenolic compound has great and diverse pharmacological potencies. Beside its effective antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antimicrobial/antiviral properties, curcumin is also considered as a cancer chemopreventive agent. While the antioxidant activity of curcumin is well documented, its interaction with DNA and RNA is not fully investigated. This study was designed to examine the interactions of curcumin with calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant DNA and RNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various curcumin/polynucleotide (phosphate) ratios of 1/120, 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, and 1/10. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand binding modes, the binding constants, and the stability of curcumin-DNA and curcumin-RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that curcumin binds to the major and minor grooves of DNA duplex and to RNA bases as well as to the back bone phosphate group with overall binding constants of K(curcumin-DNA) = 4.255 x 10(4) M(-1) and K(curcumin-RNA) = 1.262 x 10(4) M(-1). Major DNA and RNA aggregation occurred at high pigment concentration. No conformational changes were observed upon curcumin interaction with these biopolymers; that is, DNA remains in the B, and RNA retains its A-family structure.

  14. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    SciTech Connect

    Giovan, Stefan M.; Scharein, Robert G.; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2014-11-07

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  15. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovan, Stefan M.; Scharein, Robert G.; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2014-11-01

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  16. Spermine Condenses DNA, but Not RNA Duplexes

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the polyamine spermine and nucleic acids drive important cellular processes. Spermine condenses DNA, and some RNAs such as poly(rA):poly(rU). A large fraction of the spermine present in cells is bound to RNA, but apparently does not condense it. Here, we study the effect of spermine binding to short duplex RNA and DNA and compare our findings with predictions of molecular dynamics simulations. When small numbers of spermine are introduced, RNA with a designed sequence, containing a mixture of 14 GC pairs and 11 AU pairs, resists condensation relative to DNA of an equivalent sequence or to 25 base pair poly(rA):poly(rU) RNA. Comparison of wide-angle x-ray scattering profiles with simulation suggests that spermine is sequestered deep within the major groove of mixed sequence RNA, preventing condensation by limiting opportunities to bridge to other molecules as well as stabilizing the RNA by locking it into a particular conformation. In contrast, for DNA, simulations suggest that spermine binds external to the duplex, offering opportunities for intermolecular interaction. The goal of this study is to explain how RNA can remain soluble, and available for interaction with other molecules in the cell, despite the presence of spermine at concentrations high enough to precipitate DNA.

  17. Synthesis of new heterometallic macromolecules: Their DNA binding, cleavage activity and in vitro model electrochemotherapy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Bhat, Irshad-ul-Haq; Arjmand, Farukh

    2009-12-01

    The homodinuclear C 16H 30N 8O 5Sn 2Cl 4 ( 1), heterotetranuclear C 16H 38N 8O 9Sn 2Cu 2Cl 8 ( 2) and C 16H 38N 8O 9Sn 2Mn 2Cl 8 ( 3) macrocyclic complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic techniques and molar conductance measurements. The interaction studies of 1-3 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were carried out by UV-vis titration, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements. These results were further authenticated by carrying out interaction studies of 1-3 with plasmid pBR322 DNA employing gel electrophoresis. To overcome the dose resistance, auto toxicity of the drugs, a model study based on electrochemotherapy (ECT) was carried out and the results were compared in the presence and in the absence of the applied electrical potential.

  18. A DNA enzyme that cleaves RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Hoyce, G. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several types of RNA enzymes (ribozymes) have been identified in biological systems and generated in the laboratory. Considering the variety of known RNA enzymes and the similarity of DNA and RNA, it is reasonable to imagine that DNA might be able to function as an enzyme as well. No such DNA enzyme has been found in nature, however. We set out to identify a metal-dependent DNA enzyme using in vitro selection methodology. RESULTS: Beginning with a population of 10(14) DNAs containing 50 random nucleotides, we carried out five successive rounds of selective amplification, enriching for individuals that best promote the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of a target ribonucleoside 3'-O-P bond embedded within an otherwise all-DNA sequence. By the fifth round, the population as a whole carried out this reaction at a rate of 0.2 min-1. Based on the sequence of 20 individuals isolated from this population, we designed a simplified version of the catalytic domain that operates in an intermolecular context with a turnover rate of 1 min-1. This rate is about 10(5)-fold increased compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Using in vitro selection techniques, we obtained a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester in a reaction that proceeds with rapid turnover. The catalytic rate compares favorably to that of known RNA enzymes. We expect that other examples of DNA enzymes will soon be forthcoming.

  19. DNA and RNA technology in soil biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    DNA technology has come a long way and state of the art techniques are currently used in the analysis of soil biodiversity. Current methods will be presented and their strengths and limitations discussed. RNA technology, for the study of gene expression and potential activity of functional groups in the soil, is lagging behind, mostly due to the difficulties of extracting stable RNA from the soil. The potentials and challenges of adopting RNA technology for soil analysis will be discussed.

  20. Incorporation of DNA and protein precursors into macromolecules by bacteria at -15 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Christner, Brent C

    2002-12-01

    DNA and protein precursors were incorporated into trichloroacetic acid-precipitated material by bacterial cell suspensions during incubation for 50 to 100 days at -15 degrees C. Incorporation did not occur at -70 degrees C and was inhibited by antibiotics. The results demonstrate that bacteria can perform macromolecular synthesis under conditions that mimic entrapment in glacial ice.

  1. RNA Splicing Factors and RNA-Directed DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Feng; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-03-26

    RNA-directed histone and/or DNA modification is a conserved mechanism for the establishment of epigenetic marks from yeasts and plants to mammals. The heterochromation formation in yeast is mediated by RNAi-directed silencing mechanism, while the establishment of DNA methylation in plants is through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recently, splicing factors are reported to be involved in both RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation in yeast and the RdDM pathway in plants. In yeast, splicing factors may provide a platform for facilitating the siRNA generation through an interaction with RDRC and thereby affect the heterochromatin formation, whereas in plants, various splicing factors seem to act at different steps in the RdDM pathway.

  2. DNA repair investigations using siRNA.

    PubMed

    Miller, Holly; Grollman, Arthur P

    2003-06-11

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a revolutionary tool for the experimental modulation of gene expression, in many cases making redundant the need for specific gene mutations and allowing examination of the effect of modulating essential genes. It has now been shown that siRNA phenotypes resulting from stable transfection with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) can be transmitted through the mouse germ line and Rosenquist and his colleagues have used shRNA, which is processed in vivo to siRNA, to create germline transgenic mice in which a target DNA repair gene has been silenced. Here, Holly Miller and Arthur P. Grollman give the background of these discoveries, provide an overview of current uses, and look at future applications of this research.

  3. Strategies for RNA-Guided DNA Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeleska, Angela; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico; Landweber, Laura F.

    We present a model for homologous DNA recombination events guided by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) templates, and apply this model to DNA rearrangements in some groups of ciliates, such as Stylonychia or Oxytricha. In these organisms, differentiation of a somatic macronucleus from a germline micronucleus involves extensive gene rearrangement, which can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA, with the template-guided alignment proceeding through DNA branch migration. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  4. RNA-DNA Chimeras in the Context of an RNA World Transition to an RNA/DNA World.

    PubMed

    Gavette, Jesse V; Stoop, Matthias; Hud, Nicholas V; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan

    2016-10-10

    The RNA world hypothesis posits that DNA and proteins were later inventions of early life, or the chemistry that gave rise to life. Most scenarios put forth for the emergence of DNA assume a clean separation of RNA and DNA polymer, and a smooth transition between RNA and DNA. However, based on the reality of "clutter" and lack of sophisticated separation/discrimination mechanisms in a protobiological (and/or prebiological) world, heterogeneous RNA-DNA backbone containing chimeric sequences could have been common-and have not been fully considered in models transitioning from an RNA world to an RNA-DNA world. Herein we show that there is a significant decrease in Watson-Crick duplex stability of the heterogeneous backbone chimeric duplexes that would impede base-pair mediated interactions (and functions). These results point to the difficulties for the transition from one homogeneous system (RNA) to another (RNA/DNA) in an RNA world with a heterogeneous mixture of ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides and sequences, while suggesting an alternative scenario of prebiological accumulation and co-evolution of homogeneous systems (RNA and DNA).

  5. Studies of the dynamics of biological macromolecules using Au nanoparticle-DNA artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica M; Rasool, Haider I; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of graphene liquid cells, a nanoscale version of liquid bubble wrap, is a breakthrough for in situ liquid phase electron microscopy (EM). Using ultrathin graphene sheets as the liquid sample container, graphene liquid cells have allowed the unprecedented atomic resolution observation of solution phase growth and dynamics of nanocrystals. Here we explore the potential of this technique to probe nanoscale structure and dynamics of biomolecules in situ, using artificial Au nanoparticle-DNA artificial molecules as model systems. The interactions of electrons with both the artificial molecules and the liquid environment have been demonstrated and discussed, revealing both the opportunities and challenges of using graphene liquid cell EM as a new method of bio-imaging.

  6. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  7. Micro-RNA quantification using DNA polymerase and pyrophosphate quantification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang-Ping; Hsiao, Yi-Ling; Pan, Hung-Yin; Huang, Chih-Hung; Hou, Shao-Yi

    2011-12-15

    A rapid quantification method for micro-RNA based on DNA polymerase activity and pyrophosphate quantification has been developed. The tested micro-RNA serves as the primer, unlike the DNA primer in all DNA sequencing methods, and the DNA probe serves as the template for DNA replication. After the DNA synthesis, the pyrophosphate detection and quantification indicate the existence and quantity of the tested miRNA. Five femtomoles of the synthetic RNA could be detected. In 20-100 μg RNA samples purified from SiHa cells, the measurement was done using the proposed assay in which hsa-miR-16 and hsa-miR-21 are 0.34 fmol/μg RNA and 0.71 fmol/μg RNA, respectively. This simple and inexpensive assay takes less than 5 min after total RNA purification and preparation. The quantification is not affected by the pre-miRNA which cannot serve as the primer for the DNA synthesis in this assay. This assay is general for the detection of the target RNA or DNA with a known matched DNA template probe, which could be widely used for detection of small RNA, messenger RNA, RNA viruses, and DNA. Therefore, the method could be widely used in RNA and DNA assays.

  8. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) < 1 nM at 25 °C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  9. Splint ligation of RNA with T4 DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Christopher J.; O’Keefe, Raymond T.

    2014-01-01

    Splint ligation of RNA, whereby specific RNA molecules are ligated together, can be carried out using T4 DNA ligase and a bridging DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the RNAs. This method takes advantage of the property of T4 DNA ligase to join RNA molecules when they are in an RNA:DNA hybrid. Splint ligation is a useful tool for the introduction of modified nucleotides into RNA molecules, insertion of a radiolabel into a specific position within an RNA and for the assembly of smaller synthetic RNAs into longer RNA molecules. Such modifications enable a wide range of experiments to be carried out with the modified RNA including structural studies, co-immunoprecipitations, and the ability to map sites of RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions. PMID:23065567

  10. Interaction of zanamivir with DNA and RNA: Models for drug DNA and drug RNA bindings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Kahangi, Fatemeh Ghoreyshi; Azizi, Ebrahim; Zebarjad, Nader; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2007-03-01

    Zanamivir (ZAN) is the first of a new generation of influenza virus-specific drugs known as neuraminidase inhibitors, which acts by interfering with life cycles of influenza viruses A and B. It prevents the virus spreading infection to other cells by blocking the neuraminidase enzyme present on the surface of the virus. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA complexes with zanamivir in aqueous solution, using constant DNA or RNA concentration (12.5 mM) and various zanamivir/polynucleotide ( P) ratios of 1/20, 1/10, 1/4, and 1/2. FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopy are used to determine the drug external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of zanamivir-DNA and RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Structural analysis showed major interaction of zanamivir with G-C (major groove) and A-T (minor groove) base pairs and minor perturbations of the backbone PO 2 group with overall binding constants of Kzanamivir-DNA = 1.30 × 10 4 M -1 and Kzanamivir-RNA = 1.38 × 10 4 M -1. The drug interaction induces a partial B to A-DNA transition, while RNA remains in A-conformation.

  11. Plasmodesmata: intercellular tunnels facilitating transport of macromolecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Kragler, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    In plants, intercellular structures named plasmodesmata (PD) form a continuous cytoplasmic network between neighboring cells. PD pores provide channels for intercellular symplasmic (cell-to-cell) transport throughout most tissues of the plant body. Cell-defining proteins, such as transcription factors, and regulatory non-coding sequences, such as short interfering RNA, micro RNA, protein-encoding messenger RNAs, viroids, and viral RNA/DNA genomes move via PD channels to adjacent cells. PD-mediated intercellular transport of macromolecules is a regulated process depending on the tissue, developmental stage, and nature of the transported macromolecule. In this review, PD channels and their similarity to tunneling nanotubes present in animals are highlighted. In addition, homeodomain protein movement and cellular components regulating transport are discussed.

  12. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  13. Transcription and Recombination: When RNA Meets DNA

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription–replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. PMID:25085910

  14. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  15. Synergistic self-assembly of RNA and DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung Hyeon; Su, Min; Zhang, Chuan; Ribbe, Alexander E.; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2010-12-01

    DNA has recently been used as a programmable 'smart' building block for the assembly of a wide range of nanostructures. It remains difficult, however, to construct DNA assemblies that are also functional. Incorporating RNA is a promising strategy to circumvent this issue as RNA is structurally related to DNA but exhibits rich chemical, structural and functional diversities. However, only a few examples of rationally designed RNA structures have been reported. Herein, we describe a simple, general strategy for the de novo design of nanostructures in which the self-assembly of RNA strands is programmed by DNA strands. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, we have designed and constructed three different RNA-DNA hybrid branched nanomotifs (tiles), which readily assemble into one-dimensional nanofibres, extended two-dimensional arrays and a discrete three-dimensional object. The current strategy could enable the integration of the precise programmability of DNA with the rich functionality of RNA.

  16. crRNA and tracrRNA guide Cas9-mediated DNA interference in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Karvelis, Tautvydas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Miksys, Algirdas; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-05-01

    The Cas9-crRNA complex of the Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 CRISPR3-Cas system functions as an RNA-guided endonuclease with crRNA-directed target sequence recognition and protein-mediated DNA cleavage. We show here that an additional RNA molecule, tracrRNA (trans-activating CRISPR RNA), co-purifies with the Cas9 protein isolated from the heterologous E. coli strain carrying the S. thermophilus DGCC7710 CRISPR3-Cas system. We provide experimental evidence that tracrRNA is required for Cas9-mediated DNA interference both in vitro and in vivo. We show that Cas9 specifically promotes duplex formation between the precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA) transcript and tracrRNA, in vitro. Furthermore, the housekeeping RNase III contributes to primary pre-crRNA-tracrRNA duplex cleavage for mature crRNA biogenesis. RNase III, however, is not required in the processing of a short pre-crRNA transcribed from a minimal CRISPR array containing a single spacer. Finally, we show that an in vitro-assembled ternary Cas9-crRNA-tracrRNA complex cleaves DNA. This study further specifies the molecular basis for crRNA-based re-programming of Cas9 to specifically cleave any target DNA sequence for precise genome surgery. The processes for crRNA maturation and effector complex assembly established here will contribute to the further development of the Cas9 re-programmable system for genome editing applications.

  17. Transcript-RNA-templated DNA recombination and repair.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Havva; Shen, Ying; Huang, Fei; Patel, Mikir; Yang, Taehwan; Ashley, Katie; Mazin, Alexander V; Storici, Francesca

    2014-11-20

    Homologous recombination is a molecular process that has multiple important roles in DNA metabolism, both for DNA repair and genetic variation in all forms of life. Generally, homologous recombination involves the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules; however, homologous recombination can also occur between RNA molecules, as shown for RNA viruses. Previous research showed that synthetic RNA oligonucleotides can act as templates for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast and human cells, and artificial long RNA templates injected in ciliate cells can guide genomic rearrangements. Here we report that endogenous transcript RNA mediates homologous recombination with chromosomal DNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a system to detect the events of homologous recombination initiated by transcript RNA following the repair of a chromosomal DSB occurring either in a homologous but remote locus, or in the same transcript-generating locus in reverse-transcription-defective yeast strains. We found that RNA-DNA recombination is blocked by ribonucleases H1 and H2. In the presence of H-type ribonucleases, DSB repair proceeds through a complementary DNA intermediate, whereas in their absence, it proceeds directly through RNA. The proximity of the transcript to its chromosomal DNA partner in the same locus facilitates Rad52-driven homologous recombination during DSB repair. We demonstrate that yeast and human Rad52 proteins efficiently catalyse annealing of RNA to a DSB-like DNA end in vitro. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of homologous recombination and DNA repair in which transcript RNA is used as a template for DSB repair. Thus, considering the abundance of RNA transcripts in cells, RNA may have a marked impact on genomic stability and plasticity.

  18. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  19. DNA display of folded RNA libraries enabling RNA-SELEX without reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, I S; Temme, J S; Krauss, I J

    2017-03-02

    A method for the physical attachment of folded RNA libraries to their encoding DNA is presented as a way to circumvent the reverse transcription step during systematic evolution of RNA ligands by exponential enrichment (RNA-SELEX). A DNA library is modified with one isodC base to stall T7 polymerase and a 5' "capture strand" which anneals to the nascent RNA transcript. This method is validated in a selection of RNA aptamers against human α-thrombin with dissociation constants in the low nanomolar range. This method will be useful in the discovery of RNA aptamers and ribozymes containing base modifications that make them resistant to accurate reverse transcription.

  20. Use of DNA, RNA, and Chimeric Templates by a Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase: Evolutionary Implications for the Transition from the RNA to the DNA World

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Robert W.; Bellon, Laurent; Beigelman, Leonid; Kao, C. Cheng

    1999-01-01

    All polynucleotide polymerases have a similar structure and mechanism of catalysis, consistent with their evolution from one progenitor polymerase. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are expected to have properties comparable to those from this progenitor and therefore may offer insight into the commonalities of all classes of polymerases. We examined RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RdRp on DNA, RNA, and hybrid templates and found that precise initiation of RNA synthesis can take place from all of these templates. Furthermore, initiation can take place from either internal or penultimate initiation sites. Using a template competition assay, we found that the BMV RdRp interacts with DNA only three- to fourfold less well than it interacts with RNA. Moreover, a DNA molecule with a ribonucleotide at position −11 relative to the initiation nucleotide was able to interact with RdRp at levels comparable to that observed with RNA. These results suggest that relatively few conditions were needed for an ancestral RdRp to replicate DNA genomes. PMID:10400735

  1. The chemical stability of abasic RNA compared to abasic DNA.

    PubMed

    Küpfer, Pascal A; Leumann, Christian J

    2007-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of an abasic RNA phosphoramidite carrying a photocleavable 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) group at the anomeric center and a triisopropylsilyloxymethyl (TOM) group as 2'-O-protecting group together with the analogous DNA and the 2'-OMe RNA abasic building blocks. These units were incorporated into RNA-, 2'-OMe-RNA- and DNA for the purpose of studying their chemical stabilities towards backbone cleavage in a comparative way. Stability measurements were performed under basic conditions (0.1 M NaOH) and in the presence of aniline (pH 4.6) at 37 degrees C. The kinetics and mechanisms of strand cleavage were followed by High pressure liquid chromotography and ESI-MS. Under basic conditions, strand cleavage at abasic RNA sites can occur via beta,delta-elimination and 2',3'-cyclophosphate formation. We found that beta,delta-elimination was 154-fold slower compared to the same mechanism in abasic DNA. Overall strand cleavage of abasic RNA (including cyclophosphate formation) was still 16.8 times slower compared to abasic DNA. In the presence of aniline at pH 4.6, where only beta,delta-elimination contributes to strand cleavage, a 15-fold reduced cleavage rate at the RNA abasic site was observed. Thus abasic RNA is significantly more stable than abasic DNA. The higher stability of abasic RNA is discussed in the context of its potential biological role.

  2. The chemical stability of abasic RNA compared to abasic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Küpfer, Pascal A.; Leumann, Christian J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of an abasic RNA phosphoramidite carrying a photocleavable 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) group at the anomeric center and a triisopropylsilyloxymethyl (TOM) group as 2′-O-protecting group together with the analogous DNA and the 2′-OMe RNA abasic building blocks. These units were incorporated into RNA-, 2′-OMe-RNA- and DNA for the purpose of studying their chemical stabilities towards backbone cleavage in a comparative way. Stability measurements were performed under basic conditions (0.1 M NaOH) and in the presence of aniline (pH 4.6) at 37°C. The kinetics and mechanisms of strand cleavage were followed by High pressure liquid chromotography and ESI-MS. Under basic conditions, strand cleavage at abasic RNA sites can occur via β,δ-elimination and 2′,3′-cyclophosphate formation. We found that β,δ-elimination was 154-fold slower compared to the same mechanism in abasic DNA. Overall strand cleavage of abasic RNA (including cyclophosphate formation) was still 16.8 times slower compared to abasic DNA. In the presence of aniline at pH 4.6, where only β,δ-elimination contributes to strand cleavage, a 15-fold reduced cleavage rate at the RNA abasic site was observed. Thus abasic RNA is significantly more stable than abasic DNA. The higher stability of abasic RNA is discussed in the context of its potential biological role. PMID:17151071

  3. Enhanced detection of RNA by MMLV reverse transcriptase coupled with thermostable DNA polymerase and DNA/RNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Katano, Yuta; Baba, Misato; Fujiwara, Ayako; Hidese, Ryota; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Yanagihara, Itaru; Hayashi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Kenji; Takita, Teisuke; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Detection of mRNA is a valuable method for monitoring the specific gene expression. In this study, we devised a novel cDNA synthesis method using three enzymes, the genetically engineered thermostable variant of reverse transcriptase (RT), MM4 (E286R/E302K/L435R/D524A) from Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV), the genetically engineered variant of family A DNA polymerase with RT activity, K4polL329A from thermophilic Thermotoga petrophila K4, and the DNA/RNA helicase Tk-EshA from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. By optimizing assay conditions for three enzymes using Taguchi's method, 100 to 1000-fold higher sensitivity was achieved for cDNA synthesis than conventional assay condition using only RT. Our results suggest that DNA polymerase with RT activity and DNA/RNA helicase are useful to increase the sensitivity of cDNA synthesis.

  4. Viroid RNA redirects host DNA ligase 1 to act as an RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-08-21

    Viroids are a unique class of noncoding RNAs: composed of only a circular, single-stranded molecule of 246-401 nt, they manage to replicate, move, circumvent host defenses, and frequently induce disease in higher plants. Viroids replicate through an RNA-to-RNA rolling-circle mechanism consisting of transcription of oligomeric viroid RNA intermediates, cleavage to unit-length strands, and circularization. Though the host RNA polymerase II (redirected to accept RNA templates) mediates RNA synthesis and a type-III RNase presumably cleavage of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and closely related members of the family Pospiviroidae, the host enzyme catalyzing the final circularization step, has remained elusive. In this study we propose that PSTVd subverts host DNA ligase 1, converting it to an RNA ligase, for the final step. To support this hypothesis, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) DNA ligase 1 specifically and efficiently catalyzes circularization of the genuine PSTVd monomeric linear replication intermediate opened at position G95-G96 and containing 5'-phosphomonoester and 3'-hydroxyl terminal groups. Moreover, we also show a decreased PSTVd accumulation and a reduced ratio of monomeric circular to total monomeric PSTVd forms in Nicotiana benthamiana Domin plants in which the endogenous DNA ligase 1 was silenced. Thus, in a remarkable example of parasitic strategy, viroids reprogram for their replication the template and substrate specificity of a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase to act as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and RNA ligase, respectively.

  5. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  6. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  7. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  8. Supporting the design of efficient dendritic DNA and siRNA nano-carriers with molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Giovanni M; Danani, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    The design of macromolecules able to generate a stable binding with nucleic acids is of great interest for their possible application in gene delivery. During the last years particular attention has been addressed to the use of dendritic scaffolds as a base to construct efficient DNA and siRNA nano-carriers. Dendrimers and dendrons are hyperbranched polymers characterized by a well-defined structure and by the possibility to functionalize their surface in many different ways. In particular, their multivalent character allows the creation of multiple binding sites between the positively charged groups that decorate the surface of cationic dendrons and dendrimers and the negatively charged phosphate groups present on the strands of DNA and siRNA. The engineering of "ideal dendritic candidates" to deliver and release genetic materials into cells is, however, not trivial due to the huge distance that exists between the design phase and the real application of such molecules. A different architecture of the dendritic scaffold (flexible or rigid) can strongly modify the binding efficiency, but, at the same time, is influenced by the interactions with the external solution. In this context, molecular simulation can represent a "virtual bridge" between the design and the comprehension of the real behavior of such macromolecules.

  9. RNA intrusions change DNA elastic properties and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Evich, Marina; Lesiak, Annie L.; Germann, Markus W.; Bongiorno, Angelo; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    The units of RNA, termed ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs), have been recently found as the most abundant defects present in DNA. Despite the relevance, it is largely unknown if and how rNMPs embedded in DNA can change the DNA structure and mechanical properties. Here, we report that rNMPs incorporated in DNA can change the elastic properties of DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule elasticity measurements show that rNMP intrusions in short DNA duplexes can decrease - by 32% - or slightly increase the stretch modulus of DNA molecules for two sequences reported in this study. Molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a series of significant local structural alterations of DNA containing embedded rNMPs, especially at the rNMPs and nucleotide 3' to the rNMP sites. The demonstrated ability of rNMPs to locally alter DNA mechanical properties and structure may help in understanding how such intrusions impact DNA biological functions and find applications in structural DNA and RNA nanotechnology.The units of RNA, termed ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs), have been recently found as the most abundant defects present in DNA. Despite the relevance, it is largely unknown if and how rNMPs embedded in DNA can change the DNA structure and mechanical properties. Here, we report that rNMPs incorporated in DNA can change the elastic properties of DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule elasticity measurements show that rNMP intrusions in short DNA duplexes can decrease - by 32% - or slightly increase the stretch modulus of DNA molecules for two sequences reported in this study. Molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a series of significant local structural alterations of DNA containing embedded rNMPs, especially at the rNMPs and nucleotide 3' to the rNMP sites. The demonstrated ability of rNMPs to locally alter DNA mechanical properties and structure

  10. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  11. Quantum-mechanical predictions of DNA and RNA ionization by energetic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Galassi, M E; Champion, C; Weck, P F; Rivarola, R D; Fojón, O; Hanssen, J

    2012-04-07

    Among the numerous constituents of eukaryotic cells, the DNA macromolecule is considered as the most important critical target for radiation-induced damages. However, up to now ion-induced collisions on DNA components remain scarcely approached and theoretical support is still lacking for describing the main ionizing processes. In this context, we here report a theoretical description of the proton-induced ionization of the DNA and RNA bases as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Two different quantum-mechanical models are proposed: the first one based on a continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state treatment and the second perturbative one developed within the first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1). Besides, the molecular structure information of the biological targets studied here was determined by ab initio calculations with the Gaussian 09 software at the restricted Hartree-Fock level of theory with geometry optimization. Doubly, singly differential and total ionization cross sections also provided by the two models were compared for a large range of incident and ejection energies and a very good agreement was observed for all the configurations investigated. Finally, in comparison with the rare experiment, we have noted a large underestimation of the total ionization cross sections of uracil impacted by 80 keV protons,whereas a very good agreement was shown with the recently reported ionization cross sections for protons on adenine, at both the differential and the total scale.

  12. Synthesis of Sindbis virus complementary DNA by avian myeloblastosis virus RNA-directed DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, V; Grandgenett, D P; Bondurant, M; Riggin, C; Tigges, M

    1978-07-24

    Sindbis virus 42 S RNA was efficiently transcribed into complementary DNA (CDNA) by avian myeloblastosis virus alphabeta DNA polymerase using oligo- (dT) or single-stranded calf thymus DNA as primers. Both of the Sindbis virus cDNA products were able to protect 60% of 125I-labeled Sindbis virus RNA, at near equal weight ratios, from RNAase A and T1 digestion. Using hybridization kinetics, the Crt 1/2 value for hybridization of the calf thymus-primed cDNA product with excess Sindbis RNA was determined to be 1.8 9 10-2 mol . s . 1-1. Thes data demonstrate that the Sindbis virus cDNA products are relatively uniform representations of Sindbis virus RNA sequences.

  13. RNA cleavage and chain elongation by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a binary enzyme.RNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, C R; Solow-Cordero, D E; Chamberlin, M J

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of DNA, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) can bind RNA to form an equimolar binary complex with the concomitant release of the sigma factor. We show now that E. coli RNA polymerase binds at a region near the 3' terminus of the RNA and that an RNA in such RNA.RNA polymerase complexes undergoes reactions previously thought to be unique to nascent RNA in ternary complexes with DNA. These include GreA/GreB-dependent cleavage of the RNA and elongation by 3'-terminal addition of NMP from NTP. Both of these reactions are inhibited by rifampicin. Hence, by several criteria, the RNA in binary complexes is bound to the polymerase in a manner quite similar to that in ternary complexes. These findings can be explained by a model for the RNA polymerase ternary complex in which the RNA is bound at the 3' terminus through two protein binding sites located up to 10 nt apart. In this model, the stability of RNA binding to the polymerase in the ternary complex is due primarily to its interaction with the protein. Images PMID:7513426

  14. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Tommy F.; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB’s fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability. PMID:28298904

  15. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Tommy F; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Godoy, Veronica G

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB's fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability.

  16. DNA and RNA ligases: structural variations and shared mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pascal, John M

    2008-02-01

    DNA and RNA ligases join 3' OH and 5' PO4 ends in polynucleotide substrates using a three-step reaction mechanism that involves covalent modification of both the ligase enzyme and the polynucleotide substrate with AMP. In the past three years, several polynucleotide ligases have been crystallized in complex with nucleic acid, providing the introductory views of ligase enzymes engaging their substrates. Crystal structures for two ATP-dependent DNA ligases, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, and an ATP-dependent RNA ligase demonstrate how ligases utilize the AMP group and their multi-domain architectures to manipulate nucleic acid structure and catalyze the end-joining reaction. Together with unliganded crystal structures of DNA and RNA ligases, a more comprehensive and dynamic understanding of the multi-step ligation reaction mechanism has emerged.

  17. An Efficient Catalytic DNA that Cleaves L-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Tram, Kha; Xia, Jiaji; Gysbers, Rachel; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    Many DNAzymes have been isolated from synthetic DNA pools to cleave natural RNA (D-RNA) substrates and some have been utilized for the design of aptazyme biosensors for bioanalytical applications. Even though these biosensors perform well in simple sample matrices, they do not function effectively in complex biological samples due to ubiquitous RNases that can efficiently cleave D-RNA substrates. To overcome this issue, we set out to develop DNAzymes that cleave L-RNA, the enantiomer of D-RNA, which is known to be completely resistant to RNases. Through in vitro selection we isolated three L-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes from a random-sequence DNA pool. The most active DNAzyme exhibits a catalytic rate constant ~3 min-1 and has a structure that contains a kissing loop, a structural motif that has never been observed with D-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes. Furthermore we have used this DNAzyme and a well-known ATP-binding DNA aptamer to construct an aptazyme sensor and demonstrated that this biosensor can achieve ATP detection in biological samples that contain RNases. The current work lays the foundation for exploring RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for engineering biosensors that are compatible with complex biological samples. PMID:25946137

  18. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-08

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  19. Relaxed specificity of prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases results in DNA site-specific modification of RNA/DNA heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Wons, Ewa; Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    RNA/DNA hybrid duplexes regularly occur in nature, for example in transcriptional R loops. Their susceptibility to modification by DNA-specific or RNA-specific enzymes is, thus, a biologically relevant question, which, in addition, has possible biotechnological implications. In this study, we investigated the activity of four isospecific DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoVIII, M.LlaCI, M.HindIII, M.BstZ1II) toward an RNA/DNA duplex carrying one 5'-AAGCUU-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5' target sequence. The analyzed enzymes belong to the β-group of adenine N6-methyltransferases and recognize the palindromic DNA sequence 5'-AAGCTT-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5'. Under standard conditions, none of these isospecific enzymes could detectibly methylate the RNA/DNA duplex. However, the addition of agents that generally relax specificity, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, resulted in substantial methylation of the RNA/DNA duplex by M.EcoVIII and M.LlaCI. Only the DNA strand of the RNA/DNA duplex was methylated. The same was not observed for M.HindIII or M.BstZ1II. This is, to our knowledge, the first report that demonstrates such activity by prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases. Possible applications of these findings in a laboratory practice are also discussed.

  20. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Andrew B; Goodrich, Karen J; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-06-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem-loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem-loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer.

  1. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, Andrew B.; Goodrich, Karen J.; Pfingsten, Jennifer S.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem–loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem–loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer. PMID:23610127

  2. DNA-water interactions distinguish messenger RNA genes from transfer RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Garima; Jayaram, B

    2012-05-30

    Physicochemical properties of DNA sequences as a guide to developing insights into genome organization has received little attention. Here, we utilize the energetics of DNA to further advance the knowledge on its language at a molecular level. Specifically, we ask the question whether physicochemical properties of different functional units on genomes differ. We extract intramolecular and solvation energies of different DNA base pair steps from a comprehensive set of molecular dynamics simulations. We then investigate the solvation behavior of DNA sequences coding for mRNAs and tRNAs. Distinguishing mRNA genes from tRNA genes is a tricky problem in genome annotation without assumptions on length of DNA and secondary structure of the product of transcription. We find that solvation energetics of DNA behaves as an extremely efficient property in discriminating 2,063,537 genes coding for mRNAs from 56,251 genes coding for tRNAs in all (~1500) completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes.

  3. a Hypothetical Pathway from the RNA to the DNA World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Line, Martin A.

    2005-08-01

    If the DNA world was preceded by a RNA world as widely suggested a rational pathway should be discernable to link the two. This report uses as a starting point a membrane-enclosed ribozyme capable of polymerising itself and its counterpart copy. As molecular complexity increased, it is suggested that a consortia of the initial ribozyme polymerase and chaperone molecules formed a complex specifically for RNA replication. A mutation in one of several copy-genomes coding for these replication machines then led in step-wise fashion to a proto-ribosome that increasingly inserted specific amino acids instead of nucleotides into a growing RNA chain, the driving force being selection for improved or new function. Eventually the nucleotides would be entirely displaced in this proto-ribosome, after which the ribose-phosphate linkage would be replaced by peptide linkage. The final steps would be the formation of DNA from the RNA genomic material viareverse transcriptase, coupled with the evolution of enzymes for DNA polymerisation and transcription. At this point the original RNA-replicator machinery would be redundant and eliminated, the RNA genomic material would become mRNA and the present-day function of the ribosome would be fixed. In the scenario described a mechanism for the selection for l-amino acids becomes evident

  4. Polyacid macromolecule primers

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-12-26

    Hydrophilic polyacids are described, such as macromolecules of polyitaconic acid and polyacrylic acid, where such macromolecules have molecular weights >50,000 as primers between a polymeric top coating, such as polyurethane, and an oxidized aluminum or aluminum alloy. A near monolayer of primer is used in polymeric adhesive/oxidized aluminum adhered joint systems in 0.05% primer concentration to give superior results in standard peel tests. 2 figs.

  5. Polyacid macromolecule primers

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Hydrophylic polyacids, such as macromolecules of polyitaconic acid and polyacrylic acid, where such macromolecules have molecular weights >50,000 as primers between a polymeric top coating, such as polyurethane, and an oxidized aluminum or aluminum alloy. A near monolayer of primer is used in polymeric adhesive/oxidized aluminum adhered joint systems in 0.05% primer concentration to give superior results in standard peel tests.

  6. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph R; Cole, John A; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2015-12-29

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript's half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories.

  7. Conditions for Using DNA Polymerase I as an RNA-Dependent DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, S. C.; Kacian, D. L.; Spiegelman, S.

    1974-01-01

    Conditions are described for using Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I for synthesizing complementary DNA copies of natural RNA molecules, which are suitable for use in hybridization experiments. The molar ratio of enzyme to template is critical; below a certain level, synthesis is not observed. Hybrids formed with the complementary DNA are of comparable specificity and stability to those formed with complementary DNAs synthesized by viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase. Synthesis of dA-dT polymers, a common occurrence with this enzyme, can be eliminated by including distamycin in the reaction mixture. PMID:4133845

  8. How Can Plant DNA Viruses Evade siRNA-Directed DNA Methylation and Silencing?

    PubMed Central

    Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2013-01-01

    Plants infected with DNA viruses produce massive quantities of virus-derived, 24-nucleotide short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can potentially direct viral DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, growing evidence indicates that the circular double-stranded DNA accumulating in the nucleus for Pol II-mediated transcription of viral genes is not methylated. Hence, DNA viruses most likely evade or suppress RNA-directed DNA methylation. This review describes the specialized mechanisms of replication and silencing evasion evolved by geminiviruses and pararetoviruses, which rescue viral DNA from repressive methylation and interfere with transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing of viral genes. PMID:23887650

  9. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  10. Protein localization with flexible DNA or RNA.

    PubMed

    Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Localization of activity is ubiquitous in life, and also within sub-cellular compartments. Localization provides potential advantages as different proteins involved in the same cellular process may supplement each other on a fast timescale. It might also prevent proteins from being active in other regions of the cell. However localization is at odds with the spreading of unbound molecules by diffusion. We model the cost and gain for specific enzyme activity using localization strategies based on binding to sites of intermediate specificity. While such bindings in themselves decrease the activity of the protein on its target site, they may increase protein activity if stochastic motion allows the acting protein to touch both the intermediate binding site and the specific site simultaneously. We discuss this strategy in view of recent suggestions on long non-coding RNA as a facilitator of localized activity of chromatin modifiers.

  11. RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: evidence of discrimination between DNA and RNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S G; Anderson, K S

    1997-11-18

    The RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been investigated using pre-steady-state kinetics under single turnover conditions. In contrast to previous estimates of low replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, the present study finds the enzyme to be more highly discriminating when an RNA/DNA template-primer is employed as compared with the corresponding DNA/DNA template-primer. The basis of this selectivity is due to extremely slow polymerization kinetics for incorporation of an incorrect deoxynucleotide. The maximum rates for misincorporation (kpol) of dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP opposite a template uridine were 0.2, 0.03, and 0.003 s-1, respectively. The equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the incorrect nucleotide opposite a template uridine were 1.0, 1.1, and 0.7 mM for dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP, respectively. These kinetic values provide fidelity estimates of 26 000 for discrimination against dGTP, 176 000 for dCTP, and 1 x 10(6) for dTTP misincorporation at this position. Similar observations were obtained when incorrect nucleotide misincorporation was examined opposite a template adenine. Thus in a direct comparison of RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA template-primer substrates, HIV-1 RT exhibits approximately a 10-60-fold increase in fidelity. This study augments our current understanding of the similarities and differences of catalytic activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using RNA and DNA substrates. Moreover, these studies lend further support for a model for nucleotide incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase involving a two-step binding mechanism governed by a rate-limiting conformational change for correct incorporation.

  12. Simulations Using Random-Generated DNA and RNA Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, C. F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Using a very simple computer program written in BASIC, a very large number of random-generated DNA or RNA sequences are obtained. Students use these sequences to predict complementary sequences and translational products, evaluate base compositions, determine frequencies of particular triplet codons, and suggest possible secondary structures.…

  13. DNA?RNA: What Do Students Think the Arrow Means?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, L. Kate; Fisk, J. Nick; Newman, Dina L.

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology, a model that has remained intact for decades, describes the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein though an RNA intermediate. While recent work has illustrated many exceptions to the central dogma, it is still a common model used to describe and study the relationship between genes and protein…

  14. Duplex structural differences and not 2'-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA.

    PubMed

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T; DeStefano, Jeffrey J

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3' recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA-DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA-DNA. Replacing 2'- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2'-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hydroxyls and RT amino acids do not stabilize binding. RT's K(d) (k(off)/k(on)) for DNA-DNA and RNA-DNA were similar, although k(off) differed almost 40-fold, suggesting a faster k(on) for DNA-DNA. Avian myeloblastosis and Moloney murine leukemia virus RTs also bound more stably to RNA-DNA, but the difference was less pronounced than with HIV-RT. We propose that the H- versus B-form structures of RNA-DNA and DNA-DNA, respectively, allow the former to conform more easily to HIV-RT's binding cleft, leading to more stable binding. Biologically, the ability of RT to form a more stable complex on RNA-DNA may aid in degradation of RNA fragments that remain after DNA synthesis.

  15. A small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Michalik, Katharina M; Böttcher, Romy; Förstemann, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Small RNAs have been implicated in numerous cellular processes, including effects on chromatin structure and the repression of transposons. We describe the generation of a small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila that is analogous to the recently reported double-strand break (DSB)-induced RNAs or Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs in Arabidopsis and vertebrates. Active transcription in the vicinity of the break amplifies this small RNA response, demonstrating that the normal messenger RNA contributes to the endogenous small interfering RNAs precursor. The double-stranded RNA precursor forms with an antisense transcript that initiates at the DNA break. Breaks are thus sites of transcription initiation, a novel aspect of the cellular DSB response. This response is specific to a double-strand break since nicked DNA structures do not trigger small RNA production. The small RNAs are generated independently of the exact end structure (blunt, 3'- or 5'-overhang), can repress homologous sequences in trans and may therefore--in addition to putative roles in repair--exert a quality control function by clearing potentially truncated messages from genes in the vicinity of the break.

  16. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent. Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:18429252

  17. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent . Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:22045560

  18. DNA Targeting by a Minimal CRISPR RNA-Guided Cascade.

    PubMed

    Hochstrasser, Megan L; Taylor, David W; Kornfeld, Jack E; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria employ surveillance complexes guided by CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) RNAs (crRNAs) to target foreign nucleic acids for destruction. Although most type I and type III CRISPR systems require four or more distinct proteins to form multi-subunit surveillance complexes, the type I-C systems use just three proteins to achieve crRNA maturation and double-stranded DNA target recognition. We show that each protein plays multiple functional and structural roles: Cas5c cleaves pre-crRNAs and recruits Cas7 to position the RNA guide for DNA binding and unwinding by Cas8c. Cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of free and DNA-bound forms of the Cascade/I-C surveillance complex reveal conformational changes that enable R-loop formation with distinct positioning of each DNA strand. This streamlined type I-C system explains how CRISPR pathways can evolve compact structures that retain full functionality as RNA-guided DNA capture platforms.

  19. Dynamic Methods for Investigating the Conformational Changes of Biological Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidolova-Angelova, E.; Peshev, Z.; Shaquiri, Z.; Angelov, D.

    2010-01-01

    Fast conformational changes of biological macromolecules such as RNA folding and DNA—protein interactions play a crucial role in their biological functions. Conformational changes are supposed to take place in the sub milliseconds to few seconds time range. The development of appropriate dynamic methods possessing both high space (one nucleotide) and time resolution is of important interest. Here, we present two different approaches we developed for studying nucleic acid conformational changes such as salt-induced tRNA folding and interaction of the transcription factor NF-κB with its recognition DNA sequence. Importantly, only a single laser pulse is sufficient for the accurate measuring the whole decay curve. This peculiarity can be used in dynamical experiments.

  20. A superfamily of DNA transposons targeting multicopy small RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Target-specific integration of transposable elements for multicopy genes, such as ribosomal RNA and small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes, is of great interest because of the relatively harmless nature, stable inheritance and possible application for targeted gene delivery of target-specific transposable elements. To date, such strict target specificity has been observed only among non-LTR retrotransposons. We here report a new superfamily of sequence-specific DNA transposons, designated Dada. Dada encodes a DDE-type transposase that shows a distant similarity to transposases encoded by eukaryotic MuDR, hAT, P and Kolobok transposons, as well as the prokaryotic IS256 insertion element. Dada generates 6-7 bp target site duplications upon insertion. One family of Dada DNA transposons targets a specific site inside the U6 snRNA genes and are found in various fish species, water flea, oyster and polycheate worm. Other target sequences of the Dada transposons are U1 snRNA genes and different tRNA genes. The targets are well conserved in multicopy genes, indicating that copy number and sequence conservation are the primary constraints on the target choice of Dada transposons. Dada also opens a new frontier for target-specific gene delivery application.

  1. DNA and RNA editing of retrotransposons accelerate mammalian genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Levanon, Erez Y

    2015-04-01

    Genome evolution is commonly viewed as a gradual process that is driven by random mutations that accumulate over time. However, DNA- and RNA-editing enzymes have been identified that can accelerate evolution by actively modifying the genomically encoded information. The apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzymes, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBECs) are potent restriction factors that can inhibit retroelements by cytosine-to-uridine editing of retroelement DNA after reverse transcription. In some cases, a retroelement may successfully integrate into the genome despite being hypermutated. Such events introduce unique sequences into the genome and are thus a source of genomic innovation. adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine-to-inosine editing in double-stranded RNA, commonly formed by oppositely oriented retroelements. The RNA editing confers plasticity to the transcriptome by generating many transcript variants from a single genomic locus. If the editing produces a beneficial variant, the genome may maintain the locus that produces the RNA-edited transcript for its novel function. Here, we discuss how these two powerful editing mechanisms, which both target inserted retroelements, facilitate expedited genome evolution.

  2. Detection theory in identification of RNA-DNA sequence differences using RNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Toung, Jonathan M; Lahens, Nicholas; Hogenesch, John B; Grant, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology have allowed for detailed analyses of the transcriptome at single-nucleotide resolution, facilitating the study of RNA editing or sequence differences between RNA and DNA genome-wide. In humans, two types of post-transcriptional RNA editing processes are known to occur: A-to-I deamination by ADAR and C-to-U deamination by APOBEC1. In addition to these sequence differences, researchers have reported the existence of all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs); however, the validity of these claims is debated, as many studies claim that technical artifacts account for the majority of these non-canonical sequence differences. In this study, we used a detection theory approach to evaluate the performance of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and associated aligners in accurately identifying RNA-DNA sequence differences. By generating simulated RNA-Seq datasets containing RDDs, we assessed the effect of alignment artifacts and sequencing error on the sensitivity and false discovery rate of RDD detection. Overall, we found that even in the presence of sequencing errors, false negative and false discovery rates of RDD detection can be contained below 10% with relatively lenient thresholds. We also assessed the ability of various filters to target false positive RDDs and found them to be effective in discriminating between true and false positives. Lastly, we used the optimal thresholds we identified from our simulated analyses to identify RDDs in a human lymphoblastoid cell line. We found approximately 6,000 RDDs, the majority of which are A-to-G edits and likely to be mediated by ADAR. Moreover, we found the majority of non A-to-G RDDs to be associated with poorer alignments and conclude from these results that the evidence for widespread non-canonical RDDs in humans is weak. Overall, we found RNA-Seq to be a powerful technique for surveying RDDs genome-wide when coupled with the appropriate thresholds and filters.

  3. Travel depth, a new shape descriptor for macromolecules: application to ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Ryan G; Sharp, Kim A

    2006-09-22

    Depth is a term frequently applied to the shape and surface of macromolecules, describing for example the grooves in DNA, the shape of an enzyme active site, or the binding site for a small molecule in a protein. Yet depth is a difficult property to define rigorously in a macromolecule, and few computational tools exist to quantify this notion, to visualize it, or analyze the results. We present our notion of travel depth, simply put the physical distance a solvent molecule would have to travel from a surface point to a suitably defined reference surface. To define the reference surface, we use the limiting form of the molecular surface with increasing probe size: the convex hull. We then present a fast, robust approximation algorithm to compute travel depth to every surface point. The travel depth is useful because it works for pockets of any size and complexity. It also works for two interesting special cases. First, it works on the grooves in DNA, which are unbounded in one direction. Second, it works on the case of tunnels, that is pockets that have no "bottom", but go through the entire macromolecule. Our algorithm makes it straightforward to quantify discussions of depth when analyzing structures. High-throughput analysis of macromolecule depth is also enabled by our algorithm. This is demonstrated by analyzing a database of protein-small molecule binding pockets, and the distribution of bound magnesium ions in RNA structures. These analyses show significant, but subtle effects of depth on ligand binding localization and strength.

  4. Single-Molecule Electrical Random Resequencing of DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshiro, Takahito; Matsubara, Kazuki; Tsutsui, Makusu; Furuhashi, Masayuki; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2012-07-01

    Two paradigm shifts in DNA sequencing technologies--from bulk to single molecules and from optical to electrical detection--are expected to realize label-free, low-cost DNA sequencing that does not require PCR amplification. It will lead to development of high-throughput third-generation sequencing technologies for personalized medicine. Although nanopore devices have been proposed as third-generation DNA-sequencing devices, a significant milestone in these technologies has been attained by demonstrating a novel technique for resequencing DNA using electrical signals. Here we report single-molecule electrical resequencing of DNA and RNA using a hybrid method of identifying single-base molecules via tunneling currents and random sequencing. Our method reads sequences of nine types of DNA oligomers. The complete sequence of 5'-UGAGGUA-3' from the let-7 microRNA family was also identified by creating a composite of overlapping fragment sequences, which was randomly determined using tunneling current conducted by single-base molecules as they passed between a pair of nanoelectrodes.

  5. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  6. A Course on Macromolecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Arturo

    1985-01-01

    Describes a senior-level course that: (1) focuses on the structure and reactions of macromolecules; (2) treats industrial polymers in a unified way; and (3) uses analysis of conformation and conformational statistics as a unifying approach. Also discusses course topics, including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, and others. (JN)

  7. Mammalian mitochondrial DNA replication intermediates are essentially duplex, but contain extensive tracts of RNA/DNA hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Holmes, J. Bradley; Wood, Stuart R.; Yang, Ming-Yao; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Reyes, Aurelio; Laura, J. Bailey; Cluett, Tricia J.; Goffart, Steffi; Willcox, Smaranda; Rigby, Rachel E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Griffith, Jack D.; Crouch, Robert J.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate, using transmission electron microscopy and immunopurification with an antibody specific for RNA/DNA hybrid, that intact mtDNA replication intermediates (mtRIs) are essentially duplex throughout their length, but contain extensive RNA tracts on one strand. However, the extent of preservation of RNA in such molecules is highly dependent on the preparative method used. These findings strongly support the strand-coupled model of mtDNA replication involving RNA incorporation throughout the lagging strand (RITOLS). PMID:20184890

  8. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Garcia, Julia T.; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A.; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K.; Attardi, Laura D.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently exquisite regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate a role of lncRNAs in guiding organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activates transcription of DINO (Damage Induced NOncoding) via p53. DINO is required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression suffice to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO binds to and promotes p53 protein stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampens p53 signaling and ameliorates acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks. PMID:27668660

  9. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  10. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  11. Did the Pre-RNA World Rest Upon DNA Molecules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, Antonio; Dworkin, Jason P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    2004-01-01

    The isolation of a DNA sequence that catalyzes the ligation of oligodeoxynucleotides via the formation of 3' - 5' phosphodiester linkage significance in selection experiments has been reported. Ball recently used this to discuss the possibility that natural DNA molecules may have formed in the primitive Earth leading to the origin of life. As noted by Ferris and Usher, if metabolic pathways evolved backwards, it could be argued that the biosynthesis of 2-deoxyribose from ribose suggests that RNA came from DNA. As summarized elsewhere, there are several properties of deoxyribose which could be interpreted to support the possibility that DNA-like molecules arose prior to the RNA world. For example, 2-deoxyribose is slightly more soluble than ribose (which may have been an advantage in a drying pool scenario), may have been more reactive under possible prebiotic conditions (it forms a nucleoside approx. 150 times faster than ribose with the alternative base urazole at 25 C), while it decomposes in solution (approximately 2.6 times more slowly than ribose at 100 C). Other advantages of DNA over RNA are that it has one fewer chiral center, has a greater stability at the 8.2 pH value of the current oceans, and does not has the 2'5' and 3'5' ambiguity in polymerizations. Yet, there is strong molecular biological and biochemical evidence that RNA was featured in the biology well before the last common ancestor. The presence of sugar acids, including both ribo- and deoxysugar acids, in the 4.6 Ga old Murchison meteorite suggest that both may have been available in the primitive Earth, derived from the accretion of extraterrestrial sources and/or from endogenous processes involving formaldehyde and its derivatives. However, the abiotic synthesis of deoxyribose, ribose, and other sugars from glyceraldehyde and acetaldehyde under alkaline conditions is inefficient and unespecific. Although sugars are labile compounds, the role of cyanamide or borate minerals in the

  12. Spectrofluorometric determination of DNA and RNA with berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Guo-Quan; Zong, Zhi-Xin; Song, Yu-Min

    1999-08-01

    On binding to nucleic acids, the dye berberine increases its fluorescence quantum efficiency by a factor of 25-30. Based on this, an easy, rapid and accurate method for the determination of nucleic acids was developed. Berberine is very like ethidium bromide (EB), but it is non-poisonous. Determination can be made at any pH between 4 and 10, where the native structure of DNA and RNA is not disrupted. The maximum emission is near 520 nm for excitation at 355 or 450 nm. This method has good sensitivity (0.01 μg ml -1 of ctDNA), high selectivity and a wide linear range (0.05-14.0 μg ml -1 of ctDNA).

  13. Shape-programmable macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Schafmeister, Christian E; Brown, Zachary Z; Gupta, Sharad

    2008-10-01

    Proteins catalyze specific chemical reactions and carry out highly selective molecular recognition because they adopt well-defined three-dimensional structures and position chemically reactive functional groups in specific constellations. Proteins attain these well-defined structures through the complex process of protein folding. We seek to emulate these protein functions by constructing macromolecules that are easier to engineer by avoiding folding altogether. Toward that goal, we have developed an approach for the synthesis of macromolecules with programmable shapes. As described in this Account, we have constructed synthetic building blocks called bis-amino acids that we then couple through pairs of amide bonds to create water-soluble, spiroladder oligomers (bis-peptides) with well-defined three-dimensional structures. Bis-peptides use the conformational preferences of fused rings, stereochemistry, and strong covalent bonds to define their shape, unlike natural proteins and synthetic foldamers, which depend on noncovalent interactions and an unpredictable folding process to attain structure. Using these bis-amino acid monomers, we have built and characterized a number of bis-peptide nanostructures. We also constructed a molecular actuator that undergoes a large change in conformation under the control of metal exchange; the first application of bis-peptides. We are currently developing further approaches to functionalize bis-peptides as scaffolds to present well-defined constellations of functional groups. Such macromolecules could facilitate multifunctional catalysis and molecular recognition and lead to nanoscale molecular devices.

  14. The RNA World: Life Before DNA and Protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1993-01-01

    All of the life that is known, all organisms that exist on Earth today or are known to have existed on Earth in the past, are of the same life form: a life form based on DNA and protein. It does not necessarily have to be that way. Why not have two competing life forms on this planet? Why not have biology as we know it and some other biology that occupies its own distinct niche? Yet that is not how evolution has played out. From microbes living on the surface of antarctic ice to tube worms lying near the deep-sea hydrothermal vents, all known organisms on this planet are of the same biology. Looking at the single known biology on Earth, it is clear that this biology could not have simply sprung forth from the primordial soup. The biological system that is the basis for all known. life is far too complicated to have arisen spontaneously. This brings us to the notion that something else something simpler, must have preceded life based on DNA and protein. One suggestion that has gained considerable acceptance over the past decade is that DNA and protein-based life was preceded by RNA-based life in a period referred to as the 'RNA world'. Even an RNA-based life form would have been fairly complicated - not as complicated as our own DNA- and protein-based life form - but far too complicated, according to prevailing scientific thinking, to have arisen spontaneously from the primordial soup. Thus, it has been argued that something else must have preceded RNA-based life, or even that there was a succession of life forms leading from the primordial soup to RNA-based life. The experimental evidence to support this conjecture is not strong because, after all, the origin of life was a historical event that left no direct physical record. However, based on indirect evidence in both the geological record and the phylogenetic record of evolutionary history on earth, it is possible to reconstruct a rough picture of what life was like before DNA and protein.

  15. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  16. A method for DNA and RNA co-extraction for use on forensic samples using the Promega DNA IQ™ system.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Anna; Fleming, Rachel; Harbison, SallyAnn

    2011-01-01

    The use of messenger RNA profiling to identify the origin of biological samples (e.g. blood, semen and saliva) from crime scenes is now at the stage of being implemented into routine forensic casework. We report on the successful modification of the Promega DNA IQ™ system to enable co-extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample without compromising the potential DNA profile. Using the protocol in our laboratory for extracting DNA using the DNA IQ™ system combined with the Zymo Research Mini RNA Isolation Kit™ II we demonstrate the simultaneous co-extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample for routine DNA and mRNA profiling for the identification of both the individual and the biological stain.

  17. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA.

  18. Comparison of nucleic acid targets prepared from total RNA or poly(A) RNA for DNA oligonucleotide microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kjell; Oyan, Anne Margrete; Rostad, Kari; Olsen, Sue; Bø, Trond Hellem; Salvesen, Helga B; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bruserud, Oystein; Halvorsen, Ole Johan; Akslen, Lars Andreas; Steen, Vidar M; Jonassen, Inge; Kalland, Karl-Henning

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work was to compare DNA microarray results using either total RNA or affinity-purified poly(A) RNA from the same biological sample for target preparation. The high-density oligonucleotide microarrays of both Agilent Technologies (based on two-color detection) and Applied Biosystems (based on single-color detection) were evaluated. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at different stages of target preparations. Poly(A) RNA versus total RNA target hybridizations exhibited slightly lower correlation coefficients than did self versus self hybridizations (i.e., poly(A) RNA targets vs. poly(A) RNA targets or total RNA targets vs. total RNA targets). Only a small fraction of all transcripts appeared to be significantly over- or underrepresented when total RNA targets or poly(A) RNA targets from the same biological sample were compared. Therefore, the conclusion is that poly(A) affinity purification from total RNA can be omitted during target preparation for routine mRNA expression analysis using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Among consistently overrepresented transcripts in total RNA targets were histone mRNAs known to lack poly(A) tails. Therefore, structurally exceptional RNA species can be identified by comparing targets derived from either poly(A) RNA or total RNA using microarray hybridization.

  19. DNARNA: What Do Students Think the Arrow Means?

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, J. Nick; Newman, Dina L.

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology, a model that has remained intact for decades, describes the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein though an RNA intermediate. While recent work has illustrated many exceptions to the central dogma, it is still a common model used to describe and study the relationship between genes and protein products. We investigated understanding of central dogma concepts and found that students are not primed to think about information when presented with the canonical figure of the central dogma. We also uncovered conceptual errors in student interpretation of the meaning of the transcription arrow in the central dogma representation; 36% of students (n = 128; all undergraduate levels) described transcription as a chemical conversion of DNA into RNA or suggested that RNA existed before the process of transcription began. Interviews confirm that students with weak conceptual understanding of information flow find inappropriate meaning in the canonical representation of central dogma. Therefore, we suggest that use of this representation during instruction can be counterproductive unless educators are explicit about the underlying meaning. PMID:26086664

  20. Assessing long-distance RNA sequence connectivity via RNA-templated DNA–DNA ligation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Christian K; Olson, Sara; Graveley, Brenton R; Zamore, Phillip D; Moore, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    Many RNAs, including pre-mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, can be thousands of nucleotides long and undergo complex post-transcriptional processing. Multiple sites of alternative splicing within a single gene exponentially increase the number of possible spliced isoforms, with most human genes currently estimated to express at least ten. To understand the mechanisms underlying these complex isoform expression patterns, methods are needed that faithfully maintain long-range exon connectivity information in individual RNA molecules. In this study, we describe SeqZip, a methodology that uses RNA-templated DNA–DNA ligation to retain and compress connectivity between distant sequences within single RNA molecules. Using this assay, we test proposed coordination between distant sites of alternative exon utilization in mouse Fn1, and we characterize the extraordinary exon diversity of Drosophila melanogaster Dscam1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03700.001 PMID:25866926

  1. Structural analysis of hepatitis C RNA genome using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Martell, María; Briones, Carlos; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Piron, María; Esteban, Juan I.; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Gómez, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have tried to identify specific nucleotide sequences in the quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that determine resistance or sensitivity to interferon (IFN) therapy, unfortunately without conclusive results. Although viral proteins represent the most evident phenotype of the virus, genomic RNA sequences determine secondary and tertiary structures which are also part of the viral phenotype and can be involved in important biological roles. In this work, a method of RNA structure analysis has been developed based on the hybridization of labelled HCV transcripts to microarrays of complementary DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridizations were carried out at non-denaturing conditions, using appropriate temperature and buffer composition to allow binding to the immobilized probes of the RNA transcript without disturbing its secondary/tertiary structural motifs. Oligonucleotides printed onto the microarray covered the entire 5′ non-coding region (5′NCR), the first three-quarters of the core region, the E2–NS2 junction and the first 400 nt of the NS3 region. We document the use of this methodology to analyse the structural degree of a large region of HCV genomic RNA in two genotypes associated with different responses to IFN treatment. The results reported here show different structural degree along the genome regions analysed, and differential hybridization patterns for distinct genotypes in NS2 and NS3 HCV regions. PMID:15247323

  2. Patterns of oligonucleotide distribution within DNA and RNA functional sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchanov, N.A.; Kel, A.E.; Ponomarenko, M.P.; Romachenko, A.G.; Likchachev, J.; Milanesi, L.; Lim, H.

    1993-12-31

    Patterns of short oligonucleotide distribution within DNA and RNA functional sites have been analyzed using ``Site-Video`` computer system. The group of DNA functional sites involved nucleosome binding sites, gyrase cleavage sites, promoters of E. coli and men. The group of RNA functional sites involved donor and acceptor splice sites of men, translation initiation sites of E. coli and men and translation frame shift site sites. Analysis of these samples of nucleotide sequences have been carried out by the ``Site-Video`` computer system. For each type of site specific set of patterns of oligonucleotide distribution important for the functioning and recognition have been revealed. At the same time, the number of specific patterns revealed in RNA sites was significantly higher than those in DNA sites. On the base of the results obtained, the script of functional sites for evolutionary emergency have been prompted. According to it, two types of context feature selection took place: (1) positive selection targeted to the appearance of the definite types of context features in particular regions of functional sites;and (2) negative selection targeted to the elimination of definite types of context features in particular regions of functional sites. The authors suppose that evolutionary formation of any functional site is a multistep process realized via combination of positive and negative selections. Negative selection, via fixation of a specific pattern of mutations, eliminates false signals of regulatory proteins binding with the functional site. Positive selection leads to the appearance of local context features (signals) which provide for the specificity and efficiency of the site functioning.

  3. An alternate method for DNA and RNA extraction from clotted blood.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Z; Umi, S H; Mokhtar, S S; Mokhtar, U; Zaiharina, M Z; Aziz, A T A; Hoh, B P

    2013-02-04

    We developed an alternative method to extract DNA and RNA from clotted blood for genomic and molecular investigations. A combination of the TRIzol method and the QIAamp spin column were used to extract RNA from frozen clotted blood. Clotted blood was sonicated and then the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit was used for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA and RNA were adequate for gene expression analysis and copy number variation (CNV) genotyping, respectively. The purity of the extracted RNA and DNA was in the range of 1.8-2.0, determined by absorbance ratios of A(260):A(280). Good DNA and RNA integrity were confirmed using gel electrophoresis and automated electrophoresis. The extracted DNA was suitable for qPCR and microarrays for CNV genotyping, while the extracted RNA was adequate for gene analysis using RT-qPCR.

  4. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of miRNA-21 Using a Zinc Finger Protein Specific to DNA-RNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chiew San; Kim, Kwang-Sun; Yu, Byeongjun; Jon, Sangyong; Kim, Moon-Soo; Yang, Haesik

    2017-02-07

    Both high sensitivity and high specificity are crucial for detection of miRNAs that have emerged as important clinical biomarkers. Just Another Zinc finger proteins (JAZ, ZNF346) bind preferably (but nonsequence-specifically) to DNA-RNA hybrids over single-stranded RNAs, single-stranded DNAs, and double-stranded DNAs. We present an ultrasensitive and highly specific electrochemical method for miRNA-21 detection based on the selective binding of JAZ to the DNA-RNA hybrid formed between a DNA capture probe and a target miRNA-21. This enables us to use chemically stable DNA as a capture probe instead of RNA as well as to apply a standard sandwich-type assay format to miRNA detection. High signal amplification is obtained by (i) enzymatic amplification by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) coupled with (ii) electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) redox cycling involving an ALP product (hydroquinone). Low nonspecific adsorption of ALP-conjugated JAZ is obtained using a polymeric self-assembled-monolayer-modified and casein-treated indium-tin oxide electrode. The detection method can discriminate between target miRNA-21 and nontarget nucleic acids (DNA-DNA hybrid, single-stranded DNA, miRNA-125b, miRNA-155, single-base mismatched miRNA, and three-base mismatched miRNA). The detection limits for miRNA-21 in buffer and 10-fold diluted serum are approximately 2 and 30 fM, respectively, indicating that the detection method is ultrasensitive. This detection method can be readily extended to multiplex detection of miRNAs with only one ALP-conjugated JAZ probe due to its nonsequence-specific binding character. We also believe that the method could offer a promising solution for point-of-care testing of miRNAs in body fluids.

  5. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy.

  6. Rates of chemical cleavage of DNA and RNA oligomers containing guanine oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Aaron M; Alshykhly, Omar; Zhu, Judy; Muller, James G; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-06-15

    The nucleobase guanine in DNA (dG) and RNA (rG) has the lowest standard reduction potential of the bases, rendering it a major site of oxidative damage in these polymers. Mapping the sites at which oxidation occurs in an oligomer via chemical reagents utilizes hot piperidine for cleaving oxidized DNA and aniline (pH 4.5) for cleaving oxidized RNA. In the present studies, a series of time-dependent cleavages of DNA and RNA strands containing various guanine lesions were examined to determine the strand scission rate constants. The guanine base lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z), and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih) were evaluated in piperidine-treated DNA and aniline-treated RNA. These data identified wide variability in the chemical lability of the lesions studied in both DNA and RNA. Further, the rate constants for cleaving lesions in RNA were generally found to be significantly smaller than for lesions in DNA. The OG nucleotides were poorly cleaved in DNA and RNA; Sp nucleotides were slowly cleaved in DNA and did not cleave significantly in RNA; Gh and Z nucleotides cleaved in both DNA and RNA at intermediate rates; and 2Ih oligonucleotides cleaved relatively quickly in both DNA and RNA. The data are compared and contrasted with respect to future experimental design.

  7. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of mRNA Using Branched DNA Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Xun; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Shengfu; Lin, Yuehe; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Ma, Yunqing

    2008-11-01

    We describe here an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of m RNA protocol without RNA purification and PCR amplification. The new m RNA electrical detection capability is coupled to the amplification feature of branched DNA (bDNA) technology and with the nagnetic beads based electrochemical bioassay.

  8. Deploying RNA and DNA with Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Alidori, Simone; Asqiriba, Karim; Londero, Pablo; Bergkvist, Magnus; Leona, Marco; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes internalize into cells and are potential molecular platforms for siRNA and DNA delivery. A comprehensive understanding of the identity and stability of ammoniumfunctionalized carbon nanotube (f-CNT)-based nucleic acid constructs is critical to deploying them in vivo as gene delivery vehicles. This work explored the capability of f-CNT to bind single- and double-strand oligonucleotides by determining the thermodynamics and kinetics of assembly and the stoichiometric composition in aqueous solution. Surprisingly, the binding affinity of f-CNT and short oligonucleotide sequences was in the nanomolar range, kinetics of complexation were extremely rapid, and from one to five sequences were loaded per nanotube platform. Mechanistic evidence for an assembly process that involved electrostatic, hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking bonding interactions was obtained by varying nanotube functionalities, oligonucleotides, and reaction conditions. 31P-NMR and spectrophotometric fluorescence emission data described the conditions required to assemble and stably bind a DNA or RNA cargo for delivery in vivo and the amount of oligonucleotide that could be transported. The soluble oligonucleic acid-f-CNT supramolecular assemblies were suitable for use in vivo. Importantly, key evidence in support of an elegant mechanism by which the bound nucleic acid material can be ‘off-loaded’ from the f-CNT was discovered. PMID:23626864

  9. The role of the largest RNA polymerase subunit lid element in preventing the formation of extended RNA-DNA hybrid.

    PubMed

    Naryshkina, Tatyana; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin

    2006-08-25

    Analysis of multi-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) structures revealed several distinct elements that may perform partial functions of the enzyme. One such element, the "lid", is formed by an evolutionarily conserved segment of the RNAP largest subunit (beta' in bacterial RNAP). The beta' lid contacts the nascent RNA at the upstream edge of the RNA-DNA hybrid, where the RNA gets separated from the DNA template-strand and double-stranded upstream DNA is formed. To test the beta' lid functions, we generated bacterial RNAP lacking the lid and studied the mutant enzyme's properties in vitro. Our results demonstrate that removal of the lid has minimal consequences on transcription elongation from double-stranded DNA. On single-stranded DNA, the mutant RNAP generates full-sized transcripts that remain annealed to the DNA throughout their length. In contrast, the wild-type enzyme produces short, 18-22 nucleotide transcripts that remain part of the transcription complex but cannot be further elongated. The cessation of transcription is apparently triggered by a clash between the lid and the nascent RNA 5' end. The results show that the lid's function is redundant in the presence of the non-template DNA strand, which alone can control the proper geometry of nucleic acids at the upstream edge of the transcription complex. Structural considerations suggest that in the absence of the non-template strand and the lid, a new channel opens within the RNAP molecule that allows continuous DNA-RNA hybrid to exit RNAP.

  10. DNA-Damage Response RNA-Binding Proteins (DDRBPs): Perspectives from a New Class of Proteins and Their RNA Targets.

    PubMed

    Dutertre, Martin; Vagner, Stéphan

    2016-09-29

    Upon DNA damage, cells trigger an early DNA-damage response (DDR) involving DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, and late responses involving gene expression regulation that determine cell fate. Screens for genes involved in the DDR have found many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), while screens for novel RBPs have identified DDR proteins. An increasing number of RBPs are involved in early and/or late DDR. We propose to call this new class of actors of the DDR, which contain an RNA-binding activity, DNA-damage response RNA-binding proteins (DDRBPs). We then discuss how DDRBPs contribute not only to gene expression regulation in the late DDR but also to early DDR signaling, DNA repair, and chromatin modifications at DNA-damage sites through interactions with both long and short noncoding RNAs.

  11. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  12. Birth of the macromolecule.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, H

    1996-04-16

    The science of chemistry has made considerable advances over the last few hundred years in the characterization of "small" molecules which can be purified and studied by melting, distillation, crystallization and solubility in various liquids. When the study of "large" natural and biological molecules, limited in these properties, rose in significance at the turn of the century, it was first attempted to explain their properties by the concepts of colloid chemistry of aggregation and complex formation. The struggle for the acceptance of the concept of the natural or biological covalently bonded macromolecule, as recalled by Herman Mark, is one of the interesting chapters in recent science history. A specific phase in the establishment of the macromolecular concept centered around the development by The Svedberg of the analytical ultracentrifuge, a versatile tool of highly practical and profound thermodynamic significance.

  13. Communication between noncontacting macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Völker, Jens; Breslauer, Kenneth J

    2005-01-01

    Molecular interactions are the language that molecules use to communicate recognition, binding, and regulation, events central to biological control mechanisms. Traditionally, such interactions involve direct, atom-to-atom, noncovalent contacts, or indirect contacts bridged by relatively fixed solvent molecules. Here we discuss a third class of molecular communication that, to date, has received less experimental attention, namely solvent-mediated communication between noncontacting macromolecules. This form of communication can be understood in terms of fundamental, well-established principles (coupled equilibria and linkage thermodynamics) that govern interactions between individual polymers and their solutions. In contrast to simple solutions used in laboratory studies, biological systems contain a multitude of nominally noninteracting biopolymers within the same solution environment. The exquisite control of biological function requires some form of communication between many of these solution components, even in the absence of direct and/or indirect contacts. Such communication must be considered when describing potential mechanisms of biological regulation.

  14. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  15. The RNA accordion model for template positioning by telomerase RNA during telomeric DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Andrea J.; Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Stone, Michael D.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme that maintains the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes and whose activation is a hallmark of 90% of all cancers. This RNP minimally contains a reverse transcriptase protein subunit (TERT) that catalyzes telomeric DNA synthesis and an RNA subunit (TER) that has templating, architectural and protein-scaffolding roles. Telomerase is unique among polymerases in that it synthesizes multiple copies of the template on the 3′ end of a primer following a single binding event, a process known as repeat addition processivity (RAP). Using biochemical assays and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments on Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase, we now directly demonstrate that TER contributes to template positioning within the active site and to the template translocation required for RAP. We propose that the single-stranded RNA elements flanking the template act as a molecular accordion, undergoing reciprocal extension and compaction during telomerase translocation. PMID:22101935

  16. Association of the Adenovirus DNA-Binding Protein with RNA Both in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleghon, Vaughn G.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1986-12-01

    The multifunctional DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenovirus binds RNA. The association of purified DBP with RNA in vitro was demonstrated by using either a gel filtration or a filter binding assay. This association is sensitive to ionic strength and exhibits no apparent sequence specificity. DBP also interacts with RNA in vivo; it can be crosslinked to polyadenylylated RNA by UV-irradiation of intact cells during the late phase of adenovirus infections. The 46-kDa carboxyl-terminal domain of DBP binds RNA in vitro and was found to be associated with polyadenylylated RNA in vivo. This is the same domain that interacts with DNA. However, the differences in sensitivity of DBP to trypsin when bound to RNA versus DNA suggest that RNA and DNA either bind at different sites within this domain or induce different conformational changes within the protein.

  17. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  18. DNA nanomechanics allows direct digital detection of complementary DNA and microRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Husale, Sudhir; Persson, Henrik H J; Sahin, Ozgur

    2009-12-24

    Techniques to detect and quantify DNA and RNA molecules in biological samples have had a central role in genomics research. Over the past decade, several techniques have been developed to improve detection performance and reduce the cost of genetic analysis. In particular, significant advances in label-free methods have been reported. Yet detection of DNA molecules at concentrations below the femtomolar level requires amplified detection schemes. Here we report a unique nanomechanical response of hybridized DNA and RNA molecules that serves as an intrinsic molecular label. Nanomechanical measurements on a microarray surface have sufficient background signal rejection to allow direct detection and counting of hybridized molecules. The digital response of the sensor provides a large dynamic range that is critical for gene expression profiling. We have measured differential expressions of microRNAs in tumour samples; such measurements have been shown to help discriminate between the tissue origins of metastatic tumours. Two hundred picograms of total RNA is found to be sufficient for this analysis. In addition, the limit of detection in pure samples is found to be one attomolar. These results suggest that nanomechanical read-out of microarrays promises attomolar-level sensitivity and large dynamic range for the analysis of gene expression, while eliminating biochemical manipulations, amplification and labelling.

  19. Templated Formation of Discrete RNA and DNA:RNA Hybrid G-Quadruplexes and Their Interactions with Targeting Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bonnat, Laureen; Dejeu, Jérôme; Bonnet, Hugues; Génnaro, Béatrice; Jarjayes, Olivier; Thomas, Fabrice; Lavergne, Thomas; Defrancq, Eric

    2016-02-24

    G-rich RNA and DNA oligonucleotides derived from the human telomeric sequence were assembled onto addressable cyclopeptide platforms through oxime ligations and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAc) reactions. The resulting conjugates were able to fold into highly stable RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (G4) architectures as demonstrated by UV, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopic analysis. Whereas rationally designed parallel RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies could be obtained, we could not force the formation of an antiparallel RNA G4 structure, thus supporting the idea that this topology is strongly disfavored. The binding affinities of four representative G4 ligands toward the discrete RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies were compared to the one obtained with the corresponding DNA G4 structure. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis suggests that the accessibility to G4 recognition elements is different among the three structures and supports the idea that G4 ligands might be shaped to achieve structure selectivity in a biological context.

  20. Role of the CCA bulge of prohead RNA of bacteriophage ø29 in DNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Morais, Marc C; Anderson, Dwight L; Jardine, Paul J; Grimes, Shelley

    2008-11-14

    The oligomeric ring of prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the ATP-driven DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ø29. The A-helix of pRNA binds the DNA translocating ATPase gp16 (gene product 16) and the CCA bulge in this helix is essential for DNA packaging in vitro. Mutation of the bulge by base substitution or deletion showed that the size of the bulge, rather than its sequence, is primary in DNA packaging activity. Proheads reconstituted with CCA bulge mutant pRNAs bound the packaging ATPase gp16 and the packaging substrate DNA-gp3, although DNA translocation was not detected with several mutants. Prohead/bulge-mutant pRNA complexes with low packaging activity had a higher rate of ATP hydrolysis per base pair of DNA packaged than proheads with wild-type pRNA. Cryoelectron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of proheads reconstituted with a CCA deletion pRNA showed that the protruding pRNA spokes of the motor occupy a different position relative to the head when compared to particles with wild-type pRNA. Therefore, the CCA bulge seems to dictate the orientation of the pRNA spokes. The conformational changes observed for this mutant pRNA may affect gp16 conformation and/or subsequent ATPase-DNA interaction and, consequently, explain the decreased packaging activity observed for CCA mutants.

  1. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active site region of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ponicsan, Steven L.; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Goodrich, James A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180 nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is a ~500 kD complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde crosslinking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after crosslinking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  2. Decoding DNA, RNA and peptides with quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2016-02-01

    Drugs and treatments could be precisely tailored to an individual patient by extracting their cellular- and molecular-level information. For this approach to be feasible on a global scale, however, information on complete genomes (DNA), transcriptomes (RNA) and proteomes (all proteins) needs to be obtained quickly and at low cost. Quantum mechanical phenomena could potentially be of value here, because the biological information needs to be decoded at an atomic level and quantum tunnelling has recently been shown to be able to differentiate single nucleobases and amino acids in short sequences. Here, we review the different approaches to using quantum tunnelling for sequencing, highlighting the theoretical background to the method and the experimental capabilities demonstrated to date. We also explore the potential advantages of the approach and the technical challenges that must be addressed to deliver practical quantum sequencing devices.

  3. Assessing the Epidemic Potential of RNA and DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Liam; McCaffery, Chris; Lycett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Many new and emerging RNA and DNA viruses are zoonotic or have zoonotic origins in an animal reservoir that is usually mammalian and sometimes avian. Not all zoonotic viruses are transmissible (directly or by an arthropod vector) between human hosts. Virus genome sequence data provide the best evidence of transmission. Of human transmissible virus, 37 species have so far been restricted to self-limiting outbreaks. These viruses are priorities for surveillance because relatively minor changes in their epidemiologies can potentially lead to major changes in the threat they pose to public health. On the basis of comparisons across all recognized human viruses, we consider the characteristics of these priority viruses and assess the likelihood that they will further emerge in human populations. We also assess the likelihood that a virus that can infect humans but is not capable of transmission (directly or by a vector) between human hosts can acquire that capability. PMID:27869592

  4. The Expanding View of RNA and DNA Function

    PubMed Central

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary RNA and DNA are simple linear polymers consisting of only four major types of subunits, and yet these molecules carry out a remarkable diversity of functions in cells and in the laboratory. Each newly-discovered function of natural or engineered nucleic acids enforces the view that prior assessments of nucleic acid function were far too narrow and that many more exciting findings are yet to come. This Perspective highlights just a few of the numerous discoveries over the past 20 years pertaining to nucleic acid function, focusing on those that have been of particular interest to chemical biologists. History suggests that there will continue to be many opportunities to engage chemical biologists in the discovery, creation, and manipulation of nucleic acid function in the years to come. PMID:25237854

  5. Programmed self-assembly of DNA/RNA for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei

    Three self-assembly strategies were utilized for assembly of novel functional DNA/RNA nanostructures. RNA-DNA hybrid origami method was developed to fabricate nano-objects (ribbon, rectangle, and triangle) with precisely controlled geometry. Unlike conventional DNA origami which use long DNA single strand as scaffold, a long RNA single strand was used instead, which was folded by short DNA single strands (staples) into prescribed objects through sequence specific hybridization between RNA and DNA. Single stranded tiles (SST) and RNA-DNA hybrid origami were utilized to fabricate a variety of barcode-like nanostructures with unique patterns by expanding a plain rectangle via introducing spacers (10-bp dsDNA segment) between parallel duplexes. Finally, complex 2D array and 3D polyhedrons with multiple patterns within one structure were assembled from simple DNA motifs. Two demonstrations of biomedical applications of DNA nanotechnology were presented. Firstly, lambda-DNA was used as template to direct the fabrication of multi-component magnetic nanoparticle chains. Nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) characterization showed superb magnetic relaxativity of the nanoparticle chains which have large potential to be utilized as MRI contrast agents. Secondly, DNA nanotechnology was introduced into the conformational study of a routinely used catalytic DNAzyme, the RNA-cleaving 10-23 DNAzyme. The relative angle between two flanking duplexes of the catalytic core was determined (94.8°), which shall be able to provide a clue to further understanding of the cleaving mechanism of this DNAzyme from a conformational perspective.

  6. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY. A Cas9-guide RNA complex preorganized for target DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fuguo; Zhou, Kaihong; Ma, Linlin; Gressel, Saskia; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-06-26

    Bacterial adaptive immunity uses CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) proteins together with CRISPR transcripts for foreign DNA degradation. In type II CRISPR-Cas systems, activation of Cas9 endonuclease for DNA recognition upon guide RNA binding occurs by an unknown mechanism. Crystal structures of Cas9 bound to single-guide RNA reveal a conformation distinct from both the apo and DNA-bound states, in which the 10-nucleotide RNA "seed" sequence required for initial DNA interrogation is preordered in an A-form conformation. This segment of the guide RNA is essential for Cas9 to form a DNA recognition-competent structure that is poised to engage double-stranded DNA target sequences. We construe this as convergent evolution of a "seed" mechanism reminiscent of that used by Argonaute proteins during RNA interference in eukaryotes.

  7. Recruitment of RNA molecules by connexin RNA-binding motifs: Implication in RNA and DNA transport through microvesicles and exosomes.

    PubMed

    Varela-Eirin, Marta; Varela-Vazquez, Adrian; Rodríguez-Candela Mateos, Marina; Vila-Sanjurjo, Anton; Fonseca, Eduardo; Mascareñas, José L; Eugenio Vázquez, M; Mayan, Maria D

    2017-04-01

    Connexins (Cxs) are integral membrane proteins that form high-conductance plasma membrane channels, allowing communication from cell to cell (via gap junctions) and from cells to the extracellular environment (via hemichannels). Initially described for their role in joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions (GJs) are found between virtually all cells in solid tissues and are essential for functional coordination by enabling the direct transfer of small signalling molecules, metabolites, ions, and electrical signals from cell to cell. Several studies have revealed diverse channel-independent functions of Cxs, which include the control of cell growth and tumourigenicity. Connexin43 (Cx43) is the most widespread Cx in the human body. The myriad roles of Cx43 and its implication in the development of disorders such as cancer, inflammation, osteoarthritis and Alzheimer's disease have given rise to many novel questions. Several RNA- and DNA-binding motifs were predicted in the Cx43 and Cx26 sequences using different computational methods. This review provides insights into new, ground-breaking functions of Cxs, highlighting important areas for future work such as transfer of genetic information through extracellular vesicles. We discuss the implication of potential RNA- and DNA-binding domains in the Cx43 and Cx26 sequences in the cellular communication and control of signalling pathways.

  8. RNA-directed DNA methylation induces transcriptional activation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Setsuko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A class-C floral homeotic gene of Petunia, pMADS3, is specifically expressed in the stamen and carpels of developing flowers. We had previously reported the ect-pMADS3 phenomenon in which introduction of a part of the pMADS3 genomic sequence, including intron 2, induces ectopic expression of endogenous pMADS3. Unlike transcriptional or posttranscriptional gene silencing triggered by the introduction of homologous sequences, this observation is unique in that the gene expression is up-regulated. In this study, we demonstrated that the ect-pMADS3 phenomenon is due to transcriptional activation based on RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) occurring in a particular CG in a putative cis-element in pMADS3 intron 2. The CG methylation was maintained over generations, along with pMADS3 ectopic expression, even in the absence of RNA triggers. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed transcriptional regulatory mechanism that could lead to the generation of a transcriptionally active epiallele, thereby contributing to plant evolution. Our results also reveal a putative negative cis-element for organ-specific transcriptional regulation of class-C floral homeotic genes, which could be difficult to identify by other approaches. PMID:19164525

  9. A novel non-coding RNA lncRNA-JADE connects DNA damage signalling to histone H4 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Guohui; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yunhua; Han, Cecil; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Zhang, Xinna; Lu, Xiongbin

    2013-10-30

    A prompt and efficient DNA damage response (DDR) eliminates the detrimental effects of DNA lesions in eukaryotic cells. Basic and preclinical studies suggest that the DDR is one of the primary anti-cancer barriers during tumorigenesis. The DDR involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage, in which long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new class of regulatory RNAs, may play an important role. In the current study, we identified a novel lncRNA, lncRNA-JADE, that is induced after DNA damage in an ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. LncRNA-JADE transcriptionally activates Jade1, a key component in the HBO1 (human acetylase binding to ORC1) histone acetylation complex. Consequently, lncRNA-JADE induces histone H4 acetylation in the DDR. Markedly higher levels of lncRNA-JADE were observed in human breast tumours in comparison with normal breast tissues. Knockdown of lncRNA-JADE significantly inhibited breast tumour growth in vivo. On the basis of these results, we propose that lncRNA-JADE is a key functional link that connects the DDR to histone H4 acetylation, and that dysregulation of lncRNA-JADE may contribute to breast tumorigenesis.

  10. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  11. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-03-06

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  12. EBV noncoding RNA binds nascent RNA to drive host PAX5 to viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Yario, Therese A.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary EBER2 is an abundant nuclear noncoding RNA expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Probing its possible chromatin localization by CHART revealed EBER2’s presence at the terminal repeats (TRs) of the latent EBV genome, overlapping previously identified binding sites for the B-cell transcription factor PAX5. EBER2 interacts with and is required for PAX5 localization to the TRs. EBER2 knockdown phenocopies PAX5 depletion in upregulating the expression of LMP2A/B and LMP1, genes nearest the TRs. Knockdown of EBER2 also decreases EBV lytic replication, underscoring the essential role of the TRs in viral replication. Recruitment of the EBER2-PAX5 complex is mediated by base-pairing between EBER2 and nascent transcripts from the TR locus. The interaction is evolutionarily conserved in the related primate herpesvirus CeHV15 despite great sequence divergence. Using base-pairing with nascent RNA to guide an interacting transcription factor to its DNA target site is a previously undescribed function for a trans-acting noncoding RNA. PMID:25662012

  13. Human Ku70 protein binds hairpin RNA and double stranded DNA through two different sites.

    PubMed

    Anisenko, Andrey N; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina S; Zatsepin, Timofey S; Gottikh, Marina B

    2017-01-01

    Human protein Ku usually functions in the cell as a complex of two subunits, Ku70 and Ku80. The Ku heterodimer plays a key role in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway by specifically recognizing the DNA ends at the site of the lesion. The binding of the Ku heterodimer to DNA has been well-studied, and its interactions with RNA have been also described. However, Ku70 subunit is known to have independent DNA binding capability, which is less characterized. RNA binding properties of Ku70 have not been yet specially studied. We have prepared recombinant full-length Ku70 and a set of its truncated mutants in E. coli, and studied their interactions with nucleic acids of various structures: linear single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA, as well as closed circular DNA and hairpin RNA. Ku70 has demonstrated a high affinity binding to double stranded DNA and hairpin RNA with a certain structure only. Interestingly, in contrast to the Ku heterodimer, Ku70 is found to interact with closed circular DNA. We also show for the first time that Ku70 employs two different sites for DNA and RNA binding. The double-stranded DNA is recognized by the C-terminal part of Ku70 including SAP domain as it has been earlier demonstrated, whereas hairpin RNA binding is provided by amino acids 251-438.

  14. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the phenomenon of hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules in idealized porous media. Tasks towards this objective include: Construct a diffusion cell with ideal pore structure for determination of diffusion coefficients, prepare and characterize ideal porous membranes, perform model compound experiments to calibrate and test diffusion apparatus and methodology, prepare and characterize coal macromolecules, and analyze data to evaluate the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. This report describes work on the hindered diffusion of tetraphenylporphine and asphaltene. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. The Roads to and from the RNA World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Lazcano, Antonio; Miller, Stanley L.

    2003-01-01

    The historical existence of the RNA world, in which early life used RNA for both genetic information and catalytic ability, is widely accepted. However, there has been little discussion of whether protein synthesis arose before DNA or what preceded the RNA world (i.e. the pre-RNA world). We outline arguments of what route life may have taken out of the RNA world: whether DNA or protein followed. The metabolic arguments favor the possibility that RNA genomes preceded the use of DNA as the informational macromolecule. However, the opposite can also be argued based on the enhanced stability, reactivity, and solubility of 2-deoxyribose as compared to ribose. The possibility that DNA may have come before RNA is discussed, although it is a less parsimonious explanation than DNA following RNA.

  16. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013.

  17. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  18. Determination of cellular RNA concentrations by electron microscopy of R loop-containing DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaback, D B; Rosbash, M; Davidson, N

    1981-01-01

    R loop hybridizations and electron microscopy have been used to determine cellular RNA concentrations for cloned genes. In plasmid DNA sequence excess, all the complementary RNA is driven into R loop structures that can be assayed by electron microscopy. To determine the concentration of a particular poly(A)+ RNA, plasmid DNA crosslinked once every 2000-5000 base pairs with trioxsalen and UV light is hybridized in DNA sequence excess to various known amounts of total poly(A)+ RNA, and the R loops are stabilized by treatment with glyoxal. If necessary, excess nonhybridized RNA is removed by Sepharose 2B chromatography, which enables the visualization of less abundant transcripts. Reconstruction experiments demonstrated that electron microscopic determination of the fraction of plasmid DNA molecules containing specific RNA loops gives accurate values of specific RNA weight fractions or concentrations in the total poly(A)+ RNA populations. These methods were also used to determine the concentrations of five RNA species complementary to sequences on TRT3, a recombinant DNA plasmid containing yeast histone 2A and 2B genes and three other nonhistone genes. The methods described allow one to visualize the R loop structures for both abundant and nonabundant transcripts and to estimate concentrations of these RNA species simply by determining the fraction of DNA containing R loops. Images PMID:6265914

  19. Anti-DNA:RNA antibodies and silicon photonic microring resonators: increased sensitivity for multiplexed microRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Qavi, Abraham J; Kindt, Jared T; Gleeson, Martin A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present a method for the sensitive detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) utilizing an antibody that specifically recognizes DNA:RNA heteroduplexes and a silicon photonic microring resonator array transduction platform. Microring resonator arrays are covalently functionalized with DNA capture probes that are complementary to solution phase miRNA targets. Following hybridization on the sensor, the anti-DNA:RNA antibody is introduced and binds selectively to the heteroduplexes, giving a larger signal than the original miRNA hybridization due to the increased mass of the antibody, as compared to the 22-mer oligoribonucleotide. Furthermore, the secondary recognition step is performed in neat buffer solution and at relatively higher antibody concentrations, facilitating the detection of miRNAs of interest. The intrinsic sensitivity of the microring resonator platform coupled with the amplification provided by the anti-DNA:RNA antibodies allows for the detection of microRNAs at concentrations as low as 10 pM (350 amol). The simplicity and sequence generality of this amplification method position it as a promising tool for high-throughput, multiplexed miRNA analysis as well as a range of other RNA based detection applications.

  20. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below.

  1. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    On August 9–11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  2. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers affect mRNA expression of DNA nucleotide excision repair in skin and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe S; Campos, Vera Maria A; Vicentini, Solange C; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; de Paoli, Flavia; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-04-01

    Lasers emit light beams with specific characteristics, in which wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode properties determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses. Low-intensity lasers could induce free radical generation in biological tissues and cause alterations in macromolecules, such as DNA. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity lasers. Wistar rat (n = 28, 4 for each group) skin and muscle were exposed to low-intensity red (660 nm) and near-infrared (880 nm) lasers at different fluences (25, 50, and 100 J/cm(2)), and samples of these tissues were withdrawn for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and gene expression evaluation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Laser exposure was in continuous wave and power of 100 mW. Data show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expressions decrease in skin (p < 0.001) exposed to near-infrared laser, but increase in muscle tissue (p < 0.001). ERCC1 mRNA expression does not alter (p > 0.05), but ERCC2 mRNA expression decreases in skin (p < 0.001) and increases in muscle tissue (p < 0.001) exposed to red laser. Our results show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expression is differently altered in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity lasers depending on wavelengths and fluences used in therapeutic protocols.

  3. Duplex structural differences and not 2′-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA–DNA versus DNA–DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3′ recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA–DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA–DNA. Replacing 2′- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2′-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hydroxyls and RT amino acids do not stabilize binding. RT’s Kd (koff/kon) for DNA–DNA and RNA–DNA were similar, although koff differed almost 40-fold, suggesting a faster kon for DNA–DNA. Avian myeloblastosis and Moloney murine leukemia virus RTs also bound more stably to RNA–DNA, but the difference was less pronounced than with HIV-RT. We propose that the H- versus B-form structures of RNA–DNA and DNA–DNA, respectively, allow the former to conform more easily to HIV-RT’s binding cleft, leading to more stable binding. Biologically, the ability of RT to form a more stable complex on RNA–DNA may aid in degradation of RNA fragments that remain after DNA synthesis. PMID:20338878

  4. The ATM Kinase Induces MicroRNA Biogenesis in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinna; Wan, Guohui; Berger, Franklin G.; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA damage response involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage. Here we show that miRNA biogenesis is globally induced upon DNA damage in an ATM-dependent manner. About one fourth of miRNAs are significantly up-regulated after DNA damage, while loss of ATM abolishes their induction. KSRP (KH-type splicing regulatory protein) is a key player that translates DNA damage signaling to miRNA biogenesis. The ATM kinase directly binds to and phosphorylates KSRP, leading to enhanced interaction between KSRP and pri-miRNAs and increased KSRP activity in miRNA processing. Mutations of the ATM phosphorylation sites of KSRP impaired its activity in regulating miRNAs. These findings reveal a mechanism by which DNA damage signaling is linked to miRNA biogenesis. PMID:21329876

  5. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations. PMID:28084308

  6. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations.

  7. In Vitro Synthesis of Rous Sarcoma Virus-Specific RNA is Catalyzed by a DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rymo, L.; Parsons, J. T.; Coffin, J. M.; Weissmann, C.

    1974-01-01

    Synthesis of Rous sarcoma virus RNA was examined in vitro with a new assay for radioactive virus-specific RNA. Nuclei from infected and uninfected cells were incubated with ribonucleoside [α-32P]triphosphates, Mn++, Mg++ and (NH4)2SO4. Incorporation into total and viral RNA proceeded with similar kinetics for up to 25 min at 37°. About 0.5% of the RNA synthesized by the infected system was scored as virus-specific, compared to 0.03% of the RNA from the uninfected system and 0.005% of the RNA synthesized by monkey kidney cell nuclei. Preincubation with DNase or actinomycin D completely suppressed total and virus-specific RNA synthesis. α-Amanitin, a specific inhibitor of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, completely inhibited virus-specific RNA synthesis, while reducing total RNA synthesis by only 50%. We conclude that tumor virus-specific RNA is synthesized on a DNA template, most probably by the host's RNA polymerase II. PMID:4368801

  8. A comparison of RNA with DNA in template-directed synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zielinski, M.; Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Nonenzymatic template-directed copying of RNA sequences rich in cytidylic acid using nucleoside 5'-(2-methylimidazol-1-yl phosphates) as substrates is substantially more efficient than the copying of corresponding DNA sequences. However, many sequences cannot be copied, and the prospect of replication in this system is remote, even for RNA. Surprisingly, wobble-pairing leads to much more efficient incorporation of G opposite U on RNA templates than of G opposite T on DNA templates.

  9. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA...

  10. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends for RNA Transcript Sequencing in Staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is a technique that was developed to swiftly and efficiently amplify full-length RNA molecules in which the terminal ends have not been characterized. Current usage of this procedure has been more focused on sequencing and characterizing RNA 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Herein is described an adapted RACE protocol to amplify bacterial RNA transcripts.

  11. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Jardine, Paul J.; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong

    2011-07-25

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage {psi}29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of {psi}29 DNA.

  12. In vitro DNA dependent synthesis of globin RNA sequences from erythroleukemic cell chromatin.

    PubMed

    Reff, M E; Davidson, R L

    1979-01-01

    Murine erythroleukemic cells in culture accumulate cytoplasmic globin mRNA during differentiation induced by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)1. Chromatin was prepared from DMSO induced erythroleukemic cells that were transcribing globin RNA in order to determine whether in vitro synthesis of globin RNA sequences was possible from chromatin. RNA was synthesized in vitro using 5-mercuriuridine triphosphate and exogenous Escheria coli RNA polymerase. Newly synthesized mercurated RNA was purified from endogenous chromatin associated RNA by affinity chromatography on a sepharose sulfhydryl column, and the globin RNA sequence content of the mercurated RNA was assayed by hybridization to cDNA globin. The synthesis of globin RNA sequences was shown to occur and to be sensitive to actinomycin and rifampicin and insensitive to alpha-amanitin. In contrast, synthesis of globin RNA sequence synthesis was not detected in significant amounts from chromatin prepared from uninduced erythroleukemic cells, nor from uninduced cell chromatin to which globin RNA was added prior to transcription. Isolated RNA:cDNA globin hybrids were shown to contain mercurated RNA by affinity chromatography. These results indicated that synthesis of globin RNA sequences from chromatin can be performed by E. coli RNA polymerase.

  13. Pulse dipolar ESR of doubly labeled mini TAR DNA and its annealing to mini TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Borbat, Peter P; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Myers, William K; Freed, Jack H; Scholes, Charles P

    2015-02-17

    Pulse dipolar electron-spin resonance in the form of double electron electron resonance was applied to strategically placed, site-specifically attached pairs of nitroxide spin labels to monitor changes in the mini TAR DNA stem-loop structure brought on by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The biophysical structural evidence was at Ångstrom-level resolution under solution conditions not amenable to crystallography or NMR. In the absence of complementary TAR RNA, double labels located in both the upper and the lower stem of mini TAR DNA showed in the presence of NCp7 a broadened distance distribution between the points of attachment, and there was evidence for several conformers. Next, when equimolar amounts of mini TAR DNA and complementary mini TAR RNA were present, NCp7 enhanced the annealing of their stem-loop structures to form duplex DNA-RNA. When duplex TAR DNA-TAR RNA formed, double labels initially located 27.5 Å apart at the 3'- and 5'-termini of the 27-base mini TAR DNA relocated to opposite ends of a 27 bp RNA-DNA duplex with 76.5 Å between labels, a distance which was consistent with the distance between the two labels in a thermally annealed 27-bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex. Different sets of double labels initially located 26-27 Å apart in the mini TAR DNA upper stem, appropriately altered their interlabel distance to ~35 Å when a 27 bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex formed, where the formation was caused either through NCp7-induced annealing or by thermal annealing. In summary, clear structural evidence was obtained for the fraying and destabilization brought on by NCp7 in its biochemical function as an annealing agent and for the detailed structural change from stem-loop to duplex RNA-DNA when complementary RNA was present.

  14. Electrochemical sandwich assay for attomole analysis of DNA and RNA from beer spoilage bacteria Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Shipovskov, Stepan; Saunders, Aaron M; Nielsen, Jesper S; Hansen, Majken H; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2012-01-01

    Attomole (10(-18)mol) levels of RNA and DNA isolated from beer spoilage bacterial cells Lactobacillus brevis have been detected by the electrochemical sandwich DNA hybridization assay exploiting enzymatic activity of lipase. DNA sequences specific exclusively to L. brevis DNA and RNA were selected and used for probe and target DNA design. The assay employs magnetic beads (MB) modified with a capture DNA sequence and a reporter DNA probe labeled with the enzyme, both made to be highly specific for L. brevis DNA. Lipase-labeled DNAs captured on MBs in the sandwich assay were collected on gold electrodes modified with a ferrocene (Fc)-terminated SAM formed by aliphatic esters. Lipase hydrolysis of the ester bond released a fraction of the Fc redox active groups from the electrode surface, decreasing the electrochemical signal from the surface-confined Fc. The assay, shown to be efficient for analysis of short synthetic DNA sequences, was ineffective with genomic double stranded bacterial DNA, but it allowed down to 16 amole detection of 1563 nts long RNA, isolated from bacterial ribosomes without the need for PCR amplification, and single DNA strands produced from ribosomal RNA. No interference from E. coli RNA was registered. The assay allowed analysis of 400 L. brevis cells isolated from 1L of beer, which fits the "alarm signal" range (from 1 to 100 cells per 100mL).

  15. Finding a human telomere DNA-RNA hybrid G-quadruplex formed by human telomeric 6-mer RNA and 16-mer DNA using click chemistry: a protective structure for telomere end.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Suzuki, Yuta; Ishizuka, Takumi; Xiao, Chao-Da; Liu, Xiao; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Komiyama, Makoto

    2014-08-15

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA is a non-coding RNA molecule newly found in mammalian cells. The telomere RNA has been found to localize to the telomere DNA, but how the newly discovered RNA molecule interacts with telomere DNA is less known. In this study, using the click chemistry we successfully found that a 6-mer human telomere RNA and 16-mer human telomere DNA sequence can form a DNA-RNA hybrid type G-quadruplex structure. Detection of the click-reaction products directly probes DNA-RNA G-quadruplex structures in a complicated solution, whereas traditional methods such as NMR and crystallography may not be suitable. Importantly, we found that formation of DNA-RNA G-quadruplex induced an exonuclease resistance for telomere DNA, indicating that such structures might be important for protecting telomeric DNA from enzyme digestion to avoid telomere DNA shortening. These results provide the direct evidence for formation of DNA-RNA hybrid G-quadruplex structure by human telomere DNA and RNA sequence, suggesting DNA-RNA hybrid G-quadruplex structure associated between telomere DNA and RNA may respond to chromosome end protection and/or present a valuable target for drug design.

  16. Stereodefined phosphorothioate analogues of DNA: relative thermodynamic stability of the model PS-DNA/DNA and PS-DNA/RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Boczkowska, Małgorzata; Guga, Piotr; Stec, Wojciech J

    2002-10-15

    Thermodynamic data regarding the influence of P-chirality on stability of duplexes formed between phosphorothioate DNA oligonucleotides (of either stereo-defined all-R(P) or all-S(P) or random configuration at the P atoms) and complementary DNA or RNA strands are presented. Measured melting temperatures and calculated DeltaG(37)(o) values showed that duplexes formed by PS-DNA oligomers with DNA strands are less stable than their unmodified counterparts. However, relative stability of the duplexes ([all-R(P)]-PS-DNA/DNA vs [all-S(P)]-PS-DNA/DNA) depends on their sequential composition rather than on the absolute configuration of PS-oligos, contrary to the results of theoretical considerations and molecular modeling reported in the literature. On the other hand, for all six analyzed pairs of diastereomers, the [all-R(P)]-PS isomers form more stable duplexes with RNA templates, but the origin of stereodifferentiation depends on the sequence with more favorable entropy and enthalpy factors which correlated with dT-rich and dA/dG-rich PS-oligomers, respectively.

  17. Macromolecule Biosynthesis Assay and Fluorescence Spectroscopy Methods to Explore Antimicrobial Peptide Mode(s) of Action.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bimal; Baker, Kristin Renee; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are viable alternatives to the currently available antimicrobials, and numerous studies have investigated their possible use as therapeutic agents for specific clinical applications. AMPs are a diverse class of antimicrobials that often act upon the bacterial cell membrane but may exhibit additional modes of action. Identification of the multiple modes of action requires a comprehensive study at subinhibitory concentrations and careful data analysis since additional modes of action can be eclipsed by AMP action on the cell membrane.Techniques that measure the biosynthesis rate of macromolecules (e.g., DNA, RNA, protein, and cell wall) and the cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force (PMF) energy can help to unravel the diverse modes of action of AMPs. Here, we present an overview of macromolecule biosynthesis rate measurement and fluorescence spectroscopy methods to identify AMP mode(s) of action. Detailed protocols designed to measure inhibition of DNA, RNA, protein, and cell wall synthesis or membrane de-energization are presented and discussed for optimal application of these two techniques as well as to enable accurate interpretation of the experimental findings.

  18. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids activate the cGAS-STING axis.

    PubMed

    Mankan, Arun K; Schmidt, Tobias; Chauhan, Dhruv; Goldeck, Marion; Höning, Klara; Gaidt, Moritz; Kubarenko, Andrew V; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Hornung, Veit

    2014-12-17

    Intracellular recognition of non-self and also self-nucleic acids can result in the initiation of potent pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokine responses. Most recently, cGAS was shown to be critical for the recognition of cytoplasmic dsDNA. Binding of dsDNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP(2'-5'), which then binds to the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein STING. This initiates a signaling cascade that triggers the induction of an antiviral immune response. While most studies on intracellular nucleic acids have focused on dsRNA or dsDNA, it has remained unexplored whether cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are also sensed by the innate immune system. Studying synthetic RNA:DNA hybrids, we indeed observed a strong type I interferon response upon cytosolic delivery of this class of molecule. Studies in THP-1 knockout cells revealed that the recognition of RNA:DNA hybrids is completely attributable to the cGAS-STING pathway. Moreover, in vitro studies showed that recombinant cGAS produced cGAMP upon RNA:DNA hybrid recognition. Altogether, our results introduce RNA:DNA hybrids as a novel class of intracellular PAMP molecules and describe an alternative cGAS ligand next to dsDNA.

  19. Methylated DNA/RNA in Body Fluids as Biomarkers for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Li, Shulin/Sl; Zhu, Shiguo/Sg; Gong, Yabin/Yb; Shi, Jun/J; Xu, Ling/L

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA methylation plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and progression. Liquid biopsy makes use of cells, nucleotides and proteins released from tumor cells into body fluids to help with cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Methylation of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has gained increasing attention as biomarkers for lung cancer. Here we briefly introduce the biological basis and detection method of ctDNA methylation, and review various applications of methylated DNA in body fluids in lung cancer screening, diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment prediction. We also discuss the emerging role of RNA methylation as biomarkers for cancer.

  20. Interacting RNA polymerase motors on a DNA track: Effects of traffic congestion and intrinsic noise on RNA synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Tripti; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an enzyme that synthesizes a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. From the perspective of physicists, an RNAP is a molecular motor that utilizes chemical energy input to move along the track formed by DNA. In many circumstances, which are described in this paper, a large number of RNAPs move simultaneously along the same track; we refer to such collective movements of the RNAPs as RNAP traffic. Here we develop a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs as well as the mechanochemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation of the mRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we calculate the rates of mRNA synthesis and the average density profile of the RNAPs on the DNA track. We also introduce, and compute, two different measures of fluctuations in the synthesis of RNA. Analyzing these fluctuations, we show how the level of intrinsic noise in mRNA synthesis depends on the concentrations of the RNAPs as well as on those of some of the reactants and the products of the enzymatic reactions catalyzed by RNAP. We suggest appropriate experimental systems and techniques for testing our theoretical predictions.

  1. Interacting RNA polymerase motors on a DNA track: effects of traffic congestion and intrinsic noise on RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Tripti; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is an enzyme that synthesizes a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. From the perspective of physicists, an RNAP is a molecular motor that utilizes chemical energy input to move along the track formed by DNA. In many circumstances, which are described in this paper, a large number of RNAPs move simultaneously along the same track; we refer to such collective movements of the RNAPs as RNAP traffic. Here we develop a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs as well as the mechanochemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation of the mRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we calculate the rates of mRNA synthesis and the average density profile of the RNAPs on the DNA track. We also introduce, and compute, two different measures of fluctuations in the synthesis of RNA. Analyzing these fluctuations, we show how the level of intrinsic noise in mRNA synthesis depends on the concentrations of the RNAPs as well as on those of some of the reactants and the products of the enzymatic reactions catalyzed by RNAP. We suggest appropriate experimental systems and techniques for testing our theoretical predictions.

  2. Small RNAs tackle large viruses: RNA interference-based antiviral defense against DNA viruses in insects.

    PubMed

    Bronkhorst, Alfred W; Miesen, Pascal; van Rij, Ronald P

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway processes viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNA) that guide the recognition and cleavage of complementary viral target RNAs. In RNA virus infections, viral replication intermediates, dsRNA genomes or viral structured RNAs have been implicated as Dicer-2 substrates. In a recent publication, we demonstrated that a double-stranded DNA virus, Invertebrate iridescent virus 6, is a target of the Drosophila RNAi machinery, and we proposed that overlapping converging transcripts base pair to form the dsRNA substrates for vsiRNA biogenesis. Here, we discuss the role of RNAi in antiviral defense to DNA viruses in Drosophila and other invertebrate model systems.

  3. DNase concentration assay to obtain DNA-free RNA from sugarcane leaves.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A; Luz, G A; Oliveira, K P; Oliveira, L F; Andrade Júnior, A S; Valente, S E S; Lima, P S C

    2016-12-02

    The success of gene expression studies, protein synthesis, and construction of cDNA libraries directly depends on the purity and integrity of the RNA used in these tests, as even minor amounts of contaminant DNA (<1%) can produce a false positive amplification signal in quantitative real-time PCR. For RNA contaminated with genomic DNA, an essential step in the studies on gene expression is the treatment of the RNA samples with DNase. This study was conducted to test three different concentrations of DNase I (0.02, 0.04, and 0.06 μL/​​ng of RNA), which were chosen based on the results of the RNA sample quantifications and as indicated by the manufacturer, to digest genomic DNA present in the RNA samples extracted from sugarcane leaves with the Concert™ Plant RNA Reagent. The results showed that all three concentrations of DNase significantly reduced DNA concentrations. However, RNA was also degraded on DNase I treatment. In addition, the amount of DNA present in the RNA samples after purification with DNase I was sufficient for its amplification in the tests conducted with conventional PCR. Furthermore, the condition of RNA samples obtained after the treatments allowed for real-time PCR. Therefore, we concluded that 0.02 μL DNase I was the ideal concentration for sugarcane RNA purification, as higher concentrations do not increase the efficiency of the genomic DNA digestion in RNA samples and only make the purification process more expensive. This study provides important information on the effect of high concentrations of DNase I and complements previous studies that have so far tested only the DNase concentration recommended by the manufacturer.

  4. ConSurf 2016: an improved methodology to estimate and visualize evolutionary conservation in macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Abadi, Shiran; Martz, Eric; Chay, Ofer; Mayrose, Itay; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2016-07-08

    The degree of evolutionary conservation of an amino acid in a protein or a nucleic acid in DNA/RNA reflects a balance between its natural tendency to mutate and the overall need to retain the structural integrity and function of the macromolecule. The ConSurf web server (http://consurf.tau.ac.il), established over 15 years ago, analyses the evolutionary pattern of the amino/nucleic acids of the macromolecule to reveal regions that are important for structure and/or function. Starting from a query sequence or structure, the server automatically collects homologues, infers their multiple sequence alignment and reconstructs a phylogenetic tree that reflects their evolutionary relations. These data are then used, within a probabilistic framework, to estimate the evolutionary rates of each sequence position. Here we introduce several new features into ConSurf, including automatic selection of the best evolutionary model used to infer the rates, the ability to homology-model query proteins, prediction of the secondary structure of query RNA molecules from sequence, the ability to view the biological assembly of a query (in addition to the single chain), mapping of the conservation grades onto 2D RNA models and an advanced view of the phylogenetic tree that enables interactively rerunning ConSurf with the taxa of a sub-tree.

  5. Production of infectious RNA transcripts from full-length cDNA clones representing two subgroups of peanut stunt virus strains: mapping satellite RNA support to RNA1.

    PubMed

    Hu, C C; Sanger, M; Ghabrial, S A

    1998-08-01

    Full-length cDNA clones from which infectious transcripts could be generated were constructed from the genomic RNAs of two distinct strains of peanut stunt cucumovirus (PSV), PSV-ER and PSV-W. PSV-ER, a subgroup I strain, is known to support efficient replication of satellite RNA (satRNA) in infected plants, whereas PSV-W, a subgroup II strain, does not support satRNA replication. Although artificial reassortants (pseudorecombinants) of all possible combinations of infectious transcripts representing RNA1, RNA2 and RNA3 were infectious, only those having RNA1 from PSV-ER supported the replication of satRNA. These results demonstrate conclusively that support of PSV satRNA replication maps to RNA1. Comparisons of secondary structure predictions of the C-terminal helicase-like domain of the 1a proteins of four PSV strains belonging to two subgroups did not reveal any obvious differences between strains that differ in satRNA support. The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA1 from strains PSV-ER and PSV-W were determined and found to be 79% identical. Sequence comparison analysis of RNA1 sequences of cucumoviruses confirmed the placement of the PSV strains into two distinct subgroups.

  6. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  7. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-05

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA.

  8. RNA-dependent DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the CRISPR system: Holy Grail of genome editing?

    PubMed

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-11-01

    Tailor-made nucleases for precise genome modification, such as zinc finger or TALE nucleases, currently represent the state-of-the-art for genome editing. These nucleases combine a programmable protein module which guides the enzyme to the target site with a nuclease domain which cuts DNA at the addressed site. Reprogramming of these nucleases to cut genomes at specific locations requires major protein engineering efforts. RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the type II (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) CRISPR-Cas system uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) as a guide to locate the DNA target and the Cas9 protein to cut DNA. Easy programmability of the Cas9 endonuclease using customizable RNAs brings unprecedented flexibility and versatility for targeted genome modification. We highlight the potential of the Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease as a novel tool for genome surgery, and discuss possible constraints and future prospects.

  9. RNA Interference by Single- and Double-stranded siRNA With a DNA Extension Containing a 3' Nuclease-resistant Mini-hairpin Structure.

    PubMed

    Allison, Simon J; Milner, Jo

    2014-01-07

    Selective gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) involves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds siRNA) composed of single-stranded (ss) guide and passenger RNAs. siRNA is recognized and processed by Ago2 and C3PO, endonucleases of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC cleaves passenger RNA, exposing the guide RNA for base-pairing with its homologous mRNA target. Remarkably, the 3' end of passenger RNA can accommodate a DNA extension of 19-nucleotides without loss of RNAi function. This construct is termed passenger-3'-DNA/ds siRNA and includes a 3'-nuclease-resistant mini-hairpin structure. To test this novel modification further, we have now compared the following constructs: (I) guide-3'-DNA/ds siRNA, (II) passenger-3'-DNA/ds siRNA, (III) guide-3'-DNA/ss siRNA, and (IV) passenger-3'-DNA/ss siRNA. The RNAi target was SIRT1, a cancer-specific survival factor. Constructs I-III each induced selective knock-down of SIRT1 mRNA and protein in both noncancer and cancer cells, accompanied by apoptotic cell death in the cancer cells. Construct IV, which lacks the SIRT1 guide strand, had no effect. Importantly, the 3'-DNA mini-hairpin conferred nuclease resistance to constructs I and II. Resistance required the double-stranded RNA structure since single-stranded guide-3'-DNA/ss siRNA (construct III) was susceptible to serum nucleases with associated loss of RNAi activity. The potential applications of 3'-DNA/siRNA constructs are discussed.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2014) 2, e141; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.68; published online 7 January 2014.

  10. RNA Interference by Single- and Double-stranded siRNA With a DNA Extension Containing a 3' Nuclease-resistant Mini-hairpin Structure.

    PubMed

    Allison, Simon J; Milner, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Selective gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) involves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds siRNA) composed of single-stranded (ss) guide and passenger RNAs. siRNA is recognized and processed by Ago2 and C3PO, endonucleases of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC cleaves passenger RNA, exposing the guide RNA for base-pairing with its homologous mRNA target. Remarkably, the 3' end of passenger RNA can accommodate a DNA extension of 19-nucleotides without loss of RNAi function. This construct is termed passenger-3'-DNA/ds siRNA and includes a 3'-nuclease-resistant mini-hairpin structure. To test this novel modification further, we have now compared the following constructs: (I) guide-3'-DNA/ds siRNA, (II) passenger-3'-DNA/ds siRNA, (III) guide-3'-DNA/ss siRNA, and (IV) passenger-3'-DNA/ss siRNA. The RNAi target was SIRT1, a cancer-specific survival factor. Constructs I-III each induced selective knock-down of SIRT1 mRNA and protein in both noncancer and cancer cells, accompanied by apoptotic cell death in the cancer cells. Construct IV, which lacks the SIRT1 guide strand, had no effect. Importantly, the 3'-DNA mini-hairpin conferred nuclease resistance to constructs I and II. Resistance required the double-stranded RNA structure since single-stranded guide-3'-DNA/ss siRNA (construct III) was susceptible to serum nucleases with associated loss of RNAi activity. The potential applications of 3'-DNA/siRNA constructs are discussed.

  11. Synthesis and properties of 4′-ThioDNA: unexpected RNA-like behavior of 4′-ThioDNA

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Naonori; Minakawa, Noriaki; Matsuda, Akira

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and properties of fully modified 4′-thioDNAs, oligonucleotides consisting of 2′-deoxy-4′-thionucleosides, were examined. In addition to the known literature properties (preferable hybridization with RNA and resistance to endonuclease hydrolysis), we also observed higher resistance of 4′-thioDNA to 3′-exonuclease cleavage. Furthermore, we found that fully modified 4′-thioDNAs behaved like RNA molecules in their hybridization properties and structural aspect, at least in the case of the 4′-thioDNA duplex. This observation was confirmed by experiments using groove binders, in which a 4′-thioDNA duplex interacts with an RNA major groove binder, lividomycin A, but not with DNA groove binders, to give an increase in its thermal stability. Since a 4′-thioDNA duplex competitively inhibited the hydrolysis of an RNA duplex by RNase V1, it was not only the physical properties but also this biological data suggested that a 4′-thioDNA duplex has an RNA-like structure. PMID:16855286

  12. Simultaneous analysis of micro-RNA and DNA for determining the body fluid origin of DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Donny; Uchimoto, Mari L; Williams, Graham

    2013-07-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) can be specifically expressed in forensically relevant body fluids such as blood or saliva. The aim of the study was to develop a simultaneous extraction and analysis protocol that allows for the acquisition of a DNA profile and the identity of the body fluid using a single process. DNA and micro-RNA were extracted from blood and saliva before undergoing a cDNA synthesis step by using stem-loop reverse transcription PCR. The resulting extracts containing DNA and cDNA synthesized from body fluid-specific miRNA markers then underwent standard STR analysis using a modified ABI AmpFℓSTR(®) NGM SElect™ kit. In all samples, a full DNA profile was obtained along with additional peaks corresponding to the miRNA marker targeted. In all cases, blood samples profiled exhibited a peak indicating the presence of the blood-specific miRNA marker and the saliva sample profiled exhibited a peak indicating the presence of the saliva-specific miRNA marker.

  13. Replication initiation and genome instability: a crossroads for DNA and RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Nussenzweig, André

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear DNA replication requires the concerted action of hundreds of proteins to efficiently unwind and duplicate the entire genome while also retaining epigenetic regulatory information. Initiation of DNA replication is tightly regulated, rapidly firing thousands of origins once the conditions to promote rapid and faithful replication are in place, and defects in replication initiation lead to proliferation defects, genome instability, and a range of developmental abnormalities. Interestingly, DNA replication in metazoans initiates in actively transcribed DNA, meaning that replication initiation occurs in DNA that is co-occupied with tens of thousands of poised and active RNA polymerase complexes. Active transcription can induce genome instability, particularly during DNA replication, as RNA polymerases can induce torsional stress, formation of secondary structures, and act as a physical barrier to other enzymes involved in DNA metabolism. Here we discuss the challenges facing mammalian DNA replication, their impact on genome instability, and the development of cancer.

  14. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Pai, Dave A; Kaplan, Craig D; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C; Engelke, David R

    2014-05-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template.

  15. Transient RNA-DNA Hybrids Are Required for Efficient Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohle, Corina; Tesorero, Rafael; Schermann, Géza; Dobrev, Nikolay; Sinning, Irmgard; Fischer, Tamás

    2016-11-03

    RNA-DNA hybrids are a major internal cause of DNA damage within cells, and their degradation by RNase H enzymes is important for maintaining genomic stability. Here, we identified an unexpected role for RNA-DNA hybrids and RNase H enzymes in DNA repair. Using a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we showed that RNA-DNA hybrids form as part of the homologous-recombination (HR)-mediated DSB repair process and that RNase H enzymes are essential for their degradation and efficient completion of DNA repair. Deleting RNase H stabilizes RNA-DNA hybrids around DSB sites and strongly impairs recruitment of the ssDNA-binding RPA complex. In contrast, overexpressing RNase H1 destabilizes these hybrids, leading to excessive strand resection and RPA recruitment and to severe loss of repeat regions around DSBs. Our study challenges the existing model of HR-mediated DSB repair and reveals a surprising role for RNA-DNA hybrids in maintaining genomic stability.

  16. Chum-RNA allows preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA without PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    Linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is useful in genome-wide analysis of gene expression using DNA microarrays, but exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is still required for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. We have designed a small RNA molecule called chum-RNA that has enabled us to prepare a single-cell cDNA library after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. Chum-RNA drove cDNA synthesis from only 0.49 femtograms of mRNA (730 mRNA molecules) as a substrate, a quantity that corresponds to a minor population of mRNA molecules in a single mammalian cell. Analysis of the independent cDNA clone of this library (6.6 x 10(5) cfu) suggests that 30-fold RNA amplification occurred in each round of the amplification process. The size distribution and representation of mRNAs in the resulting one-cell cDNA library retained its similarity to that of the million-cell cDNA library. The use of chum-RNA might also facilitate reactions involving other DNA/RNA modifying enzymes whose Michaelis constant (K(m)) values are around 1 mM, allowing them to be activated in the presence of only small quantities of substrate.

  17. Molecular underpinnings of Aprataxin RNA/DNA deadenylase function and dysfunction in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Tumbale, Percy P; Williams, R Scott

    2015-03-01

    Eukaryotic DNA ligases seal DNA breaks in the final step of DNA replication and repair transactions via a three-step reaction mechanism that can abort if DNA ligases encounter modified DNA termini, such as the products and repair intermediates of DNA oxidation, alkylation, or the aberrant incorporation of ribonucleotides into genomic DNA. Such abortive DNA ligation reactions act as molecular checkpoint for DNA damage and create 5'-adenylated nucleic acid termini in the context of DNA and RNA-DNA substrates in DNA single strand break repair (SSBR) and ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). Aprataxin (APTX), a protein altered in the heritable neurological disorder Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia 1 (AOA1), acts as a DNA ligase "proofreader" to directly reverse AMP-modified nucleic acid termini in DNA- and RNA-DNA damage responses. Herein, we survey APTX function and the emerging cell biological, structural and biochemical data that has established a molecular foundation for understanding the APTX mediated deadenylation reaction, and is providing insights into the molecular bases of APTX deficiency in AOA1.

  18. Molecular cloning of cDNA for double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase, a candidate enzyme for nuclear RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, U; Wang, Y; Sanford, T; Zeng, Y; Nishikura, K

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned human cDNA encoding double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (DRADA). DRADA is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that converts multiple adenosines to inosines in double-helical RNA substrates without apparent sequence specificity. The A --> I conversion activity of the protein encoded by the cloned cDNA was confirmed by recombinant expression in insect cells. Use of the cloned DNA as a molecular probe documented sequence conservation across mammals and detected a single transcript of 7 kb in RNA of all human tissues analyzed. The deduced primary structure of human DRADA revealed a bipartite nuclear localization signal, three repeats of a double-stranded RNA binding motif, and the presence of sequences conserved in the catalytic center of other deaminases, including a cytidine deaminase involved in the RNA editing of apolipoprotein B. These structural properties are consistent with the enzymatic signature of DRADA, and strengthen the hypothesis that DRADA carries out the RNA editing of transcripts encoding glutamate-gated ion channels in brain. Images PMID:7972084

  19. Legume genomics: understanding biology through DNA and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Jamie A.; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The legume family (Leguminosae) consists of approx. 17 000 species. A few of these species, including, but not limited to, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum and Cajanus cajan, are important dietary components, providing protein for approx. 300 million people worldwide. Additional species, including soybean (Glycine max) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), are important crops utilized mainly in animal feed. In addition, legumes are important contributors to biological nitrogen, forming symbiotic relationships with rhizobia to fix atmospheric N2 and providing up to 30 % of available nitrogen for the next season of crops. The application of high-throughput genomic technologies including genome sequencing projects, genome re-sequencing (DNA-seq) and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) by the legume research community has provided major insights into genome evolution, genomic architecture and domestication. Scope and Conclusions This review presents an overview of the current state of legume genomics and explores the role that next-generation sequencing technologies play in advancing legume genomics. The adoption of next-generation sequencing and implementation of associated bioinformatic tools has allowed researchers to turn each species of interest into their own model organism. To illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing, an in-depth overview of the transcriptomes of both soybean and white lupin (Lupinus albus) is provided. The soybean transcriptome focuses on analysing seed development in two near-isogenic lines, examining the role of transporters, oil biosynthesis and nitrogen utilization. The white lupin transcriptome analysis examines how phosphate deficiency alters gene expression patterns, inducing the formation of cluster roots. Such studies illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in elucidating the gene networks underlying biological processes. PMID:24769535

  20. Metakaryotic stem cell nuclei use pangenomic dsRNA/DNA intermediates in genome replication and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Thilly, William G; Gostjeva, Elena V; Koledova, Vera V; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Chung, Daniel; Fomina, Janna N; Darroudi, Firouz; Stollar, B David

    2014-01-01

    Bell shaped nuclei of metakaryotic cells double their DNA content during and after symmetric and asymmetric amitotic fissions rather than in the separate, pre-mitotic S-phase of eukaryotic cells. A parsimonious hypothesis was tested that the two anti-parallel strands of each chromatid DNA helix were first segregated as ssDNA-containing complexes into sister nuclei then copied to recreate a dsDNA genome. Metakaryotic nuclei that were treated during amitosis with RNase A and stained with acridine orange or fluorescent antibody to ssDNA revealed large amounts of ssDNA. Without RNase treatment metakaryotic nuclei in amitosis stained strongly with an antibody complex specific to dsRNA/DNA. Images of amitotic figures co-stained with dsRNA/DNA antibody and DAPI indicated that the entire interphase dsDNA genome (B-form helices) was transformed into two dsRNA/DNA genomes (A-form helices) that were segregated in the daughter cell nuclei then retransformed into dsDNA. As this process segregates DNA strands of opposite polarity in sister cells it hypothetically offers a sequential switching mechanism within the diverging stem cell lineages of development. PMID:24418910

  1. Metakaryotic stem cell nuclei use pangenomic dsRNA/DNA intermediates in genome replication and segregation.

    PubMed

    Thilly, William G; Gostjeva, Elena V; Koledova, Vera V; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Chung, Daniel; Fomina, Janna N; Darroudi, Firouz; Stollar, B David

    2014-01-01

    Bell shaped nuclei of metakaryotic cells double their DNA content during and after symmetric and asymmetric amitotic fissions rather than in the separate, pre-mitotic S-phase of eukaryotic cells. A parsimonious hypothesis was tested that the two anti-parallel strands of each chromatid DNA helix were first segregated as ssDNA-containing complexes into sister nuclei then copied to recreate a dsDNA genome. Metakaryotic nuclei that were treated during amitosis with RNase A and stained with acridine orange or fluorescent antibody to ssDNA revealed large amounts of ssDNA. Without RNase treatment metakaryotic nuclei in amitosis stained strongly with an antibody complex specific to dsRNA/DNA. Images of amitotic figures co-stained with dsRNA/DNA antibody and DAPI indicated that the entire interphase dsDNA genome (B-form helices) was transformed into two dsRNA/DNA genomes (A-form helices) that were segregated in the daughter cell nuclei then retransformed into dsDNA. As this process segregates DNA strands of opposite polarity in sister cells it hypothetically offers a sequential switching mechanism within the diverging stem cell lineages of development.

  2. Evolution of viruses by acquisition of cellular RNA or DNA nucleotide sequences and genes: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    2000-01-01

    The origins of virus evolution may be traced to Archeabacteria since Inouye and Inouye (6) discovered a retroelement with a gene for reverse transcriptase in the bacterial genome and in the satellite, multiple copy single stranded DNA (msDNA) in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. It was possible (8) to define the evolution of retroelements in eukaryotic cells of plants, insects (gypsy retrovirus) and vertebrates. The replication of RNA viruses in eukaryotic cells allowed for the viral RNA genome to integrate a cellular ubiquitin mRNA, as reported for BVDV (24). Another example is the integration of 28S ribosomal RNA into the hemagglutinin gene of an influenza virus. This change in the hemagglutinin gene led to an increased pathogenicity of the influenza virus (25). In contrast to RNA viruses, DNA viruses had evolved by inserting cDNA molecules derived from mRNA transcripts of cellular genes or foreign viral RNA. It is of interest that the virus acquired cellular genes in the genomes of DNA viruses represent genes that code for proteins that inhibit cellular molecular processes related to HLA class I and II molecules. The other acquired genes are cellular genes that code for cytokines that are capable of inhibiting antigen presentation to T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) by dendritic Langerhans cells. The acquisition of cellular genes by DNA viruses enhances their pathogenicity by inhibiting the hosts' defense systems.

  3. Evaluation of commercial kits for extraction of DNA and RNA from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Devon; Weese, J Scott

    2012-12-01

    Commercial nucleic acid extraction kits are a cost effective, efficient and convenient way to isolate DNA and RNA from bacteria. Despite the increasing importance of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Clostridium difficile, and the increased use of nucleic acids in its identification, characterization, and investigation of virulence factors, no standardized or recommended methods for nucleic acid isolation exist. Here, we sought to evaluate 4 commercial DNA extraction kits and 3 commercial RNA extraction kits assessing cost, labor intensity, purity, quantity and quality of nucleic acid preparations. The DNA extraction kits produced a range of concentrations (20.9-546 ng/ml) and A(260/280) ratios (1.92-2.11). All kits were suitable for DNA extraction with the exception of the Roche MagNA pure LC DNA isolation kit III which produced DNA of high yield but with substantial shearing, but that did not affect downstream PCR amplifications. For RNA extraction, the Qiagen RNeasy mini kit stood out producing preparations of consistently higher concentrations and higher RNA integrity numbers (RIN). The Roche MagNA pure LC RNA isolation kit produced preparations that could not be properly assigned RINs due to a failure to remove small RNAs which were interpreted as degradation. Good DNA and RNA yield are critical but methods are often overlooked. This study highlights the potential for critical variation between established commercial systems and the need for assessment of any extraction methods that are used.

  4. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-10-04

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases.

  5. Photocleavage of DNA and photofootprinting of E. coli RNA polymerase bound to promoter DNA by azido-9-acridinylamines.

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, C; Buchardt, O; Henriksen, U; Nielsen, P E

    1988-01-01

    The long-wavelength ultraviolet (lambda approximately 420 nm) radiation induced reaction between 6-azido-2-methoxy-9-acridinylamines and supercoiled plasmid DNA results in single strand scissions and formation of covalent adducts (ratio approximately 1:10). By treating azidoacridine-photomodified DNA with piperidine at 90 degrees C, additional strand scissions are observed in a complex sequence dependent manner with an overall preference for T greater than or equal to G greater than C much greater than A. The resulting DNA fragments migrate as 5'-phosphates in polyacrylamide gels. Photofootprinting of the binding site of RNA-polymerase on promoter DNA is demonstrated with an azido-9-acridinylamino-octamethylene-9-aminoacridine. Similar experiments using 9-amino-6-azido-2-methoxyacridine indicate that this reagent recognizes changes in the DNA conformation induced by RNA polymerase binding, in relation to open complex formation. Images PMID:3041368

  6. DNA as Tunable Adaptor for siRNA Polyplex Stabilization and Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Heissig, Philipp; Klein, Philipp M.; Hadwiger, Philipp; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    siRNA and microRNA are promising therapeutic agents, which are engaged in a natural mechanism called RNA interference that modulates gene expression posttranscriptionally. For intracellular delivery of such nucleic acid triggers, we use sequence-defined cationic polymers manufactured through solid phase chemistry. They consist of an oligoethanamino amide core for siRNA complexation and optional domains for nanoparticle shielding and cell targeting. Due to the small size of siRNA, electrostatic complexes with polycations are less stable, and consequently intracellular delivery is less efficient. Here we use DNA oligomers as adaptors to increase size and charge of cargo siRNA, resulting in increased polyplex stability, which in turn boosts transfection efficiency. Extending a single siRNA with a 181-nucleotide DNA adaptor is sufficient to provide maximum gene silencing aided by cationic polymers. Interestingly, this simple strategy was far more effective than merging defined numbers (4–10) of siRNA units into one DNA scaffolded construct. For DNA attachment, the 3′ end of the siRNA passenger strand was beneficial over the 5′ end. The impact of the attachment site however was resolved by introducing bioreducible disulfides at the connection point. We also show that DNA adaptors provide the opportunity to readily link additional functional domains to siRNA. Exemplified by the covalent conjugation of the endosomolytic influenza peptide INF-7 to siRNA via a DNA backbone strand and complexing this construct with a targeting polymer, we could form a highly functional polyethylene glycol–shielded polyplex to downregulate a luciferase gene in folate receptor–positive cells. PMID:26928236

  7. Molecular Underpinnings of Aprataxin RNA/DNA Deadenylase Function and Dysfunction in Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA ligases seal DNA breaks in the final step of DNA replication and repair transactions via a three-step reaction mechanism that can abort if DNA ligases encounter modified DNA termini, such as the products and repair intermediates of DNA oxidation, alkylation, or the aberrant incorporation of ribonucleotides into genomic DNA. Such abortive DNA ligation reactions create 5’–adenylated nucleic acid termini in the context of DNA and RNA-DNA substrates in DNA base excision repair (BER), double strand break repair (DSBR) and ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). Aprataxin (APTX), a protein altered in the heritable neurological disorder Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia 1 (AOA1), acts as a DNA ligase “proofreader” to directly reverse AMP-modified nucleic acid termini in DNA- and RNA-DNA damage responses. Herein, we survey APTX function and the emerging cell biological, structural and biochemical data that has established a molecular foundation for understanding the APTX mediated deadenylation reaction, and is providing insights into the molecular bases of APTX deficiency in AOA1. PMID:25637650

  8. The effect of as long-term Mars simulation on a microbial permafrost soil community and macromolecules such as DNA, polypeptides and cell wall components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finster, K.; Hansen, A.; Liengaard, L.; Kristoffersen, T.; Mikkelsen, K.; Merrison, J.; Lomstein, B.

    Ten freeze-dried and homogenized samples of a 2300 years old Spitsbergen permafrost soil containing a complex microbial community were aseptically transferred to inert glass tubes and subjected to a 30 days Martian simulation experiment. During this period the samples received an UV dose equivalent to 80 Martian Sol. Data loggers in 4 out the ten samples monitored the temperature 0-2 mm below the surface of the sample. After removal from the simulation chamber, the samples were sliced in 1.5 to 6 mm thick horizons (H1, 0-1.5 mm; H2, 1.5-3 mm; H3, 3-6 mm; H4, 6-9 mm; H5, 9-15 mm; H6, 15-21 mm; H7, 21-27 mm and H8, 27-33 mm), resulting in 10 subsamples from each soil horizon. The subsamples from each horizon were pooled and used for the following investigations: 1. Determination of the bacterial number after staining with SYBR-gold, 2. Determination of the number of dead and living bacteria using the BacLight kit, 3. Determination of the total amount of extractable DNA, 4. Determination of the number of culturable aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, 5. Determination of the concentration of the total hydrolysable amino acids and D and L enantiomers, 6. Determination of the muramic acid contentration. The results of the experiments will be presented and discussed in our communication

  9. The RNA-binding protein HuR regulates DNA methylation through stabilization of DNMT3b mRNA.

    PubMed

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Gorospe, Myriam; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Srikantan, Subramanya; Alaminos, Miguel; Berdasco, María; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Fraga, Mario F; Jacinto, Filipe V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-05-01

    The molecular basis underlying the aberrant DNA-methylation patterns in human cancer is largely unknown. Altered DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity is believed to contribute, as DNMT expression levels increase during tumorigenesis. Here, we present evidence that the expression of DNMT3b is post-transcriptionally regulated by HuR, an RNA-binding protein that stabilizes and/or modulates the translation of target mRNAs. The presence of a putative HuR-recognition motif in the DNMT3b 3'UTR prompted studies to investigate if this transcript associated with HuR. The interaction between HuR and DNMT3b mRNA was studied by immunoprecipitation of endogenous HuR ribonucleoprotein complexes followed by RT-qPCR detection of DNMT3b mRNA, and by in vitro pulldown of biotinylated DNMT3b RNAs followed by western blotting detection of HuR. These studies revealed that binding of HuR stabilized the DNMT3b mRNA and increased DNMT3b expression. Unexpectedly, cisplatin treatment triggered the dissociation of the [HuR-DNMT3b mRNA] complex, in turn promoting DNMT3b mRNA decay, decreasing DNMT3b abundance, and lowering the methylation of repeated sequences and global DNA methylation. In summary, our data identify DNMT3b mRNA as a novel HuR target, present evidence that HuR affects DNMT3b expression levels post-transcriptionally, and reveal the functional consequences of the HuR-regulated DNMT3b upon DNA methylation patterns.

  10. RNA2DNAlign: nucleotide resolution allele asymmetries through quantitative assessment of RNA and DNA paired sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Movassagh, Mercedeh; Alomran, Nawaf; Mudvari, Prakriti; Dede, Merve; Dede, Cem; Kowsari, Kamran; Restrepo, Paula; Cauley, Edmund; Bahl, Sonali; Li, Muzi; Waterhouse, Wesley; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Edwards, Nathan; Horvath, Anelia

    2016-12-15

    We introduce RNA2DNAlign, a computational framework for quantitative assessment of allele counts across paired RNA and DNA sequencing datasets. RNA2DNAlign is based on quantitation of the relative abundance of variant and reference read counts, followed by binomial tests for genotype and allelic status at SNV positions between compatible sequences. RNA2DNAlign detects positions with differential allele distribution, suggesting asymmetries due to regulatory/structural events. Based on the type of asymmetry, RNA2DNAlign outlines positions likely to be implicated in RNA editing, allele-specific expression or loss, somatic mutagenesis or loss-of-heterozygosity (the first three also in a tumor-specific setting). We applied RNA2DNAlign on 360 matching normal and tumor exomes and transcriptomes from 90 breast cancer patients from TCGA. Under high-confidence settings, RNA2DNAlign identified 2038 distinct SNV sites associated with one of the aforementioned asymetries, the majority of which have not been linked to functionality before. The performance assessment shows very high specificity and sensitivity, due to the corroboration of signals across multiple matching datasets. RNA2DNAlign is freely available from http://github.com/HorvathLab/NGS as a self-contained binary package for 64-bit Linux systems.

  11. Single molecule photobleaching (SMPB) technology for counting of RNA, DNA, protein and other molecules in nanoparticles and biological complexes by TIRF instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-05-15

    Direct counting of biomolecules within biological complexes or nanomachines is demanding. Single molecule counting using optical microscopy is challenging due to the diffraction limit. The single molecule photobleaching (SMPB) technology for direct counting developed by our team (Shu et al., 2007 [18]; Zhang et al., 2007 [19]) offers a simple and straightforward method to determine the stoichiometry of molecules or subunits within biocomplexes or nanomachines at nanometer scales. Stoichiometry is determined by real-time observation of the number of descending steps resulted from the photobleaching of individual fluorophore. This technology has now been used extensively for single molecule counting of protein, RNA, and other macromolecules in a variety of complexes or nanostructures. Here, we elucidate the SMPB technology, using the counting of RNA molecules within a bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging biomotor as an example. The method described here can be applied to the single molecule counting of other molecules in other systems. The construction of a concise, simple and economical single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope combining prism-type and objective-type TIRF is described. The imaging system contains a deep-cooled sensitive EMCCD camera with single fluorophore detection sensitivity, a laser combiner for simultaneous dual-color excitation, and a Dual-View™ imager to split the multiple outcome signals to different detector channels based on their wavelengths. Methodology of the single molecule photobleaching assay used to elucidate the stoichiometry of RNA on phi29 DNA packaging motor and the mechanism of protein/RNA interaction are described. Different methods for single fluorophore labeling of RNA molecules are reviewed. The process of statistical modeling to reveal the true copy number of the biomolecules based on binomial distribution is also described.

  12. Recognition of Chelerythrine to Human Telomeric DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Li-Ping; Hagihara, Masaki; Nakatani, Kazuhiko; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-10-01

    A study on binding of antitumor chelerythrine to human telomeric DNA/RNA G-quadruplexes was performed by using DNA polymerase stop assay, UV-melting, ESI-TOF-MS, UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometry and fluorescent triazole orange displacement assay. Chelerythrine selectively binds to and stabilizes the K+-form hybrid-type human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex of biological significance, compared with the Na+-form antiparallel-type DNA G-quadruplex. ESI-TOF-MS study showed that chelerythrine possesses a binding strength for DNA G-quadruplex comparable to that of TMPyP4 tetrachloride. Both 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries were observed for chelerythrine's binding with DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes. The binding strength of chelerythrine with RNA G-quadruplex is stronger than that with DNA G-quadruplex. Fluorescent triazole orange displacement assay revealed that chelerythrine interacts with human telomeric RNA/DNA G-quadruplexes by the mode of end- stacking. The relative binding strength of chelerythrine for human telomeric RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes obtained from ESI-TOF-MS experiments are respectively 6.0- and 2.5-fold tighter than that with human telomeric double-stranded hairpin DNA. The binding selectivity of chelerythrine for the biologically significant K+-form human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex over the Na+-form analogue, and binding specificity for human telomeric RNA G-quadruplex established it as a promising candidate in the structure-based design and development of G-quadruplex specific ligands.

  13. Recognition of RNA by amide modified backbone nucleic acids: molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-RNA hybrids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Nina, Mafalda; Fonné-Pfister, Raymonde; Beaudegnies, Renaud; Chekatt, Habiba; Jung, Pierre M J; Murphy-Kessabi, Fiona; De Mesmaeker, Alain; Wendeborn, Sebastian

    2005-04-27

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a chemically modified DNA-RNA hybrid in which a phosphodiester linkage is replaced by a neutral amide-3 linkage (3'-CH(2)-CONH-5') were investigated using UV melting experiments, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, and continuum solvent models. van't Hoff analysis of the experimental UV melting curves suggests that the significant increase of the thermodynamic stability of a 15-mer DNA-RNA with seven alternated amide-3 modifications (+11 degrees C) is mainly due to an increased binding enthalpy. To further evaluate the origin in the observed affinities differences, the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy was calculated by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation numerically. The nonelectrostatic contribution was estimated as the product of a hydrophobic surface tension coefficient and the surface area that is buried upon double strand formation. Structures were taken from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations computed in a consistent fashion using explicit solvent, counterions, and the particle-mesh Ewald procedure. The present preliminary thermodynamic study suggests that the favorable binding free energy of the amide-3 DNA single strand to the complementary RNA is equally driven by electrostatic and nonpolar contributions to the binding compared to their natural analogues. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water were performed on an amide-3 DNA single strand and the corresponding natural DNA. Results from the conformations cluster analysis of the simulated amide-3 DNA single strand ensembles suggest that the 25% of the population sampled within 10 ns has a pre-organized conformation where the sugar C3' endo pucker is favored at the 3'-flanking nucleotides. These structural and thermodynamic features contribute to the understanding of the observed increased affinities of the amide-3 DNA-RNA hybrids at the microscopic level.

  14. DNA and RNA Synthesis in Animal Cells in Culture--Methods for Use in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godsell, P. M.; Balls, M.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the experimental procedures used for detecting DNA and RNA synthesis in xenopus cells by autoradiography. The method described is suitable for senior high school laboratory classes or biology projects, if supervised by a teacher qualified to handle radioisotopes. (JR)

  15. On the path to genetic novelties: insights from programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Catania, Francesco; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how genetic novelties arise is a central goal of evolutionary biology. To this end, programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing deserve special consideration. While programmed DNA elimination reshapes genomes by eliminating chromatin during organismal development, RNA splicing rearranges genetic messages by removing intronic regions during transcription. Small RNAs help to mediate this class of sequence reorganization, which is not error-free. It is this imperfection that makes programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing excellent candidates for generating evolutionary novelties. Leveraging a number of these two processes' mechanistic and evolutionary properties, which have been uncovered over the past years, we present recently proposed models and empirical evidence for how splicing can shape the structure of protein-coding genes in eukaryotes. We also chronicle a number of intriguing similarities between the processes of programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing, and highlight the role that the variation in the population-genetic environment may play in shaping their target sequences.

  16. Evolution from DNA to RNA Recognition by the bI3 LAGLIDADG Maturase

    SciTech Connect

    Longo,A.; Leonard, C.; Bassi, G.; Berndt, D.; Krahn, J.; Tanaka Hall, T.; Weeks, K.

    2005-01-01

    LAGLIDADG endonucleases bind across adjacent major grooves via a saddle-shaped surface and catalyze DNA cleavage. Some LAGLIDADG proteins, called maturases, facilitate splicing by group I introns, raising the issue of how a DNA-binding protein and an RNA have evolved to function together. In this report, crystallographic analysis shows that the global architecture of the bI3 maturase is unchanged from its DNA-binding homologs; in contrast, the endonuclease active site, dispensable for splicing facilitation, is efficiently compromised by a lysine residue replacing essential catalytic groups. Biochemical experiments show that the maturase binds a peripheral RNA domain 50 Angstroms from the splicing active site, exemplifying long-distance structural communication in a ribonucleoprotein complex. The bI3 maturase nucleic acid recognition saddle interacts at the RNA minor groove; thus, evolution from DNA to RNA function has been mediated by a switch from major to minor groove interaction.

  17. SPERM RNA AMPLIFICATION FOR GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING BY DNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm RNA Amplification for Gene Expression Profiling by DNA Microarray Technology
    Hongzu Ren, Kary E. Thompson, Judith E. Schmid and David J. Dix, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triang...

  18. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  19. How Severely Is DNA Quantification Hampered by RNA Co-extraction?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ignacio; Remm, Matthieu; Frasquilho, Sonia; Betsou, Fay; Mathieson, William

    2015-10-01

    The optional RNase digest that is part of many DNA extraction protocols is often omitted, either because RNase is not provided in the kit or because users do not want to risk contaminating their laboratory. Consequently, co-eluting RNA can become a "contaminant" of unknown magnitude in a DNA extraction. We extracted DNA from liver, lung, kidney, and heart tissues and established that 28-52% of the "DNA" as assessed by spectrophotometry is actually RNA (depending on tissue type). Including an RNase digest in the extraction protocol reduced 260:280 purity ratios. Co-eluting RNA drives an overestimation of DNA yield when quantification is carried out using OD 260 nm spectrophotometry, or becomes an unquantified contaminant when spectrofluorometry is used for DNA quantification. This situation is potentially incompatible with the best practice guidelines for biobanks issued by organizations such as the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, which state that biospecimens should be accurately characterized in terms of their identity, purity, concentration, and integrity. Consequently, we conclude that an RNase digest must be included in DNA extractions if pure DNA is required. We also discuss the implications of unquantified RNA contamination in DNA samples in the context of laboratory accreditation schemes.

  20. CRISPR RNA binding and DNA target recognition by purified Cascade complexes from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Flick, Robert; Datsenko, Kirill A; Brown, Greg; Popovic, Ana; Lemak, Sofia; Semenova, Ekaterina; Severinov, Konstantin; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and their associated Cas proteins comprise a prokaryotic RNA-guided adaptive immune system that interferes with mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids and phages. The type I-E CRISPR interference complex Cascade from Escherichia coli is composed of five different Cas proteins and a 61-nt-long guide RNA (crRNA). crRNAs contain a unique 32-nt spacer flanked by a repeat-derived 5' handle (8 nt) and a 3' handle (21 nt). The spacer part of crRNA directs Cascade to DNA targets. Here, we show that the E. coli Cascade can be expressed and purified from cells lacking crRNAs and loaded in vitro with synthetic crRNAs, which direct it to targets complementary to crRNA spacer. The deletion of even one nucleotide from the crRNA 5' handle disrupted its binding to Cascade and target DNA recognition. In contrast, crRNA variants with just a single nucleotide downstream of the spacer part bound Cascade and the resulting ribonucleotide complex containing a 41-nt-long crRNA specifically recognized DNA targets. Thus, the E. coli Cascade-crRNA system exhibits significant flexibility suggesting that this complex can be engineered for applications in genome editing and opening the way for incorporation of site-specific labels in crRNA.

  1. RNA cell typing and DNA profiling of mixed samples: can cell types and donors be associated?

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Joyce; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Sijen, Titia

    2013-09-01

    Forensic samples regularly involve mixtures, which are readily recognised in forensic analyses. Combined DNA and mRNA profiling is an upcoming forensic practice to examine donors and cell types from the exact same sample. From DNA profiles individual genotypes may be deconvoluted, but to date no studies have established whether the cell types identified in corresponding RNA profiles can be associated with individual donors. Although RNA expression levels hold many variables from which an association may not be expected, proof of concept is important to forensic experts who may be cross examined about this possible correlation in court settings. Clearly, the gender-specificity of certain body fluids (semen, vaginal mucosa, menstrual secretion) can be instructive. However, when donors of the same gender or gender-neutral cell types are involved, alternatives are needed. Here we analyse basic two-component mixtures (two cell types provided by different donors) composed of six different cell types, and assess whether the heights of DNA and RNA peaks may guide association of donor and cell type. Divergent results were obtained; for some mixtures RNA peak heights followed the DNA results, but for others the major DNA component did not present higher RNA peaks. Also, variation in mixture ratios was observed for RNA profiling replicates and when different donor couples gave the same two body fluids. As sample degradation may affect the two nucleic acids and/or distinct cell types differently (and thus influence donor and cell type association), mixtures were subjected to elevated temperature or UV-light. Variation in DNA and RNA stability was observed both between and within cell types and depended on the method inducing degradation. Taken together, we discourage to associate cell types and donors from peak heights when performing RNA and DNA profiling.

  2. Interaction between cationic agents and small interfering RNA and DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Slita, A. V.; Petrova, A. V.; Pereviazko, I.; Bakulev, V. M.; Rolich, V. I.; Bondarenko, A. B.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Azobenzene containing surfactant AzoTAB was used for investigation of binding in cationic- agent + nucleic acid in NaCl salt aqueous solutions. Two nucleic acids, macromolecular DNA and small interfering RNA, were examined upon the interaction with the surfactant. For DNA the interaction was studied using spectral methods and the methods of viscometry and flow birefringence measurement. For siRNA the possibility of surfactant-based delivery was checked in vitro.

  3. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Posner, R.G.; Marrone, B.L.; Hammond, M.L.; Simpson, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    A method is described for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand. 4 figures.

  4. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Posner, Richard G.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Hammond, Mark L.; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Method for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand.

  5. Role for RNA:DNA hybrids in origin-independent replication priming in a eukaryotic system

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Ruth; García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Aguilera, Andrés; Wellinger, Ralf Erik

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at defined replication origins along eukaryotic chromosomes, ensuring complete genome duplication within a single S-phase. A key feature of replication origins is their ability to control the onset of DNA synthesis mediated by DNA polymerase-α and its intrinsic RNA primase activity. Here, we describe a novel origin-independent replication process that is mediated by transcription. RNA polymerase I transcription constraints lead to persistent RNA:DNA hybrids (R-loops) that prime replication in the ribosomal DNA locus. Our results suggest that eukaryotic genomes have developed tools to prevent R-loop–mediated replication events that potentially contribute to copy number variation, particularly relevant to carcinogenesis. PMID:25902524

  6. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  7. Size and distribution of polyadenylic acid sequences in Drosophila polytene DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C; Pages, M; García, M L

    1977-12-02

    [3H]Poly(U) hybridizes very rapidly to polytene DNA from Drosophila hydei. When hybridization is performed at 30 degrees C in 2 X SSC to a large excess of DNA, 95% of the poly(U) becomes ribonuclease resistant. Also, complementary RNA transcribed in vitro from polytene DNA hybridizes to poly(U). 023--0.25% of the DNA is composed of (dA)-rich sequences and 0.23--0.31% of cRNA hybridizes to [3H]poly(U). The length of the (dA)-rich sequences on the DNA and cRNA is 40 nucleotides. The Tm values of these hybrids formed between DNA or cRNA-poly(U) is 45 degrees C. The poly(A) fragments from cytoplasmic RNA ranged from 80 to 170 nucleotides in lenght, and migrated in polyacrilamide gels as a broad peak. The average sizes of the poly(A) fragments from the poly(A)-containing RNA transcribed by nuclei isolated from salivary glands in vivo or in vitro were 40, 70, 170 and 70 nucleotides, respectively. Hybridization in situ of [3H]-poly(U) to chromosome squashes indicated that the (dA)-rich sequences are randomly distributed over the whole genome.

  8. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-03-23

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals.

  9. Combined RNA/DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries.

    PubMed

    Shpiz, Sergey; Lavrov, Sergey; Kalmykova, Alla

    2014-01-01

    DNA FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) analysis reveals the chromosomal location of the gene of interest. RNA in situ hybridization is used to examine the amounts and cell location of transcripts. This method is commonly used to describe the localization of processed transcripts in different tissues or cell lines. Gene activation studies are often aimed at determining the mechanism of this activation (transcriptional or posttranscriptional). Elucidation of the mechanism of piRNA-mediated silencing of genomic repeats is at the cutting edge of small RNA research. The RNA/DNA FISH technique is a powerful method for assessing transcriptional changes at any particular genomic locus. Colocalization of the RNA and DNA FISH signals allows a determination of the accumulation of nascent transcripts at the transcribed genomic locus. This would be suggest that this gene is activated at the transcriptional (or co-transcriptional) level. Moreover, this method allows for the identification of transcriptional derepression of a distinct copy (copies) among a genomic repeat family. Here, a RNA/DNA FISH protocol is presented for the simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA in situ on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries using tyramide signal amplification. With subsequent immunostaining of chromatin components, this protocol can be easily extended for studying the interdependence between chromatin changes at genomic loci and their transcriptional activity.

  10. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-01-01

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals. PMID:28332631

  11. Telomeres in ICF syndrome cells are vulnerable to DNA damage due to elevated DNA:RNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Sagie, Shira; Toubiana, Shir; Hartono, Stella R.; Katzir, Hagar; Tzur-Gilat, Aya; Havazelet, Shany; Francastel, Claire; Velasco, Guillaume; Chédin, Frédéric; Selig, Sara

    2017-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrids, nucleic acid structures with diverse physiological functions, can disrupt genome integrity when dysregulated. Human telomeres were shown to form hybrids with the lncRNA TERRA, yet the formation and distribution of these hybrids among telomeres, their regulation and their cellular effects remain elusive. Here we predict and confirm in several human cell types that DNA:RNA hybrids form at many subtelomeric and telomeric regions. We demonstrate that ICF syndrome cells, which exhibit short telomeres and elevated TERRA levels, are enriched for hybrids at telomeric regions throughout the cell cycle. Telomeric hybrids are associated with high levels of DNA damage at chromosome ends in ICF cells, which are significantly reduced with overexpression of RNase H1. Our findings suggest that abnormally high TERRA levels in ICF syndrome lead to accumulation of telomeric hybrids that, in turn, can result in telomeric dysfunction. PMID:28117327

  12. MicroRNA expression profiling and DNA methylation signature for deregulated microRNA in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Juan; Díaz-Lagares, Angel; Salgado, Rocío; Servitje, Octavio; Climent, Fina; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Pérez-Ferriols, Amparo; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Garcia, Mar; Nonell, Lara; Esteller, Manel; Pujol, Ramon M; Espinet, Blanca; Gallardo, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs usually regulate gene expression negatively, and aberrant expression has been involved in the development of several types of cancers. Microarray profiling of microRNA expression was performed to define a microRNA signature in a series of mycosis fungoides tumor stage (MFt, n=21) and CD30+ primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30+ cALCL, n=11) samples in comparison with inflammatory dermatoses (ID, n=5). Supervised clustering confirmed a distinctive microRNA profile for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) with respect to ID. A 40 microRNA signature was found in MFt including upregulated onco-microRNAs (miR-146a, miR-142-3p/5p, miR-21, miR-181a/b, and miR-155) and downregulated tumor-suppressor microRNAs (miR-200ab/429 cluster, miR-10b, miR-193b, miR-141/200c, and miR-23b/27b). Regarding CD30+ cALCL, 39 differentially expressed microRNAs were identified. Particularly, overexpression of miR-155, miR-21, or miR-142-3p/5p and downregulation of the miR-141/200c clusters were observed. DNA methylation in microRNA gene promoters, as expression regulatory mechanism for deregulated microRNAs, was analyzed using Infinium 450K array and approximately one-third of the differentially expressed microRNAs showed significant DNA methylation differences. Two different microRNA methylation signatures for MFt and CD30+ cALCL were found. Correlation analysis showed an inverse relationship for microRNA promoter methylation and microRNA expression. These results reveal a subgroup-specific epigenetically regulated microRNA signatures for MFt and CD30+ cALCL patients.

  13. Macromolecules in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattice, Wayne L.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the topic of macromolecules and synthetic polymers be included in undergraduate courses. Two macromolecular systems (polyethylene in a state unperturbated by long-range interactions and a polypeptide undergoing a helix-coil transition) are described which are suitable for inclusion in the statistical mechanics section of physical…

  14. Collaborative study for the calibration of HCV RNA, HBV DNA and HIV RNA reference preparations against the relative international standards.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Giulio; Marino, Francesco; Cristiano, Karen; Bisso, Guillermo Mario; Mele, Caludio; Luciani, Francesca; Wirz, Maria; Gentili, Giuliano

    2007-01-01

    We organised a collaborative study to calibrate three new ISS reference preparations (ISS: Istituto Superiore di Sanità), one for HCV RNA, one for HIV RNA and one for HBV DNA, to be used for nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT) in blood testing. Serial dilution of the ISS reference preparations and the respective international standards were tested in different days by each participating laboratory using two commercial NAT assays. Data were collected by the ISS for statistical analysis. Based on the mean potency of the HCV RNA and HIV RNA preparations, calculated from the results provided by the 12 participating laboratories, a definitive concentrations of 5700 IU/mL and 4000 IU/mL, respectively, were assigned to the reference materials. On the contrary, it was not possible to obtain a consensus titre for the HBV DNA reference material. These new Italian reference preparations (HCV RNA ISS/1005 and HIV RNA ISS/1005) calibrated against the respective international standards are available free of charge to any laboratory upon request.

  15. Novel application of Phi29 DNA polymerase: RNA detection and analysis in vitro and in situ by target RNA-primed RCA

    PubMed Central

    Lagunavicius, Arunas; Merkiene, Egle; Kiveryte, Zivile; Savaneviciute, Agne; Zimbaite-Ruskuliene, Vilma; Radzvilavicius, Tomas; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel Phi29 DNA polymerase application in RCA-based target RNA detection and analysis. The 3′→5′ RNase activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase converts target RNA into a primer and the polymerase uses this newly generated primer for RCA initiation. Therefore, using target RNA-primed RCA, padlock probes may be targeted to inner RNA sequences and their peculiarities can be analyzed directly. We demonstrate that the exoribonucleolytic activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase can be successfully applied in vitro and in situ. These findings expand the potential for detection and analysis of RNA sequences distanced from 3′-end. PMID:19244362

  16. Preservation of RNA and DNA from mammal samples under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Sanchez, Miguel; Burraco, Pablo; Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Leonard, Jennifer A

    2013-07-01

    Ecological and conservation genetics require sampling of organisms in the wild. Appropriate preservation of the collected samples, usually by cryostorage, is key to the quality of the genetic data obtained. Nevertheless, cryopreservation in the field to ensure RNA and DNA stability is not always possible. We compared several nucleic acid preservation solutions appropriate for field sampling and tested them on rat (Rattus rattus) blood, ear and tail tip, liver, brain and muscle. We compared the efficacy of a nucleic acid preservation (NAP) buffer for DNA preservation against 95% ethanol and Longmire buffer, and for RNA preservation against RNAlater (Qiagen) and Longmire buffer, under simulated field conditions. For DNA, the NAP buffer was slightly better than cryopreservation or 95% ethanol, but high molecular weight DNA was preserved in all conditions. The NAP buffer preserved RNA as well as RNAlater. Liver yielded the best RNA and DNA quantity and quality; thus, liver should be the tissue preferentially collected from euthanized animals. We also show that DNA persists in nonpreserved muscle tissue for at least 1 week at ambient temperature, although degradation is noticeable in a matter of hours. When cryopreservation is not possible, the NAP buffer is an economical alternative for RNA preservation at ambient temperature for at least 2 months and DNA preservation for at least 10 months.

  17. Effects of long DNA folding and small RNA stem-loop in thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yusuke T; Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert

    2012-10-30

    In thermophoresis, with the fluid at rest, suspensions move along a gradient of temperature. In an aqueous solution, a PEG polymer suspension is depleted from the hot region and builds a concentration gradient. In this gradient, DNA polymers of different sizes can be separated. In this work the effect of the polymer structure for genomic DNA and small RNA is studied. For genome-size DNA, individual single T4 DNA is visualized and tracked in a PEG solution under a temperature gradient built by infrared laser focusing. We find that T4 DNA follows steps of depletion, ring-like localization, and accumulation patterns as the PEG volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, a coil-globule transition for DNA is observed for a large enough PEG volume fraction. This drastically affects the localization position of T4 DNA. In a similar experiment, with small RNA such as ribozymes we find that the stem-loop folding of such polymers has important consequences. The RNA polymers having a long and rigid stem accumulate, whereas a polymer with stem length less than 4 base pairs shows depletion. Such measurements emphasize the crucial contribution of the double-stranded parts of RNA for thermal separation and selection under a temperature gradient. Because huge temperature gradients are present around hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean seafloor, this process might be relevant, at the origin of life, in an RNA world hypothesis. Ribozymes could be selected from a pool of random sequences depending on the length of their stems.

  18. Recombinant human MDM2 oncoprotein shows sequence composition selectivity for binding to both RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Challen, Christine; Anderson, John J; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lunec, John

    2012-03-01

    MDM2 is a 90 kDa nucleo-phosphoprotein that binds p53 and other proteins contributing to its oncogenic properties. Its structure includes an amino proximal p53 binding site, a central acidic domain and a carboxy region which incorporates Zinc and Ring Finger domains suggestive of nucleic acid binding or transcription factor function. It has previously been reported that a bacculovirus expressed MDM2 protein binds RNA in a sequence-specific manner through the Ring Finger domain, however, its ability to bind DNA has yet to be examined. We report here that a bacterially expressed human MDM2 protein binds both DNA as well as the previously defined RNA consensus sequence. DNA binding appears selective and involves the carboxy-terminal domain of the molecule. RNA binding is inhibited by an MDM2 specific antibody, which recognises an epitope within the carboxy region of the protein. Selection cloning and sequence analysis of MDM2 DNA binding sequences, unlike RNA binding sequences, revealed no obvious DNA binding consensus sequence, but preferential binding to oligopurine:pyrimidine-rich stretches. Our results suggest that the observed preferential DNA binding may occur through the Zinc Finger or in a charge-charge interaction through the Ring Finger, thereby implying potentially different mechanisms for DNA and RNA MDM2 binding.

  19. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA from mature rice kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few RNA extraction protocols or commercial kits work well with the starchy endosperm of cereal grains. Standard RNA extraction protocols are time consuming, use large amounts of expensive chemicals, and leave behind hazardous wastes. However, there are numerous commercial DNA extraction kits that ...

  20. Modified mRNA as an alternative to plasmid DNA (pDNA) for transcript replacement and vaccination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyewon; Chung, June-Key

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Current gene therapy involves replacement of defective gene by delivery of healthy genetic material to precede normal function. Virus-mediated gene delivery is the most successful and efficient method for gene therapy, but it has been challenged due to serious safety concerns. Conversely, gene delivery using plasmid DNA (pDNA) is considered safer, but its transfection efficiency is much lower than virus-mediated gene transfer. Recently, mRNA has been suggested as an alternative option to avoid undesired insertion of delivered DNA sequences with higher transfection efficiency and stability. Area covered: In this review, we summarize the currently available strategies of mRNA modification to increase the therapeutic efficacy; we also highlight the recent improvements of mRNA delivery for in vivo applications of gene therapy. Expert opinion: The use of mRNA-based gene transfer could indeed be a promising new strategy for gene therapy. Notable advantages include no risk of integration into the genomic DNA, adjustable gene expression and easier modulation of the immune system. By reducing or utilizing the immunogenic properties, mRNA offers a promising tool for gene/or transcript replacement. PMID:26125492

  1. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J; Poirier, Guy G; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood.

  2. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  3. DNA and RNA profiling of excavated human remains with varying postmortem intervals.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, M; Wiskerke, D; Gerretsen, R R R; Tabak, J; Sijen, T

    2016-11-01

    When postmortem intervals (PMIs) increase such as with longer burial times, human remains suffer increasingly from the taphonomic effects of decomposition processes such as autolysis and putrefaction. In this study, various DNA analysis techniques and a messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling method were applied to examine for trends in nucleic acid degradation and the postmortem interval. The DNA analysis techniques include highly sensitive DNA quantitation (with and without degradation index), standard and low template STR profiling, insertion and null alleles (INNUL) of retrotransposable elements typing and mitochondrial DNA profiling. The used mRNA profiling system targets genes with tissue specific expression for seven human organs as reported by Lindenbergh et al. (Int J Legal Med 127:891-900, 27) and has been applied to forensic evidentiary traces but not to excavated tissues. The techniques were applied to a total of 81 brain, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, heart, kidney and skin samples obtained from 19 excavated graves with burial times ranging from 4 to 42 years. Results show that brain and heart are the organs in which both DNA and RNA remain remarkably stable, notwithstanding long PMIs. The other organ tissues either show poor overall profiling results or vary for DNA and RNA profiling success, with sometimes DNA and other times RNA profiling being more successful. No straightforward relations were observed between nucleic acid profiling results and the PMI. This study shows that not only DNA but also RNA molecules can be remarkably stable and used for profiling of long-buried human remains, which corroborate forensic applications. The insight that the brain and heart tissues tend to provide the best profiling results may change sampling policies in identification cases of degrading cadavers.

  4. SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III is suppressed by histone methylation but not by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J.; Cowling, Victoria H.; Cairns, Bradley R.; White, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), such as Alu, spread by retrotransposition, which requires their transcripts to be copied into DNA and then inserted into new chromosomal sites. This can lead to genetic damage through insertional mutagenesis and chromosomal rearrangements between non-allelic SINEs at distinct loci. SINE DNA is heavily methylated and this was thought to suppress its accessibility and transcription, thereby protecting against retrotransposition. Here we provide several lines of evidence that methylated SINE DNA is occupied by RNA polymerase III, including the use of high-throughput bisulphite sequencing of ChIP DNA. We find that loss of DNA methylation has little effect on accessibility of SINEs to transcription machinery or their expression in vivo. In contrast, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor selectively promotes SINE expression and occupancy by RNA polymerase III. The data suggest that methylation of histones rather than DNA plays a dominant role in suppressing SINE transcription. PMID:25798578

  5. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  6. 16S rRNA gene probe quantitates residual host cell DNA in pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Yu; Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Shi, Ke; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Kai-Hui; Yi-Zhang; Chen, Zu-Huan

    2006-03-24

    The development and widespread use of DNA-based vaccination against infectious pathogens have been a great triumph of medical science. Quality control of DNA vaccines as biopharmaceutical productions is a problem to solve. Residual genomic DNA of engineering bacteria has been identified as a potential risk factor, so whose level must be controlled under the regulatory standards. We report a dot-blot hybridization method to detect residual host cell DNA in purified DNA vaccines. The assay utilizes PCR amplified and digoxigenin-labeled Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene as probe. The sensitivity of the dot-blot hybridization assay with E. coli 16S rRNA gene probe was evaluated in comparison with single copy UidR gene probe. The optimized dot-blot hybridization assay had both low background and a suitable sensitivity, detecting 10 pg of residual E. coli DNA. The method is suitable in the routine use of measuring the levels of residual E. coli DNA in the pharmaceutical-grade DNA vaccine.

  7. Synthesis of RNA probes by the direct in vitro transcription of PCR-generated DNA templates.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, R; McNiven, M A; Kachar, B

    1993-05-01

    We describe a novel method for the generation of RNA probes based on the direct in vitro transcription of DNA templates amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers with sequence hybrids between the target gene and those of the T7 and T3 RNA polymerases promoters. This method circumvents the need for cloning and allows rapid generation of strand-specific RNA molecules that can be used for the identification of genes in hybridization experiments. We have successfully applied this method to the identification of DNA sequences by Southern blot analysis and library screening.

  8. INFLUENCE OF MACROMOLECULES ON CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macromolecules in the pore fluid influence the mobility of hydrophobic compounds through soils. his study evaluated the significance of macromolecules in facilitating chemical transport under laboratory conditions. Partition coefficients between 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and ...

  9. Pulse Dipolar ESR of Doubly Labeled Mini TAR DNA and Its Annealing to Mini TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Borbat, Peter P.; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Myers, William K.; Freed, Jack H.; Scholes, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse dipolar electron-spin resonance in the form of double electron electron resonance was applied to strategically placed, site-specifically attached pairs of nitroxide spin labels to monitor changes in the mini TAR DNA stem-loop structure brought on by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The biophysical structural evidence was at Ångstrom-level resolution under solution conditions not amenable to crystallography or NMR. In the absence of complementary TAR RNA, double labels located in both the upper and the lower stem of mini TAR DNA showed in the presence of NCp7 a broadened distance distribution between the points of attachment, and there was evidence for several conformers. Next, when equimolar amounts of mini TAR DNA and complementary mini TAR RNA were present, NCp7 enhanced the annealing of their stem-loop structures to form duplex DNA-RNA. When duplex TAR DNA-TAR RNA formed, double labels initially located 27.5 Å apart at the 3′- and 5′-termini of the 27-base mini TAR DNA relocated to opposite ends of a 27 bp RNA-DNA duplex with 76.5 Å between labels, a distance which was consistent with the distance between the two labels in a thermally annealed 27-bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex. Different sets of double labels initially located 26–27 Å apart in the mini TAR DNA upper stem, appropriately altered their interlabel distance to ∼35 Å when a 27 bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex formed, where the formation was caused either through NCp7-induced annealing or by thermal annealing. In summary, clear structural evidence was obtained for the fraying and destabilization brought on by NCp7 in its biochemical function as an annealing agent and for the detailed structural change from stem-loop to duplex RNA-DNA when complementary RNA was present. PMID:25692594

  10. Effect of salts, solvents and buffer on miRNA detection using DNA silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNCs) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun; Waaben Thulstrup, Peter; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ˜21 nt to ˜25 nt) which regulate a variety of important cellular events in plants, animals and single cell eukaryotes. Especially because of their use in diagnostics of human diseases, efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence selective detection method for miRNAs. Recently, we reported an innovative method for the determination of miRNA levels using the red fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). Our method is based on monitoring the emission drop of a DNA/AgNCs probe in the presence of its specific target miRNA. Accordingly, the accuracy and efficiency of the method relies on the sensitivity of hybridization between the probe and target. To gain specific and robust hybridization between probe and target, we investigated a range of diverse salts, organic solvents, and buffer to optimize target sensing conditions. Under the newly adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity and the formation of emissive DNA/AgNCs probes were significantly improved. Also, fortification of the Tris-acetate buffer with inorganic salts or organic solvents improved the sensitivity of the DNA/AgNC probes. On the basis of these optimizations, the versatility of the DNA/AgNCs-based miRNA detection method can be expanded.

  11. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  12. Evaluation of commercial kits for dual extraction of DNA and RNA from human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Schweighardt, Andrew J; Tate, Courtney M; Scott, Kristina A; Harper, Kathryn A; Robertson, James M

    2015-01-01

    STR typing of DNA evidence can identify the donor with a high power of discrimination but cannot identify the tissue origin of a body-fluid stain. Using RNA to attribute a crime scene stain to a particular tissue may aid in reconstruction efforts. With blood from 10 donors, four DNA and RNA coextraction kits were evaluated by measuring yields and STR and mRNA profiles. T tests indicated some significant differences in kit performance. The Zymo Research ZR-Duet(™) kit performed best based on average DNA (41.4 ng) and mRNA (4.07 ng) yields and was the only kit to provide complete DNA/RNA profiles for all samples. The consistency of this kit was challenged by data from additional blood and saliva donors. Further testing is advised before a superior kit is unequivocally chosen. Stand-alone DNA or RNA purification generally offers higher yield, but coextraction may still allow successful STR profiling and tissue source identification.

  13. RIGulation of STING expression: at the crossroads of viral RNA and DNA sensing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiliu; Lin, Rongtuan; Olagnier, David

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune sensing of pathogens is important for host to mount defensive responses. STING has emerged in recent years as a critical signaling adaptor in the immune response to cytosolic DNA and RNA derived from pathogens. Liu et al. (2016) demonstrate that the RIG-I-dependent RNA sensing signaling induces STING expression via a TNF-α and IFN-α synergy. The up-regulation of STING is vital for 5′pppRNA restriction of HSV, a DNA virus that infects humans and causes herpes, in vitro and in vivo. This study provides new insights into the cross talk between DNA and RNA pathogen-sensing systems via the control of STING. PMID:28191486

  14. Monitoring translocation of multisubunit RNA polymerase along the DNA with fluorescent base analogues.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Anssi M; Turtola, Matti; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a direct fluorescence method that reports real-time occupancies of the pre- and post-translocated state of multisubunit RNA polymerase. In a stopped-flow setup, this method is capable of resolving a single base-pair translocation motion of RNA polymerase in real time. In a conventional spectrofluorometer, this method can be employed for studies of the time-averaged distribution of RNA polymerase on the DNA template. This method utilizes commercially available base analogue fluorophores integrated into template DNA strand in place of natural bases. We describe two template DNA strand designs where translocation of RNA polymerase from a pre-translocation to a post-translocation state results in disruption of stacking interactions of fluorophore with neighboring bases, with a concomitant large increase in fluorescence intensity.

  15. Organocatalytic removal of formaldehyde adducts from RNA and DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Harcourt, Emily M.; Hewings, David S.; Lovejoy, Alexander F.; Kurtz, David M.; Ehrenschwender, Thomas; Barandun, Luzi J.; Roost, Caroline; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Kool, Eric T.

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde is universally used to fix tissue specimens, where it forms hemiaminal and aminal adducts with biomolecules, hindering the ability to retrieve molecular information. Common methods for removing these adducts involve extended heating, which can cause extensive degradation of nucleic acids, particularly RNA. Here, we show that water-soluble bifunctional catalysts (anthranilates and phosphanilates) speed the reversal of formaldehyde adducts of mononucleotides over standard buffers. Studies with formaldehyde-treated RNA oligonucleotides show that the catalysts enhance adduct removal, restoring unmodified RNA at 37 °C even when extensively modified, while avoiding the high temperatures that promote RNA degradation. Experiments with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cell samples show that the catalysis is compatible with common RNA extraction protocols, with detectable RNA yields increased by 1.5-2.4-fold using a catalyst under optimized conditions and by 7-25-fold compared with a commercial kit. Such catalytic strategies show promise for general use in reversing formaldehyde adducts in clinical specimens.

  16. Viral nanomotors for packaging of dsDNA and dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peixuan; Lee, Tae Jin

    2007-01-01

    While capsid proteins are assembled around single-stranded genomic DNA or RNA in rod-shaped viruses, the lengthy double-stranded genome of other viruses is packaged forcefully within a preformed protein shell. This entropically unfavourable DNA or RNA packaging is accomplished by an ATP-driven viral nanomotor, which is mainly composed of two components, the oligomerized channel and the packaging enzymes. This intriguing DNA or RNA packaging process has provoked interest among virologists, bacteriologists, biochemists, biophysicists, chemists, structural biologists and computational scientists alike, especially those interested in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, AAA+ family proteins, energy conversion, cell membrane transport, DNA or RNA replication and antiviral therapy. This review mainly focuses on the motors of double-stranded DNA viruses, but double-stranded RNA viral motors are also discussed due to interesting similarities. The novel and ingenious configuration of these nanomotors has inspired the development of biomimetics for nanodevices. Advances in structural and functional studies have increased our understanding of the molecular basis of biological movement to the point where we can begin thinking about possible applications of the viral DNA packaging motor in nanotechnology and medical applications. PMID:17501915

  17. Development of multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection of six swine DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Gang; Chen, Guang-Da; Huang, Yong; Ding, Li; Li, Zhao-Cai; Chang, Ching-Dong; Wang, Chi-Young; Tong, De-Wen; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2012-07-01

    Uniplex and multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR protocols were developed and evaluated subsequently for its effectiveness in detecting simultaneously single and mixed infections in swine. Specific primers for three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses, including classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine pseudorabies virus (PRV) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) were used for testing procedure. A single nucleic acid extraction protocol was adopted for the simultaneous extraction of both RNA and DNA viruses. The multiplex PCR consisted with two-step procedure which included reverse transcription of RNA virus and multiplex PCR of viral cDNA and DNA. The multiplex PCR assay was shown to be sensitive detecting at least 450pg of viral genomic DNA or RNA from a mixture of six viruses in a reaction. The assay was also highly specific in detecting one or more of the same viruses in various combinations in specimens. Thirty clinical samples and aborted fetuses collected from 4- to 12-week-old piglets were detected among 39 samples tested by both uniplex and multiplex PCR, showing highly identification. Because of the sensitivity and specificity, the multiplex PCR is a useful approach for clinical diagnosis of mixed infections of DNA and RNA viruses in swine.

  18. DGCR8 Mediates Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage Independently of RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Calses, Philamer C; Dhillon, Kiranjit K; Tucker, Nyka; Chi, Yong; Huang, Jen-Wei; Kawasumi, Masaoki; Nghiem, Paul; Wang, Yemin; Clurman, Bruce E; Jacquemont, Celine; Gafken, Philip R; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Saijo, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2017-04-04

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a carcinogen that generates DNA lesions. Here, we demonstrate an unexpected role for DGCR8, an RNA binding protein that canonically functions with Drosha to mediate microRNA processing, in the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions. Treatment with UV induced phosphorylation on serine 153 (S153) of DGCR8 in both human and murine cells. S153 phosphorylation was critical for cellular resistance to UV, the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions, and the recovery of RNA synthesis after UV exposure but not for microRNA expression. The RNA-binding and Drosha-binding activities of DGCR8 were not critical for UV resistance. DGCR8 depletion was epistatic to defects in XPA, CSA, and CSB for UV sensitivity. DGCR8 physically interacted with CSB and RNA polymerase II. JNKs were involved in the UV-induced S153 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that UV-induced S153 phosphorylation mediates transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in a manner independent of microRNA processing.

  19. Simultaneous Extraction from Bacterioplankton of Total RNA and DNA Suitable for Quantitative Structure and Function Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Weinbauer, Markus G.; Fritz, Ingo; Wenderoth, Dirk F.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for the simultaneous extraction from bacterioplankton of RNA and DNA suitable for quantitative molecular analysis. By using a combined mechanical and chemical extraction method, the highest RNA and DNA yield was obtained with sodium lauryl sarcosinate-phenol or DivoLab-phenol as the extraction mix. The efficiency of extraction of nucleic acids was comparatively high and varied only moderately in gram-negative bacterial isolates and bacterioplankton (RNA, 52 to 66%; DNA, 43 to 61%); significant amounts of nucleic acids were also obtained for a gram-positive bacterial isolate (RNA, 20 to 30%; DNA, 20 to 25%). Reverse transcription-PCR and PCR amplification products of fragments of 16S rRNA and its genes were obtained from all isolates and communities, indicating that the extracted nucleic acids were intact and pure enough for community structure analyses. By using single-strand conformation polymorphism of fragments of 16S rRNA and its gene, community fingerprints were obtained from pond bacterioplankton. mRNA transcripts encoding fragments of the enzyme nitrite reductase gene (nir gene) could be detected in a pond water sample, indicating that the extraction method is also suitable for studying gene expression. The extraction method presented yields nucleic acids that can be used to perform structural and functional studies of bacterioplankton communities from a single sample. PMID:11872453

  20. Mechanism of Concerted RNA-DNA Primer Synthesis by the Human Primosome.

    PubMed

    Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Zhang, Yinbo; Gu, Jianyou; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2016-05-06

    The human primosome, a 340-kilodalton complex of primase and DNA polymerase α (Polα), synthesizes chimeric RNA-DNA primers to be extended by replicative DNA polymerases δ and ϵ. The intricate mechanism of concerted primer synthesis by two catalytic centers was an enigma for over three decades. Here we report the crystal structures of two key complexes, the human primosome and the C-terminal domain of the primase large subunit (p58C) with bound DNA/RNA duplex. These structures, along with analysis of primase/polymerase activities, provide a plausible mechanism for all transactions of the primosome including initiation, elongation, accurate counting of RNA primer length, primer transfer to Polα, and concerted autoregulation of alternate activation/inhibition of the catalytic centers. Our findings reveal a central role of p58C in the coordinated actions of two catalytic domains in the primosome and ultimately could impact the design of anticancer drugs.

  1. DNA Binding of Centromere Protein C (CENPC) Is Stabilized by Single-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yaqing; Topp, Christopher N.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres are the attachment points between the genome and the cytoskeleton: centromeres bind to kinetochores, which in turn bind to spindles and move chromosomes. Paradoxically, the DNA sequence of centromeres has little or no role in perpetuating kinetochores. As such they are striking examples of genetic information being transmitted in a manner that is independent of DNA sequence (epigenetically). It has been found that RNA transcribed from centromeres remains bound within the kinetochore region, and this local population of RNA is thought to be part of the epigenetic marking system. Here we carried out a genetic and biochemical study of maize CENPC, a key inner kinetochore protein. We show that DNA binding is conferred by a localized region 122 amino acids long, and that the DNA-binding reaction is exquisitely sensitive to single-stranded RNA. Long, single-stranded nucleic acids strongly promote the binding of CENPC to DNA, and the types of RNAs that stabilize DNA binding match in size and character the RNAs present on kinetochores in vivo. Removal or replacement of the binding module with HIV integrase binding domain causes a partial delocalization of CENPC in vivo. The data suggest that centromeric RNA helps to recruit CENPC to the inner kinetochore by altering its DNA binding characteristics. PMID:20140237

  2. Comparing protocols for preparation of DNA-free total yeast RNA suitable for RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Del Aguila, Eduardo M; Dutra, Marcio B; Silva, Joab T; Paschoalin, Vânia MF

    2005-01-01

    Background Preparation of RNA free from DNA is a critical step before performing RT-PCR assay. Total RNA isolated from several sources, including those obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using routine methodologies are frequently contaminated with DNA, which can give rise to amplification products that mimic the amplicons expected from the RNA target. Results We investigated the efficiency of two DNase I based protocols for eliminating DNA contaminations from RNA samples obtained from yeast cells. Both procedures are very efficient in eliminating DNA contamination from RNA samples and entail three main steps, which involve treating of RNA samples with DNase I, inhibition of the enzyme by EDTA and its subsequent inactivation at 65°C. The DNase I treated samples were further purified with phenol: chloroform followed by precipitation with ice-cold ethanol (protocol I) or, alternatively, they were directly used in RT-PCR reactions (protocol II). Transcripts from ACT1, PDA1, CNA1, CNA2, TPS1 and TPS2 analyzed after each treatment showed that all mRNAs tested can be amplified if total RNA was extracted and purified after DNase I treatment, however, only TPS1, TPS2 and ACT1 mRNAs were amplified without extraction/purification step. Conclusion Although more laborious and requiring a higher initial amount of material, the inclusion of an extraction and purification step allows to prepare RNA samples that are free from DNA and from low molecular contaminants and can be applied to amplify any Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNA by RT-PCR. PMID:15833107

  3. Identification of persistent RNA-DNA hybrid structures within the origin of replication of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Prichard, M N; Jairath, S; Penfold, M E; St Jeor, S; Bohlman, M C; Pari, G S

    1998-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic-phase DNA replication initiates at the cis-acting origin of replication, oriLyt. oriLyt is a structurally complex region containing repeat elements and transcription factor binding sites. We identified two site-specific alkali-labile regions within oriLyt which flank an alkali-resistant DNA segment. These alkali-sensitive regions were the result of the degradation of two RNA species embedded within oriLyt and covalently linked to viral DNA. The virus-associated RNA, vRNA, was identified by DNase I treatment of HCMV DNA obtained from sucrose gradient purified virus. This heterogeneous population of vRNA was end labeled and used as a hybridization probe to map the exact location of vRNAs within oriLyt. vRNA-1 is localized between restriction endonuclease sites XhoI at nucleotide (nt) 93799 and SacI at nt 94631 and is approximately 500 bases long. The second vRNA, vRNA-2, lies within a region which exhibits a heterogeneous restriction pattern located between the SphI (nt 92636) and BamHI (nt 93513) and is approximately 300 bases long. This region was previously shown to be required for oriLyt replication (D. G. Anders, M. A. Kacica, G. S. Pari, and S. M. Punturieri, J. Virol. 66:3373-3384, 1992). RNase H analysis determined that vRNA-2 forms a persistent RNA-DNA hybrid structure in the context of the viral genome and in an oriLyt-containing plasmid used in the transient-replication assay.

  4. The birth of new genes by RNA- and DNA-mediated duplication during mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin; Ryvkin, Paul; Hemphill, Edward; Mandoiu, Ion; Nelson, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Gene duplication has long been recognized as a major force in genome evolution and has recently been recognized as an important source of individual variation. For many years, the origin of functional gene duplicates was assumed to be whole or partial genome duplication events, but recently retrotransposition has also been shown to contribute new functional protein coding genes and siRNA's. In this study, we utilize pseudogenes to recreate more complete gene family histories, and compare the rates of RNA and DNA-mediated duplication and new functional gene formation in five mammalian genomes. We find that RNA-mediated duplication occurs at a much higher and more variable rate than DNA-mediated duplication, and gives rise to many more duplicated sequences over time. We show that, while the chance of RNA-mediated duplicates becoming functional is much lower than that of their DNA-mediated counterparts, the higher rate of retrotransposition leads to nearly equal contributions of new genes by each mechanism. We also find that functional RNA-mediated duplicates are closer to neighboring genes than non-functional RNA-mediated copies, consistent with co-option of regulatory elements at the site of insertion. Overall, new genes derived from DNA and RNA-mediated duplication mechanisms are under similar levels of purifying selective pressure, but have broadly different functions. RNA-mediated duplication gives rise to a diversity of genes but is dominated by the highly expressed genes of RNA metabolic pathways. DNA-mediated duplication can copy regulatory material along with the protein coding region of the gene and often gives rise to classes of genes whose function are dependent on complex regulatory information. This mechanistic difference may in part explain why we find that mammalian protein families tend to evolve by either one mechanism or the other, but rarely by both. Supplementary Material has been provided (see online Supplementary Material at www.liebertonline.com ).

  5. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunits encoded within the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, E V; Puckett, C; Moss, B

    1987-01-01

    Antiserum to a multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from vaccinia virions was prepared to carry out genetic studies. This antiserum selectively inhibited the activity of the viral polymerase but had no effect on calf thymus RNA polymerase II. The specificity of the antiserum was further demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of RNA polymerase subunits from dissociated virus particles. The presence in vaccinia virus-infected cells of mRNA that encodes the polymerase subunits was determined by in vitro translation. Immunoprecipitable polypeptides with Mrs of about 135,000, 128,000, 36,000, 34,000, 31,000, 23,000, 21,000, 20,000, and 17,000 were made when early mRNA was added to reticulocyte extracts. The subunits were encoded within the vaccinia virus genome, as demonstrated by translation of early mRNA that hybridized to vaccinia virus DNA. The locations of the subunit genes were determined initially by hybridization of RNA to a series of overlapping 40-kilobase-pair DNA fragments that were cloned in a cosmid vector. Further mapping was achieved with cloned HindIII restriction fragments. Results of these studies indicated that RNA polymerase subunit genes are transcribed early in infection and are distributed within the highly conserved central portion of the poxvirus genome in HindIII fragments E, J, H, D, and A. Images PMID:3033308

  6. Single molecule identification of homology-dependent interactions between long ssRNA and dsDNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenli; Danilowicz, Claudia; Kleckner, Nancy; Prentiss, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prominently associated with chromosomes in an ever-increasing diversity of roles. To provide further insight into the potential nature of these associations, we have explored, for the first time, the interaction of long single-stranded (ss) RNAs with cognate homologous double-stranded (ds) DNA in vitro. Using magnetic tweezers, we measured the effects of ssRNA on force extension curves for dsDNA. We observe that the presence of ssRNA impedes the extension of dsDNA, specifically at low forces, dependent on homology between the RNA and DNA species, and dependent on ssRNA lengths (≥1 kb). The observed effect also depends on the concentration of ssRNA and is abolished by overstretching of the dsDNA. These findings show that significant homologous contacts can occur between long ssRNA and dsDNA in the absence of protein and that these contacts alter the mechanical properties of the dsDNA. We propose that long ssRNA interacts paranemically with long dsDNA via periodic short homologous interactions, e.g. mediated by RNA/DNA triplex-formation, and that dsDNA extension is impeded by formation of RNA secondary structure in the intervening unbound regions. Analogous interactions in vivo would permit lncRNAs to mediate the juxtaposition of two or more DNA regions on the same or different chromosomes. PMID:27580717

  7. Microbial rRNA: rDNA gene ratios may be unexpectedly low due to extracellular DNA preservation in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested a method of estimating the activity of detectable individual bacterial and archaeal OTUs within a community by calculating ratios of absolute 16S rRNA to rDNA copy numbers. We investigated phylogenetically coherent patterns of activity among soil prokaryotes in non-growing soil communitie...

  8. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  9. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  10. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  11. Drug targeting by macromolecules without recognition unit?

    PubMed

    Hudecz, Ferenc; Reményi, Judit; Szabó, Rita; Kóczán, György; Mezo, Gábor; Kovács, Péter; Gaál, Dezso

    2003-01-01

    his review will summarize available information on the ability of macromolecular conjugates containing no specific recognition motifs to deliver anthracyclines (daunomycin, adriamycin) or methotrexate to target cells such as tumour cells or macrophages. Conjugates with natural (proteins, DNA, carbohydrates) and synthetic macromolecules (linear and branched chain poly-alpha-amino acids, non-biodegradable DIVEMA, HPMA etc.) will be reviewed. Experimental data from several laboratories indicate that these conjugates are taken up by cells mainly by fluid-phase or adsorptive endocytosis. It is believed that these processes do not involve 'specific receptors'. Two examples of methotrexate and daunomycin conjugates will be discussed to show the effect of the chemical structure of branched chain polypeptides on the uptake and antitumour or antiparasitic (Leishmania donovani infection) efficacy of conjugates.

  12. Structure and Stability of Individual DNA or RNA Hairpin Molecules Captured in an Ion Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeson, Mark

    2002-03-01

    Nanoscale pores can be used to analyze individual DNA or RNA molecules. For example, a prototype device based on the alpha-hemolysin protein permits serial examination of hundreds to thousands of molecules per minute. It is routinely used to identify individual polynucleotide homopolymers, and to read segments within single DNA or RNA block copolymers as they thread through a narrow, trans-membrane pore formed by the protein (1.5 nm limiting aperture). In recent reports, we have shown that this device can also be used to examine structural details of individual DNA or RNA hairpins at single base-pair precision. This is achieved by capturing each hairpin in a vestibule of the channel leading to the trans-membrane pore. Under a 120 mV applied voltage, ionic current through the channel is gated by the RNA or DNA hairpin as it is perched in the vestibule, resulting in a dynamic current pattern that is exquisitely sensitive to sequence identity. In this presentation, I will explain the ion channel device and then describe structural details of the hairpin molecules that can be resolved by the instrument. These include: i) Watson-Crick base-pair identity at the hairpin stem terminus; ii) duplex fraying caused by single base pair mismatches internal to the hairpin stem; and iii) A form (RNA) versus B form (DNA) helix conformation. I will then discuss alternative mechanisms that can account for the discrete gating patterns that underlie the analysis.

  13. Novel DNA-binding properties of the RNA-binding protein TIAR.

    PubMed

    Suswam, Esther A; Li, Yan Yan; Mahtani, Harry; King, Peter H

    2005-01-01

    TIA-1 related protein binds avidly to uridine-rich elements in mRNA and pre-mRNAs of a wide range of genes, including interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The protein has diverse regulatory roles, which in part depend on the locus of binding within the transcript, including translational control, splicing and apoptosis. Here, we observed selective and potent inhibition of TIAR-RNP complex formation with IL-8 and VEGF 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) using thymidine-rich deoxyoligonucleotide (ODN) sequences derived from the VEFG 3'-UTR. We show by ultraviolet crosslinking and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that TIAR can bind directly to single-stranded, thymidine-rich ODNs but not to double-stranded ODNs containing the same sequence. TIAR had a nearly 6-fold greater affinity for DNA than RNA (K(d)app = 1.6x10(-9) M versus 9.4 x 10(-9) M). Truncation of TIAR indicated that the high affinity DNA-binding site overlaps with the RNA-binding site involving RNA recognition motif 2 (RRM2). However, RRM1 alone could also bind to DNA. Finally, we show that TIAR can be displaced from single-stranded DNA by active transcription through the binding site. These results provide a potential mechanism by which TIAR can shuttle between RNA and DNA ligands.

  14. Immobilization of microalgae cells in alginate facilitates isolation of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Blanca R; Hernandez, Juan-Pablo; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2017-04-01

    Isolation of nucleic acids from Chlorella is difficult, given the chemically complex nature of their cell walls and variable production of metabolites. Immobilization of microalgae in polymers adds additional difficulty. Here, we modified, amended, and standardized methods for isolation of nucleic acids and compared the yield of DNA and RNA from free-living and encapsulated microalgae C. sorokiniana. Isolation of nucleic acids from immobilized cells required two steps in dissolving the alginate matrix, releasing the cells, and mechanical disruption with glass beads. For DNA extraction, we used modified versions of a commercial kit along with the hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method. For RNA extraction, we used the commercial TRI reagent procedure and the CTAB-dithiotreitol method. Quantity and quality of nucleic acids in extracts varied with growth conditions, isolation procedures, and time of incubation of the original culture. There were consistently higher amounts of DNA and RNA in extracts from immobilized cells. Quantitatively, the modified procedure with the commercial Promega kit was the most reliable procedure for isolating DNA and a modified commercial TRI reagent procedure was the choice for isolating RNA. All four procedures eliminated proteins efficiently and had low levels of contamination from residual polysaccharides from the matrices and/or metabolites naturally produced by the microalgae. All DNA extracts under both growth conditions, time of incubation, and two isolation methods successfully amplified the 18S ribosomal RNA by PCR and quantitative reverse transcription (RT-qPCR).

  15. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James B; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems.

  16. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems. PMID:26125550

  17. DNA repair by RNA: Templated, or not templated, that is the question.

    PubMed

    Meers, Chance; Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to both endogenous and exogenous sources of genomic stress. To maintain chromosome stability, a variety of mechanisms have evolved to cope with the multitude of genetic abnormalities that can arise over the life of a cell. Still, failures to repair these lesions are the driving force of cancers and other degenerative disorders. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most toxic genetic lesions, inhibiting cell ability to replicate, and are sites of mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. DSB repair is known to proceed via two major mechanisms: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HR reliance on the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules offers increased accuracy. While the preferred substrate for HR in mitotic cells is the sister chromatid, this is limited to the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. However, abundant amounts of homologous genetic substrate may exist throughout the cell cycle in the form of RNA. Considered an uncommon occurrence, the direct transfer of information from RNA to DNA is thought to be limited to special circumstances. Studies have shown that RNA molecules reverse transcribed into cDNA can be incorporated into DNA at DSB sites via a non-templated mechanism by NHEJ or a templated mechanism by HR. In addition, synthetic RNA molecules can directly template the repair of DSBs in yeast and human cells via an HR mechanism. New work suggests that even endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a homologous template to repair a DSB in chromosomal DNA. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the recent advancements in DSB repair by RNA via non-templated and templated mechanisms. We will provide current findings, models and future challenges investigating RNA and its role in DSB repair.

  18. Analysis of allele-specific RNA transcription in FSHD by RNA-DNA FISH in single myonuclei.

    PubMed

    Masny, Peter S; Chan, On Ying A; de Greef, Jessica C; Bengtsson, Ulla; Ehrlich, Melanie; Tawil, Rabi; Lock, Leslie F; Hewitt, Jane E; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Martin, Jorge H; van der Maarel, Silvere M; Winokur, Sara T

    2010-04-01

    Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is likely caused by epigenetic alterations in chromatin involving contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array near the telomere of chromosome 4q. The precise mechanism by which deletions of D4Z4 influence gene expression in FSHD is not yet resolved. Regulatory models include a cis effect on proximal gene transcription (position effect), DNA looping, non-coding RNA, nuclear localization and trans-effects. To directly test whether deletions of D4Z4 affect gene expression in cis, nascent RNA was examined in single myonuclei so that transcription from each allele could be measured independently. FSHD and control myotubes (differentiated myoblasts) were subjected to sequential RNA-DNA FISH. A total of 16 genes in the FSHD region (FRG2, TUBB4Q, FRG1, FAT1, F11, KLKB1, CYP4V2, TLR3, SORBS2, PDLIM3 (ALP), LRP2BP, ING2, SNX25, SLC25A4 (ANT1), HELT and IRF2) were examined for interallelic variation in RNA expression within individual myonuclei. Sequential DNA hybridization with a unique 4q35 chromosome probe was then applied to confirm the localization of nascent RNA to 4q. A D4Z4 probe, labeled with a third fluorochrome, distinguished between the deleted and normal allele in FSHD nuclei. Our data do not support an FSHD model in which contracted D4Z4 arrays induce altered transcription in cis from 4q35 genes, even for those genes (FRG1, FRG2 and SLC25A4 (ANT1)) for which such an effect has been proposed.

  19. Simultaneous isolation of DNA, RNA, and proteins for genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Radpour, Ramin; Sikora, Michal; Grussenmeyer, Thomas; Kohler, Corina; Barekati, Zeinab; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Lefkovits, Ivan; Zhong, Xiao Yan

    2009-11-01

    Analysis of DNA, RNA, and proteins for downstream genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis holds an important place in the field of medical care and life science. This is often hampered by the limited availability of sample material. For this reason, there exists an increasing interest for simultaneous isolation of DNA, RNA and proteins from a single sample aliquot. Several kit-systems allowing such a procedure have been introduced to the market. We present an approach using the AllPrep method for simultaneous isolation of DNA, RNA and proteins from several human specimens, such as whole blood, buffy coat, serum, plasma and tissue samples. The quantification and qualification of the isolated molecular species were assessed by different downstream methods: NanoDrop for measuring concentration and purity of all molecular species; DNA and RNA LabChip for fractionation analysis of nucleic acids; quantitative PCR for quantification analysis of DNA and RNA; thymidine-specific cleavage mass array on MALDI-TOF silico-chip for epigenetic analysis; Protein LabChip and two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis for proteomic analysis. With our modified method, we can simultaneously isolate DNA, RNA and/or proteins from one single sample aliquot. We could overcome to some method limitations like low quality or DNA fragmentation using reamplification strategy for performing high-throughput downstream assays. Fast and easy performance of the procedure makes this method interesting for all fields of downstream analysis, especially when using limited sample resources. The cost-effectiveness of the procedure when material is abundantly available has not been addressed. This methodological improvement enables to execute such experiments that were not performable with standard procedure, and ensures reproducible outcome.

  20. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro is stimulated by RNA from uninfected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    van der Vliet, P C; van Dam, D; Kwant, M M

    1984-06-04

    Adenovirus DNA replication was studied in a partially reconstituted system consisting of purified viral proteins (DNA-binding protein, precursor terminal protein and Ad DNA polymerase) and a nuclear extract from uninfected HeLa cells. Optimal DNA replication required the presence of a heat-stable, ribonuclease-sensitive fraction from the cytosol of uninfected cells. This fraction stimulated the initiation about 3-fold and the replication of origin fragments 5-10-fold. Sedimentation analysis indicated the presence of a fast-sedimenting and a slow-sedimenting component which complemented each other. At least part of the stimulation was caused by low-molecular-mass RNA.

  1. Method for RNA extraction and cDNA library construction from microbes in crop rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changxun; Xu, Tiecheng; Ye, Changliang; Huang, Likun; Wang, Qingshui; Lin, Wenxiong

    2014-02-01

    Techniques to analyze the transcriptome of the soil rhizosphere are essential to reveal the interactions and communications between plants and microorganisms in the soil ecosystem. In this study, different volumes of Al₂(SO₄)₃ were added to rhizosphere soil samples to precipitate humic substances, which interfere with most procedures of RNA and DNA analyses. After humic substances were precipitated, cells of soil microorganisms were broken by vortexing with glass beads, and then DNA and RNA were recovered using Tris-HCl buffer with LiCl, SDS, and EDTA. The crude extract was precipitated and dissolved in RNAse-free water, and then separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. We determined the optimum volume of Al₂(SO₄)₃ for treating rhizosphere soil of rice, tobacco, sugarcane, Rehmannia glutinosa, and Pseudostellaria heterophylla. The crude nucleic acids extract from rice soil was treated with DNase I and then RNA was purified using a gel filtration column. The purified RNA was reverse-transcribed into single-strand cDNA and then ligated with an adaptor at each end before amplifying ds cDNA. The ds cDNA was sub-cloned for subsequent gene sequence analysis. We conducted qPCR to amplify 16S ribosomal DNA and observed highly efficient amplification. These results show that the extraction method can be optimized to isolate and obtain high-quality nucleic acids from microbes in different rhizosphere soils, suitable for genomic and post-genomic analyses.

  2. Density functional study of the phosphate diester hydrolysis of RNA in RNA/DNA hybrid by RNase HI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Makoto; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Ribonuclease HI (RNase HI) catalyses the non-specific hydrolysis of RNA in an RNA/DNA hybrid. This enzyme is found in almost all organisms and involved in replication initiation and DNA topology restoration. A similar fold has been observed in other enzymes such as DNA transposases. In particular, RNases HI has emerged as important therapeutic targets because the enzymatic activity is absolutely required for proliferation of HIV and other retroviruses. The X-ray crystallographic structures of RNase HI revealed that the Mg2+ ion is essential for the enzymatic reaction and that Asp and Glu coordinate to the Mg2+ ion. There are, however, controversies about the catalytic mechanism of RNase HI, the number of Mg2+ ions, the proton transfer pathway, and the protonation states of the active site residues. In the present study, we have explored the hydrolysis of the phosphate diester group of RNA by RNase HI using density functional theory to elucidate how many Mg2+ ions are required for the catalysis of RNase HI. Our computation demonstrates that both one- and two-metal models show the stepwise hydrolysis pathway via a pentacovalent intermediate. However, the activation barrier of the two-metal model is lower than that of the one-metal model by 11.7 kcal/mol.

  3. A column-based rapid method for the simultaneous isolation of DNA, RNA, miRNA and proteins.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Sandeep K; Dave, Vivek P; Rajput, Ankita; Pandey, Hausila P; Datta, Tirtha K; Singh, Rakesh K

    2012-09-01

    In the 21st century, systems biology is a holistic approach to understand life by the cross-talk study between the genome, Rnome and proteome of a cell. We describe a column-based rapid method for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, miRNA (microRNA) and proteins from the same experimental sample without prior fractionation, which allows a direct correlation between genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data. This method provides a simple and effective way to analyse each of these biomolecules without affecting yield and quality. We also show that isolated biomolecules are of the highest purity and compatible for all the respective downstream applications, such as PCR amplification, RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR), real-time PCR, reverse Northern blotting, SDS/PAGE and Western blot analysis. The buffers and reagents used in this method are optimized extensively to achieve the cost effective and reliable procedure to separate the functional biomolecules of the cell.

  4. Hybridization of denatured RNA and small DNA fragments transferred to nitrocellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P S

    1980-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for transferring RNA from agarose gels to nitrocellulose paper for blot hybridization has been developed. Poly(A)+ and ribosomal RNAs transfer efficiently to nitrocellulose paper in high salt (3 M NaCl/0.3 M trisodium citrate) after denaturation with glyoxal and 50% (vol/vol) dimethyl sulfoxide. RNA also binds to nitrocellulose after treatment with methylmercuric hydroxide. The method is sensitive: about 50 pg of specific mRNA per band is readily detectable after hybridization with high specific activity probes (10(8) cpm/microgram). The RNA is stably bound to the nitrocellulose paper by this procedure, allowing removal of the hybridized probes and rehybridization of the RNA blots without loss of sensitivity. The use of nitrocellulose paper for the analysis of RNA by blot hybridization has several advantages over the use of activated paper (diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper). The method is simple, inexpensive, reproducible, and sensitive. In addition, denaturation of DNA with glyoxal and dimethyl sulfoxide promotes transfer and retention of small DNAs (100 nucleotides and larger) to nitrocellulose paper. A related method is also described for dotting RNA and DNA directly onto nitrocellulose paper treated with a high concentration of salt; under these conditions denatured DNA of less than 200 nucleotides is retained and hybridizes efficiently. Images PMID:6159641

  5. Human papilloma virus, DNA methylation and microRNA expression in cervical cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-WENCES, HILDA; PERALTA-ZARAGOZA, OSCAR; FERNÁNDEZ-TILAPA, GLORIA

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease caused by genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that affect gene expression. The progression from precursor lesions to invasive cervical cancer is influenced by persistent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, which induces changes in the host genome and epigenome. Epigenetic alterations, such as aberrant miRNA expression and changes in DNA methylation status, favor the expression of oncogenes and the silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. Given that some miRNA genes can be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, it has been proposed that alterations in the methylation status of miRNA promoters could be the driving mechanism behind their aberrant expression in cervical cancer. For these reasons, we assessed the relationship among HPV infection, cellular DNA methylation and miRNA expression. We conclude that alterations in the methylation status of protein-coding genes and various miRNA genes are influenced by HPV infection, the viral genotype, the physical state of the viral DNA, and viral oncogenic risk. Furthermore, HPV induces deregulation of miRNA expression, particularly at loci near fragile sites. This deregulation occurs through the E6 and E7 proteins, which target miRNA transcription factors such as p53. PMID:24737381

  6. RNA/DNA ratio and LPL and MyoD mRNA expressions in muscle of Oreochromis niloticus fed with elevated levels of palm oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayisi, Christian Larbi; Zhao, Jinliang

    2016-02-01

    Palm oil is of great potential as one of the sustainable alternatives to fish oil (FO) in aquafeeds. In this present study, five isonitrogenous diets (32% crude protein) with elevated palm oil levels of 0%, 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% were used during an 8-week feeding trial to evaluate its effects on RNA/DNA ratio and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and MyoD mRNA expressions in muscle of Oreochromis niloticus. The results showed that RNA, DNA content as well as ratio of RNA to DNA were significantly affected ( P < 0.05), in each case the highest was recorded in fish group subjected to 6% palm oil level. There was a strong positive correlation between nucleic acid concentration (RNA concentration and RNA: DNA ratio) and specific growth rate (SGR), protein efficiency ratio (PER), while a negative correlation existed between nucleic acid concentration (RNA concentration and RNA: DNA ratio) and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The mRNA expressions of LPL and MyoD in muscle were not significantly affected by the different palm oil levels, although the highest expression was observed in fish fed with 6% palm oil level. There also existed a strong positive correlation between the mRNA expression of LPL, MyoD and SGR, PER, while their correlation with FCR was negative. In conclusion, elevated palm oil affected the RNA, DNA concentration as well as RNA/DNA ratio significantly, although the mRNA expression of LPL and MyoD were not affected significantly by elevated palm oil levels.

  7. RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes with Altered Regio- or Enantioselectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    In vitro evolution methods were used to obtain DNA enzymes that cleave either a 2',5' - phosphodiester following a wibonucleotide or a 3',5' -phosphodiester following an L-ribonucleotide. Both enzymes can operate in an intermolecular reaction format with multiple turnover. The DNA enzyme that cleaves a 2',5' -phosphodiester exhibits a k(sub cat) of approx. 0.01/ min and catalytic efficiency, k(sub cat)/k(sub m) of approx. 10(exp 5)/ M min. The enzyme that cleaves an L-ribonudeotide is about 10-fold slower and has a catalytic efficiency of approx. 4 x 10(exp 5)/ M min. Both enzymes require a divalent metal cation for their activity and have optimal catalytic rate at pH 7-8 and 35-50 C. In a comparison of each enzyme s activity with either its corresponding substrate that contains an unnatural ribonudeotide or a substrate that instead contains a standard ribonucleotide, the 2',5' -phosphodiester-deaving DNA enzyme exhibited a regioselectivity of 6000- fold, while the L-ribonucleotide-cleaving DNA enzyme exhibited an enantioselectivity of 50-fold. These molecules demonstrate how in vitro evolution can be used to obtain regio- and enantioselective catalysts that exhibit specificities for nonnatural analogues of biological compounds.

  8. RNA m(6)A methylation regulates the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Laurent, Benoit; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Lu, Zhike; Sheng, Wanqiang; Xu, Chuanyun; Chen, Hao; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Siqing; Ling, Dominic; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Zou, Lee; Jambhekar, Ashwini; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2017-03-23

    Cell proliferation and survival require the faithful maintenance and propagation of genetic information, which are threatened by the ubiquitous sources of DNA damage present intracellularly and in the external environment. A system of DNA repair, called the DNA damage response, detects and repairs damaged DNA and prevents cell division until the repair is complete. Here we report that methylation at the 6 position of adenosine (m(6)A) in RNA is rapidly (within 2 min) and transiently induced at DNA damage sites in response to ultraviolet irradiation. This modification occurs on numerous poly(A)(+) transcripts and is regulated by the methyltransferase METTL3 (methyltransferase-like 3) and the demethylase FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated protein). In the absence of METTL3 catalytic activity, cells showed delayed repair of ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine adducts and elevated sensitivity to ultraviolet, demonstrating the importance of m(6)A in the ultraviolet-responsive DNA damage response. Multiple DNA polymerases are involved in the ultraviolet response, some of which resynthesize DNA after the lesion has been excised by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, while others participate in trans-lesion synthesis to allow replication past damaged lesions in S phase. DNA polymerase κ (Pol κ), which has been implicated in both nucleotide excision repair and trans-lesion synthesis, required the catalytic activity of METTL3 for immediate localization to ultraviolet-induced DNA damage sites. Importantly, Pol κ overexpression qualitatively suppressed the cyclobutane pyrimidine removal defect associated with METTL3 loss. Thus, we have uncovered a novel function for RNA m(6)A modification in the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response, and our findings collectively support a model in which m(6)A RNA serves as a beacon for the selective, rapid recruitment of Pol κ to damage sites to facilitate repair and cell survival.

  9. Archaeal DnaG contains a conserved N-terminal RNA-binding domain and enables tailing of rRNA by the exosome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Linlin; Klug, Gabriele; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2014-11-10

    The archaeal exosome is a phosphorolytic 3'-5' exoribonuclease complex. In a reverse reaction it synthesizes A-rich RNA tails. Its RNA-binding cap comprises the eukaryotic orthologs Rrp4 and Csl4, and an archaea-specific subunit annotated as DnaG. In Sulfolobus solfataricus DnaG and Rrp4 but not Csl4 show preference for poly(rA). Archaeal DnaG contains N- and C-terminal domains (NTD and CTD) of unknown function flanking a TOPRIM domain. We found that the NT and TOPRIM domains have comparable, high conservation in all archaea, while the CTD conservation correlates with the presence of exosome. We show that the NTD is a novel RNA-binding domain with poly(rA)-preference cooperating with the TOPRIM domain in binding of RNA. Consistently, a fusion protein containing full-length Csl4 and NTD of DnaG led to enhanced degradation of A-rich RNA by the exosome. We also found that DnaG strongly binds native and in vitro transcribed rRNA and enables its polynucleotidylation by the exosome. Furthermore, rRNA-derived transcripts with heteropolymeric tails were degraded faster by the exosome than their non-tailed variants. Based on our data, we propose that archaeal DnaG is an RNA-binding protein, which, in the context of the exosome, is involved in targeting of stable RNA for degradation.

  10. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien

    2014-01-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by Watson-Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases

  11. High-affinity RNA binding by a hyperthermophilic single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Morten, Michael J; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Cubeddu, Liza; Kariawasam, Ruvini; Peregrina, Jose; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F

    2017-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), including replication protein A (RPA) in eukaryotes, play a central role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. SSBs utilise an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain to bind DNA, and typically oligomerise in solution to bring multiple OB fold domains together in the functional SSB. SSBs from hyperthermophilic crenarchaea, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, have an unusual structure with a single OB fold coupled to a flexible C-terminal tail. The OB fold resembles those in RPA, whilst the tail is reminiscent of bacterial SSBs and mediates interaction with other proteins. One paradigm in the field is that SSBs bind specifically to ssDNA and much less strongly to RNA, ensuring that their functions are restricted to DNA metabolism. Here, we use a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches to demonstrate that the binding properties of S. solfataricus SSB are essentially identical for ssDNA and ssRNA. These features may represent an adaptation to a hyperthermophilic lifestyle, where DNA and RNA damage is a more frequent event.

  12. Automated Device for Asynchronous Extraction of RNA, DNA, or Protein Biomarkers from Surrogate Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Bitting, Anna L; Bordelon, Hali; Baglia, Mark L; Davis, Keersten M; Creecy, Amy E; Short, Philip A; Albert, Laura E; Karhade, Aditya V; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Adams, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Many biomarker-based diagnostic methods are inhibited by nontarget molecules in patient samples, necessitating biomarker extraction before detection. We have developed a simple device that purifies RNA, DNA, or protein biomarkers from complex biological samples without robotics or fluid pumping. The device design is based on functionalized magnetic beads, which capture biomarkers and remove background biomolecules by magnetically transferring the beads through processing solutions arrayed within small-diameter tubing. The process was automated by wrapping the tubing around a disc-like cassette and rotating it past a magnet using a programmable motor. This device recovered biomarkers at ~80% of the operator-dependent extraction method published previously. The device was validated by extracting biomarkers from a panel of surrogate patient samples containing clinically relevant concentrations of (1) influenza A RNA in nasal swabs, (2) Escherichia coli DNA in urine, (3) Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum, and (4) Plasmodium falciparum protein and DNA in blood. The device successfully extracted each biomarker type from samples representing low levels of clinically relevant infectivity (i.e., 7.3 copies/µL of influenza A RNA, 405 copies/µL of E. coli DNA, 0.22 copies/µL of TB DNA, 167 copies/µL of malaria parasite DNA, and 2.7 pM of malaria parasite protein).

  13. Structural basis for CRISPR RNA-guided DNA recognition by Cascade.

    PubMed

    Jore, Matthijs M; Lundgren, Magnus; van Duijn, Esther; Bultema, Jelle B; Westra, Edze R; Waghmare, Sakharam P; Wiedenheft, Blake; Pul, Umit; Wurm, Reinhild; Wagner, Rolf; Beijer, Marieke R; Barendregt, Arjan; Zhou, Kaihong; Snijders, Ambrosius P L; Dickman, Mark J; Doudna, Jennifer A; Boekema, Egbert J; Heck, Albert J R; van der Oost, John; Brouns, Stan J J

    2011-05-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) immune system in prokaryotes uses small guide RNAs to neutralize invading viruses and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, immunity depends on a ribonucleoprotein complex called Cascade. Here we present the composition and low-resolution structure of Cascade and show how it recognizes double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets in a sequence-specific manner. Cascade is a 405-kDa complex comprising five functionally essential CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins (CasA(1)B(2)C(6)D(1)E(1)) and a 61-nucleotide CRISPR RNA (crRNA) with 5'-hydroxyl and 2',3'-cyclic phosphate termini. The crRNA guides Cascade to dsDNA target sequences by forming base pairs with the complementary DNA strand while displacing the noncomplementary strand to form an R-loop. Cascade recognizes target DNA without consuming ATP, which suggests that continuous invader DNA surveillance takes place without energy investment. The structure of Cascade shows an unusual seahorse shape that undergoes conformational changes when it binds target DNA.

  14. Quantitation of cell-free DNA and RNA in plasma during tumor progression in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To clarify the implications of cell-free nucleic acids (cfNA) in the plasma in neoplastic disease, it is necessary to determine the kinetics of their release into the circulation. Methods To quantify non-tumor and tumor DNA and RNA in the plasma of tumor-bearing rats and to correlate such levels with tumor progression, we injected DHD/K12-PROb colon cancer cells subcutaneously into syngenic BD-IX rats. Rats were sacrificed and their plasma was analyzed from the first to the eleventh week after inoculation. Results The release of large amounts of non-tumor DNA into plasma was related to tumor development from its early stages. Tumor-specific DNA was detected in 33% of tumor-bearing rats, starting from the first week after inoculation and at an increasing frequency thereafter. Animals that were positive for tumor DNA in the plasma had larger tumors than those that were negative (p = 0.0006). However, the appearance of both mutated and non-mutated DNA fluctuated with time and levels of both were scattered among individuals in each group. The release of non-tumor mRNA was unaffected by tumor progression and we did not detect mutated RNA sequences in any animals. Conclusions The release of normal and tumor cfDNA into plasma appeared to be related to individual-specific factors. The contribution of tumor DNA to the elevated levels of plasma DNA was intermittent. The release of RNA into plasma during cancer progression appeared to be an even more selective and elusive phenomenon than that of DNA. PMID:23374730

  15. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  16. The Chemical Synthesis of DNA/RNA: Our Gift to Science

    PubMed Central

    Caruthers, Marvin H.

    2013-01-01

    It is a great privilege to contribute to the Reflections essays. In my particular case, this essay has allowed me to weave some of my major scientific contributions into a tapestry held together by what I have learned from three colleagues (Robert Letsinger, Gobind Khorana, and George Rathmann) who molded my career at every important junction. To these individuals, I remain eternally grateful, as they always led by example and showed many of us how to break new ground in both science and biotechnology. Relative to my scientific career, I have focused primarily on two related areas. The first is methodologies we developed for chemically synthesizing DNA and RNA. Synthetic DNA and RNA continue to be an essential research tool for biologists, biochemists, and molecular biologists. The second is developing new approaches for solving important biological problems using synthetic DNA, RNA, and their analogs. PMID:23223445

  17. Long noncoding RNA LINP1 regulates double strand DNA break repair in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youyou; He, Qun; Hu, Zhongyi; Feng, Yi; Fan, Lingling; Tang, Zhaoqing; Yuan, Jiao; Shan, Weiwei; Li, Chunsheng; Hu, Xiaowen; Tanyi, Janos L; Fan, Yi; Huang, Qihong; Montone, Kathleen; Dang, Chi V; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are transcripts that are larger than 200 nucleotides but do not appear to have protein-coding potential, play critical roles during tumorigenesis by functioning as scaffolds to regulate protein-protein, protein-DNA or protein-RNA interactions. Using a clinically guided genetic screening approach, we identified (lncRNA in Non-homologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway 1) as a lncRNA that is overexpressed in human triple-negative breast cancer. We found that LINP1 enhances double-strand DNA break repair by serving as a scaffold that links Ku80 and DNA-PKcs, thereby coordinating the NHEJ pathway. Importantly, blocking LINP1, which is regulated by the p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, increases sensitivity of tumor cell response to radiotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27111890

  18. Comparison and optimization of methods for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vorreiter, Fränze; Richter, Silke; Peter, Michel; Baumann, Sven; von Bergen, Martin; Tomm, Janina M

    2016-09-01

    The challenge of performing a time-resolved comprehensive analysis of molecular systems has led to the quest to optimize extraction methods. When the size of a biological sample is limited, there is demand for the simultaneous extraction of molecules representing the four areas of "omics": genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Here we optimized a protocol for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites and compared it with two existing protocols. Our optimization comprised the addition of a methanol/chloroform metabolite purification before the separation of DNA/RNA and proteins. Extracted DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites were quantitatively and/or qualitatively analyzed. Of the three methods, only the newly developed protocol yielded all biomolecule classes of adequate quantity and quality.

  19. Rolling circle amplification detection of RNA and DNA

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Pattee, Melissa S.; Attix, Cristina M.; Tucker, James D.

    2004-08-31

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been useful for detecting point mutations in isolated nucleic acids, but its application in cytological preparations has been problematic. By pretreating cells with a combination of restriction enzymes and exonucleases, we demonstrate RCA in solution and in situ to detect gene copy number and single base mutations. It can also detect and quantify transcribed RNA in individual cells, making it a versatile tool for cell-based assays.

  20. Abnormal rapid non-linear RNA production induced by T7 RNA polymerase in the absence of an exogenous DNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Y.; Fujinuma, A.; Fujita, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Umekage, S.

    2015-02-01

    Although recombinant T7 RNA polymerase is commonly used for in vitro RNA synthesis, several reports have pointed out that T7 RNA polymerase can also induce RNA-directed RNA polymerization or replication. In addition, here we show a new aberrant transcription when using T7 RNA polymerase. This polymerization was observed in the presence of both ribonucleotides and a purchasable T7 RNA polymerase, Thermo T7 RNA polymerase, as well as in the absence of an exogenous DNA template. This cryptic RNA production was detectable after several hours of incubation and was inhibited by adding DNase I. These findings suggested that some contaminated DNA along with the Thermo stable T7 RNA polymerase could be used as template DNA. However, to our surprise, RNA production showed a rapid non-linear increase. This finding strongly indicated that a self-replication cycle emerged from the RNA-directed polymerization or replication by T7 RNA polymerase, triggering the abnormal explosive increase.

  1. Not just "a clever way to detect whether DNA really made RNA": The invention of DNA-RNA hybridization and its outcome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Susie

    2015-10-01

    The invention of DNA-RNA hybridization in 1960 by Ben Hall and Sol Spiegelman had a powerful impact on the theory and discourse of molecular biology. Yet, despite its importance, the story of this invention has barely been told. Hybridization allowed biologists to bridge the theoretical realm and the material world of organisms, to correlate a hypothetical concept of biological information transfer with a mechanism capable of making an RNA copy of DNA. During the early 1960s, Spiegelman and coworkers employed hybridization to investigate the origin of RNAs found in cells. They operationally defined messenger RNA and elucidated several aspects of genome organization. For Spiegelman, this was the culmination of his longstanding interest in the mechanism of enzyme/protein synthesis; for Hall, it was the beginning of a successful career in genetics. Other scientists immediately recognized the power of the technique and introduced improvements. In 1965, Gillespie and Spiegelman combined several modifications and described a procedure for hybridization that became standard. Since the 1970s, it has become an essential tool in biology and in biotechnology, and a core component in molecular techniques such as DNA microarrays. Notwithstanding its current success, the inventors' names have disappeared from the literature. This curiosity is discussed.

  2. [Inhibitory effect of Howiinol A(GHM-10) on the synthesis of biological macromolecules in L1210 cells].

    PubMed

    He, J; Xu, C

    1998-12-01

    Howiinol(GHM-10), a new compound isolated from Goniothalamus howii, had been shown to have marked anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effect of GHM-10 on the biosynthesis of macromolecules in L1210 cells was investigated. By using [3H] labeled precursor incorporation assays, we found that the biosyntheses, of DNA, RNA and protein in L1210 cells were inhibited markedly after the cells were pretreated with GHM-10 in 4-12 micrograms.ml-1 for 6 h and the inhibition of DNA synthesis was the most obvious one. We also used the methods of [3H]TdR incorporation curve, shift of UV-absorption spectrum and shift of fluorescence spectrum to investigate the mechanism of inhibitory action of GHM-10 on DNA biosynthesis. The results showed that the inhibition of DNA synthesis already became irreversible after the L1210 cells were treated with GHM-10 in 6-8 micrograms.ml-1 for 1 h, indicating that GHM-10 may induce damage on DNA molecular structure. However, when calf thymus DNA was treated with GHM-10, the UV-absorption spectrum and the fluorescence spectrum of the DNA were not changed significantly. It is suggested that GHM-10 was not able to intercalate into DNA molecules or to damage the structure of DNA directly.

  3. Nucleic acid determinants for selective deamination of DNA over RNA by activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Christopher S; Lee, Jae W; Wang, Laura C; Kohli, Rahul M

    2013-08-27

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the larger AID/APOBEC family, is the key catalyst in initiating antibody somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. The DNA deamination model accounting for AID's functional role posits that AID deaminates genomic deoxycytosine bases within the immunoglobulin locus, activating downstream repair pathways that result in antibody maturation. Although this model is well supported, the molecular basis for AID's selectivity for DNA over RNA remains an open and pressing question, reflecting a broader need to elucidate how AID/APOBEC enzymes engage their substrates. To address these questions, we have synthesized a series of chimeric nucleic acid substrates and characterized their reactivity with AID. These chimeric substrates feature targeted variations at the 2'-position of nucleotide sugars, allowing us to interrogate the steric and conformational basis for nucleic acid selectivity. We demonstrate that modifications to the target nucleotide can significantly alter AID's reactivity. Strikingly, within a substrate that is otherwise DNA, a single RNA-like 2'-hydroxyl substitution at the target cytosine is sufficient to compromise deamination. Alternatively, modifications that favor a DNA-like conformation (or sugar pucker) are compatible with deamination. AID's closely related homolog APOBEC1 is similarly sensitive to RNA-like substitutions at the target cytosine. Inversely, with unreactive 2'-fluoro-RNA substrates, AID's deaminase activity was rescued by introducing a trinucleotide DNA patch spanning the target cytosine and two nucleotides upstream. These data suggest a role for nucleotide sugar pucker in explaining the molecular basis for AID's DNA selectivity and, more generally, suggest how other nucleic acid-modifying enzymes may distinguish DNA from RNA.

  4. Effects of long DNA folding and small RNA stem–loop in thermophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yusuke T.; Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In thermophoresis, with the fluid at rest, suspensions move along a gradient of temperature. In an aqueous solution, a PEG polymer suspension is depleted from the hot region and builds a concentration gradient. In this gradient, DNA polymers of different sizes can be separated. In this work the effect of the polymer structure for genomic DNA and small RNA is studied. For genome-size DNA, individual single T4 DNA is visualized and tracked in a PEG solution under a temperature gradient built by infrared laser focusing. We find that T4 DNA follows steps of depletion, ring-like localization, and accumulation patterns as the PEG volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, a coil–globule transition for DNA is observed for a large enough PEG volume fraction. This drastically affects the localization position of T4 DNA. In a similar experiment, with small RNA such as ribozymes we find that the stem–loop folding of such polymers has important consequences. The RNA polymers having a long and rigid stem accumulate, whereas a polymer with stem length less than 4 base pairs shows depletion. Such measurements emphasize the crucial contribution of the double-stranded parts of RNA for thermal separation and selection under a temperature gradient. Because huge temperature gradients are present around hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean seafloor, this process might be relevant, at the origin of life, in an RNA world hypothesis. Ribozymes could be selected from a pool of random sequences depending on the length of their stems. PMID:23071341

  5. Discriminative Prediction of A-To-I RNA Editing Events from DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangming; Singh, Pratibha; Bagge, Annika; Valtat, Bérengère; Vikman, Petter; Spégel, Peter; Mulder, Hindrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional alteration of RNA sequences that, via insertions, deletions or base substitutions, can affect protein structure as well as RNA and protein expression. Recently, it has been suggested that RNA editing may be more frequent than previously thought. A great impediment, however, to a deeper understanding of this process is the paramount sequencing effort that needs to be undertaken to identify RNA editing events. Here, we describe an in silico approach, based on machine learning, that ameliorates this problem. Using 41 nucleotide long DNA sequences, we show that novel A-to-I RNA editing events can be predicted from known A-to-I RNA editing events intra- and interspecies. The validity of the proposed method was verified in an independent experimental dataset. Using our approach, 203 202 putative A-to-I RNA editing events were predicted in the whole human genome. Out of these, 9% were previously reported. The remaining sites require further validation, e.g., by targeted deep sequencing. In conclusion, the approach described here is a useful tool to identify potential A-to-I RNA editing events without the requirement of extensive RNA sequencing. PMID:27764195

  6. Fluorescent Labeling of Plasmid DNA and mRNA: Gains and Losses of Current Labeling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, K; Braeckmans, K; Remaut, K

    2016-02-17

    Live-cell imaging has provided the life sciences with insights into the cell biology and dynamics. Fluorescent labeling of target molecules proves to be indispensable in this regard. In this Review, we focus on the current fluorescent labeling strategies for nucleic acids, and in particular mRNA (mRNA) and plasmid DNA (pDNA), which are of interest to a broad range of scientific fields. By giving a background of the available techniques and an evaluation of the pros and cons, we try to supply scientists with all the information needed to come to an informed choice of nucleic acid labeling strategy aimed at their particular needs.

  7. Using Amino-Labeled Nucleotide Probes for Simultaneous Single Molecule RNA-DNA FISH

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using amino-labeled oligonucleotide probes, we established a simple, robust and low-noise method for simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization, a highly useful tool to study the large pool of long non-coding RNAs being identified in the current research. With probes either chemically or biologically synthesized, we demonstrate that the method can be applied to study a wide range of RNA and DNA targets at the single-cell and single-molecule level in cellular contexts. PMID:25226542

  8. RNA Polymerase Collision versus DNA Structural Distortion: Twists and Turns Can Cause Break Failure.

    PubMed

    Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Lieber, Michael R

    2016-05-05

    The twisting of DNA due to the movement of RNA polymerases is the basis of numerous classic experiments in molecular biology. Recent mouse genetic models indicate that chromosomal breakage is common at sites of transcriptional turbulence. Two key studies on this point mapped breakpoints to sites of either convergent or divergent transcription but arrived at different conclusions as to which is more detrimental and why. The issue hinges on whether DNA strand separation is the basis for the chromosomal instability or collision of RNA polymerases.

  9. Abnormal expression of mRNA, microRNA alteration and aberrant DNA methylation patterns in rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xianglong; Yuan, Xiangfei; Qin, Hai; Zhang, Xipeng

    2017-01-01

    Aim Rectal adenocarcinoma (READ) is a malignancy cancer with the high morbidity and motility worldwide. Our study aimed to explore the potential pathogenesis of READ through integrated analysis of gene expression profiling and DNA methylation data. Methods The miRNA, mRNA expression profiling and corresponding DNA methylation data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Differentially expressed mRNAs/ miRNAs/methylated regions (DEmRNA/DEmiRNAs) were identified in READ. The negatively correlation of DEmiRNA-DEmRNAs and DNA methylation-DEmRNAs were obtained. DEmRNAs expression was validated through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microarray expression profiling analyses. Results 1192 dysregulated DEmRNAs, 27 dysregulated DEmiRNAs and 6403 aberrant methylation CpG sites were screened in READ compared to normal controls. 1987 negative interaction pairs among 27 DEmiRNAs and 668 DEmRNAs were predicted. 446 genes with aberrant methylation were annotated. Eventually, 50 DEmRNAs (39 down- and 11 up-regulated DEmRNAs) with hypermethylation, synchronously negatively targeted by DEmiRNAs, were identified through the correlation analysis among 446 genes with aberrant methylation and 668 DEmRNAs. 50 DEmRNAs were significantly enriched in cAMP signaling pathway, circadian entrainment and glutamatergic synapse. The validation results of expression levels of DEmRNAs through qRT-PCR and microarray analyses were compatible with our study. Conclusion 7 genes of SORCS1, PDZRN4, LONRF2, CNGA3, HAND2, RSPO2 and GNAO1 with hypermethylation and negatively regulation by DEmiRNAs might contribute to the tumorigenesis of READ. Our work might provide valuable foundation for the READ in mechanism elucidation, early diagnosis and therapeutic target identification. PMID:28350845

  10. Selective RNA versus DNA G-quadruplex targeting by in situ click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Di Antonio, Marco; Biffi, Giulia; Mariani, Angelica; Raiber, Eun-Ang; Rodriguez, Raphaël; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2012-10-29

    It all clicks into place: A potent telomere-targeting small molecule has been identified by using the copper-free 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a series of alkyne and azide building blocks catalyzed by a non-Watson-Crick DNA secondary structure (see picture). This method rapidly identifies, otherwise unanticipated, potent small-molecule probes to selectively target a given RNA or DNA.

  11. INVOLVED IN DE NOVO 2-containing complex involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Ausin, Israel; Greenberg, Maxim V.C.; Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Hale, Christopher J.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Simon, Stacey A.; Lee, Tzuu-fen; Feng, Suhua; Española, Sophia D.; Meyers, Blake C.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2012-10-23

    At least three pathways control maintenance of DNA cytosine methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway is solely responsible for establishment of this silencing mark. We previously described INVOLVED IN DE NOVO 2 (IDN2) as being an RNA-binding RdDM component that is required for DNA methylation establishment. In this study, we describe the discovery of two partially redundant proteins that are paralogous to IDN2 and that form a stable complex with IDN2 in vivo. Null mutations in both genes, termed IDN2-LIKE 1 and IDN2-LIKE 2 (IDNL1 and IDNL2), result in a phenotype that mirrors, but does not further enhance, the idn2 mutant phenotype. Genetic analysis suggests that this complex acts in a step in the downstream portion of the RdDM pathway. We also have performed structural analysis showing that the IDN2 XS domain adopts an RNA recognition motif (RRM) fold. Finally, genome-wide DNA methylation and expression analysis confirms the placement of the IDN proteins in an RdDM pathway that affects DNA methylation and transcriptional control at many sites in the genome. Results from this study identify and describe two unique components of the RdDM machinery, adding to our understanding of DNA methylation control in the Arabidopsis genome.

  12. Automation of DNA and miRNA co-extraction for miRNA-based identification of human body fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Kulstein, Galina; Marienfeld, Ralf; Miltner, Erich; Wiegand, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In the last years, microRNA (miRNA) analysis came into focus in the field of forensic genetics. Yet, no standardized and recommendable protocols for co-isolation of miRNA and DNA from forensic relevant samples have been developed so far. Hence, this study evaluated the performance of an automated Maxwell® 16 System-based strategy (Promega) for co-extraction of DNA and miRNA from forensically relevant (blood and saliva) samples compared to (semi-)manual extraction methods. Three procedures were compared on the basis of recovered quantity of DNA and miRNA (as determined by real-time PCR and Bioanalyzer), miRNA profiling (shown by Cq values and extraction efficiency), STR profiles, duration, contamination risk and handling. All in all, the results highlight that the automated co-extraction procedure yielded the highest miRNA and DNA amounts from saliva and blood samples compared to both (semi-)manual protocols. Also, for aged and genuine samples of forensically relevant traces the miRNA and DNA yields were sufficient for subsequent downstream analysis. Furthermore, the strategy allows miRNA extraction only in cases where it is relevant to obtain additional information about the sample type. Besides, this system enables flexible sample throughput and labor-saving sample processing with reduced risk of cross-contamination.

  13. Enhanced specificity of HPV16 E6E7 siRNA by RNA-DNA chimera modification.

    PubMed

    Yamato, K; Egawa, N; Endo, S; Ui-Tei, K; Yamada, T; Saigo, K; Hyodo, I; Kiyono, T; Nakagawa, I

    2011-08-01

    Although efforts have been made to develop new drugs for infectious and neoplastic diseases utilizing synthetic small interfering RNA(siRNAs), those intrinsically have undesirable effects, including silencing of unintended genes (off-target effect) and nonspecific cytotoxicity. Off-target effects can be avoided by DNA substitution in the guide strand (GS) seed region of nucleotide positions 1-8 and its complementary part of the passenger strand plus the 3' overhang, which is designated as a double-strand RNA-DNA chimera (dsRDC). In this study, we found that the specificity of potent siRNAs targeting human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 oncogenes, which we previously reported, could be enhanced by short dsRDC modification (first six nucleotides from the 5' end of the GS and its complementary nucleotides of the passenger strand). Such dsRDC modification reduced nonspecific cytotoxicity in two of three siRNAs (497 and 752), although not in the other (573), which correlated with their off-target effects. In addition, silencing activity was marginally impaired in two dsRDCs (497 and 573) and moderately in one (752). Finally, dsRDC-497 induced E6E7-specific growth suppression of cervical cancer cells as well as E6E7-immortalized human keratinocytes. Our results show that dsRDC modification enhances the specificity of E6E7 siRNA, which is required for use in in vivo settings.

  14. Labile Catalytic Packaging of DNA/siRNA: Control of Gold Nanoparticles “out” of DNA/siRNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alex M.; Taratula, Oleh; Wei, Dongguang; Yen, Hsin-I; Thomas, Thresia; Thomas, T. J.; Minko, Tamara; He, Huixin

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to efficiently package and deliver nucleic acids with low generation polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimers by using Au nanoparticles as a “labile catalytic” packaging agent. The Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) helped low generation dendrimers to package nucleic acids into discrete nanoparticles but are not included in the final DNA/siRNA complexes. Therefore it becomes possible to eliminate the potential toxic problems associated with Au NPs by selectively removing the Au NPs from the resulting nucleic acid complexes before their delivery to targeted cells. This is a new concept in using inorganic engineered nanoparticles in nucleic acid packaging and delivery applications. Furthermore, compared to the siRNA nanostructures (mainly randomly aggregated nanofibers) fabricated by low generation dendrimer alone (Generation 3), the siRNA nanoparticles packaged using this novel approach (by Au NPs modified with G3 PPI) can be internalized by cancer cells and the delivered siRNAs can efficiently silence their target mRNA. The efficiency of mRNA silencing by this novel approach is even superior to higher generation dendrimers (Generation 5). PMID:20521827

  15. Four plant Dicers mediate viral small RNA biogenesis and DNA virus induced silencing

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Todd; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V.; Beknazariants, Daria; Si-Ammour, Azeddine; Park, Hyun-Sook; Vazquez, Franck; Robertson, Dominique; Meins, Frederick; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2006-01-01

    Like other eukaryotes, plants use DICER-LIKE (DCL) proteins as the central enzymes of RNA silencing, which regulates gene expression and mediates defense against viruses. But why do plants like Arabidopsis express four DCLs, a diversity unmatched by other kingdoms? Here we show that two nuclear DNA viruses (geminivirus CaLCuV and pararetrovirus CaMV) and a cytoplasmic RNA tobamovirus ORMV are differentially targeted by subsets of DCLs. DNA virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of specific size classes (21, 22 and 24 nt) are produced by all four DCLs, including DCL1, known to process microRNA precursors. Specifically, DCL1 generates 21 nt siRNAs from the CaMV leader region. In contrast, RNA virus infection is mainly affected by DCL4. While the four DCLs are partially redundant for CaLCuV-induced mRNA degradation, DCL4 in conjunction with RDR6 and HEN1 specifically facilitates extensive virus-induced silencing in new growth. Additionally, we show that CaMV infection impairs processing of endogenous RDR6-derived double-stranded RNA, while ORMV prevents HEN1-mediated methylation of small RNA duplexes, suggesting two novel viral strategies of silencing suppression. Our work highlights the complexity of virus interaction with host silencing pathways and suggests that DCL multiplicity helps mediate plant responses to diverse viral infections. PMID:17090584

  16. mRNA and DNA selection via protein multimerization: YB-1 as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kretov, Dmitry A.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Abrakhi, Sanae; Desforges, Bénédicte; Ovchinnikov, Lev P.; Pastré, David

    2015-01-01

    Translation is tightly regulated in cells for keeping adequate protein levels, this task being notably accomplished by dedicated mRNA-binding proteins recognizing a specific set of mRNAs to repress or facilitate their translation. To select specific mRNAs, mRNA-binding proteins can strongly bind to specific mRNA sequences/structures. However, many mRNA-binding proteins rather display a weak specificity to short and redundant sequences. Here we examined an alternative mechanism by which mRNA-binding proteins could inhibit the translation of specific mRNAs, using YB-1, a major translation regulator, as a case study. Based on a cooperative binding, YB-1 forms stable homo-multimers on some mRNAs while avoiding other mRNAs. Via such inhomogeneous distribution, YB-1 can selectively inhibit translation of mRNAs on which it has formed stable multimers. This novel mechanistic view on mRNA selection may be shared by other proteins considering the elevated occurrence of multimerization among mRNA-binding proteins. Interestingly, we also demonstrate how, by using the same mechanism, YB-1 can form multimers on specific DNA structures, which could provide novel insights into YB-1 nuclear functions in DNA repair and multi-drug resistance. PMID:26271991

  17. Synergistic effects of multiple treatments, and both DNA and RNA direct bindings on, green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Kuzuhara, Takashi; Tanabe, Akitoshi; Sei, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Suganuma, Masami; Fujiki, Hirota

    2007-08-01

    This article reviews two main topics: (1) the synergistic effects of multiple treatments with green tea catechin and (2) the direct binding of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to both DNA and RNA molecules. Japanese drink green tea throughout the day, so we studied whether multiple treatments of cells with EGCG would enhance the expression of apoptosis-related genes, such as growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD153) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene (p21(waf1)): The results suggest that the synergistic enhancement of both GADD153 and p21(waf1) gene expressions by multiple treatments plays a significant role in human cancer prevention with green tea beverage. Our previous observation-that nucleic acids extracted from catechin-treated cells are colored-allowed us to speculate that catechins directly interact with nucleic acids. Surface plasmon resonance assay (Biacore) indicated that four catechins, EGCG, (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (+)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and (+)-catechin gallate (CG), bound to DNA oligomers. Cold spray ionization mass spectrometry (CSI-MS) analysis showed that one to three EGCG molecules bound to single-stranded 18 mers of DNA and RNA. Moreover, one or two molecules of EGCG bound to double-stranded AG:CT oligomers of various nucleotide lengths. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) oligomers were detected only as EGCG-bound forms at high temperature, whereas at low temperature both the free and bound forms were detected, suggesting that EGCG protects double-stranded DNA oligomers from double-stranded melting into single-stranded DNA. We assume that catechins accumulate in both double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules through multiple administrations of green tea beverage in in vivo, and that the accumulated green tea catechins play a significant role for human cancer prevention.

  18. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Henry S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Yoga, Yano M. K.; Pendini, Nicole R.; Gunzburg, Menachem J.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U–rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose is a reflection of the higher probability of association. Differences between TIAR and HuR are observed in their modes of binding to RNA. TIAR is able to bind deoxy-oligonucleotides with nanomolar affinity, whereas HuR affinity is reduced to a micromolar level. Studies with U-rich DNA reveal that TIAR binding depends less on the 2′-hydroxyl group of RNA than HuR binding. Finally we show that SAXS data, recorded for the first two domains of TIAR in complex with RNA, are more consistent with a flexible, elongated shape and not the compact shape that the first two domains of Hu proteins adopt upon binding to RNA. We thus propose that these triple-RRM proteins, which compete for the same binding sites in cells, interact with their targets in fundamentally different ways. PMID:21233170

  19. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Henry S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Yoga, Yano M K; Pendini, Nicole R; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Wilson, Gerald M; Williams, Bryan R G; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2011-02-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U-rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose is a reflection of the higher probability of association. Differences between TIAR and HuR are observed in their modes of binding to RNA. TIAR is able to bind deoxy-oligonucleotides with nanomolar affinity, whereas HuR affinity is reduced to a micromolar level. Studies with U-rich DNA reveal that TIAR binding depends less on the 2'-hydroxyl group of RNA than HuR binding. Finally we show that SAXS data, recorded for the first two domains of TIAR in complex with RNA, are more consistent with a flexible, elongated shape and not the compact shape that the first two domains of Hu proteins adopt upon binding to RNA. We thus propose that these triple-RRM proteins, which compete for the same binding sites in cells, interact with their targets in fundamentally different ways.

  20. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  1. Molecular approaches for forensic cell type identification: On mRNA, miRNA, DNA methylation and microbial markers.

    PubMed

    Sijen, Titia

    2015-09-01

    Human biological traces have the potential to present strong evidence for placing a suspect at a crime scene. In cases, the activity that led to deposition of an individual's cellular material is increasingly disputed, for which the identification of cell types could be crucial. This review aims to give an overview of the possibilities of the employment of mRNA, miRNA, DNA methylation and microbial markers for tissue identification in a forensic context. The biological background that renders these markers tissue-specificity is considered, as this can affect data interpretation. Furthermore, the forensic relevance of inferring certain cell types is discussed, as are the various methodologies that can be applied. Forensic stains can carry minute amounts of cell material that may be degraded or polluted and most likely cell material of multiple sources will be present. The interpretational challenges that are imposed by this compromised state will be discussed as well.

  2. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  3. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells, DNA, and mRNA: Potential for Clinical Utility in Patients With Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Melody J.; Dorsey, Jay F.; Amaravadi, Ravi; Karakousis, Giorgos; Simone, Charles B.; Xu, Xiaowei; Xu, Wei; Carpenter, Erica L.; Schuchter, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), and messenger RNA (mRNA), collectively termed circulating tumor products (CTPs), represent areas of immense interest from scientists’ and clinicians’ perspectives. In melanoma, CTP analysis may have clinical utility in many areas, from screening and diagnosis to clinical decision-making aids, as surveillance biomarkers or sources of real-time genetic or molecular characterization. In addition, CTP analysis can be useful in the discovery of new biomarkers, patterns of treatment resistance, and mechanisms of metastasis development. Here, we compare and contrast CTCs, ctDNA, and mRNA, review the extent of translational evidence to date, and discuss how future studies involving both scientists and clinicians can help to further develop this tool for the benefit of melanoma patients. Implications for Practice: Scientific advancement has enabled the rapid development of tools to analyze circulating tumor cells, tumor DNA, and messenger RNA, collectively termed circulating tumor products (CTPs). A variety of techniques have emerged to detect and characterize melanoma CTPs; however, only a fraction has been applied to human subjects. This review summarizes the available human data that investigate clinical utility of CTP in cancer screening, melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and genetic or molecular characterization. It provides a rationale for how CTPs may be useful for future research and discusses how clinicians can be involved in developing this exciting new technology. PMID:26614709

  5. Inhibition of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus by thiosemicarbazones and several cations.

    PubMed

    Levinson, W; Faras, A; Woodson, B; Jackson, J; Bishop, J M

    1973-01-01

    The RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus is inhibited by N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and by thiosemicarbazide, but not by semicarbazide. These inhibitors also inactivate, upon contact with the virion, the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma virus. Sulfhydryl donors, such as 2-mercapto-ethanol, can prevent these effects. The RNA-directed activity of the purified polymerase is inhibited to a greater degree than is the DNA-directed activity. Two cations, Cu(++) and Hg(++), can inhibit RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and inactivate the transforming ability of the virus. Synergism between N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and Cu(++) occurs, since treatment of the virus with a low dose of either N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone or Cu(++) has little effect; however, when the two compounds are mixed together, significant inactivation occurs. This observation supports the hypothesis that the antiviral action of thiosemicarbazones is a function of their ability to act as a ligand for metallic ions. Several cations (Ag(+), Co(++), Zn(++), Cd(++), and Ni(++)) significantly inactivate the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, but have little effect on the transforming ability. In view of this result, the conclusion that the enzyme activity is required for transformation remains open to question.

  6. Comparison of commercial systems for extraction of nucleic acids from DNA/RNA respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Genyan; Erdman, Dean E; Kodani, Maja; Kools, John; Bowen, Michael D; Fields, Barry S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared six automated nucleic acid extraction systems and one manual kit for their ability to recover nucleic acids from human nasal wash specimens spiked with five respiratory pathogens, representing Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Legionella pneumophila), DNA viruses (adenovirus), segmented RNA viruses (human influenza virus A), and non-segmented RNA viruses (respiratory syncytial virus). The robots and kit evaluated represent major commercially available methods that are capable of simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from respiratory specimens, and included platforms based on magnetic-bead technology (KingFisher mL, Biorobot EZ1, easyMAG, KingFisher Flex, and MagNA Pure Compact) or glass fiber filter technology (Biorobot MDX and the manual kit Allprep). All methods yielded extracts free of cross-contamination and RT-PCR inhibition. All automated systems recovered L. pneumophila and adenovirus DNA equivalently. However, the MagNA Pure protocol demonstrated more than 4-fold higher DNA recovery from the S. pyogenes than other methods. The KingFisher mL and easyMAG protocols provided 1- to 3-log wider linearity and extracted 3- to 4-fold more RNA from the human influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus. These findings suggest that systems differed in nucleic acid recovery, reproducibility, and linearity in a pathogen specific manner.

  7. Therapeutic plasmid DNA versus siRNA delivery: common and different tasks for synthetic carriers.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Claudia; Wagner, Ernst

    2012-07-20

    Gene therapy offers great opportunities for the treatment of severe diseases including cancer. In recent years the design of synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery has become a research field of increasing interest. Studies on the delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA) have brought up a variety of gene delivery vehicles. The more recently emerged gene silencing strategy by the intracellular delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) takes benefit from existing expertise in pDNA transfer. Despite common properties however, delivery of siRNA also faces distinct challenges due to apparent differences in size, stability of the formed nucleic acid complexes, the location and mechanism of action. This review emphasizes the common aspects and main differences between pDNA and siRNA delivery, taking into consideration a wide spectrum of polymer-based, lipidic and peptide carriers. Challenges and opportunities which result from these differences as well as the recent progress made in the optimization of carrier design are presented.

  8. Subtle.Nets.Finder: finely tuned interaction networks in DNA/RNA/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    Graphical Abstract Subtle.Nets.Finder is a workflow of algorithms for identification of subtly interacting groups in DNA/RNA/protein complexes. It is founded on detailed and sophisticated evaluation of the self-consistency in the cooperative network of residue interactions via a combination of advanced calculations (fast multipole method and statistical mechanics) supplemented with graph-theoretical procedures.

  9. Role of messenger RNA-ribosome complex in complementary DNA display.

    PubMed

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Ohtsuka, Isao; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kudou, Motonori; Kimura, Shinnosuke

    2013-07-15

    In vitro display technologies such as ribosome display and messenger RNA (mRNA)/complementary DNA (cDNA) display are powerful methods that can generate library diversities on the order of 10(10-14). However, in mRNA and cDNA display methods, the end use diversity is two orders of magnitude lower than initial diversity and is dependent on the downstream processes that act as limiting factors. We found that in our previous cDNA display protocol, the purification of protein fusions by the use of streptavidin matrices from cell-free translation mixtures had poor efficiency (∼10-15%) that seriously affected the diversity of the purified library. Here, we have investigated and optimized the protocols that provided remarkable purification efficiencies. The stalled ribosome in the mRNA-ribosome complex was found to impede this purification efficiency. Among the various conditions tested, destabilization of ribosomes by appropriate concentration of metal chelating agents in combination with an optimal temperature of 30°C were found to be crucial and effective for nearly complete isolation of protein fusions from the cell-free translation system. Thus, this protocol provided 8- to 10-fold increased efficiency of purification over the previous method and results in retaining the diversity of the library by approximately an order of magnitude-important for directed evolution. We also discuss the possible effects in the fabrication of protein chips.

  10. Pericentromeric satellite repeat expansions through RNA-derived DNA intermediates in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Francesca; Lee, Eunjung; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Xu, Andrew W.; Liu, Mingzhu; Xega, Kristina; MacKenzie, Olivia C.; Brannigan, Brian W.; Wittner, Ben S.; Jung, Hyunchul; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Park, Peter J.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Ting, David T.; Haber, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant transcription of the pericentromeric human satellite II (HSATII) repeat is present in a wide variety of epithelial cancers. In deriving experimental systems to study its deregulation, we observed that HSATII expression is induced in colon cancer cells cultured as xenografts or under nonadherent conditions in vitro, but it is rapidly lost in standard 2D cultures. Unexpectedly, physiological induction of endogenous HSATII RNA, as well as introduction of synthetic HSATII transcripts, generated cDNA intermediates in the form of DNA/RNA hybrids. Single molecule sequencing of tumor xenografts showed that HSATII RNA-derived DNA (rdDNA) molecules are stably incorporated within pericentromeric loci. Suppression of RT activity using small molecule inhibitors reduced HSATII copy gain. Analysis of whole-genome sequencing data revealed that HSATII copy number gain is a common feature in primary human colon tumors and is associated with a lower overall survival. Together, our observations suggest that cancer-associated derepression of specific repetitive sequences can promote their RNA-driven genomic expansion, with potential implications on pericentromeric architecture. PMID:26575630

  11. Discovery and design of DNA and RNA ligase inhibitors in infectious microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily known as DNA and RNA ligases carry out the enzymatic process of polynucleotide ligation. These guardians of genomic integrity share a three-step ligation mechanism, as well as common core structural elements. Both DNA and RNA ligases have experienced a surge of recent interest as chemotherapeutic targets for the treatment of a range of diseases, including bacterial infection, cancer, and the diseases caused by the protozoan parasites known as trypanosomes. Objective In this review, we will focus on efforts targeting pathogenic microorganisms; specifically, bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases, which are promising broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, and ATP-dependent RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei, the species responsible for the devastating neurodegenerative disease, African sleeping sickness. Conclusion High quality crystal structures of both NAD+-dependent DNA ligase and the Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase have facilitated the development of a number of promising leads. For both targets, further progress will require surmounting permeability issues and improving selectivity and affinity. PMID:20354588

  12. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  13. 18S Ribosomal RNA Evaluation as Preanalytical Quality Control for Animal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Novacco, Marilisa; Borel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene is present in all eukaryotic cells. In this study, we evaluated the use of this gene to verify the presence of PCR-amplifiable host (animal) DNA as an indicator of sufficient sample quality for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. We compared (i) samples from various animal species, tissues, and sample types, including swabs; (ii) multiple DNA extraction methods; and (iii) both fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Results showed that 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplification was possible from all tissue samples evaluated, including avian, reptile, and FFPE samples and most swab samples. A single swine rectal swab, which showed sufficient DNA quantity and the demonstrated lack of PCR inhibitors, nonetheless was negative by 18S qPCR. Such a sample specifically illustrates the improvement of determination of sample integrity afforded by inclusion of 18S rRNA gene qPCR analysis in addition to spectrophotometric analysis and the use of internal controls for PCR inhibition. Other possible applications for the described 18S rRNA qPCR are preselection of optimal tissue specimens for studies or preliminary screening of archived samples prior to acceptance for biobanking projects. PMID:27672657

  14. Computational and Experimental Characterization of Ribosomal DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Samuel

    DNA G-quadruplexes in human telomeres and gene promoters are being extensively studied for their role in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Recent studies strongly suggest that guanine (G)-rich genes encoding pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) are a potential anticancer target through the inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in ribosome biogenesis. However, the structures of ribosomal G-quadruplexes at atomic resolution are unknown, and very little biophysical characterization has been performed on them to date. Here, we have modeled two putative rDNA G-quadruplex structures, NUC 19P and NUC 23P, which we observe via circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to adopt a predominantly parallel topology, and their counterpart rRNA. To validate and refine the putative ribosomal G-quadruplex structures, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the CHARMM36 force field in the presence and absence of stabilizing K + or Na + ions. We optimized the CHARMM36 force field K + parameters to be more consistent with quantum mechanical calculations (and the polarizable Drude model force field) so that the K + ion is predominantly in the G-quadruplex channel. Our MD simulations show that the rDNA G-quadruplex have more well-defined, predominantly parallel-topology structures than rRNA and NUC 19P is more structured than NUC 23P, which features extended loops. Our study demonstrates that they are both potential targets for the design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  15. Endogenous Small RNA Mediates Meiotic Silencing of a Novel DNA Transposon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yizhou; Smith, Kristina M; Taylor, John W; Freitag, Michael; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-06-23

    Genome defense likely evolved to curtail the spread of transposable elements and invading viruses. A combination of effective defense mechanisms has been shown to limit colonization of the Neurospora crassa genome by transposable elements. A novel DNA transposon named Sly1-1 was discovered in the genome of the most widely used laboratory "wild-type" strain FGSC 2489 (OR74A). Meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA, also simply called meiotic silencing, prevents the expression of regions of the genome that are unpaired during karyogamy. This mechanism is posttranscriptional and is proposed to involve the production of small RNA, so-called masiRNAs, by proteins homologous to those involved in RNA interference-silencing pathways in animals, fungi, and plants. Here, we demonstrate production of small RNAs when Sly1-1 was unpaired in a cross between two wild-type strains. These small RNAs are dependent on SAD-1, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase necessary for meiotic silencing. We present the first case of endogenously produced masiRNA from a novel N. crassa DNA transposable element.

  16. T7 RNA polymerase cannot transcribe through a highly knotted DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, J; Rodríguez-Campos, A

    1996-01-01

    The ability of T7 RNA polymerase to transcribe a plasmid DNA in vitro in its linear, supercoiled, relaxed and knotted forms was analysed. Similar levels of transcription were found on each template with the exception of plasmids showing varying degrees of knotting (obtained using stoichiometric amounts of yeast topoisomerase II). A purified fraction of knotted DNA with a high number of nodes (crosses) was found to be refractory to transcription. The unknotting of the knotted plasmids, using catalytic amounts of topoisomerase II, restored their capacity as templates for transcription to levels similar to those obtained for the other topological forms. These results demonstrate that highly knotted DNA is the only topological form of DNA that is not a template for transcription. We suggest that the regulation of transcription, which depends on the topological state of the template, might be related to the presence of knotted DNA with different number of nodes. PMID:9016657

  17. DNAPKcs-dependent arrest of RNA polymerase II transcription in the presence of DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Pankotai, Tibor; Bonhomme, Céline; Chen, David; Soutoglou, Evi

    2012-02-12

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair interferes with ongoing cellular processes, including replication and transcription. Although the process of replication stalling upon collision of replication forks with damaged DNA has been extensively studied, the fate of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that encounters a DSB is not well understood. We show that the occurrence of a single DSB at a human RNAPII-transcribed gene leads to inhibition of transcription elongation and reinitiation. Upon inhibition of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), RNAPII bypasses the break and continues transcription elongation, suggesting that it is not the break per se that inhibits the processivity of RNAPII, but the activity of DNAPK. We also show that the mechanism of DNAPK-mediated transcription inhibition involves the proteasome-dependent pathway. The results point to the pivotal role of DNAPK activity in the eviction of RNAPII from DNA upon encountering a DNA lesion.

  18. Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Diagnostics, Therapy and Macromolecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  19. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, Anthony T.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm) with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5′ tag) of the crRNA and the 3′ flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD) nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography. PMID:28114398

  20. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tina Y; Iavarone, Anthony T; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm) with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5' tag) of the crRNA and the 3' flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD) nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography.

  1. A sequential co-extraction method for DNA, RNA and protein recovery from soil for future system-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Gunnigle, Eoin; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Frossard, Aline; Seeley, Mary; Cowan, Don

    2014-08-01

    A co-extraction protocol that sequentially isolates core biopolymer fractions (DNA, RNA, protein) from edaphic microbial communities is presented. In order to confirm compatibility with downstream analyses, bacterial T-RFLP profiles were generated from the DNA- and RNA-derived fractions of an arid-based soil, with metaproteomics undertaken on the corresponding protein fraction.

  2. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Cooper, Kristin S.; Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  3. Transcriptional bursting is intrinsically caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability plays a critical role in cellular responses and decision-making in a population, and transcriptional bursting has been broadly studied by experimental and theoretical approaches as the potential source of cell-to-cell variability. Although molecular mechanisms of transcriptional bursting have been proposed, there is little consensus. An unsolved key question is whether transcriptional bursting is intertwined with many transcriptional regulatory factors or is an intrinsic characteristic of RNA polymerase on DNA. Here we design an in vitro single-molecule measurement system to analyse the kinetics of transcriptional bursting. The results indicate that transcriptional bursting is caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA. The kinetics of in vitro transcriptional bursting is quantitatively consistent with the gene-nonspecific kinetics previously observed in noisy gene expression in vivo. Our kinetic analysis based on a cellular automaton model confirms that arrest and rescue by trailing RNA polymerase intrinsically causes transcriptional bursting. PMID:27924870

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of microRNA through rolling circle amplification on a DNA tetrahedron decorated electrode.

    PubMed

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Bidou; Meng, Fanyu; Yin, Jian; Tang, Yuguo

    2015-03-18

    MicroRNAs are a class of evolutionally conserved, small noncoding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression and affect a variety of biological processes including cellular differentiation, immunological response, tumor development, and so on. Recently, microRNAs have been identified as promising disease biomarkers. In this work, we have fabricated a novel electrochemical method for ultrasensitive detection of microRNA. Generally, a DNA tetrahedron decorated gold electrode is employed as the recognition interface. Then, hybridizations between DNA tetrahedron, microRNA, and primer probe initiate rolling circle amplification (RCA) on the electrode surface. Silver nanoparticles attached to the RCA products provide significant electrochemical signals and a limit of detection as low as 50 aM is achieved. Moreover, homology microRNA family members with only one or two mismatches can be successfully distinguished. Therefore, this proposed method reveals great advancements toward improved disease diagnosis and prognosis.

  5. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction.

  6. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    DiMenna, Lauren; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase AID is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is effected. Here we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a non-coding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of non-coding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B-cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  7. Inhibition of Hepatitis B virus cccDNA replication by siRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guiqiu; Gu Hongxi . E-mail: hxgu2432@163.com; Li Di; Xu Weizhen

    2007-04-06

    The development of an effective therapy for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still a challenge. Progress in RNA interference (RNAi) has shed slight on developing a new anti-HBV strategy. Here, we present a series of experiments showing a significant reduction in HBV transcripts and replication intermediates in HepG2.2.15 cells by vector-based siRNA targeted nuclear localization signal (NLS) region. More importantly, we showed that siRNA1 markedly inhibited HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) replication. Our results indicated that HBV NLS may serve as a novel RNAi target to combat HBV infection, which can enhance anti-HBV efficacy and overcome the drawbacks of current therapies.

  8. Transcriptional bursting is intrinsically caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    Cell-to-cell variability plays a critical role in cellular responses and decision-making in a population, and transcriptional bursting has been broadly studied by experimental and theoretical approaches as the potential source of cell-to-cell variability. Although molecular mechanisms of transcriptional bursting have been proposed, there is little consensus. An unsolved key question is whether transcriptional bursting is intertwined with many transcriptional regulatory factors or is an intrinsic characteristic of RNA polymerase on DNA. Here we design an in vitro single-molecule measurement system to analyse the kinetics of transcriptional bursting. The results indicate that transcriptional bursting is caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA. The kinetics of in vitro transcriptional bursting is quantitatively consistent with the gene-nonspecific kinetics previously observed in noisy gene expression in vivo. Our kinetic analysis based on a cellular automaton model confirms that arrest and rescue by trailing RNA polymerase intrinsically causes transcriptional bursting.

  9. Opposing Effects of Multivalent Ions on the Flexibility of DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Pollack, Lois; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-07-01

    Increasing the concentration of counterions (salt) is known to reduce the bending persistence length of DNA. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to predict that multivalent counterions have the opposite effect on double-stranded RNA, increasing its bending rigidity by at least 30%. This counterintuitive effect is observed for various tri- and tetravalent ions alike, and is robust to methodological details and the RNA sequence. In contrast to DNA, multivalent counterions bind inside the RNA major groove, causing significant contraction of the molecule along its helical axis—as a result, its further deformation due to bending becomes energetically more expensive compared to bending without bound multivalent ions. Thus, the relationship between mechanical properties of a charged polymer and its ionic atmosphere may be richer than previously thought.

  10. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Xing, Na; Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  11. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  12. 'A' forms of RNAs in single strands, duplexes and RNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, S; Hingerty, B

    1978-01-01

    Helical parameters have been calculated for the 'A' form minimum energy conformations of ApA, CpC, GpG, UpU, GpC and UpA. The helix geometries are base sequence dependent. The single strands are narrower and more tightly wound than that duplex RNA-11 form. 9-12 kcal./mole are needed to convert these single strands to the RNA-11 conformation. However, in some sequences other 'A' type conformers capable of complementary base pairing may be formed at lower energetic cost. There is substantially more base stacking in the calculated single strands than in the RNA-11 conformation. Calculated intrastrand base stacking energies reflect these differences, and also are sequence dependent. The 'A' form RNA subunits differ from the analogous DNAs in possessing a larger rise per residue, needed to accomodate the 2'-OH. RNA-DNA hybrids are consequently more likely to be in the 'A-RNA than in the 'A'-DNA conformation, although the base sequence determines the extent of the preference. PMID:693318

  13. RNA-directed DNA methylation and plant development require an IWR1-type transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Bucher, Etienne; Daxinger, Lucia; Huettel, Bruno; Kreil, David P; Breinig, Frank; Lind, Marc; Schmitt, Manfred J; Simon, Stacey A; Gurazada, Sai Guna Ranjan; Meyers, Blake C; Lorkovic, Zdravko J; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2010-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in plants requires two RNA polymerase (Pol) II-related RNA polymerases, namely Pol IV and Pol V. A genetic screen designed to reveal factors that are important for RdDM in a developmental context in Arabidopsis identified DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 4 (DMS4). Unlike other mutants defective in RdDM, dms4 mutants have a pleiotropic developmental phenotype. The DMS4 protein is similar to yeast IWR1 (interacts with RNA polymerase II), a conserved putative transcription factor that interacts with Pol II subunits. The DMS4 complementary DNA partly complements the K1 killer toxin hypersensitivity of a yeast iwr1 mutant, suggesting some functional conservation. In the transgenic system studied, mutations in DMS4 directly or indirectly affect Pol IV-dependent secondary short interfering RNAs, Pol V-mediated RdDM, Pol V-dependent synthesis of intergenic non-coding RNA and expression of many Pol II-driven genes. These data suggest that DMS4 might be a regulatory factor for several RNA polymerases, thus explaining its diverse roles in the plant.

  14. Accurate Quantification of microRNA via Single Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Origami Motif

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs. PMID:23990889

  15. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun; Grover, Neena

    2015-07-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl(2) or 1 M KCl. The [Formula: see text] loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47-2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The [Formula: see text] loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride.

  16. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun

    2015-01-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl2 or 1 M KCl. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47–2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride. PMID:26022248

  17. The arabidopsis polyamine transporter LHRI/AtPUT3 modulates heat responsive gene expression by regulating mRNA stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyamines (PA) involve in the gene regulation by interacting with various anionic macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins and modulating their structure and function. Previous studies have showed that changing in polyamine biosynthesis alters plant response to different abiotic stresses. Here,...

  18. Preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA using chum-RNA.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Hiroshi; Tougan, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Unlike exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is advantageous for genome-wide analysis of gene expression and for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. However, the use of RNA polymerase requires a large amount of RNA, as the optimum concentration of the substrate (mRNA), or the Michaelis constant (K(m)), is one millionfold higher than the single-cell amount of mRNA. To circumvent this K(m) problem, we designed a small mRNA-like dummy molecule, termed chum-RNA, which can be easily removed after the completion of the reaction. Chum-RNA allowed the preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from single-cell quantities of RNA after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. The use of chum-RNA may also facilitate quantitative reverse-transcription (qRT)-PCR from small quantities of substrate.

  19. DNA and RNA sequencing by nanoscale reading through programmable electrophoresis and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for performing nucleic acid (DNA and/or RNA) sequencing on a single molecule. The genetic sequence information is obtained by probing through a DNA or RNA molecule base by base at nanometer scale as though looking through a strip of movie film. This DNA sequencing nanotechnology has the theoretical capability of performing DNA sequencing at a maximal rate of about 1,000,000 bases per second. This enhanced performance is made possible by a series of innovations including: novel applications of a fine-tuned nanometer gap for passage of a single DNA or RNA molecule; thin layer microfluidics for sample loading and delivery; and programmable electric fields for precise control of DNA or RNA movement. Detection methods include nanoelectrode-gated tunneling current measurements, dielectric molecular characterization, and atomic force microscopy/electrostatic force microscopy (AFM/EFM) probing for nanoscale reading of the nucleic acid sequences.

  20. Understanding the Relative Flexibility of RNA and DNA Duplexes: Stretching and Twist-Stretch Coupling.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2017-03-28

    The flexibility of double-stranded (ds) RNA and dsDNA is crucial for their biological functions. Recent experiments have shown that the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA can be distinctively different in the aspects of stretching and twist-stretch coupling. Although various studies have been performed to understand the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA, there is still a lack of deep understanding of the distinctive differences in the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA helices as pertains to their stretching and twist-stretch coupling. In this work, we have explored the relative flexibility in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling are in good accordance with the existing experiments. Our analyses show that the differences in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA helices are mainly attributed to their different (A- and B-form) helical structures. Stronger basepair inclination and slide in dsRNA is responsible for the apparently weaker stretching rigidity versus that of dsDNA, and the opposite twist-stretch coupling for dsRNA and dsDNA is also attributed to the stronger basepair inclination in dsRNA than in dsDNA. Our calculated macroscopic elastic parameters and microscopic analyses are tested and validated by different force fields for both dsRNA and dsDNA.

  1. Cell cycle specific distribution of killin: evidence for negative regulation of both DNA and RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Man; Luo, Dan; Kuang, Yi; Feng, Haiyan; Luo, Guangping; Liang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    p53 tumor-suppressor gene is a master transcription factor which controls cell cycle progression and apoptosis. killin was discovered as one of the p53 target genes implicated in S-phase control coupled to cell death. Due to its extreme proximity to pten tumor-suppressor gene on human chromosome 10, changes in epigenetic modification of killin have also been linked to Cowden syndrome as well as other human cancers. Previous studies revealed that Killin is a high-affinity DNA-binding protein with preference to single-stranded DNA, and it inhibits DNA synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, co-localization studies of RFP-Killin with either GFP-PCNA or endogenous single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA during S-phase show that Killin always adopts a mutually exclusive punctuated nuclear expression pattern with the 2 accessory proteins in DNA replication. In contrast, when cells are not in S-phase, RFP-Killin largely congregates in the nucleolus where rRNA transcription normally occurs. Both of these cell cycle specific localization patterns of RFP-Killin are stable under high salt condition, consistent with Killin being tightly associated with nucleic acids within cell nuclei. Together, these cell biological results provide a molecular basis for Killin in competitively inhibiting the formation of DNA replication forks during S-phase, as well as potentially negatively regulate RNA synthesis during other cell cycle phases.

  2. Mutually Exclusive Binding of Telomerase RNA and DNA by Ku Alters Telomerase Recruitment Model

    PubMed Central

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S.; Goodrich, Karen J.; Taabazuing, Cornelius; Ouenzar, Faissal; Chartrand, Pascal; Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ku heterodimer contributes to telomere maintenance as a component of telomeric chromatin and as an accessory subunit of telomerase. How Ku binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and to telomerase RNA (TLC1) promotes its telomeric functions is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that deletions designed to constrict the DNA-binding ring of Ku80 disrupt non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), telomeric gene silencing and telomere length maintenance, suggesting that these functions require Ku's DNA end-binding activity. Contrary to the current model, a mutant Ku with low affinity for dsDNA also loses affinity for TLC1 both in vitro and in vivo. Competition experiments reveal that wild-type Ku binds dsDNA and TLC1 mutually exclusively. Cells expressing the mutant Ku are deficient in nuclear accumulation of TLC1, as expected from the RNA-binding defect. These findings force reconsideration of the mechanisms by which Ku assists in recruiting telomerase to natural telomeres and broken chromosome ends. PMID:22365814

  3. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality.

  4. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  5. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  6. HIV RNA and proviral HIV DNA can be detected in semen after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy although HIV RNA is undetectable in blood.

    PubMed

    Du, Peiwei; Liu, An; Jiao, Yanmei; Liu, Cuie; Jiang, Taiyi; Zhu, Weijun; Zhu, Yunxia; Wu, Hao; Sun, Lijun

    2016-03-01

    The risk of sexual transmission of HIV is strongly correlated with amounts of genital HIV RNA. Few studies have reported amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen in HIV-infected Chinese patients undergoing antiviral treatment (ART). In this observational study, the amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen were assessed after six months of ART in HIV-infected Chinese individuals, when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood . This study included 19 HIV-infected Chinese men undergoing ART for six months. Amounts of HIV in paired semen and blood samples were assessed using real-time PCR. The C2-V5 region of the HIV envelope (env) genes was cloned and sequenced and genotype and co-receptor usage predicted based on the sequence. It was found that HIV RNA was undetectable in the plasma of most patients (17/19), whereas HIV RNA could be detected in the semen of most patients (16/19). HIV DNA could be detected in both semen and blood. Genetic diversity of HIV between the seminal and blood compartments was identified. Thus, amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA remain high in semen of HIV-infected Chinese patients after six months of ART treatment, even when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood.

  7. Novel zinc-based fixative for high quality DNA, RNA and protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Lykidis, Dimitrios; Van Noorden, Susan; Armstrong, Alan; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Li, Jie; Zhuang, Zhengping; Stamp, Gordon W H

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a reliable, cost-effective and non-toxic fixative to meet the needs of contemporary molecular pathobiology research, particularly in respect of RNA and DNA integrity. The effects of 25 different fixative recipes on the fixed quality of tissues from C57BL/6 mice were investigated. Results from IHC, PCR, RT-PCR, RNA Agilent Bioanalyser and Real-Time PCR showed that a novel zinc-based fixative (Z7) containing zinc trifluoroacetate, zinc chloride and calcium acetate was significantly better than the standard zinc-based fixative (Z2) and neutral buffered formalin (NBF) for DNA, RNA and protein preservation. DNA sequences up to 2.4 kb in length and RNA fragments up to 361 bp in length were successfully amplified from Z7 fixed tissues, as demonstrated by PCR, RT-PCR and Real-Time PCR. Total protein analysis was achieved using 2-D gel electrophoresis. In addition, nucleic acids and proteins were very stable over a 6-14-month period. This improved, non-toxic and economical tissue fixative could be applied for routine use in pathology laboratories to permit subsequent genomic/proteomic studies.

  8. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Vincent, Kimberly; Pichler, Martin; Fodde, Riccardo; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Slack, Frank J.; Calin, George A

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted much attention due to their large number and biological significance. Many lncRNAs have been identified as mapping to regulatory elements including gene promoters and enhancers, ultraconserved regions, and intergenic regions of protein-coding genes. Yet, the biological function and molecular mechanisms of lncRNA in human diseases in general and cancer in particular remain largely unknown. Data from the literature suggest that lncRNA, often via interaction with proteins, functions in specific genomic loci or use their own transcription loci for regulatory activity. In this review, we summarize recent findings supporting the importance of DNA loci in lncRNA function, and the underlying molecular mechanisms via cis or trans regulation, and discuss their implications in cancer. In addition, we use the 8q24 genomic locus, a region containing interactive SNPs, DNA regulatory elements and lncRNAs, as an example to illustrate how single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within lncRNAs may be functionally associated with the individual’s susceptibility to cancer. PMID:25619839

  9. Polymers modified with double-tailed fluorous compounds for efficient DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    He, Bingwei; Wang, Yitong; Shao, Naimin; Chang, Hong; Cheng, Yiyun

    2015-08-01

    Cationic polymers are widely used as gene carriers, however, these polymers are usually associated with low transfection efficacy and non-negligible toxicity. Fluorination on polymers significantly improves their performances in gene delivery, but a high density of fluorous chains must be conjugated on a single polymer. Here we present a new strategy to construct fluorinated polymers with minimal fluorous chains for efficient DNA and siRNA delivery. A double-tailed fluorous compound 2-chloro-4,6-bis[(perfluorohexyl)propyloxy]-1,3,5-triazine (CBT) was conjugated on dendrimers of different generations and low molecular weight polyethylenimine via a facile synthesis. The yielding products with average numbers of 1-2 conjugated CBT moieties showed much improved EGFP and luciferase transfection efficacy compared to unmodified polymers. In addition, these polymers show high siRNA delivery efficacy on different cell lines. Among the synthesized polymers, generation 1 (G1) dendrimer modified with an average number of 1.9 CBT moieties (G1-CBT1.9) shows the highest efficacy when delivering both DNA and siRNA and its efficacy approaches that of Lipofectamine 2000. G1-CBT1.9 also shows efficient gene silencing in vivo. All of the CBT-modified polymers exhibit minimal toxicity on the cells at their optimal transfection conditions. This study provides a new strategy to design efficient fluorous polymers for DNA and siRNA delivery.

  10. Crystal structure of Cpf1 in complex with guide RNA and target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Takashi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Zetsche, Bernd; Hirano, Hisato; Slaymaker, Ian M.; Li, Yinqing; Fedorova, Iana; Nakane, Takanori; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Zhang, Feng; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease of a type V CRISPR-Cas system that has been recently harnessed for genome editing. Here, we report the crystal structure of Acidaminococcus sp. Cpf1 (AsCpf1) in complex with the guide RNA and its target DNA, at 2.8 Å resolution. AsCpf1 adopts a bilobed architecture, with the RNA–DNA heteroduplex bound inside the central channel. The structural comparison of AsCpf1 with Cas9, a type II CRISPR-Cas nuclease, reveals both striking similarity and major differences, thereby explaining their distinct functionalities. AsCpf1 contains the RuvC domain and a putative novel nuclease domain, which are responsible for the cleavage of the non-target and target strands, respectively, and jointly generate staggered DNA double-strand breaks. AsCpf1 recognizes the 5′-TTTN-3′ protospacer adjacent motif by base and shape readout mechanisms. Our findings provide mechanistic insights into RNA-guided DNA cleavage by Cpf1, and establish a framework for rational engineering of the CRISPR-Cpf1 toolbox. PMID:27114038

  11. An RNA aptamer that interferes with the DNA binding of the HSF transcription activator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoching; Shi, Hua; Sevilimedu, Aarti; Liachko, Nicole; Nelson, Hillary C M; Lis, John T

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor (HSF) is a conserved and highly potent transcription activator. It is involved in a wide variety of important biological processes including the stress response and specific steps in normal development. Reagents that interfere with HSF function would be useful for both basic studies and practical applications. We selected an RNA aptamer that binds to HSF with high specificity. Deletion analysis defined the minimal binding motif of this aptamer to be two stems and one stem-loop joined by a three-way junction. This RNA aptamer interferes with normal interaction of HSF with its DNA element, which is a key regulatory step for HSF function. The DNA-binding domain plus a flanking linker region on the HSF (DL) is essential for the RNA binding. Additionally, this aptamer inhibits HSF-induced transcription in vitro in the complex milieu of a whole cell extract. In contrast to the previously characterized NF-kappaB aptamer, the HSF aptamer does not simply mimic DNA binding, but rather binds to HSF in a manner distinct from DNA binding to HSF.

  12. SL1 RNA gene recovery from Enterobius vermicularis ancient DNA in pre-Columbian human coprolites.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena Mayo; Reinhard, Karl; Carvalho Gonçalves, Marcelo Luiz; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Araújo, Adauto; Paulo Vicente, Ana Carolina

    2006-11-01

    Enterobius vermicularis, pinworm, is one of the most common helminths worldwide, infecting nearly a billion people at all socio-economic levels. In prehistoric populations the paleoparasitological findings show a pinworm homogeneous distribution among hunter-gatherers in North America, intensified with the advent of agriculture. This same increase also occurred in the transition from nomad hunter-gatherers to sedentary farmers in South America, although E. vermicularis infection encompasses only the ancient Andean peoples, with no record among the pre-Colombian populations in the South American lowlands. However, the outline of pinworm paleoepidemiology has been supported by microscopic finding of eggs recovered from coprolites. Since molecular techniques are precise and sensitive in detecting pathogen ancient DNA (aDNA), and also could provide insights into the parasite evolutionary history, in this work we have performed a molecular paleoparasitological study of E. vermicularis. aDNA was recovered and pinworm 5S rRNA spacer sequences were determined from pre-Columbian coprolites (4110 BC-AD 900) from four different North and South American archaeological sites. The sequence analysis confirmed E. vermicularis identity and revealed a similarity among ancient and modern sequences. Moreover, polymorphisms were identified at the relative positions 160, 173 and 180, in independent coprolite samples from Tulán, San Pedro de Atacama, Chile (1080-950 BC). We also verified the presence of peculiarities (Splicing leader (SL1) RNA sequence, spliced donor site, the Sm antigen biding site, and RNA secondary structure) which characterise the SL1 RNA gene. The analysis shows that the SL1 RNA gene of contemporary pinworms was present in pre-Columbian E. vermicularis by 6110 years ago. We were successful in detecting E. vermicularis aDNA even in coprolites without direct microscopic evidence of the eggs, improving the diagnosis of helminth infections in the past and further

  13. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-07

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors.

  14. RNA-DNA hybrid (R-loop) immunoprecipitation mapping: an analytical workflow to evaluate inherent biases.

    PubMed

    Halász, László; Karányi, Zsolt; Boros-Oláh, Beáta; Rózsa, Tímea; Sipos, Éva; Nagy, Éva; Mosolygó-L, Ágnes; Mázló, Anett; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Halmos, Gábor; Székvölgyi, Lóránt

    2017-03-24

    The impact of R-loops on the physiology and pathology of chromosomes has been demonstrated extensively by chromatin biology research. The progress in this field has been driven by technological advancement of R-loop mapping methods that largely relied on a single approach, DNA-RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP). Most of the DRIP protocols use the experimental design that was developed by a few laboratories, without paying attention to the potential caveats that might affect the outcome of RNA-DNA hybrid mapping. To assess the accuracy and utility of this technology, we pursued an analytical approach to estimate inherent biases and errors in the DRIP protocol. By performing DRIP-sequencing, qPCR and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, we tested the effect of formaldehyde fixation, cell lysis temperature, mode of genome fragmentation, and removal of free RNA on the efficacy of RNA-DNA hybrid detection, and implemented workflows that were able to distinguish complex and weak DRIP signals in a noisy background with high confidence. We also show that some of the workflows perform poorly and generate random answers. Furthermore, we found that the most commonly used genome fragmentation method (restriction enzyme digestion) led to the overrepresentation of lengthy DRIP fragments over coding ORFs, and this bias was enhanced at the first exons. Biased genome sampling severely compromised the mapping resolution and prevented the assignment of precise biological function to a significant fraction of R-loops. The revised workflow presented herein is established and optimized using objective ROC analyses and provides reproducible and highly specific RNA-DNA hybrid detection.

  15. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase detects hidden giant viruses in published databanks.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Colson, Philippe; Giorgi, Roch; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2014-06-13

    Environmental metagenomic studies show that there is a "dark matter," composed of sequences not linked to any known organism, as determined mainly using ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, which therefore ignore giant viruses. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) genes are universal in microbes and conserved in giant viruses and may replace rDNA for identifying microbes. We found while reconstructing RNAP subunit 2 (RNAP2) phylogeny that a giant virus sequenced together with the genome of a large eukaryote, Hydra magnipapillata, has been overlooked. To explore the dark matter, we used viral RNAP2 and reconstructed putative ancestral RNAP2, which were significantly superior in detecting distant clades than current sequences, and we revealed two additional unknown mimiviruses, misclassified as an euryarchaeote and an oomycete plant pathogen, and detected unknown putative viral clades. We suggest using RNAP systematically to decipher the black matter and identify giant viruses.

  16. Site-specific DICER and DROSHA RNA products control the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Michelini, Flavia; Saxena, Alka; Tang, Dave; de Hoon, Michiel; Anelli, Viviana; Mione, Marina; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-08-09

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in an increasingly recognized number of cellular events. Some ncRNAs are processed by DICER and DROSHA RNases to give rise to small double-stranded RNAs involved in RNA interference (RNAi). The DNA-damage response (DDR) is a signalling pathway that originates from a DNA lesion and arrests cell proliferation3. So far, DICER and DROSHA RNA products have not been reported to control DDR activation. Here we show, in human, mouse and zebrafish, that DICER and DROSHA, but not downstream elements of the RNAi pathway, are necessary to activate the DDR upon exogenous DNA damage and oncogene-induced genotoxic stress, as studied by DDR foci formation and by checkpoint assays. DDR foci are sensitive to RNase A treatment, and DICER- and DROSHA-dependent RNA products are required to restore DDR foci in RNase-A-treated cells. Through RNA deep sequencing and the study of DDR activation at a single inducible DNA double-strand break, we demonstrate that DDR foci formation requires site-specific DICER- and DROSHA-dependent small RNAs, named DDRNAs, which act in a MRE11–RAD50–NBS1-complex-dependent manner (MRE11 also known as MRE11A; NBS1 also known as NBN). DDRNAs, either chemically synthesized or in vitro generated by DICER cleavage, are sufficient to restore the DDR in RNase-A-treated cells, also in the absence of other cellular RNAs. Our results describe an unanticipated direct role of a novel class of ncRNAs in the control of DDR activation at sites of DNA damage.

  17. Comparative analysis of amplified and nonamplified RNA for hybridization in cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Luciana I; Silva, Ricardo L A; Stolf, Beatriz S; Cristo, Elier B; Hirata, Roberto; Soares, Fernando A; Reis, Luiz F L; Neves, E Jordão; Carvalho, Alex F

    2003-10-15

    Limiting amounts of RNA is a major issue in cDNA microarray, especially when one is dealing with fresh tissue samples. Here we describe a protocol based on template switch and T7 amplification that led to efficient and linear amplification of 1300x. Using a glass-array containing 368 genes printed in three or six replicas covering a wide range of expression levels and ratios, we determined quality and reproducibility of the data obtained from one nonamplified and two independently amplified RNAs (aRNA) derived from normal and tumor samples using replicas with dye exchange (dye-swap measurements). Overall, signal-to-noise ratio improved when we used aRNA (1.45-fold for channel 1 and 2.02-fold for channel 2), increasing by 6% the number of spots with meaningful data. Measurements arising from independent aRNA samples showed strong correlation among themselves (r(2)=0.962) and with those from the nonamplified sample (r(2)=0.975), indicating the reproducibility and fidelity of the amplification procedure. Measurement differences, i.e, spots with poor correlation between amplified and nonamplified measurements, did not show association with gene sequence, expression intensity, or expression ratio and can, therefore, be compensated with replication. In conclusion, aRNA can be used routinely in cDNA microarray analysis, leading to improved quality of data with high fidelity and reproducibility.

  18. Blind Predictions of DNA and RNA Tweezers Experiments with Force and Torque

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Lipfert, Jan; Das, Rhiju

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule tweezers measurements of double-stranded nucleic acids (dsDNA and dsRNA) provide unprecedented opportunities to dissect how these fundamental molecules respond to forces and torques analogous to those applied by topoisomerases, viral capsids, and other biological partners. However, tweezers data are still most commonly interpreted post facto in the framework of simple analytical models. Testing falsifiable predictions of state-of-the-art nucleic acid models would be more illuminating but has not been performed. Here we describe a blind challenge in which numerical predictions of nucleic acid mechanical properties were compared to experimental data obtained recently for dsRNA under applied force and torque. The predictions were enabled by the HelixMC package, first presented in this paper. HelixMC advances crystallography-derived base-pair level models (BPLMs) to simulate kilobase-length dsDNAs and dsRNAs under external forces and torques, including their global linking numbers. These calculations recovered the experimental bending persistence length of dsRNA within the error of the simulations and accurately predicted that dsRNA's “spring-like” conformation would give a two-fold decrease of stretch modulus relative to dsDNA. Further blind predictions of helix torsional properties, however, exposed inaccuracies in current BPLM theory, including three-fold discrepancies in torsional persistence length at the high force limit and the incorrect sign of dsRNA link-extension (twist-stretch) coupling. Beyond these experiments, HelixMC predicted that ‘nucleosome-excluding’ poly(A)/poly(T) is at least two-fold stiffer than random-sequence dsDNA in bending, stretching, and torsional behaviors; Z-DNA to be at least three-fold stiffer than random-sequence dsDNA, with a near-zero link-extension coupling; and non-negligible effects from base pair step correlations. We propose that experimentally testing these predictions should be powerful next steps for

  19. Evidence for a partial RNA transcript of the small circular component of kinetoplast DNA of Crithidia acanthocephali.

    PubMed Central

    Fouts, D L; Wolstenholme, D R

    1979-01-01

    The major component of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) in the protozoan Crithidia acanthocephali is an association of approximately 27,000, 0.8 micrometers (1.58 x 10(6) dalton) circular molecules apparently held together in a particular structural configuration by topological interlocking. We have carried out hybridization experiments between kDNA samples containing one or the other of the two complementary (H and L) strands of purified 0.8 micrometers molecules derived from mechanically disrupted associations and RNA samples prepared either from whole C. acanthocephali cells or from a mitochondrion-enriched fraction. The results of experiments involving cesium sulfate buoyant density centrifugation indicate that whole cell RNA contains a component(s) complementary to all kDNA H strands, but none complementary to kDNA L strands. Similar results were obtained using mitochondrion-associated RNA. Digestion of RNA/DNA hybrids and suitable controls with the single-strand-specific nuclease S1 indicated that 10% of the kDNA H strand is involved in hybrid formation. Visualization of RNA/DNA hybrids stained with bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein revealed that hybridation involves a single region of each kDNA H strand, equal to approximately 10% of the molecule length. These data suggest that at least 10% of the small circular component of kDNA of Crithidia acanthocephali is transcribed. Images PMID:493124

  20. Specific and sensitive mRNA biomarkers for the identification of skin in 'touch DNA' evidence.

    PubMed

    Hanson, E; Haas, C; Jucker, R; Ballantyne, J

    2012-09-01

    In forensic casework analysis it is often necessary to attempt to obtain DNA profiles from microscopic amounts of biological material left behind by perpetrators of crime. The ability to obtain profiles from trace biological evidence is routinely demonstrated with so-called 'touch DNA' evidence, which is generally perceived to be the result of DNA obtained from shed skin cells transferred from donor to an object or person during physical contact. Although a genetic profile from trace biological evidence is routinely obtained, the tissue source of the profile is rarely known. This merely perpetuates the 'mystery' of the nature of 'touch DNA' evidence allowing the significance or meaningfulness of genetic profiles obtained from these samples to be challenged. Numerous reports state that the tissue source of origin of 'touch DNA' evidence cannot be determined due to the small amount of biological material present, while others conclude that the DNA profiles are obtained from shed skin cells (as opposed to, say, buccal epithelial cells present in saliva traces) without any scientific basis for this assertion. Proper identification of the biological material present might be crucial to the investigation and prosecution of a criminal offense and a misrepresentation of the nature of the evidence can have undue influence on the perception of the circumstance of the crime. Thus far, research has failed to provide forensic scientists with feasible, definitive methods to identify the tissue origin of 'touch DNA'. In the present work, we sought to identify novel highly specific and sensitive messenger RNA (mRNA) biomarkers for the identification of skin. Gene candidates were identified using both literature searches and whole transcriptome deep sequencing (RNA-Seq). Utilizing this dual approach, we identified and evaluated over 100 gene candidates. Five mRNA markers were identified that demonstrated a high degree of specificity for skin. Using these markers, we have been able

  1. Cloning and physical mapping of DNA complementary to potato leafroll virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) was aphid-transmitted from potato (Solanum tuberosum cultivar Russett Burbank) to ground cherry (Physalis floridana), where it was maintained by serial aphid transmission. Serological and plant differential tests indicated that the isolate was not contaminated with beet western yellows virus. Purified PLRV RNA was poly(A)-tailed in vitro and used as a template for reverse transcriptase, primed with oligo(dT). Alkaline gel electrophoresis of /sup 32/P-labeled first-strand complementary DNA (cDNA) indicated a major size range of 0.1 to 3.5 kilobases (kb). A small percentage of transcripts corresponded to full length PLRV RNA. Following RNase H and DNA polymerase I-mediated second strand synthesis, double-stranded cDNA was cloned into the Pst I site of the plasmid pUC9 using oligo (dC)-oligo(dG) tailing methodology. Escherichia coli JM109 transformants were screened with first-strand /sup 32/P-cDNA in colony hybridization experiments to confirm that recombinants contained PLRV-specific sequences.

  2. Structural Basis for DNA-Hairpin Promoter Recognition by the Bacteriophage N4 Virion RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Gleghorn, M.; Davydova, E; Rothman-Denes, L; Murakami, K

    2008-01-01

    Coliphage N4 virion-encapsidated RNA polymerase (vRNAP) is a member of the phage T7-like single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) family. Its central domain (mini-vRNAP) contains all RNAP functions of the full-length vRNAP, which recognizes a 5 to 7 base pair stem and 3 nucleotide loop hairpin DNA promoter. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of mini-vRNAP bound to promoters. Mini-vRNAP uses four structural motifs to recognize DNA sequences at the hairpin loop and stem and to unwind DNA. Despite their low sequence similarity, three out of four motifs are shared with T7 RNAP that recognizes a double-stranded DNA promoter. The binary complex structure and results of engineered disulfide linkage experiments reveal that the plug and motif B loop, which block the access of template DNA to the active site in the apo-form mini-vRNAP, undergo a large-scale conformational change upon promoter binding, explaining the restricted promoter specificity that is critical for N4 phage early transcription.

  3. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication with linear DNA sequences expressing antiviral micro-RNA shuttles

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Saket; Ely, Abdullah; Bloom, Kristie; Weinberg, Marc S.; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2009-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) may be harnessed to inhibit viral gene expression and this approach is being developed to counter chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Compared to synthetic RNAi activators, DNA expression cassettes that generate silencing sequences have advantages of sustained efficacy and ease of propagation in plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the large size of pDNAs and inclusion of sequences conferring antibiotic resistance and immunostimulation limit delivery efficiency and safety. To develop use of alternative DNA templates that may be applied for therapeutic gene silencing, we assessed the usefulness of PCR-generated linear expression cassettes that produce anti-HBV micro-RNA (miR) shuttles. We found that silencing of HBV markers of replication was efficient (>75%) in cell culture and in vivo. miR shuttles were processed to form anti-HBV guide strands and there was no evidence of induction of the interferon response. Modification of terminal sequences to include flanking human adenoviral type-5 inverted terminal repeats was easily achieved and did not compromise silencing efficacy. These linear DNA sequences should have utility in the development of gene silencing applications where modifications of terminal elements with elimination of potentially harmful and non-essential sequences are required.

  4. Campylobacter species identification based on polymorphism of DNA encoding rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, P; Derclaye, I; Gregoire, D; Janssen, M; Cornelis, G R

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA from five Campylobacter species was digested with a mixture of XhoI and BglII restriction endonucleases and analyzed by Southern hybridization by using a probe complementary to the DNA coding for the 16S rRNA. Each of the Campylobacter species, including C. jejuni, C. coli, C. laridis, C. fetus, and C. upsaliensis, displayed a characteristic pattern. Although some bands may be common to different species, the simplicity of the hybridization pattern enabled us to discriminate among the different species of Campylobacter. Images PMID:2570080

  5. Overexpression of Ribosomal RNA in the Development of Human Cervical Cancer Is Associated with rDNA Promoter Hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Yapei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qing; Gao, Fei; Hou, Haoli; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene encodes rRNA for protein synthesis. Aberrant expression of the rRNA gene has been generally observed in tumor cells and levels of its promoter methylation as an epigenetic regulator affect rRNA gene transcription. The possible relationship between expression and promoter methylation of rDNA has not been examined in human clinical cervical cancer. Here we investigate rRNA gene expression by quantitative real time PCR, and promoter methylation levels by HpaII/MspI digestion and sodium bisulfite sequencing in the development of human cervical cancer. We find that indeed rRNA levels are elevated in most of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) specimens as compared with non-cancer tissues. The rDNA promoter region in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) tissues reveals significant hypomethylation at cytosines in the context of CpG dinucleotides, accompanied with rDNA chromatin decondensation. Furthermore treatment of HeLa cells with the methylation inhibitor drug 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (DAC) demonstrates the negative correlation between the expression of 45S rDNA and the methylation level in the rDNA promoter region. These data suggest that a decrease in rDNA promoter methylation levels can result in an increase of rRNA synthesis in the development of human cervical cancer. PMID:27695092

  6. PlaMoM: a comprehensive database compiles plant mobile macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Daogang; Yan, Bin; Thieme, Christoph; Hua, Jingmin; Zhu, Hailong; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zhao, Zhongying; Kragler, Friedrich; Xia, Yiji; Zhang, Shoudong

    2017-01-01

    In plants, various phloem-mobile macromolecules including noncoding RNAs, mRNAs and proteins are suggested to act as important long-distance signals in regulating crucial physiological and morphological transition processes such as flowering, plant growth and stress responses. Given recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, numerous mobile macromolecules have been identified in diverse plant species from different plant families. However, most of the identified mobile macromolecules are not annotated in current versions of species-specific databases and are only available as non-searchable datasheets. To facilitate study of the mobile signaling macromolecules, we compiled the PlaMoM (Plant Mobile Macromolecules) database, a resource that provides convenient and interactive search tools allowing users to retrieve, to analyze and also to predict mobile RNAs/proteins. Each entry in the PlaMoM contains detailed information such as nucleotide/amino acid sequences, ortholog partners, related experiments, gene functions and literature. For the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, protein–protein interactions of mobile transcripts are presented as interactive molecular networks. Furthermore, PlaMoM provides a built-in tool to identify potential RNA mobility signals such as tRNA-like structures. The current version of PlaMoM compiles a total of 17 991 mobile macromolecules from 14 plant species/ecotypes from published data and literature. PlaMoM is available at http://www.systembioinfo.org/plamom/. PMID:27924044

  7. Activation of RNA polymerase II by topologically linked DNA-tracking proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ouhammouch, Mohamed; Sayre, Michael H.; Kadonaga, James T.; Geiduschek, E. Peter

    1997-01-01

    Almost all proteins mediating transcriptional activation from promoter-distal sites attach themselves, directly or indirectly, to specific DNA sequence elements. Nevertheless, a single instance of activation by a prokaryotic topologically linked DNA-tracking protein has also been demonstrated. The scope of the latter class of transcriptional activators is broadened in this work. Heterologous fusion proteins linking the transcriptional activation domain of herpes simplex virus VP16 protein to the sliding clamp protein β of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme are shown to function as topologically DNA-linked activators of yeast and Drosophila RNA polymerase II. The β:VP16 fusion proteins must be loaded onto DNA by the clamp-loading E. coli γ complex to be transcriptionally active, but they do not occupy fixed sites on the DNA. The DNA-loading sites of these activators have all the properties of enhancers: they can be inverted and their locations relative to the transcriptional start site are freely adjustable. PMID:9192631

  8. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity.

  9. Bacterial and archaeal communities in long-term contaminated surface and subsurface soil evaluated through coextracted RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Mikkonen, Anu; Santalahti, Minna; Lappi, Kaisa; Pulkkinen, Anni-Mari; Montonen, Leone; Suominen, Leena

    2014-10-01

    Soil RNA and DNA were coextracted along a contamination gradient at a landfarming field with aged crude oil contamination to investigate pollution-dependent differences in 16S rRNA and rRNA gene pools. Microbial biomass correlated with nucleic acid yields as well as bacterial community change, indicating that the same factors controlled community size and structure. In surface soil, bacterial community evenness, estimated through length heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR) fingerprinting, appeared higher for RNA-based than for DNA-based communities. The RNA-based community profiles resembled the DNA-based communities of soil with a lower contamination level. Cloning-based identification of bacterial hydrocarbon-degrading taxa in the RNA pool, representing the viable community with high protein synthesis potential, indicated that decontamination processes still continue. Analyses of archaea revealed that only Thaumarchaeota were present in the aerobic samples, whereas more diverse communities were found in the compacted subsurface soil with more crude oil. For subsurface bacteria, hydrocarbon concentration explained neither the community structure nor the difference between RNA-based and DNA-based communities. However, rRNA of bacterial taxa associated with syntrophic and sulphate-reducing alkane degradation was detected. Although the same prokaryotic taxa were identified in DNA and RNA, comparison of the two nucleic acid pools can aid in the assessment of past and future restoration success.

  10. The content of DNA and RNA in microparticles released by Jurkat and HL-60 cells undergoing in vitro apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Charles F.; Pisetsky, David S.

    2009-03-10

    Microparticles are small membrane-bound vesicles that are released from apoptotic cells during blebbing. These particles contain DNA and RNA and display important functional activities, including immune system activation. Furthermore, nucleic acids inside the particle can be analyzed as biomarkers in a variety of disease states. To elucidate the nature of microparticle nucleic acids, DNA and RNA released in microparticles from the Jurkat T and HL-60 promyelocytic cell lines undergoing apoptosis in vitro were studied. Microparticles were isolated from culture media by differential centrifugation and characterized by flow cytometry and molecular approaches. In these particles, DNA showed laddering by gel electrophoresis and was present in a form that allowed direct binding by a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody, suggesting antigen accessibility even without fixation. Analysis of RNA by gel electrophoresis showed intact 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA bands, although lower molecular bands consistent with 28s ribosomal RNA degradation products were also present. Particles also contained messenger RNA as shown by RT-PCR amplification of sequences for {beta}-actin and GAPDH. In addition, gel electrophoresis showed the presence of low molecular weight RNA in the size range of microRNA. Together, these results indicate that microparticles from apoptotic Jurkat and HL-60 cells contain diverse nucleic acid species, indicating translocation of both nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA and RNA as particle release occurs during death.

  11. Lipidoid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Love, Kevin T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-03-13

    The safe, targeted and effective delivery of gene therapeutics remains a significant barrier to their broad clinical application. Here we develop a magnetic nucleic acid delivery system composed of iron oxide nanoparticles and cationic lipid-like materials termed lipidoids. Coated nanoparticles are capable of delivering DNA and siRNA to cells in culture. The mean hydrodynamic size of these nanoparticles was systematically varied and optimized for delivery. While nanoparticles of different sizes showed similar siRNA delivery efficiency, nanoparticles of 50-100 nm displayed optimal DNA delivery activity. The application of an external magnetic field significantly enhanced the efficiency of nucleic acid delivery, with performance exceeding that of the commercially available lipid-based reagent, Lipofectamine 2000. The iron oxide nanoparticle delivery platform developed here offers the potential for magnetically guided targeting, as well as an opportunity to combine gene therapy with MRI imaging and magnetic hyperthermia.

  12. Tetrahedral DNA nanostructure-based microRNA biosensor coupled with catalytic recycling of the analyte.

    PubMed

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Bidou; Chen, Xifeng; Li, Xiaoxi; Tang, Yuguo

    2015-03-25

    MicroRNAs are not only important regulators of a wide range of cellular processes but are also identified as promising disease biomarkers. Due to the low contents in serum, microRNAs are always difficult to detect accurately . In this study, an electrochemical biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of microRNA based on tetrahedral DNA nanostructure is developed. Four DNA single strands are engineered to form a tetrahedral nanostructure with a pendant stem-loop and modified on a gold electrode surface, which largely enhances the molecular recognition efficiency. Moreover, taking advantage of strand displacement polymerization, catalytic recycling of microRNA, and silver nanoparticle-based solid-state Ag/AgCl reaction, the proposed biosensor exhibits high sensitivity with the limit of detection down to 0.4 fM. This biosensor shows great clinical value and may have practical utility in early diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases.

  13. GnRH binding RNA and DNA Spiegelmers: a novel approach toward GnRH antagonism.

    PubMed

    Leva, Susanne; Lichte, Andrea; Burmeister, Jens; Muhn, Peter; Jahnke, Birgit; Fesser, Dirk; Erfurth, Jeannette; Burgstaller, Petra; Klussmann, Sven

    2002-03-01

    Mirror-image oligonucleotide ligands (Spiegelmers) that bind to the pharmacologically relevant target gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH) with high affinity and high specificity have been identified using the Spiegelmer technology. GnRH is a decapeptide that plays an important role in mammalian reproduction and sexual maturation and is associated with several benign and malignant diseases. First, aptamers that bind to D-GnRH with dissociation constants of 50-100 nM were isolated out of RNA and DNA libraries. The respective enantiomers of the DNA and RNA aptamers were synthesized, and their binding to L-GnRH was shown. These Spiegelmers bind to L-GnRH with similar affinity to that of the corresponding aptamers that bind to D-GnRH. We further demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of GnRH-induced Ca(2+) release in Chinese hamster ovary cells that were stably transfected with the human GnRH receptor.

  14. Piezoelectric Cantilever Biosensors for Label-free, Real-time Detection of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Haring, Alexander P; Cesewski, Ellen; Johnson, Blake N

    2017-01-01

    This chapter reviews the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensors. The sensor transduction mechanism, sensing principle, and mode of operation are discussed. Bio-recognition strategies and surface functionalization methods for detection of DNA and RNA are discussed with a focus on self-assembly-based approaches. Methods for the verification of biosensor response via secondary binding assays, reversible binding assays, and the integration of complementary transduction mechanisms are presented. Sensing applications for medical diagnostics, food safety, and environmental monitoring are provided. PEMC sensor technology provides a robust platform for the real-time, label-free detection of DNA and RNA in complex matrices over nanomolar (nM) to attomolar (aM) concentration ranges.

  15. NAD homeostasis in the bacterial response to DNA/RNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Leonardo; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    In mammals, NAD represents a nodal point for metabolic regulation, and its availability is critical to genome stability. Several NAD-consuming enzymes are induced in various stress conditions and the consequent NAD decline is generally accompanied by the activation of NAD biosynthetic pathways to guarantee NAD homeostasis. In the bacterial world a similar scenario has only recently begun to surface. Here we review the current knowledge on the involvement of NAD homeostasis in bacterial stress response mechanisms. In particular, we focus on the participation of both NAD-consuming enzymes (DNA ligase, mono(ADP-ribosyl) transferase, sirtuins, and RNA 2'-phosphotransferase) and NAD biosynthetic enzymes (both de novo, and recycling enzymes) in the response to DNA/RNA damage. As further supporting evidence for such a link, a genomic context analysis is presented showing several conserved associations between NAD homeostasis and stress responsive genes.

  16. HYPOXIA-INDUCED GROWTH LIMITATION OF JUVENILE FISHES IN AN ESTUARINE NURSERY: ASSESSMENT OF SMALL-SCALE TEMPORAL DYNAMICS USING RNA:DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ratio of RNA to DNA (RNA:DNA) in white muscle tissue of juvenile summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) and weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) was used as a proxy for recent growth rate in an estuarine nursery. Variability in RNA:DNA was examined relative to temporal changes in te...

  17. Effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate on the incorporation of labelled precursors into RNA, DNA and protein in epidermis, dermis and subcutis from precancerous mouse skin with reference to enhanced tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bhisey, R.A.; Ramchandani, A.G.; Sirsat, S.M.

    1984-02-01

    The effects of a single application of 1.8 nmol 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on precursor incorporation into RNA, DNA and protein in the epidermis, dermis and subcutis from 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) injected precancerous mouse skin were studied at various time points between 3 and 96 h. In the precancerous tissues, the rates of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)uridine into RNA did not alter appreciably from those in the control tissues; while the rates of (/sup 3/H)methylthymidine incorporation into DNA were elevated with peaks appearing between 6 and 12 h, at 24 h and at 72 h in epidermis, dermis and subcutis. The rate of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)leucine into protein was markedly elevated in all the three tissues which showed 3-4 sharp peaks. The maximum stimulation ranged between 14 and 20 times that of the control. A single application of TPA to the precancerous mouse skin induced early stimulation of precursor incorporation into all the three macromolecules in epidermis, dermis and subcutis. The increased stimulation was maintained for 36-72 h. The patterns of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)methylthymidine into DNA gave rise to 2-3 peaks of elevated uptake in each tissue up to 36-48 h. A lowered rate of DNA synthesis between 48 and 60 h was followed by a peak at 72 h. In each group, epidermal mitotic activity correlated well with spurts of precursor incorporation into cellular DNA. The observations indicate that TPA recruits more cells into the DNA synthetic phase and accelerates selective growth of preneoplastic cells during tumor progression.

  18. New insights into the promoterless transcription of DNA coligo templates by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Seidl, Christine I; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chemically synthesized DNA can carry small RNA sequence information but converting that information into small RNA is generally thought to require large double-stranded promoters in the context of plasmids, viruses and genes. We previously found evidence that circularized oligodeoxynucleotides (coligos) containing certain sequences and secondary structures can template the synthesis of small RNA by RNA polymerase III in vitro and in human cells. By using immunoprecipitated RNA polymerase III we now report corroborating evidence that this enzyme is the sole polymerase responsible for coligo transcription. The immobilized polymerase enabled experiments showing that coligo transcripts can be formed through transcription termination without subsequent 3' end trimming. To better define the determinants of productive transcription, a structure-activity relationship study was performed using over 20 new coligos. The results show that unpaired nucleotides in the coligo stem facilitate circumtranscription, but also that internal loops and bulges should be kept small to avoid secondary transcription initiation sites. A polymerase termination sequence embedded in the double-stranded region of a hairpin-encoding coligo stem can antagonize transcription. Using lessons learned from new and old coligos, we demonstrate how to convert poorly transcribed coligos into productive templates. Our findings support the possibility that coligos may prove useful as chemically synthesized vectors for the ectopic expression of small RNA in human cells.

  19. Chemical Methylation of RNA and DNA Viral Genomes as a Probe of In Situ Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Minoru; Shatkin, Aaron J.; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    1981-01-01

    We used [methyl-3H] dimethyl sulfate to probe the genome structures of several RNA and DNA viruses. We compared sites of modification in nucleic acids that were methylated chemically before and after extraction from purified virions. With both single-stranded and double-stranded substrates alkylation occurred mainly at the N7 position of guanine. However, adenine N1 atoms were differentially accessible in single-stranded RNA and DNA. For example, the ratios of 1-methyladenosine to 7-methylguanosine for reovirus mRNA and deproteinized genome RNA were 0.43 and 0.03, respectively. Members of the Reoviridae methylated in situ yielded RNAs with ratios of 0.04 to 0.08, indicating that the intravirion genomes were double stranded. We obtained ratios of 0.26 and 0.35 for the RNAs of dimethyl sulfate-treated brome mosaic and avian sarcoma virions, respectively, which was consistent with partial protection of adenine N1 sites by structural proteins or genome conformation or both. The ratios of 1-methyladenosine to 7-methylguanosine for vaccinia virus DNAs methylated in situ (0.10) and after phenol extraction (0.14) were less than the ratios for φX174 and M13 DNAs (0.39 to 0.64) but considerably greater than the ratio observed with adenovirus DNA (0.002 to 0.02). The presence of a single-stranded region(s) in the vaccinia virus genome was confirmed by S1 nuclease digestion of [methyl-3H] DNA; the released radiolabeled fraction had a ratio of 0.41, compared with 0.025 for the residual duplex DNA. In addition to the structure-dependent accessibility of adenine N1, methylation of adenine N3 was severalfold lower in the intravirion genomes of vaccinia virus, φX174, and adenovirus than in the corresponding extracted DNAs. Chemical methylation of virions and subviral particles should be useful for in situ analyses of specific regions of RNA and DNA genomes, such as the sites of protein binding during virus maturation. PMID:6172596

  20. Ricin A-chain substrate specificity in RNA, DNA, and hybrid stem-loop structures.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Tim K; Schramm, Vern L

    2004-05-04

    Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) is the catalytic subunit of ricin, a heterodimeric toxin from castor beans. Its ribosomal inactivating activity arises from depurination of a single adenine from position A(4324) in a GAGA tetraloop from 28S ribosomal RNA. Minimal substrate requirements are the GAGA tetraloop and stem of two or more base pairs. Depurination activity also occurs on stem-loop DNA with the same sequence, but with the k(cat) reduced 200-fold. Systematic variation of RNA 5'-G(1)C(2)G(3)C(4)[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)]G(9)C(10)G(11)C(12)-3' 12mers via replacement of each nucleotide in the tetraloop with a deoxynucleotide showed a 16-fold increase in k(cat) for A(6) --> dA(6) but reduced k(cat) up to 300-fold for the other sites. Methylation of individual 2'-hydroxyls in a similar experiment reduced k(cat) by as much as 3 x 10(-3)-fold. In stem-loop DNA, replacement of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] with individual ribonucleotides resulted in small kinetic changes, except for the dA(6) --> A(6) replacement for which k(cat) decreased 6-fold. Insertion of d[G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8)] into an RNA stem-loop or G(5)A(6)G(7)A(8) into a DNA stem-loop reduced k(cat) by 30- and 5-fold, respectively. Multiple substitutions of deoxyribonucleotides into RNA stem-loops in one case (dG(5),dG(7)) decreased k(cat)/K(m) by 10(5)-fold, while a second change (dG(5),dA(8)) decreased k(cat) by 100-fold. Mapping these interactions on the structure of GAGA stem-loop RNA suggests that all the loop 2'-hydroxyl groups play a significant role in the action of ricin A-chain. Improved binding of RNA-DNA stem-loop hybrids provides a scaffold for inhibitor design. Replacing the adenosine of the RTA depurination site with deoxyadenosine in a small RNA stem-loop increased k(cat) 20-fold to 1660 min(-1), a value similar to RTA's k(cat) on intact ribosomes.

  1. Inhibition of Adenovirus In Vitro DNA Replication by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Leader RNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-18

    19 Inhibition of Macromolecular Synthesis •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 22 Adenovirus Structure and Life Cycle...be possible to determine the affects of VSV and VSV leader RNA on eukaryotic DNA synthesis. ; . 1 .· 29 Adenovirus Structure and Life Cycle

  2. RNA/DNA ratio as biomarkers for periphyton and macroinvertebrate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Daniela; Winkelmann, Carola

    2015-04-01

    A biocenosis is a complex assembly of organisms driven and shaped by numerous processes and interactions. Yet, in order to describe the biocenosis of a stream often only state variables, such as algal biomass or invertebrate diversity and abundance, are measured. But these variables fail to provide much needed information on those driving processes. Because processes such as growth of periphyton and invertebrates can hardly be measured directly in the field, the use of biomarkers is a promising approach to quantify biological rates under natural conditions. Periphyton represents the main food source for invertebrate grazers and periphyton growth rate rather than standing stocks alone allows the estimation of the availability of this resource. A linear relationship of RNA/DNA ratios and growth rate has previously been established for single species cultures of algae and bacteria but not for naturally occurring freshwater periphyton assemblages. In this study it could be shown that linear relationships of RNA/DNA ratios and growth rate are also valid for naturally occurring freshwater periphyton assemblages and can be used as biomarkers for periphyton growth rate. Moreover, recent results indicate that the RNA/DNA ratio might also be used as biomarker for invertebrates, because high-quality food was observed to increase the RNA/DNA ratios of the freshwater amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus. These are very promising results with regard to the usefulness and applicability of biomarkers ecosystem analysis in running waters. Additional biomarkers allowing the analysis of further processes and interactions within the food web such as PLFAs (phospholipid-fatty acids), neutral lipids and PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acids) are to be tested for their applicability in stream ecosystems.

  3. Effects of trace elements and pesticides on dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA added to soils

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T. Jr.; Johanson, J.B.; Lund L.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of 14 trace elements, 12 herbicides, and two fungicides on dephosphorylation of yeast ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) added to soils (Xerollic Calciorthids and Typic Haploxeralfs). The cumulative amount of ortho phosphate (Pi) released from nucleic acids increased linearly with time of incubation (up to 72 h), decreased with profile depth, and was highly influenced by soil pH. When trace elements were applied and compared by using 2.5 mmol kg/sup -1/ of soil, the average inhibition in dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA in two soils ranged from 17% with Co(II) to 52% with Cu(II). The most effective inhibitors of nucleic acid dephosphorylation were Ag(I), Cu(I), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) (avg inhibition greater than or equal to 35%). Other elements that inhibited dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA added to soils included Ba(II), Co(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), Ti(IV), V(IV), and W(VI). When the pesticides were compared by using 5 mg of active ingredient kg/sup -1/ of soil, the average inhibition in nucleic acid dephosphorylation ranged from 14% with butylate to 39% with chloramben. The most effective inhibitors (> 25%) were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, trifluralin, and maneb. Other pesticides that inhibited RNA and DNA dephosphorylation in soils included cyanazine, 2,4-D, dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, alachlor, paraquat, butylate, and captan.

  4. Comparative modeling of DNA and RNA polymerases from Moniliophthora perniciosa mitochondrial plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Bruno S; Taranto, Alex G; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; Duarte, Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa (Stahel) Aime & Phillips-Mora is a hemibiotrophic Basidiomycota that causes witches' broom disease of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). This disease has resulted in a severe decrease in Brazilian cocoa production, which changed the position of Brazil in the market from the second largest cocoa exporter to a cocoa importer. Fungal mitochondrial plasmids are usually invertrons encoding DNA and RNA polymerases. Plasmid insertions into host mitochondrial genomes are probably associated with modifications in host generation time, which can be involved in fungal aging. This association suggests activity of polymerases, and these can be used as new targets for drugs against mitochondrial activity of fungi, more specifically against witches' broom disease. Sequencing and modeling: DNA and RNA polymerases of M. perniciosa mitochondrial plasmid were completely sequenced and their models were carried out by Comparative Homology approach. The sequences of DNA and RNA polymerase showed 25% of identity to 1XHX and 1ARO (pdb code) using BLASTp, which were used as templates. The models were constructed using Swiss PDB-Viewer and refined with a set of Molecular Mechanics (MM) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) in water carried out with AMBER 8.0, both working under the ff99 force fields, respectively. Ramachandran plots were generated by Procheck 3.0 and exhibited models with 97% and 98% for DNA and RNA polymerases, respectively. MD simulations in water showed models with thermodynamic stability after 2000 ps and 300 K of simulation. Conclusion This work contributes to the development of new alternatives for controlling the fungal agent of witches' broom disease. PMID:19744344

  5. ALS-associated mutation FUS-R521C causes DNA damage and RNA splicing defects

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Haiyan; Lee, Sebum; Shang, Yulei; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Au, Kin Fai; Kamiya, Sherry; Barmada, Sami J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Lui, Hansen; Carlton, Caitlin E.; Tang, Amy A.; Oldham, Michael C.; Wang, Hejia; Shorter, James; Filiano, Anthony J.; Roberson, Erik D.; Tourtellotte, Warren G.; Chen, Bin; Tsai, Li-Huei; Huang, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations of the RNA/DNA binding protein FUS are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS); however, it is not clear how FUS mutations cause neurodegeneration. Using transgenic mice expressing a common FALS-associated FUS mutation (FUS-R521C mice), we found that mutant FUS proteins formed a stable complex with WT FUS proteins and interfered with the normal interactions between FUS and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Consequently, FUS-R521C mice exhibited evidence of DNA damage as well as profound dendritic and synaptic phenotypes in brain and spinal cord. To provide insights into these defects, we screened neural genes for nucleotide oxidation and identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) as a target of FUS-R521C–associated DNA damage and RNA splicing defects in mice. Compared with WT FUS, mutant FUS-R521C proteins formed a more stable complex with Bdnf RNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Stabilization of the FUS/Bdnf RNA complex contributed to Bdnf splicing defects and impaired BDNF signaling through receptor TrkB. Exogenous BDNF only partially restored dendrite phenotype in FUS-R521C neurons, suggesting that BDNF-independent mechanisms may contribute to the defects in these neurons. Indeed, RNA-seq analyses of FUS-R521C spinal cords revealed additional transcription and splicing defects in genes that regulate dendritic growth and synaptic functions. Together, our results provide insight into how gain-of-function FUS mutations affect critical neuronal functions. PMID:24509083

  6. ALS-associated mutation FUS-R521C causes DNA damage and RNA splicing defects.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haiyan; Lee, Sebum; Shang, Yulei; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Au, Kin Fai; Kamiya, Sherry; Barmada, Sami J; Finkbeiner, Steven; Lui, Hansen; Carlton, Caitlin E; Tang, Amy A; Oldham, Michael C; Wang, Hejia; Shorter, James; Filiano, Anthony J; Roberson, Erik D; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Chen, Bin; Tsai, Li-Huei; Huang, Eric J

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations of the RNA/DNA binding protein FUS are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS); however, it is not clear how FUS mutations cause neurodegeneration. Using transgenic mice expressing a common FALS-associated FUS mutation (FUS-R521C mice), we found that mutant FUS proteins formed a stable complex with WT FUS proteins and interfered with the normal interactions between FUS and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Consequently, FUS-R521C mice exhibited evidence of DNA damage as well as profound dendritic and synaptic phenotypes in brain and spinal cord. To provide insights into these defects, we screened neural genes for nucleotide oxidation and identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) as a target of FUS-R521C-associated DNA damage and RNA splicing defects in mice. Compared with WT FUS, mutant FUS-R521C proteins formed a more stable complex with Bdnf RNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Stabilization of the FUS/Bdnf RNA complex contributed to Bdnf splicing defects and impaired BDNF signaling through receptor TrkB. Exogenous BDNF only partially restored dendrite phenotype in FUS-R521C neurons, suggesting that BDNF-independent mechanisms may contribute to the defects in these neurons. Indeed, RNA-seq analyses of FUS-R521C spinal cords revealed additional transcription and splicing defects in genes that regulate dendritic growth and synaptic functions. Together, our results provide insight into how gain-of-function FUS mutations affect critical neuronal functions.

  7. Dry Powder Formulation of Plasmid DNA and siRNA for Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chow, Michael Y T; Lam, Jenny K W

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapeutics has huge potential for the treatment of a wide range of diseases including respiratory diseases. Plasmid DNA (pDNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) are the two most widely investigated nucleic acids for therapeutic development. However, efficient and safe delivery of nucleic acids is still a major hurdle in translating nucleic acid therapy into clinical practice. For the treatment of respiratory diseases, administration via inhalation is the most direct and effective way to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids to the lungs. Although liquid aerosol formulation is investigated in most of the studies, it is not desirable in terms of maintaining the stability of nucleic acid especially during long-term storage. This problem could be circumvented by formulating the therapeutic nucleic acids into dry powder for inhalation, and should be considered as the future direction of developing inhalable nucleic acids. In this review, the three major particle engineering methods investigated for the preparation of inhalable pDNA and siRNA formulations, including spray drying (SD), spray freeze drying (SFD) and supercritical fluid (SFC) drying, are discussed and compared. Moreover, common assessment methods and the challenges of evaluating the biological activities of inhalable nucleic acid powders are also reviewed.

  8. Direct visualization of both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells via an uncommon spectroscopic method

    PubMed Central

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M. Y.; Monchaud, David

    2016-01-01

    Guanine-rich DNA or RNA sequences can fold into higher-order, four-stranded structures termed quadruplexes that are suspected to play pivotal roles in cellular mechanisms including the control of the genome integrity and gene expression. However, the biological relevance of quadruplexes is still a matter of debate owing to the paucity of unbiased evidences of their existence in cells. Recent reports on quadruplex-specific antibodies and small-molecule fluorescent probes help dispel reservations and accumulating evidences now pointing towards the cellular relevance of quadruplexes. To better assess and comprehend their biology, developing new versatile tools to detect both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in cells is essential. We report here a smart fluorescent probe that allows for the simple detection of quadruplexes thanks to an uncommon spectroscopic mechanism known as the red-edge effect (REE). We demonstrate that this effect could open avenues to greatly enhance the ability to visualize both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells, using simple protocols and fluorescence detection facilities. PMID:27535322

  9. Spatio-temporal monitoring of deep-sea communities using metabarcoding of sediment DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Guardiola, Magdalena; Wangensteen, Owen S.; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Uriz, María Jesús

    2016-01-01

    We assessed spatio-temporal patterns of diversity in deep-sea sediment communities using metabarcoding. We chose a recently developed eukaryotic marker based on the v7 region of the 18S rRNA gene. Our study was performed in a submarine canyon and its adjacent slope in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, sampled along a depth gradient at two different seasons. We found a total of 5,569 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs), dominated by Metazoa, Alveolata and Rhizaria. Among metazoans, Nematoda, Arthropoda and Annelida were the most diverse. We found a marked heterogeneity at all scales, with important differences between layers of sediment and significant changes in community composition with zone (canyon vs slope), depth, and season. We compared the information obtained from metabarcoding DNA and RNA and found more total MOTUs and more MOTUs per sample with DNA (ca. 20% and 40% increase, respectively). Both datasets showed overall similar spatial trends, but most groups had higher MOTU richness with the DNA template, while others, such as nematodes, were more diverse in the RNA dataset. We provide metabarcoding protocols and guidelines for biomonitoring of these key communities in order to generate information applicable to management efforts. PMID:28028473

  10. Spatio-temporal monitoring of deep-sea communities using metabarcoding of sediment DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Magdalena; Wangensteen, Owen S; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Uriz, María Jesús; Turon, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We assessed spatio-temporal patterns of diversity in deep-sea sediment communities using metabarcoding. We chose a recently developed eukaryotic marker based on the v7 region of the 18S rRNA gene. Our study was performed in a submarine canyon and its adjacent slope in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, sampled along a depth gradient at two different seasons. We found a total of 5,569 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs), dominated by Metazoa, Alveolata and Rhizaria. Among metazoans, Nematoda, Arthropoda and Annelida were the most diverse. We found a marked heterogeneity at all scales, with important differences between layers of sediment and significant changes in community composition with zone (canyon vs slope), depth, and season. We compared the information obtained from metabarcoding DNA and RNA and found more total MOTUs and more MOTUs per sample with DNA (ca. 20% and 40% increase, respectively). Both datasets showed overall similar spatial trends, but most groups had higher MOTU richness with the DNA template, while others, such as nematodes, were more diverse in the RNA dataset. We provide metabarcoding protocols and guidelines for biomonitoring of these key communities in order to generate information applicable to management efforts.

  11. Protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis in cultures of skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects and patients with rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Abakumova, O.Y.; Kutsenko, N.G.; Panasyuk, A.F.

    1985-07-01

    To study the mechanism of the lasting disturbance of fibroblast function, protein, RNA and DNA synthesis was investigated in skin fibroblasts from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic scleroderma (SS). The labeled precursors used to analyze synthesis of protein, RNA, and DNA were /sup 14/C-protein hydrolysate, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and (/sup 14/C) thymidine. Stimulation was determined by measuring incorporation of (/sup 14/C)proline into fibroblast proteins. During analysis of stability of fast-labeled RNA tests were carried out to discover whether all measurable radioactivity belonged to RNA molecules.

  12. Optimized rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for mapping bacterial mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Tillett, D; Burns, B P; Neilan, B A

    2000-03-01

    A simple, efficient and sensitive RACE-based procedure was developed for the determination of unknown 5' regions from bacterial cDNA. A number of critical modifications were made to the standard RACE method, including the optimization of the RNA extraction, reverse transcription and PCR conditions. This procedure was used to accurately determine the site of transcript initiation and structure of the promoter region of the Helicobacter pylori aspartate carbamoyltransferase gene (pyrB). The technique avoids many of the difficulties associated with established bacterial transcript mapping protocols and can be performed in two days starting with less than 1 microgram of total RNA. The modifications described here have significant potential for the identification of transcript start sites of bacterial genes and non-polyadenylated eukaryotic RNA.

  13. RNA exosome regulates AID DNA mutator activity in the B cell genome

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin diversification processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination critically rely on transcription coupled targeting of AID to Ig loci in activated B lymphocytes. AID catalyzes deamination of cytidine deoxynucleotides on exposed single stranded DNA. In addition to driving immunoglobulin diversity, promiscuous targeting of AID mutagenic activity poses a deleterious threat to genomic stability. Recent genome-wide studies have uncovered pervasive AID activity throughout the B cell genome. It is increasingly apparent that AID activity is frequently targeted to genomic loci undergoing early transcription termination where RNA exosome promotes the resolution of stalled transcription complexes via co-transcriptional RNA degradation mechanisms. Here we review aspects and consequences of eukaryotic transcription that lead to early termination, RNA exosome recruitment, and ultimately targeting of AID mutagenic activity. PMID:26073986

  14. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  15. SYBR Green-activated sorting of Arabidopsis pollen nuclei based on different DNA/RNA content.

    PubMed

    Schoft, Vera K; Chumak, Nina; Bindics, János; Slusarz, Lucyna; Twell, David; Köhler, Claudia; Tamaru, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    Key message: Purification of pollen nuclei. Germ cell epigenetics is a critical topic in plants and animals. The male gametophyte (pollen) of flowering plants is an attractive model to study genetic and epigenetic reprogramming during sexual reproduction, being composed of only two sperm cells contained within, its companion, vegetative cell. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method to purify SYBR Green-stained sperm and vegetative cell nuclei of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to analyze chromatin and RNA profiles. The method obviates generating transgenic lines expressing cell-type-specific fluorescence reporters and facilitates functional genomic analysis of various mutant lines and accessions. We evaluate the purity and quality of the sorted pollen nuclei and analyze the technique's molecular basis. Our results show that both DNA and RNA contents contribute to SYBR Green-activated nucleus sorting and RNA content differences impact on the separation of sperm and vegetative cell nuclei. We demonstrate the power of the approach by sorting wild-type and polyploid mutant sperm and vegetative cell nuclei from mitotic and meiotic mutants, which is not feasible using cell-type-specific transgenic reporters. Our approach should be applicable to pollen nuclei of crop plants and possibly to cell/nucleus types and cell cycle phases of different species containing substantially different amounts of DNA and/or RNA.

  16. Proteasome inhibition increases DNA and RNA oxidation in astrocyte and neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qunxing; Dimayuga, Edgardo; Markesbery, William R; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2004-12-01

    Increased levels of nucleic acid oxidation have been described as part of normal brain aging and have been demonstrated to occur in multiple neurological disorders. The basis for increased nucleic acid oxidation in each of these conditions is presently unknown. Proteasome inhibition occurs in a host of neurodegenerative conditions and likely contributes to increased levels of oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. In the present study we demonstrate for the first time the ability of proteasome inhibition to increase the level of nucleic acid oxidation in primary neuron and astrocyte cultures. Administration of proteasome inhibitors (MG262, MG115) at concentrations that do not induce neuron death in the first 24 h of treatment, dramatically increase the levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-hydroxyguanosine (8OHG) immunoreactivity in both cell types. Neurons underwent larger increases in nucleic acid oxidation compared to astrocyte cultures. While both DNA and RNA oxidation were observed following proteasome inhibition, RNA appeared to undergo a greater degree of oxidation than DNA. Both 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA were dramatically decreased following proteasome inhibition. Interestingly, an accumulation of unprocessed and/or cross-linked RNA species was observed following proteasome inhibition. Taken together, these data indicate the ability of proteasome inhibition to increase the levels of nucleic acid oxidation in both neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that proteasome inhibition may have deleterious effects on transcription and translation in both neurons and glia.

  17. Addressing RNA integrity to determine the impact of mitochondrial DNA mutations on brain mitochondrial function with age.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M; Stewart, James B; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations.

  18. Addressing RNA Integrity to Determine the Impact of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations on Brain Mitochondrial Function with Age

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M.; Stewart, James B.; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations. PMID:24819950

  19. Small RNA-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA lesions by the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 and ARGONAUTE 1.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Catherine; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Vincent, Timothée; Voinnet, Olivier; Molinier, Jean

    2017-04-04

    As photosynthetic organisms, plants need to prevent irreversible UV-induced DNA lesions. Through an unbiased, genome-wide approach, we have uncovered a previously unrecognized interplay between Global Genome Repair and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in the recognition of DNA photoproducts, prevalently in intergenic regions. Genetic and biochemical approaches indicate that, upon UV irradiation, the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 (DDB2) and ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana form a chromatin-bound complex together with 21-nt siRNAs, which likely facilitates recognition of DNA damages in an RNA/DNA complementary strand-specific manner. The biogenesis of photoproduct-associated siRNAs involves the noncanonical, concerted action of RNA POLYMERASE IV, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE-2, and DICER-LIKE-4. Furthermore, the chromatin association/dissociation of the DDB2-AGO1 complex is under the control of siRNA abundance and DNA damage signaling. These findings reveal unexpected nuclear functions for DCL4 and AGO1, and shed light on the interplay between small RNAs and DNA repair recognition factors at damaged sites.

  20. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; ...

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA genemore » sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.« less

  1. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.

  2. Isolation and characterization of a complementary DNA specific for human aromatase-system cytochrome P-450 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C T; Ledesma, D B; Schulz, T Z; Simpson, E R; Mendelson, C R

    1986-01-01

    A cloned complementary DNA sequence has been isolated from a human placental cDNA library in the bacteriophage expression vector lambda gt11 after screening with polyclonal antibodies against human placental aromatase-system cytochrome P-450 (P-450Arom). A single recombinant clone, lambda hAROM1, was characterized by its ability to generate a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that reacted independently with polyclonal antibodies raised against beta-galactosidase and cytochrome P-450Arom and with monoclonal antibodies specific for cytochrome P-450Arom. The cDNA insert, which was found to be 1.8 kilobases in length, was radiolabeled and used to analyze poly(A)+ RNA isolated from human placenta and total RNA isolated from human adipose stromal cells cultured in the absence or presence of regulatory factors. The radiolabeled cDNA hybridized to several size species of mRNA in both placental and adipose stromal cell RNA fractions. Changes in the levels of adipose stromal cell RNA that hybridized to the cDNA insert were associated with comparable changes in the levels of translatable cytochrome P-450Arom mRNA and aromatase system activity. These findings are indicative that lambda hAROM1 contains DNA sequences complementary to human cytochrome P-450Arom mRNA and are suggestive that regulatory factors affect aromatase activity by altering the transcriptional activity of the cytochrome P-450Arom gene. Images PMID:3018730

  3. DNA's Liaison with RNA Polymerase Physical Consequences of a Twisted Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulic, Igor; Nelson, Phil

    2006-03-01

    RNA polymerase is the molecular motor that performs the fundamental process of transcription. Besides being the key- protagonist of gene regulation it is one of the most powerful nano-mechanical force generators known inside the cell. The fact that polymerase strictly tracks only one of DNA's strands together with DNA's helical geometry induces a force-to-torque transmission, with several important biological consequences like the ``twin supercoil domain'' effect and remote torsional interaction of genes. In the first part of the talk we theoretically explore the mechanisms of non-equilibrium transport of twist generated by a moving polymerase. We show that these equations are intrinsically non-linear in the crowded cellular environment and lead to peculiar effects like self-confinement of torsional strain by generation of alternative DNA structures like cruciforms. We demonstrate how the asymmetric conformational properties of DNA lead to a ``torsional diode'' effect, i.e. a rectification of polymerase-generated twist currents of different signs. In the second part we explore the possibility of exploiting the polymerase as a powerful workhorse for nanomechanical devices. We propose simple and easy to assemble arrangements of DNA templates interconnected by strand-hybridization that when transcribed by the polymerase linearly contract by tenfold. We show that the typical forces generated by such ``DNA stress fibers'' are in the piconewton range. We discuss their kinetics of contraction and relaxation and draw parallels to natural muscle fiber design.

  4. Chromatin proteins and RNA are associated with DNA during all phases of mitosis

    PubMed Central

    L Black, Kathryn; Petruk, Svetlana; Fenstermaker, Tyler K; Hodgson, Jacob W; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Brock, Hugh W; Mazo, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis brings about major changes to chromosome and nuclear structure. We used recently developed proximity ligation assay-based techniques to investigate the association with DNA of chromatin-associated proteins and RNAs in Drosophila embryos during mitosis. All groups of tested proteins, histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling proteins and methylated histones remained in close proximity to DNA during all phases of mitosis. We also found that RNA transcripts are associated with DNA during all stages of mitosis. Reduction of H3K27me3 levels or elimination of RNAs had no effect on the association of the components of PcG and TrxG complexes to DNA. Using a combination of proximity ligation assay-based techniques and super-resolution microscopy, we found that the number of protein–DNA and RNA–DNA foci undergoes significant reduction during mitosis, suggesting that mitosis may be accompanied by structural re-arrangement or compaction of specific chromatin domains. PMID:27807477

  5. Changes in 16s RNA Gene Microbial Community Profiling by Concentration of Prokaryotic DNA.

    PubMed

    Glassing, Angela; Dowd, Scot E; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Jorden, Jeffrey R; Chiodini, Rodrick J

    2015-12-01

    Microbial metagenomics are hindered in clinical tissue samples as a result of the large relative amount of human DNA in relation to microbial DNA acting as competitive inhibitors of downstream applications. We evaluated the LOOXSTER® Enrichment Kit to separate eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA in submucosal intestinal tissue samples having a low microbial biomass and to determine the effects of enrichment on 16s rRNA microbiota sequencing. The enrichment kit reduced the amount of human DNA in the samples 40-70% resulting in a 3.5-fold increase in the number of 16s bacterial gene sequences detected on the Illumina MiSeq platform. This increase was accompanied by the detection of 41 additional bacterial genera and 94 tentative species. The additional bacterial taxa detected accounted for as much as 25% of the total bacterial population that significantly altered the relative prevalence and composition of the intestinal microbiota. The ability to reduce the competitive inhibition created by human DNA and the concentration of bacterial DNA may allow metagenomics to be performed on complex tissues containing a low bacterial biomass.

  6. Temporal aspects of DNA and RNA synthesis during human immunodeficiency virus infection: evidence for differential gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S Y; Byrn, R; Groopman, J; Baltimore, D

    1989-01-01

    The kinetics of retroviral DNA and RNA synthesis are parameters vital to understanding viral growth, especially for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which encodes several of its own regulatory genes. We have established a single-cycle growth condition for HIV in H9 cells, a human CD4+ lymphocyte line. The full-length viral linear DNA is first detectable by 4 h postinfection. During a one-step growth of HIV, amounts of viral DNA gradually increase until 8 to 12 h postinfection and then decrease. The copy number of unintegrated viral DNA is not extraordinarily high even at its peak. Most strikingly, there is a temporal program of RNA accumulation: the earliest RNA is greatly enriched in the 2-kilobase subgenomic mRNA species, while the level of 9.2-kilobase RNA which is both genomic RNA and mRNA remains low until after 24 h of infection. Virus production begins at about 24 h postinfection. Thus, viral DNA synthesis is as rapid as for other retroviruses, but viral RNA synthesis involves temporal alteration in the species that accumulate, presumably as a consequence of viral regulatory genes. Images PMID:2760980

  7. Interplay of Structure, Hydration and Thermal Stability in Formacetal Modified Oligonucleotides: RNA May Tolerate Nonionic Modifications Better than DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarovic, A.; Schweizer, E; Greene, E; Gironda, M; Pallan, P; Egli, M; Rozners, E

    2009-01-01

    DNA and RNA oligonucleotides having formacetal internucleoside linkages between uridine and adenosine nucleosides have been prepared and studied using UV thermal melting, osmotic stress, and X-ray crystallography. Formacetal modifications have remarkably different effects on double helical RNA and DNAethe formacetal stabilizes the RNA helix by +0.7 C but destabilizes the DNA helix by -1.6 C per modification. The apparently hydrophobic formacetal has little effect on hydration of RNA but decreases the hydration of DNA, which suggests that at least part of the difference in thermal stability may be related to differences in hydration. A crystal structure of modified DNA shows that two isolated formacetal linkages fit almost perfectly in an A-type helix (decamer). Taken together, the data suggest that RNA may tolerate nonionic backbone modifications better than DNA. Overall, formacetal appears to be an excellent mimic of phosphate linkage in RNA and an interesting modification for potential applications in fundamental studies and RNA-based gene control strategies, such as RNA interference.

  8. Theoretical method for full ab initio calculation of DNA/RNA-ligand interaction energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi H.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we further develop the molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (MFCC) scheme for quantum mechanical computation of DNA-ligand interaction energy. We study three oligonuclear acid interaction systems: dinucleotide dCG/water, trinucleotide dCGT/water, and a Watson-Crick paired DNA segment, dCGT/dGCA. Using the basic MFCC approach, the nucleotide chains are cut at each phosphate group and a pair of conjugate caps (concaps) are inserted. Five cap molecules have been tested among which the dimethyl phosphate anion is proposed to be the standard concap for application. For each system, one-dimensional interaction potential curves are computed using the MFCC method and the calculated interaction energies are found to be in excellent agreement with corresponding results obtained from the full system ab initio calculations. The current study extends the application of the MFCC method to ab initio calculations for DNA- or RNA-ligand interaction energies.

  9. HIV-1 tropism: a comparison between RNA and proviral DNA in routine clinical samples from Chilean patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV in Chile has a notification rate of 0.01%. Coreceptor antagonists are a family of antiretroviral drugs that are used with the prior knowledge of patients HIV-1 tropism. Viral RNA-based tropism detection requires a plasma viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, while proviral DNA-based detection can be performed regardless of plasma viral load. This test is useful in patients with low or undetectable viral loads and would benefit with a proper therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between HIV RNA and proviral genotypic DNA tropism tests. Findings Forty three Chilean patients were examined using population-based V3 sequencing, and a geno2pheno false-positive rate (FPR) cutoff values of 5, 5.75, 10 and 20%. With cutoff 5.75% a concordance of 88.4% in tropism prediction was found after a simultaneous comparison between HIV tropism assessment by RNA and DNA. In total, five discrepancies (11.6%) were found, 3 patients were RNA-R5/DNA-X4 and two were RNA-X4/DNA-R5. Proviral DNA enabled the prediction of tropism in patients with a low or undetectable viral load. For cutoff 5 and 5.75% genotypic testing using proviral DNA showed a similar sensitivity for X4 as RNA. We found that the highest sensitivity for detecting the X4 strain occurred with proviral DNA and cutoff of 10 and 20%. Viral loads were higher among X4 strain carriers than among R5 strain carriers (p < 0.05). Conclusions A high degree of concordance was found between tropism testing with RNA and testing with proviral DNA. Our results suggest that proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism testing is a useful option for patients with low or undetectable viral load who require a different therapy. PMID:24165156

  10. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  11. Ultrasensitive detection of DNA and RNA based on enzyme-free click chemical ligation chain reaction on dispersed gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daiki; Oishi, Motoi

    2014-10-28

    An ultrasensitive colorimetric DNA and RNA assay using a combination of enzyme-free click chemical ligation chain reaction (CCLCR) on dispersed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and a magnetic separation process has been developed. The click chemical ligation between an azide-containing probe DNA-modified GNP and a dibenzocyclooctyne-containing probe biotinyl DNA occurred through hybridization with target DNA (RNA) to form the biotinyl-ligated GNPs (ligated products). Eventually, both the biotinyl-ligated GNPs and target DNA (RNA) were amplified exponentially using thermal cycling. After separation of the biotinyl-ligated GNPs using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads, the change in intensity of the surface plasmon band at 525 nm in the supernatants was observed by UV/vis measurement and was also evident visually. The CCLCR assay provides ultrasensitive detection (50 zM: several copies) of target DNA that is comparable to PCR-based approaches. Note that target RNA could also be detected with similar sensitivity without the need for reverse transcription to the corresponding cDNA. The amplification efficiency of the CCLCR assay was as high as 82% due to the pseudohomogeneous reaction behavior of CCLCR on dispersed GNPs. In addition, the CCLCR assay was able to discriminate differences in single-base mismatches and to specifically detect target DNA and target RNA from the cell lysate.

  12. Transparent DNA/RNA Co-extraction Workflow Protocol Suitable for Inhibitor-Rich Environmental Samples That Focuses on Complete DNA Removal for Transcriptomic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Natalie Y N; Roco, Constance A; Frostegård, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Adequate comparisons of DNA and cDNA libraries from complex environments require methods for co-extraction of DNA and RNA due to the inherent heterogeneity of such samples, or risk bias caused by variations in lysis and extraction efficiencies. Still, there are few methods and kits allowing simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample, and the existing ones generally require optimization. The proprietary nature of kit components, however, makes modifications of individual steps in the manufacturer's recommended procedure difficult. Surprisingly, enzymatic treatments are often performed before purification procedures are complete, which we have identified here as a major problem when seeking efficient genomic DNA removal from RNA extracts. Here, we tested several DNA/RNA co-extraction commercial kits on inhibitor-rich soils, and compared them to a commonly used phenol-chloroform co-extraction method. Since none of the kits/methods co-extracted high-quality nucleic acid material, we optimized the extraction workflow by introducing small but important improvements. In particular, we illustrate the need for extensive purification prior to all enzymatic procedures, with special focus on the DNase digestion step in RNA extraction. These adjustments led to the removal of enzymatic inhibition in RNA extracts and made it possible to reduce genomic DNA to below detectable levels as determined by quantitative PCR. Notably, we confirmed that DNase digestion may not be uniform in replicate extraction reactions, thus the analysis of "representative samples" is insufficient. The modular nature of our workflow protocol allows optimization of individual steps. It also increases focus on additional purification procedures prior to enzymatic processes, in particular DNases, yielding genomic DNA-free RNA extracts suitable for metatranscriptomic analysis.

  13. Transparent DNA/RNA Co-extraction Workflow Protocol Suitable for Inhibitor-Rich Environmental Samples That Focuses on Complete DNA Removal for Transcriptomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Natalie Y. N.; Roco, Constance A.; Frostegård, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Adequate comparisons of DNA and cDNA libraries from complex environments require methods for co-extraction of DNA and RNA due to the inherent heterogeneity of such samples, or risk bias caused by variations in lysis and extraction efficiencies. Still, there are few methods and kits allowing simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample, and the existing ones generally require optimization. The proprietary nature of kit components, however, makes modifications of individual steps in the manufacturer’s recommended procedure difficult. Surprisingly, enzymatic treatments are often performed before purification procedures are complete, which we have identified here as a major problem when seeking efficient genomic DNA removal from RNA extracts. Here, we tested several DNA/RNA co-extraction commercial kits on inhibitor-rich soils, and compared them to a commonly used phenol-chloroform co-extraction method. Since none of the kits/methods co-extracted high-quality nucleic acid material, we optimized the extraction workflow by introducing small but important improvements. In particular, we illustrate the need for extensive purification prior to all enzymatic procedures, with special focus on the DNase digestion step in RNA extraction. These adjustments led to the removal of enzymatic inhibition in RNA extracts and made it possible to reduce genomic DNA to below detectable levels as determined by quantitative PCR. Notably, we confirmed that DNase digestion may not be uniform in replicate extraction reactions, thus the analysis of “representative samples” is insufficient. The modular nature of our workflow protocol allows optimization of individual steps. It also increases focus on additional purification procedures prior to enzymatic processes, in particular DNases, yielding genomic DNA-free RNA extracts suitable for metatranscriptomic analysis. PMID:27803690

  14. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Poolman, Bert

    2011-02-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The extremely high macromolecule crowding of prokaryotes is used to rationalize the reported lower diffusion coefficients as compared to eukaryotes, and we speculate on the nature of the barriers for diffusion observed for proteins (and mRNAs) in vivo. Building on in vitro experiments and modeling studies, we evaluate the size dependence of diffusion coefficients for macromolecules in vivo, in case of both water-soluble and integral membrane proteins. We comment on the possibilities of anomalous diffusion and provide examples where the macromolecule mobility may be limiting biological processes.

  15. DNA/RNA chimera templates improve the emission intensity and target the accessibility of silver nanocluster-based sensors for human microRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratik; Choi, Suk Won; Kim, Ho-jin; Cho, Seok Keun; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Yang, Seong Wook

    2015-05-21

    In recent years microRNAs (miRNAs) have been established as important biomarkers in a variety of diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging, Alzheimer's disease, asthma, autoimmune disease and liver diseases. As a consequence, a variety of monitoring methods for miRNAs have been developed, including a fast and simple method for miRNA detection by exploitation of the unique photoluminescence of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). To increase the versatility of the AgNC-based method, we have adopted DNA/RNA chimera templates for AgNC-based probes, allowing response from several human miRNAs which are hardly detectable with DNA-based probes. Here, we demonstrate in detail the power of DNA/RNA chimera/AgNC probes in detecting two human miRNAs, let-7a and miR-200c. The DNA/RNA chimera-based probes are highly efficient to determine the level of miRNAs in several human cell lines.

  16. DNA and RNA polymerase activity in a Moniliophthora perniciosa mitochondrial plasmid and self-defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Andrade, B S; Villela-Dias, C; Gomes, D S; Micheli, F; Góes-Neto, A

    2013-06-13

    Moniliophthora perniciosa (Stahel) Aime and Phillips-Mora is a hemibiotrophic basidiomycete (Agaricales, Tricholomataceae) that causes witches' broom disease in cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). This pathogen carries a stable integrated invertron-type linear plasmid in its mitochondrial genome that encodes viral-like DNA and RNA polymerases related to fungal senescence and longevity. After culturing the fungus and obtaining its various stages of development in triplicate, we carried out total RNA extraction and subsequent complementary DNA synthesis. To analyze DNA and RNA polymerase expression levels, we performed real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for various fungal phases of development. Our results showed that DNA and RNA polymerase gene expression in the primordium phase of M. perniciosa is related to a potential defense mechanism against T. cacao oxidative attack.

  17. Purification and Subunit Structure of DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase III from Wheat Germ 1

    PubMed Central

    Jendrisak, Jerry

    1981-01-01

    A rapid and simple, large-scale method for the purification of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III (EC 2.7.7.6) from wheat germ is presented. The method involves enzyme extraction at low ionic strength, polyethyleneimine fractionation, (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, DEAE-cellulose, and heparin agarose. Milligram quantities of highly purified enzyme can be obtained from kilogram quantities of starting material in 2 to 3 days. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that RNA polymerase III contains 14 subunits with molecular weights of: 150,000; 130,000; 94,000; 55,000; 38,000; 30,000; 28,000; 25,000; 24,500; 20,500; 20,000; 19,500; 17,800; and 17,000. Subunit structure comparison of wheat germ RNA polymerases I, II, and III indicates that all three enzymes may contain common subunits with molecular weights 20,000, 17,800, and 17,000. In addition, RNA polymerases II and III may contain a common subunit with a molecular weight of 25,000, and RNA polymerases I and III may contain a common subunit with a molecular weight of 38,000. Images PMID:16661690

  18. Ionic strength-dependent persistence lengths of single-stranded RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huimin; Meisburger, Steve P; Pabit, Suzette A; Sutton, Julie L; Webb, Watt W; Pollack, Lois

    2012-01-17

    Dynamic RNA molecules carry out essential processes in the cell including translation and splicing. Base-pair interactions stabilize RNA into relatively rigid structures, while flexible non-base-paired regions allow RNA to undergo conformational changes required for function. To advance our understanding of RNA folding and dynamics it is critical to know the flexibility of these un-base-paired regions and how it depends on counterions. Yet, information about nucleic acid polymer properties is mainly derived from studies of ssDNA. Here we measure the persistence lengths (l(p)) of ssRNA. We observe valence and ionic strength-dependent differences in l(p) in a direct comparison between 40-mers of deoxythymidylate (dT(40)) and uridylate (rU(40)) measured using the powerful combination of SAXS and smFRET. We also show that nucleic acid flexibility is influenced by local environment (an adjoining double helix). Our results illustrate the complex interplay between conformation and ion environment that modulates nucleic acid function in vivo.

  19. Ionic strength-dependent persistence lengths of single-stranded RNA and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huimin; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Sutton, Julie L.; Webb, Watt W.; Pollack, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic RNA molecules carry out essential processes in the cell including translation and splicing. Base-pair interactions stabilize RNA into relatively rigid structures, while flexible non-base-paired regions allow RNA to undergo conformational changes required for function. To advance our understanding of RNA folding and dynamics it is critical to know the flexibility of these un-base-paired regions and how it depends on counterions. Yet, information about nucleic acid polymer properties is mainly derived from studies of ssDNA. Here we measure the persistence lengths (lp) of ssRNA. We observe valence and ionic strength-dependent differences in lp in a direct comparison between 40-mers of deoxythymidylate (dT40) and uridylate (rU40) measured using the powerful combination of SAXS and smFRET. We also show that nucleic acid flexibility is influenced by local environment (an adjoining double helix). Our results illustrate the complex interplay between conformation and ion environment that modulates nucleic acid function in vivo. PMID:22203973

  20. An unnatural hydrophobic base pair system: site-specific incorporation of nucleotide analogs into DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Rie; Sato, Akira; Harada, Yoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-09-01

    Methods for the site-specific incorporation of extra components into nucleic acids can be powerful tools for creating DNA and RNA molecules with increased functionality. We present an unnatural base pair system in which DNA containing an unnatural base pair can be amplified and function as a template for the site-specific incorporation of base analog substrates into RNA via transcription. The unnatural base pair is formed by specific hydrophobic shape complementation between the bases, but lacks hydrogen bonding interactions. In replication, this unnatural base pair exhibits high selectivity in combination with the usual triphosphates and modified triphosphates, gamma-amidotriphosphates, as substrates of 3' to 5' exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerases, allowing PCR amplification. In transcription, the unnatural base pair complementarity mediates the incorporation of these base substrates and their analogs, such as a biotinylated substrate, into RNA by T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP). With this system, functional components can be site-specifically incorporated into a large RNA molecule.

  1. Reverse transcription of turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA primed with calf-thymus DNA hydrolysate: characterization of the purified cDNA product.

    PubMed Central

    Kummert, J; Kettmann, R

    1978-01-01

    Complementary DNA was transcribed from turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA, using the method of Taylor et al. (1). The purified cDNA thus obtained sedimented between 2 and 4 S and was a mostly uniform transcript of template RNA. It hybridized with a sharp transition to homologous TYMV-RNA (Crt 1/2 = 2.7 x 10(-2)), but showed a low level of hybridization (less than 5%) to the RNAs of two other tymoviruses, namely Andean potato latent virus and eggplant mosaic virus. PMID:82938

  2. DNA sequencing analysis of ITS and 28S rRNA of Poria cocos.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Mikage, Masayuki

    2007-08-01

    We determined the DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS 1 and 2), the 5.8S rRNA gene and most of the 28S rRNA gene of Poria cocos for the first time, and conducted analysis of 20 samples including cultured mycelias and crude drug materials obtained from various localities and markets. Direct sequencing of the ITS 1 and 2 regions of the samples, except for four wild samples, showed that they had identical DNA sequences for ITS 1 and 2 with nucleotide lengths of 997 bps and 460 bps, respectively. By cloning, the four wild samples were found to have combined sequences of common ITS sequences with 1 or 2-base-pair insertions. Altogether both ITS 1 and 2 sequences were substantially longer than those of other fungal crude drugs such as Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus. Thus, Poria cocos could be distinguished from these crude drugs and fakes by comparing the nucleotide length of PCR products of ITS 1 and 2. Contrary to the basic homogeneity in ITS 1 and 2, three types (Group 1, 2, 3) of the 28S rRNA gene with distinctive differences in length and sequence were found. Furthermore, Group 1 could be divided into three subgroups depending on differences at nucleotide position 690. Products with different types of 28S rRNA gene were found in crude drugs from Yunnan and Anhui Provinces as well as the Korean Peninsula, suggesting that the locality of the crude drugs does not guarantee genetic uniformity. The result of DNA typing of Poria cocos may help discrimination of the quality of the crude drug by genotype.

  3. Exploring the recovery and detection of messenger RNA and DNA from enhanced fingermarks in blood.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Gittos, M; Harbison, S A; Fleming, R; Wivell, R

    2014-05-01

    Often in the examination of bloodstained fingermarks discussion occurs around whether to prioritise the fingerprint evidence or focus on the biological evidence. Collecting a sample for genetic profiling may result in the loss of ridge detail that could have been used for fingerprint comparison. Fingermark enhancement and recovery methods along with sample collection methods could also compromise downstream genetic analysis. Previous forensic casework has highlighted circumstances where, after enhancement had been performed, it would have been extremely valuable to both identify the body fluid and generate a DNA profile from the same sample. We enhanced depletion series of fingermarks made in blood, using single treatments consisting of aqueous amido black, methanol-based amido black, acid yellow and leucocrystal violet, and exposure to long wave UV light. We then extracted the DNA and RNA for profiling, to assess the recovery and detection of genetic material from the enhanced fingermarks. We have shown that genetic profiling of bloodstained fingermarks can be successful after chemical enhancement; however it may still be necessary to prioritise evidence types in certain circumstances. From our results it appears that even with visible bloodstained fingermarks, leucocrystal violet can reduce the effectiveness of subsequent messenger RNA profiling. Aqueous amido black and acid yellow also have adverse effects on messenger RNA profiling of depleted fingermarks with low levels of cellular material. These results help with forensic decision-making by expanding knowledge of the extent of the detrimental effects of blood-enhancement reagents on both DNA profiling and body fluid identification using messenger RNA profiling.

  4. RNA and DNA binding of inert oligonuclear ruthenium(II) complexes in live eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gorle, Anil K; Ainsworth, Tracy D; Heimann, Kirsten; Woodward, Clifford E; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2015-02-28

    Confocal microscopy was used to study the intracellular localisation of a series of inert polypyridylruthenium(II) complexes with three eukaryotic cells lines - baby hamster kidney (BHK), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver carcinoma (Hep-G2). Co-staining experiments with the DNA-selective dye DAPI demonstrated that the di-, tri- and tetra-nuclear polypyridylruthenium(II) complexes that are linked by the bis[4(4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-1,12-dodecane bridging ligand ("bb12") showed a high degree of selectivity for the nucleus of the eukaryotic cells. Additional co-localisation experiments with the general nucleic acid stain SYTO 9 indicated that the ruthenium complexes showed a considerable preference for the RNA-rich nucleolus, rather than chromosomal DNA. No significant differences were observed in the intracellular localisation between the ΔΔ and ΛΛ enantiomers of the dinuclear complex. Cytotoxicity assays carried out over 72 hours indicated that the ruthenium complexes, particularly the tri- and tetra-nuclear species, were significantly toxic to the eukaryotic cells. However, when the activity of the least cytotoxic compound (the ΔΔ enantiomer of the dinuclear species) was determined over a 24 hour period, the results indicated that the ruthenium complex was approximately a 100-fold less toxic to liver and kidney cells than to Gram positive bacteria. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy was used to examine the effect of the ΔΔ and ΛΛ enantiomers of the dinuclear complex on the solution conformations of RNA and DNA. The CD experiments indicated that the RNA maintained the A-type conformation, and the DNA the B-type structure, upon binding by the ruthenium complexes.

  5. Design and Construction of Shrimp Antiviral DNA Vaccines Expressing Long and Short Hairpins for Protection by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna; Pathakota, Gireesh-Babu; Annam, Pavan-Kumar

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines present the aquaculture industry with an effective and economically viable method of controlling viral pathogens that drastically affect productivity. Since specific immune response is rudimentary in invertebrates, the presence of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in shrimps provides a promising new approach to vaccination. Plasmid DNA vaccines that express short or long double stranded RNA in vivo have shown protection against viral diseases. The design, construction and considerations for preparing such vaccines are discussed.

  6. Hoogsteen-paired homopurine [RP-PS]-DNA and homopyrimidine RNA strands form a thermally stable parallel duplex.

    PubMed

    Guga, Piotr; Janicka, Magdalena; Maciaszek, Anna; Rebowska, Beata; Nowak, Genowefa

    2007-11-15

    Homopurine deoxyribonucleoside phosphorothioates possessing all internucleotide linkages of R(P) configuration form a duplex with an RNA or 2'-OMe-RNA strand with Hoogsteen complementarity. The duplexes formed with RNA templates are thermally stable at pH 5.3, while those formed with a 2'-OMe-RNA are stable at neutrality. Melting temperature and fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that the strands are parallel. Remarkably, these duplexes are thermally more stable than parallel Hoogsteen duplexes and antiparallel Watson-Crick duplexes formed by unmodified homopurine DNA molecules of the same sequence with corresponding RNA templates.

  7. Pisum sativum p68 DEAD-box protein is ATP-dependent RNA helicase and unique bipolar DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tarique, Mohammed; Banu, Mst Sufara Akhter; Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-08-01

    DEAD-box helicases play essential role in DNA and RNA metabolism such as replication, repair, recombination, transcription, translation, ribosome biogenesis and splicing which regulate plant growth and development. The presence of helicases in the stress-induced ORFs identified by cDNA microarray indicates that helicases might be playing an important role in stabilizing growth in plants under stress. p68 DEAD-box helicase has been identified and characterized from animal systems but the properties and functions of plant p68 are poorly understood. In this study, the identification, purification and characterization of recombinant p68 from Pisum sativum (Psp68) is presented. Psp68 possesses all the characteristic motifs like DEAD-box ATP-binding and helicase C terminal motifs and is structurally similar to human p68 homologue. Psp68 exhibits ATPase activity in the presence of both DNA and RNA and it binds to DNA as well as RNA. It contains the characteristic RNA helicase activity. Interestingly Psp68 also shows the unique DNA helicase activity, which is bipolar in nature (unwinds DNA in both the 5'-3' and 3'-5' directions). The Km values of Psp68 for ATPase are 0.5126 and 0.9142 mM in the presence of DNA and RNA, respectively. The Km values of Psp68 are 1.6129 and 1.14 nM for DNA helicase and RNA helicase, respectively. The unique properties of Psp68 suggest that it could be a multifunctional protein involved in different aspect of DNA and RNA metabolism. This discovery should make an important contribution to better understanding of nucleic acids metabolism plants.

  8. The Relative Reactivity of Deoxyribose and Ribose: Did DNA Come Before RNA?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    If it is assumed that there was a precursor to the ribose-phosphate backbone of RNA in the preRNA world (such as peptide nucleic acid), then the entry of various sugars into the genetic material may be related to the stability and non-enzymatic reactivity of the aldose. The rate of decomposition of 2-deoxyribose has been determined to be 1/3 that of ribose. In addition we have measured the amount of free aldehyde by H-1 and C-13 NMR and find that it has approximately 0.15% free aldehyde compared to 0.05% for ribose at 25 C. This suggests that deoxyribose would be significantly more reactive with early bases in the absence of enzymes. This is confirmed by urazole and deoxyribose reacting to form the deoxynucleoside 45 times faster as 25 C than urazole reacts with ribose to form the Ribonucleoside. Urazole is a potential precursor of uracil and is a plausible prebiotic compound which reacts with aldoses to form nucleosides. Thus the non-enzymatic reactivity of deoxyribose would favor its early use over ribose until enzymes could change the relative reactivities. Most of the reasons that RNA is presumed to have come before DNA are extrapolations back from contemporary metabolism (e.g. the abundance of ribose based coenzymes, the biosynthesis of histidine, deoxyribonucleotides are synthesized from ribonucleotides, etc.). It is very difficult to reconstruct biochemical pathways much before the last common ancestor, and it is even more difficult to do more than guess at the biochemistry of very early self-replicating systems. Thus we believe that these reasons are not compelling and that the non-enzymatic chemistry may be more important than enzymatic pathways for constructing the earliest of biochemical pathways. While the RNA world has been discussed at great length, there has not been an exploration of the transition out of the RNA world. We have constructed many possible schemes of genetic takeover events from preRNA to modern DNA, RNA, protein system which could

  9. De Novo Reconstruction of Consensus Master Genomes of Plant RNA and DNA Viruses from siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Jonathan; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Malpica-López, Nachelli; Martin, Robert R.; Kasschau, Kristin; Dolja, Valerian V.; Otten, Patricia; Farinelli, Laurent; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2014-01-01

    Virus-infected plants accumulate abundant, 21–24 nucleotide viral siRNAs which are generated by the evolutionary conserved RNA interference (RNAi) machinery that regulates gene expression and defends against invasive nucleic acids. Here we show that, similar to RNA viruses, the entire genome sequences of DNA viruses are densely covered with siRNAs in both sense and antisense orientations. This implies pervasive transcription of both coding and non-coding viral DNA in the nucleus, which generates double-stranded RNA precursors of viral siRNAs. Consistent with our finding and hypothesis, we demonstrate that the complete genomes of DNA viruses from Caulimoviridae and Geminiviridae families can be reconstructed by deep sequencing and de novo assembly of viral siRNAs using bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, we prove that this ‘siRNA omics’ approach can be used for reliable identification of the consensus master genome and its microvariants in viral quasispecies. Finally, we utilized this approach to reconstruct an emerging DNA virus and two viroids associated with economically-important red blotch disease of grapevine, and to rapidly generate a biologically-active clone representing the wild type master genome of Oilseed rape mosaic virus. Our findings show that deep siRNA sequencing allows for de novo reconstruction of any DNA or RNA virus genome and its microvariants, making it suitable for universal characterization of evolving viral quasispecies as well as for studying the mechanisms of siRNA biogenesis and RNAi-based antiviral defense. PMID:24523907

  10. Mechanism of CRISPR-RNA guided recognition of DNA targets in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Paul B G; Jackson, Ryan N; Carter, Joshua; Golden, Sarah M; Bailey, Scott; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-09-30

    In bacteria and archaea, short fragments of foreign DNA are integrated into Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) loci, providing a molecular memory of previous encounters with foreign genetic elements. In Escherichia coli, short CRISPR-derived RNAs are incorporated into a multi-subunit surveillance complex called Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense). Recent structures of Cascade capture snapshots of this seahorse-shaped RNA-guided surveillance complex before and after binding to a DNA target. Here we determine a 3.2 Å x-ray crystal structure of Cascade in a new crystal form that provides insight into the mechanism of double-stranded DNA binding. Molecular dynamic simulations performed using available structures reveal functional roles for residues in the tail, backbone and belly subunits of Cascade that are critical for binding double-stranded DNA. Structural comparisons are used to make functional predictions and these predictions are tested in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, the results in this study reveal underlying mechanisms involved in target-induced conformational changes and highlight residues important in DNA binding and protospacer adjacent motif recognition.

  11. RNA polymerase II senses obstruction in the DNA minor groove via a conserved sensor motif

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Gotte, Deanna; Yang, Fei; Hare, Alissa A.; Welch, Timothy R.; Li, Benjamin C.; Shin, Ji Hyun; Chong, Jenny; Strathern, Jeffrey N.; Dervan, Peter B.; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) encounters numerous barriers during transcription elongation, including DNA strand breaks, DNA lesions, and nucleosomes. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides bind to the minor groove of DNA with programmable sequence specificity and high affinity. Previous studies suggest that Py-Im polyamides can prevent transcription factor binding, as well as interfere with pol II transcription elongation. However, the mechanism of pol II inhibition by Py-Im polyamides is unclear. Here we investigate the mechanism of how these minor-groove binders affect pol II transcription elongation. In the presence of site-specifically bound Py-Im polyamides, we find that the pol II elongation complex becomes arrested immediately upstream of the targeted DNA sequence, and is not rescued by transcription factor IIS, which is in contrast to pol II blockage by a nucleosome barrier. Further analysis reveals that two conserved pol II residues in the Switch 1 region contribute to pol II stalling. Our study suggests this motif in pol II can sense the structural changes of the DNA minor groove and can be considered a “minor groove sensor.” Prolonged interference of transcription elongation by sequence-specific minor groove binders may present opportunities to target transcription addiction for cancer therapy. PMID:27791148

  12. Import of desired nucleic acid sequences using addressing motif of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA for fluorescent in vivo hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Alán, Lukáš; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2014-04-01

    Based on the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mitochondria, we have constructed an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mt-mRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. Thus DNA oligonucleotides were constructed, containing the 5'-flanked T7 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro transcription and fluorescent labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 or 647 dye, we obtained the fluorescent "L-ND5 probe" containing MAM and exemplar cargo, i.e., annealing sequence to a short portion of ND5 mRNA and to the light-strand mtDNA complementary to the heavy strand nd5 mt gene (5'-end 21 base pair sequence). For mitochondrial in vivo fluorescent hybridization, HepG2 cells were treated with dequalinium micelles, containing the fluorescent probes, bringing the probes proximally to the mitochondrial outer membrane and to the natural import system. A verification of import into the mitochondrial matrix of cultured HepG2 cells was provided by confocal microscopy colocalizations. Transfections using lipofectamine or probes without 5S-rRNA addressing MAM sequence or with MAM only were ineffective. Alternatively, the same DNA oligonucleotides with 5'-CACC overhang (substituting T7 promoter) were transcribed from the tetracycline-inducible pENTRH1/TO vector in human embryonic kidney T-REx®-293 cells, while mitochondrial matrix localization after import of the resulting unlabeled RNA was detected by PCR. The MAM-containing probe was then enriched by three-order of magnitude over the natural ND5 mRNA in the mitochondrial matrix. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-principle for mitochondrial in vivo hybridization and mitochondrial nucleic acid import.

  13. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA for RT-PCR from starchy rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Belefant-Miller, Helen; Ledbetter, Cindy; Bennett, Selester

    2008-03-01

    The extraction of RNA from a starchy plant material, such as many common food grains, is difficult, and especially so from the mature endosperm of rice. Most commercial RNA kits are not suitable for starchy materials. Traditional RNA extraction procedures, in addition to being laborious and time consuming, leave hazardous organic wastes that result in expensive disposal costs. Interestingly, the numerous commercial DNA isolation kits now available often include directions for eliminating co-isolated RNA. This indicated an approach to obtain the generally unwanted RNA by-product by treating the total extraction product to intentionally retain RNA. A method was developed by which a two-step DNase procedure was applied to the product of the Cartagen Food DNA extraction kit that eliminated the DNA but left the co-extracted RNA. This modified procedure was compared with several other commercial and standard methods that are promoted as being able to work under high polysaccharide conditions. Successful extraction was determined by the production and amplification of cDNA by RT-PCR of actin. Extraction was successful from milled rice, as well as from cornmeal and wheat flour. The modification provides an RNA extraction method that is quick, easy, and inexpensive, and also eliminates the production of hazardous wastes.

  14. Major degradable polycations as carriers for DNA and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Park, Tae-Eun; Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Firdous, Jannatul; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kang, Sang-Kee; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-10

    Non-viral gene delivery systems are one of the most potential alternatives to viral vectors because of their less immunogenicity, less toxicity and easy productivity in spite of their low capacity of gene transfection using DNA or silencing using siRNA compared to that of viral vectors. Among non-viral systems, the polycationic derivatives are the most popular gene carriers since they can effectively condense nucleic acids to transfer into the cells, especially the polyethylenimine (PEI) which has been used as a golden standard polymer owing to its high buffering ability for endosomal escape of gene to be expressed. However, PEI has severe problems for its toxicity due to the high positive charge density and non-degradability although the toxicity of PEI depends on its molecular weight (MW) and structure. Therefore, a considerable attention has been paid on synthesis of degradable PEI derivatives using low MW one because low MW PEI is much less toxic than high MW PEI. Other degradable polycationic gene carriers such as polyamidoamines (PAA) and cyclodextrin (CD)-based polycations are also in a significant interest because of their high transfection efficiency with low toxicity. This review in detail explains the recent developments on these three major degradable polycations as promising carriers for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA).

  15. Degradable polymer-coated gold nanoparticles for co-delivery of DNA and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Corey J; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Green, Jordan J

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have utility for in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo imaging applications as well as for serving as a scaffold for therapeutic delivery and theranostic applications. Starting with gold nanoparticles as a core, layer-by-layer degradable polymer coatings enable the simultaneous co-delivery of DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA). To engineer release kinetics, polymers which degrade through two different mechanisms can be utilized to construct hybrid inorganic/polymeric particles. During fabrication of the nanoparticles, the zeta potential reverses upon the addition of each oppositely charged polyelectrolyte layer and the final nanoparticle size reaches approximately 200nm in diameter. When the hybrid gold/polymer/nucleic acid nanoparticles are added to human primary brain cancer cells in vitro, they are internalizable by cells and reach the cytoplasm and nucleus as visualized by transmission electron microscopy and observed through exogenous gene expression. This nanoparticle delivery leads to both exogenous DNA expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown, with the knockdown efficacy superior to that of Lipofectamine® 2000, a commercially available transfection reagent. These gold/polymer/nucleic acid hybrid nanoparticles are an enabling theranostic platform technology capable of delivering combinations of genetic therapies to human cells.

  16. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. PMID:27369379

  17. Protozoan ALKBH8 oxygenases display both DNA repair and tRNA modification activities.

    PubMed

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn; Davydova, Erna; Puścian, Alicja; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Krokan, Hans E; Klungland, Arne; Tudek, Barbara; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø

    2014-01-01

    The ALKBH family of Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenases comprises enzymes that display sequence homology to AlkB from E. coli, a DNA repair enzyme that uses an oxidative mechanism to dealkylate methyl and etheno adducts on the nucleobases. Humans have nine different ALKBH proteins, ALKBH1-8 and FTO. Mammalian and plant ALKBH8 are tRNA hydroxylases targeting 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-modified uridine (mcm5U) at the wobble position of tRNAGly(UCC). In contrast, the genomes of some bacteria encode a protein with strong sequence homology to ALKBH8, and robust DNA repair activity was previously demonstrated for one such protein. To further explore this apparent functional duality of the ALKBH8 proteins, we have here enzymatically characterized a panel of such proteins, originating from bacteria, protozoa and mimivirus. All the enzymes showed DNA repair activity in vitro, but, interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function different from that of their eukaryotic counterparts. The present study provides new insights on the function and evolution of the ALKBH8 family of proteins.

  18. Analysis of dsDNA and RNA viromes in methanogenic digesters reveals novel viral genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Marynowska, Martyna; Goux, Xavier; Lentzen, Esther; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Although viruses are not the key players of the anaerobic digestion process, they may affect the dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations involved in biogas production. Until now viruses have received very little attention in this specific habitat; therefore, as a first step towards their characterization, we optimized a virus filtration protocol from anaerobic sludge. Afterwards, to assess dsDNA and RNA viral diversity in sludge samples from nine different reactors fed either with waste water, agricultural residues or solid municipal waste plus agro-food residues, we performed metagenomic analyses. As a result we showed that, while the dsDNA viromes (21 assigned families in total) were dominated by dsDNA phages of the order Caudovirales, RNA viruses (14 assigned families in total) were less diverse and were for the main part plant-infecting viruses. Interestingly, less than 2% of annotated contigs were assigned as putative human and animal pathogens. Our study greatly extends the existing view of viral genetic diversity in methanogenic reactors and shows that these viral assemblages are distinct not only among the reactor types but also from nearly 30 other environments already studied, including the human gut, fermented food, deep sea sediments and other aquatic habitats.

  19. DNA structural variation affects complex formation and promoter melting in ribosomal RNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Marilley, M; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Laybourn, P J; Paule, M R

    2002-08-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomal RNA promoters exhibit an unusual conservation of non-canonical DNA structure (curvature, twist angle and duplex stability) despite a lack of primary sequence conservation. This raises the possibility that rRNA transcription factors might utilize structural anomalies in their sequence recognition process. We have analyzed in detail the interaction of the polymerase I transcription factor TIF-IB from Acanthmoeba castellanii with the CORE promoter. TIF-IB interacts primarily with the minor groove of the promoter. By correlating the effects on transcription and on DNA structure of promoter point mutations, we show that the TIF-IB interaction is strongly inhibited by increases in minor groove width. This suggests that a particular DNA structure is required for interaction with the transcription factor. In addition, TIF-IB induces a small bend in the promoter upon binding. Modeling of this bend reveals that it requires an additional narrowing of the minor groove, which would favor binding to mutants with narrower grooves. We also discuss how this narrowing would induce a small destabilization of the helix upstream of the transcription start site. Telestability predicts this would result in destabilization of the sequence that melts during initiation, suggesting that TIF-IB may have a role in stimulating melting.

  20. Attacking HIV-1 RNA versus DNA by sequence-specific approaches: RNAi versus CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be effectively controlled by potent antiviral drugs, but this never results in a cure. The patient should therefore take these drugs for the rest of his/her life, which can cause drug-resistance and adverse effects. Therefore, more durable therapeutic strategies should be considered, such as a stable gene therapy to protect the target T cells against HIV-1 infection. The development of potent therapeutic regimens based on the RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) mechanisms will be described, which can be delivered by lentiviral vectors. These mechanisms attack different forms of the viral genome, the RNA and DNA, respectively, but both mechanisms act in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Early RNAi experiments demonstrated profound virus inhibition, but also indicated that viral escape is possible. Such therapy failure can be prevented by the design of a combinatorial RNAi attack on the virus and this gene therapy is currently being tested in a preclinical humanized mouse model. Recent CRISPR-Cas studies also document robust virus inhibition, but suggest a novel viral escape route that is induced by the cellular nonhomologous end joining DNA repair pathway, which is activated by CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA breaks. We will compare these two approaches for durable HIV-1 suppression and discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages. The potential for future clinical applications will be described.

  1. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1215764109], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  2. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of RNA and DNA C tracts

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Boiko; Larson, Matthew H.; Kohler, Bern

    2008-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the RNA homopolymer of cytosine and of the 18-mer (dC)18 were studied by steady-state and time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopy. At pH 6.8, excitation of poly(rC) by a femtosecond UV pump pulse produces excited states that decay up to one order of magnitude more slowly than the excited states formed in the mononucleotide cytidine 5’-monophosphate under the same conditions. Even slower relaxation is observed for the hemiprotonated, self-associated form of poly(rC), which is stable at acidic pH. Transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence signals for (dC)18 at pH 6.8 are similar to ones observed for poly(rC) near pH 4, indicating that hemiprotonated structures are found in DNA C tracts at neutral pH. In both systems, there is evidence for two kinds of emitting states with lifetimes of ~100 ps and slightly more than 1 ns. The former states are responsible for the bulk of emission from the hemiprotonated structures. Evidence suggests that slow electronic relaxation in these self-complexes is the result of vertical base stacking. The similar signals from RNA and DNA C tracts suggest a common base-stacked structure, which may be identical with that of i-motif DNA. PMID:18574520

  3. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012)], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  4. Characterization of Damage to Bacteria and Bio-macromolecules Caused by (V)UV Radiation and Particles Generated by a Microscale Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Narberhaus, Franz; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E.

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets effectively inactivate bacteria on ­surfaces including infected tissues. This is due to the combined effects of (V)UV radiation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ions, and high electric fields. A well-characterized microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated with He/O2 gas mixture has been modified so that (V)UV radiation and heavy reactive particles (mainly O3 molecules and O atoms) emitted from the plasma source can be separated effectively. The separation is achieved by an additional lateral He flow, which diverts the heavy particles from the jet axis. The new jet geometry is called X-Jet. Separation of different plasma components allows studying their effects on living cells and bio-macromolecules separately. First, the effectiveness of the separation of different plasma components was demonstrated by treatment of monolayers of vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. To characterize effects on nucleic acids, dried plasmid DNA and total cellular RNA were treated with the separated plasma components. Dried bovine serum albumin was used to study etching effects of (V)UV radiation and heavy particles on proteins. We found that heavy particles emitted from the X-Jet kill vegetative cells more effectively than the (V)UV radiation from this type of plasma source. All bio-macromolecules investigated, DNA, RNA, and proteins, are affected by plasma treatment. DNA exposed to the (V)UV-channel of the jet seems to be prone to thymine dimer formation not only in vitro but also in vivo as indicated by induction of the photolyase in Escherichia coli, while DNA strand breaks occur under both jet channels. Heavy particles seem more effective in degrading RNA and in etching protein in vitro.

  5. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  6. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human saliva and semen stains--results of a third collaborative EDNAP exercise.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J; Banemann, R; Berti, A; Borges, E; Carracedo, A; Carvalho, M; Courts, C; De Cock, G; Dötsch, M; Flynn, S; Gomes, I; Hollard, C; Hjort, B; Hoff-Olsen, P; Hríbiková, K; Lindenbergh, A; Ludes, B; Maroñas, O; McCallum, N; Moore, D; Morling, N; Niederstätter, H; Noel, F; Parson, W; Popielarz, C; Rapone, C; Roeder, A D; Ruiz, Y; Sauer, E; Schneider, P M; Sijen, T; Court, D Syndercombe; Sviežená, B; Turanská, M; Vidaki, A; Zatkalíková, L; Ballantyne, J

    2013-02-01

    A third collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Twenty saliva and semen stains, four dilution series (10-0.01 μl saliva, 5-0.01 μl semen) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework samples of human or non-human origin were analyzed by 20 participating laboratories using an RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction method. Two novel mRNA multiplexes were used: a saliva triplex (HTN3, STATH and MUC7) and a semen pentaplex (PRM1, PRM2, PSA, SEMG1 and TGM4). The laboratories used different chemistries and instrumentation and a majority (16/20) were able to successfully isolate and detect mRNA in dried stains. The simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA from individual stains not only permitted a confirmation of the presence of saliva/semen (i.e. tissue/fluid source of origin), but allowed an STR profile of the stain donor to be obtained as well. The method proved to be reproducible and sensitive, with as little as 0.05 μl saliva or semen, using different analysis strategies. Additionally, we demonstrated the ability to positively identify the presence of saliva and semen, as well as obtain high quality DNA profiles, from old and compromised casework samples. The results of this collaborative exercise involving an RNA/DNA co-extraction strategy support the potential use of an mRNA based system for the identification of saliva and semen in forensic casework that is compatible with current DNA analysis methodologies.

  7. Suppression of aflatoxin B1-induced lipid abnormalities and macromolecule-adduct formation by L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Sachan, D S; Yatim, A M

    1992-01-01

    The fatty liver and hypolipidemia caused by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed Purina Rat Chow with or without L-carnitine supplement for 6 weeks. In Experiment 1, the rats (n = 20) were divided into four groups, i.e., nonsupplemented control (NSC), nonsupplemented AFB1 (NSA), carnitine supplemented control (CSC), and carnitine supplemented AFB1 (CSA). The NSA and CSA groups were given an oral dose of [3H]AFB1 (1 mg/kg) 6 hr before kill. In Experiment 2 (n = 10) there were only NSA and CSA groups and they were killed 24 hr post-AFB1 administration. Hepatic and plasma concentrations of total lipid, triglycerides, AFB1-macromolecules adducts and urinary excretion of AFB1 were determined. Carnitine supplementation ameliorated AFB1-induced hepatic steatosis and hypolipidemia. Supplementary carnitine reduced covalent binding of AFB1 to hepatic DNA, RNA, and protein. The carnitine effect was more pronounced after 24 hr than after 6 hr of AFB1 treatment. We conclude that supplementary carnitine suppressed AFB1-induced fatty liver and AFB1-macromolecule adduct formation in the rat.

  8. Metal chelate affinity precipitation of RNA and purification of plasmid DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, Sindhu; Murphy, Jason; Galaev, Igor; Kumar, Ashok; Fox, George E.; Mattiasson, Bo; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    The affinity of metal chelates for amino acids, such as histidine, is widely used in purifying proteins, most notably through six-histidine 'tails'. We have found that metal affinity interactions can also be applied to separation of single-stranded nucleic acids through interactions involving exposed purines. Here we describe a metal affinity precipitation method to resolve RNA from linear and plasmid DNA. A copper-charged copolymer of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) and vinyl imidazole (VI) is used to purify plasmid from an alkaline lysate of E. coli. The NIPAM units confer reversible solubility on the copolymer while the imidazole chelates metal ions in a manner accessible to interaction with soluble ligands. RNA was separated from the plasmid by precipitation along with the polymer in the presence of 800 mM NaCl. Bound RNA could be recovered by elution with imidazole and separated from copolymer by a second precipitation step. RNA binding showed a strong dependence on temperature and on the type of buffer used.

  9. RNA-Directed DNA Methylation: The Evolution of a Complex Epigenetic Pathway in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Marjori A; Kanno, Tatsuo; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2015-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an epigenetic process in plants that involves both short and long noncoding RNAs. The generation of these RNAs and the induction of RdDM rely on complex transcriptional machineries comprising two plant-specific, RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-related RNA polymerases known as Pol IV and Pol V, as well as a host of auxiliary factors that include both novel and refashioned proteins. We present current views on the mechanism of RdDM with a focus on evolutionary innovations that occurred during the transition from a Pol II transcriptional pathway, which produces mRNA precursors and numerous noncoding RNAs, to the Pol IV and Pol V pathways, which are specialized for RdDM and gene silencing. We describe recently recognized deviations from the canonical RdDM pathway, discuss unresolved issues, and speculate on the biological significance of RdDM for flowering plants, which have a highly developed Pol V pathway.

  10. Discovery of widespread GTP-binding motifs in genomic DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Edward A; Liu, David R

    2013-04-18

    Biological RNAs that bind small molecules have been implicated in a variety of regulatory and catalytic processes. Inspired by these examples, we used in vitro selection to search a pool of genome-encoded RNA fragments for naturally occurring GTP aptamers. Several aptamer classes were identified, including one (the "G motif") with a G-quadruplex structure. Further analysis revealed that most RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes bind GTP. The G motif is abundant in eukaryotes, and the human genome contains ~75,000 examples with dissociation constants comparable to the GTP concentration of a eukaryotic cell (~300 μM). G-quadruplexes play roles in diverse cellular processes, and our findings raise the possibility that GTP may play a role in the function of these elements. Consistent with this possibility, the sequence requirements of several classes of regulatory G-quadruplexes parallel those of GTP binding.

  11. The dynamic assembly of distinct RNA polymerase I complexes modulates rDNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Torreira, Eva; Louro, Jaime Alegrio; Pazos, Irene; González-Polo, Noelia; Gil-Carton, David; Duran, Ana Garcia; Tosi, Sébastien; Gallego, Oriol; Calvo, Olga; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2017-03-06

    Cell growth requires synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Binding of initiation factor Rrn3 activates Pol I, fostering recruitment to ribosomal DNA promoters. This fundamental process must be precisely regulated to satisfy cell needs at any time. We present in vivo evidence that, when growth is arrested by nutrient deprivation, cells induce rapid clearance of Pol I-Rrn3 complexes, followed by the assembly of inactive Pol I homodimers. This dual repressive mechanism reverts upon nutrient addition, thus restoring cell growth. Moreover, Pol I dimers also form after inhibition of either ribosome biogenesis or protein synthesis. Our mutational analysis, based on the electron cryomicroscopy structures of monomeric Pol I alone and in complex with Rrn3, underscores the central role of subunits A43 and A14 in the regulation of differential Pol I complexes assembly and subsequent promoter association.

  12. The dynamic assembly of distinct RNA polymerase I complexes modulates rDNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Torreira, Eva; Louro, Jaime Alegrio; Pazos, Irene; González-Polo, Noelia; Gil-Carton, David; Duran, Ana Garcia; Tosi, Sébastien; Gallego, Oriol; Calvo, Olga; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Cell growth requires synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Binding of initiation factor Rrn3 activates Pol I, fostering recruitment to ribosomal DNA promoters. This fundamental process must be precisely regulated to satisfy cell needs at any time. We present in vivo evidence that, when growth is arrested by nutrient deprivation, cells induce rapid clearance of Pol I–Rrn3 complexes, followed by the assembly of inactive Pol I homodimers. This dual repressive mechanism reverts upon nutrient addition, thus restoring cell growth. Moreover, Pol I dimers also form after inhibition of either ribosome biogenesis or protein synthesis. Our mutational analysis, based on the electron cryomicroscopy structures of monomeric Pol I alone and in complex with Rrn3, underscores the central role of subunits A43 and A14 in the regulation of differential Pol I complexes assembly and subsequent promoter association. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20832.001 PMID:28262097

  13. Combined sequencing of mRNA and DNA from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mertes, Florian; Kuhl, Heiner; Wruck, Wasco; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2016-06-01

    Combined transcriptome and whole genome sequencing of the same ultra-low input sample down to single cells is a rapidly evolving approach for the analysis of rare cells. Besides stem cells, rare cells originating from tissues like tumor or biopsies, circulating tumor cells and cells from early embryonic development are under investigation. Herein we describe a universal method applicable for the analysis of minute amounts of sample material (150 to 200 cells) derived from sub-colony structures from human embryonic stem cells. The protocol comprises the combined isolation and separate amplification of poly(A) mRNA and whole genome DNA followed by next generation sequencing. Here we present a detailed description of the method developed and an overview of the results obtained for RNA and whole genome sequencing of human embryonic stem cells, sequencing data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69471.

  14. Why does TNA cross-pair more strongly with RNA than with DNA? An answer from X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, P.S.; Wilds, C.J.; Wawrzak, Z.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Eschenmoser, A.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    L-{alpha}-threofuranosyl (3' {yields} 2') nucleic acid (TNA) residues adopt a C4'-exo pucker when incorporated into an A- (left) or a B-form DNA duplex (right). The resulting intranucleotide P {hor_ellipsis} P distance in TNA is very similar to that in RNA (represented by a C3'-endo puckered adenosine residue; green). The structural data explain earlier observations that TNA hydridizes more stably with RNA than with DNA and that RNA constitutes the better template for ligating TNA fragments.

  15. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  16. MGMT analysis at DNA, RNA and protein levels in glioblastoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Preusser, Matthias

    2009-04-01

    Evidence from several studies supports that the epigenetic, transcriptional and translational regulation and expression of O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) is relevant for prognostic and predictive considerations in glioblastoma patients. MGMT status is being used as a stratifying factor or eligibility criterion in ongoing and accruing clinical glioblastoma trials. In some cases, there is also interest in MGMT assessment of glioblastoma tissue in the day-to-day clinical setting. However, a number of different methods and protocols have been used for MGMT analysis and it is unclear which methods harbour the greatest potential for translation into routine clinical use. This article reviews methods that have been used for MGMT assessment at DNA-, RNA- and protein-level in glioblastoma with a focus on their potential clinical utility. Conclusions. (1) DNA-based methods for MGMT analysis seem more promising for translation into the clinical setting than RNA- or protein-based methods. However, at present there is lack of data to base recommendations for a specific method or protocol for MGMT testing on. There is a strong need for systematic comparisons and validation of intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility and clinical performance of different methods for MGMT assessment to identify the best method for clinical MGMT testing. (2) The current practice of formalin-fixation of neurosurgical specimens considerably limits the spectrum of methods that can be applied for molecular diagnosis in clinical neuro-oncology. Further studies may be helpful to establish more appropriate protocols for tumour tissue preservation (e.g. identification of alternative fixatives that do not deteriorate DNA and RNA quality).

  17. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  18. Re-use of commercial microfluidics chips for DNA, RNA, and protein electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi; Kwak, Sukyoung; Karpowicz, Steven J

    2014-11-01

    Microfluidics chip technology is a powerful and convenient alternative to agarose gels and PAGE, but costs can be high due to certain chips being non-reusable. Here we describe a method to regenerate, re-use, and store Agilent DNA, RNA, and protein electrophoresis chips designed for use in the Bioanalyzer 2100. By washing the sample wells and displacing the old gel matrix with new gel-dye mix, we have run samples on the same chip up to ten times with negligible loss of signal quality. Chips whose wells were loaded with buffer or water were stored successfully for one week before re-use.

  19. DUPLEX: A molecular mechanics program in torsion angle space for computing structures of DNA and RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hingerty, B.E.

    1992-07-01

    DUPLEX produces energy minimized structures of DNA and RNA of any base sequence for single and double strands. The smallest subunits are deoxydinucleoside monophosphates, and up to 12 residues, single or double stranded can be treated. In addition, it can incorporate NMR derived interproton distances an constraints in the minimizations. Both upper and lower bounds for these distances can be specified. The program has been designed to run on a UNICOS Cray supercomputer, but should run, albeit slowly, on a laboratory computer such as a VAX or a workstation.

  20. Switchable Protecting Strategy for Solid Phase Synthesis of DNA and RNA Interacting Nucleopeptides.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Maria Emilia; Tomassi, Stefano; Gaglione, Maria; Russo, Rosita; Chambery, Angela; Lama, Stefania; Stiuso, Paola; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Di Maro, Salvatore; Messere, Anna

    2016-12-02

    Nucleopeptides are promising nucleic acid mimetics in which the peptide backbone bears nucleobases. They can recognize DNA and RNA targets modulating their biological functions. To date, the lack of an effective strategy for the synthesis of nucleopeptides prevents their evaluation for biological and biomedical applications. Herein, we describe an unprecedented approach that enables the synthesis of cationic both homo and heterosequence nucleopeptides wholly on solid support with high yield and purity. Spectroscopic studies indicate advantageous properties of the nucleopeptides in terms of binding, thermodynamic stability and sequence specific recognition. Biostability assay and laser scanning confocal microscopy analyses reveal that the nucleopeptides feature acceptable serum stability and ability to cross the cell membrane.

  1. Simplified Identification of mRNA or DNA in Whole Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almeida, Eduardo; Kadambi, Geeta

    2007-01-01

    A recently invented method of detecting a selected messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) or deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence offers two important advantages over prior such methods: it is simpler and can be implemented by means of compact equipment. The simplification and miniaturization achieved by this invention are such that this method is suitable for use outside laboratories, in field settings in which space and power supplies may be limited. The present method is based partly on hybridization of nucleic acid, which is a powerful technique for detection of specific complementary nucleic acid sequences and is increasingly being used for detection of changes in gene expression in microarrays containing thousands of gene probes.

  2. A laminar flow electroporation system for efficient DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zewen; Zhao, Deyao; Li, Xueming; Wu, Mengxi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Huang; Wang, Xiaoxia; Du, Quan; Liang, Zicai; Li, Zhihong

    2011-08-01

    By introducing a hydrodynamic mechanism into a microfluidics-based electroporation system, we developed a novel laminar flow electroporation system with high performance. The laminar buffer flow implemented in the system separated the cell suspension flow from the electrodes, thereby excluding many unfavorable effects due to electrode reaction during electroporation, such as hydrolysis, bubble formation, pH change, and heating. Compared to conventional microfluidic electroporation systems, these improvements significantly enhanced transfection efficiency and cell viability. Furthermore, successful electrotransfection of plasmid DNA and, more importantly, synthetic siRNA, was demonstrated in several hard-to-transfect cell types using this system.

  3. Nonenzymatic synthesis of RNA and DNA oligomers on hexitol nucleic acid templates: the importance of the A structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Politis, P. K.; Van Aerschot, A.; Busson, R.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Dolan, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acid (HNA) is an analogue of DNA containing the standard nucleoside bases, but with a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. HNA oligomers form duplexes having the nucleic acid A structure with complementary DNA or RNA oligomers. The HNA decacytidylate oligomer is an efficient template for the oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of guanosine or deoxyguanosine. Comparison of the oligomerization efficiencies on HNA, RNA, and DNA decacytidylate templates under various conditions suggests strongly that only nucleic acid double helices with the A structure support efficient template-directed synthesis when 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of nucleosides are used as substrates.

  4. In-vitro nanodiagnostic platform through nanoparticles and DNA-RNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ki; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing nanoparticles or nanostructured domains exhibit an even higher degree of material complexity that leads to an extremely high variability of nanostructured materials. This review introduces analytical concepts and techniques for nanomaterials and derives recommendations for a qualified selection of characterization techniques for specific types of samples, and focuses the characterization of nanoparticles and their agglomerates or aggregates. In addition, DNA nanotechnology and the more recent newcomer RNA nanotechnology have achieved almost an advanced status among nanotechnology researchers¸ therefore, the core features, potential, and significant challenges of DNA nanotechnology are also highlighted as a new discipline. Moreover, nanobiochips made by nanomaterials are rapidly emerging as a new paradigm in the area of large-scale biochemical analysis. The use of nanoscale components enables higher precision in diagnostics while considerably reducing the cost of the platform that leads this review to explore the use of nanoparticles, nanomaterials, and other bionanotechnologies for its application to nanodiagnostics in-vitro.

  5. Structural mimicry in transcription regulation of human RNA polymerase II by the DNA helicase RECQL5

    PubMed Central

    Kassube, Susanne A.; Jinek, Martin; Fang, Jie; Tsutakawa, Susan; Nogales, Eva

    2013-01-01

    RECQL5 is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family of DNA helicases involved in DNA repair. RECQL5 interacts with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and inhibits transcription of protein–coding genes by an unknown mechanism. We show that RECQL5 contacts the Rpb1 jaw domain of Pol II at a site that overlaps with the binding site for the transcription elongation factor TFIIS. Our cryo–electron microscopy structure of elongating Pol II arrested in complex with RECQL5 shows that the RECQL5 helicase domain is positioned to sterically block elongation. The crystal structure of the RECQL5 KIX domain reveals similarities with TFIIS, and binding of RECQL5 to Pol II interferes with the ability of TFIIS to promote transcriptional read–through in vitro. Together, our findings reveal a dual mode of transcriptional repression by RECQL5 that includes structural mimicry of the Pol II–TFIIS interaction. PMID:23748380

  6. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  7. Review on the binding of anticancer drug doxorubicin with DNA and tRNA: Structural models and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Bourassa, P; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we have compared the results of multiple spectroscopic studies and molecular modeling of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) bindings to DNA and tRNA. DOX was intercalated into DNA duplex, while tRNA binding is via major and minor grooves. DOX-DNA intercalation is close to A-7, C-5, *C-19 (H-bonding with DOX NH2 group), G-6, T-8 and T-18 with the free binding energy of -4.99kcal/mol. DOX-tRNA groove bindings are near A-29, A-31, A-38, C-25, C-27, C-28, *G-30 (H-bonding) and U-41 with the free binding energy of -4.44kcal/mol. Drug intercalation induced a partial B to A-DNA transition, while tRNA remained in A-family structure. The structural differences observed between DOX bindings to DNA and tRNA can be the main reasons for drug antitumor activity. The results of in vitro MTT assay on SKC01 colon carcinoma are consistent with the observed DNA structural changes. Future research should be focused on finding suitable nanocarriers for delivery of DOX in vivo in order to exploit the full capacity of this very important anticancer drug.

  8. Ultrastable pRNA hexameric ring gearing hexameric phi29 DNA-packaging motor by revolving without rotating and coiling.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Chad; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-08-01

    Biomotors have previously been classified into two categories: linear and rotational motors. It has long been popularly believed that viral DNA packaging motors are rotation motors. We have recently found that the DNA-packaging motor of bacteriophage phi29 uses a third mechanism: revolution without rotation. phi29 motor consists of three-coaxial rings of hexameric RNA, a hexameric ATPase, and a dodecameric channel. The motor uses six ATP to revolve one helical turn of dsDNA around the hexameric ring of ATPase gp16. Each dodecameric segment tilts at a 30°-angle and runs anti-parallel to the dsDNA helix to facilitate translation in one direction. The negatively charged phosphate backbone interacts with four positively charged lysine rings, resulting in four steps of transition. This review will discuss how the novel pRNA meets motor requirements for translocation concerning structure, stoichiometry, and thermostability; how pRNA studies have led to the generation of the concept of RNA nanotechnology; and how pRNA is fabricated into nanoparticles to deliver siRNA, miRNA, and ribozymes to cancer and virus-infected cells.

  9. RNA-directed DNA methylation enforces boundaries between heterochromatin and euchromatin in the maize genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Gent, Jonathan I; Zynda, Greg; Song, Jawon; Makarevitch, Irina; Hirsch, Cory D; Hirsch, Candice N; Dawe, R Kelly; Madzima, Thelma F; McGinnis, Karen M; Lisch, Damon; Schmitz, Robert J; Vaughn, Matthew W; Springer, Nathan M

    2015-11-24

    The maize genome is relatively large (∼ 2.3 Gb) and has a complex organization of interspersed genes and transposable elements, which necessitates frequent boundaries between different types of chromatin. The examination of maize genes and conserved noncoding sequences revealed that many of these are flanked by regions of elevated asymmetric CHH (where H is A, C, or T) methylation (termed mCHH islands). These mCHH islands are quite short (∼ 100 bp), are enriched near active genes, and often occur at the edge of the transposon that is located nearest to genes. The analysis of DNA methylation in other sequence contexts and several chromatin modifications revealed that mCHH islands mark the transition from heterochromatin-associated modifications to euchromatin-associated modifications. The presence of an mCHH island is fairly consistent in several distinct tissues that were surveyed but shows some variation among different haplotypes. The presence of insertion/deletions in promoters often influences the presence and position of an mCHH island. The mCHH islands are dependent upon RNA-directed DNA methylation activities and are lost in mop1 and mop3 mutants, but the nearby genes rarely exhibit altered expression levels. Instead, loss of an mCHH island is often accompanied by additional loss of DNA methylation in CG and CHG contexts associated with heterochromatin in nearby transposons. This suggests that mCHH islands and RNA-directed DNA methylation near maize genes may act to preserve the silencing of transposons from activity of nearby genes.

  10. RNA-directed DNA methylation enforces boundaries between heterochromatin and euchromatin in the maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Gent, Jonathan I.; Zynda, Greg; Song, Jawon; Makarevitch, Irina; Hirsch, Cory D.; Hirsch, Candice N.; Dawe, R. Kelly; Madzima, Thelma F.; McGinnis, Karen M.; Lisch, Damon; Schmitz, Robert J.; Vaughn, Matthew W.; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The maize genome is relatively large (∼2.3 Gb) and has a complex organization of interspersed genes and transposable elements, which necessitates frequent boundaries between different types of chromatin. The examination of maize genes and conserved noncoding sequences revealed that many of these are flanked by regions of elevated asymmetric CHH (where H is A, C, or T) methylation (termed mCHH islands). These mCHH islands are quite short (∼100 bp), are enriched near active genes, and often occur at the edge of the transposon that is located nearest to genes. The analysis of DNA methylation in other sequence contexts and several chromatin modifications revealed that mCHH islands mark the transition from heterochromatin-associated modifications to euchromatin-associated modifications. The presence of an mCHH island is fairly consistent in several distinct tissues that were surveyed but shows some variation among different haplotypes. The presence of insertion/deletions in promoters often influences the presence and position of an mCHH island. The mCHH islands are dependent upon RNA-directed DNA methylation activities and are lost in mop1 and mop3 mutants, but the nearby genes rarely exhibit altered expression levels. Instead, loss of an mCHH island is often accompanied by additional loss of DNA methylation in CG and CHG contexts associated with heterochromatin in nearby transposons. This suggests that mCHH islands and RNA-directed DNA methylation near maize genes may act to preserve the silencing of transposons from activity of nearby genes. PMID:26553984

  11. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that