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Sample records for macrophage activating factor

  1. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) enzymatic activity and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Leona; Armstrong, Michelle E; O' Reilly, Ciaran; Bucala, Richard; Leng, Lin; Fingerle-Rowson, Gunter; Fayne, Darren; Keane, Michael P; Tynan, Aisling; Maher, Lewena; Cooke, Gordon; Lloyd, David; Conroy, Helen; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2015-04-16

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) possesses unique tautomerase enzymatic activity, which contributes to the biological functional activity of MIF. In this study, we investigated the effects of blocking the hydrophobic active site of the tautomerase activity of MIF in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To address this, we initially established a Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) murine model in Mif-KO and wild-type (WT) mice and compared tumor growth in a knock-in mouse model expressing a mutant MIF lacking enzymatic activity (Mif (P1G)). Primary tumor growth was significantly attenuated in both Mif-KO and Mif (P1G) mice compared with WT mice. We subsequently undertook a structure-based, virtual screen to identify putative small molecular weight inhibitors specific for the tautomerase enzymatic active site of MIF. From primary and secondary screens, the inhibitor SCD-19 was identified, which significantly attenuated the tautomerase enzymatic activity of MIF in vitro and in biological functional screens. In the LLC murine model, SCD-19, given intraperitoneally at the time of tumor inoculation, was found to significantly reduce primary tumor volume by 90% (p < 0.001) compared with the control treatment. To better replicate the human disease scenario, SCD-19 was given when the tumor was palpable (at d 7 after tumor inoculation) and, again, treatment was found to significantly reduce tumor volume by 81% (p < 0.001) compared with the control treatment. In this report, we identify a novel inhibitor that blocks the hydrophobic pocket of MIF, which houses its specific tautomerase enzymatic activity, and demonstrate that targeting this unique active site significantly attenuates lung cancer growth in in vitro and in vivo systems.

  2. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  3. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetics of tumor necrosis factor production by photodynamic-therapy-activated macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pass, Harvey I.; Evans, Steven; Perry, Roger; Matthews, Wilbert

    1990-07-01

    The ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to activate macrophages and produce cytokines, specifically tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is unknown. Three day thioglycolate elicited macrophages were incubated with 25 ug/mi Photofrin II (P11) for 2 hour, after which they were subjected to 630 nm light with fluences of 0-1800 J/m. The amount of TNF produced in the system as well as macrophage viability was measured 1, 3, 6, and 18 hours after POT. The level of TNF produced by the macrophages was significantly elevated over control levels 6 hours after POT and the absolute level of tumor necrosis factor production was influenced by the treatment energy and the resulting macrophage cytotoxicity. These data suggest that POT therapy induced cytotoxicity in vivo may be amplified by macrophage stimulation to secrete cytokines and these cytokines may also participate in other direct/indirect photodynamic therapy effects, i.e. immunosuppression, vascular effects.

  5. Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF): isoelectric focusing pattern and tumoricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Nagasawa, Hideko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Kawashima, Ken; Hori, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Gc protein is the precursor for Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), with three phenotypes: Gc1f, Gc1s and Gc2, based on its electrophoretic mobility. The difference in electrophoretic mobility is because of the difference in its posttranslational sugar moiety composition. We compared the difference between Gc protein and GcMAF electrophoretic mobility using the isoelectric focusing (IEF) method. The tumoricidal activity of GcMAF-treated macrophage was evaluated after coculture with L-929 cell. The tumoricidal mechanism was investigated using TNF bioassay and nitric oxide (NO) release. The difference in Gc protein and GcMAF electrophoretic mobility was detected. The tumoricidal activity of GcMAF-treated macrophage was detected, but no release of TNF and NO was detected. The difference of isoelectric focusing mobility in Gc protein and GcMAF would be useful to develop a GcMAF detection method. GcMAF increased macrophage tumoricidal activity but TNF and NO release were not involved in the mechanism.

  6. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  7. Oral Colostrum Macrophage-activating Factor for Serious Infection and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Inui, Toshio; Kubo, Kentaro; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito; Sakamoto, Norihiro; Mette, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) immunotherapy has been steadily advancing over the last two decades. Oral colostrum macrophage-activating factor (MAF) produced from bovine colostrum has shown high macrophage phagocytic activity. GcMAF-based immunotherapy has a wide application for use in treating many diseases via macrophage activation or for use as supportive therapy. Three case studies demonstrate that oral colostrum MAF can be used for serious infection and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) without adverse effects. We demonstrate that colostrum MAF shows promising clinical results in patients with infectious diseases and for symptoms of fatigue, which is common in many chronic diseases. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  9. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  10. A novel assay system for macrophage-activating factor activity using a human U937 cell line.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages play important roles in antitumor immunity, and immunotherapy with the group-specific component protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) has been reported to be effective in patients with various types of cancers. However, in macrophage research, it is important to properly evaluate macrophage activity. U937 macrophages were induced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbolacetate (TPA). The phagocytic activity of macrophages was evaluated as the internalized beads ratio. The MAF activity was assessed at 30 min after MAF addition as the activation ratio. We established a novel assay for phagocytic activities using differentiated U937 macrophages. The novel protocol was simple and rapid and was sensitive for GcMAF. This protocol should be useful not only for basic studies, such as those on molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, but also for clinical studies, such as assessment of GcMAF activity prior to clinical use. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Macrophage PPARγ, a Lipid Activated Transcription Factor Controls the Growth Factor GDF3 and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varga, Tamas; Mounier, Rémi; Patsalos, Andreas; Gogolák, Péter; Peloquin, Matthew; Horvath, Attila; Pap, Attila; Daniel, Bence; Nagy, Gergely; Pintye, Eva; Póliska, Szilárd; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Larbi, Sabrina Ben; Sansbury, Brian E; Spite, Matthew; Brown, Chester W; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-11-15

    Tissue regeneration requires inflammatory and reparatory activity of macrophages. Macrophages detect and eliminate the damaged tissue and subsequently promote regeneration. This dichotomy requires the switch of effector functions of macrophages coordinated with other cell types inside the injured tissue. The gene regulatory events supporting the sensory and effector functions of macrophages involved in tissue repair are not well understood. Here we show that the lipid activated transcription factor, PPARγ, is required for proper skeletal muscle regeneration, acting in repair macrophages. PPARγ controls the expression of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family member, GDF3, which in turn regulates the restoration of skeletal muscle integrity by promoting muscle progenitor cell fusion. This work establishes PPARγ as a required metabolic sensor and transcriptional regulator of repair macrophages. Moreover, this work also establishes GDF3 as a secreted extrinsic effector protein acting on myoblasts and serving as an exclusively macrophage-derived regeneration factor in tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor inhibits HCC in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Koichi; Onizuka, Shinya; Ishibashi, Hiromi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Nariaki; Kanematsu, Takashi; Fujioka, Hikaru

    2012-01-01

    A high incidence of recurrence after treatment is the most serious problem in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, a new strategy for the treatment of the disease is needed. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) is able to inhibit the growth of HCC. The effects of DBP-maf on endothelial cells and macrophage were evaluated by WST-1 assay and phagocytosis assay, respectively. Human HCC cells (HepG2) were implanted into the dorsum of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. These mice were divided into control and DBP-maf treatment groups (n = 10/group). The mice in the treatment group received 40 ng/kg/d of DBP-maf for 21 d. DBP-maf showed anti-proliferative activity against endothelial cells and also activated phagocytosis by macrophages. DBP-maf inhibited the growth of HCC cells (treatment group: 126 ± 18mm(3), untreated group: 1691.5 ± 546.9mm(3), P = 0.0077). Histologic examinations of the tumors revealed the microvessel density was reduced and more macrophage infiltration was demonstrated in the tumor of mice in the treatment group. DBP-maf has at least two novel functions, namely, an anti-angiogenic activity and tumor killing activity through the activation of macrophages. DBP-maf may therefore represent a new strategy for the treatment of HCC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Activates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Seiko; Oda, Tomoyuki; Nishi, Kenichiro; Takabuchi, Satoshi; Wakamatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Adachi, Takehiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Semenza, Gregg L.; Hirota, Kiichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is not only a cytokine which has a critical role in several inflammatory conditions but also has endocrine and enzymatic functions. MIF is identified as an intracellular signaling molecule and is implicated in the process of tumor progression, and also strongly enhances neovascularization. Overexpression of MIF has been observed in tumors from various organs. MIF is one of the genes induced by hypoxia in an hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-dependent manner. Methods/Principal Findings The effect of MIF on HIF-1 activity was investigated in human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells. We demonstrate that intracellular overexpression or extracellular administration of MIF enhances activation of HIF-1 under hypoxic conditions in MCF-7 cells. Mutagenesis analysis of MIF and knockdown of 53 demonstrates that the activation is not dependent on redox activity of MIF but on wild-type p53. We also indicate that the MIF receptor CD74 is involved in HIF-1 activation by MIF at least when MIF is administrated extracellularly. Conclusion/Significance MIF regulates HIF-1 activity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition to MIF's potent effects on the immune system, MIF is linked to fundamental processes conferring cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, and tumor invasiveness. This functional interdependence between MIF and HIF-1α protein stabilization and transactivation activity provide a molecular mechanism for promotion of tumorigenesis by MIF. PMID:18493321

  14. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  15. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  16. Activating transcription factor 1 directs Mhem atheroprotective macrophages through coordinated iron handling and foam cell protection.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Joseph J; Johns, Michael; Kampfer, Theresa; Nguyen, Aivi T; Game, Laurence; Schaer, Dominik J; Mason, Justin C; Haskard, Dorian O

    2012-01-06

    Intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) drives atherosclerosis through the dual metabolic stresses of cholesterol-enriched erythrocyte membranes and pro-oxidant heme/iron. When clearing tissue hemorrhage, macrophages are typically seen storing either iron or lipid. We have recently defined hemorrhage-associated macrophages (HA-mac) as a plaque macrophage population that responds adaptively to IPH. This study aimed to define the key transcription factor(s) involved in HO-1 induction by heme. To address this question, we used microarray analysis and transfection with siRNA and plasmids. To maintain physiological relevance, we focused on human blood-derived monocytes. We found that heme stimulates monocytes through induction of activating transcription factor 1 (ATF-1). ATF-1 coinduces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and Liver X receptor beta (LXR-β). Heme-induced HO-1 and LXR-β were suppressed by knockdown of ATF-1, and HO-1 and LXR-β were induced by ATF-1 transfection. ATF-1 required phosphorylation for full functional activity. Expression of LXR-β in turn led to induction of other genes central to cholesterol efflux, such as LXR-α and ABCA1. This heme-directed state was distinct from known macrophage states (M1, M2, Mox) and, following the same format, we have designated them Mhem. These results show that ATF-1 mediates HO-1 induction by heme and drives macrophage adaptation to intraplaque hemorrhage. Our definition of an ATF-1-mediated pathway for linked protection from foam cell formation and oxidant stress may have therapeutic potential.

  17. Effect of the Gc-derived macrophage-activating factor precursor (preGcMAF) on phagocytic activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Syota; Takeuchi, Ryota; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hirota, Keiji; Terada, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Shinya; Nakata, Eiji; Hori, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    The 1f1f subtype of the Gc protein (Gc(1f1f) protein) was converted into Gc-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) by enzymatic processing in the presence of β-galactosidase of an activated B-cell and sialidase of a T-cell. We hypothesized that preGc(1f1f)MAF, the only Gc(1f1f) protein lacking galactose, can be converted to GcMAF in vivo because sialic acid is cleaved by residual sialidase. Hence, we investigated the effect of preGc(1f1f)MAF on the phagocytic activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages. We examined the sugar moiety of preGc(1f1f)MAF with a Western blot using peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) lectin. We also found that preGc(1f1f)MAF significantly enhanced phagocytic activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages but only in the presence of the mouse peritoneal fluid; the level of phagocytic activity was the same as that observed for GcMAF. PreGc(1f1f)MAF can be used as an effective macrophage activator in vivo.

  18. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  19. Platelet-activating factor increases reactive oxygen species-mediated microbicidal activity of human macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Borges, Arissa Felipe; Morato, Camila Imai; Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; Dorta, Miriam Leandro; de Oliveira, Milton Adriano Pelli; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima

    2017-09-29

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by macrophages during inflammation and infections. We evaluated whether PAF is able to modulate the infection of human macrophages by Leishmania braziliensis, the main Leishmania sp. in Brazil. Monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with promastigote forms in absence or presence of exogenous PAF. We observed that the treatment of macrophages with low concentrations of PAF prior to infection increased the phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. More importantly, exogenous PAF reduced the parasitism when it was added before, during or after infection. In addition, treatment with a PAF antagonist (PCA 4248) resulted in a significant increase of macrophage infection in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that endogenous PAF is important to control L. braziliensis infection. Mechanistically, while exogenous PAF increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) treatment with PCA 4248 reduced oxidative burst during L. braziliensis infection. The microbicidal effects of exogenous PAF were abolished when macrophages were treated with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. The data show that PAF promotes the production of ROS induced by L. braziliensis, suggesting that this lipid mediator may be relevant to control L. braziliensis infection in human macrophages. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Asbestos-activated peritoneal macrophages release a factors(s) which inhibits lymphocyte mitogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, K.; Davis, J.M.G.; James, K.

    1984-10-01

    Intraperitoneal asbestos injection in mice has previously been reported to elicit an activated macrophage population. In the present study supernatants from such macrophages were tested for their effect on thymocyte mitogenesis in response to concanavalin A; control supernantants were obtained from saline- and latex-elicited macrophages. Supernatants from asbestos-elicited macrophages were significantly inhibitory to thymocyte mitogenesis while saline- and latex-elicited macrophages did not release significant amounts of such activity. Asbestos-activated macrophage supernatants were inhibitory in a dose-dependent way and the activity was not secreted by macrophages from mice which had received asbestos in the long term. The inhibitory activity was partially dialysable. Supernatants prepared by treating macrophages in vitro with a lethal dose of asbestos were not inhibitory suggesting that the inhibitory activity in the supernatants of asbestos-activated macrophages did not leak from dead or dying cells. The asbestos macrophage supernatant was also significantly inhibitory to mature T-cell-enriched spleen cells but had no effect on fibroblasts, suggesting that the inhibitory effect could be lymphoid cell specific.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  2. Krüppel like factor 4 promoter undergoes active demethylation during monocyte/macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karpurapu, Manjula; Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Xiao, Lei; Nirujogi, Teja Srinivas; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2014-01-01

    The role of different lineage specific transcription factors in directing hematopoietic cell fate towards myeloid lineage is well established but the status of epigenetic modifications has not been defined during this important developmental process. We used non proliferating, PU.1 inducible myeloid progenitor cells and differentiating bone marrow derived macrophages to study the PU.1 dependent KLF4 transcriptional regulation and its promoter demethylation during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. Expression of KLF4 was regulated by active demethylation of its promoter and PU.1 specifically bound to KLF4 promoter oligo harboring the PU.1 consensus sequence. Methylation specific quantitative PCR and Bisulfite sequencing indicated demethylation of CpG residues most proximal to the transcription start site of KLF4 promoter. Cloned KLF4 promoter in pGL3 Luciferase and CpG free pcpgf-bas vectors showed accentuated reporter activity when co-transfected with the PU.1 expression vector. In vitro methylation of both KLF4 promoter oligo and cloned KLF4 promoter vectors showed attenuated in vitro DNA binding activity and Luciferase/mouse Alkaline phosphotase reporter activity indicating the negative influence of KLF4 promoter methylation on PU.1 binding. The Cytosine deaminase, Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AICDA) was found to be critical for KLF4 promoter demethylation. More importantly, knock down of AICDA resulted in blockade of KLF4 promoter demethylation, decreased F4/80 expression and other phenotypic characters of macrophage differentiation. Our data proves that AICDA mediated active demethylation of the KLF4 promoter is necessary for transcriptional regulation of KLF4 by PU.1 during monocyte/macrophage differentiation.

  3. Krüppel Like Factor 4 Promoter Undergoes Active Demethylation during Monocyte/Macrophage Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Karpurapu, Manjula; Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Xiao, Lei; Nirujogi, Teja Srinivas; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2014-01-01

    The role of different lineage specific transcription factors in directing hematopoietic cell fate towards myeloid lineage is well established but the status of epigenetic modifications has not been defined during this important developmental process. We used non proliferating, PU.1 inducible myeloid progenitor cells and differentiating bone marrow derived macrophages to study the PU.1 dependent KLF4 transcriptional regulation and its promoter demethylation during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. Expression of KLF4 was regulated by active demethylation of its promoter and PU.1 specifically bound to KLF4 promoter oligo harboring the PU.1 consensus sequence. Methylation specific quantitative PCR and Bisulfite sequencing indicated demethylation of CpG residues most proximal to the transcription start site of KLF4 promoter. Cloned KLF4 promoter in pGL3 Luciferase and CpG free pcpgf-bas vectors showed accentuated reporter activity when co-transfected with the PU.1 expression vector. In vitro methylation of both KLF4 promoter oligo and cloned KLF4 promoter vectors showed attenuated in vitro DNA binding activity and Luciferase/mouse Alkaline phosphotase reporter activity indicating the negative influence of KLF4 promoter methylation on PU.1 binding. The Cytosine deaminase, Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AICDA) was found to be critical for KLF4 promoter demethylation. More importantly, knock down of AICDA resulted in blockade of KLF4 promoter demethylation, decreased F4/80 expression and other phenotypic characters of macrophage differentiation. Our data proves that AICDA mediated active demethylation of the KLF4 promoter is necessary for transcriptional regulation of KLF4 by PU.1 during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. PMID:24695324

  4. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells c3 modulates the function of macrophages in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Xiao, Lei; Joo, Myungsoo; Christman, John William; Karpurapu, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    The role of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) was initially identified in T and B cell gene expression, but its role in regulating gene expression in macrophages during sepsis is not known. Our data show that NFATc3 regulates expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Selective inhibition of NFAT by cyclosporine A and a competitive peptide inhibitor 11R-VIVIT inhibited endotoxin-induced expression of iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) release. Macrophages from NFATc3 knockout (KO) mice show reduced iNOS expression and NO release and attenuated bactericidal activity. Gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that endotoxin challenge increases NFATc3 binding to the iNOS promoter, resulting in transcriptional activation of iNOS. The binding of NFATc3 to the iNOS promoter is abolished by NFAT inhibitors. NFATc3 KO mice subjected to sepsis show that NFATc3 is necessary for bacterial clearance in mouse lungs during sepsis. Our study demonstrates for the first time that NFATc3 is necessary for macrophage iNOS expression during sepsis, which is essential for containment of bacterial infections.

  6. Macrophage procoagulant-inducing factor. In vivo properties and chemotactic activity for phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J; Geczy, C L

    1988-09-15

    Murine macrophage procoagulant-inducing factor (MPIF) is a lymphokine with chemical properties distinct from a number of well-characterized cytokines. MPIF induces procoagulant activity on the surface of macrophages and thus may play a central role in the expression of cell-mediated immunity. Highly enriched MPIF-alpha and -beta, separated by virtue of their basic isoelectric point and affinity for heparin, induced local induration and fibrin deposition and cellular infiltration similar to that observed in delayed type hypersensitivity reactions, when injected intradermally. Margination with of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) along the endothelium as well as increased PMN infiltration was evident after 4 h. In contrast to other inflammatory mediators (e.g., C5a, IL-1) reactivity was sustained, with greater numbers of mononuclear cells apparent 24 h after skin testing. Changes in the dermis were evident 4 h after MPIF injection with increased numbers of cells near areas where spaces in the collagen bundles had formed. Dermal thickening was evident after 24 h and collagen fiber structure was disrupted. Extravascular fibrinogen/fibrin was most prominent 24 h after testing. LPS, which induces macrophage procoagulant activity in vitro, did not induce the histopathologic changes evident with MPIF. MPIF was chemotactic for PMN and macrophages in vitro. Chemotactic activity was heat-labile and not due to C5a. Migration was dependent on a concentration gradient, as determined by checkerboard analysis, indicating that MPIF promoted chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis. Experiments reported here suggest that MPIF is an important mediator of fibrin deposition and cellular infiltration characteristic of cell-mediated immune response.

  7. Quantitative proteomics reveals the induction of mitophagy in tumor necrosis factor-α-activated (TNFα) macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christina; English, Luc; Boulais, Jonathan; Chemali, Magali; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Desjardins, Michel; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity as professional phagocytes capable of internalizing and degrading pathogens to derive antigens for presentation to T cells. They also produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) that mediate local and systemic responses and direct the development of adaptive immunity. The present work describes the use of label-free quantitative proteomics to profile the dynamic changes of proteins from resting and TNF-α-activated mouse macrophages. These analyses revealed that TNF-α activation of macrophages led to the down-regulation of mitochondrial proteins and the differential regulation of several proteins involved in vesicle trafficking and immune response. Importantly, we found that the down-regulation of mitochondria proteins occurred through mitophagy and was specific to TNF-α, as other cytokines such as IL-1β and IFN-γ had no effect on mitochondria degradation. Furthermore, using a novel antigen presentation system, we observed that the induction of mitophagy by TNF-α enabled the processing and presentation of mitochondrial antigens at the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. These findings highlight an unsuspected role of TNF-α in mitophagy and expanded our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for MHC presentation of self-antigens.

  8. Biological and antigenic similarities of murine interferon-gamma and macrophage-activating factor

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Murine peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) treated with murine recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (greater than 99% estimated purity), or concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cell supernatants developed tumoricidal properties (macrophage activation factor [MAF] activity). MAF activity was found to occur with treatments of 10 U/ml IFN-gamma, and at levels as low as 1 U/ml IFN-gamma if a second signal (5 ng/ml endotoxin) was present in the MAF assay. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) alone at these levels failed to induce MAF; induction of MAF was observed at 1,000-fold greater levels. The ability of IFN-gamma to stimulate murine PEC was species specific. Various sources of materials that displayed MAF activity, including supernatants from interleukin 2- dependent cloned cytotoxic murine T lymphocyte lines that did not display detectable antiviral activity, were neutralized by antibody raised and affinity purified against recombinant IFN-gamma. Thus, IFN- gamma, although never detectable by antiviral assays, appears to be present in many lymphokine preparations and has potent macrophage activation capability. PMID:6421982

  9. NDRG2 induced by oxidized LDL in macrophages antagonizes growth factor productions via selectively inhibiting ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shumei; Yang, Pengyuan; Kang, Hui; Lu, Ling; Zhang, Yuefan; Pan, Jingwei; Rui, Yao-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    During atherogenesis, macrophage foam cells produce prodigious growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines, which play the central roles in inflammatory process in atherosclerotic plaque formation. In the present study, we identified a new protein marker, N-Myc downstream-regulated protein 2 (NDRG2), which is significantly up-regulated in oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) treated macrophages and in human atherosclerotic plaques. Over-expression and siRNA knockdown studies showed that NDRG2 is a negative regulator of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) productions in macrophages. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of NDRG2 on MAPK signal activation. Our results showed ERK1/2 activation, but not P38 or JNK1/2 activation, is responsible for regulation of NDRG2 on VEGF and PDGF productions. Consistent with the PDGF levels, the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation was also regulated by the conditional medium of the oxLDL treated macrophages with NDRG2 knockdown or over-expression. Neutralizing anti-PDGF antibody can significantly inhibit the enhanced VSMC proliferation by macrophage medium with NDRG2 knockdown. Our present results demonstrate that NDRG2 participates in oxLDL-induced macrophage activation and modulates ERK1/2-dependent PDGF and VEGF production, which has potential application in atherogenesis. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear factor kappa-B- and activator protein-1-mediated immunostimulatory activity of compound K in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woo Seok; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Min Ho; Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Sang Yeol; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Park, Junseong; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-07-01

    Compound K (CK) is a bioactive derivative of ginsenoside Rb1 in Panax ginseng (Korean ginseng). Its biological and pharmacological activities have been studied in various disease conditions, although its immunomodulatory role in innate immunity mediated by monocytes/macrophages has been poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the regulatory role of CK on cellular events mediated by monocytes and macrophages in innate immune responses. The immunomodulatory role of CK was explored by various immunoassays including cell-cell adhesion, fibronectin adhesion, cell migration, phagocytic uptake, costimulatory molecules, reactive oxygen species production, luciferase activity, and by the measurement of mRNA levels of proinflammatory genes. Compound K induced cell cluster formation through cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, and phagocytic activity, but it suppressed cell-tissue interactions in U937 and RAW264.7 cells. Compound K also upregulated the surface expression of the cell adhesion molecule cluster of differentiation (CD) 43 (CD43) and costimulatory molecules CD69, CD80, and CD86, but it downregulated the expression of monocyte differentiation marker CD82 in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, CK induced the release of reactive oxygen species and induced messenger RNA expression of proinflammatory genes, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by enhancing the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activities of nuclear factor kappa-B and activator protein-1. Our results suggest that CK has an immunomodulatory role in innate immune responses through regulating various cellular events mediated by monocytes and macrophages.

  11. A macrophage-activating, injectable hydrogel to sequester endogenous growth factors for in situ angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanxian; Li, Qiu; Wu, Dang; Niu, Yiming; Yang, Cheng; Dong, Lei; Wang, Chunming

    2017-07-01

    Biomaterials scaffolds designed for many regenerative applications are expected to support neo-vascularisation, which is now being hampered by two limitations - the instability of exogenous growth factors (GFs) that are delivered to promote angiogenesis; and the loss of extracellular matrix components that bind and stabilise GFs. Here, we report the design and evaluation of an injectable hydrogel system aimed at restoring a GF-binding microenvironment to enhance the pro-angiogenic functions of endogenous GFs. This gel comprises two polysaccharides with their unique bioactivities: Konjac glucomannan (KGM) as the building block of the gel scaffold, for its demonstrated capacity to activate macrophages/monocytes to secrete pro-angiogenic/-mitogenic GFs; and heparin (Hep), a representative glycosaminoglycan molecule that binds numerous pro-angiogenic GFs, as functional moieties to sequester the macrophage-produced GFs. Modified with tyramine (TA) groups, the two polysaccharides can be co-polymerised and rapidly form into hydrogel upon enzyme catalysis. The designed KGM-TA/Hep-TA hydrogel successfully preserves the macrophage-activating function and GF-binding affinity of the two components, respectively, and, once subcutaneously implanted, effectively sequestered the locally-produced GFs in situ and promote the formation and maturation of blood vessels in mice. In summary, the designed hydrogel system demonstrates a feasible approach to stimulate the production and harness the function of endogenous GFs for inducing blood vessel formation in vivo, without the addition of any exogenous proteins. This design may provide an innovative, open platform to promote vascularisation for various regenerative purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) and its structural characterization and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    Gc protein has been reported to be a precursor of Gc protein-derived macrophage activation factor (GcMAF) in the inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade. An inducible beta-galactosidase of B cells and neuraminidase of T cells convert Gc protein to GcMAF. Gc protein from human serum was purified using 25(OH)D3 affinity column chromatography and modified to GcMAF using immobilized glycosidases (beta-galactosidase and neuraminidase) The sugar moiety structure of GcMAF was characterized by lectin blotting by Helix pomatia agglutinin. The biological activities of GcMAF were evaluated by a superoxide generation assay and a phagocytosis assay. We successfully purified Gc protein from human serum. GcMAF was detected by lectin blotting and showed a high biological activity. Our results support the importance of the terminal N-acetylgalactosamine moiety in the GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, and the existence of constitutive GcMAF in human serum. These preliminary data are important for designing small molecular GcMAF mimics.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor alpha derived from classically activated "M1" macrophages reduces interstitial cell of Cajal numbers.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, S T; Gibbons, S J; Verhulst, P-J; Cipriani, G; Saur, D; Farrugia, G

    2017-04-01

    Delayed gastric emptying in diabetic mice and humans is associated with changes in macrophage phenotype and loss of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the gastric muscle layers. In diabetic mice, classically activated M1 macrophages are associated with delayed gastric emptying, whereas alternatively activated M2 macrophages are associated with normal gastric emptying. This study aimed to determine if secreted factors from M1 macrophages could injure mouse ICC in primary culture. Cultures of gastric ICC were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and the effect of CM was quantified by counting ICC per high-powered field. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were activated to a M1 or M2 phenotype confirmed by qRT-PCR. Conditioned medium from M1 macrophages reduced ICC numbers by 41.1%, whereas M2-CM had no effect as compared to unconditioned, control media. Immunoblot analysis of 40 chemokines/cytokines found 12 that were significantly increased in M1-CM, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). ELISA detected 0.697±0.03 ng mL(-1) TNF-α in M1-CM. Recombinant mouse TNF-α reduced Kit expression and ICC numbers in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.817 ng mL(-1) ). Blocking M1-CM TNF-α with a neutralizing antibody preserved ICC numbers. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk partly preserved ICC numbers (cells/field; 6.63±1.04, 9.82±1.80 w/Z-VAD.fmk, n=6, P<.05). This work demonstrates that TNF-α secreted from M1 macrophages can result in Kit loss and directly injure ICC in vitro partly through caspase-dependent apoptosis and may play an important role in ICC depletion in diabetic gastroparesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The glycosylation and characterization of the candidate Gc macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Ravnsborg, Tina; Olsen, Dorthe T; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Christiansen, Maja; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The vitamin D binding protein, Gc globulin, has in recent years received some attention for its role as precursor for the extremely potent macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). An O-linked trisaccharide has been allocated to the threonine residue at position 420 in two of the three most common isoforms of Gc globulin (Gc1s and Gc1f). A substitution for a lysine residue at position 420 in Gc2 prevents this isoform from being glycosylated at that position. It has been suggested that Gc globulin subjected sequentially to sialidase and galactosidase treatment generates GcMAF in the form of Gc globulin with only a single GalNAc attached to T420. In this study we confirm the location of a linear trisaccharide on T420. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence of the generation of the proposed GcMAF by use of glycosidase treatment and mass spectrometry. Additionally the generated GcMAF candidate was tested for its effect on cytokine release from macrophages in human whole blood.

  15. Novel Anti-inflammatory Activity of Epoxyazadiradione against Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Athar; Haldar, Saikat; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.; Kumar, Rahul; Goyal, Manish; Iqbal, Mohd Shameel; Pal, Chinmay; Dey, Sumanta; Bindu, Samik; Sarkar, Souvik; Pal, Uttam; Maiti, Nakul C.; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is responsible for proinflammatory reactions in various infectious and non-infectious diseases. We have investigated the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of epoxyazadiradione, a limonoid purified from neem (Azadirachta indica) fruits, against MIF. Epoxyazadiradione inhibited the tautomerase activity of MIF of both human (huMIF) and malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum (PfMIF) and Plasmodium yoelii (PyMIF)) non-competitively in a reversible fashion (Ki, 2.11–5.23 μm). Epoxyazadiradione also significantly inhibited MIF (huMIF, PyMIF, and PfMIF)-mediated proinflammatory activities in RAW 264.7 cells. It prevented MIF-induced macrophage chemotactic migration, NF-κB translocation to the nucleus, up-regulation of inducible nitric-oxide synthase, and nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells. Epoxyazadiradione not only exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in vitro but also in vivo. We tested the anti-inflammatory activity of epoxyazadiradione in vivo after co-administering LPS and MIF in mice to mimic the disease state of sepsis or bacterial infection. Epoxyazadiradione prevented the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α when LPS and PyMIF were co-administered to BALB/c mice. The molecular basis of interaction of epoxyazadiradione with MIFs was explored with the help of computational chemistry tools and a biological knowledgebase. Docking simulation indicated that the binding was highly specific and allosteric in nature. The well known MIF inhibitor (S,R)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester (ISO-1) inhibited huMIF but not MIF of parasitic origin. In contrast, epoxyazadiradione inhibited both huMIF and plasmodial MIF, thus bearing an immense therapeutic potential against proinflammatory reactions induced by MIF of both malaria parasites and human. PMID:22645149

  16. HIV-1 Nef activates STAT1 in human monocytes/macrophages through the release of soluble factors.

    PubMed

    Federico, M; Percario, Z; Olivetta, E; Fiorucci, G; Muratori, C; Micheli, A; Romeo, G; Affabris, E

    2001-11-01

    Monocytes/macrophages play a predominant role in the immunologic network by secreting and reacting to a wide range of soluble factors. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to deep immunologic dysfunctions, also as a consequence of alterations in the pattern of cytokine release. Recent studies on in vivo models demonstrated that the expression of HIV Nef alone mimics many pathogenetic effects of HIV infection. In particular, Nef expression in monocytes/macrophages has been correlated with remarkable modifications in the pattern of secreted soluble factors, suggesting that the interaction of Nef with monocytes/macrophages plays a role in the pathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study sought to define possible alterations in intracellular signaling induced by Nef in monocytes/macrophages. Results demonstrate that HIV-1 Nef specifically activates both alpha and beta isoforms of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). This was observed both by infecting human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) with HIV-1 deletion mutants, and by exploiting the ability of MDMs to internalize soluble, recombinant Nef protein (rNef). STAT1-alpha activation occurs on phosphorylation of both C-terminal Tyr701 and Ser727 and leads to a strong binding activity. Nef-dependent STAT1 activation is followed by increased expression of both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor-1, a transcription factor transcriptionally regulated by STAT1 activation. It was also established that Nef-induced STAT1- alpha/beta activation occurs through the secretion of soluble factors. Taken together, the results indicate that HIV-1 Nef could interfere with STAT1-governed intracellular signaling in human monocytes/macrophages.

  17. Effects of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on the development, differentiation, and maturation of marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages in the spleen of osteopetrosis (op) mutant mice lacking functional M-CSF activity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Umeda, S; Shultz, L D; Hayashi, S; Nishikawa, S

    1994-05-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques using an anti-mouse panmacrophage monoclonal antibody and anti-mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for marginal metallophilic macrophages or marginal zone macrophages were used to detect red pulp macrophages, marginal metallophilic macrophages, and marginal zone macrophages in the spleen of op/op mice. In the mutant mice, the red pulp macrophages were reduced to about 60% of those in the normal littermates and the marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages were absent. After administration of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhM-CSF), numbers of red pulp macrophages increased rapidly, reaching levels found in normal littermates 1 week later. In contrast, the marginal metallophilic macrophages as well as the marginal zone macrophages appeared slowly after rhM-CSF administration and their numbers were less than half of the baseline level of normal littermates even at 12 weeks of administration. The distribution of marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages appearing after M-CSF administration was irregular in the spleen of the op/op mice. These splenic macrophage subpopulations differed in their responses to rhM-CSF, suggesting that distinct mechanisms may be involved in their development and differentiation. The splenic red pulp macrophages present in unmanipulated op/op mice are an M-CSF-independent macrophage population. Although the marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages are thought to be M-CSF-dependent, their development and differentiation appear to be influenced by locally produced M-CSF or other cytokines.

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is markedly expressed in active and early-stage endometriotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Kats, Rouslan; Metz, Christine N; Akoum, Ali

    2002-02-01

    The establishment of a new vascular supply is essential for the survival of endometrial tissue and its development in ectopic locations. We have previously shown that ectopic endometrial cells release an important mitogenic activity for human endothelial cells and identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as one of the principal bioactive molecules involved in endothelial cell proliferation. In the present study, immunohistochemical and dual immunofluorescence analyses showed that MIF is effectively expressed by endometriotic tissue, particularly in the glands, and identified endothelial cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes as cells markedly expressing MIF in the stroma. Western blot analysis showed a single 12.5-kDa band corresponding to the known mol wt of the molecule. The highest concentrations of MIF protein in endometriotic tissue, as measured by ELISA, were found in flame-like red endometriotic lesions, compared with typical black-bluish (P < 0.01) or with white lesions (P < 0.01). Interestingly, MIF displayed a marked expression in lesions from the initial stage of endometriosis (stage I). Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis of MIF mRNA levels in the same endometriotic tissues showed a pattern of expression comparable with that of the protein. In view of its potent proinflammatory and angiogenic properties, local production of MIF within endometrial implants, particularly in those that are highly vascularized and representing the earliest and most active forms of the disease, make plausible the involvement of this factor in the local immunoinflammatory process observed in endometriosis and the initial steps of endometriotic tissue growth and development.

  19. Activating transcription factor 4 underlies the pathogenesis of arsenic trioxide-mediated impairment of macrophage innate immune functions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ritesh K; Li, Changzhao; Wang, Yong; Weng, Zhiping; Elmets, Craig A; Harrod, Kevin S; Deshane, Jessy S; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure to humans is considered immunosuppressive with augmented susceptibility to several infectious diseases. The exact molecular mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Earlier, we showed the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling in arsenic-mediated impairment of macrophage functions. Here, we show that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a UPR transcription factor, regulates arsenic trioxide (ATO)-mediated dysregulation of macrophage functions. In ATO-treated ATF4(+/+) wild-type mice, a significant down-regulation of CD11b expression was associated with the reduced phagocytic functions of peritoneal and lung macrophages. This severe immuno-toxicity phenotype was not observed in ATO-treated ATF4(+/-) heterozygous mice. To confirm these observations, we demonstrated in Raw 264.7 cells that ATF4 knock-down rescues ATO-mediated impairment of macrophage functions including cytokine production, bacterial engulfment and clearance of engulfed bacteria. Sustained activation of ATF4 by ATO in macrophages induces apoptosis, while diminution of ATF4 expression protects against ATO-induced apoptotic cell death. Raw 264.7 cells treated with ATO also manifest dysregulated Ca(++) homeostasis. ATO induces Ca(++)-dependent calpain-1 and caspase-12 expression which together regulated macrophage apoptosis. Additionally, apoptosis was also induced by mitochondria-regulated pathway. Restoring ATO-impaired Ca(++) homeostasis in ER/mitochondria by treatments with the inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) attenuate innate immune functions of macrophages. These studies identify a novel role for ATF4 in underlying pathogenesis of macrophage dysregulation and immuno-toxicity of arsenic.

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1) in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Copin, C.; Derudas, B.; Marx, N.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the initiator of the blood coagulation cascade after interaction with the activated factor VII (FVIIa). Moreover, the TF/FVIIa complex also activates intracellular signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines. The TF/FVIIa complex is inhibited by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that, together with PPARα and PPARβ/δ, controls macrophage functions. However, whether PPARγ activation modulates the expression of TFP1-1 in human macrophages is not known. Here we report that PPARγ activation increases the expression of TFPI-1 in human macrophages in vitro as well as in vivo in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The induction of TFPI-1 expression by PPARγ ligands, an effect shared by the activation of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, occurs also in proinflammatory M1 and in anti-inflammatory M2 polarized macrophages. As a functional consequence, treatment with PPARγ ligands significantly reduces the inflammatory response induced by FVIIa, as measured by variations in the IL-8, MMP-2, and MCP-1 expression. These data identify a novel role for PPARγ in the control of TF the pathway. PMID:28115923

  1. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF): Biological Activities and Relation with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Camila Cristina Guimarães; de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão; Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo de Medeiros; Cobucci, Ricardo Ney Oliveira; Lanza, Daniel Carlos Ferreira; Andrade, Vânia Sousa; Fernandes, José Veríssimo

    2016-10-23

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) emerged in recent years as an important inflammation mediator, playing a prominent role in the pathogenesis of various types of malignant neoplasm. MIF is a glycoprotein that presents a wide spectrum of biological activities and exerts a complex interaction with various cellular signaling pathways, causing imbalance of homeostasis. Experimental and clinical studies show that high levels of MIF are found in almost all types of human cancers and are implicated in seemingly all stages of development of the tumors. The production of MIF is triggered through an autocrine signal emitted by tumor cells, and stimulates the production of cytokines, chemokines, and growth as well as angiogenic factors that lead to growth of the tumor, increasing its aggressiveness and metastatic potential. MIF is produced by virtually all types of human body cells, in response to stress caused by different factors, leading to pathological conditions such as chronic inflammation and immunomodulation with suppression of immune surveillance and of immune response against tumors, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. In this review, we present recent advances on the biological activity of MIF, the signaling pathways with which it is involved and their role in tumorigenesis.

  2. Monocyte-derived macrophage microparticles impart tissue factor activity to biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patchipulusu, Sirisha; Turturro, Michael; Hall, Connie L

    2010-02-01

    The initiation of coagulation on biomaterials is attributed to the contact pathway of coagulation. However, recent discoveries of blood-borne tissue factor (TF) activity suggest that the TF pathway of coagulation may contribute to thrombosis on biomaterials. To evaluate the role of TF bearing microparticles to biomaterial thrombogenicity, the adhesion of monocyte-derived macrophage microparticles (MMPs) to bare, bovine serum albumin (BSA) blocked, and plasma-coated materials was examined. MMP suspensions consisted of 20-37% TF positive particles that exhibited TF activity. Data from static experiments with polyethylene (PE), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and glass knitted and woven Dacron(R) grafts showed that MMPs adhered to uncoated, and plasma coated surfaces supported TF activity, whereas surfaces blocked with BSA supported less activity. Flow studies were performed on plasma-coated glass and tissue culture-treated polystyrene (TCPS) as a model system to demonstrate deposition and firm adhesion of microparticles under physiologic flow conditions. MMPs deposited and imparted TF activity to plasma-coated glass at wall shear rates of 100, 400, and 1200 sec(-1). Deposition on TCPS was comparable to glass at 100 sec(-1), but virtually nonexistent at the two higher shear rates after a 1 h perfusion, implying material and shear dependent adhesion. The localization of procoagulant MMPs to biomaterial surfaces could lead to an increased risk of thrombosis on cardiovascular implants beyond that anticipated by the contact pathway alone. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  4. Role of tumor necrosis factor in macrophage leishmanicidal activity in vitro and resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Theodos, C M; Povinelli, L; Molina, R; Sherry, B; Titus, R G

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and purified murine TNF were both able to activate macrophages to destroy intracellular Leishmania major in vitro. In addition, parasitizing macrophages with L. major markedly increased the ability of the cells to produce TNF. Finally, when mice were vaccinated with an avirulent form of L. major, the animals produced large amounts of TNF but no gamma interferon in response to infection with virulent L. major. Treating these mice with a neutralizing anti-TNF antibody led to partial but not complete inhibition of the resistant state, which suggests that factors other than TNF and gamma interferon contribute to resistance to L. major. PMID:1906844

  5. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice.

  6. Human single-chain variable fragment antibody inhibits macrophage migration inhibitory factor tautomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Tarasuk, Mayuri; Poungpair, Ornnuthchar; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, secreted from a variety of immune cells, that regulates innate and adaptive immune responses. Elevation of MIF levels in plasma correlates with the severity of inflammatory diseases in humans. Inhibition of MIF or its tautomerase activity ameliorates disease severity by reducing inflammatory responses. In this study, the human single-chain variable fragment (HuScFv) antibody specific to MIF was selected from the human antibody phage display library by using purified recombinant full-length human MIF (rMIF) as the target antigen. Monoclonal HuScFv was produced from phage-transformed bacteria and tested for their binding activities to rMIF by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as to native MIF by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. The HuScFv with highest binding signal to rMIF also inhibited the tautomerase activities of both rMIF and native MIF in human monoblastic leukemia (U937) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Mimotope searching and molecular docking concordantly demonstrated that the HuScFv interacted with Lys32 and Ile64 in the MIF tautomerase active site. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on MIF-specific fully-human antibody fragment with a tautomerase-inhibitory effect that has potential to be developed as anti-inflammatory biomolecules for human use.

  7. Antitumor effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Koga, Y; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1999-01-01

    Cancerous cells secrete alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) into the blood stream, resulting in deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (known as Gc protein), which is a precursor for macrophage activating factor (MAF). Incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF). Administration of GcMAF to cancer-bearing hosts can bypass the inactivated MAF precursor and act directly on macrophages for efficient activation. Therapeutic effects of GcMAF on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice were assessed by survival time and serum NaGalase activity, because serum NaGalase activity was proportional to tumor burden. A single administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) to eight mice on the same day after transplantation of the tumor (5 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 21 +/- 3 days for seven mice, with one mouse surviving more than 60 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 13 +/- 2 days. Six of the eight mice that received two GcMAF administrations, at Day 0 and Day 4 after transplantation, survived up to 31 +/- 4 days whereas, the remaining two mice survived for more than 60 days. Further, six of the eight mice that received three GcMAF administrations with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 60 days, and serum NaGalase levels were as low as those of control mice throughout the survival period. The cure with subthreshold GcMAF-treatments (administered once or twice) of tumor-bearing mice appeared to be a consequence of sustained macrophage activation by inflammation resulting from the macrophage-mediated tumoricidal process. Therefore, a protracted macrophage activation induced by a few administrations of minute amounts of GcMAF eradicated the murine ascites tumor.

  8. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  9. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients.

  10. Monocyte activation following systemic administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, A; Oratz, R; Hoogmoed, R; Caron, D; Peace, D; Liebes, L; Blum, R H; Vilcek, J

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-four patients with solid malignancies were treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on a Phase 1b trial. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of GM-CSF on peripheral blood monocyte activation. GM-CSF was administered by subcutaneous injection daily for 14 days. Immune parameters measured were monocyte cytotoxicity against the human colon carcinoma (HT29) cell line, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta, and in vitro TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta induction. All patients were evaluable for toxicity. Fifteen patients were evaluable for immunologic response. Treatment with GM-CSF led to a statistically significant enhancement in direct monocyte cytotoxicity against HT29 cells. There was no increase in serum TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta and no consistent in vitro induction of TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta from monocytes posttreatment. Treatment was well tolerated overall. We conclude that treatment with GM-CSF can lead to enhanced monocyte cytotoxicity. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of GM-CSF on other parameters of monocyte functions.

  11. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S; Crocker, Paul R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-07-21

    The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of vitamin D(3)-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Shigeru; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Nobuto

    2002-09-04

    The vitamin D(3)-binding protein (Gc protein)-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) activates tumoricidal macrophages against a variety of cancers indiscriminately. We investigated whether GcMAF also acts as an antiangiogenic factor on endothelial cells. The effects of GcMAF on angiogenic growth factor-induced cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and tube formation were examined in vitro by using cultured endothelial cells (murine IBE cells, porcine PAE cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]) and in vivo by using a mouse cornea micropocket assay. Blocking monoclonal antibodies to CD36, a receptor for the antiangiogenic factor thrombospondin-1, which is also a possible receptor for GcMAF, were used to investigate the mechanism of GcMAF action. GcMAF inhibited the endothelial cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and tube formation that were all stimulated by fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor-A, or angiopoietin 2. FGF-2-induced neovascularization in murine cornea was also inhibited by GcMAF. Monoclonal antibodies against murine and human CD36 receptor blocked the antiangiogenic action of GcMAF on the angiogenic factor stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis. In addition to its ability to activate tumoricidal macrophages, GcMAF has direct antiangiogenic effects on endothelial cells independent of tissue origin. The antiangiogenic effects of GcMAF may be mediated through the CD36 receptor.

  13. The critical role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Vujicic, Milica; Senerovic, Lidija; Nikolic, Ivana; Saksida, Tamara; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Stojanovic, Ivana

    2014-09-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a molecule with plethora of functions such as regulation of immune response, hormone-like, enzymatic and chaperone-like activity. Further, MIF is a major participant in glucose homeostasis since it is an autocrine stimulator of insulin secretion. MIF absence in male knockout mice (MIF-KO) results in development of glucose intolerance, while sensitivity to insulin is fully preserved. Since our results confirm that beta cells from MIF-KO mice express, produce and secrete insulin similarly to beta cells of their wild type (WT) counterparts C57BL/6 mice, we hypothesize that MIF-KO-derived insulin is less active. Indeed, insulin from MIF-KO islets is unable to significantly induce glucose uptake into hepatocytes and to efficiently promote insulin-triggered Akt phosphorylation determined by immunoblot. However, MIF's tautomerase function is not crucial for insulin biosynthesis since MIF inhibitors had no impact on WT insulin activity. Importantly, MIF recognition by anti-MIF antibody (ELISA) after in vitro co-incubation with purified insulin was significantly lower suggesting that insulin covers MIF immunodominant epitope. In addition, MIF binds insulin within beta cell as confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. WT and MIF-KO-derived insulin exhibited different cleavage patterns suggesting different protein conformations. Finally, pre-incubation of recombinant MIF with insulin promotes formation of insulin hexamers. These results imply that MIF probably enables proper insulin folding what results in insulin full activity. This newly discovered feature of the cytokine MIF could be potentially important for commercially produced insulin, for increasing its stability and/or bioavailability.

  14. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Staiano, Rosaria I; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol,N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine,N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, and N-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling

  15. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, Rosaria I.; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine, N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, and N-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular

  16. Macrophage Infiltration is a Causative Factor for Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy through the Activation of Collagen Production in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeyuki; Hara, Masamitsu; Kumamaru, Hiromi; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Yokota, Kazuya; Kijima, Ken; Yoshizaki, Shingo; Harimaya, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Hayashida, Mitsumasa; Inagaki, Yutaka; Shiba, Keiichiro; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Okada, Seiji

    2017-09-18

    Ligamentum flavum (LF) hypertrophy causes lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leading to leg pain and disability in activities of daily living in elderly individuals. Although there have been previous studies on LF hypertrophy, its pathomechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that infiltrating macrophages were a causative factor for LF hypertrophy. Induction of macrophages into the mouse LF by applying a micro-injury resulted in LF hypertrophy along with collagen accumulation and fibroblasts proliferation at the injured site, which were very similar to the characteristics observed in the severely hypertrophied LF of human. However, we found that macrophage depletion by injecting clodronate-containing liposomes counteracted LF hypertrophy even with micro-injury. For identification of fibroblasts in the LF, we utilized collagen type 1 alpha 2 linked to green fluorescent protein (COL1a2-GFP) transgenic mice, and selectively isolated GFP-positive fibroblasts from the micro-injured LF using laser microdissection (LMD). A quantitative RT-PCR on LMD samples showed that the gene expression of collagen markedly increased in the fibroblasts at the injured site with infiltrating macrophages compared to the uninjured location. These results suggested that macrophage infiltration was crucial for LF hypertrophy by stimulating collagen production in fibroblasts, providing better understanding the pathophysiology of LF hypertrophy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Migration Inhibitory Factor and Macrophage Bactericidal Function

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Harvey B.; Sheagren, John N.

    1972-01-01

    A homogeneous population of immunologically active lymphocytes was obtained from peritoneal exudates of guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity to bovine gamma globulin (BGG). The lymphocytes were cultured with and without BGG for 24 hr, and cell-free supernatant fluids were then assayed simultaneously for their ability to influence two in vitro parameters of macrophage function: migration from capillary tubes and bactericidal capacity. In four consecutive experiments, supernatants from antigenically stimulated lymphocytes exhibited substantial migration-inhibitory-factor activity without enhancing the ability of macrophages to kill Listeria monocytogenes. Lymphocyte lysates were inactive in both assays. Possible mechanisms of lymphocyte-macrophage interactions are discussed. PMID:4120244

  18. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thyroxine is a potential endogenous antagonist of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abed, Yousef; Metz, Christine N.; Cheng, Kai Fan; Aljabari, Bayan; VanPatten, Sonya; Blau, Steven; Lee, Hans; Ochani, Mahendar; Pavlov, Valentin A.; Coleman, Thomas; Meurice, Nathalie; Tracey, Kevin J.; Miller, Edmund J.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormally low plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones during sepsis often occur in the absence of thyroidal illness; however, the mechanisms involved in the “euthyroid sick syndrome” remain poorly understood. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized interaction between the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) and the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), together with its clinical relevance in sepsis. We found that in both patients with severe sepsis, and our rodent model, low plasma T4 concentrations were inversely correlated with plasma MIF concentrations. The MIF molecule contains a hydrophobic pocket that is important for many of its proinflammatory activities. Binding of L-T4 (or its hormonally inert isomer D-T4) significantly, and dose-dependently, inhibited the catalytic activity of this pocket. Moreover, administration of exogenous D-T4 significantly improved survival in mice with severe sepsis. To examine the specificity of the MIF∶T4 interaction, wild-type and MIF knockout mice were subjected to the carrageenan-air pouch model of inflammation and then treated with D-T4 or vehicle. D-T4 significantly inhibited leukocyte infiltration in wild-type mice but not in MIF knockout mice, providing evidence that in vivo T4 may influence MIF-mediated inflammatory responses via inhibition of its hydrophobic proinflammatory pocket. These findings demonstrate a new physiological role for T4 as a natural inhibitor of MIF proinflammatory activity. The data may also, in part, explain the low plasma T4 concentrations in critically ill, euthyroid patients and suggest that targeting the imbalance between MIF and T4 may be beneficial in improving outcome from sepsis. PMID:21536912

  20. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium for human monocytes: absence of macrophage-activating factor activity of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Toba, H; Crawford, J T; Ellner, J J

    1989-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a frequent opportunistic pathogen in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We compared 12 strains of M. avium in an in vitro model of pathogenicity. Peripheral blood-derived monocytes from healthy individuals were infected with M. avium in vitro. Bacterial uptake and intracellular replication were assessed by microscopic count of acid-fast bacilli and CFU of bacteria, respectively, in lysed monocytes. The CFU assay showed that among five AIDS-associated strains, only one replicated in monocytes. Two of seven non-AIDS-associated strains replicated intracellularly. In addition, we examined the effect of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) on M. avium infection. IFN-gamma treatment of monocytes decreased phagocytosis and had no effect on the intracellular replication of M. avium. Thus, most strains of M. avium do not multiply within monocytes from healthy individuals and IFN-gamma does not have macrophage-activating factor activity for M. avium infection of human monocytes. PMID:2491838

  1. Identification and characterization of a non-interferon antileishmanial macrophage activating factor (antileishmanial MAF).

    PubMed

    Van Niel, A; Zacks, S E; David, J R; Remold, H G; Weiser, W Y

    1988-01-01

    A non-interferon lymphokine elaborated from PHA and Con A-stimulated human T-cell hybridoma, T-CEMA, has been found to activate monocyte-derived macrophages for the intracellular killing of L. donovani (antileishmanial MAF). This T-cell hybridoma derived antileishmanial MAF which has an apparent mw of 65,000 and pI of 5.3-5.6, contains neither antiviral activity nor colony stimulating activity. Furthermore, antileishmanial MAF is not neutralized by anti-MIF, anti-IFN-gamma or anti-GM-CSF antibodies.

  2. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years.

  3. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  4. Effect of transcription factor GATA-2 on phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages from Pneumocystis carinii-infected hosts.

    PubMed

    Lasbury, Mark E; Tang, Xing; Durant, Pamela J; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2003-09-01

    Alveolar macrophages from Pneumocystis carinii-infected hosts are defective in phagocytosis (W. Chen, J. W. Mills, and A. G. Harmsen, Int. J. Exp. Pathol. 73:709-720, 1992; H. Koziel et al., J. Clin. Investig. 102:1332-1344, 1998). Experiments were performed to determine whether this defect is specific for P. carinii organisms. The results showed that these macrophages were unable to phagocytose both P. carinii organisms and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated latex beads, indicating that alveolar macrophages from P. carinii-infected hosts have a general defect in phagocytosis. To determine whether this defect correlates with the recently discovered down-regulation of the GATA-2 transcription factor gene during P. carinii infection, alveolar macrophages from dexamethasone-suppressed or healthy rats were treated with anti-GATA-2 oligonucleotides and then assayed for phagocytosis. Aliquots of the alveolar macrophages were also treated with the sense oligonucleotides as the control. Cells treated with the antisense oligonucleotides were found to have a 46% reduction in phagocytosis of P. carinii organisms and a 65% reduction in phagocytosis of FITC-latex beads compared to those treated with the sense oligonucleotides. To determine whether the defect in phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages from P. carinii-infected hosts can be corrected by overexpression of GATA-2, a plasmid containing the rat GATA-2 gene in the sense orientation driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter was introduced into alveolar macrophages from P. carinii-infected rats. Aliquots of the same cells transfected with a plasmid containing GATA-2 in the antisense orientation relative to the CMV promoter served as the control. Alveolar macrophages treated with the sense GATA-2 expression construct were found to increase their phagocytic activity by 66% in phagocytosis of P. carinii organisms and by 280% in phagocytosis of FITC-latex beads compared to those that received the antisense GATA-2

  5. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  6. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S.; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Results A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC–UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. Conclusions These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. PMID

  7. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-06-20

    American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC-UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell-derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase on the bioactivity of macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Takashi; Uematsu, Takashi; Yamaoka, Minoru; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) produced by human salivary gland adenocarcinoma (SGA) cells on the bioactivity of macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). High exo-alpha-NaGalase activity was detected in the SGA cell line HSG. HSG alpha-NaGalase had both exo- and endo-enzyme activities, cleaving the Gal-GalNAc and GalNAc residues linked to Thr/Ser but not releasing the [NeuAc2-6]GalNac residue. Furthermore, GcMAF enzymatically prepared from the Gc protein enhanced the superoxide-generation capacity and phagocytic activity of monocytes/macrophages. However, GcMAF treated with purified alpha-NaGalase did not exhibit these effects. Thus, HSG possesses the capacity to produce larger quantities of alpha-NaGalase, which inactivates GcMAF produced from Gc protein, resulting in reduced phagocytic activity and superoxide-generation capacity of monocytes/macrophages. The present data strongly suggest that HSG alpha-NaGalase acts as an immunodeficiency factor in cancer patients.

  9. Neuroprotective Activities of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Following Controlled Cortical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Matthew L.; Elliott, Bret R.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is facilitated by innate and adaptive immunity and can be harnessed to effect brain repair. In mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) we show that treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) affects regulatory T cell numbers coincident with decreased lesion volumes and increased cortical tissue sparing. This paralleled increases in neurofilament and diminished reactive microglial staining. Transcriptomic analysis showed that GM-CSF induces robust immune neuroprotective responses seven days following CCI. Together, these results support the therapeutic potential of GM-CSF for TBI. PMID:25468272

  10. Structural definition of a potent macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein with adjuvant activity for antibody production.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N

    1996-10-01

    Incubation of human vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), with a mixture of immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, efficiently generated a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, and isolation of the intermediates with immobilized lectins, revealed that either sequence of hydrolysis of Gc glycoprotein by these glycosidases yields the macrophage-activating factor, implying that Gc protein carries a trisaccharide composed of N-acetylgalactosamine and dibranched galactose and sialic acid termini. A 3 hr incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with picomolar amounts of the enzymatically generated macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) resulted in a greatly enhanced phagocytic activity. Administration of a minute amount (10-50 pg/mouse) of GcMAF resulted in a seven- to nine-fold enhanced phagocytic activity of macrophages. Injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) along with GcMAF into mice produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days.

  11. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  12. Association of the macrophage activating factor (MAF) precursor activity with polymorphism in vitamin D-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Shinichi; Hori, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (Gc protein or DBP) is a highly expressed polymorphic protein, which is a precursor of the inflammation-primed macrophage activating factor, GcMAF, by a cascade of carbohydrate processing reactions. In order to elucidate the relationship between Gc polymorphism and GcMAF precursor activity, we estimated the phagocytic ability of three homotypes of Gc protein, Gc1F-1F, Gc1S-1S and Gc2-2, through processing of their carbohydrate moiety. We performed Gc typing of human serum samples by isoelectric focusing (IEF). Gc protein from human serum was purified by affinity chromatography with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-sepharose. A phagocytosis assay of Gc proteins, modified using beta-glycosidase and sialidase, was carried out. The Gc1F-1F phenotype was revealed to possess Galbeta1-4GalNAc linkage by the analysis of GcMAF precursor activity using beta1-4 linkage-specific galactosidase from jack bean. The GcMAF precursor activity of the Gc1F-1F phenotype was highest among three Gc homotypes. The Gc polymorphism and carbohydrate diversity of Gc protein are significant for its pleiotropic effects.

  13. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vendrame, Celia Maria Vieira; Carvalho, Marcia Dias Teixeira; Tempone, Andre Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I on interactions between L. (L.) amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L.) amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms. PMID:25294956

  14. Sesamin inhibits macrophage-induced vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and proangiogenic activity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Chung; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Wu, Yu-Chen; Lin, Sue-Jane; Chang, Ching-Chun; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2011-06-01

    Sesamin is a sesame component with antihypertensive and antioxidative activities and has recently aroused much interest in studying its potential anticancer application. Macrophage is one of the infiltrating inflammatory cells in solid tumor and may promote tumor progression via enhancement of tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether sesamin inhibited macrophage-enhanced proangiogenic activity of breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Using vascular endothelial cell capillary tube and network formation assays, both breast cancer cell lines exhibited elevated proangiogenic activities after coculture with macrophages or pretreatment with macrophage-conditioned medium. This elevation of proangiogenic activity was drastically suppressed by sesamin. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) induced by macrophages in both cell lines were also inhibited by sesamin. Nuclear levels of HIF-1α and NF-κB, important transcription factors for VEGF and MMP-9 expression, respectively, were obviously reduced by sesamin. VEGF induction by macrophage in MCF-7 cells was shown to be via ERK, JNK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and NF-κB-mediated pathways. These signaling molecules and additional p38(MAPK) were also involved in macrophage-induced MMP-9 expression. Despite such diverse pathways were induced by macrophage, only Akt and p38(MAPK) activities were potently inhibited by sesamin. Expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α were substantially increased and involved in macrophage-induced VEGF and MMP-9 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells. Sesamin effectively inhibited the expression of these cytokines to avoid the reinforced induction of VEGF and MMP-9. In conclusion, sesamin potently inhibited macrophage-enhanced proangiogenic activity of breast cancer cells via inhibition of VEGF and MMP-9 induction.

  15. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor interacts with HBx and inhibits its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shimeng; Lin Ruxian; Zhou Zhe; Wen Siyuan; Lin Li; Chen Suhong; Shan Yajun; Cong Yuwen; Wang Shengqi . E-mail: sqwang@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-04-07

    HBx, a transcriptional transactivating protein of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. We used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify that HBx interacts with MIF directly. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation, cell growth, and even tumor formation. The interaction between HBx and MIF was verified with co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, and cellular colocalization. The expression of MIF was up-regulated in HBV particle producing cell 2.2.15 compared with HepG2 cell. Both HBx and MIF cause HepG2 cell G /G{sub 1} phase arrest, proliferation inhibition, and apoptosis. However, MIF can counteract the apoptotic effect of HBx. These results may provide evidence to explain the link between HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection.

  17. Regulation of inflammation-primed activation of macrophages by two serum factors, vitamin D3-binding protein and albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, N; Kumashiro, R; Yamamoto, M; Willett, N P; Lindsay, D D

    1993-01-01

    A very small amount (0.0005 to 0.001%) of an ammonium sulfate [50% saturated (NH4)2SO4]-precipitable protein fraction of alpha 2-globulin efficiently supported inflammation-primed activation of macrophages. This fraction contains vitamin D3-binding protein essential for macrophage activation. Comparative macrophage activation studies with fetal calf serum, alpha 2-globulin fraction, 50% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate, and purified bovine vitamin D3-binding protein revealed that fetal calf serum and alpha 2-globulin fraction appear to contain an inhibitor for macrophage activation while ammonium sulfate precipitate contains no inhibitor. This inhibitor was found to be serum albumin. When bovine serum albumin (25 micrograms/ml) was added to a medium supplemented with 0.0005 to 0.05% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate or 1 to 10 ng of vitamin D3-binding protein per ml, activation of macrophages was inhibited. PMID:8225612

  18. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    PubMed

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  19. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy.

  20. Design of Recombinant Stem Cell Factor macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Fusion Proteins and their Biological Activity In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuelang; Zhan, Chenyang; Zang, Yuhui; Qin, Junchuan

    2005-05-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can act in synergistic way to promote the growth of mononuclear phagocytes. SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were designed on the computer using the Homology and Biopolymer modules of the software packages InsightII. Several existing crystal structures were used as templates to generate models of the complexes of receptor with fusion protein. The structure rationality of the fusion protein incorporated a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed on InsightII system. Then, a suitable peptide GGGGSGGGGSGG was chosen for the fusion protein. Two recombinant SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were generated by construction of a plasmid in which the coding regions of human SCF (1-165aa) and M-CSF (1-149aa) cDNA were connected by this linker peptide coding sequence followed by subsequent expression in insect cell. The results of Western blot and activity analysis showed that these two recombinant fusion proteins existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of 84 KD under non-reducing conditions and a monomer of 42 KD at reducing condition. The results of cell proliferation assays showed that each fusion protein induced a dose-dependent proliferative response. At equimolar concentration, SCF/M-CSF was about 20 times more potent than the standard monomeric SCF in stimulating TF-1 cell line growth, while M-CSF/SCF was 10 times of monomeric SCF. No activity difference of M-CSF/SCF or SCF/M-CSF to M-CSF (at same molar) was found in stimulating the HL-60 cell linear growth. The synergistic effect of SCF and M-CSF moieties in the fusion proteins was demonstrated by the result of clonogenic assay performed with human bone mononuclear, in which both SCF/M-CSF and M-CSF/SCF induced much higher number of CFU-M than equimolar amount of SCF or M-CSF or that of two cytokines mixture.

  1. Metformin Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced Inflammatory Response in Murine Macrophages via Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3) Induction*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyoung; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Yun-Seung; Rhee, Sang Dahl; Kim, Kwang Rok; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, a well known antidiabetic agent that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity, also elicits anti-inflammatory actions, but its mechanism is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect of metformin action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. Metformin inhibited LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner and in parallel induction of activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a transcription factor and member of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein family. ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of metformin on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production accompanied with reversal of metformin-induced suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Conversely, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and NF-κB suppression by metformin were unaffected by ATF-3 knockdown. ChIP-PCR analysis revealed that LPS-induced NF-κB enrichments on the promoters of IL-6 and TNF-α were replaced by ATF-3 upon metformin treatment. AMPK knockdown blunted all the effects of metformin (ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation), suggesting that AMPK activation by metformin is required for and precedes ATF-3 induction. Oral administration of metformin to either mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia or ob/ob mice lowered the plasma and tissue levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased ATF-3 expression in spleen and lungs. These results suggest that metformin exhibits anti-inflammatory action in macrophages at least in part via pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:24973221

  2. Metformin suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in murine macrophages via activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) induction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Yun-Seung; Rhee, Sang Dahl; Kim, Kwang Rok; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2014-08-15

    Metformin, a well known antidiabetic agent that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity, also elicits anti-inflammatory actions, but its mechanism is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect of metformin action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. Metformin inhibited LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner and in parallel induction of activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a transcription factor and member of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein family. ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of metformin on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production accompanied with reversal of metformin-induced suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Conversely, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and NF-κB suppression by metformin were unaffected by ATF-3 knockdown. ChIP-PCR analysis revealed that LPS-induced NF-κB enrichments on the promoters of IL-6 and TNF-α were replaced by ATF-3 upon metformin treatment. AMPK knockdown blunted all the effects of metformin (ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation), suggesting that AMPK activation by metformin is required for and precedes ATF-3 induction. Oral administration of metformin to either mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia or ob/ob mice lowered the plasma and tissue levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased ATF-3 expression in spleen and lungs. These results suggest that metformin exhibits anti-inflammatory action in macrophages at least in part via pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor family related protein (GITR) mediates inflammatory activation of macrophages that can destabilize atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Jung; Bae, Eun-Mi; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Bae, Hyung-Uk; Hong, Su Hyung; Lee, Joo Y; Park, Jeong-Euy; Kwon, Byoung S; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Won-Ha

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor family related protein (GITR) is the 18th member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF18) and is known to interact with its cognate ligand GITRL (TNFSF18). We investigated the potential role of GITR in the pro-inflammatory activation of macrophages. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization analyses of human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated that GITR and its ligand are expressed mainly in lipid-rich macrophages. We then investigated the role of GITR in human and mouse monocyte/macrophage functions. Stimulation of GITR caused nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in both the human and mouse monocytic/macrophage cell lines, THP-1 and RAW264.7, respectively. These cellular responses were also observed when the THP-1 cells were treated with phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA), which is known to induce macrophage differentiation. To demonstrate that these responses are not restricted to cultured cell lines, we tested primary macrophages. Both peritoneal and bone marrow-derived macrophages responded to GITR stimulation with induction of MMP-9 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Furthermore, the GITR staining pattern overlapped with those of MMP-9 and TNF-α in atherosclerotic plaques. These data indicate that GITR-mediated macrophage activation may promote atherogenesis via the induction of pro-atherogenic cytokines/chemokines, and destabilize the atherosclerotic plaques via the induction of the matrix-degrading enzyme, MMP-9. PMID:17067317

  4. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  5. Effects of resveratrol and ethanol on production of pro-inflammatory factors from endotoxin activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong-Hong; Zou, Jian-Ping; Li, Xiao-Yu

    2002-11-01

    To study the interaction of resveratrol and ethanol on the production of pro-inflammatory factors from activated murine peritoneal macrophages (MPM). NO production was measured with Griess assay; IL-1 production was measured through thymocyte co-stimulating assay; IL-6 and TNF-alpha were detected by ELISA method. Resveratrol (6.25, 12.5, 25 micromol/L) and ethanol (0.2 %, 0.8 %) synergistically inhibited the 24 h production of NO from lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 mg/L) and IFN-gamma (5 kU/L) stimulated MPM; resveratrol at higher dose (25 micromol/L) also inhibited IL-6 production. Ethanol additively strengthened this effect. Ethanol had no significant influence on 24 h MPM IL-1 production, but it promoted the ability of resveratrol on enhancing the IL-1 release from activated MPM. Low doses of ethanol inhibited 24 h production of TNF-alpha, however, both dose of ethanol enhanced the promoting effect of resveratrol on TNF-alpha production. Resveratrol and ethanol can interact to influence the production of macrophage function molecules, which is noteworthy in evaluating the health-care effect of wine consumption.

  6. Allograft-inflammatory factor-1 in rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, neuritis, and uveitis: expression by activated macrophages and microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Schluesener, H J; Seid, K; Kretzschmar, J; Meyermann, R

    1998-10-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a Ca2+ binding peptide expressed predominantly by activated monocytes. In order to investigate the role of AIF-1 in autoimmune lesions of the rat nervous system, we have used a synthetic gene to express AIF-1 in E. coli and have produced monoclonal antibodies against AIF-1. AIF-1 was localized to monocytes/macrophages with rather selective staining of a minor rat monocyte subpopulation of lymphoid tissue. We then investigated expression of AIF-1 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), neuritis (EAN), and uveitis (EAU). Within the local inflammatory lesions, infiltrating macrophages are prominently stained. In the diseased brain, AIF-1-positive microglial cells are not only found in the direct vicinity of the infiltrate, but widespread activation is seen in the parenchyma. This is the first demonstration that AIF-1 is present in autoimmune lesions. Immunostaining of microglial cells is noteworthy, as these cells are strategically placed regulatory elements of CNS immunosurveillance. Thus, AIF-1 might be a valuable marker to dissect the local monocyte heterogeneity in autoimmune disease.

  7. Receptor binding and cellular uptake studies of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): use of biologically active labeled MIF derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kleemann, Robert; Grell, Matthias; Mischke, Ralf; Zimmermann, Gudrun; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2002-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine for which a receptor has not been identified. That MIF has intracellular functions has been suggested by its enzymatic activity and constitutive expression profile. The discovery of functional MIF-c-Jun activation domain binding protein 1 (JAB1) binding has confirmed this notion and indicated that nonreceptor-based signaling mechanisms are important for MIF function. Here, we have generated and tested several biologically active labeled MIF derivatives to further define target protein binding by MIF and its cellular uptake characteristics. (35)S-MIF, biotinylated MIF, and fluoresceinated MIF were demonstrated to exhibit full biologic activity. Neither by applying a standard iodinated MIF preparation nor by using the biologically active (35)S-MIF derivative in receptor-binding studies were we able to measure any receptor-binding activity on numerous cells, confirming that uptake of MIF into target cells and MIF signaling can occur by receptor-independent pathways. When MIF derivatives were applied in cellular uptake studies, MIF was found to be endocytosed into both immune and nonimmune cells and targeted to the cytosol and lysosomes. The entry of MIF was temperature and energy dependent and was inhibited by monodansylcadaverine but not by ouabain. Endocytosed biotin-MIF bound JAB1 not only in macrophages, as shown previously, but also in nonimmune cells. A tagged MIF construct, MIF-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was shown to be a valuable tool, as EGFP constructs of critical MIF cysteine mutants exhibited identical cellular localization properties to those of wild-type MIF (wtMIF). Our results indicate that MIF membrane receptors are not widely expressed, if at all, and suggest that the cellular uptake of MIF occurs by nonreceptor-mediated endocytosis rather than penetration. All the derivatives investigated, except for iodinated MIF, represent valuable tools for further MIF target

  8. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-GuC)rin) activates disabled naC/ve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-N1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1N2), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-N2) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions.

  9. Effects of Activated Macrophages on Nocardia asteroides

    PubMed Central

    Filice, Gregory A.; Beaman, Blaine L.; Remington, Jack S.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism(s) of host resistance against Nocardia asteroides has not been well defined. Since disease due to N. asteroides frequently occurs in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, we studied the interaction of N. asteroides with activated and control mouse peritoneal macrophages. Activated macrophages were from mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii or injected with Corynebacterium parvum. N. asteroides in the early stationary phase (>99% in the coccobacillary form) was used for challenge of macrophage monolayers. Growth of two strains of N. asteroides was markedly inhibited in activated macrophages, whereas N. asteroides grew well in control macrophages. Quantitation of macrophage-associated N. asteroides indicated that activated macrophages killed 40 to 50% of N. asteroides within 6 h (P < 0.002). In control macrophage preparations, it appeared as if Nocardia filaments extended from within macrophages to the outside, and many of these filaments appeared to have extended to and then grown through neighboring macrophages. In activated macrophage preparations, Nocardia remained in the coccobacillary form in most macrophages. Control macrophage monolayers were almost completely overgrown with and destroyed by Nocardia 20 h after challenge, whereas activated macrophage monolayers remained intact. Nocardia that grew in control macrophages were not acid-alcohol fast or only weakly so, whereas the few Nocardia that grew in activated macrophages were strongly acid-alcohol fast. Our results indicate that activated macrophages may be important in host defense against N. asteroides. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6991421

  10. S. aureus blocks efferocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages through the activity of its virulence factor alpha toxin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor S.; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Hotz, Meghan; Cheng, Lily; Miller, Lloyd S.; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C. Kendall; Sellman, Bret R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with an influx of inflammatory neutrophils into the lung tissue and airways. Regulation and clearance of recruited neutrophils is essential for preventing tissue damage by “friendly fire”, a responsibility of macrophages in a process called efferocytosis. We hypothesized that S. aureus impairs efferocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) through the activity of the secreted virulence factor alpha toxin (AT), which has been implicated in altering the antimicrobial function of AMs. Infection of mice lacking AMs resulted in significantly increased numbers of neutrophils in the lung, while clearance of neutrophils delivered intranasally into uninfected mice was reduced in AM depleted animals. In vitro, sublytic levels of AT impaired uptake of apoptotic neutrophils by purified AMs. In vivo, the presence of AT reduced uptake of neutrophils by AMs. Differential uptake of neutrophils was not due to changes in either the CD47/CD172 axis or CD36 levels. AT significantly reduced lung expression of CCN1 and altered AM surface localization of DD1α, two proteins known to influence efferocytosis. We conclude that AT may contribute to tissue damage during S. aureus pneumonia by inhibiting the ability of AM to clear neutrophils at the site of infection. PMID:27739519

  11. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in the skin of patient with localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Higashi-Kuwata, Nobuyo; Makino, Takamitsu; Inoue, Yuji; Takeya, Motohiro; Ihn, Hironobu

    2009-08-01

    Localized scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that is limited to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Macrophages have been reported to be particularly activated in patients with skin disease including systemic sclerosis and are potentially important sources for fibrosis-inducing cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta. To clarify the features of immunohistochemical characterization of the immune cell infiltrates in localized scleroderma focusing on macrophages, skin biopsy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry. The number of cells stained with monoclonal antibodies, CD68, CD163 and CD204, was calculated. An evident macrophage infiltrate and increased number of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in their fibrotic areas were observed along with their severity of inflammation. This study revealed that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) may be a potential source of fibrosis-inducing cytokines in localized scleroderma, and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma.

  12. Secretion of a macrophage-activating factor distinct from interferon-gamma by human T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Andrew, P W; Rees, A D; Scoging, A; Dobson, N; Matthews, R; Whittall, J T; Coates, A R; Lowrie, D B

    1984-10-01

    Supernatants from clones of human T lymphocytes that were responding to a purified Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen were able to activate macrophages and macrophage-like myeloma cells (U937) to release increased amounts of the microbicidal agent hydrogen peroxide. The activity was not neutralized by monoclonal antibody against interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), was greater than could be accounted for by the IFN-gamma activity in the supernatants, and was separated from IFN-gamma by high performance liquid chromatography. It is evident that IFN-gamma is not the only macrophage activator released by T lymphocytes responding to microbial antigen, and may not even be the main one to enhance antimicrobial activity in infections such as tuberculosis.

  13. Macrophage cell death and transcriptional response are actively triggered by the fungal virulence factor Cbp1 during H. capsulatum infection

    PubMed Central

    English, Bevin C.; Murray, Davina Hocking; Lee, Young Nam; Coady, Alison; Sil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Summary Microbial pathogens induce or inhibit death of host cells during infection, with significant consequences for virulence and disease progression. Death of an infected host cell can either facilitate release and dissemination of intracellular pathogens or promote pathogen clearance. Histoplasma capsulatum is an intracellular fungal pathogen that replicates robustly within macrophages and triggers macrophage lysis by unknown means. To identify H. capsulatum effectors of macrophage lysis, we performed a genetic screen and discovered three mutants that grew to wild-type levels within macrophages but failed to elicit host-cell death. Each mutant was defective in production of the previously identified secreted protein Cbp1 (calcium-binding protein 1), whose role in intracellular growth had not been fully investigated. We found that Cbp1 was dispensable for high levels of intracellular growth, but required to elicit a unique transcriptional signature in macrophages, including genes whose induction was previously associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and host-cell death. Additionally Cbp1 was required for activation of cell-death caspases-3/7, and macrophage death during H. capsulatum infection was dependent on the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that the ability of Cbp1 to actively program host-cell death is an essential step in H. capsulatum pathogenesis. PMID:26288377

  14. Macrophage cell death and transcriptional response are actively triggered by the fungal virulence factor Cbp1 during H. capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Dervla T; Berkes, Charlotte A; English, Bevin C; Hocking Murray, Davina; Lee, Young Nam; Coady, Alison; Sil, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Microbial pathogens induce or inhibit death of host cells during infection, with significant consequences for virulence and disease progression. Death of an infected host cell can either facilitate release and dissemination of intracellular pathogens or promote pathogen clearance. Histoplasma capsulatum is an intracellular fungal pathogen that replicates robustly within macrophages and triggers macrophage lysis by unknown means. To identify H. capsulatum effectors of macrophage lysis, we performed a genetic screen and discovered three mutants that grew to wild-type levels within macrophages but failed to elicit host-cell death. Each mutant was defective in production of the previously identified secreted protein Cbp1 (calcium-binding protein 1), whose role in intracellular growth had not been fully investigated. We found that Cbp1 was dispensable for high levels of intracellular growth but required to elicit a unique transcriptional signature in macrophages, including genes whose induction was previously associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and host-cell death. Additionally, Cbp1 was required for activation of cell-death caspases-3/7, and macrophage death during H. capsulatum infection was dependent on the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that the ability of Cbp1 to actively program host-cell death is an essential step in H. capsulatum pathogenesis.

  15. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  16. Early activation of splenic macrophages by tumor necrosis factor alpha is important in determining the outcome of experimental histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Hsieh, B A; Lee, G S; Franco, M; Hofman, F M

    1992-01-01

    Experimental infection of animals with Histoplasma capsulatum caused a massive macrophage infiltration into the spleen and induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) locally. The cytokine was also produced in vitro by peritoneal exudate macrophages exposed to a large inoculum of yeast cells. Depletion of the cytokine by injection of polyclonal sheep anti-TNF-alpha antibody was detrimental to sublethally infected mice. Fungous burdens in the spleens of TNF-alpha-depleted mice were higher than they were in the infected control mice at days 2, 7, and 9 after infection, and the antibody-treated animals succumbed to the infection. Histopathological study of spleen sections revealed that splenic macrophages were not able to control proliferation of intracellular yeasts as a result of TNF-alpha depletion. It seems that TNF-alpha plays a role in early activation of splenic macrophages which is important in controlling the outcome of an infection. Images PMID:1398934

  17. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity.

    PubMed

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Sanders, Rogier W

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF) chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF) proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF) should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  18. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  19. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo JV; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort of patients with histologically diverse, advanced neoplasms, generally considered as “incurable” diseases. In most cases, GcMAF therapy was initiated at late stages of tumor progression. As this is an open-label, non-controlled, retrospective analysis, caution must be employed when establishing cause-effect relationships between the administration GcMAF and disease outcome. However, the response to GcMAF was generally robust and some trends emerged. All patients (n = 20) presented with elevated serum nagalase activity, well above normal values. All patients but one showed a significant decrease of serum nagalase activity upon weekly GcMAF injections. Decreased nagalase activity was associated with improved clinical conditions and no adverse side effects were reported. The observations reported here confirm and extend previous results and pave the way to further studies aimed at assessing the precise role and indications for GcMAF-based anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:24179708

  20. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo Jv; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-08-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort of patients with histologically diverse, advanced neoplasms, generally considered as "incurable" diseases. In most cases, GcMAF therapy was initiated at late stages of tumor progression. As this is an open-label, non-controlled, retrospective analysis, caution must be employed when establishing cause-effect relationships between the administration GcMAF and disease outcome. However, the response to GcMAF was generally robust and some trends emerged. All patients (n = 20) presented with elevated serum nagalase activity, well above normal values. All patients but one showed a significant decrease of serum nagalase activity upon weekly GcMAF injections. Decreased nagalase activity was associated with improved clinical conditions and no adverse side effects were reported. The observations reported here confirm and extend previous results and pave the way to further studies aimed at assessing the precise role and indications for GcMAF-based anticancer immunotherapy.

  1. Thymus-derived lymphocytes and their interactions with macrophages are required for the production of osteoclast-activating factor in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, M; Vignery, A; Gershon, R K; Baron, R

    1984-01-01

    A bone-resorbing factor, comparable to the osteoclast-activating factor (OAF) produced from peripheral blood leukocytes, is shown to be produced by murine spleen cells activated with the T-cell mitogen Con A. Murine OAF is demonstrated here as being a product of the interaction between thymus-derived T lymphocytes and macrophages. Activation of T cells in the presence of macrophages with Con A yields culture supernatants with OAF activity. This OAF activity is not dialyzable and is not extracted by lipid solvents. Purified B cells in the presence or absence of macrophages and cocultured with Con A or activated with the B-cell-specific mitogen lipopolysaccharide yield culture supernatants with no detectable OAF activity. Similarly, macrophages cocultured with Con A or activated with lipopolysaccharide fail to yield culture supernatants with bone resorbing activity. These types of immune cell interactions are similar to that required for the production of lymphokines. These data support the hypothesis that one aspect of regulation of bone remodeling is through cells of the immune system. PMID:6609360

  2. Intracellular multiplication of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in macrophages: killing and restriction of multiplication by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of coculturing yeast-form Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with murine cells was studied. Coculture of resident peritoneal or pulmonary macrophages with P. brasiliensis for 72 h dramatically enhanced fungal multiplication 19.3 +/- 2.4- and 4.7 +/- 0.8-fold, respectively, compared with cocultures with lymph node cells or complete tissue culture medium alone. Support of P. brasiliensis multiplication by resident peritoneal macrophages was macrophage dose dependent. Lysates of macrophages, supernatants from macrophage cultures, or McVeigh-Morton broth, like complete tissue culture medium, did not support multiplication of P. brasiliensis in 72-h cultures. Time course microscopic studies of cocultures in slide wells showed that macrophages ingested P. brasiliensis cells and that the ingested cells multiplied intracellularly. In sharp contrast to resident macrophages, lymphokine-activated peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages not only prevented multiplication but reduced inoculum CFU by 96 and 100%, respectively, in 72 h. Microscopic studies confirmed killing and digestion of P. brasiliensis ingested by activated macrophages in 48 h. These findings indicate that resident macrophages are permissive for intracellular multiplication of P. brasiliensis and that this could be a factor in pathogenicity. By contrast, activated macrophages are fungicidal for P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:2744848

  3. MIF-driven activation of macrophages induces killing of intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi dependent on endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cutrullis, Romina A; Petray, Patricia B; Corral, Ricardo S

    2017-02-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key player in innate immunity. MIF has been considered critical for controlling acute infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Our study aimed to analyze whether MIF could favor microbicidal activity of the macrophage, a site where T. cruzi grows and the initial effector cell against this parasite. Using murine macrophages infected in vitro, we examined the effect of MIF on their parasiticidal ability and attempted to identify inflammatory agents involved in MIF-induced protection. Our findings show that MIF is readily secreted from peritoneal macrophages upon T. cruzi infection. MIF activates both primary and J774 phagocytes boosting the endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 signaling, as well as the release of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, leading to enhanced pathogen elimination. MIF can also potentiate the effect of interferon-gamma on T. cruzi killing by J774 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, rendering these cells more competent in reducing intracellular parasite burden. The present results unveil a novel innate immune pathway that contributes to host defense and broaden our understanding of the regulation of inflammatory mediators implicated in early parasite containment that is decisive for resistance to T. cruzi infection.

  4. A Membrane Protease Regulates Energy Production in Macrophages by Activating Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1 via a Non-proteolytic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Most cells produce ATP in the mitochondria by oxidative phosphorylation. However, macrophages, which are major players in the innate immune system, use aerobic glycolysis to produce ATP. HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates expression of glycolysis-related genes and maintains macrophage glycolytic activity. However, it is unclear how HIF-1 activity is maintained in macrophages during normoxia. In this study, we found that macrophages lacking membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14), a potent invasion-promoting protease, exhibited considerably lower ATP levels than wild-type cells. HIF-1 was activated by an unanticipated function of MT1-MMP, which led to the stimulation of ATP production via glycolysis. The cytoplasmic tail of MT1-MMP bound to FIH-1 (factor inhibiting HIF-1), which led to the inhibition of the latter by its recently identified inhibitor, Mint3/APBA3. We have thus identified a new function of MT1-MMP to mediate production of ATP so as to support energy-dependent macrophage functions by a previously unknown non-proteolytic mechanism. PMID:20663879

  5. Functional characterization of the turkey macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to clone the turkey MIF (TkMIF) gene, express the active protein, and characte...

  6. Macrophage-activating T-cell factor(s) produced in an early phase of Legionella pneumophila infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Y; Yoshida, S; Goto, Y; Mizuguchi, Y; Kuroiwa, A

    1989-01-01

    Protective immunity of guinea pigs against Legionella pneumophila was studied by infecting the animals with a sublethal dose (about 2 x 10(4) CFU) of the organism. The bacteria multiplied in the liver, spleen, and lungs up to day 4 after the intraperitoneal infection. The live bacteria in these organs decreased quickly thereafter and were eliminated by day 7. A delayed-type skin reaction and lymphoproliferation of spleen cells to Formalin-killed L. pneumophila were detected from days 5 and 6, respectively, after infection. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from guinea pigs infected 6 days previously inhibited the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from infected guinea pigs inhibited the intracellular growth of the organism in macrophages obtained from uninfected animals. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from spleen cells treated with anti-guinea pig T-cell monoclonal antibody did not inhibit growth. The activity of antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor was labile to pH 2 treatment, and the factor could not be absorbed by L. pneumophila antigen, suggesting that it contains gamma interferon. Our data show that T-cell-mediated immunity begins to work from an early period of infection with L. pneumophila in guinea pigs. PMID:2807531

  7. Precursor frequency analysis of lymphokine-secreting alloreactive T lymphocytes. Dissociation of subsets producing interleukin 2, macrophage-activating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor on the basis of Lyt-2 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The frequencies of precursors of C57BL/6 T lymphocytes that respond to DBA/2 alloantigens by secreting the lymphokines interleukin 2 (IL-2), macrophage-activating factor (MAF), and granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have been directly compared with cytolytic T lymphocyte precursor (CTL-P) frequencies in limiting dilution microcultures established from spleen cells positively or negatively selected on the basis of Lyt-2 phenotype. A clear dichotomy was observed between CTL-P, which were contained in the Lyt-2+ fraction, and precursors of IL-2-secreting cells, which were detected almost exclusively in the Lyt-2- population. In contrast, precursors of cells secreting MAF and GM-CSF were found in both populations: almost all responding cells from the Lyt-2- fraction produced both these factors, whereas the precursor frequency of MAF-secreting and GM-CSF-secreting cells was three- to fourfold lower in the Lyt-2+ population. These frequency data were consistent with quantitative differences observed in the average production of these lymphokines by Lyt-2+ and Lyt-2- populations. PMID:6752327

  8. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor homolog from Plasmodium yoelii modulates monocyte recruitment and activation in spleen during infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhui; Miura, Kazutoyo; Li, Jian; Tullo, Gregory; Zhu, Feng; Hong, Lingxian; Lin, Tianlong; Su, Xin-zhuan; Long, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. Malaria parasites express an MIF homolog that may play a role in regulating host immune responses and a recent study showed that overexpression of MIF reduced parasitemia in a mouse malaria model. Another recent study showed migration of monocytes to the spleen contributed to the control of blood stage infection. However, there are few papers describing the effect of MIF on monocyte recruitment/activation during the infection. We generated recombinant P. yoelii MIF (rPyMIF) and investigated its function on purified mouse CD11b+ cells in vitro and monocyte responses in vivo. The result shows that rPyMIF protein bound to mouse CD11b+ cells and inhibited their random migration in vitro. On the other hand, rPyMIF did not induce cytokine release from the cells directly or modulate LPS-induced cytokine release. Mice immunized with rPyMIF showed transient, but significantly lower parasitemia than the control mice at day 3 after lethal Py17XL challenge. The total number of CD11b+ cells in the spleens was significantly higher in rPyMIF-immunized group. Further investigation revealed that there were significantly higher numbers of recruited and activated monocytes in the spleens of rPyMIF immunization group on day 3. These results indicate that PyMIF potentially modulates monocyte recruitment and activation during infection of P. yoelii erythrocytic stages. PMID:22015474

  9. Acid fibroblast growth factor and peripheral nerve grafts regulate Th2 cytokine expression, macrophage activation, polyamine synthesis, and neurotrophin expression in transected rat spinal cords.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Huai-Sheng; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Ming-Chao; Chiu, Chuan-Wen; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Lee, Meng-Jen; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Lo; Kuo, Wen-Chun; Cheng, Henrich

    2011-03-16

    Spinal cord injury elicits an inflammatory response that recruits macrophages to the injured spinal cord. Quantitative real-time PCR results have shown that a repair strategy combining peripheral nerve grafts with acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) induced higher interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and IL-13 levels in the graft areas of rat spinal cords compared with transected spinal cords at 10 and 14 d. This led to higher arginase I-positive alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) responses. The gene expression of several enzymes involved in polyamine biosynthesis pathways was also upregulated in the graft areas of repaired spinal cords. The treatment induced a twofold upregulation of polyamine levels at 14 d, as confirmed by HPLC. Polyamines are important for the repair process, as demonstrated by the observation that treatment with inhibitors of arginase I and ornithine decarboxylase attenuates the functional recoveries of repaired rats. After 14 d, the treatment also induced the expression of neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), as well as M2 macrophages within grafted nerves expressing BDNF. IL-4 was upregulated in the injury sites of transected rats that received aFGF alone compared with those that received nerve grafts alone at 10 d. Conversely, nerve graft treatment induced NGF and BDNF expression at 14 d. Macrophages expressing polyamines and BDNF may benefit axonal regeneration at 14 d. These results indicate that aFGF and nerve grafts regulate different macrophage responses, and M2 macrophages may play an important role in axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

  10. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor Directly Inhibits Proliferation, Migration, and uPAR Expression of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bielenberg, Diane R.; Dridi, Sami; Wu, Jason; Jiang, Weihua; Huang, Bin; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Fannon, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) is a potent inhibitor of tumor growth. Its activity, however, has been attributed to indirect mechanisms such as boosting the immune response by activating macrophages and inhibiting the blood vessel growth necessary for the growth of tumors. Methods and Findings In this study we show for the first time that DBP-maf exhibits a direct and potent effect on prostate tumor cells in the absence of macrophages. DBP-maf demonstrated inhibitory activity in proliferation studies of both LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines as well as metastatic clones of these cells. Flow cytometry studies with annexin V and propidium iodide showed that this inhibitory activity is not due to apoptosis or cell death. DBP-maf also had the ability to inhibit migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Finally, DBP-maf was shown to cause a reduction in urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in prostate tumor cells. There is evidence that activation of this receptor correlates with tumor metastasis. Conclusions These studies show strong inhibitory activity of DBP-maf on prostate tumor cells independent of its macrophage activation. PMID:20976141

  11. Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor directly inhibits proliferation, migration, and uPAR expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Kalvin J; Zhao, Bing; Bielenberg, Diane R; Dridi, Sami; Wu, Jason; Jiang, Weihua; Huang, Bin; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Fannon, Michael

    2010-10-18

    Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) is a potent inhibitor of tumor growth. Its activity, however, has been attributed to indirect mechanisms such as boosting the immune response by activating macrophages and inhibiting the blood vessel growth necessary for the growth of tumors. In this study we show for the first time that DBP-maf exhibits a direct and potent effect on prostate tumor cells in the absence of macrophages. DBP-maf demonstrated inhibitory activity in proliferation studies of both LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines as well as metastatic clones of these cells. Flow cytometry studies with annexin V and propidium iodide showed that this inhibitory activity is not due to apoptosis or cell death. DBP-maf also had the ability to inhibit migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Finally, DBP-maf was shown to cause a reduction in urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in prostate tumor cells. There is evidence that activation of this receptor correlates with tumor metastasis. These studies show strong inhibitory activity of DBP-maf on prostate tumor cells independent of its macrophage activation.

  12. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia.

  13. Inactivation of Tautomerase Activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor by Sulforaphane: A Potential Biomarker for Anti-inflammatory Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Zachary R.; Liu, Hua; Holtzclaw, W. David; Talalay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine with keto-enol tautomerase activity, rises rapidly in response to inflammation, and is elevated in many chronic diseases. Isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane from broccoli, are very potent inactivators of MIF tautomerase activity. A simple rapid method for determining this activity in tissues and body fluids may therefore be valuable for assessing severity of inflammation and efficacy of intervention. Methods Existing spectrophotometric assays of MIF, based on conversion of methyl L-dopachrome to methyl 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylate and associated loss of absorption at 475 nm, lack sensitivity. Assay sensitivity and efficiency were markedly improved by reducing the nonenzymatic rate, by lowering pH to 6.2, replacing phosphate (which catalyzes the reaction) with Bis-Tris buffer, and converting to a microtiter plate format. Results A structure-potency study of MIF tautomerase inactivation by isothiocyanates showed that sulforaphane, benzyl, n-hexyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were especially potent. MIF tautomerase could be readily quantified in human urine concentrated by ultrafiltration. This activity comprised: (i) a heat-labile, sulforaphane-inactivated macromolecular fraction (presumably MIF) that was concentrated during ultrafiltration; (ii) a flow-through fraction, with constant activity during filtration, that was heat-stable, and insensitive to sulforaphane. Administration of the sulforaphane precursor glucoraphanin to human volunteers almost completely abolished urinary tautomerase activity, which was recovered over many hours. Conclusions A simple, rapid, quantitative MIF tautomerase assay has been developed as a potential biomarker for assessing inflammatory severity and effectiveness of intervention. Impact An improved assay for measuring MIF tautomerase activity and its applications are described. PMID:21602309

  14. Ascorbic acid stimulates the resorption of canine articular cartilage induced by a factor derived from activated rabbit macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dean, D D; Sellers, A; Howell, D S; Kerwar, S S; Woessner, J F

    1985-01-01

    Articular cartilage explants from the knees of mongrel dogs release 5-10% of their proteoglycan content spontaneously when cultured for 4 days in serum-free modified Bigger's medium. A factor synthesized and secreted by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rabbit macrophages can stimulate this release of proteoglycan by 2 to 3-fold. The release of proteoglycan in response to macrophage factor is maximal in the presence of 1.5-50 micrograms/ml L-ascorbic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, or with high levels of ascorbate (150 micrograms/ml), the effect of the factor is diminished by 50%. D-isoascorbate, reduced glutathione, or dithiothreitol cannot substitute for L-ascorbate in producing this effect, while dehydroascorbate can.

  15. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  16. THE ENHANCEMENT OF MACROPHAGE BACTERIOSTASIS BY PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Robert E.; Fajardo, Ileana M.; Leibowitch, Jacques L.; David, John R.

    1973-01-01

    It was reported previously that the incubation of normal guinea pig macrophages with partially purified products of activated lymphocytes resulted in altered macrophage function including increased cell adherence to culture vessels, spreading, phagocytosis, and glucose carbon-1 oxidation. Studies reported here demonstrate that such macrophages also exhibit enhanced bacteriostasis. Lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, the culture supernatant was chromatographed over Sephadex G-100 and the fraction of mol wt 25,000–55,000, rich in lymphocyte mediators, was cultured with normal guinea pig macrophages for 1–3 days. Macrophages incubated with fractions from unstimulated lymphocyte cultures served as controls. The resulting macrophage monolayers were infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Macrophages incubated with mediator-rich fractions exhibited 2- to 10-fold enhanced bacteriostasis compared to controls. Further studies indicate that this enhancement was attributable to intrinsic changes in the macrophages and not simply a consequence of the number of macrophages on the monolayers. The studies support the concept that macrophage bacteriostasis can be enhanced by lymphocyte mediators. However, macrophages, which have been preincubated directly with sensitive lymphocytes and antigen exhibit even greater bacteriostasis and sometimes bactericidal capacity, suggesting that either a labile lymphocyte factor or direct lymphocyte macrophage interaction may also be involved in bactericidal activity. PMID:4200649

  17. In vitro and in vivo activity of human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Werner, F J; Lam, C; Besemer, J

    1990-10-01

    Although it is well documented that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) controls the production and functional activity of human and nonhuman primate granulocytes and macrophages, relatively little is known about its effects on cells obtained from other species. The molecular cloning of the complementary DNA for human GM-CSF has made it possible to determine the cross-reactivity of the purified recombinant human material (rhGM-CSF) on cells of other species. The results presented herein show that specific receptors for human GM-CSF exist on dog bone marrow cells and mature circulating dog granulocytes. The number of the receptors and the apparent binding affinity of the rhGM-CSF to its receptors on granulocytes were similar to those observed either on human or monkey cells. In cultures of dog bone marrow cells, rhGM-CSF was capable of promoting colony formation in a dose-dependent manner. Human GM-CSF also primed dog granulocytes for increased production of reactive oxygen metabolites in response to either phorbolmyristic acetate-or zymosan-activated dog serum. In vivo, s.c. administration to healthy dogs of rhGM-CSF in daily doses of 15, 50, or 150 micrograms/kg body weight over a period of 7-20 days induced a dose-dependent rise of up to a maximum of a fourfold increase in peripheral WBC counts. The rise in WBC counts was mainly due to elevated neutrophil levels, but an increase in the numbers of monocytes and eosinophils was also observed. However, the rhGM-CSF-induced leukocytosis in dogs was not as dramatic as that observed in nonhuman primates. In all rhGM-CSF-treated dogs, circulating platelet counts dropped to nadir levels of about 20%-30% of normal numbers. Dogs that were treated with 150 micrograms/kg rhGM-CSF developed specific antibodies after about 10-12 days of treatment. These antibodies were able to neutralize the effect of rhGM-CSF in in vitro assays. In vivo WBC counts began to decline when specific antibodies developed

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes osteosarcoma growth and lung metastasis through activating the RAS/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Zhou, Xing; Li, Wentao; Li, Mingyue; Tu, Tingyue; Ba, Ximing; Wu, Yinyu; Huang, Zhen; Fan, Gentao; Zhou, Guangxin; Wu, Sujia; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Jiangning

    2017-09-10

    Emerging evidence suggests that the tumour microenvironment plays a critical role in osteosarcoma (OS) development. Thus, cytokine immunotherapy could be a novel strategy for OS treatment. In this study, we explored the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an important cytokine in OS progression, and investigated the anti-tumour effects of targeting MIF in OS. The results showed that MIF significantly increased in the tissue and serum samples of OS patients and was associated with tumour size, pulmonary metastasis and the survival rate of OS patients. We verified a positive correlation between MIF and p-ERK1/2 in OS patients. The in vitro results indicated that MIF could activate the RAS/MAPK pathway in a time- and dose-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, shRNA targeting MIF significantly inhibited tumour growth and lung metastasis in a mouse xenograft model and orthotopic model of OS. Additionally, inhibition of MIF significantly enhanced the sensitivity of OS cells to cisplatin and doxorubicin. Our findings suggest that immunotherapy targeting MIF to block the RAS/MAPK kinase cascade may represent a feasible and promising approach for OS treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Stefania; Punzi, Tiziana; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Searching for additional therapeutic tools to fight breast cancer, we investigated the effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF, also known as GcMAF) on a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). The effects of DBP-MAF on proliferation, morphology, vimentin expression and angiogenesis were studied by cell proliferation assay, phase-contrast microscopy, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. DBP-MAF inhibited human breast cancer cell proliferation and cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis. MCF-7 cells treated with DBP-MAF predominantly grew in monolayer and appeared to be well adherent to each other and to the well surface. Exposure to DBP-MAF significantly reduced vimentin expression, indicating a reversal of the epithelial/mesenchymal transition, a hallmark of human breast cancer progression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the known anticancer efficacy of DBP-MAF can be ascribed to different biological properties of the molecule that include inhibition of tumour-induced angiogenesis and direct inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration and metastatic potential.

  20. Induction of copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase by CCL5/CCR5 activation causes tumour necrosis factor-alpha and reactive oxygen species production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Ding, Li; Huang, Jin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Junping; Guo, Baoyu

    2009-09-01

    Using two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we found that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD, SOD-1) was induced in constructed CCR5 stably transfected HEK 293 cells, but not in mock cells, treated with CCL5. CCL5-induced SOD-1 expression was also confirmed in HEK 293-CCR5 cells and CCR5-positive granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced human macrophages and murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. CCL5 and CCR5 interaction induced SOD-1 expression mainly via MEK-ERK activation. In addition, we provided evidence that upregulation of SOD-1 by CCL5/CCR5 activation occurred in parallel with the increased release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide and production of intracellular reactive oxygen species as well as enhanced nuclear factor-kappaB transcriptional activity in CCR5-positive RAW264.7 cells. Conversely, the MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 significantly inhibited SOD-1 expression with the decrease of these biological responses. More importantly, inhibition of SOD-1 activity by disulfiram also strongly inhibited the CCL5-induced biological effects. These data suggest that SOD-1 mediates CCR5 activation by CCL5 and that pharmacological modulation of SOD-1 may be beneficial to CCR5-associated diseases.

  1. A potential pathogenic factor from Mycoplasma hominis is a TLR2-dependent, macrophage-activating, P50-related adhesin.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Akira; Mu, Hong-Hua; Cole, Barry C

    2014-09-01

    Mycoplasma hominis has been implicated in many inflammatory conditions of the human urogenital tract in particular amniotic infections that lead to fetal and neonatal disease and pre-term labor. The mechanisms responsible are poorly defined. Biochemical and immunological methods were used to extract, purify, and characterize an inflammatory component present in M. hominis. We isolated and purified to homogeneity a 40-kDa bioactive lipoprotein from M. hominis that was a potent TLR2-dependent, CD14-independent activator of the human THP-1 macrophage cell line. Homology searches of the N-terminal sequence revealed that 22 of the first 23 residues were identical to those seen for the phase-variable M. hominis p50 adhesin. The truncated P50t lipoprotein importantly retained its adhesive properties for human macrophages. The unique adhesin/macrophage activator may play a key role in M. hominis infections by triggering an inflammatory cytokine cascade. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Modulation of macrophage activation by prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Carnuccio, R.; D'Acquisto, F.; Rosa, M. Di

    1996-01-01

    The effect of prostaglandtn E2, iloprost and cAMP on both nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α release in J774 macrophages has been studied. Both prostaglandin E2 and iloprost inhibited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, the lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of these prostanoids seems to be mediated by an increase of the second messenger cAMP since it was mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and potentiated by the selective type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor RO-20-1724. Our results suggest that the inhibition of nitric oxide release by prostaglandin E2 and iloprost in lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages may be secondary to the inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α generation, which in turn is likely to be mediated by cAMP. PMID:18475691

  3. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    TOYOHARA, YUKIYO; HASHITANI, SUSUMU; KISHIMOTO, HIROMITSU; NOGUCHI, KAZUMA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUTO; URADE, MASAHIRO

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  4. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Yukiyo; Hashitani, Susumu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model.

  5. A Novel Role for a Major Component of the Vitamin D Axis: Vitamin D Binding Protein-Derived Macrophage Activating Factor Induces Human Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis through Stimulation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J. V.; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This al1ows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects. PMID:23857228

  6. A novel role for a major component of the vitamin D axis: vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor induces human breast cancer cell apoptosis through stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-07-08

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This allows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  7. Production and secretion of biologically active human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic tomato suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Young-Sook; Lee, Jae-Hwa; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2003-09-01

    A complementary DNA encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) was cloned and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Seokwang) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic PCR and Northern blot analysis demonstrated the integration of the construction into the plant nuclear genome and expression of the hGM-CSF in transgenic tomato. The cell suspension culture was established from leaf-derived calli of the transgenic tomato plants transformed with the hGM-CSF gene. Recombinant hGM-CSF was synthesized by the transgenic cell culture and secreted into the growth medium at 45 microg l(-1) after 10 d' cultivation.

  8. Sodium-activated macrophages: the salt mine expands.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Liliana E; Hafler, David A

    2015-08-01

    High sodium consumption has been raising interest as a putative environmental factor linking Western lifestyle to the growing epidemic of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Now Zhang and colleagues show that high sodium drives macrophage to acquire a new proinflammatory effector phenotype with a distinct signature, paving the path to assess the role of salt-activated macrophages in human disease.

  9. Cholesterol enrichment of human monocyte/macrophages induces surface exposure of phosphatidylserine and the release of biologically-active tissue factor-positive microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Reilly, Michael P; Casasanto, Peter; McKenzie, Steven E; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2007-02-01

    Biologically significant amounts of two procoagulant molecules, phosphatidylserine (PS) and tissue factor (TF), are transported by monocyte/macrophage-derived microvesicles (MVs). Because cellular cholesterol accumulation is an important feature of atherosclerotic vascular disease, we now examined effects of cholesterol enrichment on MV release from human monocytes and macrophages. Cholesterol enrichment of human THP-1 monocytes, alone or in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tripled their total MV generation, as quantified by flow cytometry based on particle size and PS exposure. The subset of these MVs that were also TF-positive was likewise increased by cellular cholesterol enrichment, and these TF-positive MVs exhibited a striking 10-fold increase in procoagulant activity. Moreover, cholesterol enrichment of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages also increased their total as well as TF-positive MV release, and these TF-positive MVs exhibited a similar 10-fold increase in procoagulant activity. To explore the mechanisms of enhanced MV release, we found that cholesterol enrichment of monocytes caused PS exposure on the cell surface by as early as 2 hours and genomic DNA fragmentation in a minority of cells by 20 hours. Addition of a caspase inhibitor at the beginning of these incubations blunted both cholesterol-induced apoptosis and MV release. Cholesterol enrichment of human monocyte/macrophages induces the generation of highly biologically active, PS-positive MVs, at least in part through induction of apoptosis. Cholesterol-induced monocyte/macrophage MVs, both TF-positive and TF-negative, may be novel contributors to atherothrombosis.

  10. Artemisia asiatica Nakai Attenuates the Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in Stimulated Macrophages Through Modulation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Cha, Kwang-Suk; Choi, Heeri; Lee, Chun Bok; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Moon; Han, Weon Cheol; Choi, Suck-Jun; Lee, Sangmin; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects and potential mechanism of action of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (A. asiatica Nakai) extract in activated murine macrophages. A. asiatica Nakai extract showed dose-dependent suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. It also showed dose-dependent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus and as an inhibitor of NF-κB-alpha phosphorylation. The extract's inhibitory effects were found to be mediated through NF-κB inhibition and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 murine macrophages, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of A. asiatica Nakai. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-inflammatory effects of A. asiatica Nakai on J774A.1 murine macrophages; these results may help develop functional foods possessing an anti-inflammatory activity.

  11. Artemisia asiatica Nakai Attenuates the Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in Stimulated Macrophages Through Modulation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Cha, Kwang-Suk; Choi, Heeri; Lee, Chun Bok; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Moon; Han, Weon Cheol; Choi, Suck-Jun; Lee, Sangmin; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects and potential mechanism of action of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (A. asiatica Nakai) extract in activated murine macrophages. A. asiatica Nakai extract showed dose-dependent suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. It also showed dose-dependent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus and as an inhibitor of NF-κB-alpha phosphorylation. The extract's inhibitory effects were found to be mediated through NF-κB inhibition and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 murine macrophages, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of A. asiatica Nakai. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-inflammatory effects of A. asiatica Nakai on J774A.1 murine macrophages; these results may help develop functional foods possessing an anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26061361

  12. Inhibition of interleukin-12 production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse macrophages by parthenolide, a predominant sesquiterpene lactone in Tanacetum parthenium: involvement of nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Kang, B Y; Chung, S W; Kim, T S

    2001-07-02

    Pharmacological control of interleukin-12 (IL-12) production may be a key therapeutic strategy for modulating immunological diseases dominated by type-1 cytokine responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of parthenolide, an anti-inflammatory sesquiterpene, on the production of IL-12 from mouse macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Parthenolide potently inhibited the LPS-induced IL-12 production in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of parthenolide on IL-12 p40 promoter activation was analyzed by transfecting RAW264.7 monocytic cells with p40 promoter/luciferase constructs. The repressive effect mapped to a region in the p40 promoter containing a binding site for nuclear factor-kappaB (p40-kappaB). Furthermore, activation of macrophages by LPS resulted in markedly enhanced binding activity to the kappaB site, which significantly decreased upon addition of parthenolide. These results suggest that parthenolide-induced inhibition of IL-12 production in macrophages may explain some of the biological effects of parthenolide including its anti-inflammatory activity.

  13. Microparticles from apoptotic RAW 264.7 macrophage cells carry tumour necrosis factor-α functionally active on cardiomyocytes from adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Milbank, Edward; Soleti, Raffaella; Martinez, Emilie; Lahouel, Badreddine; Hilairet, Grégory; Martinez, M. Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Noireaud, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    After ischaemic injury and in patients with atherosclerosis, the pool of inflammatory macrophages is enlarged in the heart and in atherosclerotic plaques. Monocyte/macrophage-derived microparticles (MPs) are part of the pathological process of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. The present study focused on effects of MPs, produced by apoptotic murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line, in adult murine cardiomyocytes. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that these MPs contained the soluble form of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening amplitudes and kinetics were reduced within 5 min of exposure to these MPs. Conversely, Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics were not modified. The contractile effects of MPs were completely prevented after pretreatment with nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase or TNF-α inhibitors as well as blocking TNF-α receptor 1 with neutralizing antibody. Microscopy showed that, after 1 h, MPs were clearly surrounding rod-shaped cardiomyocytes, and after 2 h they were internalized into cardiomyocytes undergoing apoptosis. After 4 h of treatment with MPs, cardiomyocytes expressed increased caspase-3, caspase-8, Bax and cytochrome C. Thus, MPs from apoptotic macrophages induced a negative inotropic effect and slowing of both contraction and relaxation, similar to that observed in the presence of TNF-α. The use of specific inhibitors strongly suggests that TNF-α receptors and the guanylate cyclase/cGMP/PKG pathway were involved in the functional responses to these MPs and that the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway was implicated in their proapoptotic effects. These data suggest that MPs issued from activated macrophages carrying TNF-α could contribute to propagation of inflammatory signals leading to myocardial infarction. PMID:26498917

  14. Involvement of nuclear factor of activated T cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Sekido, Machiko; Iio, Aki; Chimura, Naoki; Shibata, Sanae; Kamishina, Harumi; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Maeda, Sadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the cysteine protease of Dermatophagoides farinae induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in a canine epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cell line (CPEK); however, the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Given that the transcription of GM-CSF mRNA in human lymphocytes is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), it is hypothesized that NFAT also contributes to GM-CSF production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease. Nuclear translocation of NFAT was evaluated in CPEK cells in the absence or presence of the cysteine protease papain. We also investigated whether blockade of NFAT could inhibit GM-CSF production. Papain-induced nuclear translocation of NFAT, producing GM-CSF, was partly inhibited by ciclosporin. The results suggest that GM-CSF production mediated by the cysteine protease is regulated not only by NFAT but also by unknown signalling pathways in canine keratinocytes. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  15. Antiosteoclastogenesis activity of a CO2 laser antagonizing receptor activator for nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation of murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage cells are the important effector cells in the immune reaction which are indispensable for osteoclastogenesis; their heterogeneity and plasticity renders macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. In recent years, there have been very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteoclastogenesis. In this study, RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were treated with RANKL to regulate osteoclastogenesis. We used a CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of osteoclastogenic. We also evaluated cell viability, cell death and cathepsin K expression. The CO2 laser inhibited a receptor activator of the NF-ĸB ligand (RANKL)-induced formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process. It was also found that irradiation for two times reduced RANKL-enhanced TRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CO2 laser-treatment diminished the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL and was concurrent with the inhibition of TRAF6 induction and NF-ĸB activation. The current report demonstrates that CO2 laser abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The CO2 laser can modulate every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, such as the proliferation and fusion of preosteoclasts and the maturation of osteoclasts. Therefore, the current results serve as an improved explanation of the cellular roles of macrophage cell populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling by CO2 laser-treatment.

  16. Enhancement of myeloperoxidase activity in WBCS in oral cancer patients treated with Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF)-A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ananth, N; Balaji, G B; Vasudevan, D M; D'Souza, V; Rao, A V; Nambiar, D

    1998-07-01

    In a pilot study with five oral cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) three were given Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) as a protective agent to reduce the mucosal inflammation during radiotherapy. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme activity in WBC was quantitated. The three patients showed a significant increase in the MPO activity when compared with two untreated controls indicating the efficacy of GM-CSF as a protective agent. It is suggested that further detailed studies with larger number of patients would be useful.

  17. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  18. Alveolar epithelial cells are critical in protection of the respiratory tract by secretion of factors able to modulate the activity of pulmonary macrophages and directly control bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Periolo, Natalia; Fernández, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation upon injury and ion transport and are very active immunologically, contributing to lung defense by secreting antimicrobial factors. AEC II also secrete a broad variety of factors, such as cytokines and chemokines, involved in activation and differentiation of immune cells and are able to present antigen to specific T cells. Another cell type important in lung defense is the pulmonary macrophage (PuM). Considering the architecture of the alveoli, a good communication between the external and the internal compartments is crucial to mount effective responses. Our hypothesis is that being in the interface, AEC may play an important role in transmitting signals from the external to the internal compartment and in modulating the activity of PuM. For this, we collected supernatants from AEC unstimulated or stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These AEC-conditioned media were used in various setups to test for the effects on a number of macrophage functions: (i) migration, (ii) phagocytosis and intracellular control of bacterial growth, and (iii) phenotypic changes and morphology. Finally, we tested the direct effect of AEC-conditioned media on bacterial growth. We found that AEC-secreted factors had a dual effect, on one hand controlling bacterial growth and on the other hand increasing macrophage activity.

  19. Control of tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation by MIF

    PubMed Central

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Putty, Kalyani; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth J.; Faughn, Jonathan D.; Satoskar, Abhay; Lasnik, Amanda; Eaton, John W.; Mitchell, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor stromal alternatively activated macrophages are important determinants of anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses, intratumoral neovascularization and metastatic dissemination. Our recent efforts to investigate the mechanism of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in antagonizing anti-melanoma immune responses reveal that macrophage-derived MIF participates in macrophage alternative activation in melanoma-bearing mice. Both peripheral and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from melanoma bearing MIF-deficient mice display elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and reduced anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic gene products compared to macrophages from tumor bearing MIF wildtype mice. Moreover, TAMs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from MIF-deficient mice exhibit reduced T lymphocyte immunosuppressive activities than do those from their wildtype littermates. Corresponding with reduced tumor immunosuppression and neoangiogenic potential by TAMs, MIF-deficiency confers protection against transplantable subcutaneous melanoma outgrowth and melanoma lung metastatic colonization. Finally, we report for the first time that our previously discovered MIF small molecule antagonist, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP), recapitulates MIF-deficiency in vitro and in vivo and attenuates tumor polarized macrophage alternative activation, immunosuppression, neoangiogenesis and melanoma tumor outgrowth. These studies describe an important functional contribution by MIF to tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation and provide justification for immunotherapeutic targeting of MIF in melanoma patients. PMID:23390297

  20. Macrophage fusion factor elicited from BGG-sensitized lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Warfel, A. H.; Hadden, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocytes obtained from rabbit lymph nodes sensitized to bovine gamma globulin produce in vitro the lymphokine macrophage fusion factor (MFF) which mediates the fusion of approximately 100% of normal alveolar and oil-induced peritoneal macrophages. Giant cells (GC) of Langhans and foreign body type form large syncytia containing as many as several hundred nuclei per cell. Nuclei of GC appear more spherical and larger than those of the normal mononucleated macrophages, and they possess several prominent nucleoli. Giant cells of peritoneal macrophage origin show enhanced intracytoplasmic vacuolization. Normal macrophages cultured as a monolayer in MFF-rich supernatants form cell clusters which progressively fuse during the 24-hour incubation period. A signoid dose-response curve was obtained for cell fusion with MFF-rich supernatants possessing high titers, ie, the latter supernatants undiluted partially inhibited macrophage fusion. MIF-like activity was detected in MFF-rich supernatants as well as a factor(s) which inhibited 3H-thymidine uptake by giant cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:362945

  1. [Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor on nuclear factor-KappaB activation in multiple organs of hemorrhage-induced acute lung injury in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Song, Yong; Shi, Yi

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the effects of nuclear factor-KappaB (NF-KappaB) activation in multiple organs of hemorrhage-induced acute lung injury (ALI) by the specific granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-neutralizing antibody (22E9) and dexamethasone (DEX) in mice. Twenty male C57BL/6 mice were used to reproduce a model of hemorrhagic shock by cardiac puncture. Before cardiac puncture, mice in different groups were transnasally administered with phosphate buffered solution (PBS, PCG group), PBS plus 1 microg 22E9 (HS1 group), PBS plus 10 microg 22E9 (HS10 group) and PBS plus 20 microg DEX (DEX group), respectively. In negative control group (NCG group) received cardiac puncture without shock followed by transnasal administration with PBS without shock. Lungs, hearts, livers and kidneys tissues of mice were harvested at 4 hours after hemorrhagic shock. The activities of NF-KappaB in different organs was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in lung and heart were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 22E9 in both low or high doses could significantly inhibit NF-KappaB activities in lung, heart and liver, and elevated NF-KappaB activity in kidney compared with those of PCG group (all P<0.05). The effect of 22E9 was much better in HS1 group than in HS10 group (all P<0.05). DEX significantly strengthened NF-KappaB activity in kidney (P<0.05) and didn't significantly inhibit NF-KappaB activities in heart and liver compared with those of PCG group. 22E9 significantly inhibited TNF-alpha in lung and heart, while DEX significantly inhibited TNF-alpha in heart (all P<0.05). 22E9 can inhibit the NF-KappaB activation and inflammatory reaction in multiple organs after hemorrhage-induced ALI and reduce injury in multiple organs, while DEX has no significant effect.

  2. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  3. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta modulate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Fc gamma-receptor stimulation in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Winston, B W; Chan, E D; Riches, D W; Henson, P M

    1997-09-08

    Engagement of receptors for the Fc region of IgG (Fc gamma R) can activate a variety of biological responses in macrophages, and these responses can be modulated either positively or negatively by co-stimulation with a variety of agents including cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have previously demonstrated that Fc gamma R crosslinking activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members p42MAPK, p38, and JNK. Herein, we examined the modulatory effect of IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on Fc gamma R-induced MAPK activation in murine macrophages. Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK and JNK was augmented nearly two-fold by pretreatment with IFN-gamma. Conversely, TGF-beta pretreatment suppressed Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK, JNK, and p38. These modulatory effects of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta on MAPK activation correlated with changes in Fc gamma R-stimulated TNF-alpha production by these two cytokines.

  4. A protease-activated receptor 2 agonist (AC-264613) suppresses interferon regulatory factor 5 and decreases interleukin-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages: Role of p53.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has a key role in the production of interleukin (IL)-12 by macrophages. IRF5 is also a central mediator of toll-like receptor signaling and is a direct target of p53. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) upregulates p53 and suppresses apoptosis. This study investigated the influence of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and PAR-2 agonists on expression of IRF5 and IL-12p40 by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophages showed upregulation of IRF5 expression, while HNE reduced expression of p53 and IRF5 in a concentration-dependent manner. HNE also caused a concentration-dependent decrease of IRF5 in macrophages transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, while silencing of β-arrestin 2 blunted the reduction of p53 or IRF5 by HNE. Incubation of macrophages with a PAR-2 agonist, AC-264613, caused a decrease of IRF5 expression and also significantly reduced p53 protein expression. HNE upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and caused transactivation of TLR4, while AC-264613 did not promote TLR4 transactivation. In conclusion, the PAR-2 agonist AC-264613 attenuated IRF5-associated IL-12p40 production by macrophages.

  5. Water extract isolated from Chelidonium majus enhances nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-alpha production via nuclear factor-kappaB activation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hwan-Suck; An, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Won, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-01

    Chelidonium majus is used to treat several inflammatory diseases and tumours. We have examined the effect of C. majus on nitric oxide (NO) production using mouse peritoneal macrophages. When C. majus was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma, 10 U mL(-1)), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production. Treatment of rIFN-gamma plus C. majus (1 mgmL(-1)) in macrophages caused a significant increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. The increased production of NO and TNF-alpha from rIFN-gamma plus C. majus-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (100 microM). These findings demonstrated that C. majus increased the production of NO and TNF-alpha by rIFN-gamma-primed macrophages and suggested that NF-kappaB played a critical role in mediating the effects of C. majus.

  6. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces indirect angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Aukerman, S L; Whitehead, R A; Knighton, D R

    1993-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage colony-stimulating factor was implanted in the rabbit cornea over a wide dose range (1 ng to 100 microg) to assay its angiogenic activity in vivo. Neovascularization occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and maximum angiogenesis occurred only with 100 microg. Histologic analysis revealed that the corneas were free of inflammation at the lower doses, but had slight inflammation at 50 and 100 microg. Nonspecific esterase staining of frozen sections and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the inflammatory cells were predominantly macrophages, with very few neutrophils present. This association of capillary formation with inflammation suggests an indirect mechanism of angiogenesis. The lack of neutrophils within the inflammatory cell infiltrate demonstrates that indirect angiogenesis can proceed without the local presence of neutrophils. This distinguishes macrophage colony-stimulating factor from other indirect-acting angiogenesis factors that have been identified to date.

  7. Characterization of platelet-activating factor synthesized by normal and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-primed human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, M; Schleimer, R P; Tomioka, K; Hubbard, W C; Chilton, F H

    1992-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine) is a mediator involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases associated with tissue eosinophil infiltration. Previous studies utilizing bioassay or assaying enzymes associated with PAF biosynthesis have suggested that human eosinophils produce PAF. The present study has extended these initial studies by identifying and quantifying the different PAF molecular species and analogues synthesized by human eosinophils in response to A23187 and f-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis indicated that A23187-stimulated eosinophils produce at least three molecular species of PAF. The predominant species is 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (16:0) followed by 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:0) and 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:1). Eosinophils stimulated with FMLP produce approximately 100-fold smaller quantities of PAF relative to those produced in response to A23187 and only the 16:0 molecular species could be measured. A small percentage (comprising between 2 and 5%) of the 2-acetylated phospholipids produced by eosinophils was the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. Long-term (72 hr) incubation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in PAF synthesis from eosinophils stimulated with FMLP, without changes in the profile of PAF molecular species or in the percentage of the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. These data indicate that human eosinophils can produce various molecular species of PAF and that this process can be quantitatively enhanced by GM-CSF. PMID:1493922

  8. Activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in macrophages, Caco-2 cells and intact human gut tissue by Maillard reaction products and coffee.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Tanja; Raithel, Martin; Kressel, Jürgen; Münch, Gerald; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2013-06-01

    In addition to direct antioxidative effects, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) could increase the antioxidative capacity of cells through the induction of cytoprotective enzymes. Since many of those enzymes are regulated by the transcription factor Nrf2, the effect of MRPs on nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in macrophages and Caco-2 cells was investigated. Stimulation of both cell types by MRPs showed a concentration-dependent significant increase in nuclear translocation of Nrf2 up to fivefold after short-term (2 h) and up to 50-fold after long-term treatment (24 h). In intact human gut tissue, nuclear translocation of Nrf2 was significantly twofold increased after short-term incubation. To study the activation mechanisms, macrophages and Caco-2 cells were stimulated with MRPs in the presence of catalase, which significantly suppressed Nrf2 activation. Thus, activation was related to extracellular H2O2 continuously formed from MRPs. Short-term incubation with coffee, a MRP-rich beverage, led to a trend towards Nrf2 activation in macrophages, but not in Caco-2 cells or intact human gut tissue. Long-term incubation with coffee (1-4 mg/mL) significantly increased nuclear Nrf2 up to 17-fold. Since raw coffee was inactive under the tested conditions, the effect was related to roasting products. Coffee-induced Nrf2 translocation was, however, only slightly reversed by catalase. Therefore, the Nrf2 activity of coffee can only partially be explained by MRP-induced, H2O2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, it can be concluded that MRPs may increase the antioxidative capacity inside the cell by inducing Nrf2-regulated signalling pathways not only in different cell types, but also in intact gut tissue.

  9. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-05

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide Chromatin Profiling of Legionella pneumophila-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Activation of the Probacterial Host Factor TNFAIP2.

    PubMed

    Du Bois, Ilona; Marsico, Annalisa; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schweiger, Michal R; Caffrey, Brian E; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Eberhardt, Martin; Vera, Julio; Vingron, Martin; Schmeck, Bernd T

    2016-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Infection leads to a broad host cell response, as evident, for example, on the transcriptional level. Chromatin modifications, which control gene expression, play a central role in the transcriptional response to L. pneumophila  We infected human-blood-derived macrophages (BDMs) with L. pneumophila and used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to screen for gene promoters with the activating histone 4 acetylation mark. We found the promoter of tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 2 (TNFAIP2) to be acetylated at histone H4. This factor has not been characterized in the pathology of L. pneumophila TNFAIP2 messenger RNA and protein were upregulated in response to L. pneumophila infection of human-BDMs and human alveolar epithelial (A549) cells. We showed that L. pneumophila-induced TNFAIP2 expression is dependent on the NF-κB transcription factor. Importantly, knock down of TNFAIP2 led to reduced intracellular replication of L. pneumophila Corby in A549 cells. Taken together, genome-wide chromatin analysis of L. pneumophila-infected macrophages demonstrated induction of TNFAIP2, a NF-κB-dependent factor relevant for bacterial replication. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  12. Molecular and epigenetic basis of macrophage polarized activation.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Riboldi, Elena; Ippolito, Alessandro; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are unique cells for origin, heterogeneity and plasticity. At steady state most of macrophages are derived from fetal sources and maintained in adulthood through self-renewing. Despite sharing common progenitors, a remarkable heterogeneity characterized tissue-resident macrophages indicating that local signals educate them to express organ-specific functions. Macrophages are extremely plastic: chromatin landscape and transcriptional programs can be dynamically re-shaped in response to microenvironmental changes. Owing to their ductility, macrophages are crucial orchestrators of both initiation and resolution of immune responses and key supporters of tissue development and functions in homeostatic and pathological conditions. Herein, we describe current understanding of heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages using the M1-M2 dichotomy as operationally useful simplification of polarized activation. We focused on the complex network of signaling cascades, metabolic pathways, transcription factors, and epigenetic changes that control macrophage activation. In particular, this network was addressed in sepsis, as a paradigm of a pathological condition determining dynamic macrophage reprogramming.

  13. Therapeutic potential of carbohydrates as regulators of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, Mimmi L E; Scanlan, Eoin M; Lavelle, Ed C

    2017-09-08

    It is well established for a broad range of disease states, including cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, that pathogenesis is bolstered by polarisation of macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype, known as M2. As these innate immune cells are relatively long-lived, their re-polarisation to pro-inflammatory, phagocytic and bactericidal "classically activated" M1 macrophages is an attractive therapeutic approach. On the other hand, there are scenarios where the resolving inflammation, wound healing and tissue remodelling properties of M2 macrophages are beneficial - for example the successful introduction of biomedical implants. Although there are numerous endogenous and exogenous factors that have an impact on the macrophage polarisation spectrum, this review will focus specifically on prominent macrophage-modulating carbohydrate motifs with a view towards highlighting structure-function relationships and therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Pulmonary macrophages activity in CO intoxication.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Maria; Giugliano, Pasquale; Vacchiano, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    The presence of macrophages and their activation on the pulmonary tissues of 21 subjects deceased after CO intoxication has been studied. A notable number of activated macrophages, especially in the interstitial level, have been evidenced, and such phenomenon supports the hypothesis of a possible association between CO intoxication and pulmonary macrophages activity. The highlighted association could be mediated by changes of the surfactant, by impairing of mitochondrial respiration and by release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  15. Macrophage activation in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Joachim L; Schmieder, Astrid; Goerdt, S

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly accepted that macrophages play a crucial role in many diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, cancer, skin diseases, and even neurodegenerative diseases. It is therefore not surprising that macrophages in human diseases have gained significant interest during the last years. Molecular analysis combined with more sophisticated murine disease models and the application of genome-wide technologies has resulted in a much better understanding of the role of macrophages in human disease. We highlight important gain of knowledge during the last years for tumor-associated macrophages, and for macrophages in atherosclerosis, obesity and wound healing. Albeit these exciting findings certainly pave the way to novel diagnostics and therapeutics, several hurdles still need to be overcome. We propose a general outline for future research and development in disease-related macrophage biology based on integrating (1) genome-wide technologies, (2) direct human sampling, and (3) a dedicated use of in vivo model systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antifungal activity of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor in models of acute and chronic candidiasis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vitt, C R; Fidler, J M; Ando, D; Zimmerman, R J; Aukerman, S L

    1994-02-01

    Models of acute and chronic candidiasis were developed in Fischer 344 rats to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhM-CSF) alone and in combination with the antifungal agent fluconazole. In the acute model, rats were challenged by intravenous injection with 2 x 10(6) Candida albicans, approximately 4 times the LD50. Daily subcutaneous (sc) bolus injections of rhM-CSF for 10 days plus a single sc bolus dose of 0.3 mg/kg of fluconazole improved the median survival time from 5 days (32% survival) with fluconazole alone to > 30 days (88% survival) in the rhM-CSF- and fluconazole-treated rats. In the chronic model, daily sc bolus injections of rhM-CSF for 10 days plus a single sc bolus dose of 1.0 mg/kg of fluconazole decreased the median titer of C. albicans cultured from the kidneys by 10-fold at 15 and 30 days after infection. These studies showed that rhM-CSF treatment improved the therapeutic outcome in both the acute and chronic rat model of candidiasis when used with fluconazole, a standard fungistatic agent.

  17. Suppressive immunoregulatory effects of three antidepressants via inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB activation assessed using primary macrophages of carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenhui; Wu, Minghong; Liu, Shuai; Chen, Bei; Pan, Chenyuan; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2017-05-01

    Antidepressants, having been applied for the treatment of major depressive disorder and other conditions for decades, are among the most commonly detected human pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. This study evaluated the immunotoxicity of acute exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of amitriptyline, fluoxetine and mianserin using an in vitro primary macrophage model isolated from red common carp (Cyprinus carpio), and also explored their potential mechanisms of action. A potential suppressive immunoregulatory effect of antidepressant exposure was suggested based on the observed suppressive effects on oxidative stress parameters, bactericidal activity, NO production, and NO synthase activity, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression, and a significant stimulatory effect on anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 and interferon cytokine gene expression and ATPase activities in macrophages after 6h-exposure to three individual antidepressants and a combination thereof. Notably, we also found these effects were significantly associated with a corresponding decrease in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity after antidepressants exposure, and the NF-κB antagonist significantly restrained the effects of antidepressants on gene expression of cytokines, indicating that antidepressants could alter the response of various immune-associated components via the inhibition of NF-κB. Moreover, time-dependent lethal concentrations of three antidepressants on primary macrophages were firstly determined at mg/L levels, and the synergetic effects of antidepressant mixtures were suggested and in particular, for some parameters including total antioxidant capacity and cytokine genes expression, they could be significantly affected by antidepressants exposure at concentrations as low as 10ng/L, which together thereby revealed the potential risk of antidepressants to aquatic life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alternatively activated macrophages in infection and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Cihakova, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play an important role in activation of the immune response and wound healing. Pathogens that require T helper-type 2 (Th2) responses for effective clearance, such as parasitic worms, are strong inducers of alternatively activated or M2 macrophages. However, infections such as bacteria and viruses that require Th1-type responses may induce M2 as a strategy to evade the immune system. M2 are particularly efficient at scavenging self tissues following injury through receptors like the mannose receptor and scavenger receptor-A. Thus, M2 may increase autoimmune disease by presenting self tissue to T cells. M2 may also exacerbate immune complex (IC)-mediated pathology and fibrosis, a hallmark of autoimmune disease in women, due to the release of profibrotic factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor-β, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. We have found that M2 comprise anywhere from 30% to 70% of the infiltrate during acute viral or experimental autoimmune myocarditis, and shifts in M2 populations correlate with increased IC-deposition, fibrosis and chronic autoimmune pathology. Thus, women may be at an increased risk of M2-mediated autoimmunity due to estrogen’s ability to increase Th2 responses. PMID:19819674

  19. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S

    2002-07-01

    Macrophages have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. However, macrophages are heterogeneous and exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and function. When blood monocytes are cultured in medium alone in vitro, monocytes die, and colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as macrophage (M)-CSF or granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF are necessary for their survival and differentiation into macrophages. However, M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (M-Mphi) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (GM-Mphi) are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions, including Fcgamma receptor mediated-phagocytosis, H2O2 production, H2O2 sensitivity, catalase activity, susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and suppressor activity. The characteristics of GM-Mphi resemble those of human alveolar macrophages.

  20. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes clearance of pneumococcal colonization.

    PubMed

    Das, Rituparna; LaRose, Meredith I; Hergott, Christopher B; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2014-07-15

    Human genetic polymorphisms associated with decreased expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) have been linked to the risk of community-acquired pneumonia. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and nasal carriage is a precursor to invasive disease, we explored the role of MIF in the clearance of pneumococcal colonization in a mouse model. MIF-deficient mice (Mif(-/-)) showed prolonged colonization with both avirulent (23F) and virulent (6A) pneumococcal serotypes compared with wild-type animals. Pneumococcal carriage led to both local upregulation of MIF expression and systemic increase of the cytokine. Delayed clearance in the Mif(-/-) mice was correlated with reduced numbers of macrophages in upper respiratory tract lavages as well as impaired upregulation of MCP-1/CCL2. We found that primary human monocyte-derived macrophages as well as THP-1 macrophages produced MIF upon pneumococcal infection in a pneumolysin-dependent manner. Pneumolysin-induced MIF production required its pore-forming activity and phosphorylation of p38-MAPK in macrophages, with sustained p38-MAPK phosphorylation abrogated in the setting of MIF deficiency. Challenge with pneumolysin-deficient bacteria demonstrated reduced MIF upregulation, decreased numbers of macrophages in the nasopharynx, and less effective clearance. Mif(-/-) mice also showed reduced Ab response to pneumococcal colonization and impaired ability to clear secondary carriage. Finally, local administration of MIF was able to restore bacterial clearance and macrophage accumulation in Mif(-/-) mice. Our work suggests that MIF is important for innate and adaptive immunity to pneumococcal colonization and could be a contributing factor in genetic differences in pneumococcal disease susceptibility.

  1. ROS is Required for Alternatively Activated Macrophage Differentiation | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Macrophages are key regulators in host inflammatory responses. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) are responsible for inducing macrophage differentiation from monocytes. GM-CSF or M-CSF-differentiated macrophages can be further differentiated, or polarized, to more specialized cells. Classically activated, or M1, macrophages have immune-stimulatory properties and cytotoxic function against tumor cells. Alternatively activated, or M2, macrophages have low cytotoxic function but high tissue-remodeling activity. There are also M2-like cells called tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that are responsible for many tumor-promoting activities. Blocking the function of TAMs inhibits tumorigenesis.

  2. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  3. The effect of inhibition of leukotriene synthesis on the activity of interleukin-8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Pizzey, A. R.; Linch, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhanced the extracellular release of arachidonate metabolites from ionophore-stimulated neutrophils by 145 ± 10% (mean ± S.E.M., n = 13) and 182 ± 11% (n = 16), respectively. To determine whether enhanced leukotriene production mediates the effects of these cytokines on neutrophil activity, two different specific arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors, piriprost and MK-886, were used to inhibit leukotriene synthesis. Neither inhibitor affected the upregulation of CD11b β2-integrin expression or priming of superoxide generation stimulated by IL-8 and GM-CSF. It is concluded that leukotrienes do not mediate either the direct or priming effects of these cytokines and that these classes of anti-inflammatory drugs are therefore unlikely to inhibit the effects of IL-8 and GM-CSF on neutrophil activation. PMID:18475524

  4. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Methods Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. Results ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1

  5. Tyrosine 569 in the c-Fms juxtamembrane domain is essential for kinase activity and macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Myles, G M; Brandt, C S; Carlberg, K; Rohrschneider, L R

    1994-01-01

    The receptor (Fms) for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a member of the tyrosine kinase class of growth factor receptors. It maintains survival, stimulates growth, and drives differentiation of the macrophage lineage of hematopoietic cells. Fms accumulates on the cell surface and becomes activated for signal transduction after M-CSF binding and is then internalized via endocytosis for eventual degradation in lysosomes. We have investigated the mechanism of endocytosis as part of the overall signaling process of this receptor and have identified an amino acid segment near the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region surrounding tyrosine 569 that is important for internalization. Mutation of tyrosine 569 to alanine (Y569A) eliminates ligand-induced rapid endocytosis of receptor molecules. The mutant Fms Y569A also lacks tyrosine kinase activity; however, tyrosine kinase activity is not essential for endocytosis because the kinase inactive receptor Fms K614A does undergo ligand-induced endocytosis, albeit at a reduced rate. Mutation of tyrosine 569 to phenylalanine had no effect on the M-CSF-induced endocytosis of Fms, and a four-amino-acid sequence containing Y-569 could support endocytosis when transferred into the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region of a glycophorin A construct. These results indicate that tyrosine 569 within the juxtamembrane region of Fms is part of a signal recognition sequence for endocytosis that does not require tyrosine phosphorylation at this site and that this domain also influences the kinase activity of the receptor. These results are consistent with a ligand-dependent step in recognition of the potential cryptic internalization signal. Images PMID:8007983

  6. Graphene quantum dots induce apoptosis, autophagy, and inflammatory response via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB mediated signaling pathways in activated THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yiru; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Pan, Shu-Ting; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Duan, Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-02

    The biomedical application of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) is a new emerging area. However, their safety data are still in scarcity to date. Particularly, the effect of GQDs on the immune system remains unknown. This study aimed to elucidate the interaction of GQDs with macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that GQDs slightly affected the cell viability and membrane integrity of macrophages, whereas GQDs significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptotic and autophagic cell death with an increase in the expression level of Bax, Bad, caspase 3, caspase 9, beclin 1, and LC3-I/II and a decrease in that of Bcl-2. Furthermore, low concentrations of GQDs significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8, whereas high concentrations of GQDs elicited opposite effects on the cytokines production. SB202190, a selective inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), abolished the cytokine-inducing effect of GQDs in macrophages. Moreover, GQDs significantly increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and p65, and promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Taken together, these results show that GQDs induce ROS generation, apoptosis, autophagy, and inflammatory response via p38MAPK and NF-κB mediated signaling pathways in THP-1 activated macrophages.

  7. A pathogenic trace of Tannerella forsythia - shedding of soluble fully active tumor necrosis factor α from the macrophage surface by karilysin.

    PubMed

    Bryzek, D; Ksiazek, M; Bielecka, E; Karim, A Y; Potempa, B; Staniec, D; Koziel, J; Potempa, J

    2014-12-01

    Tannerella forsythia is implicated as a pathogen causing chronic and aggressive periodontitis. However, its virulence factors, including numerous putative proteases, are mostly uncharacterized. Karilysin is a newly described matrix metalloprotease-like enzyme of T. forsythia. Since pathogen-derived proteases may affect the host defense system via modulation of the cytokine network, the aim of this study was to determine the influence of karilysin on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The results showed that karilysin cleaved the membrane form of TNF-α on the surface of macrophages, and that this led to an increased concentration of soluble TNF-α in the conditioned medium. Importantly, despite partial degradation of soluble TNF-α by karilysin, the released cytokine retained its biological activity, inducing apoptosis and stimulating autocrine pathway of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Notably, the observed effect required proteolytic activity by karilysin, since a catalytically inactive mutant of the enzyme did not affect TNF-α secretion. The shedding was independent of the activity of ADAM17, a major endogenous TNF-α converting enzyme. Karilysin-dependent TNF-α release from the cell surface is likely to occur in vivo because human plasma, the main constituent of gingival crevicular fluid, only slightly affected the sheddase activity of karilysin. Taken together, these results indicate that karilysin modulates the host immune response through regulation of TNF-α secretion, and should therefore be considered as a new virulence factor of T. forsythia.

  8. Macrophage heterogeneity and cholesterol homeostasis: classically-activated macrophages are associated with reduced cholesterol accumulation following treatment with oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Chu, Eugene M; Tai, Daven C; Beer, Jennifer L; Hill, John S

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages are centrally involved during atherosclerosis development and are the predominant cell type that accumulates cholesterol in the plaque. Macrophages however, are heterogeneous in nature reflecting a variety of microenvironments and different phenotypes may be more prone to contribute towards atherosclerosis progression. Using primary human monocyte-derived macrophages, we sought to evaluate one aspect of atherogenic potential of different macrophage phenotypes by determining their propensity to associate with and accumulate oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Classically-activated macrophages treated simultaneously with interferon γ (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) associated with less oxLDL and accumulated less cholesterol compared to untreated controls. The combined treatment of IFNγ and TNFα reduced the mRNA expression of CD36 and the expression of both cell surface CD36 and macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1) protein. Under oxLDL loaded conditions, IFNγ and TNFα did not reduce macrophage protein expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-actived receptor γ (PPARγ) which is known to positively regulate CD36 expression. However, macrophages treated with IFNγ attenuated the ability of the PPARγ-specific agonist rosiglitazone from upregulating cell surface CD36 protein expression. Our results demonstrate that the observed reduction of cholesterol accumulation in macrophages treated with IFNγ and TNFα following oxLDL treatment was due at least in part to reduced cell surface CD36 and MSR1 protein expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1.

  10. Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Oliver; Onizuka, Shinya; Becker, Christian M; Fannon, Michael; Flynn, Evelyn; D'Amato, Robert; Zetter, Bruce; Folkman, Judah; Ray, Rahul; Swamy, Narasimha; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated a selectively deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line. DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell compartment of a growing malignancy.

  11. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor (DBP-maf) Inhibits Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Oliver; Onizuka, Shinya; Becker, Christian M; Fannon, Michael; Flynn, Evelyn; D'Amato, Robert; Zetter, Bruce; Folkman, Judah; Ray, Rahul; Swamy, Narasimha; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Abstract We have isolated a selectively deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line. DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell compartment of a growing malignancy. PMID:12659668

  12. Association of Interferon- and Transforming Growth Factor β–Regulated Genes and Macrophage Activation With Systemic Sclerosis–Related Progressive Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Romy B.; Sampaio-Barros, Percival; Stifano, Giuseppina; Borges, Claudia L.; de Carvalho, Carlos R.; Kairalla, Ronaldo; Parra, Edwin R.; Spira, Avrum; Simms, Robert; Capellozzi, Vera L.; Lafyatis, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc)–related interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the leading causes of mortality. We undertook this study to analyze the gene expression of lung tissue in a prospective cohort of patients with SSc-related ILD and to compare it with that in control lungs and with 2 prospective clinical parameters in order to understand the molecular pathways implicated in progressive lung disease. Methods Lung tissue was obtained by open lung biopsy in 28 consecutive patients with SSc-related ILD and in 4 controls. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function testing (PFT) were performed at baseline and 2–3 years after treatment based on lung histologic classification. Microarray analysis was performed, and the results were correlated with changes in the HRCT score (FibMax) and PFT values. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm differential levels of messenger RNA and protein. Results Lung microarray data distinguished patients with SSc-related ILD from healthy controls. In the lungs of patients with SSc-related ILD who had nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), expressed genes included macrophage markers, chemokines, collagen, and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)– and interferon (IFN)–regulated genes. Expression of these genes correlated with progressive lung fibrosis defined by the change in FibMax. Immunohistochemistry confirmed increased markers of collagen (COL1A1), IFN (OAS1 and IFI44), and macrophages (CCL18 and CD163), and the positive correlation with the change in FibMax was confirmed by qPCR in a larger group of SSc patients with NSIP. Several genes correlated with both the change in FibMax (r > 0.4) and the change in % predicted forced vital capacity (r < −0.1), including IFN and macrophage markers, chemokines, and heat-shock proteins. Conclusion These results highlight major pathogenic pathways relevant to progressive pulmonary fibrosis in SSc

  13. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces phagocytosis of foreign particles by macrophages in autocrine and paracrine fashion.

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, S; Suzuki, K; Matsuno, T; Kaneda, K; Takagi, M; Nishihira, J

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to foreign particles sometimes causes inflammatory reactions through production of cytokines and chemoattractants by phagocytic cells. In this study, we focused on macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to evaluate its pathophysiological role in the phagocytic process. Immunohistochemical analysis of human pseudosynovial tissues retrieved at revision of total hip arthroplasty showed that infiltrating mononuclear and multinuclear cells were positively stained by both an anti-CD68 antibody and anti-human MIF antibody. For in vitro study, MIF was released from murine macrophage-like cells (RAW 264.7) in response to phagocytosis of fluorescent-latex beads in a particle dose-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis showed marked elevation of the MIF mRNA level in the phagocytic macrophage-like cells. Moreover, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with rat recombinant MIF increased the extent of phagocytosis by 1.6-fold compared with the control. Taken together, these results suggest that MIF plays an important role by activating macrophages in autocrine and paracrine fashion to phagocytose foreign particles. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9370935

  14. Is chondroitin sulfate responsible for the biological effects attributed to the GC protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF)?

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Marco; Reinwald, Heinz; Pacini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesize that a plasma glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate, may be responsible for the biological and clinical effects attributed to the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF), a protein that is extracted from human blood. Thus, Gc protein binds chondroitin sulfate on the cell surface and such an interaction may occur also in blood, colostrum and milk. This interpretation would solve the inconsistencies encountered in explaining the effects of GcMAF in vitro and in vivo. According to our model, the Gc protein or the GcMAF bind to chondroitin sulfate both on the cell surface and in bodily fluids, and the resulting multimolecular complexes, under the form of oligomers trigger a transmembrane signal or, alternatively, are internalized and convey the signal directly to the nucleus thus eliciting the diverse biological effects observed for both GcMAF and chondroitin sulfate.

  15. Effects of Histoplasma capsulatum on murine macrophage functions: inhibition of macrophage priming, oxidative burst, and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J E; Abegg, A L; Travis, S J; Kobayashi, G S; Little, J R

    1989-02-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells fail to trigger an oxidative burst response in normal murine macrophages. The results of this study, in which an in vitro assay of macrophage antifungal effects was used, extend these findings. During 18 h of incubation, unprimed elicited murine macrophages inhibited H. capsulatum growth only when macrophages were present in great excess. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-primed macrophages showed enhanced fungal growth inhibition but a similar requirement for an excess of phagocytes. Macrophages containing heat-killed H. capsulatum exhibited diminished antifungal effects toward viable H. capsulatum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Parallel experiments showed no comparable effect of ingested latex particles on macrophage antifungal activity. Using chemiluminescence as a measure of the oxidative burst, we found that macrophages primed in vitro with IFN-gamma alone failed to exhibit a significant response to triggering by H. capsulatum yeast cells unless a second priming agent (tumor necrosis factor alpha or bacterial lipopolysaccharide) was added to IFN-gamma. Furthermore, macrophage priming with single agents was blocked by the prior ingestion of heat-killed H. capsulatum. These studies provide evidence that ingestion of H. capsulatum yeast cells can induce a prompt and enduring deactivation of murine macrophages.

  16. Effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) infusion on bone resorption in two osteopetrotic mutations.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G B; Benis, K A; Flay, N W; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1995-06-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone diseases characterized by an excess accumulation of bone and a variety of immune defects. Osteopetrosis (op) and incisors absent (ia) are two nonallelic mutations in the rat which demonstrated these skeletal defects as a result of reduced bone resorption. Osteopetrotic (op) rats have severe sclerosis as a result of reduced numbers of osteoclasts which are structurally abnormal. The sclerosis in ia rats is not as severe as in op mutants; they have elevated numbers of osteoclasts, but they are also morphologically abnormal, lacking a ruffled border. Both of these mutations have defects in the inflammation-primed activation of macrophages. They demonstrate independent defects in the cascade involved in the conversion of vitamin D binding protein (DBP) to a potent macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF). Because this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoclastic dysfunction, the effects of ex vivo-generated DBP-MAF were evaluated on the skeletal system of these two mutations. Newborn ia and op rats and normal littermate controls were injected with DBP-MAF or vehicle once every 4 days from birth until 2 weeks of age, at which time bone samples were collected to evaluate a number of skeletal parameters. DBP-MAF treated op rats had an increased number of osteoclasts and the majority of them exhibited normal structure. There was also reduced bone volume in the treated op animals and an associated increased cellularity of the marrow spaces. The skeletal sclerosis was also corrected in the ia rats; the bone marrow cavity size was significantly enlarged and the majority of the osteoclasts appeared normal with extensive ruffled borders.

  17. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  18. Potential novel biomarkers of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients: CXCL13, CCL23, transforming growth factor alpha, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Hughes, Fiona J; Sharp, Catriona H; Warnock, Linda C; Montgomery, Doug S; Akil, Mohammed; Wilson, Anthony G; Binks, Michael H; Dickson, Marion C

    2008-08-01

    To determine whether the plasma levels of a range of inflammatory proteins have utility as biomarkers of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Plasma proteins (n = 163) were profiled in 44 patients with RA diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology 1987 criteria (22 with active and 22 with quiescent disease) and in 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The utility of a subset of differentially expressed proteins as predictors of RA disease activity was investigated using partial least-squares discriminant analysis, and their response to therapeutic intervention was evaluated in plasma from an additional cohort of 16 patients with active RA treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha). The protein profiling study identified 25 proteins that were differentially expressed in plasma samples from patients with active RA (P for the false discovery rate < or = 0.01) compared with those with quiescent RA, including the previously described interleukin-6 (IL-6), oncostatin M, and IL-2, and the 5 less-established markers macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9, CCL23, transforming growth factor alpha, and CXCL13. Systemic levels of these 5 markers correlated with the C-reactive protein level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor level, tender joint count in 68 joints, and Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), and their combined plasma levels were shown to be good predictors of disease activity (kappa = 0.64). In anti-TNFalpha-treated RA patients, plasma levels of CXCL13 were reduced after 1 and 7 days of therapy, and levels of CCL23, M-CSF, and CXCL13 showed a statistically significant positive correlation with the DAS28 score. This exploratory study for biomarker discovery led to the identification of several proteins predictive of RA disease activity that may be useful in the definition of disease subphenotypes and in the measurement of

  19. The toothless osteopetrotic rat has a normal vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) cascade and chondrodysplasia resistant to treatments with colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and/or DBP-MAF.

    PubMed

    Odgren, P R; Popoff, S N; Safadi, F F; MacKay, C A; Mason-Savas, A; Seifert, M F; Marks, S C

    1999-08-01

    The osteopetrotic rat mutation toothless (tl) is characterized by little or no bone resorption, few osteoclasts and macrophages, and chondrodysplasia at the growth plates. Short-term treatment of tl rats with colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) has been shown to increase the number of osteoclasts and macrophages, producing dramatic resolution of skeletal sclerosis at some, but not all, sites. Defects in production of vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) have been identified in two other independent osteopetrotic mutations of the rat (op and ia), and two in the mouse (op and mi), in which macrophages and osteoclasts can be activated by the administration of exogenous DBP-MAF. The present studies were undertaken to examine the histology and residual growth defects in tl rats following longer CSF-1 treatments, to investigate the possibility that exogenous DBP-MAF might act synergistically with CSF-1 to improve the tl phenotype, and to assess the integrity of the endogenous DBP-MAF pathway in this mutation. CSF-1 treatment-with or without DBP-MAF-induced resorption of metaphyseal bone to the growth plate on the marrow side, improved slightly but did not normalize long bone growth, and caused no improvement in the abnormal histology of the growth plate. Injections of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) to prime macrophage activation via the DBP-MAF pathway raised superoxide production to similar levels in peritoneal macrophages from both normal and mutant animals, indicating no defect in the DBP-MAF pathway in tl rats. Interestingly, pretreatments with CSF-1 alone also increased superoxide production, although the mechanism for this remains unknown. In summary, we find that, unlike other osteopetrotic mutations investigated to date, the DBP-MAF pathway does not appear to be defective in the tl rat; that additional DBP-MAF does not augment the beneficial skeletal effects seen with CSF-1 alone; and that the growth plate chondrodystrophy seen in

  20. SKLB023 Blocks Joint Inflammation and Cartilage Destruction in Arthritis Models via Suppression of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation in Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Li, Xiuxia; Pei, Heying; Xiang, Mingli; Chen, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common arthritis and is mainly characterized by symmetric polyarticular joint disorders. Our previous study demonstrated a novel small molecule compound (Z)-N-(3-Chlorophenyl)-2-(4-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene) methyl) phenoxy) acet-amide (SKLB023) showed potently anti-arthritic effects in a rat arthritis model, however, the underlying mechanisms for this are largely unknown. Both NF-κB and macrophages were reported to play important roles in the pathologic processes of RA. The purposes of this study were to indicate whether NF-κB and macrophages contributed to anti-arthritic effects of SKLB023 in two experimental arthritis models. Our results showed that SKLB023 could significantly improve joint inflammation and cartilage destruction both in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. We further found that the binding activation of NF-κB to DNA in joint tissues and RAW264.7 macrophages were suppressed by SKLB023. SKLB023 also inhibited the NF-κB activity in peritoneal macrophages by luciferase assay. Furthermore, the number of macrophages in synovial tissues was decreased after the treatment of different doses of SKLB023. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in plasma, and the levels of TNF-α, NO, and IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages were down-regulated by SKLB023. Finally, SKLB023 attenuated the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in vivo and suppressed the phosphorylations of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These observations identify a novel function for SKLB023 as an inhibitor of NF-κB in macrophages of RA, highlighting that SKLB023 was a potential therapeutic strategy for RA. PMID:23431370

  1. Interferon-gamma regulates nucleoside transport systems in macrophages through signal transduction and activator of transduction factor 1 (STAT1)-dependent and -independent signalling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio; García-Manteiga, José; Serra, Maria; Guillén-Gómez, Elena; Casado, F Javier; MacLeod, Carol; Modolell, Manuel; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Celada, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The expressions of CNT and ENT (concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters) in macrophages are differentially regulated by IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). This cytokine controls gene expression through STAT1-dependent and/or -independent pathways (where STAT1 stands for signal transduction and activator of transcription 1). In the present study, the role of STAT1 in the response of nucleoside transporters to IFN-gamma was studied using macrophages from STAT1 knockout mice. IFN-gamma triggered an inhibition of ENT1-related nucleoside transport activity through STAT1-dependent mechanisms. Such inhibition of macrophage growth and ENT1 activity by IFN-gamma is required for DNA synthesis. Interestingly, IFN-gamma led to an induction of the CNT1- and CNT2-related nucleoside transport activities independent of STAT1, thus ensuring the supply of extracellular nucleosides for the STAT1-independent RNA synthesis. IFN-gamma up-regulated CNT2 mRNA and CNT1 protein levels and down-regulated ENT1 mRNA in both wild-type and STAT1 knockout macrophages. This is consistent with a STAT1-independent, long-term-mediated, probably transcription-dependent, regulation of nucleoside transporter genes. Moreover, STAT1-dependent post-transcriptional mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity. Although nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of ENT1 activity in B-cells at a post-transcriptional level, our results show that STAT1-dependent induction of nitric oxide by IFN-gamma is not implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity in macrophages. Our results indicate that both STAT1-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of nucleoside transporters by IFN-gamma in macrophages. PMID:12868960

  2. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 {mu}M of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 {mu}M) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms

  3. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gone-Jhe; Chen, Ta-Liang; Ueng, Yune-Fang; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2008-04-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 microM ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 microM of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 microM) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-alpha and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms occur through

  4. Evidence for active antigen presentation by monocyte/macrophages in response to stimulation with particles: the expression of NFκB transcription factors and costimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Huwaidha; Revell, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    The macrophage and lymphocyte response to wear debris contributes to the failure of some joint replacements. Costimulatory molecule expression by particle-containing macrophages is an evidence for antigen presentation. The NFκB transcription factors are regulators of costimulatory molecules and are present in tissue near failed joint prostheses. The tissue localisation of NFκB and the expression of these factors and costimulatory molecules by U937 cells stimulated with nano- and microparticles are reported, together with the effects of an NFκB inhibitor (sc514). The tissue localisation of RelA, RelB, c-rel, p50, p52 and NF-IL6 was examined by immunohistochemistry in samples from 15 patients with failure of metal against polyethylene total hip replacements. The expression of these NFκB factors by U937 cells stimulated with microparticles (CoCr, diamond) and nanoparticles (diamond) was examined by quantified RT-PCR. Lipopolysaccharide provided positive controls while negative controls had no additions to culture. Inhibition of NFκB activity by sc-514 was studied. The expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) was evaluated in parallel cell culture studies by tricolour flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry of tissue showed the highest expression for NF-IL6 (32.56 ± 11.61 per cent), RelA (33.66 ± 9.98 per cent) and p52 (32.07 ± 12.90 per cent), then RelB (22.63 ± 7.49 per cent), c-rel (14.07 ± 6.72 per cent) and p50 (13.07 ± 5.99 per cent). NF-IL6 was localised to macrophages, RelB to RFD1+ dendritic cells. U937 cells showed an increased expression of all NFκB factors (p < 0.01) in response to CoCr and diamond microparticles. Only RelA and c-rel (p < 0.01) were increased by one diamond nanoparticle and p52 and c-rel (p < 0.01) by another nanoparticulate diamond. Inhibition by sc-514 of RelA, c-rel and p50 expression occurred with all four particles, p52 was decreased for all diamond particles (but not CoCr) and RelB was not inhibited with

  5. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  6. The Toll-like receptor 4-activated neuroprotective microglia subpopulation survives via granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and JAK2/STAT5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kamigaki, Mayumi; Hide, Izumi; Yanase, Yuhki; Shiraki, Hiroko; Harada, Kana; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Seki, Takahiro; Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Michihiro; Sakai, Norio

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 mediates inflammation and is also known to trigger apoptosis in microglia. Our time-lapse observations showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induced rapid death in primary cultures of rat microglia, while a portion of the microglia escaped from death and survived for much longer than 2 days, in which time, all of the control cells had died. However, it remains unclear how the LPS-stimulated microglia subpopulation could continue to survive in the absence of any supplied growth factors. In the present study, to clarify the mechanism underlying the LPS-stimulated survival, we investigated whether microglia could produce their own survival factors in response to LPS, focusing on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-34, which are mainly supplied by astrocytes or neurons. The LPS-stimulated microglia drastically induced the expression of the GM-CSF mRNA and protein, while M-CSF and IL-34 levels were unchanged. The surviving microglia also significantly upregulated the expression of GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) mRNA without affecting M-CSFR. As for the GM-CSFR downstream signal, LPS resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT5 and its translocation to the nucleus in the surviving microglia. Moreover, a specific JAK2 inhibitor, NVP-BSK805, suppressed STAT5 phosphorylation and microglia survival in response to LPS, indicating a critical role of the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in this survival mechanism. Together, these results suggest that a subpopulation of TLR4-activated microglia may survive by producing GM-CSF and up-regulating GM-CSFR. This autocrine GM-CSF pathway may activate the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, which controls the transcription of survival-related genes. Finally, these surviving microglia may have neuroprotective functions because the neurons remained viable in co-cultures with these microglia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamir,D.; Zierow, S.; Leng, L.; Cho, Y.; Diaz, Y.; Griffith, J.; McDonald, C.; Merk, M.; Mitchell, R.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 A). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (K(d) = 2.9 x 10(-8) M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction.

  8. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Kamir, Daniela; Zierow, Swen; Leng, Lin; Cho, Yoonsang; Diaz, Yira; Griffith, Jason; McDonald, Courtney; Merk, Melanie; Mitchell, Robert A.; Trent, John; Chen, Yibang; Kwong, Yuen-Kwan Amy; Xiong, Huabao; Vermeire, Jon; Cappello, Michael; McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Walker, John; Bernhagen, Jurgen; Lolis, Elias; Bucala, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 Å). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (Kd = 2.9 × 10−8 M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction. PMID:18523291

  9. The macrophage migration inhibitory factor homolog of Entamoeba histolytica binds to and immunomodulates host macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moonah, Shannon N; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A

    2014-09-01

    The host inflammatory response contributes to the tissue damage that occurs during amebic colitis, with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) being a key mediator of the gut inflammation observed. Mammalian macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in the exacerbation of a wide range of inflammatory diseases, including colitis. We identified a MIF gene homolog in the Entamoeba histolytica genome, raising the question of whether E. histolytica MIF (EhMIF) has proinflammatory activity similar to that of mammalian MIF. In this report, we describe the first functional characterization of EhMIF. Antibodies were prepared against recombinantly expressed EhMIF and used to demonstrate that EhMIF is expressed as a 12-kDa protein localized to the cytoplasm of trophozoites. In a manner similar to that of mammalian MIF, EhMIF interacted with the MIF receptor CD74 and bound to macrophages. EhMIF induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production. In addition, EhMIF enhanced TNF-α secretion by amplifying TNF-α production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and by inhibiting the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of TNF-α secretion. EhMIF was expressed during human infection, as evidenced by the presence of anti-EhMIF antibodies in the sera of children living in an area where E. histolytica infection is endemic. Anti-EhMIF antibodies did not cross-react with human MIF. The ability of EhMIF to modulate host macrophage function may promote an exaggerated proinflammatory immune response and contribute to the tissue damage seen in amebic colitis.

  10. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A.; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ−/− leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ+/+ counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ−/− neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus–challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  11. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  13. Urine macrophage migration inhibitory factor in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Otukesh, Hasan; Chalian, Majid; Hoseini, Rozita; Chalian, Hamid; Hooman, Nakysa; Bedayat, Arash; Yazdi, Reza Salman; Sabaghi, Saeed; Mahdavi, Saeed

    2007-12-01

    We reported a series of ten patients with lupus nephritis (five patients in the relapse phase and five in the remission phase) and measured the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an important pro-inflammatory cytokine with probable role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, in their urine samples. MIF/creatinine (Cr) ratio directly correlated with disease activity and it does not have any significant difference between inactive disease and normal ones. We found that the urine MIF/Cr ratio not only differentiates active disease from inactive disease and normal ones but also correlates with the activity indices of renal pathology.

  14. Baculovirus-expressed vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) activates osteoclasts and binding of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) does not influence this activity.

    PubMed

    Swamy, N; Ghosh, S; Schneider, G B; Ray, R

    2001-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is a multi-functional serum protein that is converted to vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) by post-translational modification. DBP-maf is a new cytokine that mediates bone resorption by activating osteoclasts, which are responsible for resorption of bone. Defective osteoclast activation leads to disorders like osteopetrosis, characterized by excessive accumulation of bone mass. Previous studies demonstrated that two nonallelic mutations in the rat with osteopetrosis have independent defects in the cascade involved in the conversion of DBP to DBP-maf. The skeletal defects associated with osteopetrosis are corrected in these mutants with in vivo DBP-maf treatment. This study evaluates the effects of various forms of DBP-maf (native, recombinant, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) bound) on osteoclast function in vitro in order to determine some of the structural requirements of this protein that relate to bone resorbing activities. Osteoclast activity was determined by evaluating pit formation using osteoclasts, isolated from the long bones of newborn rats, incubated on calcium phosphate coated, thin film, Ostologic MultiTest Slides. Incubation of osteoclasts with ex vivo generated native DBP-maf resulted in a dose dependent, statistically significant, activation of the osteoclasts. The activation was similar whether or not the vitamin D binding site of the DBP-maf was occupied. The level of activity in response to DBP-maf was greater than that elicited by optimal doses of other known stimulators (PTH and 1,25(OH(2)D(3)) of osteoclast function. Furthermore, another potent macrophage activating factor, interferon--gamma, had no effect on osteoclast activity. The activated form of a full length recombinant DBP, expressed in E. coli showed no activity in the in vitro assay. Contrary to this finding, baculovirus-expressed recombinant DBP-maf demonstrated significant osteoclast activating activity. The normal

  15. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 promotes macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Feng, Ye; Shu, Bingyan; Gui, Yuan; Wei, Wei; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling controls many essential cellular functions. However, the role of Rictor/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) in regulating macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis remains largely unknown. We report here that Rictor/mTORC2 was activated in macrophages from the fibrotic kidneys of mice. Ablation of Rictor in macrophages reduced kidney fibrosis, inflammatory cell accumulation, macrophage proliferation and polarization after unilateral ureter obstruction or ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs), deletion of Rictor or blockade of protein kinase Cα inhibited cell migration. Additionally, deletion of Rictor or blockade of Akt abolished interleukin-4-stimulated or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-stimulated macrophage M2 polarization. Furthermore, deletion of Rictor downregulated TGF-β1-stimulated upregulation of multiple profibrotic cytokines, including platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and connective tissue growth factor, in BMMs. Conditioned medium from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor(-/-) macrophages stimulated fibroblast activation less efficiently than that from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor(+/+) macrophages. These results demonstrate that Rictor/mTORC2 signalling can promote macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis. Targeting this signalling pathway in macrophages may shine light on ways to protect against kidney fibrosis in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Immunotherapy of BALB/c mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumor with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1997-06-01

    Vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) is the precursor of macrophage activating factor (MAF). Treatment of mouse DBP with immobilized beta-galactosidase or treatment of human Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated a remarkably potent MAF, termed DBPMAF or GcMAF, respectively. The domain of Gc protein responsible for macrophage activation was cloned and enzymatically converted to the cloned MAF, designated CdMAF. In Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice, tumor-specific serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) activity increased linearly with time as the transplanted tumor cells grew in the peritoneal cavity. Therapeutic effects of DBPMAF, GcMAF, and CdMAF on mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumor were assessed by survival time, the total tumor cell count in the peritoneal cavity, and serum NaGalase activity. Mice that received a single administration of DBPMAF or GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) on the same day after transplantation of tumor (1 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 35 +/- 4 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 16 +/- 2 days. When mice received the second DBPMAF or GcMAF administration at day 4, they survived more than 50 days. Mice that received two DBPMAF administrations, at days 4 and 8 after transplantation of 1 x 10(5) tumor cells, survived up to 32 +/- 4 days. At day 4 posttransplantation, the total tumor cell count in the peritoneal cavity was approximately 5 x 10(5) cells. Mice that received two DBPMAF administrations, at days 0 and 4 after transplantation of 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, also survived up to 32 +/- 4 days, while control mice that received the 5 x 10(5) ascites tumor cells only survived for 14 +/- 2 days. Four DBPMAF, GcMAF, or CdMAF administrations to mice transplanted with 5 x 10(5) Ehrlich ascites tumor cells with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 90 days and an insignificantly low serum NaGalase level between days 30 and 90.

  17. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid.

  18. Measurement of Macrophage Activation by Chemiluminescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    cytotoxicity and oxidative metabolism including those reactions responsible for chemiluminescence (11-13). This activation has been correlated with an...order to assay this event, enhancers of chemiluminescence such as lucigenin and luminol are required to amplify the reaction . Enhancement of CL by...Maleic vinyl ether activation of murine *. macrophages against lung metastasizing tumors. Cancer Res 41:3901-3906 1981 4. Fidler I.J., Sone, S., Fogler

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  20. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cardiac stem cell proliferation and endothelial differentiation through the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and AMPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    CUI, JINJIN; ZHANG, FENGYUN; WANG, YONGSHUN; LIU, JINGJIN; MING, XING; HOU, JINGBO; LV, BO; FANG, SHAOHONG; YU, BO

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has pleiotropic immune functions in a number of inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence from expression and functional studies has indicated that MIF is involved in various aspects of cardiovascular disease. In this study, we aimed to determine whether MIF supports in vitro c-kit+CD45− cardiac stem cell (CSC) survival, proliferation and differentiation into endothelial cells, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. We observed MIF receptor (CD74) expression in mouse CSCs (mCSCs) using PCR and immunofluorescence staining, and MIF secretion by mCSCs using PCR and ELISA in vitro. Increasing amounts of exogenous MIF did not affect CD74 expression, but promoted mCSC survival, proliferation and endothelial differentiation. By contrast, treatment with an MIF inhibitor (ISO-1) or siRNA targeting CD74 (CD74-siRNA) suppressed the biological changes induced by MIF in the mCSCs. Increasing amounts of MIF increased the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which are known to support cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. These effects of MIF on the mCSCs were abolished by LY294002 [a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor] and MK-2206 (an Akt inhibitor). Moreover, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation increased following treatment with MIF. The AMPK inhibitor, compound C, partly blocked the pro-proliferative effects of MIF on the mCSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that MIF promotes mCSC survival, proliferation and endothelial differentiation through the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways. Thus, MIF may prove to be a potential therapeutic factor in the treatment of heart failure and myocardial infarction by activating CSCs. PMID:27035848

  1. Phospholipase A2-modified low-density lipoprotein activates macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Namgaladze, Dmitry; Morbitzer, Daniel; von Knethen, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors modulating metabolic and inflammatory responses of phagocytes to stimuli such as fatty acids and their metabolites. We studied the role of PPARs in macrophages exposed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA). By analyzing PPAR ligand-binding domain luciferase reporter activation, we observed that PLA-LDL transactivates PPARalpha and PPARdelta, but not PPARgamma. We confirmed that PLA-LDL induced PPAR response element reporter activation by endogenous PPARalpha and PPARdelta in human THP-1 macrophages. By using THP-1 cells with a stable knockdown of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, we showed that PLA-LDL-activated PPARdelta altered macrophage gene expression related to lipid metabolism and lipid droplet formation. Although PPARalpha/delta silencing did not affect cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages, PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL attenuated macrophage inflammatory gene expression induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide. PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL does not influence lipid accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages. However, it attenuates macrophage inflammatory responses, thus contributing to an anti-inflammatory cell phenotype.

  2. High Glucose and Interferon Gamma Synergistically Stimulate MMP-1 Expression in U937 Macrophages by Increasing Transcription Factor STAT1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nareika, Alena; Sundararaj, Kamala P; Im, Yeong-Bin; Game, Bryan A.; Lopes-Virella, Maria F.; Huang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Recent Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) and other clinical studies have reported that glucose control in patients with diabetes leads to a significant reduction of cardiovascular events and atherosclerosis, indicating that hyperglycemia plays an essential role in cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. Although several mechanisms by which hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis have been proposed, it remains unclear how hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis by interaction with inflammatory cytokines. To test our hypothesis that hyperglycemia interplays with interferon gamma (IFNγ), a key factor involved in atherosclerosis, to up-regulate the expression of genes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines that are involved in plaque destabilization, U937 macrophages cultured in medium containing either normal or high glucose were challenged with IFNγ and the expression of MMPs and cytokines were then quantified by real-time PCR and ELISA. Results showed that high glucose and IFNγ had a synergistic effect on the expression of MMP-1, MMP-9 and IL-1β. High glucose also enhanced IFNγ-induced priming effect on LPS-stimulated MMP-1 secretion. Furthermore, high glucose and IFNγ exert the synergistic effect on MMP-1 expression by enhancing STAT1 phosphorylation and STAT1 transcriptional activity. In summary, this study revealed a novel mechanism potentially involved in diabetes-promoted cardiovascular disease. PMID:18586252

  3. Pro-apoptotic action of macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 and counteraction of activating transcription factor 3 in carrageenan-exposed enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Jin; Kim, Hwi-Gon; Kim, Juil; Park, Seong-Hwan; Park, Jiyeon; Oh, Chang Gyu; Do, Kee Hun; Lee, Seung Joon; Park, Young Chul; Ahn, Soon Cheol; Kim, Yong Sik; Moon, Yuseok

    2014-11-18

    Carrageenan (CGN), a widely used food additive, has been shown to injure the epithelial barrier in animal models. This type of damage is a clinical feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans. In the present study, the effects of CGN on pro-apoptotic responses associated with macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) regulation in human enterocytes were evaluated. CGN up-regulated the expression of MIC-1 that promoted epithelial cell apoptosis. Although MIC-1 induction was dependent on pro-apoptotic p53 protein, the pro-survival protein activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was negatively regulated by p53 expression. However, MIC-1 enhanced the expression of the pro-survival protein ATF3 in enterocytes exposed to CGN. Functionally, MIC-1-mediated epithelial cell apoptosis was counteracted by the pro-survival action of ATF3 in response to CGN exposure. These findings demonstrated that the counterbalance between MIC-1 and ATF3 is critical for deciding the fate of enterocytes under the food chemical stress.

  4. Urban particulate matter suppresses priming of T helper type 1 cells by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Nick C; Faith, Alex; Pfeffer, Paul; Lu, Haw; Kelly, Frank J; Hawrylowicz, Catherine M; Lee, Tak H

    2014-02-01

    Urban particulate matter (UPM) exacerbates asthmatic lung inflammation and depresses lung immunity. Lung dendritic cells (DCs) react to airway particulates, and have a critical role in linking innate and adaptive immunity, but the direct effects of UPM on DCs, that have been activated by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a product of stimulated normal human bronchial epithelial cells, has not been investigated. Human blood CD1c(+) DCs were purified and activated with UPM in the presence or absence of GM-CSF with and without LPS, and DC maturation was assessed by flow cytometry. DC stimulatory capacity and priming of 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled naive CD4 T cells was investigated using the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. T cell proliferation and effector function were assessed using flow cytometry and secreted cytokines were measured by combined bead array. UPM enhanced DC maturation in an LPS-independent manner. DCs activated by UPM plus GM-CSF (UPM + GM-CSF DCs) induced higher naive CD4 T cell proliferation in the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction than DCs pretreated by GM-CSF alone (GM-CSF DCs), and elicited both substantially lower levels of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-5 secretion, and lower frequencies of alloantigen-specific T helper (Th) type 1 effector cells than naive CD4 T cells primed by GM-CSF DCs. UPM-stimulated DCs produced IL-6 and TNF-α. Neutralization of IL-6 decreased naive CD4 T cell proliferation stimulated by UPM + GM-CSF DCs, and significantly increased the frequency of alloantigen-specific Th1 effector cells, but did not reverse UPM-induced inhibition of IFN-γ secretion. We conclude that UPM enhances GM-CSF-induced DC maturation and stimulatory capacity, but inhibits the generation of Th1 cells. Thus, UPM exposure may impair Th1 responses to pulmonary pathogens.

  5. Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Allen, Judith E; Biswas, Subhra K; Fisher, Edward A; Gilroy, Derek W; Goerdt, Sergij; Gordon, Siamon; Hamilton, John A; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Lawrence, Toby; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Martinez, Fernando O; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mosser, David M; Natoli, Gioacchino; Saeij, Jeroen P; Schultze, Joachim L; Shirey, Kari Ann; Sica, Antonio; Suttles, Jill; Udalova, Irina; van Ginderachter, Jo A; Vogel, Stefanie N; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-07-17

    Description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing. Like the biblical Tower of Babel, macrophage activation encompasses a panoply of descriptors used in different ways. The lack of consensus on how to define macrophage activation in experiments in vitro and in vivo impedes progress in multiple ways, including the fact that many researchers still consider there to be only two types of activated macrophages, often termed M1 and M2. Here, we describe a set of standards encompassing three principles-the source of macrophages, definition of the activators, and a consensus collection of markers to describe macrophage activation-with the goal of unifying experimental standards for diverse experimental scenarios. Collectively, we propose a common framework for macrophage-activation nomenclature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid suppresses TXNIP mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation in MSU crystal stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages through the upregulation of Nrf2 transcription factor and alleviates MSU crystal induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Palani; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2017-03-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of berberine on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and in MSU crystal induced rats. Our results indicate that berberine (25, 50 and 75μM) suppressed the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) and intracellular reactive oxygen species in MSU crystal stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, caspase 1, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) and kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) were found downregulated with the upregulation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor and its associated anti-oxidant enzymes: Heme oxygenase I (HO-1), superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), NADPH quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and catalase (CAT) in MSU crystal stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages upon berberine treatment. Subsequently, western blot analysis revealed that berberine decreased the protein expression of IL-1β and caspase 1 and increased Nrf2 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Immunofluorescence analysis also explored increased expression of Nrf2 in MSU crystal stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by berberine treatment. In addition, the paw edema, pain score, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and articular elastase activity were found significantly reduced in berberine (50mg/kgb·wt) administered MSU crystal-induced rats. Conclusively, our current findings suggest that berberine may represent as a potential candidate for the treatment of gouty arthritis by suppressing inflammatory mediators and activating Nrf2 anti-oxidant pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide stimulates release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha through mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Choi, Eun-Young; Kim, Eun Gyung; Shin, Su-Hwa; Lee, Ju-Youn; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In-Soon

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide from Prevotella intermedia, a major cause of inflammatory periodontal disease, on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA in differentiated THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line. The potential involvement of the three main mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in the induction of TNF-alpha production was also investigated. Lipopolysaccharide from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 was prepared by the standard hot phenol-water method. THP-1 cells were incubated in the medium supplemented with phorbol myristate acetate to induce differentiation into macrophage-like cells. It was found that P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide can induce TNF-alpha mRNA expression and stimulate the release of TNF-alpha in differentiated THP-1 cells without additional stimuli. Treatment of the cells with P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide resulted in a simultaneous activation of three MAPKs [extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) and p38]. Pretreatment of the cells with MAPK inhibitors effectively suppressed P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production without affecting the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA. These data thus provided good evidence that the MAPK signaling pathways are required for the regulation of P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha synthesis at the level of translation more than at the transcriptional level.

  8. Inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) pathway by tetracyclic kaurene diterpenes in macrophages. Specific effects on NF-kappa B-inducing kinase activity and on the coordinate activation of ERK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Castrillo, A; de Las Heras, B; Hortelano, S; Rodriguez, B; Villar, A; Bosca, L

    2001-05-11

    The anti-inflammatory action of most terpenes has been explained in terms of the inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity. Ent-kaurene diterpenes are intermediates of the synthesis of gibberellins and inhibit the expression of NO synthase-2 and the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in J774 macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide. These diterpenes inhibit NF-kappaB and IkappaB kinase (IKK) activation in vivo but failed to affect in vitro the function of NF-kappaB, the phosphorylation and targeting of IkappaBalpha, and the activity of IKK-2. Transient expression of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) activated the IKK complex and NF-kappaB, a process that was inhibited by kaurenes, indicating that the inhibition of NIK was one of the targets of these diterpenes. These results show that kaurenes impair the inflammatory signaling by inhibiting NIK, a member of the MAPK kinase superfamily that interacts with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors, and mediate the activation of NF-kappaB by these receptors. Moreover, kaurenes delayed the phosphorylation of p38, ERK1, and ERK2 MAPKs, but not that of JNK, in response to lipopolysaccharide treatment of J774 cells. The absence of a coordinate activation of MAPK and IKK might contribute to a deficient activation of NF-kappaB that is involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of these molecules.

  9. Calcineurin potentiates activation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene in T cells: involvement of the conserved lymphokine element 0.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, A; Masuda, E S; Naito, Y; Tokumitsu, H; Arai, K; Arai, N

    1994-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are produced by stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (A23187) in human T cell leukemia Jurkat cells. The expression of GM-CSF and IL-2 is inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Earlier studies on the IL-2 gene expression showed that overexpression of calcineurin (CN), a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, can stimulate transcription from the IL-2 promoter through the NF-AT-binding site. In this study, we obtained evidence that transfection of the cDNAs for CN A (catalytic) and CN B (regulatory) subunits also augments transcription from the GM-CSF promoter and recovers the transcription inhibited by CsA. The constitutively active type of the CN A subunit, which lacks the auto-inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains, acts in synergy with PMA to activate transcription from the GM-CSF promoter. We also found that the active CN partially replaces calcium ionophore in synergy with PMA to induce expression of endogenous GM-CSF and IL-2. By multimerizing the regulatory elements of the GM-CSF promoter, we found that one of the target sites for the CN action is the conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0), located at positions between -54 and -40. Mobility shift assays showed that the CLE0 sequence has an AP1-binding site and is associated with an NF-AT-like factor, termed NF-CLE0 gamma. NF-CLE0 gamma binding is induced by PMA/A23187 and is inhibited by treatment with CsA. These results suggest that CN is involved in the coordinated induction of the GM-CSF and IL-2 genes and that the CLE0 sequence of the GM-CSF gene is a functional analogue of the NF-AT-binding site in the IL-2 promoter, which mediates signals downstream of T cell activation. Images PMID:8186461

  10. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages.

  11. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  12. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  13. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    PubMed

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  14. D-penicillamine-induced autoimmunity: relationship to macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinze; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2009-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions represent a serious health problem, and they remain unpredictable largely due to our limited understanding of the mechanisms involved. Penicillamine-induced autoimmunity in Brown Norway (BN) rats represents one model of an idiosyncratic reaction, and this drug can also cause autoimmune reactions in humans. We previously demonstrated that penicillamine binds to aldehydes on the surface of macrophages. There is evidence that an imine bond formed by aldehyde groups on macrophages and amine groups on T cells is one type of interaction between these two cells that is involved in the induction of an immune response. We proposed that the binding of penicillamine with aldehyde groups on macrophages could lead to their activation and in some patients could lead to autoimmunity. In this study, the transcriptome profile of spleen macrophages 6 h after penicillamine treatment was used to detect effects of penicillamine on macrophages with a focus on 20 genes known to be macrophage activation biomarkers. One biological consequence of macrophage activation was investigated by determining mRNA levels for IL-15 and IL-1 beta which are crucial for NK cell activation, as well as levels of mRNA for selected cytokines in spleen NK cells. Up-regulation of the macrophage activating cytokines, IFN-gamma and GM-CSF, and down-regulation of IL-13 indicated activation of NK cells, which suggests a positive feedback loop between macrophages and NK cells. Furthermore, treatment of a murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, with penicillamine increased the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-23, providing additional evidence that penicillamine activates macrophages. Hydralazine and isoniazid cause a lupus-like syndrome in humans and also bind to aldehyde groups. These drugs were also found to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Together, these data support the hypothesis that drugs that bind irreversibly with aldehydes lead to macrophage activation, which in some

  15. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  16. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  17. Degalactosylated/desialylated human serum containing GcMAF induces macrophage phagocytic activity and in vivo antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Kuchiike, Daisuke; Uto, Yoshihiro; Mukai, Hirotaka; Ishiyama, Noriko; Abe, Chiaki; Tanaka, Daichi; Kawai, Tomohito; Kubo, Kentaro; Mette, Martin; Inui, Toshio; Endo, Yoshio; Hori, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The group-specific component protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) has various biological activities, such as macrophage activation and antitumor activity. Clinical trials of GcMAF have been carried out for metastatic breast cancer, prostate cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer. In this study, despite the complicated purification process of GcMAF, we used enzymatically-treated human serum containing GcMAF with a considerable macrophage-stimulating activity and antitumor activity. We detected GcMAF in degalactosylated/desialylated human serum by western blotting using an anti-human Gc globulin antibody, and Helix pomatia agglutinin lectin. We also found that GcMAF-containing human serum significantly enhanced the phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages and extended the survival time of mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumors. We demonstrated that GcMAF-containing human serum can be used as a potential macrophage activator for cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Particulate matter phagocytosis induces tissue factor in differentiating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Milano, M; Dongiovanni, P; Artoni, A; Gatti, S; Rosso, L; Colombo, F; Bollati, V; Maggioni, M; Mannucci, P M; Bertazzi, P A; Fargion, S; Valenti, L

    2016-01-01

    Airborne exposure to particulate matter with diameter < 10 mcM (PM10) has been linked to an increased risk of thromboembolic events, but the mechanisms are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PM10 phagocytosis on the release of procoagulant molecules in human differentiating macrophages, and that of PM10 inhalation in an experimental model in rats. Human monocytes were separated from the peripheral blood by the lymphoprep method, differentiated in vitro and treated with standard PM10 or vehicle. Sprague-Dawley rats were instilled intratracheally with PM10 or vehicle alone. The outcome was expression of proinflammatory genes and of tissue factor (TF). In human differentiating macrophages, PM10 exposure upregulated inflammatory genes, but most consistently induced TF mRNA and protein levels, but not TF protein inhibitor, resulting in increased TF membrane expression and a procoagulant phenotype. Differentiation towards the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype inhibited PM10 -mediated TF expression. TF induction required phagocytosis of PM10 , whereas phagocytosis of inert particles was less effective. PM10 phagocytosis was associated with a gene expression profile consistent with intracellular retention of iron, inducing oxidative stress. Both PM10 and iron activated the stress kinases ERK1/2 pathway, involved in the induction of TF expression. In rats, alveolar exposure to PM10 was associated with pulmonary recruitment of inflammatory cells and resulted in local, but not systemic, induction of TF expression, which was sufficient to increase circulating TF levels. In conclusion, TF induction by differentiating lung macrophages, activated following phagocytosis, contributes to the increased risk of thromboembolic complications associated with PM10 exposure. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Polarization dictates iron handling by inflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Corna, Gianfranca; Campana, Lara; Pignatti, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bosurgi, Lidia; Campanella, Alessandro; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Apostoli, Pietro; Silvestri, Laura; Camaschella, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a key role in iron homeostasis. In peripheral tissues, they are known to polarize into classically activated (or M1) macrophages and alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages. Little is known on whether the polarization program influences the ability of macrophages to store or recycle iron and the molecular machinery involved in the processes. Design and Methods Inflammatory/M1 and alternatively activated/M2 macrophages were propagated in vitro from mouse bone-marrow precursors and polarized in the presence of recombinant interferon-γ or interleukin-4. We characterized and compared their ability to handle radioactive iron, the characteristics of the intracellular iron pools and the expression of molecules involved in internalization, storage and export of the metal. Moreover we verified the influence of iron on the relative ability of polarized macrophages to activate antigen-specific T cells. Results M1 macrophages have low iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 binding activity, express high levels of ferritin H, low levels of transferrin receptor 1 and internalize – albeit with low efficiency -iron only when its extracellular concentration is high. In contrast, M2 macrophages have high iron regulatory protein binding activity, express low levels of ferritin H and high levels of transferrin receptor 1. M2 macrophages have a larger intracellular labile iron pool, effectively take up and spontaneously release iron at low concentrations and have limited storage ability. Iron export correlates with the expression of ferroportin, which is higher in M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells activate antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cells. In the absence of the metal, only M1 macrophages are effective. Conclusions Cytokines that drive macrophage polarization ultimately control iron handling, leading to the differentiation of macrophages into a subset which has a relatively sealed intracellular iron content (M1) or into a subset endowed with

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the ferritin heavy-chain gene: the activity of the CCAAT binding factor NF-Y is modulated in heme-treated Friend leukemia cells and during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Marziali, G; Perrotti, E; Ilari, R; Testa, U; Coccia, E M; Battistini, A

    1997-01-01

    The ferritin H-chain gene promoter regulation was analyzed in heme-treated Friend leukemia cells (FLCs) and during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. In the majority of cell lines studied, the regulation of ferritin expression was exerted mostly at the translational level. However, in differentiating erythroid cells, which must incorporate high levels of iron to sustain hemoglobin synthesis, and in macrophages, which are involved in iron storage, transcriptional regulation seemed to be a relevant mechanism. We show here that the minimum region of the ferritin H-gene promoter that is able to confer transcriptional regulation by heme in FLCs to a reporter gene is 77 nucleotides upstream of the TATA box. This cis element binds a protein complex referred to as HRF (heme-responsive factor), which is greatly enhanced both in heme-treated FLCs and during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. The CCAAT element present in reverse orientation in this promoter region of the ferritin H-chain gene is necessary for binding and for gene activity, since a single point mutation is able to abolish the binding of HRF and the transcriptional activity in transfected cells. By competition experiments and supershift assays, we identified the induced HRF as containing at least the ubiquitous transcription factor NF-Y. NF-Y is formed by three subunits, A, B, and C, all of which are necessary for DNA binding. Cotransfection with a transdominant negative mutant of the NF-YA subunit abolishes the transcriptional activation by heme, indicating that NF-Y plays an essential role in this activation. We have also observed a differential expression of the NF-YA subunit in heme-treated and control FLCs and during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. PMID:9032265

  1. CKIP-1 regulates macrophage proliferation by inhibiting TRAF6-mediated Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luo; Wang, Yiwu; Xiao, Fengjun; Wang, Shaoxia; Xing, Guichun; Li, Yang; Yin, Xiushan; Lu, Kefeng; Wei, Rongfei; Fan, Jiao; Chen, Yuhan; Li, Tao; Xie, Ping; Yuan, Lin; Song, Lei; Ma, Lanzhi; Ding, Lujing; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play pivotal roles in development, homeostasis, tissue repair and immunity. Macrophage proliferation is promoted by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced Akt signaling; yet, how this process is terminated remains unclear. Here, we identify casein kinase 2-interacting protein-1 (CKIP-1) as a novel inhibitor of macrophage proliferation. In resting macrophages, CKIP-1 was phosphorylated at Serine 342 by constitutively active GSK3β, the downstream target of Akt. This phosphorylation triggers the polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of CKIP-1. Upon M-CSF stimulation, Akt is activated by CSF-1R-PI3K and then inactivates GSK3β, leading to the stabilization of CKIP-1 and β-catenin proteins. β-catenin promotes the expression of proliferation genes including cyclin D and c-Myc. CKIP-1 interacts with TRAF6, a ubiquitin ligase required for K63-linked ubiquitination and plasma membrane recruitment of Akt, and terminates TRAF6-mediated Akt activation. By this means, CKIP-1 inhibits macrophage proliferation specifically at the late stage after M-CSF stimulation. Furthermore, CKIP-1 deficiency results in increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of macrophages in vitro and CKIP-1−/− mice spontaneously develop a macrophage-dominated splenomegaly and myeloproliferation. Together, these data demonstrate that CKIP-1 plays a critical role in the regulation of macrophage homeostasis by inhibiting TRAF6-mediated Akt activation. PMID:24777252

  2. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  3. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  4. Modulation of macrophage activation and programming in immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Yang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are central mediators of the immune, contributing both to the initiation and the resolution of inflammation. The concept of macrophage activation and program has stimulated interest in its definition, and functional significance in homeostasis and diseases. It has been known that macrophages could be differently activated and programmed into different functional subtypes in response to different types of antigen stumuli or different kinds of cytokines present in the microenvironment and could thus profoundly influence immune responses, but little is known about the state and exact regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program from cell or molecular signaling level in immunity. In this review, we summarize the recent finding regarding the regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program toward M1 and M2, especially on M2 macrophages.

  5. Roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, platelet-activating factor, and arachidonic acid metabolites in interleukin-1-induced resistance to infection in neutropenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogels, M T; Hermsen, C C; Huys, H L; Eling, W M; van der Meer, J W

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge in granulocytopenic and in normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. The mechanism behind this protection has only partially been elucidated. Since IL-1 induces production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), and arachidonic acid metabolites, we investigated the potential role of these substances in IL-1-induced protection. Low doses of murine TNF-alpha but not of human TNF-alpha enhanced survival, suggesting an effect via the type II TNF receptor rather than the type I TNF receptor, which has little species specificity. In line with this TNF-alpha-induced protection from infection, pretreatment with a low dose of a rat anti-murine TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody tended to inhibit IL-1-induced protection, suggesting a role of TNF-alpha as a mediator of IL-1-induced enhanced resistance to infection. Pretreatment with higher doses of anti-TNF-alpha, however, showed a dose-related protective effect per se, which could be further enhanced by a suboptimal dose of IL-1. A combination of optimal doses of anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1 produced an increase in survival similar to that produced by separate pretreatments. This lack of further enhancement of survival by combined optimal pretreatments suggests a similar mechanism of protection, most likely attenuation of deleterious effects of overproduced proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha during lethal infection. Pretreatment with different doses of GM-CSF before a lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge in neutropenic mice did not enhance survival. Different doses of WEB 2170, a selective PAF receptor antagonist, of MK-886, a selective inhibitor of leukotriene biosynthesis, or of several cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not reduce the protective effect of IL-1 pretreatment. We conclude that IL-1-induced nonspecific

  6. Hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia in a girl with macrophage activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, Kazuki; Kodo, Kazuki; Maeda, Jun; Omori, Sayu; Hida, Mariko; Mori, Tetsuya; Awazu, Midori

    2006-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome, a life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorders, is accompanied by the overproduction of cytokines. We describe a girl with macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic-onset juvenile arthritis who developed hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia associated with a high level of serum tumor necrosis factor alpha. Renal proximal tubule dysfunction was considered to be the cause, which may be attributable to tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  7. Inflammatory Stroke Extracellular Vesicles Induce Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Davis, Simon; Fischer, Roman; Dickens, Alex M; Neuhaus, Ain A; Burgess, Annette I; Rothwell, Peter M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are protein-lipid complexes released from cells, as well as actively exocytosed, as part of normal physiology, but also during pathological processes such as those occurring during a stroke. Our aim was to determine the inflammatory potential of stroke EVs. EVs were quantified and analyzed in the sera of patients after an acute stroke (<24 hours; OXVASC [Oxford Vascular Study]). Isolated EV fractions were subjected to untargeted proteomic analysis by liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry/mass-spectrometry and then applied to macrophages in culture to investigate inflammatory gene expression. EV number, but not size, is significantly increased in stroke patients when compared to age-matched controls. Proteomic analysis reveals an overall increase in acute phase proteins, including C-reactive protein. EV fractions applied to monocyte-differentiated macrophage cultures induced inflammatory gene expression. Together these data show that EVs from stroke patients are proinflammatory in nature and are capable of inducing inflammation in immune cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  9. Refractory ceramic fibers activate alveolar macrophage eicosanoid and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Leikauf, G D; Fink, S P; Miller, M L; Lockey, J E; Driscoll, K E

    1995-01-01

    Refractory ceramic fiber has been developed for industrial processes requiring materials with high thermal and mechanical stability. To evaluate the biological activity of this fiber, rat alveolar macrophages were exposed for < or = 24 h to 0-1,000 micrograms/ml of refractory ceramic fiber, crocidolite asbestos, silica (fibrogenic particles), or titanium dioxide (a nonfibrogenic particle), and eicosanoid, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and lactate dehydrogenase release were measured. Particle dimensions were determined by electron microscopy. Radioactivity coeluting with leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and immunoreactive LTB4 and TNF release increased after refractory ceramic fiber and were similar in magnitude after asbestos but less than after silica. For example, the total [3H]eicosanoid release increased 3.9-fold after refractory ceramic fiber, 4.6-fold after asbestos, and 8.7-fold after silica. Refractory ceramic fiber and asbestos also have similar particle dimensions (diameter, length, and surface area). Inasmuch as macrophage-derived LTB4 and TNF are potent mediators in inflammatory events, including migration and activation of neutrophils, these findings suggest that refractory ceramic fiber can activate macrophages in vitro to release mediators relevant to in vivo findings of inflammation and fibrotic lung disease in laboratory animals.

  10. The anabolic effects of vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) and a novel small peptide on bone.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gary B; Grecco, Kristina J; Safadi, Fayez F; Popoff, Steven N

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) has previously been shown to stimulate bone resorption and correct the skeletal defects associated with osteopetrosis in two nonallelic mutations in rats. This same protein and a small fragment of the protein have now been shown to demonstrate an anabolic effect on the skeleton of both newborn and young adult, intact rats. The novel peptide fragment was synthetically produced based on the human amino acid sequence at the site of glycosylation in the third domain of the native protein (DBP). The peptide tested is 14 amino acids in length and demonstrates no homologies other than to that region of DBP. Newborn rats were injected i.p. with saline, peptide (0.4 ng/g body wt.) or DBP-MAF (2 ng/g body wt.) every other day from birth to 14 days of age. On day 16 the rats were euthanized and the long bones collected for bone densitometry by pQCT. After 2 weeks of treatment with either the whole protein (DBP-MAF) or the small peptide, bone density was significantly increased in the treated animals compared to the saline controls. Young adult female rats (180 grams) were given s.c. injections of saline or peptide (0.4 ng/g body wt. or 5 ng/g body wt.) every other day for 2 weeks; 2 days after the final injections, the rats were euthanized and the femurs and tibias collected for bone densitometry. Both doses of the peptide resulted in significant increases in bone density as determined by pQCT. Young adult rats were injected locally with a single dose of the peptide (1 microg) or saline into the marrow cavity of the distal femur. One week after the single injection, the bones were collected for radiographic and histological evaluation. The saline controls showed no evidence of new bone formation, whereas the peptide-treated animals demonstrated osteoinduction in the marrow cavity and osteogenesis of surrounding cortical and metaphyseal bone. These data suggest that DBP-MAF and the synthetic peptide represent

  11. Th1 CD4+ lymphocytes delete activated macrophages through the Fas/APO-1 antigen pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ashany, D; Song, X; Lacy, E; Nikolic-Zugic, J; Friedman, S M; Elkon, K B

    1995-01-01

    The Fas/APO-1 cytotoxic pathway plays an important role in the regulation of peripheral immunity. Recent evidence indicates that this regulatory function operates through deletion of activated T and B lymphocytes by CD4+ T cells expressing the Fas ligand. Because macrophages play a key role in peripheral immunity, we asked whether Fas was involved in T-cell-macrophage interactions. Two-color flow cytometry revealed that Fas receptor (FasR) was expressed on resting murine peritoneal macrophages. FasR expression was upregulated after activation of macrophages with cytokines or lipopolysaccharide, although only tumor necrosis factor-alpha rendered macrophages sensitive to anti-FasR antibody-mediated death. To determine the consequence of antigen presentation by macrophages to CD4+ T cells, macrophages were pulsed with antigen and then incubated with either Th1 or Th2 cell lines or clones. Th1, but not Th2, T cells induced lysis of 60-80% of normal macrophages, whereas macrophages obtained from mice with mutations in the FasR were totally resistant to Th1-mediated cytotoxicity. Macrophage cytotoxicity depended upon specific antigen recognition by T cells and was major histocompatibility complex restricted. These findings indicate that, in addition to deletion of activated lymphocytes, Fas plays an important role in deletion of activated macrophages after antigen presentation to Th1 CD4+ T cells. Failure to delete macrophages that constitutively present self-antigens may contribute to the expression of autoimmunity in mice deficient in FasR (lpr) or Fas ligand (gld). PMID:7479970

  12. Th1 CD4+ lymphocytes delete activated macrophages through the Fas/APO-1 antigen pathway.

    PubMed

    Ashany, D; Song, X; Lacy, E; Nikolic-Zugic, J; Friedman, S M; Elkon, K B

    1995-11-21

    The Fas/APO-1 cytotoxic pathway plays an important role in the regulation of peripheral immunity. Recent evidence indicates that this regulatory function operates through deletion of activated T and B lymphocytes by CD4+ T cells expressing the Fas ligand. Because macrophages play a key role in peripheral immunity, we asked whether Fas was involved in T-cell-macrophage interactions. Two-color flow cytometry revealed that Fas receptor (FasR) was expressed on resting murine peritoneal macrophages. FasR expression was upregulated after activation of macrophages with cytokines or lipopolysaccharide, although only tumor necrosis factor-alpha rendered macrophages sensitive to anti-FasR antibody-mediated death. To determine the consequence of antigen presentation by macrophages to CD4+ T cells, macrophages were pulsed with antigen and then incubated with either Th1 or Th2 cell lines or clones. Th1, but not Th2, T cells induced lysis of 60-80% of normal macrophages, whereas macrophages obtained from mice with mutations in the FasR were totally resistant to Th1-mediated cytotoxicity. Macrophage cytotoxicity depended upon specific antigen recognition by T cells and was major histocompatibility complex restricted. These findings indicate that, in addition to deletion of activated lymphocytes, Fas plays an important role in deletion of activated macrophages after antigen presentation to Th1 CD4+ T cells. Failure to delete macrophages that constitutively present self-antigens may contribute to the expression of autoimmunity in mice deficient in FasR (lpr) or Fas ligand (gld).

  13. Immunomodulation by Blastomyces dermatitidis: functional activity of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, L S; Cozad, G C

    1983-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays the dominant role in the immune response of mice to Blastomyces dermatitidis infections. Since macrophages play an important role in cell-mediated immunity, the interactions between sensitized murine peritoneal macrophages and the yeast phase of B. dermatitidis were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the sensitized macrophages readily phagocytized B. dermatitidis yeast cells. In addition, there appeared to be activation of metabolic pathways within the sensitized macrophages, as indicated by increased chemiluminescence activity during phagocytosis. Sensitized macrophages were significantly better at controlling intracellular proliferation of the yeast cells when compared to nonsensitized cells. This was determined by disruption of macrophages and plating for viable yeasts. Scanning electron microscope observations offered further substantiation. Experiments with Candida albicans indicated that B. dermatitidis non-specifically activated macrophages. At 2 h postphagocytosis, 30% fewer C. albicans in B. dermatitidis-activated macrophages were able to form germ tubes. These studies demonstrated the multiple potential of activated macrophages with regard to their functional activity. Images PMID:6840859

  14. Krüppel-like factor KLF10 deficiency predisposes to colitis through colonic macrophage dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Krempski, James; Svingen, Phyllis; Xiong, Yuning; Sarmento, Olga F.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Faubion, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor (KLF)-10 is an important transcriptional regulator of TGF-β1 signaling in both CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role for KLF10 in the regulation of TGFβRII expression with functional relevance in macrophage differentiation and activation. We first show that transfer of KLF10−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages into wild-type (WT) mice leads to exacerbation of experimental colitis. At the cell biological level, using two phenotypic strategies, we show that KLF10-deficient mice have an altered colonic macrophage phenotype with higher frequency of proinflammatory LyC6+MHCII+ cells and a reciprocal decrease of the anti-inflammatory LyC6−MHCII+ subset. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory CD11b+CX3CR1hi subset of colonic macrophages is significantly decreased in KLF10−/− compared with WT mice under inflammatory conditions. Molecularly, CD11b+ colonic macrophages from KLF10−/− mice exhibit a proinflammatory cytokine profile with increased production of TNF-α and lower production of IL-10 in response to LPS stimulation. Because KLF10 is a transcription factor, we explored how this protein may regulate macrophage function. Consequently, we analyzed the expression of TGFβRII expression in colonic macrophages and found that, in the absence of KLF10, macrophages express lower levels of TGFβRII and display an attenuated Smad-2 phosphorylation following TGF-β1 stimulation. We further show that KLF10 directly binds to the TGFβRII promoter in macrophages, leading to enhanced gene expression through histone H3 acetylation. Collectively, our data reveal a critical role for KLF10 in the epigenetic regulation of TGFβRII expression in macrophages and the acquisition of a “regulatory” phenotype that contributes to intestinal mucosal homeostasis. PMID:26472224

  15. Krüppel-like factor KLF10 deficiency predisposes to colitis through colonic macrophage dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A; Krempski, James; Svingen, Phyllis; Xiong, Yuning; Sarmento, Olga F; Lomberk, Gwen A; Urrutia, Raul A; Faubion, William A

    2015-12-01

    Krüppel-like factor (KLF)-10 is an important transcriptional regulator of TGF-β1 signaling in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role for KLF10 in the regulation of TGFβRII expression with functional relevance in macrophage differentiation and activation. We first show that transfer of KLF10(-/-) bone marrow-derived macrophages into wild-type (WT) mice leads to exacerbation of experimental colitis. At the cell biological level, using two phenotypic strategies, we show that KLF10-deficient mice have an altered colonic macrophage phenotype with higher frequency of proinflammatory LyC6(+)MHCII(+) cells and a reciprocal decrease of the anti-inflammatory LyC6(-)MHCII(+) subset. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory CD11b(+)CX3CR1(hi) subset of colonic macrophages is significantly decreased in KLF10(-/-) compared with WT mice under inflammatory conditions. Molecularly, CD11b(+) colonic macrophages from KLF10(-/-) mice exhibit a proinflammatory cytokine profile with increased production of TNF-α and lower production of IL-10 in response to LPS stimulation. Because KLF10 is a transcription factor, we explored how this protein may regulate macrophage function. Consequently, we analyzed the expression of TGFβRII expression in colonic macrophages and found that, in the absence of KLF10, macrophages express lower levels of TGFβRII and display an attenuated Smad-2 phosphorylation following TGF-β1 stimulation. We further show that KLF10 directly binds to the TGFβRII promoter in macrophages, leading to enhanced gene expression through histone H3 acetylation. Collectively, our data reveal a critical role for KLF10 in the epigenetic regulation of TGFβRII expression in macrophages and the acquisition of a "regulatory" phenotype that contributes to intestinal mucosal homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  17. Jund is a determinant of macrophage activation and is associated with glomerulonephritis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Behmoaras, Jacques; Bhangal, Gurjeet; Smith, Jennifer; McDonald, Kylie; Mutch, Brenda; Lai, Ping Chin; Domin, Jan; Game, Laurence; Salama, Alan; Foxwell, Brian M; Pusey, Charles D; Cook, H Terence; Aitman, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis is an important cause of human kidney failure for which the underlying molecular basis is largely unknown. In previous studies, we mapped several susceptibility loci, Crgn1–Crgn7, for crescentic glomerulonephritis in the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat1. Here we show by combined congenic, linkage and microarray studies that the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor JunD is a major determinant of macrophage activity and is associated with glomerulonephritis susceptibility. Introgression of Crgn2 from the nonsusceptible Lewis strain onto the WKY background leads to significant reductions in crescent formation, macrophage infiltration, Fc receptor–mediated macrophage activation and cytokine production. Haplotype analysis restricted the Crgn2 linkage interval to a 430-kb interval containing Jund, which is markedly overexpressed in WKY macrophages and glomeruli. Jund knockdown in rat and human primary macrophages led to significantly reduced macrophage activity and cytokine secretion, indicating conservation of JunD function in macrophage activation in rats and humans and suggesting in vivo inhibition of Jund as a possible new therapeutic strategy for diseases characterized by inflammation and macrophage activation. PMID:18443593

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  19. Titanium particles that have undergone phagocytosis by macrophages lose the ability to activate other macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhiqing; Schwab, Luciana P; Alley, Carie F; Hasty, Karen A; Smith, Richard A

    2008-04-01

    Titanium particles derived from the wear of the orthopaedic implant surfaces can activate macrophages to secrete cytokines and stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption, causing osteolysis around orthopaedic implants. However, what happens to the titanium particles after being phagocytosed by macrophages is not known. We prepared titanium particles (as received, clean, and LPS-coated), and exposed them to macrophages in culture. Free particles were washed away after 24 h and the intracellular particles were kept in culture for additional 48 h until being harvested by lysing the cells. Particles that had been cell treated or noncell treated were examined by scanning electronic microscopy to analyze the shape, size, and concentration of the particles. The cell treated and noncell treated particles were exposed to macrophages in culture with a particle to cell ratio of 300:1. After 18 h, the levels of TNF-alpha in culture medium and the viability of the cells were examined. Clean particles did not stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages, while LPS-coated particles dramatically increased that response. Phagocytosis by macrophages did not change the shape and size of the particles, but depleted the ability of the particles to stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages. This indicates that macrophages are capable of rendering titanium particles inactive without degrading the particles, possibly by altering the surface chemistry of the particles.

  20. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  1. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  2. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens.

  3. Kaurane diterpenes protect against apoptosis and inhibition of phagocytosis in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, B; Hortelano, S; Girón, N; Bermejo, P; Rodríguez, B; Boscá, L

    2007-09-01

    The kaurane diterpenes foliol and linearol are inhibitors of the activation of nuclear factor kappaB, a transcription factor involved in the inflammatory response. Effects of these diterpenes on apoptosis and phagocytosis have been analysed in cultured peritoneal macrophages and in the mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Macrophages were maintained in culture and activated with pro-inflammatory stimuli in the absence or presence of diterpenes. Apoptosis and the phagocytosis in these cells under these conditions were determined. Incubation of macrophages with a mixture of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) induced apoptosis through a NO-dependent pathway, an effect significantly inhibited by foliol and linearol in the low muM range, without cytotoxic effects. Apoptosis in macrophages induced by NO donors was also inhibited. The diterpenes prevented apoptosis through a mechanism compatible with the inhibition of caspase-3 activation, release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and p53 overexpression, as well as an alteration in the levels of proteins of the Bcl-2 family, in particular, the levels of Bax. Cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a well-established caspase substrate, was reduced by these diterpenes. Treatment of cells with foliol and linearol decreased phagocytosis of zymosan bioparticles by RAW 264.7 cells and to a greater extent by peritoneal macrophages. Both diterpenes protected macrophages from apoptosis and inhibited phagocytosis, resulting in a paradoxical control of macrophage function, as viability was prolonged but inflammatory and phagocytic functions were impaired.

  4. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis.

  5. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  6. Interleukin-25 fails to activate STAT6 and induce alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stolfi, Carmine; Caruso, Roberta; Franzè, Eleonora; Sarra, Massimiliano; De Nitto, Daniela; Rizzo, Angelamaria; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-25 (IL-25), a T helper type 2 (Th2) -related factor, inhibits the production of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes/macrophages. Since Th2 cytokines antagonize classically activated monocytes/macrophages by inducing alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs), we here assessed the effect of IL-25 on the alternative activation of human monocytes/macrophages. The interleukins IL-25, IL-4 and IL-13 were effective in reducing the expression of inflammatory chemokines in monocytes. This effect was paralleled by induction of AAMs in cultures added with IL-4 or IL-13 but not with IL-25, regardless of whether cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or interferon-γ. Moreover, pre-incubation of cells with IL-25 did not alter the ability of both IL-4 and IL-13 to induce AAMs. Both IL-4 and IL-13 activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6), and silencing of this transcription factor markedly reduced the IL-4/IL-13-driven induction of AAMs. In contrast, IL-25 failed to trigger STAT6 activation. Among Th2 cytokines, only IL-25 and IL-10 were able to activate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. These results collectively indicate that IL-25 fails to induce AAMs and that Th2-type cytokines suppress inflammatory responses in human monocytes by activating different intracellular signalling pathways.

  7. The AP-1 Transcription Factor c-Jun Promotes Arthritis by Regulating Cyclooxygenase-2 and Arginase-1 Expression in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hannemann, Nicole; Jordan, Jutta; Paul, Sushmita; Reid, Stephen; Baenkler, Hanns-Wolf; Sonnewald, Sophia; Bäuerle, Tobias; Vera, Julio; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2017-05-01

    Activation of proinflammatory macrophages is associated with the inflammatory state of rheumatoid arthritis. Their polarization and activation are controlled by transcription factors such as NF-κB and the AP-1 transcription factor member c-Fos. Surprisingly, little is known about the role of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun in macrophage activation. In this study, we show that mRNA and protein levels of c-Jun are increased in macrophages following pro- or anti-inflammatory stimulations. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment cluster analyses of microarray data using wild-type and c-Jun-deleted macrophages highlight the central function of c-Jun in macrophages, in particular for immune responses, IL production, and hypoxia pathways. Mice deficient for c-Jun in macrophages show an amelioration of inflammation and bone destruction in the serum-induced arthritis model. In vivo and in vitro gene profiling, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of macrophages, revealed direct activation of the proinflammatory factor cyclooxygenase-2 and indirect inhibition of the anti-inflammatory factor arginase-1 by c-Jun. Thus, c-Jun regulates the activation state of macrophages and promotes arthritis via differentially regulating cyclooxygenase-2 and arginase-1 levels. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Antonio J.; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E.; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis. PMID:26159717

  9. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  10. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  11. The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor in macrophages ameliorates kidney injury via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activities.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Ishii, Toshihisa; Tamura, Shogo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Ichijo, Masashi; Takizawa, Soichi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2017-03-08

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, inflammation plays a pivotal role in the progression of renal fibrosis. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased occurrence of atherosclerosis and inflammation, suggesting protective roles of thyroid hormones and their receptors against inflammatory processes. The contribution of thyroid hormone receptors to macrophage differentiation has not been well documented. Here, we focused on the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) in macrophages and examined the role of ligand-bound TRα in macrophage polarization-mediated anti-inflammatory effects. TRα-deficient irradiated chimeric mice showed exacerbated tubulointerstitial injury in a unilateral ureteral obstruction model. Compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages isolated from the obstructed kidneys of mice lacking TRα displayed increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines that was accompanied by enhanced nuclear translocation of p65. Comparison of TRα-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type macrophages confirmed the propensity of the former cells to produce excessive IL-1β levels. Co-culture of these macrophages with renal epithelial cells induced more severe damage to the epithelial cells via the IL-1 receptor. Our findings indicate that ligand-bound TRα on macrophages plays a protective role in kidney inflammation through the inhibition of NF-κB pathways, possibly by affecting the pro- and anti-inflammatory balance that controls the development of CKD.

  12. The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor in macrophages ameliorates kidney injury via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activities

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Ishii, Toshihisa; Tamura, Shogo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Ichijo, Masashi; Takizawa, Soichi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2017-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, inflammation plays a pivotal role in the progression of renal fibrosis. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased occurrence of atherosclerosis and inflammation, suggesting protective roles of thyroid hormones and their receptors against inflammatory processes. The contribution of thyroid hormone receptors to macrophage differentiation has not been well documented. Here, we focused on the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) in macrophages and examined the role of ligand-bound TRα in macrophage polarization-mediated anti-inflammatory effects. TRα-deficient irradiated chimeric mice showed exacerbated tubulointerstitial injury in a unilateral ureteral obstruction model. Compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages isolated from the obstructed kidneys of mice lacking TRα displayed increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines that was accompanied by enhanced nuclear translocation of p65. Comparison of TRα-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type macrophages confirmed the propensity of the former cells to produce excessive IL-1β levels. Co-culture of these macrophages with renal epithelial cells induced more severe damage to the epithelial cells via the IL-1 receptor. Our findings indicate that ligand-bound TRα on macrophages plays a protective role in kidney inflammation through the inhibition of NF-κB pathways, possibly by affecting the pro- and anti-inflammatory balance that controls the development of CKD. PMID:28272516

  13. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-02

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  14. Foxm1 Transcription Factor is required for Macrophage Migration during Lung Inflammation and Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    Balli, David; Ren, Xiaomeng; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Cross, Emily; Zhang, Yufang; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Kalin, Tanya V.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in tumor-associated pulmonary inflammation that supports proliferation of tumor cells and promotes lung tumor growth. Although increased numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are linked to poor prognosis in lung cancer patients, little is known regarding the transcriptional mechanisms controlling recruitment of macrophages during lung tumorigenesis. Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor is induced in multiple cell types within tumor lesions and its increased expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with lung adenocarcinomas. To determine the role of Foxm1 in recruitment of TAM, a mouse line with macrophage-specific Foxm1 deletion was generated (macFoxm1−/−). Lung tumorigenesis was induced using a MCA/BHT tumor initiation/promotion protocol. Ablation of Foxm1 in macrophages reduced the number and size of lung tumors in macFoxm1−/− mice. Decreased tumorigenesis was associated with diminished proliferation of tumor cells and decreased recruitment of macrophages during the early stages of tumor formation. Expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes iNOS, Cox-2, IL-1b and IL-6, as well as migration related genes MIP-1α, MIP-2 and MMP-12, were decreased in macrophages isolated from macFoxm1−/− mice. Migration of Foxm1-deficient macrophages was reduced in vitro. The chemokine receptors responsible for monocyte recruitment to the lung, CX3CR1 and CXCR4, were decreased in Foxm1-deficient monocytes. In co-transfection experiments, Foxm1 directly bound to and transcriptionally activated CX3CR1 promoter. Adoptive transfer of wild type monocytes to macFoxm1−/− mice restored BHT-induced pulmonary inflammation to the levels observed in control mice. Expression of Foxm1 in macrophages is required for pulmonary inflammation, recruitment of macrophages into tumor sites and lung tumor growth. PMID:22139074

  15. Amphiregulin may be a new biomarker of classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chen; Liu, Guilin; Mu, Honglan; Zhou, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shihai; Xu, Younian

    2015-10-23

    Amphiregulin (Areg) participates in tissue repair and inflammation regulation. As important effector cells in inflammation, macrophages can be polarized to classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated phenotype with diverse functions in immunity. However, the relationship between Areg expression and macrophage activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Areg was significantly expressed in M1 but not in M2 macrophages. This was confirmed by analyses of RT-PCR and ELISA in peritoneal macrophages, and by evaluating protein expression in alveolar macrophages and RAW264.7 cells. Selective inhibitors of TLR4 (CLI-095) and MAP kinase, including Erk1/2 (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580), significantly reduced Areg expression in M1 macrophages, suggesting that M1 macrophages produce Areg mainly through the TLR4-MAPK pathway, which is involved in the mechanism of M1 activation. When compared with productions of classical biomarkers of M1 macrophages, Areg expression was highly consistent in time series. Taken together, Areg may be an effective new biomarker of M1 macrophages.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 transactivates the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor and synergizes with colony-stimulating factor-1 in the induction of macrophage migration via the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Graziana; Ziche, Marina; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Donnini, Sandra; Rovida, Elisabetta

    2015-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a key mediator of immunity, inflammation, and cancer, acts through 4 G-protein-coupled E-prostanoid receptors (EPs 1-4). Crosstalk between EPs and receptor tyrosine kinases also occurs. Colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is an RTK that sustains the survival, proliferation, and motility of monocytes/macrophages, which are an essential component of innate immunity and cancer development. The aim of this study was to investigate on a possible crosstalk between EP and CSF-1R. In BAC1.2F5 and RAW264.7 murine macrophages, CSF-1 (EC₅₀ = 18.1 and 10.2 ng/ml, respectively) and PGE2 (EC₅₀ = 1.5 and 5.5 nM, respectively) promoted migration. PGE2 induced rapid CSF-1R phosphorylation that was dependent on Src family kinases (SFKs). CSF-1R inhibition reduced PGE2-elicited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and macrophage migration, indicating that CSF-1R plays a role in PGE2-mediated immunoregulation. EP4 appeared responsible for functional PGE2/CSF-1R crosstalk. Furthermore, PGE2 synergized with CSF-1 in inducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and macrophage migration. ERK1/2 inhibition completely blocked migration induced by the combination CSF-1/PGE2. CSF-1/PGE2 functional interaction with respect to migration also occurred in bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (EC₅₀ CSF-1, 6.7 ng/ml; EC₅₀ PGE2, 16.7 nM). These results indicated that PGE2 transactivates CSF-1R and synergizes with its signaling at ERK1/2 level in promoting macrophage migration. © FASEB.

  17. Anticandidal effects of voriconazole and caspofungin, singly and in combination, against Candida glabrata, extracellularly and intracellularly in granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-activated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baltch, Aldona L; Bopp, Lawrence H; Smith, Raymond P; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B

    2008-12-01

    The antifungal effects of voriconazole and caspofungin, singly and in combination, were determined against Candida glabrata in time-kill curves in broth, in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in MDMs activated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Three strains of fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata were evaluated. For intracellular studies, MDM monolayers, with or without GM-CSF activation, were infected with C. glabrata and treated with voriconazole and caspofungin at 2.5x and 5x MIC, respectively, or at 1x MIC. Extracellular studies in broth were performed using drug concentrations from 0.1 to 10x MIC. Viable yeast were enumerated at 0, 24 and 48 h. Significantly greater killing of C. glabrata occurred with the drug combination than with either single drug, both intracellularly and extracellularly (P < 0.01). For voriconazole, the antifungal activity in MDM activated by GM-CSF was greater than that in unactivated MDM, regardless of antibiotic concentration or time of exposure. However, for caspofungin and for the two-drug combination, enhanced activity in GM-CSF-activated MDM depended on the drug concentration and time of exposure. Our data suggest that combinations of voriconazole and caspofungin may be efficacious for the treatment of serious C. glabrata infections. With single-drug therapy, especially voriconazole, GM-CSF activation of monocytes could be considered.

  18. Functional characterization of the turkey macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Myeongseon; Kim, Sungwon; Fetterer, Raymond H; Dalloul, Rami A

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to clone the turkey MIF (TkMIF) gene, express the active protein, and characterize its basic function. The full-length TkMIF gene was amplified from total RNA extracted from turkey spleen, followed by cloning into a prokaryotic (pET11a) expression vector. Sequence analysis revealed that TkMIF consists of 115 amino acids with 12.5 kDa molecular weight. Multiple sequence alignment revealed 100%, 65%, 95% and 92% identity with chicken, duck, eagle and zebra finch MIFs, respectively. Recombinant TkMIF (rTkMIF) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified through HPLC and endotoxin removal. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed an approximately 13.5 kDa of rTkMIF monomer containing T7 tag in soluble form. Western blot analysis showed that anti-chicken MIF (ChMIF) polyclonal antisera detected a monomer form of TkMIF at approximately 13.5 kDa size. Further functional analysis revealed that rTkMIF inhibits migration of both mononuclear cells and splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner, but was abolished by the addition of anti-ChMIF polyclonal antisera. qRT-PCR analysis revealed elevated transcripts of pro-inflammatory cytokines by rTkMIF in LPS-stimulated monocytes. rTkMIF also led to increased levels of IFN-γ and IL-17F transcripts in Con A-activated splenocytes, while IL-10 and IL-13 transcripts were decreased. Overall, the sequences of both the turkey and chicken MIF have high similarity and comparable biological functions with respect to migration inhibitory activities of macrophages and enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, suggesting that turkey and chicken MIFs would be biologically cross-reactive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Statin attenuates experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis together with the augmentation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Emiko; Shimizu, Akira; Masuda, Yukinari; Kuwahara, Naomi; Arai, Takashi; Nagasaka, Shinya; Aki, Kaoru; Mii, Akiko; Natori, Yasuhiro; Iino, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Yasuo; Fukuda, Yuh

    2010-09-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and include classically activated M1 and alternatively activated M2 macrophages, characterized by pro- and anti-inflammatory functions, respectively. Macrophages that express heme oxygenase-1 also exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and in vitro, focusing on the macrophage heterogeneity. Rats were induced anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and treated with atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (control). Control rats showed infiltration of macrophages in the glomeruli at day 3 and developed crescentic glomerulonephritis by day 7, together with increased mRNA levels of the M1 macrophage-associated cytokines, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-12. In contrast, statin reduced the level of proteinuria, reduced infiltration of macrophages in glomeruli with suppression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression, and inhibited the formation of necrotizing and crescentic lesions. The number of glomerular ED3-positive macrophages decreased with down-regulation of M1 macrophage-associated cytokines. Furthermore, statin augmented ED2-positive M2 macrophages with up-regulation of the M2 macrophage-associated chemokines and cytokines, chemokine (C-C motif) Iigand-17 and interleukin-10. Statin also increased the glomerular interleukin-10-expressing heme oxygenase-1-positive macrophages. Statin inhibited macrophage development, and suppressed ED3-positive macrophages, but augmented ED2-positive macrophages in M2-associated cytokine environment in vitro. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in glomerulonephritis are mediated through inhibition of macrophage infiltration as well as augmentation of anti-inflammatory macrophages.

  20. Substance P enhances tissue factor release from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces procoagulant activity of macrophages. Tissue factor (TF) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein and substance P (SP) is a pro-inflammatory neuropeptide involved in the formation of membrane blebs. This study investigated the role of SP in TF release by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. SP significantly decreased TF levels in whole-cell lysates of GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. TF was detected in the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation of macrophages by SP. Aprepitant (an SP/neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) reduced TF release from macrophages stimulated with SP. Pretreatment of macrophages with a radical scavenger(pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) also limited the decrease of TF in whole-cell lysates after stimulation with SP. A protein kinase C inhibitor (rottlerin) partially blocked this macrophage response to SP, while it was significantly inhibited by a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) or a dynamin inhibitor (dinasore). An Akt inhibitor (perifosine) also partially blocked this response. Furthermore, siRNA targeting p22phox, β-arrestin 2, or Rho A, blunted the release of TF from macrophages stimulated with SP. In other experiments, visceral adipocytes derived from cryopreserved preadipocytes were found to produce SP. In conclusion, SP enhances the release of TF from macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting macrophage anti-tumor activity to suppress melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Luhong; Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Linjing

    2017-01-01

    By phagocytosing cancer cells and their cellular debris, macrophages play a critical role in nonspecific defense (innate immunity) and, as antigen presenters, they help initiate specific defense mechanisms (adaptive immunity). Malignant melanoma is a lethal disease due to its aggressive capacity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. For decades, considerable effort has gone into development of an effective immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic melanoma. In this review, we focus on the anti-tumor activities of macrophages in melanoma and their potential as therapeutic targets in melanoma. Although macrophages can be re-educated through intercellular signaling to promote tumor survival owing to their plasticity, we expect that targeting the anti-tumor activity of macrophages remains a promising strategy for melanoma inhibition. The combination of tumoricidal macrophage activation and other treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, may provide an effective and comprehensive anti-melanoma strategy. PMID:28060744

  2. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  3. Esophageal Expression of Active IκB Kinase-β in Mice Up-Regulates Tumor Necrosis Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, Promoting Inflammation and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tétreault, Marie-Pier; Weinblatt, Daniel; Ciolino, Jody Dyan; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Sackey, Bridget K; Twyman-Saint Victor, Christina; Karakasheva, Tatiana; Teal, Valerie; Katz, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    IκB kinase-β (IKKβ) mediates activation of the nuclear factor-κB, which regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Although nuclear factor-κB is activated in cells from patients with inflammatory diseases or cancer, little is known about its roles in the development and progression of esophageal diseases. We investigated whether mice that express an activated form of IKKβ in the esophageal epithelia develop esophageal disorders. We generated ED-L2-Cre/Rosa26-IKK2caSFL mice, in which the ED-L2 promoter activates expression of Cre in the esophageal epithelia, leading to expression of a constitutively active form of IKKβ (IKKβca) in epithelial cells but not in inflammatory cells or the surrounding stroma (IKKβca mice). Mice lacking the Cre transgene served as controls. Some mice were given intraperitoneal injections of neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or immunoglobulin G1 (control), starting at 1 month of age. Epithelial tissues were collected and analyzed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. Transgenes were overexpressed from retroviral vectors in primary human keratinocytes. IKKβca mice developed esophagitis and had increased numbers of blood vessels in the esophageal stroma, compared with controls. Esophageal tissues from IKKβca mice had increased levels of GM-CSF. Expression of IKKβca in primary human esophageal keratinocytes led to 11-fold overexpression of GM-CSF and 200-fold overexpression of TNF. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with conditioned media from these keratinocytes increased endothelial cell migration by 42% and promoted formation of capillary tubes; these effects were blocked by a neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF. Injections of anti-GM-CSF reduced angiogenesis and numbers of CD31+ blood vessels in esophageal tissues of IKKβca mice, but did not alter the

  4. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  5. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  6. Conditional deletion of caspase-8 in macrophages alters macrophage activation in a RIPK-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Cuda, Carla M; Misharin, Alexander V; Khare, Sonal; Saber, Rana; Tsai, FuNien; Archer, Amy M; Homan, Philip J; Haines, G Kenneth; Hutcheson, Jack; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Budinger, G R Scott; Stehlik, Christian; Perlman, Harris

    2015-10-16

    Although caspase-8 is a well-established initiator of apoptosis and suppressor of necroptosis, recent evidence suggests that this enzyme maintains functions beyond its role in cell death. As cells of the innate immune system, and in particular macrophages, are now at the forefront of autoimmune disease pathogenesis, we examined the potential involvement of caspase-8 within this population. Cre (LysM) Casp8 (fl/fl) mice were bred via a cross between Casp8 (fl/fl) mice and Cre (LysM) mice, and RIPK3 (-/-) Cre (LysM) Casp8 (fl/fl) mice were generated to assess the contribution of receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase (RIPK)3. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses were used to examine renal damage. Flow cytometric analysis was employed to characterize splenocyte distribution and activation. Cre (LysM) Casp8 (fl/fl) mice were treated with either Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists or oral antibiotics to assess their response to TLR activation or TLR agonist removal. Luminex-based assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure cytokine/chemokine and immunoglobulin levels in serum and cytokine levels in cell culture studies. In vitro cell culture was used to assess macrophage response to cell death stimuli, TLR activation, and M1/M2 polarization. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Loss of caspase-8 expression in macrophages promotes onset of a mild systemic inflammatory disease, which is preventable by the deletion of RIPK3. In vitro cell culture studies reveal that caspase-8-deficient macrophages are prone to a caspase-independent death in response to death receptor ligation; yet, caspase-8-deficient macrophages are not predisposed to unchecked survival, as analysis of mixed bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrates that caspase-8 deficiency does not confer preferential expansion of myeloid populations. Loss of caspase-8 in macrophages dictates the response to TLR activation, as injection of TLR ligands upregulates

  7. Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Islam, M I; Talukder, M K; Islam, M M; Laila, K; Rahman, S A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of rheumatic disorders, which commonly occurs in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA).This study was carried out with the aims of describing the clinical features, laboratory findings and outcomes of MAS associated with paediatric rheumatic diseases in the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and compare these results with previous studies on MAS. This retrospective study was conducted in the paediatric rheumatology wing of the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Clinical and laboratory profile of all the diagnosed cases of MAS were analyzed from the medical records from January 2010 to July 2015. Among 10 MAS patients, 6 were female and 4 were male. Seven patients of systemic JIA, two patients of SLE and one patient with Kawasaki Disease developed MAS in their course of primary disease. Mean duration of primary disease prior to development of MAS was 2.9 years and mean age of onset was 9.1 years. High continued fever and new onset hepatosplenomegaly were the hallmark of the clinical presentation. White blood cell count and platelet count came down from the mean of 16.2 to 10.2×10⁹/L and 254 to 90×10⁹/L. Mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was dropped from 56 to 29 mm/hr. Six patients had abnormal liver enzyme level (ALT) and 5 had evidence of coagulopathy (prolonged prothrombin time and APTT) at the onset of disease. Hyperferritinnemia were found in all the patients. Bone marrow study was done in 5 patients but features of hamophagocytosis were found only in 2 patients. All patients received intravenous steroid and 3 patients who did not respond to steroid received additional cyclosporine. Mortality rate was 30% in this series. Macrophage activation syndrome is a fatal complication of paediatric rheumatic diseases among which s-JIA was predominant. Early diagnosis and

  8. Alternative activation modifies macrophage resistance to Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Aranday-Cortés, Elihú; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2011-07-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of macrophage alternative activation in the intracellular pathogen natural disease resistance phenotype of the host. Macrophage monolayers from resistant (R) (3) or susceptible (S) (3) cattle donors were treated with 10 ng/ml of bovine recombinant IL-4 (rbIL-4), and infected with virulent and avirulent Mycobacterium bovis (MOI 10:1). Bactericidal assays were performed to assess the bacterial phagocytic index and intracellular survival. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and used to analyze the relative changes in gene expression of IL-10, IL-12, IL-18 IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, MCP-2, IL-6, MIP-1, MIP-3, iNOS, ARGII and SLAM by real time PCR. Cell supernatants were collected and nitric oxide and arginase production was assessed. Apoptosis induction was measured by TUNEL. IL-4 treatment increased the phagocytic index in both R and S macrophages; however intracellular survival was augmented mainly in S macrophages. Alternative activation decreased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide production and DNA fragmentation mainly in R macrophages. On the other hand, arginase production was not different between R and S macrophages. Alternative activation modifies the macrophage response against M. bovis. IL-4 treatment minimized the functional differences that exist between R and S macrophages. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Suppress Phagolysosome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric; Choe, Yoona; Ng, Tat Fong; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The eye is an immune-privileged microenvironment that has adapted several mechanisms of immune regulation to prevent inflammation. One of these potential mechanisms is retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) altering phagocytosis in macrophages. Methods The conditioned media of RPE eyecups from eyes of healthy mice and mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) were used to treat primary macrophage phagocytizing pHrodo bacterial bioparticles. In addition, the neuropeptides were depleted from the conditioned media of healthy RPE eyecups and used to treat phagocytizing macrophages. The conditioned media from healthy and EAU RPE eyecups were assayed for IL-6, and IL-6 was added to the healthy conditioned media, and neutralized in the EAU conditioned media. The macrophages were treated with the conditioned media and assayed for fluorescence. The macrophages were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity, relative to active phagolysosomes, was measured. Also, the macrophages were assayed using fluorescent viability dye staining. Results The conditioned media from healthy, but not from EAU RPE eyecups suppressed phagolysosome activation. Depletion of the neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y from the healthy RPE eyecup conditioned media resulted in macrophage death. In the EAU RPE eyecup conditioned media was 0.96 ± 0.18 ng/mL of IL-6, and when neutralized the conditioned media suppressed phagolysosome activation. Conclusions The healthy RPE through soluble molecules, including alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y, suppresses the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages. In EAU, the IL-6 produced by the RPE promotes the activation of phagolysosomes in macrophages. These results demonstrate that under healthy conditions, RPE promotes an altered pathway of phagocytized material in macrophages with implications on antigen processing and clearance. PMID:28241314

  10. Characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present study is the first characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (NcMIF). BLAST-N analysis of NcMIF revealed high similarity (87%) to the Toxoplasma gondii MIF. NcMIF was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in three forms, NcMIF (mature protein), NcMI...

  11. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  12. A novel allosteric inhibitor of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A; Powell, Thomas J; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G

    2012-08-31

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases.

  13. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-CXCR4 Receptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Gröning, Sabine; Schmitz, Corinna; Zierow, Swen; Drucker, Natalie; Bakou, Maria; Kohl, Kristian; Mertens, André; Lue, Hongqi; Weber, Christian; Xiao, Annie; Luker, Gary; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Lolis, Elias; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    An emerging number of non-chemokine mediators are found to bind to classical chemokine receptors and to elicit critical biological responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine that exhibits chemokine-like activities through non-cognate interactions with the chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, in addition to activating the type II receptor CD74. Activation of the MIF-CXCR2 and -CXCR4 axes promotes leukocyte recruitment, mediating the exacerbating role of MIF in atherosclerosis and contributing to the wealth of other MIF biological activities. Although the structural basis of the MIF-CXCR2 interaction has been well studied and was found to engage a pseudo-ELR and an N-like loop motif, nothing is known about the regions of CXCR4 and MIF that are involved in binding to each other. Using a genetic strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses a functional CXCR4 receptor, site-specific mutagenesis, hybrid CXCR3/CXCR4 receptors, pharmacological reagents, peptide array analysis, chemotaxis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we provide novel molecular information about the structural elements that govern the interaction between MIF and CXCR4. The data identify similarities with classical chemokine-receptor interactions but also provide evidence for a partial allosteric agonist compared with CXCL12 that is possible due to the two binding sites of CXCR4. PMID:27226569

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: the immunological induction of macrophage plasminogen activator requires thymus-derived lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    In this article we describe methods in which unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages were induced to secrete high livels of plasminogen activator under in vitro conditions. The exposure of sensitized peritoneal or spleen cell populations from Trypanosoma cruzi- infected animals to either viable or heat-killed trypanosomes lead to the release of an inducing factor(s). Maximal levels of plasminogen activator secretion are achieved by the incubation of such factors (s) with unstimulated macrophages for 48 h. A significant increase in enzyme secretion was already observed after a 24 h incubation. The production of the inducing factor(s) by sensitized cells was immunologically specific and unrelated antigens did not stimulate the production of the factor(s) by sensitized peritoneal or spleen cell populations. The inducing factor(s) was produced by nylon-wool- fractionated spleen and peritoneal cells which had been depleted of marcrophages. Pretreatment of sensitized spleen cells with anti-theta serum and C abolished the production of the activating factor(s). The active supernatant fluids were able to induce secretion of macrophage plasminogen activator across H-2 barriers. Attempts to induce trypanocidal activity in unstimulated macrophages have not been successful. PMID:327013

  15. Pneumocystis carinii cell wall beta-glucans initiate macrophage inflammatory responses through NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Frances; Vassallo, Robert; Puri, Vishwajeet; Limper, Andrew H

    2003-07-04

    beta-Glucans are major structural components of fungi. We have recently reported that the pathogenic fungus Pneumocystis carinii assembles a beta-glucan-rich cell wall that potently activates alveolar macrophages to release pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Purified P. carinii beta-glucans predictably induce both cytokine generation and associated neutrophilic lung inflammation. Herein, we demonstrate that P. carinii beta-glucan-induced macrophage stimulation results from activation of NF-kappaB. Although analogous to macrophage activation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), P. carinii beta-glucan-induced macrophage NF-kappaB activation exhibits distinctly different kinetics, with slower induction and longer duration compared with LPS stimulation. Macrophage activation in response to P. carinii beta-glucan was also substantially inhibited with the NF-kappaB antagonist pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. In addition to different kinetics of NF-kappaB activation, P. carinii beta-glucan and LPS also utilize different receptor systems to induce macrophage activation. Macrophages from Toll-like receptor 4-deficient and wild type mice produced equivalent amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha when stimulated with P. carinii beta-glucan. However, Toll-like receptor 4-deficient macrophages were refractory to stimulation with LPS. In contrast, MyD88-deficient macrophages exhibited a significant (though partial) blunted response to P. carinii beta-glucan. These data demonstrate that P. carinii beta-glucan acts as potent inducer of macrophage activation through NF-kappaB utilizing cellular receptors and signaling pathways distinct from LPS.

  16. Macrophage colony stimulating factor: not just for macrophages anymore! A gateway into complex biologies.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Thomas G; Driggers, Lara; Zhang, Jian Gang; Hoa, Neil; Delgado, Christina; Williams, Christopher C; Dan, Qinhong; Sanchez, Ramon; Jeffes, Edward W B; Wepsic, H Terry; Myers, Michael P; Koths, Kirston; Jadus, Martin R

    2008-10-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called colony stimulating factor-1) has traditionally been viewed as a growth/differentiation factor for monocytes, macrophages, and some female-specific tumors. As a result of alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational processing, several forms of M-CSF protein are produced: a secreted glycoprotein, a longer secreted form containing proteoglycan, and a short membrane-bound isoform. These different forms of M-CSF all initiate cell signaling in cells bearing the M-CSF receptor, called c-fms. Here we review the biology of M-CSF, which has important roles in bone physiology, the intestinal tract, cancer metastases to the bone, macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing and tumor immunity. Although this review concentrates mostly on the membrane form of human M-CSF (mM-CSF), the biology of the soluble forms and the M-CSF receptor will also be discussed for comparative purposes. The mechanisms of the biological effects of the membrane-bound M-CSF reveal that this cytokine is unexpectedly involved in many complex molecular events. Recent experiments suggest that a tumor vaccine based on membrane-bound M-CSF-transduced tumor cells, combined with anti-angiogenic therapy, should be evaluated further for use in clinical trials.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  18. Transcription factor Fli-1 positively regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-27 production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yuan, Ming; Ma, Xianwei; Jiang, Wei; Zhu, Lingxi; Wen, Mingyue; Xu, Jing; Liu, Qiuyan; An, Huazhang

    2016-03-01

    IL-27 is an important regulator of TLR4-activated innate immune. The mechanism by which IL-27 production is regulated in TLR4-activated innate immune remains largely unclear. Here we show that expression of transcription factor Fli-1 at protein level is increased in macrophages following LPS stimulation. Fli-1 overexpression increases LPS-activated IL-27 production in macrophages. Consistently, Fli-1 knockdown inhibits LPS-induced IL-27 production in macrophages. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay reveals that Fli-1 binds the promoter of IL-27 p28 subunit. Further experiments manifest that Fli-1 binds the region between -250 and -150 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of p28 gene and increases p28 gene promoter-controlled transcription. These results demonstrate that Fli-1 positively regulates IL-27 production in TLR4-activated immune response by promoting transcription of IL-27 p28 gene.

  19. Macrophage immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Opuntia polyacantha

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Xie, Gang; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Klein, Robyn A.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Opuntia polyacantha (prickly pear cactus) has been used extensively for its nutritional properties; however, less is known regarding medicinal properties of Opuntia tissues. In the present study, we extracted polysaccharides from O. polyacantha and used size-exclusion chromatography to fractionate the crude polysaccharides into four polysaccharide fractions (designated as Opuntia polysaccharides C-I to C-IV). The average Mr of fractions C-I through C-IV was estimated to be 733, 550, 310, and 168 kDa, respectively, and sugar composition analysis revealed that Opuntia polysaccharides consisted primarily of galactose, galacturonic acid, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Analysis of the effects of Opuntia polysaccharides on human and murine macrophages demonstrated that all four fractions had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6. Furthermore, modulation of macrophage function by Opuntia polysaccharides was mediated, at least in part, through activation of nuclear factor κB. Together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain a portion of the beneficial therapeutic properties of extracts from O. polyacantha and support the concept of using Opuntia polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant. PMID:18597716

  20. Macrophage immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Opuntia polyacantha.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Xie, Gang; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Klein, Robyn A; Jutila, Mark A; Quinn, Mark T

    2008-10-01

    Opuntia polyacantha (prickly pear cactus) has been used extensively for its nutritional properties; however, less is known regarding medicinal properties of Opuntia tissues. In the present study, we extracted polysaccharides from O. polyacantha and used size-exclusion chromatography to fractionate the crude polysaccharides into four polysaccharide fractions (designated as Opuntia polysaccharides C-I to C-IV). The average M(r) of fractions C-I through C-IV was estimated to be 733, 550, 310, and 168 kDa, respectively, and sugar composition analysis revealed that Opuntia polysaccharides consisted primarily of galactose, galacturonic acid, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Analysis of the effects of Opuntia polysaccharides on human and murine macrophages demonstrated that all four fractions had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6. Furthermore, modulation of macrophage function by Opuntia polysaccharides was mediated, at least in part, through activation of nuclear factor kappaB. Together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain a portion of the beneficial therapeutic properties of extracts from O. polyacantha and support the concept of using Opuntia polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant.

  1. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  2. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-04-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells.

  5. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-01-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells. PMID:8132359

  6. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on thymidine salvage as related to macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Y; Nagao, S; Nakamura, M; Okada, F; Tanigawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), known as one of the potent activators of macrophages, has inhibitory effects on the proliferation of normal macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines. We report here that LPS dose- and time-dependently suppressed the tritiated thymidine ([3H]TdR) incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction with a significant inverse correlation to the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) production in the J774.1 macrophage cell line. Among the three tested enzymes involved in DNA synthesis, only thymidine kinase (TK) activity decreased progressively in parallel with the decline in [3H]TdR incorporation, reaching 97% inhibition within 12 hr of LPS treatment, while changes in the activities of other two enzymes, DNA polymerase alpha and thymidylate synthase (TS), were less significant. On the other hand, LPS inhibited the cell proliferation only incompletely, as judged by 62% inhibition of cell growth at 36 hr. Even in the experiments done in a TdR-free medium, cell growth was inhibited by LPS to the same extent, suggesting that TK was not directly involved in the proliferation of J774 cells. LPS also inhibited the conversion of TdR to thymidine monophosphate (TMP) in murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM). Thus LPS-induced suppression of TdR salvage related to TNF production is common in both normal and neoplastic macrophages, and therefore may be of potential importance in the process of macrophage activation. PMID:7751001

  7. Extract from Calotropis procera latex activates murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Seddek, Abdel latif Shaker; Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Shiina, Takahiko; Hirayama, Haruko; Iwami, Momoe; Miyazawa, Seiji; Nikami, Hideki; Takewaki, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2009-07-01

    Calotropis procera latex has long been used in traditional medicines. Extracts from C. procera latex have been reported to have various pharmacological actions, including protection from myocardial infarction, hepatoprotective action, antitumor activity, antinociceptive, and pro- and anti-inflammatory actions. To evaluate the immunomodulatory functions of the water-soluble C. procera extract (CPE), we investigated its ability to activate macrophages-effector cells in inflammatory and immune responses. Intraperitoneal injection of CPE in mice (2 mg/mouse) induced migration of macrophages to the intraperitoneal cavity, confirming the proinflammatory effects of water-soluble CPE. The direct effects of CPE on macrophages were then assessed by measuring the production of nitric oxide (NO) as an indicator for macrophage activation. Addition of CPE (1-10 microg/ml) to the culture medium of the murine monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 caused an increase in NO production in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CPE-elicited NO production was blocked by application of an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Expression of iNOS mRNA was induced by treatment of cultured macrophages with CPE. Injection of CPE in mice also resulted in an increase in plasma NO level. The results suggest that CPE activates macrophages and facilitates NO production via up-regulation of iNOS gene expression.

  8. Posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in colonic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Filardy, A A; He, J; Bennink, J; Yewdell, J; Kelsall, B L

    2016-07-01

    Colonic macrophages (cMPs) are important for intestinal homeostasis as they kill microbes and yet produce regulatory cytokines. Activity of the NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat-containing pyrin receptor 3) inflammasome, a major sensor of stress and microorganisms that results in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death, must be tightly controlled in the intestine. We demonstrate that resident cMPs are hyporesponsive to NLRP3 inflammasome activation owing to a remarkable level of posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 and pro-interleukin-1β (proIL-1β) protein expression, which was also seen for tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6, but lost during experimental colitis. Resident cMPs rapidly degraded NLRP3 and proIL-1β proteins by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Finally, blocking IL-10R-signaling in vivo enhanced NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein but not mRNA levels in resident cMPs, implicating a role for IL-10 in environmental conditioning of cMPs. These data are the first to show dramatic posttranscriptional control of inflammatory cytokine production by a relevant tissue-derived macrophage population and proteasomal degradation of proIL-1β and NLRP3 as a mechanism to control inflammasome activation, findings which have broad implications for our understanding of intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases.

  9. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type Ι interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV.

  10. Tim-3 fosters HCC development by enhancing TGF-β-mediated alternative activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenjiang; Liu, Xiao; Ma, Hongxin; Zhang, Hualin; Song, Xiaojia; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2015-10-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) and their alternative activation contribute greatly to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tim-3 is highly expressed on macrophages and regulates macrophage functions in several conditions. However, whether Tim-3 is involved in the activation and the function of TAMs has not been reported. Tim-3 expression in HCC samples was evaluated by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and confocal analysis. We analysed the effects of Tim-3 knockdown on macrophages in growth of H22 tumour homografts in BALB/c mice. Tim-3 interference was performed by neutralising antibody, small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA-expressing lentivirus. Cytokine production was evaluated by reverse transcription PCR, ELISA or Cytometric Bead Array. The effects of Tim-3 interference in macrophages were examined with regard to alternative activation of macrophages and proliferation and migration of Hepa1-6 cells. Cell growth curve, colony formation and transwell assays were involved to estimate cell proliferation and migration. Tim-3 expression was significantly increased in both peripheral blood monocytes and TAMs in patients with HCC. The Tim-3 expression in monocytes/TAMs strongly correlated with higher tumour grades and the poor survival of patients with HCC. Consistently, HCC conditioned medium or transforming growth factor-β fostered Tim-3 expression and the alternative activation of macrophages. Moreover, Tim-3 interference in macrophages significantly inhibited the alternative activation of macrophages and suppressed HCC cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking interleukin 6 reversed the Tim-3-mediated effects on HCC cell growth in vitro. Tim-3 displays critical roles in microenvironment-induced activation and protumoral effects of TAMs in HCC. Interference of Tim-3 might be great potential in HCC therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  11. Killing of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by activated murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, yet the mechanisms by which macrophages defend against Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained obscure. Results from this study show that murine macrophages, activated by interferon gamma, and lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, both growth inhibit and kill M. tuberculosis. This antimycobacterial effect, demonstrable both in murine macrophage cell lines and in peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice, is independent of the macrophage capacity to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Both the ROI-deficient murine macrophage cell line D9, and its ROI-generating, parental line J774.16, expressed comparable antimycobacterial activity upon activation. In addition, the oxygen radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, mannitol, and diazabicyclooctane had no effect on the antimycobacterial activity of macrophages. These findings, together with the results showing the relative resistance of M. tuberculosis to enzymatically generated H2O2, suggest that ROI are unlikely to be significantly involved in killing M. tuberculosis. In contrast, the antimycobacterial activity of these macrophages strongly correlates with the induction of the L-arginine- dependent generation of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). The effector molecule(s) that could participate in mediating this antimycobacterial function are toxic RNI, including NO, NO2, and HNO2, as demonstrated by the mycobacteriocidal effect of acidified NO2. The oxygen radical scavenger SOD adventitiously perturbs RNI production, and cannot be used to discriminate between cytocidal mechanisms involving ROI and RNI. Overall, our results provide support for the view that the L-arginine-dependent production of RNI is the principal effector mechanism in activated murine macrophages responsible for killing and growth inhibiting virulent M. tuberculosis. PMID:1552282

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is required for recruitment of scar-associated macrophages during liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Mark A; McMullen, Megan R; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Madhun, Nabil Z; Niese, Kathryn; Olman, Mitchell A; Stavitsky, Abram B; Bucala, Richard; Nagy, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the liver is a key contributor to the response to injury. MIF can act as a chemokine and cytokine, regulating innate immune responses in many tissues and cell types. We hypothesized that MIF contributes to the progression of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis by regulating recruitment of SAM. SAMs dynamically regulate HSC activation and ECM degradation. To gain insight into the role of MIF in progression of liver fibrosis, we investigated markers of fibrosis and immune responses after chronic CCl4 administration to female C57BL/6 and MIF(-/-) mice. Chronic CCl4 exposure increased activation of HSC in WT mice, indicated by increased expression of αSMA mRNA and protein, as well as mRNA for collagen 1α1; these responses were blunted in female MIF(-/-) mice. Despite lower activation of HSC in MIF(-/-) mice, accumulation of ECM was similar in WT and MIF(-/-)mice, suggesting a decreased rate of ECM degradation. Recruitment of SAMs was lower in MIF(-/-) mice compared with WT mice, both in their initial inflammatory phenotype, as well as in the later phase as proresolution macrophages. The decreased presence of resolution macrophages was associated with lower expression of MMP13 in MIF(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data indicate that MIF-dependent recruitment of SAMs contributes to degradation of ECM via MMP13, highlighting the importance of appropriate recruitment and phenotypic profile of macrophages in the resolution of fibrosis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. AKT mediated glycolytic shift regulates autophagy in classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matta, Sumit Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is considered as an innate defense mechanism primarily due to its role in the targeting of intracellular pathogens for lysosomal degradation. Here we report inhibition of autophagy as an adaptive response in classically activated macrophages that helps achieve high cellular ROS production and cell death-another hallmark of innate mechanisms. We show prolonged classical activation of Raw 264.7 macrophages by treating them with IFN-γ and LPS inhibited autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy was dependent on nitric oxide (NO) production which activated the AKT-mTOR signaling, the known negative regulators of autophagy. Autophagy inhibition in these cells was accompanied with a shift to aerobic glycolysis along with a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MOMP). The decline in MOMP coupled with autophagy inhibition led to increased mitochondrial content and considerably elevated cellular ROS, eventually causing cell death. Next, using specific siRNA mediated knockdowns we show AKT was responsible for the glycolytic shift and autophagy inhibition in activated macrophages. Surprisingly, AKT knockdown in activated macrophages also rescued them from cell death. Finally we show that AKT mediated autophagy inhibition in the activated macrophages correlated with the depletion of glucose from the extracellular medium, and glucose supplementation not only rescued autophagy levels and reversed other phenotypes of activated macrophages, but also inhibited cell death. Thus we report here a novel link between AKT mediated glycolytic metabolism and autophagy in the activated macrophages, and provide a possible mechanism for sustained macrophage activation in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Peroxidase activity in monocytes and tissue macrophages of mice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Koerten, H K; Daems, W T

    1978-04-28

    A description is given of the distribution of peroxidatic (PO) activity in murine monocytes of blood and peritoneal cavity, and in murine macrophages residing in the unstimulated peritoneal cavity as well as in liver, spleen, bone marrow, and small intestine. In the monocytes, PO activity is restricted to some of the cytoplasmic granules; in the tissue (or resident) macrophages present in peritoneal cavity, liver, spleen, and small intestine, the PO activity is located in the nuclear envelope and the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Macrophages in the bone marrow are PO-negative. In the spleen and bone marrow, reticulum cells show PO activity in the nuclear envelope and the RER. Transitional forms between monocytes and tissue macrophages were not observed.

  15. Infection of murine macrophages with Toxoplasma gondii is associated with release of transforming growth factor beta and downregulation of expression of tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Covaro, G; Remington, J

    1993-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is capable of invading and multiplying within murine peritoneal macrophages. Previous studies have shown that treatment of macrophage monolayers with recombinant gamma interferon but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is associated with intracellular killing of T. gondii by macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with T. gondii prevents their stimulation for mycobactericidal activity by TNF. Since transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is known to suppress a number of functions in macrophages, we investigated the influence of infection with T. gondii on macrophage TNF receptors and on production of TGF-beta. Infection with T. gondii was associated with increased production of TGF-beta and downregulation of TNF receptors. This effect was observed early after infection and was partially inhibited by anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody. PMID:8406801

  16. Transplantable Subcutaneous Hepatoma 22a Affects Functional Activity of Resident Tissue Macrophages in Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Kisseleva, Ekaterina P.; Krylov, Andrei V.; Stepanova, Olga I.; Lioudyno, Victoria I.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors spontaneously develop central necroses due to inadequate blood supply. Recent data indicate that dead cells and their products are immunogenic to the host. We hypothesized that macrophage tumor-dependent reactions can be mediated differentially by factors released from live or dead tumor cells. In this study, functional activity of resident peritoneal macrophages was investigated in parallel with tumor morphology during the growth of syngeneic nonimmunogenic hepatoma 22a. Morphometrical analysis of tumor necroses, mitoses and leukocyte infiltration was performed in histological sections. We found that inflammatory potential of peritoneal macrophages in tumor-bearing mice significantly varied depending on the stage of tumor growth and exhibited two peaks of activation as assessed by nitroxide and superoxide anion production, 5′-nucleotidase activity and pinocytosis. Increased inflammatory reactions were not followed by the enhancement of angiogenic potential as assessed by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor mRNA expression. Phases of macrophage activity corresponded to the stages of tumor growth characterized by high proliferative potential. The appearance and further development of necrotic tissue inside the tumor did not coincide with changes in macrophage behavior and therefore indirectly indicated that activation of macrophages was a reaction mostly to the signals produced by live tumor cells. PMID:21760797

  17. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  18. Monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated (MMD) positively regulates ERK and Akt activation and TNF-α and NO production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Jin; Yin, Dan-Dan; Xiang, Jie; He, Fei; Wang, Yao-Chun; Liang, Liang; Qin, Hong-Yan; Liu, Li; Liang, Ying-Min; Han, Hua

    2012-05-01

    Macrophage activation is modulated by both environmental cues and endogenous programs. In the present study, we investigated the role of a PAQR family protein, monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated (MMD), in macrophage activation and unveiled its underlying molecular mechanism. Our results showed that while MMD expression could be detected in all tissues examined, its expression level is significantly up-regulated upon monocyte differentiation. Within cells, EGFP-MMD fusion protein could be co-localized to endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, but not lysosomes and cytoplasm. MMD expression is up-regulated in macrophages after LPS stimulation, and this might be modulated by RBP-J, the critical transcription factor of Notch signaling. Overexpression of MMD in macrophages increased the production of TNF-α and NO upon LPS stimulation. We found that MMD overexpression enhanced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in macrophages after LPS stimulation. Blocking Erk or Akt by pharmacological agent reduced TNF-α or NO production in MMD-overexpressing macrophages, respectively. These results suggested that MMD modulates TNF-α and NO production in macrophages, and this process might involves Erk or Akt.

  19. IL-27 inhibits HIV-1 infection in human macrophages by down-regulating host factor SPTBN1 during monocyte to macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lue; Lidie, Kristy B; Chen, Qian; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Zheng, Xin; Huang, DaWei; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A; Rehman, Tauseef; Dewar, Robin L; Wang, Yanmei; Hornung, Ronald L; Canizales, Kelsey A; Lockett, Stephen J; Lane, H Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2013-03-11

    The susceptibility of macrophages to HIV-1 infection is modulated during monocyte differentiation. IL-27 is an anti-HIV cytokine that also modulates monocyte activation. In this study, we present new evidence that IL-27 promotes monocyte differentiation into macrophages that are nonpermissive for HIV-1 infection. Although IL-27 treatment does not affect expression of macrophage differentiation markers or macrophage biological functions, it confers HIV resistance by down-regulating spectrin β nonerythrocyte 1 (SPTBN1), a required host factor for HIV-1 infection. IL-27 down-regulates SPTBN1 through a TAK-1-mediated MAPK signaling pathway. Knockdown of SPTBN1 strongly inhibits HIV-1 infection of macrophages; conversely, overexpression of SPTBN1 markedly increases HIV susceptibility of IL-27-treated macrophages. Moreover, we demonstrate that SPTBN1 associates with HIV-1 gag proteins. Collectively, our results underscore the ability of IL-27 to protect macrophages from HIV-1 infection by down-regulating SPTBN1, thus indicating that SPTBN1 is an important host target to reduce HIV-1 replication in one major element of the viral reservoir.

  20. Methamphetamine Inhibits Toll-Like Receptor 9-Mediated Anti-HIV Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Ping; Ye, Li; Su, Qi-Jian; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Lin, Xin-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is one of the key sensors that recognize viral infection/replication in the host cells. Studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) dysregulated host cell innate immunity and facilitated HIV infection of macrophages. In this study, we present new evidence that METH suppressed TLR9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. Activation of TLR9 by its agonist CpG-ODN 2216 inhibits HIV replication, which was demonstrated by increased expression of TLR9, interferon (IFN)-α, IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) in macrophages. However, METH treatment of macrophages greatly compromised the TLR9 signaling-mediated anti-HIV effect and inhibited the expression of TLR9 downstream signaling factors. Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists (SCH23390) could block METH-mediated inhibition of anti-HIV activity of TLR9 signaling. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the METH action showed that METH treatment selectively down-regulated the expression of TLR9 on macrophages, whereas it had little effect on the expression of other TLRs. Collectively, our results provide further evidence that METH suppresses host cell innate immunity against HIV infection by down-regulating TLR9 expression and its signaling-mediated antiviral effect in macrophages. PMID:23751096

  1. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor deficiency is associated with impaired killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages and increased susceptibility to Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thierry; Delaloye, Julie; Chanson, Anne-Laure; Giddey, Marlyse; Le Roy, Didier; Calandra, Thierry

    2013-01-15

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important component of the early proinflammatory response of the innate immune system. However, the antimicrobial defense mechanisms mediated by MIF remain fairly mysterious. In the present study, we examined whether MIF controls bacterial uptake and clearance by professional phagocytes, using wild-type and MIF-deficient macrophages. MIF deficiency did not affect bacterial phagocytosis, but it strongly impaired the killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages and host defenses against gram-negative bacterial infection, as shown by increased mortality in a Klebsiella pneumonia model. Consistent with MIF's regulatory role of Toll-like 4 expression in macrophages, MIF-deficient cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or Escherichia coli exhibited reduced nuclear factor κB activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. Addition of recombinant MIF or TNF corrected the killing defect of MIF-deficient macrophages. Together, these data show that MIF is a key mediator of host responses against gram-negative bacteria, acting in part via a modulation of bacterial killing by macrophages.

  2. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor production by human sarcoid alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bachwich, P. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Larrick, J.; Spengler, M.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an oncolytic peptide that may also exert many other biologic effects. Experimentally, immunologically activated mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with endotoxin (LPS) produce TNF, while resting mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with LPS produce little TNF. To date, the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to produce TNF has not been clearly delineated. As pulmonary sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disorder characterized by immunologically activated AMs, we investigated the production of TNF by AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 7 normal volunteers and 13 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. The AMs were cultured with and without LPS, and TNF production was assessed by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Unstimulated sarcoid and normal AMs produced little TNF, but LPS stimulation enhanced TNF production by both normal and sarcoid AMs. Furthermore, LPS-stimulated sarcoid AMs produced more TNF than normal AMs (84.9 +/- 16.7 versus 32.5 +/- 10.2 units/million cells, P less than 0.05). It is concluded that human AMs can produce TNF and that sarcoid AMs are primed and can produce significantly more TNF, compared with normal AMs. PMID:3799813

  4. Effect of titanium surface topography on macrophage activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

    PubMed

    Refai, Ali K; Textor, Marcus; Brunette, Donald M; Waterfield, J Douglas

    2004-08-01

    The macrophage has a major role in normal wound healing and the reparative process around implants. Murine macrophage-like cells RAW 264.7 were used to investigate the effect of titanium surfaces on macrophage activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] and chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha). Four topographies were used: those produced by mechanically polishing, coarse sand blasting, acid etching, and sandblasting and acid etching (SLA). Macrophages were plated on the four titanium surfaces at a population density of 5 x 10(5) cells/mL/well. Tissue culture plastic and tissue culture plastic plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) served as negative and positive control, respectively. In addition, all surfaces were tested for their effects on macrophages in the presence of LPS. Supernatants were collected for assays after 6, 24, and 48 h and the numbers of macrophages attached to the surfaces were quantified using the DAPI (4,6-di-amidino-2-phenylindole) assay. Cytokine and chemokine levels were measured with sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Statistical comparison between the surfaces and the controls was determined by using the two-way analysis of variance including interaction effect (two tailed and p < or = 0.05). Unstimulated macrophages increased their secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-alpha) when attached to rough surfaces (acid etching and SLA, p < or = 0.05). In macrophages stimulated with LPS, the roughest surface SLA produced higher levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha at 24 and 48 h than all other surfaces (p < or = 0.05). Surface topography also modulated the secretion of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha by macrophages. Unstimulated macrophages attached to the SLA surface down-regulated their production of chemokines (p < or = 0.05) whereas

  5. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate.

  6. Granulocyte, granulocyte–macrophage, and macrophage colony-stimulating factors can stimulate the invasive capacity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, X-H; Nakanishi, Y; Takayama, K; Bai, F; Hara, N

    1999-01-01

    We and other researchers have previously found that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), which generally include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), promote invasion by lung cancer cells. In the present study, we studied the effects of these CSFs on gelatinase production, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) production and their activity in human lung cancer cells. Gelatin zymographs of conditioned media derived from human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed two major bands of gelatinase activity at 68 and 92 kDa, which were characterized as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 respectively. Treatment with CSFs increased the 68- and 92-kDa activity and converted some of a 92-kDa proenzyme to an 82-kDa enzyme that was consistent with an active form of the MMP-9. Plasminogen activator zymographs of the conditioned media from the cancer cells showed that CSF treatment resulted in an increase in a 48–55 kDa plasminogen-dependent gelatinolytic activity that was characterized as human uPA. The conditioned medium from the cancer cells treated with CSFs stimulated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, providing a direct demonstration of the ability of enhanced uPA to increase plasmin-dependent proteolysis. The enhanced invasive behaviour of the cancer cells stimulated by CSFs was well correlated with the increase in MMPs and uPA activities. These data suggest that the enhanced production of extracellular matrix-degrading proteinases by the cancer cells in response to CSF treatment may represent a biochemical mechanism which promotes the invasive behaviour of the cancer cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408691

  7. Microgravity inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α expression in macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongzhen; Luo, Haiying; Zhu, Linnan; Yang, Fan; Chu, Zhulang; Tian, Hongling; Feng, Meifu; Zhao, Yong; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity environments in space can cause major abnormalities in human physiology, including decreased immunity. The underlying mechanisms of microgravity-induced inflammatory defects in macrophages are unclear. RAW264.7 cells and primary mouse macrophages were used in the present study. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine expression in mouse macrophages was detected under either simulated microgravity or 1g control. Freshly isolated primary mouse macrophages and RAW264.7 cells were cultured in a standard simulated microgravity situation using a rotary cell culture system (RCCS-1) and 1g control conditions. The cytokine expression was determined by real-time PCR and ELISA assays. Western blots were used to investigate the related intracellular signals. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression, but not interleukin-1β expression, in mouse macrophages was significantly suppressed under simulated microgravity. The molecular mechanism studies showed that LPS-induced intracellular signal transduction including phosphorylation of IKK and JNK and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in macrophages was identical under normal gravity and simulated microgravity. Furthermore, TNF-α mRNA stability did not decrease under simulated microgravity. Finally, we found that heat shock factor-1 (HSF1), a known repressor of TNF-α promoter, was markedly activated under simulated microgravity. Short-term treatment with microgravity caused significantly decreased TNF-α production. Microgravity-activated HSF1 may contribute to the decreased TNF-α expression in macrophages directly caused by microgravity, while the LPS-induced NF-κB pathway is resistant to microgravity.

  8. Adipose tissue macrophages in insulin-resistant subjects are associated with collagen VI and fibrosis and demonstrate alternative activation

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Unal, Resat; Rasouli, Neda; Gurley, Catherine M.; Zhu, Beibei; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages are associated with insulin resistance and are linked to changes in the extracellular matrix. To better characterize adipose macrophages, the extracellular matrix, and adipocyte-macrophage interactions, gene expression from adipose tissue and the stromal vascular fraction was assessed for markers of inflammation and fibrosis, and macrophages from obese and lean subjects were counted and characterized immunohistochemically. Coculture experiments examined the effects of adipocyte-macrophage interaction. Collagen VI gene expression was associated with insulin sensitivity and CD68 (r = −0.56 and 0.60, P < 0.0001) and with other markers of inflammation and fibrosis. Compared with adipose tissue from lean subjects, adipose tissue from obese subjects contained increased areas of fibrosis, which correlated inversely with insulin sensitivity (r = −0.58, P < 0.02) and positively with macrophage number (r = 0.70, P < 0.01). Although macrophages in crownlike structures (CLS) were more abundant in obese adipose tissue, the majority of macrophages were associated with fibrosis and were not organized in CLS. Macrophages in CLS were predominantly M1, but most other macrophages, particularly those in fibrotic areas, were M2 and also expressed CD150, a marker of M2c macrophages. Coculture of THP-1 macrophages with adipocytes promoted the M2 phenotype, with a lower level of IL-1 expression and a higher ratio of IL-10 to IL-12. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was more abundant in M2 macrophages and was further increased by coculture with adipocytes. Downstream effectors of TGF-β, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, collagen VI, and phosphorylated Smad, were increased in macrophages and adipocytes. Thus adipose tissue of insulin-resistant humans demonstrated increased fibrosis, M2 macrophage abundance, and TGF-β activity. PMID:20841504

  9. Adipose tissue macrophages in insulin-resistant subjects are associated with collagen VI and fibrosis and demonstrate alternative activation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Michael; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Unal, Resat; Rasouli, Neda; Gurley, Catherine M; Zhu, Beibei; Peterson, Charlotte A; Kern, Philip A

    2010-12-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages are associated with insulin resistance and are linked to changes in the extracellular matrix. To better characterize adipose macrophages, the extracellular matrix, and adipocyte-macrophage interactions, gene expression from adipose tissue and the stromal vascular fraction was assessed for markers of inflammation and fibrosis, and macrophages from obese and lean subjects were counted and characterized immunohistochemically. Coculture experiments examined the effects of adipocyte-macrophage interaction. Collagen VI gene expression was associated with insulin sensitivity and CD68 (r = -0.56 and 0.60, P < 0.0001) and with other markers of inflammation and fibrosis. Compared with adipose tissue from lean subjects, adipose tissue from obese subjects contained increased areas of fibrosis, which correlated inversely with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.58, P < 0.02) and positively with macrophage number (r = 0.70, P < 0.01). Although macrophages in crownlike structures (CLS) were more abundant in obese adipose tissue, the majority of macrophages were associated with fibrosis and were not organized in CLS. Macrophages in CLS were predominantly M1, but most other macrophages, particularly those in fibrotic areas, were M2 and also expressed CD150, a marker of M2c macrophages. Coculture of THP-1 macrophages with adipocytes promoted the M2 phenotype, with a lower level of IL-1 expression and a higher ratio of IL-10 to IL-12. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was more abundant in M2 macrophages and was further increased by coculture with adipocytes. Downstream effectors of TGF-β, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, collagen VI, and phosphorylated Smad, were increased in macrophages and adipocytes. Thus adipose tissue of insulin-resistant humans demonstrated increased fibrosis, M2 macrophage abundance, and TGF-β activity.

  10. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na).

  11. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  12. Cyclophilin A Aggravates Collagen-Induced Arthritis via Promoting Classically Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dongsheng, Zhai; Zhiguang, Fu; Junfeng, Jia; Zifan, Lu; Li, Wang

    2017-07-29

    Activated macrophages exhibiting diverse phenotypes and various functions contribute to the pathogenesis or amelioration of different diseases like cancer, inflammation, and infectious and autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms of macrophage polarization in inflamed joint and its effects on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are still not clarified. This study is designed to explore the effects of cyclophilin A (CypA) on macrophage polarization and describe the underlying mechanisms. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was employed to address the pro-arthritic effects of CypA. Flow cytometry was performed to investigate the populations of M1 and M2 macrophages in synovial tissues of the mice. Knockdown or overexpression of CypA macrophage cells was used to study the functions of CypA on macrophage polarization. Western blot was carried out to examine the potential signaling pathways. We found that CypA aggravated the severity of CIA in mice, as assessed by the increase of clinical score of inflammation, cartilage damage, and bone erosion. Moreover, the level of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-17, and the number of pro-inflammatory macrophages in synovial fluid were significantly elevated. In accordance with our observation, CypA dysregulation could actually influence the M1 macrophages polarization and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Further mechanism study disclosed that CypA could regulate the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, the pivotal transcriptional factor regulating M1 polarization, dependent of its PPIase activity. Our findings provide evidence that PPIase CypA promoted macrophages polarization toward pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype via transcriptional activating NF-κB, thus leading to aggravated arthritis.

  13. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor ameliorates DSS induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sainathan, Satheesh K.; Hanna, Eyad M.; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S.; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V.; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sargramostim, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that Sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Methods Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or PBS. To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examine the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. Results GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis; resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes including TNFα and IL1β; results further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1−/− mice, demonstrating activity independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-β administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial CpG DNA. Conclusions GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c+ plasmacytoid DC population. PMID:17932977

  14. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies. PMID:27833923

  15. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-06-20

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%-8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  16. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis; Garcia, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  17. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  18. CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) is required for degranulation of human eosinophils induced by human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Kita, H

    1994-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests adhesion molecules play an important role in the function of leukocytes. Because human eosinophils are known to express beta 2 integrins, we hypothesized that these adhesion molecules mediate the effector function of eosinophils. Normal human eosinophils incubated in albumin-coated polystyrene plates released granule protein and produced superoxide anion when stimulated with human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage CSF (rGM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), or PMA. Simultaneous monitoring of eosinophil adhesion and degranulation showed that degranulation was always preceded by cellular adhesion regardless of stimuli. Furthermore, eosinophil degranulation induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was abolished in suspension culture of the cells when the cell suspensions were gently stirred. To identify the molecules involved in this adhesion-dependent degranulation, we have investigated the effects of mAbs (mAb) against beta 2 integrins. mAb reactive with CD18 markedly inhibited the eosinophil adhesion and degranulation induced by PAF and human rGM-CSF. mAb reactive with CD11b also moderately inhibited the adhesion and degranulation. In contrast, mAb reactive with CD11a slightly enhanced or showed no effect on the adhesion and degranulation by human rGM-CSF or PAF. Superoxide production induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was also abolished by the treatment of cells with anti-CD18 mAb. mAb against CD11b and CD18 had little effect on degranulation and superoxide production induced by PMA. These results indicate that CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-dependent cellular adhesion plays an important role in the degranulation and superoxide production of eosinophils induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF, and that these mechanisms may be employed in vivo where eosinophils contact with stromal cells and/or proteins.

  19. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4Rα, myeloid specific IL-4Rα, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression in macrophages is controlled by lymphocytes during macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong; Yang, Xiqiang; Yao, Lan; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xin; Wang, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    The viewpoints on the control of innate immune cells by the adaptive immune system during sepsis remain controversial. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is essential to the negative control of innate immunity and suppresses the activation of macrophages by inhibiting activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The purpose of the current study was to observe inflammatory response and macrophage activation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with endotoxemia and to determine the role of MKP-1 in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system. Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and SCID mice by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and all of the SCID mice died. SCID mice produced more inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice systemically and locally. TNF-α mRNA expression was higher and MKP-1 mRNA expression was lower in peritoneal macrophages (PMa) from SCID mice compared to PMa from wild-type mice after and even before LPS injection. Thioglycollate-stimulated PMa from wild-type mice were stimulated with LPS in vitro in the presence or absence of pan-T cells. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were higher in the supernatants from PMa cultured alone compared to PMa co-cultured with pan-T cells, and PMa MKP-1 mRNA and protein expression were higher when PMa were co-cultured with pan-T cells. Therefore, pan-T cells can up-regulate MKP-1 expression in macrophages and inhibit the secretion of inflammatory cytokines secretion by macrophages. In SCID mice, lymphocyte deficiency, especially T cell deficiency, causes insufficient MKP-1 expression in macrophages, which can be responsible for the severe inflammation and bad prognosis of septic SCID mice. MKP-1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system.

  1. Interleukin-3/granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor promotes stem cell expansion, monocytosis, and atheroma macrophage burden in mice with hematopoietic ApoE deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mi; Subramanian, Manikandan; Abramowicz, Sandra; Murphy, Andrew J; Gonen, Ayelet; Witztum, Joseph; Welch, Carrie; Tabas, Ira; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R

    2014-05-01

    Coronary heart disease is associated with monocytosis. Studies using animal models of monocytosis and atherosclerosis such as ApoE(-/-) mice have shown bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion, associated with increased cell surface expression of the common β subunit of the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 receptor (CBS) on HSPCs. ApoE(-/-) mice also display increased granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent monocyte production in the spleen. We investigated the role of the CBS in cholesterol-driven HSPC expansion, monocytosis, and atherosclerosis. Ldlr(-/-) mice were transplanted with ApoE(-/-)Cbs(-/-) or ApoE(-/-) BM followed by Western-type diet feeding. Compared with ApoE(-/-) BM-transplanted controls, ApoE(-/-)Cbs(-/-) BM-transplanted mice had reduced BM and splenic HSPC proliferation, fewer blood monocytes and neutrophils, and reduced macrophage content and area of early atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced lesions showed diminished macrophage and collagen content; however, lesion size was unchanged, reflecting an increase in necrotic core area, associated with a marked decrease in Abcg1 expression and increased macrophage apoptosis. Compared with wild-type mice, Western-type diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice showed increased CBS expression on granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-producing innate response activator B cells and expansion of this population. ApoE(-/-)Cbs(-/-) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) mice showed a marked decrease in innate response activator B cells compared with ApoE(-/-) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) controls. Increased levels of CBS on HSPCs and splenic innate response activator B cells lead to expansion of these populations in ApoE(-/-) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) mice, contributing to monocytosis and increased lesional macrophage content. However, in more advanced lesions, the CBS also has a role in atherosclerotic plaque stabilization.

  2. The insect peptide CopA3 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyo Jung; Oh, Ah Reum; Nam, Seung Taek; Kang, Jin Ku; Chang, Jong Soo; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ji Hye; Hwang, Jae Sam; Shong, Ko Eun; Park, Mi Jung; Seok, Heon; Kim, Ho

    2012-10-01

    We recently demonstrated that the insect peptide CopA3 (LLCIALRKK), a disulfide-linked dimeric peptide, exerts antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities in a mouse colitis model. Here, we examined whether CopA3 inhibited activation of macrophages by LPS. Exposure of an unseparated mouse peritoneal cell population or isolated peritoneal macrophages to LPS markedly increased secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α; these effects were significantly inhibited by CopA3 treatment. The inhibitory effect of CopA3 was also evident in murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Western blotting revealed that LPS-induced activation of STAT1 and STAT5 in macrophages was significantly inhibited by CopA3. Inhibition of JAK (STAT1/STAT5 kinase) with AG490 markedly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in macrophages. Collectively, these observations suggest that CopA3 inhibits macrophage activation by inhibiting activating phosphorylations of the transcription factors, STAT1 and STAT5, and blocking subsequent production of IL-6 and TNF-α and indicate that CopA3 may be useful as an immune-modulating agent.

  3. CXCL17 is a major chemotactic factor for lung macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Carnevale, Christina D.; Vilches-Cisneros, Natalia; Flores, Juan P.; Hevezi, Peter A.; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of chemotactic cytokines that direct the movement of cells throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The mucosal chemokine CXCL17 was the last ligand of this superfamily to be characterized. Several recent studies have provided greater insight into the basic biology of this chemokine and have implicated CXCL17 in several human diseases. We sought to better characterize CXCL17's activity in vivo. To this end, we analyzed its chemoattractant properties in vivo and characterized a Cxcl17-/- mouse. This mouse has a significantly reduced number of macrophages in their lungs compared to WT mice. Additionally, we observed a concurrent increase in a new population of macrophage-like cells that are F4/80+CDllcmid. These results indicate that CXCL17 is a novel macrophage chemoattractant that operates in mucosal tissues. Given the importance of macrophages in inflammation, these observations strongly suggest that CXCL17 is a major regulator of mucosal inflammatory responses. PMID:24973458

  4. An integrated signal transduction network of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Variar, Prathyaksha; Advani, Jayshree; Nair, Bipin; Shankar, Subramanian; Gowda, Harsha; Saussez, Sven; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a glycosylated multi-functional protein that acts as an enzyme as well as a cytokine. MIF mediates its actions through a cell surface class II major histocompatibility chaperone, CD74 and co-receptors such as CD44, CXCR2, CXCR4 or CXCR7. MIF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Although MIF is a molecule of biomedical importance, a public resource of MIF signaling pathway is currently lacking. In view of this, we carried out detailed data mining and documentation of the signaling events pertaining to MIF from published literature and developed an integrated reaction map of MIF signaling. This resulted in the cataloguing of 68 molecules belonging to MIF signaling pathway, which includes 24 protein-protein interactions, 44 post-translational modifications, 11 protein translocation events and 8 activation/inhibition events. In addition, 65 gene regulation events at the mRNA levels induced by MIF signaling have also been catalogued. This signaling pathway has been integrated into NetPath ( http://www.netpath.org ), a freely available human signaling pathway resource developed previously by our group. The MIF pathway data is freely available online in various community standard data exchange formats. We expect that data on signaling events and a detailed signaling map of MIF will provide the scientific community with an improved platform to facilitate further molecular as well as biomedical investigations on MIF.

  5. Nerve growth factor promotes killing of Leishmania donovani by macrophages through the induction of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Rieko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Katakura, Ken; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is protozoonosis that occurs worldwide and still requires effective therapies with less toxicity. In this study, we examined the antileishmanial effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) using a murine infection model. NGF blocked the infection of macrophages by Leishmania donovani, which was completely cancelled by a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor. In vivo, not only did NGF show antileishmanial effects, but combination therapy of NGF and sodium stibogluconate synergistically exhibited the activity more potently than each monotherapy. These results indicate that NGF exerts antileishmanial effect by stimulating hydrogen peroxide production in macrophages and can be a novel therapy for leishmaniasis.

  6. Exosomes contribute to the transmission of anti-HIV activity from TLR3-activated brain microvascular endothelial cells to macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Run-Hong; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), the major cell type in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), play a key role in maintaining brain homeostasis. However, their role in the BBB innate immunity against HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) remains to be determined. Our early work showed that TLR3 signaling of HBMECs could produce the antiviral factors that inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. The present study examined whether exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs mediate the intercellular transfer of antiviral factors to macrophages. Primary human macrophages could take up exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs. HBMECs-derived exosomes contained multiple antiviral factors, including several key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs; ISG15, ISG56, and Mx2) at mRNA and protein levels. The depletion of exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs culture supernatant diminished HBMECs-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. In conclusion, we demonstrate that exosomes shed by HBMECs are able to transport the antiviral molecules to macrophages. This finding suggests the possibility that HIV nonpermissive BBB cells (HBMECs) can help to restore the antiviral state in HIV-infected macrophages, which may be a defense mechanism against HIV neuroinvasion. PMID:27496004

  7. Peptides conjugated to gold nanoparticles induce macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Bastús, Neus G; Sánchez-Tilló, Ester; Pujals, Silvia; Farrera, Consol; Kogan, Marcelo J; Giralt, Ernest; Celada, Antonio; Lloberas, Jorge; Puntes, Victor

    2009-02-01

    Macrophages that react against pathogenic organisms can also be activated with artificial nanometric units consisting of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with a peptide coating. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages, here we show that these cells have the capacity to recognize Au NPs once conjugated to two biomedically relevant peptides, the amyloid growth inhibitory peptide (AGIP) and the sweet arrow peptide (SAP), while they do not recognize peptides or NPs alone. The recognition of these conjugates by macrophages is mediated by a pattern recognition receptor, the TLR-4. Consequently, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6, as well as nitric oxide synthase were induced and macrophage proliferation was stopped when exposed to the peptide-conjugated Au NPs. Contamination by lipopolysaccharide in our experimental system was excluded. Furthermore, macrophage activation appeared to be independent of peptide length and polarity. As a result of macrophage activation, conjugated Au NPs were internalized and processed. These results open up a new avenue in the world of adjuvants and illustrate the basic requirements for the design of NP conjugates that efficiently reach their target.

  8. Effect of cinnamon water extract on monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and scavenger receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Water soluble cinnamon extract has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and modulate macrophage activation, a desirable trait for the management of obesity or atherosclerosis. Our present study investigated whether cinnamon water extract (CWE) may influence the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and the activity of macrophage scavenger receptors, commonly observed in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods We investigated the effect of CWE on the expression of various surface markers and the uptake of acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 cells. The protein levels of PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-stimulated type 1 macrophage scavenger receptor (SRA) were analyzed. Finally, the role of extracellar signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 in SRA synthesis and the effect of CWE on PMA-stimulated ERK1/2 were determined. Results CWE inhibited the differentiation of monocyte by decreasing the expression of CD11b, CD36 and SRA and the uptake of acetyl LDL. CWE suppressed the upregulation of SRA by M-CSF and modulated ERK1/2 activity, which was required for PMA-induced SRA synthesis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that CWE was able to interfere with monocyte differentiation and macrophage scavenger activity, indicating its potential in preventing the development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24602512

  9. The TLR4-Active Morphine Metabolite Morphine-3-Glucuronide Does Not Elicit Macrophage Classical Activation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Xie, Nan; Pu, Wenjun; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the tumor microenvironment where they adopt a pro-tumor phenotype following alternative polarization induced by paracrine factors from cancer and stromal cells. In contrast, classically activated macrophages have tumoricidal activities, such that the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages has become a novel therapeutic target. Toll-like receptor 4 engagement promotes classical activation of macrophages, and recent literature suggests TLR4 agonism to prevent metastasis and promote survival in experimental metastasis models. A growing number of studies indicate that TLR4 can respond to opioids, including the opioid receptor-inactive morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). We measured the activation of TLR4 in a reporter cell line exogenously expressing TLR4 and TLR4 co-receptors, and confirmed that M3G weakly but significantly activates TLR4. We hypothesized that M3G would promote the expression of classical activation signature genes in macrophages in vitro. We exposed mouse and human macrophage cell lines to M3G or the TLR4 activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone or in combination with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The classical macrophage activation markers tested were iNOS, CD86, IL-6, or TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells and IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, CXCL10, and CXCL11 in THP1 cells. Our results show that despite exhibiting TLR4-activation ability, M3G does not elicit the expression of classical activation markers in LPS-responsive macrophages.

  10. The TLR4-Active Morphine Metabolite Morphine-3-Glucuronide Does Not Elicit Macrophage Classical Activation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Xie, Nan; Pu, Wenjun; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the tumor microenvironment where they adopt a pro-tumor phenotype following alternative polarization induced by paracrine factors from cancer and stromal cells. In contrast, classically activated macrophages have tumoricidal activities, such that the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages has become a novel therapeutic target. Toll-like receptor 4 engagement promotes classical activation of macrophages, and recent literature suggests TLR4 agonism to prevent metastasis and promote survival in experimental metastasis models. A growing number of studies indicate that TLR4 can respond to opioids, including the opioid receptor-inactive morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). We measured the activation of TLR4 in a reporter cell line exogenously expressing TLR4 and TLR4 co-receptors, and confirmed that M3G weakly but significantly activates TLR4. We hypothesized that M3G would promote the expression of classical activation signature genes in macrophages in vitro. We exposed mouse and human macrophage cell lines to M3G or the TLR4 activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone or in combination with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The classical macrophage activation markers tested were iNOS, CD86, IL-6, or TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells and IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, CXCL10, and CXCL11 in THP1 cells. Our results show that despite exhibiting TLR4-activation ability, M3G does not elicit the expression of classical activation markers in LPS-responsive macrophages. PMID:27909407

  11. Kaurane diterpenes protect against apoptosis and inhibition of phagocytosis in activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, B; Hortelano, S; Girón, N; Bermejo, P; Rodríguez, B; Boscá, L

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The kaurane diterpenes foliol and linearol are inhibitors of the activation of nuclear factor κB, a transcription factor involved in the inflammatory response. Effects of these diterpenes on apoptosis and phagocytosis have been analysed in cultured peritoneal macrophages and in the mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Experimental approach: Macrophages were maintained in culture and activated with pro-inflammatory stimuli in the absence or presence of diterpenes. Apoptosis and the phagocytosis in these cells under these conditions were determined. Key results: Incubation of macrophages with a mixture of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induced apoptosis through a NO-dependent pathway, an effect significantly inhibited by foliol and linearol in the low μM range, without cytotoxic effects. Apoptosis in macrophages induced by NO donors was also inhibited. The diterpenes prevented apoptosis through a mechanism compatible with the inhibition of caspase-3 activation, release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and p53 overexpression, as well as an alteration in the levels of proteins of the Bcl-2 family, in particular, the levels of Bax. Cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a well-established caspase substrate, was reduced by these diterpenes. Treatment of cells with foliol and linearol decreased phagocytosis of zymosan bioparticles by RAW 264.7 cells and to a greater extent by peritoneal macrophages. Conclusions and implications: Both diterpenes protected macrophages from apoptosis and inhibited phagocytosis, resulting in a paradoxical control of macrophage function, as viability was prolonged but inflammatory and phagocytic functions were impaired. PMID:17618303

  12. PGC-1β suppresses saturated fatty acid-induced macrophage inflammation by inhibiting TAK1 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongen; Liu, Yan; Li, Di; Song, Jiayi; Xia, Min

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation of infiltrated macrophages in adipose tissue is a key contributor to the initiation of adipose insulin resistance. These macrophages are exposed to high local concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) and can be proinflammatory activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). However, the regulatory mechanisms on SFA-induced macrophage inflammation are still elusive. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1β (PGC-1β) is a member of the PGC-1 family of transcriptional coactivators and has been reported to play a key role in SFAs metabolism and in the regulation of inflammatory signaling. However, it remains unclear whether PGC-1β is involved in SFA-induced macrophage inflammation. In this study, we found that PGC-1β expression was significantly decreased in response to palmitic acid (PA) in macrophages in a dose dependent manner. PGC-1β inhibited PA induced TNFα, MCP-1, and IL-1β mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, PGC-1β significantly antagonized PA induced macrophage nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and JUN N-terminal kinase activation. Mechanistically, we revealed that TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its adaptor protein TAK1 binding protein 1 (TAB1) played a dominant role in the regulatory effects of PGC-1β. We confirmed that PGC-1β inhibited downstream inflammatory signals via binding with TAB1 and thus preventing TAB1/TAK1 binding and TAK1 activation. Finally, we showed that PGC-1β overexpression in PA treated macrophages improved adipocytes PI3K-Akt insulin signaling in a paracrine fashion. Collectively, our results uncovered a novel mechanism on how macrophage inflammation induced by SFAs was regulated and suggest a potential target in the treatment of obesity induced insulin resistance.

  13. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  14. HCV dsRNA-Activated Macrophages Inhibit HCV Replication in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhong; Li, Jieliang; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Ting; Ho, Wenzhe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Macrophages play critical roles in innate immune response in the liver. Whether macrophages participate in liver innate immunity against HCV replication is poorly understood Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of macrophages in liver innate immunity against HCV replication. Materials and Methods: Freshly isolated monocytes were purified from peripheral blood of healthy adult donors. Macrophages refer to 7-day-cultured monocytes in vitro. A hepatoma cell line (Huh7) was infected with HCV JFH-1 to generate in vitro HCV infectious system. RT-PCR was used to determine HCV RNA and mRNA levels of genes expression. ELISA was used to measure the protein level of interferon-α (IFN-α) and western blot was used to determine protein expression level of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). Results: HCV dsRNA induced the expression of type I IFN (IFN-α/β) in monocyte-derived macrophages. HCV dsRNA also induced the expression of TLR3 and IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), the key regulators of the IFN signaling pathway. When HCV JFH-1-infected Huh7 cells were co-cultured with macrophages activated with HCV dsRNA or incubated in media conditioned with supernatant (SN) from HCV dsRNA-activated macrophages, HCV replication was significantly suppressed. This macrophage SN action on HCV inhibition was mediated through type I IFN, which was evidenced by the observation that antibody to type I IFN receptor could neutralize the macrophages-mediated anti-HCV effect. The role of type I IFN in macrophages-mediated anti-HCV activity is further supported by the observation that HCV dsRNA-activated macrophages SN treatment induced the expression of several IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), ISG15, ISG56, OAS-1, OAS-2, MxA and Viperin in HCV-infected Huh7 cells. Conclusions: Macrophages may play an important role in liver innate immunity against HCV replication through a type I IFN-dependent mechanism. PMID:26322111

  15. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models.

  16. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  17. Coordinated Regulation of Signaling Pathways during Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Toby

    2016-10-01

    The functional and phenotypic diversity of macrophages has long been appreciated, and it is now clear that it reflects a complex interplay between hard-wired differentiation pathways and instructive signals in specific tissues (Lawrence T, Natoli G. 2011, Nat Rev Immunol11:750-761). Recent studies have begun to unravel the molecular basis for the integration of these intrinsic developmental pathways with extracellular signals from the tissue microenvironment that confer the distinct phenotypes of tissue-resident macrophages (Lavin Y et al. 2014. Cell159:1312-1326; Gosselin D et al. 2014. Cell159:1327-1340). Macrophage phenotype and function is particularly dynamic during inflammation or infection, as blood monocytes are recruited into tissues and differentiate into macrophages, and depending on the nature of the inflammatory stimulus, they may acquire distinct functional phenotypes (Xue J et al. 2014. Immunity40:274-288; Murray PJ et al. 2014. Immunity41:14-20). Furthermore, these functional activation states can be rapidly modified in response to a changing microenvironment. Here we will discuss several key signaling pathways that drive macrophage activation during the inflammatory response and discuss how these pathways are integrated to "fine-tune" macrophage phenotype and function.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor is produced by peritoneal fluid macrophages in endometriosis and is regulated by ovarian steroids.

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, J; Prentice, A; Charnock-Jones, D S; Millican, S A; Müller, K H; Sharkey, A M; Smith, S K

    1996-01-01

    Angiogenesis is important in the pathophysiology of endometriosis, a condition characterized by implantation of ectopic endometrium in the peritoneal cavity. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic factor involved in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, and elevated levels of VEGF are found in peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis. Our aim was to investigate the site of expression and regulation of VEGF in endometriosis. VEGF immunoreactivity was found in tissue macrophages present in ectopic endometrium and in activated peritoneal fluid macrophages. Macrophage activation was highest in women with endometriosis, and media conditioned by peritoneal fluid macrophages from these women caused a VEGF-dependent increase in endothelial cell proliferation above that seen from normal women. Peritoneal fluid macrophages secreted VEGF in response to ovarian steroids, and this secretion was enhanced after activation with lipopolysaccharide. Peritoneal fluid macrophages expressed receptors for steroid hormones. VEGF receptors flt and KDR (kinase domain receptor) were also detected, suggesting autocrine regulation. During the menstrual cycle, expression of flt was constant but that of KDR was increased in the luteal phase, at which time the cells migrated in response to VEGF. KDR expression and the migratory response were significantly higher in patients with endometriosis. This study demonstrates that activated macrophages are a major source of VEGF in endometriosis and that this expression is regulated directly by ovarian steroids. PMID:8755660

  19. Active autophagy but not lipophagy in macrophages with defective lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Chandak, Prakash G.; Korbelius, Melanie; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Leopold, Christina; Obrowsky, Sascha; Rainer, Silvia; Doddapattar, Prakash; Aflaki, Elma; Wegscheider, Martin; Sachdev, Vinay; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    During autophagy, autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes to degrade damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. Breakdown products are released into the cytosol and contribute to energy and metabolic building block supply, especially during starvation. Lipophagy has been defined as the autophagy-mediated degradation of lipid droplets (LDs) by lysosomal acid lipase. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme catalyzing the initial step of lipolysis by hydrolyzing triglycerides (TGs) in cytosolic LDs. Consequently, most organs and cells, including macrophages, lacking ATGL accumulate TGs, resulting in reduced intracellular free fatty acid concentrations. Macrophages deficient in hormone-sensitive lipase (H0) lack TG accumulation albeit reduced in vitro TG hydrolase activity. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated in lipase-deficient macrophages to counteract their energy deficit. We therefore generated mice lacking both ATGL and HSL (A0H0). Macrophages from A0H0 mice showed 73% reduced neutral TG hydrolase activity, resulting in TG-rich LD accumulation. Increased expression of cathepsin B, accumulation of LC3-II, reduced expression of p62 and increased DQ-BSA dequenching suggest intact autophagy and functional lysosomes in A0H0 macrophages. Markedly decreased acid TG hydrolase activity and lipid flux independent of bafilomycin A1 treatment, however, argue against effective lysosomal degradation of LDs in A0H0 macrophages. We conclude that autophagy of proteins and cell organelles but not of LDs is active as a compensatory mechanism to circumvent and balance the reduced availability of energy substrates in A0H0 macrophages. PMID:26143381

  20. Endogenous Epoxygenases Are Modulators of Monocyte/Macrophage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Mary C.; Holness, Mark J.; Swales, Karen E.; Warner, Timothy D.; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid is metabolized through three major metabolic pathways, the cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and CYP450 enzyme systems. Unlike cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases, the role of CYP450 epoxygenases in monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings When transfected in vitro, CYP2J2 is an efficient activator of anti-inflammatory pathways through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α. Human monocytes and macrophages contain PPARα and here we show they express the epoxygenases CYP2J2 and CYP2C8. Inhibition of constitutive monocyte epoxygenases using the epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A induces cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and activity, and the release of TNFα, and can be reversed by either add back of the endogenous epoxygenase products and PPARα ligand 11,12- epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) or the addition of the selective synthetic PPARα ligand GW7647. In alternatively activated (IL-4-treated) monocytes, in contrast to classically activated cells, epoxygenase inhibition decreased TNFα release. Epoxygenases can be pro-inflammatory via superoxide anion production. The suppression of TNFα by SKF525A in the presence of IL-4 was associated with a reduction in superoxide anion generation and reproduced by the superoxide dismutase MnCl2. Similar to these acute activation studies, in monocyte derived macrophages, epoxygenase inhibition elevates M1 macrophage TNFα mRNA and further decreases M2 macrophage TNFα. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, epoxygenase activity represents an important endogenous pathway which limits monocyte activation. Moreover endogenous epoxygenases are immuno-modulators regulating monocyte/macrophage activation depending on the underlying activation state. PMID:22028915

  1. Differential Regulation of Macrophage Glucose Metabolism by Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor: Implications for (18)F FDG PET Imaging of Vessel Wall Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Sina; Short, John D; Downs, Kevin; Nguyen, Huynh Nga; Lai, Yanlai; Zhang, Wei; Jerabek, Paul; Goins, Beth; Sadeghi, Mehran M; Asmis, Reto

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To determine the divergence of immunometabolic phenotypes of macrophages stimulated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and granulocyte-M-CSF (GM-CSF) and its implications for fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the animal care committee. Uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and various indexes of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism were evaluated in nonactivated murine peritoneal macrophages (MΦ0) and macrophages stimulated with M-CSF (MΦM-CSF) or GM-CSF (MΦGM-CSF). Intracellular glucose flux was measured by using stable isotope tracing of glycolytic and tricyclic acid intermediary metabolites. (18)F-FDG uptake was evaluated in murine atherosclerotic aortas after stimulation with M-CSF or GM-CSF by using quantitative autoradiography. Results Despite inducing distinct activation states, GM-CSF and M-CSF stimulated progressive but similar levels of increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in macrophages that reached up to sixfold compared with MΦ0. The expression of glucose transporters, oxidative metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis were induced to similar levels in MΦM-CSF and MΦGM-CSF. Unexpectedly, there was a 1.7-fold increase in extracellular acidification rate, a 1.4-fold increase in lactate production, and overexpression of several critical glycolytic enzymes in MΦM-CSF compared with MΦGM-CSF with associated increased glucose flux through glycolytic pathway. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated a 1.6-fold induction of (18)F-FDG uptake in murine atherosclerotic plaques by both M-CSF and GM-CSF. Conclusion The proinflammatory and inflammation-resolving activation states of macrophages induced by GM-CSF and M-CSF in either cell culture or atherosclerotic plaques may not be distinguishable by the assessment of glucose uptake. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  2. Roles of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2017-06-02

    To obtain stable outcomes in regenerative medicine, understanding and controlling immunological responses in transplanted tissues are of great importance. In our previous study, auricular chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage transplanted in mice were shown to express immunological factors, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Since MIF exerts pleiotropic functions, in this study, we examined the roles of MIF in cartilage regenerative medicine. We made tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of auricular chondrocytes of C57BL/6J mouse, atellocollagen gel and a PLLA scaffold, and transplanted the construct subcutaneously in a syngeneic manner. Localization of MIF was prominent in cartilage areas of tissue-engineered cartilage at 2 weeks after transplantation, though it became less apparent by 8 weeks. Co-culture with RAW264 significantly increased the expression of MIF in chondrocytes, suggesting that the transplanted chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage could enhance the expression of MIF by stimulation of surrounding macrophages. When MIF was added in the culture of chondrocytes, the expression of type II collagen was increased, indicating that MIF could promote the maturation of chondrocytes. Meanwhile, toluidine blue staining of constructs containing wild type (Mif+/+) chondrocytes showed increased metachromasia compared to MIF-knockout (Mif-/-) constructs at 2 weeks. However, this tendency was reversed by 8 weeks, suggesting that the initial increase in cartilage maturation in Mif+/+ constructs deteriorated by 8 weeks. Since the Mif+/+ constructs included more iNOS-positive inflammatory macrophages at 2 weeks, MIF might induce an M1 macrophage-polarized environment, which may eventually worsen the maturation of tissue-engineered cartilage in the long term. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor involvement in breast cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RICHARD, VINCENT; KINDT, NADÈGE; SAUSSEZ, SVEN

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine involved in many cellular processes and in particular carcinogenesis. Here, we review the experimental and clinical published data on MIF and its pathways in breast cancer. Experimental data show that MIF is overexpressed in breast cancer cells (BCC) due, at least partly, to its stabilization by HSP90 and upregulation by HIF-1α. MIF interacts with its main receptor CD74 and its co-receptor CXCR-4, both overexpressed, promoting cell survival by PI3K/Akt activation, a possible link with EGFR and HER2 pathways and inhibition of autophagy. Besides these auto- and paracrine effects on BCC, MIF interacts with BCC micro-environment by several mechanisms: immunomodulation by increasing the prevalence of immune suppressive cells, neo-angiogenesis by its link to HIF-1, and finally BCC transendothelial migration. Clinical studies show higher levels of MIF in breast cancer patients serum compared to healthy volunteers but without obvious clinical significance. In breast cancer tissue, MIF and CD74 are overexpressed in the cancer cells and in the stroma but correlations with classical prognostic factors or survival are elusive. However, an inverse correlation with the tumor size for stromal MIF and a positive correlation with the triple receptor negative tumor status for stromal CD74 seem to be showed. This set of experimental and clinical data shows the involvement of MIF pathways in breast carcinogenesis. Several anti-MIF targeted strategies are being explored in therapeutic goals and should merit further investigations. PMID:26412712

  4. Degalactosylated/Desialylated Bovine Colostrum Induces Macrophage Phagocytic Activity Independently of Inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Tomohito; Sasaki, Toshihide; Hamada, Ken; Yamada, Hisatsugu; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Inui, Toshio; Mette, Martin; Tokunaga, Ken; Hayakawa, Akio; Go, Akiteru; Oosaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    Colostrum contains antibodies, such as immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin M (IgM), and, therefore, has potent immunomodulating activity. In particular, IgA has an O-linked sugar chain similar to that in the group-specific component (Gc) protein, a precursor of the Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). In the present study, we investigated the macrophage-activating effects of degalactosylated/desialylated bovine colostrum. We detected the positive band in degalactosylated/ desialylated bovine colostrum by western blotting using Helix pomatia agglutinin lectin. We also found that degalactosylated/ desialylated bovine colostrum could significantly enhance the phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and of intestinal macrophages in vivo. Besides, degalactosylated/desialylated bovine colostrum did not mediate the production of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Similar to the use of GcMAF, degalactosylated/desialylated bovine colostrum can be used as a potential macrophage activator for various immunotherapies. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of TNFR2 sensitizes macrophages for TNFR1-mediated necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Daniela; Kums, Juliane; Ehrenschwender, Martin; Wajant, Harald

    2016-09-22

    Macrophages express TNFR1 as well as TNFR2 and are also major producers of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), especially upon contact with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Consequently, TNF not only acts as a macrophage-derived effector molecule but also regulates the activity and viability of macrophages. Here, we investigated the individual contribution of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to TNF-induced cell death in macrophages. Exclusive stimulation of TNFR1 showed no cytotoxic effect whereas selective stimulation of TNFR2 displayed mild cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, the latter was strongly enhanced by the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. The strong cytotoxic activity of TNFR2 in the presence of zVAD-fmk was reversed by necrostatin-1, indicating necroptotic cell death. TNFR1- and TNF-deficient macrophages turned out to be resistant against TNFR2-induced cell death. In addition, the cIAP-depleting SMAC mimetic BV6 also enforced TNF/TNFR1-mediated necroptotic cell death in the presence of zVAD-fmk. In sum, our data suggest a model in which TNFR2 sensitizes macrophages for endogenous TNF-induced TNFR1-mediated necroptosis by the known ability of TNFR2 to interfere with the survival activity of TRAF2-cIAP1/2 complexes.

  6. Activation of TNFR2 sensitizes macrophages for TNFR1-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Daniela; Kums, Juliane; Ehrenschwender, Martin; Wajant, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages express TNFR1 as well as TNFR2 and are also major producers of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), especially upon contact with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Consequently, TNF not only acts as a macrophage-derived effector molecule but also regulates the activity and viability of macrophages. Here, we investigated the individual contribution of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to TNF-induced cell death in macrophages. Exclusive stimulation of TNFR1 showed no cytotoxic effect whereas selective stimulation of TNFR2 displayed mild cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, the latter was strongly enhanced by the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. The strong cytotoxic activity of TNFR2 in the presence of zVAD-fmk was reversed by necrostatin-1, indicating necroptotic cell death. TNFR1- and TNF-deficient macrophages turned out to be resistant against TNFR2-induced cell death. In addition, the cIAP-depleting SMAC mimetic BV6 also enforced TNF/TNFR1-mediated necroptotic cell death in the presence of zVAD-fmk. In sum, our data suggest a model in which TNFR2 sensitizes macrophages for endogenous TNF-induced TNFR1-mediated necroptosis by the known ability of TNFR2 to interfere with the survival activity of TRAF2-cIAP1/2 complexes. PMID:27899821

  7. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates JAK2 signaling pathway and rapidly activates p93fes, STAT1 p91, and STAT3 p92 in polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Aronica, M G; Rosso, A; Bagnara, G P; Yarden, Y; Pegoraro, L

    1996-02-16

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), supports proliferation, differentiation, and functional activation of hemopoietic cells by its interaction with a heterodimeric receptor. Although GM-CSF receptor is devoid of tyrosine kinase enzymatic activity, GM-CSF-induced peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional activation is mediated by the phosphorylation of a large number of intracellular signaling molecules. We have previously shown that JAK2 becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to GM-CSF in PMN. In the present study we demonstrate that also the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family members STAT1 p91 and STAT3 p92 and the product of the c-fps/fes protooncogene become tyrosine-phosphorylated upon GM-CSF stimulation and physically associated with both GM-CSF receptor beta common subunit and JAK2. Moreover GM-CSF was able to induce JAK2 and p93fes catalytic activity. We also demonstrate that the association of the GM-CSF receptor beta common subunit with JAK2 is ligand-dependent. Finally we demonstrate that GM-CSF induces a DNA-binding complex that contains both p91 and p92. These results identify a new signal transduction pathway activated by GM-CSF and provide a mechanism for rapid activation of gene expression in GM-CSF-stimulated PMN.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activates Human Macrophage Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Linking Mannose Receptor Recognition to Regulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Brooks, Michelle N.; Morris, Jessica D.; Torrelles, Jordi B.; Azad, Abul K.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances its survival in macrophages by suppressing immune responses in part through its complex cell wall structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is a transcriptional factor that regulates inflammation and has high expression in alternatively activated alveolar macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, both cell types relevant to tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we show that virulent M. tuberculosis and its cell wall mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan induce PPARγ expression through a macrophage mannose receptor-dependent pathway. When activated, PPARγ promotes IL-8 and cyclooxygenase 2 expression, a process modulated by a PPARγ agonist or antagonist. Upstream, MAPK-p38 mediates cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, which is required for PPARγ ligand production. The induced IL-8 response mediated by mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan and the mannose receptor is independent of TLR2 and NF-κB activation. In contrast, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin induces less PPARγ and preferentially uses the NF-κB–mediated pathway to induce IL-8 production. Finally, PPARγ knockdown in human macrophages enhances TNF production and controls the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis. These data identify a new molecular pathway that links engagement of the mannose receptor, an important pattern recognition receptor for M. tuberculosis, with PPARγ activation, which regulates the macrophage inflammatory response, thereby playing a role in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:20554962

  10. Homolog of allograft inflammatory factor-1 induces macrophage migration during innate immune response in leech.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Tilo; Drago, Francesco; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Valvassori, Roberto; de Eguileor, Magda; Vizioli, Jacopo; Grimaldi, Annalisa

    2015-03-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a 17-kDa cytokine-inducible calcium-binding protein that, in vertebrates, plays an important role in the allograft immune response. Its expression is mostly limited to the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Until recently, AIF-1 was assumed to be a novel molecule involved in inflammatory responses. To clarify this aspect, we have investigated the expression of AIF-1 after bacterial challenge and its potential role in regulating the innate immune response in an invertebrate model, the medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis). Analysis of an expressed sequence tag library from the central nervous system of Hirudo revealed the presence of the gene Hmaif-1/alias Hmiba1, showing high homology with vertebrate aif-1. Immunohistochemistry with an anti-HmAIF-1 polyclonal antibody revealed the constitutive presence of this protein in spread CD68(+) macrophage-like cells. A few hours after pathogen (bacterial) injection into the body wall, the amount of these immunopositive cells co-expressing HmAIF-1 and the common leucocyte marker CD45 increased at the injected site. Moreover, the recombinant protein HmAIF-1 induced massive angiogenesis and was a potent chemoattractant for macrophages. Following rHmAIF-1 stimulation, macrophage-like cells co-expressed the macrophage marker CD68 and the surface glycoprotein CD45, which, in vertebrates, seems to have a role in the integrin-mediated adhesion of macrophages and in the regulation of the functional responsiveness of cells to chemoattractants. CD45 is therefore probably involved in leech macrophage-like cell activation and migration towards an inflammation site. We have also examined its potential effect on HmAIF-1-induced signalling.

  11. Oryza sativa (Rice) Hull Extract Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response in RAW264.7 Macrophages by Suppressing Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase, and Nuclear Factor-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sang Keun; Sung, Jeehye; Choi, Inwook; Kim, Yoonsook

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is a major cereal crop in many Asian countries and an important staple food source. Rice hulls have been reported to possess antioxidant activities. In this study, we evaluated the antiinflammatory effects of rice hull extract and associated signal transduction mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that rice hull extract inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, respectively. The release of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rice hull extract attenuated the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), as well as the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This suggests that rice hull extract decreases the production of inflammatory mediators by downregulating ERK and JNK and the NF-κB signal pathway in RAW 264.7 cells. Rice hull extract inhibits the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages.Rice hull extract inhibited nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, respectively.Rice hull extract exerted anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways.Rice hull extract may provide a potential therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases. Abbreviations used: COX-2: cyclooxygenase-2, ERK: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, IκB: inhibitory kappa B, IL-1β: interleukin-1β, iNOS: inducible NO synthase, JNK: c-Jun N-terminal kinase, LPS: lipopolysaccharide, MAPKs: mitogen-activated protein kinases, NF-κB: nuclear factor-κB, NO: nitric oxide, PGE2: prostaglandin E2, RHE: rice hull extract, ROS: reactive oxygen species, TNF

  12. Oryza sativa (Rice) Hull Extract Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response in RAW264.7 Macrophages by Suppressing Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase, and Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Keun; Sung, Jeehye; Choi, Inwook; Kim, Yoonsook

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rice (Oryza sativa) is a major cereal crop in many Asian countries and an important staple food source. Rice hulls have been reported to possess antioxidant activities. Materials and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the antiinflammatory effects of rice hull extract and associated signal transduction mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Results: We found that rice hull extract inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, respectively. The release of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rice hull extract attenuated the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), as well as the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Conclusion: This suggests that rice hull extract decreases the production of inflammatory mediators by downregulating ERK and JNK and the NF-κB signal pathway in RAW 264.7 cells. SUMMARY Rice hull extract inhibits the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages.Rice hull extract inhibited nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, respectively.Rice hull extract exerted anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways.Rice hull extract may provide a potential therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases. Abbreviations used: COX-2: cyclooxygenase-2, ERK: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, IκB: inhibitory kappa B, IL-1β: interleukin-1β, iNOS: inducible NO synthase, JNK: c-Jun N-terminal kinase, LPS: lipopolysaccharide, MAPKs: mitogen-activated protein kinases, NF-κB: nuclear factor-κB, NO: nitric oxide, PGE2: prostaglandin

  13. Macrophage colony stimulating factor regulation by nuclear factor kappa B: a relevant pathway in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Michael; Haine, Valerie; Ke, Yuxong; Wigdahl, Brian; Fischer-Smith, Tracy; Rappaport, Jay

    2012-03-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a cytokine that promotes monocyte differentiation and survival. When overexpressed, M-CSF contributes to pathology in a wide variety of diseases, including osteoporosis, obesity, certain human cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, particularly with respect to monocyte/macrophage infection and the development of HIV-1 associated central nervous system disorders. In this study, our aim was to expand the current knowledge of M-CSF regulation, focusing on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor playing a prominent role during inflammation and HIV-1 infection. Our results suggest that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) promotes M-CSF secretion in primary macrophages and activates the -1310/+48 bp M-CSF promoter in Mono-Mac 1 cells. Inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway diminish this response. We identified four putative NF-κB and four CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites within the M-CSF promoter. Our findings, using promoter constructs mutated at individual NF-κB sites within the M-CSF promoter region, suggest that these sites are redundant with respect to NF-κB regulation. TNF-α treatment promoted NF-κB p65 binding to the M-CSF promoter in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treated U937 cells chronically infected with HIV-1 (U1 cells), but not in PMA treated uninfected U937 cells, suggesting that the presence of HIV-1 increases the NF-κB response. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that NF-κB induces M-CSF expression on a promoter level via multiple functional NF-κB binding sites and that this pathway is likely relevant in HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

  14. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  15. PAI-1 (Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1) Expression Renders Alternatively Activated Human Macrophages Proteolytically Quiescent.

    PubMed

    Hohensinner, Philipp J; Baumgartner, Johanna; Kral-Pointner, Julia B; Uhrin, Pavel; Ebenbauer, Benjamin; Thaler, Barbara; Doberer, Konstantin; Stojkovic, Stefan; Demyanets, Svitlana; Fischer, Michael B; Huber, Kurt; Schabbauer, Gernot; Speidl, Walter S; Wojta, Johann

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages are versatile immune cells capable of polarizing into functional subsets depending on environmental stimulation. In atherosclerotic lesions, proinflammatory polarized macrophages are associated with symptomatic plaques, whereas Th2 (T-helper cell type 2) cytokine-polarized macrophages are inversely related with disease progression. To establish a functional cause for these observations, we analyzed extracellular matrix degradation phenotypes in polarized macrophages. We provide evidence that proinflammatory polarized macrophages rely on membrane-bound proteases including MMP-14 (matrix metalloproteinase-14) and the serine protease uPA (urokinase plasminogen activator) together with its receptor uPAR for extracellular matrix degradation. In contrast, Th2 cytokine alternatively primed macrophages do not show different proteolytic activity in comparison to unpolarized macrophages and lack increased localization of MMP-14 and uPA receptor to the cell membrane. Nonetheless, they express the highest amount of the serine protease uPA. However, uPA activity is blocked by similarly increased expression of its inhibitor PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1). When inhibiting PAI-1 or when analyzing macrophages deficient in PAI-1, Th2 cytokine-polarized macrophages display the same matrix degradation capability as proinflammatory-primed macrophages. Within atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages positive for the alternative activation marker CD206 express high levels of PAI-1. In addition, to test changed tissue remodeling capacities of alternatively activated macrophages, we used a bleomycin lung injury model in mice reconstituted with PAI-1(-/-) bone marrow. These results supported an enhanced remodeling phenotype displayed by increased fibrosis and elevated MMP activity in the lung after PAI-1 loss. We were able to demonstrate matrix degradation dependent on membrane-bound proteases in proinflammatory stimulated macrophages and a forced proteolytical quiescence

  16. Pinellia ternata lectin exerts a pro-inflammatory effect on macrophages by inducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Li; Zhao, Teng-Fei; Wu, Hao; Pan, Yao-Zong; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Kui-Long; Zhang, Chen-Chao; Jin, Yang-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Pinellia ternata (PT) is a widely used traditional Chinese medicine. The raw material has a throat-irritating toxicity that is associated with the PT lectin (PTL). PTL is a monocot lectin isolated from the tubers of PT, which exhibits mouse peritoneal acute inflammatory effects in vivo. The present study aimed to investigate the pro-inflammatory effect of PTL on macrophages. PTL (50 µg/ml)‑stimulated macrophages enhanced the chemotactic activity of neutrophils. PTL (50, 100, 200 and 400 µg/ml) significantly elevated the production of cytokines [tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF-α) , interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6]. PTL (25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. PTL also caused transfer of p65 from the macrophage cytoplasm to the nucleus and activated the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway. Scanning electron microscope images revealed severe cell swelling and membrane integrity defection of macrophages following PTL (100 µg/ml) stimulation, which was also associated with inflammation. PTL had pro‑inflammatory activity, involving induced neutrophil migration, cytokine release, ROS overproduction and the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which was associated with the activation of macrophages.

  17. Diesel Exhaust Particles Induce the Over expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) Gene in Alveolar Macrophages and Failed to Induce Apoptosis through Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB)

    PubMed Central

    Kafoury, Ramzi M.; Madden, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5–10), including diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been reported to induce lung injury and exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Alveolar macrophages play a major role in the lung’s response to inhaled particles and therefore, are a primary target for PM2.5–10 effect. The molecular and cellular events underlying DEP-induced toxicity in the lung, however, remain unclear. To determine the effect of DEP on alveolar macrophages, RAW 264.7 cells were grown in RPMI 1640 with supplements until confluency. RAW 264.7 cultures were exposed to Hank’s buffered saline solution (vehicle), vehicle containing an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY11-7082 (25μM with 11/2 hr pre-incubation), or vehicle containing DEP (250μg/ml) in the presence or absence of BAY11-7082 (25μM with 11/2 hr pre-incubation) for 4 hr and TNF-α release was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by western blots. RAW 264.7 apoptotic response was determined by DNA fragmentation assays. U937 cells treated with campothecin (4 μg/ml × 3 hr), an apoptosis-inducing agent, were used as positive control. We report that exposure to the carbonaceous core of DEP induces significant release of TNF-α in a concentration-dependent fashion (31 ± 4 pg/ml, n = 4, p = 0.08; 162 ± 23 pg/ml, n = 4, p < 0.05; 313 ± 31 pg/ml, n = 4, p < 0.05 at 25, 100, and 250 μg/ml, respectively). DEP exposure, however, failed to induce any apoptotic response in RAW 264.7 cells. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB binding activity has resulted in DEP-induced apoptotic response in alveolar macrophages, as demonstrated by the NF-κB inhibitor, BAY11-7082 studies. The results of the present study indicate that DEP induce the release of TNF-α in alveolar macrophages, a primary target for inhaled particles effect. DEP-induced TNF-α gene expression is regulated at the transcriptional level by NF-κB. Furthermore, DEP-induced increase in NF-κB-DNA binding

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury via the activation of M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanqiu; Zhang, Li; Fu, Bo; Zhang, Jianrong; Hong, Quan; Hu, Jie; Li, Diangeng; Luo, Congjuan; Cui, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Fei; Chen, Xiangmei

    2014-06-24

    The mortality of rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is still high, as there is no effective therapy. It has been shown that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can induce M2 macrophages, which mediate MSC protection in other experimental inflammation-related organ injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of macrophage activation in MSC therapy of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. MSCs were injected into glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis mice. Renal injury was evaluated using the serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, renal pathology and acute tubular necrosis score. The distribution of MSCs was detected using two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging. Immunofluorescence of anti-F4/80 and anti-CD206 was performed to determine macrophages and M2 macrophages in the tissues of the kidney, and M2 macrophage infiltration was also evaluated using western blotting analyses. After depletion of macrophages using clodronate liposomes at the phase of kidney repair, renal injury was re-evaluated. RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated with lipopolysaccharide and co-cultured with MSCs and subsequently visualised using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, disparate phenotype macrophages, including normal macrophages (M0), lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages (M1), and MSC-co-cultured macrophages (M2), were infused into mice with AKI, which were pre-treated with liposomal clodronate. In vivo infusion of MSCs protected AKI mice from renal function impairment and severe tubular injury, which was accompanied by a time-dependent increase in CD206-positive M2 macrophage infiltration. In addition, depleting macrophages with clodronate delayed restoration of AKI. In vitro, macrophages co-cultured with MSCs acquired an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, which was characterised by an increased expression of CD206 and the secretory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. The concentrations of IL-10, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor

  19. ERK5 Activation in Macrophages Promotes Efferocytosis and Inhibits Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Kyung-Sun; Cushman, Hannah J.; Akaike, Masashi; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Wang, Xin; Qiu, Xing; Fujiwara, Keigi; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Efferocytosis is a process by which dead and dying cells are removed by phagocytic cells. Efferocytosis by macrophages is thought to curb the progression of atherosclerosis, but the mechanistic insight of this process is lacking. Methods and Results When macrophages were fed apoptotic cells or treated with pitavastatin in vitro, efferocytosis-related signaling and phagocytic capacity were upregulated in an ERK5 activity–dependent manner. Macrophages isolated from macrophage-specific ERK5-null mice exhibited reduced efferocytosis and levels of gene and protein expression of efferocytosis-related molecules. When these mice were crossed with low-density lipoprotein receptor−/− mice and fed a high-cholesterol diet, atherosclerotic plaque formation was accelerated, and the plaques had more advanced and vulnerable morphology. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ERK5, which is robustly activated by statins, is a hub molecule that upregulates macrophage efferocytosis, thereby suppressing atherosclerotic plaque formation. Molecules that upregulate ERK5 and its signaling in macrophages may be good drug targets for suppressing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25001623

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced neutrophil ectosomes decrease macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tonya Azevedo; Noronha-Dutra, Alberto Augusto; Nery, Joilda Silva; Ribeiro, Samantha Brum; Pitanga, Thassila Nogueira; Lapa E Silva, José R; Arruda, Sérgio; Boéchat, Neio

    2012-05-01

    The existence of ectosome-like microvesicles released by neutrophils was proposed a few decades ago. Other studies revealed that the innate immune response during mycobacterial infection is accompanied by an intense migration of neutrophils to the site of infection, which may be important during the acute phase of tuberculosis. We found that the ectosomes derived from infected neutrophils are biologically active and can influence the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within macrophages. Mycobacteria were cultured on supplemented Middlebrook-7H9 broth. All strains were grown to the exponential phase and quantitated by serial dilution. Human neutrophils and macrophages were infected with mycobacteria. Ectosomes from neutrophils were isolated post-infection and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. To determine whether these microvesicles influenced mycobactericidal activity, mycobacteria-infected macrophages were treated with isolated ectosomes. Ectosomes were released from neutrophils infected with mycobacteria. These ectosomes were derived from neutrophil plasma membrane and a small proportion stained with PKH26. These microvesicles, when incubated with infected macrophages, influenced antimycobacterial activity. This is the first study to demonstrate that ectosomes that are shed from infected neutrophils influence mycobactericidal activity in macrophages in vitro, suggesting that these microvesicles have biological significance. Nevertheless, major gaps in our knowledge of microvesicle biology remain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y.P. Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    All homeotherms utilize thermogenesis to maintain core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiologic processes can ensue in cold environments1-3. In the prevailing model, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures, it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT)4,5. Acting via the β3-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes6, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPARγ coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes7-9. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report an unexpected requirement for the interleukin 4 (IL4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Cold exposure rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in BAT and lipolysis in WAT. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization, and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. We have thus discovered a surprising role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  2. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Sato, Miwa; Li, Liangzhu; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup) markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly upregulated neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2–3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but not macrophage CSF, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently upregulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly upregulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment. PMID:26834744

  3. PEDF increases the tumoricidal activity of macrophages towards prostate cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner; Volpert, Olga V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although inflammation and prostate cancer (PCa) have been linked, the molecular interactions between macrophages and PCa cells are poorly explored. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor. We previously showed that PEDF induces macrophages recruitment in vitro, correlates with macrophages density in human prostate, and stimulates macrophages polarization towards the classically activated pathway. Here, we demonstrate that PEDF modulates the interaction between macrophages and PCa cells through a bidirectional signalling leading to tumor cell apoptosis and phagocytosis. Methods RAW 264.7 and THP-1 cells, and BMDMs were grown in vitro as mono- or co-cultures with PC3 or CL1 tumor cells. The effects of PEDF and its derived P18 peptide were measured on macrophages differentiation, migration, and superoxide production, and tumor cell apoptosis and phagocytosis. PEDF receptors (ATP5B, PNPLA2, and LRP6) and CD47 mRNA and protein expression were quantified in macrophages and tumor cells by quantitative RT-PCR, western blot, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Results We found that PEDF induced the migration of macrophages towards tumor 3D spheroids and 2D cultures. In co-culture, PEDF increased PCa cells phagocytosis through an indirect apoptosis-dependent mechanism. Moreover, PEDF stimulated the production of superoxide by macrophages. Conditioned media from macrophages exposed to PEDF induced tumor cells apoptosis in contrast to control conditioned media suggesting that ROS may be involved in tumor cells apoptosis. ATP5B and PNPLA2 PEDF receptors on macrophages and CD47 on tumor cells were respectively up- and down-regulated by PEDF. As PEDF, blocking CD47 induced phagocytosis. Inhibiting ATP5B reduced phagocytosis. Inversely, PNPLA2 inhibition blocks differentiation but maintains phagocytosis. CD47-induced phagocytosis was partially reverted by ATP5B inhibition suggesting a complementary action. Similar effects

  4. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models.

  5. Macrophage-induced angiogenesis is mediated by tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Leibovich, S J; Polverini, P J; Shepard, H M; Wiseman, D M; Shively, V; Nuseir, N

    Macrophages are important in the induction of new blood vessel growth during wound repair, inflammation and tumour growth. We show here that tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a secretory product of activated macrophages that is believed to mediate tumour cytotoxicity, is a potent inducer of new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis). In vivo, TNF-alpha induces capillary blood vessel formation in the rat cornea and the developing chick chorioallantoic membrane at very low doses. In vitro, TNF-alpha stimulates chemotaxis of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells and induces cultures of these cells grown on type-1 collagen gels to form capillary-tube-like structures. The angiogenic activity produced by activated murine peritoneal macrophages is completely neutralized by a polyclonal antibody to TNF-alpha, suggesting immunological features are common to TNF-alpha and the protein responsible for macrophage-derived angiogenic activity. In inflammation and wound repair, TNF-alpha could augment repair by stimulating new blood vessel growth; in tumours, TNF-alpha might both stimulate tumour development by promoting vessel growth and participate in tumour destruction by direct cytotoxicity.

  6. Macrophage-induced angiogenesis is mediated by tumour necrosis factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibovich, S. Joseph; Polverini, Peter J.; Shepard, H. Michael; Wiseman, David M.; Shively, Vera; Nuseir, Nureddin

    1987-10-01

    Macrophages are important in the induction of new blood vessel growth during wound repair, inflammation and tumour growth1-4. We show here that tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a secretory product of activated macrophages that is believed to mediate tumour cytotoxicity5-9, is a potent inducer of new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis). In vivo, TNF-α induces capillary blood vessel formation in the rat cornea and the developing chick chorioallantoic membrane at very low doses. In vitro, TNF-α stimulates chemotaxis of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells and induces cultures of these cells grown on type-1 collagen gels to form capillary-tube-like structures. The angiogenic activity produced by activated murine peritoneal macrophages is completely neutralized by a polyclonal antibody to TNF-α, suggesting immunological features are common to TNF-α and the protein responsible for macrophage-derived angiogenic activity. In inflammation and wound repair, TNF-α could augment repair by stimulating new blood vessel growth; in tumours, TNF-α might both stimulate tumour development by promoting vessel growth and participate in tumour destruction by direct cytotoxicity10-12.

  7. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-α concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-α signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-κB/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  8. In acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, infiltrating macrophages are immune activated, whereas microglia remain immune suppressed.

    PubMed

    Vainchtein, I D; Vinet, J; Brouwer, N; Brendecke, S; Biagini, G; Biber, K; Boddeke, H W G M; Eggen, B J L

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of myelin accompanied by infiltration of T-lymphocytes and monocytes. Although it has been shown that these infiltrates are important for the progression of MS, the role of microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, remains ambiguous. Therefore, we have compared the phenotypes of microglia and macrophages in a mouse model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In order to properly discriminate between these two cell types, microglia were defined as CD11b(pos) CD45(int) Ly-6C(neg) , and infiltrated macrophages as CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) . During clinical EAE, microglia displayed a weakly immune-activated phenotype, based on the expression of MHCII, co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, and CD40) and proinflammatory genes [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α)]. In contrast, CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) infiltrated macrophages were strongly activated and could be divided into two populations Ly-6C(int) and Ly-6C(high) , respectively. Ly-6C(high) macrophages contained less myelin than Ly-6C(int) macrophages and expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in Ly-6C(int) macrophages. Together, our data show that during clinical EAE, microglia are only weakly activated whereas infiltrated macrophages are highly immune reactive.

  9. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  10. Nerve growth factor is an autocrine factor essential for the survival of macrophages infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Garaci, E; Caroleo, M C; Aloe, L; Aquaro, S; Piacentini, M; Costa, N; Amendola, A; Micera, A; Caliò, R; Perno, C F; Levi-Montalcini, R

    1999-11-23

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophin with the ability to exert specific effects on cells of the immune system. Human monocytes/macrophages (M/M) infected in vitro with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) are able to produce substantial levels of NGF that are associated with enhanced expression of the high-affinity NGF receptor (p140 trkA) on the M/M surface. Treatment of HIV-infected human M/M with anti-NGF Ab blocking the biological activity of NGF leads to a marked decrease of the expression of p140 trkA high-affinity receptor, a concomitant increased expression of p75(NTR) low-affinity receptor for NGF, and the occurrence of apoptotic death of M/M. Taken together, these findings suggest a role for NGF as an autocrine survival factor that rescues human M/M from the cytopathic effect caused by HIV infection.

  11. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhou, Xia; Fan, Lucy X.; Yao, Ying; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I.; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Wallace, Darren P.; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Yu, Alan; Grantham, Jared J.; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by renal cyst formation, inflammation, and fibrosis. Macrophages infiltrate cystic kidneys, but the role of these and other inflammatory factors in disease progression are poorly understood. Here, we identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as an important regulator of cyst growth in ADPKD. MIF was upregulated in cyst-lining epithelial cells in polycystin-1–deficient murine kidneys and accumulated in cyst fluid of human ADPKD kidneys. MIF promoted cystic epithelial cell proliferation by activating ERK, mTOR, and Rb/E2F pathways and by increasing glucose uptake and ATP production, which inhibited AMP-activated protein kinase signaling. MIF also regulated cystic renal epithelial cell apoptosis through p53-dependent signaling. In polycystin-1–deficient mice, MIF was required for recruitment and retention of renal macrophages, which promoted cyst expansion, and Mif deletion or pharmacologic inhibition delayed cyst growth in multiple murine ADPKD models. MIF-dependent macrophage recruitment was associated with upregulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. TNF-α induced MIF expression, and MIF subsequently exacerbated TNF-α expression in renal epithelial cells, suggesting a positive feedback loop between TNF-α and MIF during cyst development. Our study indicates MIF is a central and upstream regulator of ADPKD pathogenesis and provides a rationale for further exploration of MIF as a therapeutic target for ADPKD. PMID:25961459

  13. Antihistoplasma effect of activated mouse splenic macrophages involves production of reactive nitrogen intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T E; Wu-Hsieh, B A; Howard, D H

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism by which recombinant murine gamma interferon (rMuIFN-gamma) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activate mouse resident splenic macrophages to inhibit the intracellular growth of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum was examined. Growth inhibition depended on L-arginine metabolism. The growth inhibitory state normally induced by rMuIFN-gamma and LPS in resident splenic macrophages did not occur when the macrophages were cultured in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of L-arginine metabolism. Resident splenic macrophages treated with rMuIFN-gamma and LPS produced nitrite (NO2-), an end product of L-arginine metabolism. When macrophages were cultured in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine together with rMuIFN-gamma and LPS, only baseline levels of NO2- were detected. Spleen cells from H. capsulatum-infected mice produced high levels of NO2- in culture. The production of NO2- correlated with in vitro inhibition of the intracellular growth of H. capsulatum. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody did not block NO2- production by the immigrant splenic macrophages and did not abolish the antihistoplasma activity. PMID:8168960

  14. Cell plasticity in wound healing: paracrine factors of M1/ M2 polarized macrophages influence the phenotypical state of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ploeger, Diana Ta; Hosper, Nynke A; Schipper, Martin; Koerts, Jasper A; de Rond, Saskia; Bank, Ruud A

    2013-04-19

    Macrophages and fibroblasts are two major players in tissue repair and fibrosis. Despite the relevance of macrophages and fibroblasts in tissue homeostasis, remarkably little is known whether macrophages are able to influence the properties of fibroblasts. Here we investigated the role of paracrine factors secreted by classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) human macrophages on human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). HDFs stimulated with paracrine factors from M1 macrophages showed a 10 to > 100-fold increase in the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL6, CCL2 and CCL7 and the matrix metalloproteinases MMP1 and MMP3. This indicates that factors produced by M1 macrophages induce a fibroblast phenotype with pro-inflammatory and extracellular matrix (ECM) degrading properties. HDFs stimulated with paracrine factors secreted by M2 macrophages displayed an increased proliferation rate. Interestingly, the M1-activated pro-inflammatory fibroblasts downregulated, after exposure to paracrine factors produced by M2 macrophages or non-conditioned media, the inflammatory markers as well as MMPs and upregulated their collagen production. Paracrine factors of M1 or M2 polarized macrophages induced different phenotypes of HDFs and the HDF phenotypes can in turn be reversed, pointing to a high dynamic plasticity of fibroblasts in the different phases of tissue repair.

  15. Cell plasticity in wound healing: paracrine factors of M1/ M2 polarized macrophages influence the phenotypical state of dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrophages and fibroblasts are two major players in tissue repair and fibrosis. Despite the relevance of macrophages and fibroblasts in tissue homeostasis, remarkably little is known whether macrophages are able to influence the properties of fibroblasts. Here we investigated the role of paracrine factors secreted by classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) human macrophages on human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Results HDFs stimulated with paracrine factors from M1 macrophages showed a 10 to > 100-fold increase in the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL6, CCL2 and CCL7 and the matrix metalloproteinases MMP1 and MMP3. This indicates that factors produced by M1 macrophages induce a fibroblast phenotype with pro-inflammatory and extracellular matrix (ECM) degrading properties. HDFs stimulated with paracrine factors secreted by M2 macrophages displayed an increased proliferation rate. Interestingly, the M1-activated pro-inflammatory fibroblasts downregulated, after exposure to paracrine factors produced by M2 macrophages or non-conditioned media, the inflammatory markers as well as MMPs and upregulated their collagen production. Conclusions Paracrine factors of M1 or M2 polarized macrophages induced different phenotypes of HDFs and the HDF phenotypes can in turn be reversed, pointing to a high dynamic plasticity of fibroblasts in the different phases of tissue repair. PMID:23601247

  16. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pre-treatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pre-treatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pre-treatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from a M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia, and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Nanotoxicology screening strategies

  17. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  18. Activation of Cannabinoid Type Two Receptors (CB2) Diminish Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages and Brain Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Persidsky, Yuri; Fan, Shongshan; Dykstra, Holly; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Rom, Slava; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuroinflammatory disorders (such as HIV associated neurodegeneration) require treatment that decreases production of inflammatory factors by activated microglia and macrophages and protection of blood brain barrier (BBB) injury secondary to activation of brain endothelium. Cannabioid type 2 receptor (CB2) is highly expressed on macrophages and brain microvasular enndothelial cells (BMVEC) and is upregulated in inflammation and HIV infection. It has been shown that CB2 activation dampened inflammatory responses in macrophages and BMVEC. In this study, we assessed by PCR array the expression of a wide range of genes increased in macrophages and BMVEC in inflammation. TNFα treatment upregulated 33 genes in primary human BMVEC, and two highly selective CB2 agonists diminished expression of 31 and 32 genes. These results were confirmed by functional assays (BBB protection after inflammatory insult and decreased migration of monocytes across BMVEC monolayers after CB2 stimulation). Similarly, CB2 stimulation in primary human macrophages led to the suppression of 35 genes out of the 50 genes upregulated by LPS. Such changes in gene expression paralleled diminished secretion of proinflammatory factors. These results indicate the potential utility of CB2 agonists for the treatment of neuroinflammation. PMID:25666933

  19. Macrophage activation syndrome triggered by coeliac disease: a unique case report.

    PubMed

    Palman, J; May, J; Pilkington, C

    2016-12-09

    Macrophage activation syndrome is described as a "clinical syndrome of hyperinflammation resulting in an uncontrolled and ineffective immune response" in the context of an autoinflammatory or rheumatic disease. Current associations of macrophage activation syndrome with autoimmune disease most notably include a host of rheumatological conditions and inflammatory bowel disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that macrophage activation syndrome is precipitated by autoimmune disease more commonly than previously thought. Diagnosing the precipitating factor is essential for effective treatment and prognosis. We report a case of a six year old girl with coeliac disease diagnosed after two episodes of secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Her condition only responded to treatment once the patient was placed on a gluten free diet. Further immunological testing confirmed anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies, however histological biopsy was deemed inappropriate due to the severity of her condition. She has remained stable with no further episodes of macrophage activation syndrome since commencing a gluten free diet. This case report is the first literature that links macrophage activation syndrome to coeliac disease and highlights the challenge of diagnosing coeliac disease with unusual features such as associated prolonged fever. Clinicians should have a low threshold for screening children with other autoimmune diseases for coeliac disease.

  20. Fine-tuning of macrophage activation using synthetic rocaglate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Devine, William G.; Kobzik, Lester; Beeler, Aaron B.; Porco, John A.; Kramnik, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria represent a significant global threat. Given the dearth of new antibiotics, host-directed therapies (HDTs) are especially desirable. As IFN-gamma (IFNγ) plays a central role in host resistance to intracellular bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we searched for small molecules to augment the IFNγ response in macrophages. Using an interferon-inducible nuclear protein Ipr1 as a biomarker of macrophage activation, we performed a high-throughput screen and identified molecules that synergized with low concentration of IFNγ. Several active compounds belonged to the flavagline (rocaglate) family. In primary macrophages a subset of rocaglates 1) synergized with low concentrations of IFNγ in stimulating expression of a subset of IFN-inducible genes, including a key regulator of the IFNγ network, Irf1; 2) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and type I IFN and 3) induced autophagy. These compounds may represent a basis for macrophage-directed therapies that fine-tune macrophage effector functions to combat intracellular pathogens and reduce inflammatory tissue damage. These therapies would be especially relevant to fighting drug-resistant pathogens, where improving host immunity may prove to be the ultimate resource. PMID:27086720

  1. Synergistic effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor by alveolar macrophages of rats.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Fujino, A; Higashi, T; Yokosaki, Y

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by alveolar macrophages. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke in vivo, and production of TNF by alveolar macrophages was measured in the presence of mineral fibres in vitro. For smoke exposure, rats were divided into two groups. Five were exposed to a daily concentration of 10 mg/m3 of cigarette smoke for an eight hour period, and five rats (controls) were not exposed to smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after exposure to smoke and the recovered alveolar macrophages were incubated with either chrysotile or ceramic fibres on a microplate for 24 hours. Activity of TNF in the supernatant was determined by the L-929 fibroblast cell bioassay. When alveolar macrophages were not stimulated by mineral fibres, production of TNF by rats exposed to smoke and unexposed rats was essentially the same. When alveolar macrophages were stimulated in vitro by chrysotile or ceramic fibres, production of TNF by alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to smoke was higher than that by alveolar macrophages from unexposed rats. The findings suggest that cigarette smoke and mineral fibres have a synergistic effect on TNF production by alveolar macrophages.

  2. Synergistic effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor by alveolar macrophages of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Y; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Fujino, A; Higashi, T; Yokosaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by alveolar macrophages. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke in vivo, and production of TNF by alveolar macrophages was measured in the presence of mineral fibres in vitro. For smoke exposure, rats were divided into two groups. Five were exposed to a daily concentration of 10 mg/m3 of cigarette smoke for an eight hour period, and five rats (controls) were not exposed to smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after exposure to smoke and the recovered alveolar macrophages were incubated with either chrysotile or ceramic fibres on a microplate for 24 hours. Activity of TNF in the supernatant was determined by the L-929 fibroblast cell bioassay. When alveolar macrophages were not stimulated by mineral fibres, production of TNF by rats exposed to smoke and unexposed rats was essentially the same. When alveolar macrophages were stimulated in vitro by chrysotile or ceramic fibres, production of TNF by alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to smoke was higher than that by alveolar macrophages from unexposed rats. The findings suggest that cigarette smoke and mineral fibres have a synergistic effect on TNF production by alveolar macrophages. Images PMID:8217857

  3. Adsorbed fibrinogen enhances production of bone- and angiogenic-related factors by monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Joana; Oliveira, Marta I; Colton, Erica; McNally, Amy K; Oliveira, Carla; Anderson, James M; Barbosa, Mário A

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells with great importance in guiding multiple stages of inflammation and tissue repair. By producing a large number of biologically active molecules, they can affect the behavior of other cells and events, such as the foreign body response and angiogenesis. Since protein adsorption to biomaterials is crucial for the inflammatory process, we addressed the ability of the pro-inflammatory molecule fibrinogen (Fg) to modulate macrophage behavior toward tissue repair/regeneration. For this purpose, we used chitosan (Ch) as a substrate for Fg adsorption. Freshly isolated human monocytes were seeded on Ch substrates alone or previously adsorbed with Fg, and allowed to differentiate into macrophages for 10 days. Cell adhesion and morphology, formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGC), and secretion of a total of 80 cytokines and growth factors were evaluated. Both substrates showed similar numbers of adherent macrophages along differentiation as compared with RGD-coated surfaces, which were used as positive controls. Fg did not potentiate FBGC formation. In addition, actin cytoskeleton staining revealed the presence of punctuate F-actin with more elongated and interconnecting cells on Ch substrates. Antibody array screening and quantification of inflammation- and wound-healing-related factors indicated an overall reduction in Ch-based substrates versus RGD-coated surfaces. At late times, most inflammatory agents were down-regulated in the presence of Fg, in contrast to growth factor production, which was stimulated by Fg. Importantly, on Ch+Fg substrates, fully differentiated macrophages produced significant amounts of macrophage inflammatory protein-1delta (MIP-1δ), platelet-derived growth factor-BB, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-5, and BMP-7 compared with Ch alone. In addition, other important factors involved in bone homeostasis and wound healing, such as growth hormone, transforming growth factor-β3, and insulin-like growth factor

  4. Adsorbed Fibrinogen Enhances Production of Bone- and Angiogenic-Related Factors by Monocytes/Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Joana; Oliveira, Marta I.; Colton, Erica; McNally, Amy K.; Oliveira, Carla; Anderson, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells with great importance in guiding multiple stages of inflammation and tissue repair. By producing a large number of biologically active molecules, they can affect the behavior of other cells and events, such as the foreign body response and angiogenesis. Since protein adsorption to biomaterials is crucial for the inflammatory process, we addressed the ability of the pro-inflammatory molecule fibrinogen (Fg) to modulate macrophage behavior toward tissue repair/regeneration. For this purpose, we used chitosan (Ch) as a substrate for Fg adsorption. Freshly isolated human monocytes were seeded on Ch substrates alone or previously adsorbed with Fg, and allowed to differentiate into macrophages for 10 days. Cell adhesion and morphology, formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGC), and secretion of a total of 80 cytokines and growth factors were evaluated. Both substrates showed similar numbers of adherent macrophages along differentiation as compared with RGD-coated surfaces, which were used as positive controls. Fg did not potentiate FBGC formation. In addition, actin cytoskeleton staining revealed the presence of punctuate F-actin with more elongated and interconnecting cells on Ch substrates. Antibody array screening and quantification of inflammation- and wound-healing-related factors indicated an overall reduction in Ch-based substrates versus RGD-coated surfaces. At late times, most inflammatory agents were down-regulated in the presence of Fg, in contrast to growth factor production, which was stimulated by Fg. Importantly, on Ch+Fg substrates, fully differentiated macrophages produced significant amounts of macrophage inflammatory protein-1delta (MIP-1δ), platelet-derived growth factor-BB, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-5, and BMP-7 compared with Ch alone. In addition, other important factors involved in bone homeostasis and wound healing, such as growth hormone, transforming growth factor-β3, and insulin-like growth factor

  5. Guinea Pig Neutrophils Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Produce Cytokines Which Activate Alveolar Macrophages in Noncontact Cultures▿

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; McMurray, David N.

    2007-01-01

    The early influx of neutrophils to the site of infection may be an important step in host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of M. tuberculosis infection on the ability of guinea pig neutrophils to produce interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and to activate alveolar macrophages. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were isolated from naïve guinea pigs, cultured together or alone, and infected with virulent M. tuberculosis for 3, 12, and 24 h. IL-8 protein production in cocultures, as measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was found to be additive at 24 h and significantly greater in M. tuberculosis-infected cocultures than in uninfected cocultures and in cultures of the infected neutrophils or macrophages alone. The IL-8 mRNA levels, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, were elevated at 24 h in infected cocultures and infected cells cultured alone. In order to elucidate the contributions of neutrophils and their soluble mediators to the activation of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were cultured in a contact-independent manner by using a Transwell insert system. Neutrophils were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis in the upper wells, and alveolar macrophages were cultured in the lower wells. The release of hydrogen peroxide from alveolar macrophages exposed to soluble products from infected neutrophils was significantly increased compared to that from unexposed alveolar macrophages. Significant up-regulation of IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA levels in alveolar macrophages was observed at 24 and 30 h, respectively, compared to those in cells not exposed to soluble neutrophil products. Treatment with anti-guinea pig TNF-α polyclonal antibody completely abolished the response of alveolar macrophages to neutrophil products. This finding suggests that TNF-α produced by infected neutrophils may be involved in the activation of

  6. Production of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) during infection: separate determinations of macrophage-, granulocyte-, granulocyte-macrophage-, and multi-CSFs.

    PubMed Central

    Cheers, C; Haigh, A M; Kelso, A; Metcalf, D; Stanley, E R; Young, A M

    1988-01-01

    After infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes, elevated levels of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) in the serum were quantitated by six different assays: ability to stimulate colony formation, the proliferation of 2 suspension of bone marrow cells (both measuring total colony-stimulating activity), a radioimmunoassay for macrophage-CSF (CSF-1), the WEHI-3B differentiation assay for granulocyte-CSF, and proliferation of 32D-c1-3 and FDC-P1 cell lines (specific for multi-CSF and either multi- or granulocyte-macrophage-CSFs, respectively). The great bulk of serum colony-stimulating activity represented macrophage- and granulocyte-CSFs, with small but measurable amounts of granulocyte-macrophage-CSF. The degree of elevation of serum CSF depended on the infecting dose used and the numbers of bacteria growing in the spleens and livers of the two mouse strains compared, i.e., L. monocytogenes-resistant C57BL/10 and susceptible BALB/cJ. The increase in serum CSFs occurred before the peak in bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors and before the reduction in bacterial numbers which follows the onset of specific cell-mediated immunity. PMID:3257205

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  8. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients.

  9. High glucose activates Raw264.7 macrophages through RhoA kinase-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng-I; Chen, Po-Han; Lin, Yu-Chun; Kao, Ying-Hsien

    2015-02-01

    Hyperglycemia has been shown to accelerate atherogenesis, an inflammation process resulting from macrophage activation. Although high glucose (HG) was previously demonstrated to accentuate ROCK activity in macrophages and enhance their activation in vitro, the role of ROCK signaling in HG-mediated macrophage activation remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate potential signal transduction pathways of HG-mediated ROCK upregulation and macrophage activation, including c-Jun or NF-κB pathways. A macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, was used to investigate the atherogenic effects of HG on RhoA/ROCK activity and macrophage functions. Exposure to HG significantly induced RhoA membrane translocation, RhoA-kinase activity, and phosphorylation of myosin-binding subunit, a RhoA-kinase substrate. Macrophage behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and TNF-α de novo synthesis, were also increased by HG exposure. However, pharmacological ROCK inhibition by hydroxyfasudil attenuated the HG-enhanced adhesion and TNF-α production. Nuclear translocation of c-Jun and transcription factor NF-κB was simultaneously noted after HG stimulation. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition by hydroxyfasudil and siRNA-mediated ROCK1 or ROCK2 gene silencing confirmed the ROCK-dependent JNK and ERK phosphorylation, but not NF-κB activation in macrophages. In addition, both interventions effectively ameliorated the HG-mediated macrophage activation under the conditions mimicking diabetes. These findings suggest that hyperglycemia activates macrophages mainly through ROCK/JNK and ROCK/ERK pathways, which results in a more pro-inflammatory phenotype and eventually contributes to atherogenesis. In conclusion, ROCK inhibition might become a novel therapeutic strategy in atherosclerosis treatment and prevention in diabetic patients.

  10. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor–node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages. PMID:27141406

  11. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  12. Characterisation of a novel Fc conjugate of macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Gow, Deborah J; Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Moffat, Lindsey; Sehgal, Anuj; Stutchfield, Ben M; Raza, Sobia; Beard, Philippa M; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bainbridge, Graeme; Boner, Pamela L; Fici, Greg; Garcia-Tapia, David; Martin, Roger A; Oliphant, Theodore; Shelly, John A; Tiwari, Raksha; Wilson, Thomas L; Smith, Lee B; Mabbott, Neil A; Hume, David A

    2014-09-01

    We have produced an Fc conjugate of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) 1 with an improved circulating half-life. CSF1-Fc retained its macrophage growth-promoting activity, and did not induce proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Treatment with CSF1-Fc did not produce adverse effects in mice or pigs. The impact of CSF1-Fc was examined using the Csf1r-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene in MacGreen mice. Administration of CSF1-Fc to mice drove extensive infiltration of all tissues by Csf1r-EGFP positive macrophages. The main consequence was hepatosplenomegaly, associated with proliferation of hepatocytes. Expression profiles of the liver indicated that infiltrating macrophages produced candidate mediators of hepatocyte proliferation including urokinase, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin 6. CSF1-Fc also promoted osteoclastogenesis and produced pleiotropic effects on other organ systems, notably the testis, where CSF1-dependent macrophages have been implicated in homeostasis. However, it did not affect other putative CSF1 targets, notably intestine, where Paneth cell numbers and villus architecture were unchanged. CSF1 has therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine in multiple organs. We suggest that the CSF1-Fc conjugate retains this potential, and may permit daily delivery by injection rather than continuous infusion required for the core molecule.

  13. Characterisation of a Novel Fc Conjugate of Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Deborah J; Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Moffat, Lindsey; Sehgal, Anuj; Stutchfield, Ben M; Raza, Sobia; Beard, Philippa M; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bainbridge, Graeme; Boner, Pamela L; Fici, Greg; Garcia-Tapia, David; Martin, Roger A; Oliphant, Theodore; Shelly, John A; Tiwari, Raksha; Wilson, Thomas L; Smith, Lee B; Mabbott, Neil A; Hume, David A

    2014-01-01

    We have produced an Fc conjugate of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) 1 with an improved circulating half-life. CSF1-Fc retained its macrophage growth-promoting activity, and did not induce proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Treatment with CSF1-Fc did not produce adverse effects in mice or pigs. The impact of CSF1-Fc was examined using the Csf1r-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene in MacGreen mice. Administration of CSF1-Fc to mice drove extensive infiltration of all tissues by Csf1r-EGFP positive macrophages. The main consequence was hepatosplenomegaly, associated with proliferation of hepatocytes. Expression profiles of the liver indicated that infiltrating macrophages produced candidate mediators of hepatocyte proliferation including urokinase, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin 6. CSF1-Fc also promoted osteoclastogenesis and produced pleiotropic effects on other organ systems, notably the testis, where CSF1-dependent macrophages have been implicated in homeostasis. However, it did not affect other putative CSF1 targets, notably intestine, where Paneth cell numbers and villus architecture were unchanged. CSF1 has therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine in multiple organs. We suggest that the CSF1-Fc conjugate retains this potential, and may permit daily delivery by injection rather than continuous infusion required for the core molecule. PMID:24962162

  14. Activation of human macrophages by allogeneic islets preparations: inhibition by AOP-RANTES and heparinoids.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Séverine; Oberholzer, José; Bohbot, Alain; Esposito, Guy; Mandes, Karim; Lamartine, Roger; Toso, Christian; Bucher, Pascal; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence

    2004-04-01

    During transplantation, pancreatic islets release chemokines which promote macrophage attraction, hampering engraftment of islets. The aim of this study was to modulate chemotaxis and the immune response of human macrophages induced by islets. Human monocyte-derived macrophages of healthy subjects were exposed to supernatants of human islets. Chemotaxis, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) release were evaluated. To modulate migration, human macrophages were incubated in the presence of aminooxypentane-regulated on activation, normal, T-cell expressed, and secreted (AOP-RANTES), a potent antagonist of CCR5. Chemotactic activity of islets supernatant was modulated by the addition of heparin or heparinoids [pentosan and calix[8S]arene (C8S)]. AOP-RANTES significantly reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, macrophage chemotaxis and cytokine release induced by islets supernatant. The chemotactic index was reduced from 3.05 +/- 0.27 to 0.71 +/- 12, TNF-alpha from 1205 +/- 52 to 202 +/- 12 pg/ml, and IL-1beta from 234 +/- 12 to 10 +/- 6 pg/ml. The trapping of chemokines by heparinoids reduced the chemotactic activity of islets supernatant from 3.05 +/- 0.27 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 with heparin or pentosan and to 1.72 +/- 0.22 with C8S, and also decreased the TNF-alpha release by human macrophages from 1205 +/- 35 to 1000 +/- 26 (C8S), 250 +/- 21 (heparin) and 320 +/- 19 (pentosan) pg/ml, and IL-1beta from 234 +/- 13 to 151 +/- 5 (C8S), 50 +/- 3 (heparin) and 57 +/- 4 (pentosan) pg/ml. In conclusion, AOP-RANTES and heparinoids inhibit human macrophage activation and migration induced by islets supernatant.

  15. Activation of human macrophages by allogeneic islets preparations: inhibition by AOP-RANTES and heparinoids

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Séverine; Oberholzer, José; Bohbot, Alain; Esposito, Guy; Mandes, Karim; Lamartine, Roger; Toso, Christian; Bucher, Pascal; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    During transplantation, pancreatic islets release chemokines which promote macrophage attraction, hampering engraftment of islets. The aim of this study was to modulate chemotaxis and the immune response of human macrophages induced by islets. Human monocyte-derived macrophages of healthy subjects were exposed to supernatants of human islets. Chemotaxis, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release were evaluated. To modulate migration, human macrophages were incubated in the presence of aminooxypentane-regulated on activation, normal, T-cell expressed, and secreted (AOP-RANTES), a potent antagonist of CCR5. Chemotactic activity of islets supernatant was modulated by the addition of heparin or heparinoids [pentosan and calix[8S]arene (C8S)]. AOP-RANTES significantly reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, macrophage chemotaxis and cytokine release induced by islets supernatant. The chemotactic index was reduced from 3·05 ± 0·27 to 0·71 ± 12, TNF-α from 1205 ± 52 to 202 ± 12 pg/ml, and IL-1β from 234 ± 12 to 10 ± 6 pg/ml. The trapping of chemokines by heparinoids reduced the chemotactic activity of islets supernatant from 3·05 ± 0·27 to 1·2 ± 0·1 with heparin or pentosan and to 1·72 ± 0·22 with C8S, and also decreased the TNF-α release by human macrophages from 1205 ± 35 to 1000 ± 26 (C8S), 250 ± 21 (heparin) and 320 ± 19 (pentosan) pg/ml, and IL-1β from 234 ± 13 to 151 ± 5 (C8S), 50 ± 3 (heparin) and 57 ± 4 (pentosan) pg/ml. In conclusion, AOP-RANTES and heparinoids inhibit human macrophage activation and migration induced by islets supernatant. PMID:15056378

  16. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  17. IRF5 governs liver macrophage activation that promotes hepatic fibrosis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Alzaid, Fawaz; Lagadec, Floriane; Albuquerque, Miguel; Ballaire, Raphaëlle; Orliaguet, Lucie; Hainault, Isabelle; Blugeon, Corinne; Lemoine, Sophie; Lehuen, Agnès; Saliba, David G.; Udalova, Irina A.; Paradis, Valérie; Foufelle, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis arises from inflammation in the liver initiated by resident macrophage activation and massive leukocyte accumulation. Hepatic macrophages hold a central position in maintaining homeostasis in the liver and in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic liver injury linked to fibrogenesis. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has recently emerged as an important proinflammatory transcription factor involved in macrophage activation under acute and chronic inflammation. Here, we revealed that IRF5 is significantly induced in liver macrophages from human subjects developing liver fibrosis from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or hepatitis C virus infection. Furthermore, IRF5 expression positively correlated with clinical markers of liver damage, such as plasma transaminase and bilirubin levels. Interestingly, mice lacking IRF5 in myeloid cells (MKO) were protected from hepatic fibrosis induced by metabolic or toxic stresses. Transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages lacking IRF5 was characterized by immunosuppressive and antiapoptotic properties. Consequently, IRF5 MKO mice respond to hepatocellular stress by promoting hepatocyte survival, leading to complete protection from hepatic fibrogenesis. Our findings reveal a regulatory network, governed by IRF5, that mediates hepatocyte death and liver fibrosis in mice and humans. Therefore, modulating IRF5 function may be an attractive approach to experimental therapeutics in fibroinflammatory liver disease. PMID:27942586

  18. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration.Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the

  19. Serum from aged F344 rats conditions the activation of young macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Pérez, Viviana; Escobar, Alejandro; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Sabaj, Valeria; Torres, Claudio; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2006-03-01

    There is considerable controversy about the molecular mechanisms responsible for the variations in innate immunity associated with age. While in vivo, aged animals and humans react to an inflammatory signal with an excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, studies in vitro generally show that this response is attenuated in macrophages from old individuals. In an effort to examine possible extrinsic factors that might affect the response of macrophages to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we have challenged peritoneal macrophages obtained from young rats with sera obtained from rats of different ages. Our results indicate that the serum from aged rats significantly impairs the capacity of young macrophages to induce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production, while at the same time it increases the basal levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6). The effect of serum from aged donors on TNF-alpha secretion requires pre-incubation and is sensitive to heat inactivation. In contrast, the stimulating effect on IL-6 is resistant to heat, and thus should not be due to a protein factor. Therefore, our results indicate that the age-related changes in macrophage activity are not only the consequence of intrinsic changes, but there also appears to be a modulatory effect imparted by the external milieu.

  20. Leishmania eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF) inhibits parasite growth in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Koutsoni, Olga; Barhoumi, Mourad; Guizani, Ikram; Dotsika, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    The leishmaniases constitute neglected global public health problems that require adequate control measures, prophylactic clinical vaccines and effective and non-toxic drug treatments. In this study, we explored the potential of Leishmania infantum eukaryotic initiation factor (LieIF), an exosomal protein, as a novel anti-infective therapeutic molecule. More specifically, we assessed the efficacy of recombinant LieIF, in combination with recombinant IFN-γ, in eliminating intracellular L. donovani parasites in an in vitro macrophage model. J774A.1 macrophages were initially treated with LieIF/IFN-γ prior to in vitro infection with L. donovani stationary phase promastigotes (pre-infection treatment), and resistance to infection was observed 72 h after infection. J774A.1 macrophages were also treated with LieIF/IFN-γ after L. donovani infection (post-infection treatment), and resistance to infection was also observed at both time points tested (19 h and 72 h) after infection. To elucidate the LieIF/IFN-γ-induced mechanism(s) that mediate the reduction of intracellular parasite growth, we examined the generation of potent microbicidal molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), within infected macrophages. Furthermore, macrophages pre-treated with LieIF/IFN-γ showed a clear up-regulation in macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression. However, significant different protein levels were not detected. In addition, macrophages pre-treated with LieIF/IFN-γ combined with anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody produced significantly lower amounts of ROS. These data suggest that during the pre-treatment state, LieIF induces intramacrophage parasite growth inhibition through the production of TNF-α, which induces microbicidal activity by stimulating NO and ROS production. The mechanisms of NO and ROS production when macrophages are treated with LieIF after infection are probably different

  1. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  2. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function an