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Sample records for macrophage cell therapy

  1. Pulmonary Macrophage Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Arumugam, Paritha; Sakagami, Takuro; Lachmann, Nico; Chalk, Claudia; Sallese, Anthony; Abe, Shuichi; Trapnell, Cole; Carey, Brenna; Moritz, Thomas; Malik, Punam; Lutzko, Carolyn; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection-risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independent of hematologic progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using GM-CSF receptor-β deficient (Csf2rb−/−) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA/CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe, well-tolerated, and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations, normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Results identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP. PMID:25274301

  2. The influence of macrophages on mesenchymal stromal cell therapy: passive or aggressive agents?

    PubMed

    Carty, F; Mahon, B P; English, K

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as promising cell therapies for multiple conditions based on demonstrations of their potent immunomodulatory and regenerative capacities in models of inflammatory disease. Understanding the effects of MSC on T cells has dominated the majority of work carried out in this field to date; recently, however, a number of studies have shown that the therapeutic effect of MSC requires the presence of macrophages. It is timely to review the mechanisms and manner by which MSC modulate macrophage populations in order to design more effective MSC therapies and clinical studies. A complex cross-talk exists through which MSC and macrophages communicate, a communication that is not controlled exclusively by MSC. Here, we examine the evidence that suggests that MSC not only respond to inflammatory macrophages and adjust their secretome accordingly, but also that macrophages respond to encounters with MSC, creating a feedback loop which contributes to the immune regulation observed following MSC therapy. Future studies examining the effects of MSC on macrophages should consider the antagonistic role that macrophages play in this exchange.

  3. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages.

  4. Cytokines, macrophage lipid metabolism and foam cells: implications for cardiovascular disease therapy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James E; Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Ramji, Dipak P

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer globally and the principal contributing factor to the pathology is atherosclerosis; a chronic, inflammatory disorder characterized by lipid and cholesterol accumulation and the development of fibrotic plaques within the walls of large and medium arteries. Macrophages are fundamental to the immune response directed to the site of inflammation and their normal, protective function is harnessed, detrimentally, in atherosclerosis. Macrophages contribute to plaque development by internalizing native and modified lipoproteins to convert them into cholesterol-rich foam cells. Foam cells not only help to bridge the innate and adaptive immune response to atherosclerosis but also accumulate to create fatty streaks, which help shape the architecture of advanced plaques. Foam cell formation involves the disruption of normal macrophage cholesterol metabolism, which is governed by a homeostatic mechanism that controls the uptake, intracellular metabolism, and efflux of cholesterol. It has emerged over the last 20 years that an array of cytokines, including interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10, are able to manipulate these processes. Foam cell targeting, anti-inflammatory therapies, such as agonists of nuclear receptors and statins, are known to regulate the actions of pro- and anti-atherogenic cytokines indirectly of their primary pharmacological function. A clear understanding of macrophage foam cell biology will hopefully enable novel foam cell targeting therapies to be developed for use in the clinical intervention of atherosclerosis.

  5. The impact of macrophage-cancer cell interaction on the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are one of the principal host cell populations in solid tumors. They are capable, due to their plasticity, of acquiring phenotypes that either combat (M1 type) or promote (M2 type) neoplastic growth. These cells, known as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), play complex but pivotal roles in the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant lesions. Among the various parenchymal and stromal cell populations found in tumors, TAMs have been shown to have the greatest capacity for the uptake of systemically administered photosensitizers. Both the tumor-localizing property of photosensitizers and their tumor-localized fluorescence could be partly attributed to the activity of TAMs. Since resident TAMs with accumulated high photosensitizer content will sustain high degrees of PDT damage, this population (predominantly M2 in most tumors) is selectively destroyed, and during the ensuing inflammatory reaction is replaced with newly invading macrophages of M1 phenotype. These macrophages are sentinels responding to DAMP signals from PDT-treated tumor cells and in turn are mobilized to generate a variety of inflammatory/immune mediators and opsonins. They have a critical role in contributing to the therapeutic effect of PDT by mediating disposal of killed cancer cells and by processing/presenting tumor antigens to T lymphocytes. However, TAMs accumulating in the later post-PDT phase can acquire the M2 (healing) phenotype, and could have a role in tumor recurrence by releasing factors that promote angiogenesis and the survival/proliferation of remaining cancer cells. Various therapeutic strategies modulating TAM activity in the PDT response have potential for clinical use for improving PDT-mediated tumor control.

  6. A novel photodynamic therapy targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Noriyuki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Moriwaki, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Haruo; Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in cancer stroma play important roles for cancer cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastases. We synthesized a novel photosensitizer, mannose-conjugated chlorin (M-chlorin), designed to bind mannose receptors highly expressed on TAMs. We evaluated the newly available photodynamic therapy (PDT) with M-chlorin against gastric and colon cancer. We evaluated PDT with M-chlorin for in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in cancer cells compared with chlorin alone and glucose-conjugated chlorin (G-chlorin). The subcellular localization of M-chlorin was observed by confocal microscopy, and the M-chlorin PDT effects against TAMs including THP-1-induced M2-polarized macrophages were evaluated. Anticancer effects were also investigated in an allograft model where cytotoxic effects against TAMs in the cancer cell stroma were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. M-chlorin PDT strongly induced cell death in cancer cells to almost the same extent as G-chlorin PDT by inducing apoptosis. M-chlorin was incorporated into cancer cells where it localized mainly in lysosomes and endoplasmic reticula. M-chlorin PDT revealed strong cytotoxicity for M2 macrophages induced from THP-1 cell lines, and it induced stronger cytotoxicity than G-chlorin PDT in the allograft model through killing both cancer cells and TAMs in the cancer stroma. The M-chlorin PDT produced strong cytotoxicity against cancer tissue by inducing apoptosis of both cancer cells and TAMs in the cancer stroma. This novel PDT thus stands as a new candidate for very effective, next-generation PDT.

  7. Th2-polarized CD4+ T cells and macrophages limit efficacy of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Ruffell, Brian; DeNardo, David G.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Park, Catherine C.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CTX) following surgery are mainstays of treatment for breast cancer (BC). While multiple studies have recently revealed the significance of immune cells as mediators of CTX response in BC, less is known regarding roles for leukocytes as mediating outcomes following RT. To address this, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic murine model of mammary carcinogenesis to investigate if response to RT could be improved when select immune cells or immune-based pathways in the mammary microenvironment were inhibited. Treatment of mammary tumor-bearing mice with either a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) to colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) or a small molecule inhibitor of the CSF-1 receptor kinase (i.e., PLX3397), resulting in efficient macrophage depletion, significantly delayed tumor regrowth following RT. Delayed tumor growth in this setting was associated with increased presence of CD8+ T cells, and reduced presence of CD4+ T cells, the main source of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)4 in mammary tumors. Selective depletion of CD4+ T cells or neutralization of IL4 in combination with RT, phenocopied results following macrophage depletion, whereas depletion of CD8+ T cells abrogated improved response to RT following these therapies. Analogously, therapeutic neutralization of IL4 or IL13, or IL4 receptor alpha deficiency, in combination with the CTX paclitaxel resulted in slowed primary mammary tumor growth by CD8+ T cell-dependent mechanisms. These findings indicate that clinical responses to cytotoxic therapy in general can be improved by neutralizing dominant Th2-based programs driving protumorigenic and immune suppressive pathways in mammary (breast) tumors to improve outcomes. PMID:25716473

  8. Macrophages as cell-based delivery systems for nanoshells in photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Steen J; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Makkouk, Amani R; Krasieva, Tatiana; Hirschberg, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Site-specific delivery of nanoparticles poses a significant challenge, especially in the brain where the blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of most therapeutic compounds including nanoparticle-based anti-cancer agents. In this context, the use of macrophages as vectors for the delivery of gold-silica nanoshells to infiltrating gliomas will be reviewed in this article. Gold-silica nanoshells are readily phagocytosed by macrophages without any apparent toxic effects, and the results of in vitro studies have demonstrated the migratory potential of nanoshell-loaded macrophages in human glioma spheroids. Of particular interest is the observation that, after near-infrared exposure of spheroids containing nanoshell-loaded macrophages, sufficient heat was generated to suppress spheroid growth. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of macrophages as nanoshell delivery vectors for photothermal therapy of gliomas, and they certainly provide the basis for future animal studies.

  9. Macrophages as Cell-Based Delivery Systems for Nanoshells in Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Steen J.; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Makkouk, Amani R.; Krasieva, Tatiana; Hirschberg, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of nanoparticles poses a significant challenge, especially in the brain where the blood–brain barrier prevents the entry of most therapeutic compounds including nanoparticle-based anti-cancer agents. In this context, the use of macrophages as vectors for the delivery of gold–silica nanoshells to infiltrating gliomas will be reviewed in this article. Gold–silica nanoshells are readily phagocytosed by macrophages without any apparent toxic effects, and the results of in vitro studies have demonstrated the migratory potential of nanoshell-loaded macrophages in human glioma spheroids. Of particular interest is the observation that, after near-infrared exposure of spheroids containing nanoshell-loaded macrophages, sufficient heat was generated to suppress spheroid growth. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of macrophages as nanoshell delivery vectors for photothermal therapy of gliomas, and they certainly provide the basis for future animal studies. PMID:21979168

  10. Diagnosis and therapy of macrophage cells using dextran-coated near-infrared responsive hollow-type gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taik Lim, Yong; Cho, Mi Young; Sil Choi, Bang; Noh, Young-Woock; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2008-09-01

    We describe the development of hollow-type gold nanoparticles (NPs) for the photonic-based imaging and therapy of macrophage cells. The strong light-absorption and light-scattering properties of gold NPs render them to be useful as molecular imaging agents as well as therapeutic moieties. By controlling the geometry of the gold NPs, the optical resonance peak was shifted to around the near-infrared (NIR) region, where light transmission through biological tissue is known to be fairly high. Hollow-type gold NPs modified with dextran were phagocytosed by macrophage cells. Using dark-field microscopy, it was possible to image macrophage cells targeted with NPs. After NIR irradiation, macrophages labeled with NPs were selectively destroyed by the photothermal effect. FACS analysis revealed that the photothermal effect caused principally late apoptosis-related cell death or secondary necrosis. The experimental results showed that hollow-type gold NPs conjugated with dextran could be used not only as optical imaging contrast agents but also as a component of a novel anti-macrophage therapeutic strategy.

  11. The Development of Macrophage-Mediated Cell Therapy to Improve Skeletal Muscle Function after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rybalko, Viktoriya; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Merscham-Banda, Melissa; Suggs, Laura J.; Farrar, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration following acute injury is a multi-step process involving complex changes in tissue microenvironment. Macrophages (MPs) are one of the key cell types involved in orchestration and modulation of the repair process. Multiple studies highlight the essential role of MPs in the control of the myogenic program and inflammatory response during skeletal muscle regeneration. A variety of MP phenotypes have been identified and characterized in vitro as well as in vivo. As such, MPs hold great promise for cell-based therapies in the field of regenerative medicine. In this study we used bone-marrow derived in vitro LPS/IFN-y-induced M1 MPs to enhance functional muscle recovery after tourniquet-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury (TK-I/R). We detected a 15% improvement in specific tension and force normalized to mass after M1 (LPS/IFN-γ) MP transplantation 24 hours post-reperfusion. Interestingly, we found that M0 bone marrow-derived unpolarized MPs significantly impaired muscle function highlighting the complexity of temporally coordinated skeletal muscle regenerative program. Furthermore, we show that delivery of M1 (LPS/IFN-γ) MPs early in regeneration accelerates myofiber repair, decreases fibrotic tissue deposition and increases whole muscle IGF-I expression. PMID:26717325

  12. Fine structure of carcinosarcoma cells and peritoneal macrophages activated by photodynamic therapy during their interaction in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Ionescu, Mircea D.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Coman, Niculina; Dima, Stefan V.

    1996-12-01

    The interaction of the photodynamic therapy activated macrophages (PDT-AM0) of the host and rat Walker-256 carcinosarcoma target cells (ascitic form) was investigated. The periotoneal macrophages were sensitized with different concentrations of Photofrin II (0.1 to 12 (mu) g/2.5 multiplied by 106 cells) and irradiated with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm; 10 mW) at different dose fluences varying between 1.5 and 15 kJ/m2. The degree of macrophage activation by PDT was estimated by means of the following parameters: (1) in vitro assay of cytotoxic and cytostatic activities and (2) observation at the electron microscopy. The results obtained indicate the following: (1) the highest rate of cytotoxic activity against Walker-256 (39.7%) and K562 (21.6%) cells was found in Photofrin II sensitized with 0.8 mg and exposure to He-Ne laser irradiation (3.0 kJ/m2): (2) the cytostatic activity of PDT-AM0 was higher against murine Walker-256 (54.7%) and lower on human K562 (28.1%) cells, in comparison with normal macrophages (NM0); (3) during interaction of PDT-AM0 in peritoneal cavity, the tumor cells were accompanied by strong changes in nuclear and cytoplasmic fine structure. Summing up, in photobioactivated macrophages by PDT some functional activities (cytotoxic, cytostatic and phagocytosis) were enhanced and induced ultrastructural changes in Walker-256 ascites carcinosarcoma cells by their interaction 'in vivo.'

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages: from mechanisms to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Roy; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex ecology of cells that evolves with and provides support to tumor cells during the transition to malignancy. Among the innate and adaptive immune cells recruited to the tumor site, macrophages are particularly abundant and are present at all stages of tumor progression. Clinical studies and experimental mouse models indicate these macrophages generally play a pro-tumoral role. In the primary tumor, macrophage can stimulate angiogenesis and enhance tumor cell invasion, motility and intravasation. During metastasis, macrophages prime the pre-metastatic site and promote tumor cell extravasation, survival and persistent growth. Macrophages are also immunosuppressive preventing tumor cell attack by natural killer and T cells during tumor progression and after recovery from chemo- or immuno-therapy. Therapeutic success in targeting these pro-tumoral roles in pre-clinical models and in early clinical trials suggests that macrophages are attractive targets as part of combination therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:25035953

  14. Macrophage Cell Membrane Camouflaged Au Nanoshells for in Vivo Prolonged Circulation Life and Enhanced Cancer Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Mingjun; Shao, Jingxin; Dai, Luru; Li, Junbai; He, Qiang

    2016-04-20

    Macrophage cell membrane (MPCM)-camouflaged gold nanoshells (AuNS) that can serve as a new generation of photothermal conversion agents for in vivo photothermal cancer therapy are presented. They are constructed by the fusion of biocompatible AuNSs and MPCM vesicles. The resulting MPCM-coated AuNSs exhibited good colloidal stability and kept the original near-infrared (NIR) adsorption of AuNSs. Because AuNS carried high-density coverage of MPCMs, the totally functional portions of macrophage cells membrane were grafted onto the surface of AuNSs. This surface functionalization provided active targeting ability by recognizing tumor endothelium and thus improved tumoritropic accumulation compared to the red blood cell membrane-coating approach. These biomimetic nanoparticles significantly enhance in vivo blood circulation time and local accumulation at the tumor when administered systematically. Upon NIR laser irradiation, local heat generated by the MPCM-coated AuNS achieves high efficiency to suppress tumor growth and selectively ablate cancerous cells within the illuminated zone. Therefore, MPCM-coated AuNSs remained the natural properties of their source cells, which may improve the efficacy of photothermal therapy modulated by AuNSs and other noble-metal nanoparticles.

  15. 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy reverses macrophage and dendritic cell passivity in murine melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Hu, Zheng; Wang, Xiaolong; Gu, Chuanwen; Gao, Zhongxiuzi; Cao, Wenwu; Zheng, Jinhua

    2014-09-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) uses a combination of sonosensitizing drugs and low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound to cause apoptosis and autophagy of tumor cells. However, its effects on the tumor microenvironment, especially on the immune state, remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the transformation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in the tumor microenvironment during 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-mediated SDT in mice transplanted with B16F10 melanomas. Tumor growth and mouse weight were measured. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to evaluate tumor morphology to quantify the anti-tumor efficacy of 5-ALA-mediated SDT. We investigated anti-tumor immunity in the tumor microenvironment by immunocytochemical staining of CD68, CD163, CD80, CD86, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon γ (IFN-γ). Tumor growth was restrained by 5-ALA-mediated SDT in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. CD68 levels increased and CD163 decreased, indicating that M2 macrophages were converted to the M1 phenotype in the tumor. The increase in CD80 and CD86 showed that DCs in the tumor microenvironment tend to mature after SDT treatment. The cytokines INF-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 significantly increased in SDT. Application of low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound alone also led to similar trends in our study, but combined treatment with 5-ALA yielded a change. The original stabilized immune state in the tumor microenvironment can be interrupted by low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound combined with 5-ALA, which enhanced the pro-inflammatory response and reversed the passive properties of macrophages and dendritic cells.

  16. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  17. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy.

  19. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  20. Monitoring ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in cancer cells and macrophages from tumours treated by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Zhang, Wei; Separovic, Duska

    2012-05-01

    Eradication of tumours by photodynamic therapy (PDT) is accompanied by marked changes in local sphingolipid (SL) engagement. Because of the heterogeneity of cellular composition, analysis of tumour tissue homogenates to quantify SL species is inadequate for evaluating their levels in parenchymal cancer cell population. By staining tumour-derived single cell suspensions with antibodies specific to ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) followed by flow cytometry, we were able to document changes in the levels of these two key SLs in cancer cells and tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) of mouse SCCVII tumours following PDT. The results confirm previously obtained indications that tumour treatment by PDT induces a marked rise in ceramide levels in cancer cells within these lesions. Cancer cells from PDT-treated SCCVII tumours undergoing apoptosis were found to have much higher ceramide levels and substantially lower S1P levels than their viable counterparts. Compared to cancer cells, considerably higher ceramide and S1P levels were consistently found in TAMs. Treatment of SCCVII tumour-bearing mice with ceramide analog LCL29 induced a rise in ceramide levels in TAMs but not in cancer cells. When combined with PDT, LCL29 treatment produced a further increase in ceramide levels in TAMs while having no evident impact on ceramide content in cancer cells within same tumours. The results highlight SLs as important participants in tumour response to PDT and potential adjuvant therapeutic targets to PDT.

  1. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients.

  2. Combination Therapy with a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor and a Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Additively Suppresses Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Atherosclerosis in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiromura, Munenori; Mori, Yusaku; Kohashi, Kyoko; Kushima, Hideki; Ohara, Makoto; Watanabe, Takuya; Andersson, Olov

    2017-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4is), in addition to their antihyperglycemic roles, have antiatherosclerotic effects. We reported that sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2is) suppress atherosclerosis in a glucose-dependent manner in diabetic mice. Here, we investigated the effects of combination therapy with SGLT2i and DPP-4i on atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. SGLT2i (ipragliflozin, 1.0 mg/kg/day) and DPP-4i (alogliptin, 8.0 mg/kg/day), either alone or in combination, were administered to db/db mice or streptozotocin-induced diabetic apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe−/−) mice. Ipragliflozin and alogliptin monotherapies improved glucose intolerance; however, combination therapy did not show further improvement. The foam cell formation of peritoneal macrophages was suppressed by both the ipragliflozin and alogliptin monotherapies and was further enhanced by combination therapy. Although foam cell formation was closely associated with HbA1c levels in all groups, DPP-4i alone or the combination group showed further suppression of foam cell formation compared with the control or SGLT2i group at corresponding HbA1c levels. Both ipragliflozin and alogliptin monotherapies decreased scavenger receptors and increased cholesterol efflux regulatory genes in peritoneal macrophages, and combination therapy showed additive changes. In diabetic Apoe−/− mice, combination therapy showed the greatest suppression of plaque volume in the aortic root. In conclusion, combination therapy with SGLT2i and DPP4i synergistically suppresses macrophage foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. PMID:28408925

  3. Targeted IL-4 therapy synergizes with dexamethasone to induce a state of tolerance by promoting Treg cells and macrophages in mice with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kawalkowska, Joanna Z; Hemmerle, Teresa; Pretto, Francesca; Matasci, Mattia; Neri, Dario; Williams, Richard O

    2016-05-01

    F8-IL-4 is a recently developed immunocytokine that delivers IL-4 to sites of inflammation by targeting the neovasculature. We previously reported that F8-IL-4, in combination with dexamethasone (DXM), provides a durable therapy in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the mechanism by which IL-4 and DXM combination therapy provides long-lasting disease remission. F8-IL-4 alone attenuated inflammation in CIA and this was associated with increased TH 2 and decreased TH 17 cell numbers in the joints. Similarly, DXM alone had an antiinflammatory effect associated with lower TH 17 cell numbers. In both cases, these therapeutic benefits were reversed once treatment was stopped. On the other hand, combination therapy with F8-IL-4 plus DXM led to a synergistic increase in the percentage of regulatory T (Treg) cells and antiinflammatory macrophages in the arthritic joint and spleen as well as IL-10 levels in serum and spleen. The net result of this was a more pronounced attenuation of inflammation and, more importantly, protection from arthritis relapse post therapy retraction. In conclusion, F8-IL-4 plus DXM is a durable treatment for arthritis that acts by promoting Treg cells in a synergistic manner, and by producing a sustained increase in antiinflammatory macrophages. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mast Cell and M1 Macrophage Infiltration and Local Pro-Inflammatory Factors Were Attenuated with Incretin-Based Therapies in Obesity-Related Glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Yuan, Geheng; Cheng, Fangxiao; Zhang, Junqing; Guo, Xiaohui

    2017-09-01

    The global increase of obesity parallels the obesity-related glomerulopathy (ORG) epidemic. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists were well recognized to attenuate renal injury independent of glucose control in diabetic nephropathy. There are limited studies focusing on their effects on ORG. We explored the effects of incretin-based therapies on early ORG and the inflammatory responses involved mainly concentrated on mast cell (MC) and macrophage (M) infiltration and local pro-inflammatory factors. ORG rat models were induced by high-fat diet and then divided into ORG vehicle, vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day, qd) and liraglutide (200 μg/kg, bid) treated groups. After 8 weeks of treatments, albuminuria, glomerular histology, renal inflammatory cell infiltration, and pro-inflammatory factors were analyzed. Early ORG model was demonstrated by albuminuria, glomerulomegaly, foot process fusion, and mesangial and endothelial mild proliferation. Incretin-based therapies limited body weight gain and improved insulin sensitivity. ORG was alleviated, manifested by decreased average glomerular area, attenuated mesangial and endothelial cell proliferation, and revived cell-to-cell propagation of podocytes, which contributed to reduced albuminuria. Compared with ORG vehicle, MC and M1 macrophage (pro-inflammatory) infiltration and M1/M2 ratio were significantly decreased; M2 macrophage (anti-inflammatory) was not significantly increased after incretin-based treatments. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-6 in renal cortex were significantly downregulated, while transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) remained unchanged. Incretin-based treatments could alleviate high-fat diet-induced ORG partly through the systemic insulin sensitivity improvement and the attenuated local inflammation, mainly by the decrease of MC and M1 macrophage infiltration and reduction of TNF-α and IL-6.

  5. Reconsideration of macrophage and dendritic cell classification.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Takeshi; Shimada, Misato; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that the activation of innate immune cells, especially antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, can ameliorate or exacerbate various diseases, including cancer. Currently, the macrophages and dendritic cells are categorized into several groups by their cell surface and intracellular molecules. However, the detailed classification of the differences between macrophages and dendritic cells has still not been established. Here, we summarized and reviewed the previous studies on the classification of macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition, the previous classification of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells is discussed based on our findings of macrophage activation, which has both conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cell phenotype.

  6. Macrophages heterogeneity in atherosclerosis - implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather M

    2010-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease occurring within the artery wall and is an underlying cause of cardiovascular complications, including myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Its pathogenesis involves many immune cell types with a well accepted role for monocyte/macrophages. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages are a characteristic feature of plaques and are major players in all stages of plaque development. As well as modulating lipid metabolism, macrophages secrete inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that drive pathogenesis. They also produce proteases and tissue factor that contribute to plaque rupture and thrombosis. Macrophages are however heterogeneous cells and when appropriately activated, they phagocytose cytotoxic lipoproteins, clear apoptotic bodies, secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and synthesize matrix repair proteins that stabilize vulnerable plaques. Pharmacological modulation of macrophage activity therefore represents a potential therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of the different macrophage subsets and their monocyte precursors, and, the implications of these subsets for atherosclerosis. This will present a foundation for highlighting novel opportunities to exploit the heterogeneity of macrophages as important diagnostic and therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis and its associated diseases. © 2010 The Author Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Macrophages in gene therapy: cellular delivery vehicles and in vivo targets.

    PubMed

    Burke, B; Sumner, S; Maitland, N; Lewis, C E

    2002-09-01

    The appearance and activation of macrophages are thought to be rapid events in the development of many pathological lesions, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, and arthritic joints. This has prompted recent attempts to use macrophages as novel cellular vehicles for gene therapy, in which macrophages are genetically modified ex vivo and then reintroduced into the body with the hope that a proportion will then home to the diseased site. Here, we critically review the efficacy of various gene transfer methods (viral, bacterial, protozoan, and various chemical and physical methods) in transfecting macrophages in vitro, and the results obtained when transfected macrophages are used as gene delivery vehicles. Finally, we discuss the use of various viral and nonviral methods to transfer genes to macrophages in vivo. As will be seen, definitive evidence for the use of macrophages as gene transfer vehicles has yet to be provided and awaits detailed trafficking studies in vivo. Moreover, although methods for transfecting macrophages have improved considerably in efficiency in recent years, targeting of gene transfer specifically to macrophages in vivo remains a problem. However, possible solutions to this include placing transgenes under the control of macrophage-specific promoters to limit expression to macrophages or stably transfecting CD34(+) precursors of monocytes/macrophages and then differentiating these cells into monocytes/macrophages ex vivo. The latter approach could conceivably lead to the bone marrow precursor cells of patients with inherited genetic disorders being permanently fortified or even replaced with genetically modified cells.

  8. Mertk on tumor macrophages is a therapeutic target to prevent tumor recurrence following radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Marka R.; Baird, Jason; Friedman, David; Savage, Talicia; Uhde, Lauren; Alice, Alejandro; Cottam, Benjamin; Young, Kristina; Newell, Pippa; Nguyen, Cynthia; Bambina, Shelly; Kramer, Gwen; Akporiaye, Emmanuel; Malecka, Anna; Jackson, Andrew; Gough, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy provides a means to kill large numbers of cancer cells in a controlled location resulting in the release of tumor-specific antigens and endogenous adjuvants. However, by activating pathways involved in apoptotic cell recognition and phagocytosis, irradiated cancer cells engender suppressive phenotypes in macrophages. We demonstrate that the macrophage-specific phagocytic receptor, Mertk is upregulated in macrophages in the tumor following radiation therapy. Ligation of Mertk on macrophages results in anti-inflammatory cytokine responses via NF-kB p50 upregulation, which in turn limits tumor control following radiation therapy. We demonstrate that in immunogenic tumors, loss of Mertk is sufficient to permit tumor cure following radiation therapy. However, in poorly immunogenic tumors, TGFb inhibition is also required to result in tumor cure following radiation therapy. These data demonstrate that Mertk is a highly specific target whose absence permits tumor control in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:27602953

  9. The application of adjuvant autologous antravesical macrophage cell therapy vs. BCG in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: a multicenter, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction While adjuvant immunotherapy with Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) is effective in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (BC), adverse events (AEs) are considerable. Monocyte-derived activated killer cells (MAK) are discussed as essential in antitumoural immunoresponse, but their application may imply risks. The present trial compared autologous intravesical macrophage cell therapy (BEXIDEM®) to BCG in patients after transurethral resection (TURB) of BC. Materials and methods This open-label trial included 137 eligible patients with TaG1-3, T1G1-2 plurifocal or unifocal tumours and ≥ 2 occurrences within 24 months and was conducted from June 2004 to March 2007. Median follow-up for patients without recurrence was 12 months. Patients were randomized to BCG or mononuclear cells collected by apheresis after ex vivo cell processing and activation (BEXIDEM). Either arm treatment consisted of 6 weekly instillations and 2 cycles of 3 weekly instillations at months 3 and 6. Toxicity profile (primary endpoint) and prophylactic effects (secondary endpoint) were assessed. Results Patient characteristics were evenly distributed. Of 73 treated with BCG and 64 with BEXIDEM, 85% vs. 45% experienced AEs and 26% vs. 14% serious AEs (SAE), respectively (p < 0.001). Recurrence occurred significantly less frequent with BCG than with BEXIDEM (12% vs. 38%; p < 0.001). Discussion This initial report of autologous intravesical macrophage cell therapy in BC demonstrates BEXIDEM treatment to be safe. Recurrence rates were significantly lower with BCG however. As the efficacy of BEXIDEM remains uncertain, further data, e.g. marker lesions studies, are warranted. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the ISRCTN registry http://isrctn.org under the registration number ISRCTN35881130. PMID:20529333

  10. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  11. The influence of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) on J-774A.1 macrophage cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawczyk-Krupka, Aleksandra; Czuba, Zenon; Ledwon, Aleksandra; Latos, Wojciech; Sliszka, Ewelina; Mianowska, Marta; Krol, Wojciech; Sieron, Aleksander

    2008-02-01

    Introduction. The whole mechanism of the cellular level of tumor destruction by photodynamic therapy (PDT) is still unknown. Despite necrotic and apoptotic ways of cell death, there is a variety of events leading to and magnifying the inactivation of tumor cells. Material and methods. J-774A.1 were incubated with δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) at different concentrations (125, 250, 500, 1000 μM) and then irradiated with VIS (400 - 750 nm) at the dose of 5,10 and 30 J/cm2 delivered from the incoherent light source. The effects of the application of ALA-PDT were evaluated on the basis of cell viability, nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor α- (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) produced by the J-774A.1 cells. Results. The cell viability (assessed using MTT test) was comparable with control group at 5,10 and 30 J/cm2. At these doses of energy using different concentrations of ALA we have observed that at the higher energy doses, the greater increase of TNF-α release, lowering of the level of IL-1β production and decrease of NO release were observed. There was also observed the dependence of the secretional activity of the cells on the ALA concentrations. Conclusion. The cell viability and production of cytokines depended on ALA concentrations and energy doses of the light. The higher some cytokines' release after PDT could be an additional factor for the complete eradication of tumor.

  12. The journey from stem cell to macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Mikael J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2014-01-01

    Essential protectors against infection and injury, macrophages can also contribute to many common and fatal diseases. Here we discuss the mechanisms that control different types of macrophage activities in mice. We follow the cells’ maturational pathways over time and space, and elaborate on events that influence the type of macrophage eventually settling a particular destination. The nature of the precursor cells, developmental niches, tissues, environmental cues, and other connecting processes appear to contribute to the identity of macrophage type. Together, the spatial and developmental relationships of macrophages comprise a topo-ontogenic map that can guide our understanding of their biology. PMID:24673186

  13. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  14. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Souza, Nadhia H C; Ferrari, Raquel A M; Silva, Daniela F T; Nunes, Fabio D; Bussadori, Sandra K; Fernandes, Kristianne P S

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle.

  15. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  16. Combined concurrent nanoshell loaded macrophage-mediated photothermal and photodynamic therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Trinidad, Anthony; Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Kwon, Young J.; Madsen, Steen

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages loaded with gold nanoshells (AuNS), that convert near infrared light to heat, can be used as transport vectors for photothermal hyperthermia of tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of combined macrophage mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) and PDT on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The results provide proof of concept for the use of macrophages as a delivery vector of AuNS for photothermal enhancement of the effects of PDT on squamous cell carcinoma. A significant synergy was demonstrated with combined PDT and PTT compared to each modality applied separately.

  17. The interaction of anticancer therapies with tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are essential components of the inflammatory microenvironment of tumors. Conventional treatment modalities (chemotherapy and radiotherapy), targeted drugs, antiangiogenic agents, and immunotherapy, including checkpoint blockade, all profoundly influence or depend on the function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can have dual influences on TAMs in that a misdirected macrophage-orchestrated tissue repair response can result in chemoresistance, but in other circumstances, TAMs are essential for effective therapy. A better understanding of the interaction of anticancer therapies with innate immunity, and TAMs in particular, may pave the way to better patient selection and innovative combinations of conventional approaches with immunotherapy. PMID:25753580

  18. Apoptotic cell-mediated suppression of streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis is associated with alteration of macrophage function and local regulatory T-cell increase: a potential cell-based therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Perruche, Sylvain; Saas, Philippe; Chen, Wanjun

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Experimental streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis is characterized by two successive phases of the disease. The acute phase occurs early and is associated with an inflammatory process and neutrophil infiltration into the synovium. The second chronic phase is related to effector T-cell activation and the dysregulation of macrophage function. Creation of an immunomodulatory environment has been attributed to apoptotic cells themselves, apoptotic cell uptake by phagocytes as well as a less sensibility of phagocytes capturing apoptotic bodies to activation. Therefore we evaluated the potential of apoptotic cell injection to influence the course of inflammation in SCW-induced arthritis in rats. Methods Rat apoptotic thymocytes were injected intraperitoneally (2 × 108) in addition to an arthritogenic dose of systemic SCW in LEW female rats. Control rats received SCW immunization and PBS. Rats were then followed for arthritis occurrence and circulating cytokine detection. At sacrifice, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and macrophages were analyzed. Results Apoptotic cell injection profoundly suppressed joint swelling and destruction typically observed during the acute and chronic phases of SCW-induced arthritis. Synovial inflammatory cell infiltration and bone destruction were also markedly suppressed. Ex vivo experiments revealed reduced levels of TNF in cultures of macrophages from rats challenged with SCW in the presence of apoptotic thymocytes as well as reduced macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, apoptotic cell injection induced higher Foxp3+ Tregs in the lymphoid organs, especially in the draining lymph nodes. Conclusions Our data indicate that apoptotic cells modulate macrophage function and result in Treg generation/increase. This may be involved in inhibition of inflammation and amelioration of arthritis. This highlights and confirms previous studies showing that in vivo generation of Tregs using apoptotic cell injection may be

  19. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  20. Fucoidan reduced the invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and modified their effects to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junda; Wang, Ketao; Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Luan, Yijun; Xu, Yan; Song, Xiaobin; Tan, Wanye; Liu, Shaohua; Wei, Fengcai; Qu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Fucoidan is a complex of polysaccharides showing antitumor and immunomodulation properties. Our previous studies found its regulation to myeloid immune cells, including macrophages. Aberrant infiltration and functions of macrophages are commonly found in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, we analyzed the effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells, and their regulation to macrophages, trying to evaluate its role as a potential therapy for OSCC. CAL27 and THP-1-derived macrophages were used as models for OSCC cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages in the in vitro study, respectively. The effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells and their recruitment to macrophages were analyzed by transwell assay. KIF4A siRNA transfection was performed to investigate its role in fucoidan-modulated OSCC cells invasion. CCL3-neutralizing antibody was added into the conditioned medium of OSCC cells to evaluate its role in fucoidan-mediated macrophages recruitment and re-education. Fucoidan reduced the invasive potential of CAL27 cells with a decrease of MMP-2 and KIF4A transcription. KIF4A knockdown in CAL27 cells led to decreased invasion and MMP-2 expression. The conditioned medium of fucoidan-treated CAL27 cells promoted recruitment and inflammatory cytokines secretion on THP-1-derived macrophages. Further analysis found that fucoidan increased CCL3 production in CAL27 cells. Blocking CCL3 expression reversed the effects of fucoidan on macrophage recruitment and re-education. Our study found that fucoidan regulated the invasion of OSCC cells and also their recruiting and re-educating effects on macrophages, suggesting it could be a complementary approach in the treatment of OSCC.

  1. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  2. BAI1 Orchestrates Macrophage Inflammatory Response to HSV Infection-Implications for Oncolytic Viral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bolyard, Chelsea; Meisen, W Hans; Banasavadi-Siddegowda, Yeshavanth; Hardcastle, Jayson; Yoo, Ji Young; Wohleb, Eric S; Wojton, Jeffrey; Yu, Jun-Ge; Dubin, Samuel; Khosla, Maninder; Xu, Bo; Smith, Jonathan; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Pow-Anpongkul, Pete; Pichiorri, Flavia; Zhang, Jianying; Old, Matthew; Zhu, Dan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Godbout, Jonathan P; Caligiuri, Michael A; Yu, Jianhua; Kaur, Balveen

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Brain angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI1) facilitates phagocytosis and bacterial pathogen clearance by macrophages; however, its role in viral infections is unknown. Here, we examined the role of BAI1, and its N-terminal cleavage fragment (Vstat120) in antiviral macrophage responses to oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV).Experimental Design: Changes in infiltration and activation of monocytic and microglial cells after treatment of glioma-bearing mice brains with a control (rHSVQ1) or Vstat120-expressing (RAMBO) oHSV was analyzed using flow cytometry. Co-culture of infected glioma cells with macrophages or microglia was used to examine antiviral signaling. Cytokine array gene expression and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) helped evaluate changes in macrophage signaling in response to viral infection. TNFα-blocking antibodies and macrophages derived from Bai1(-/-) mice were used.Results: RAMBO treatment of mice reduced recruitment and activation of macrophages/microglia in mice with brain tumors, and showed increased virus replication compared with rHSVQ1. Cytokine gene expression array revealed that RAMBO significantly altered the macrophage inflammatory response to infected glioma cells via altered secretion of TNFα. Furthermore, we showed that BAI1 mediated macrophage TNFα induction in response to oHSV therapy. Intracranial inoculation of wild-type/RAMBO virus in Bai1(-/-) or wild-type non-tumor-bearing mice revealed the safety of this approach.Conclusions: We have uncovered a new role for BAI1 in facilitating macrophage anti-viral responses. We show that arming oHSV with antiangiogenic Vstat120 also shields them from inflammatory macrophage antiviral response, without reducing safety. Clin Cancer Res; 23(7); 1809-19. ©2016 AACR.

  3. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  4. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  5. Immunometabolism governs dendritic cell and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on intracellular metabolism in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages provide new insights on the functioning of these critical controllers of innate and adaptive immunity. Both cell types undergo profound metabolic reprogramming in response to environmental cues, such as hypoxia or nutrient alterations, but importantly also in response to danger signals and cytokines. Metabolites such as succinate and citrate have a direct impact on the functioning of macrophages. Immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of DCs is also determined by anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. These findings provide new prospects for therapeutic manipulation in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26694970

  6. Macrophages heterogeneity in atherosclerosis – implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease occurring within the artery wall and is an underlying cause of cardiovascular complications, including myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Its pathogenesis involves many immune cell types with a well accepted role for monocyte/macrophages. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages are a characteristic feature of plaques and are major players in all stages of plaque development. As well as modulating lipid metabolism, macrophages secrete inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that drive pathogenesis. They also produce proteases and tissue factor that contribute to plaque rupture and thrombosis. Macrophages are however heterogeneous cells and when appropriately activated, they phagocytose cytotoxic lipoproteins, clear apoptotic bodies, secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and synthesize matrix repair proteins that stabilize vulnerable plaques. Pharmacological modulation of macrophage activity therefore represents a potential therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of the different macrophage subsets and their monocyte precursors, and, the implications of these subsets for atherosclerosis. This will present a foundation for highlighting novel opportunities to exploit the heterogeneity of macrophages as important diagnostic and therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis and its associated diseases. PMID:20629993

  7. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E.; Feig, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression. PMID:22934038

  8. ROS-responsive activatable photosensitizing agent for imaging and photodynamic therapy of activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, In-Hoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of macrophage-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (MacTNP) prepared from a Chlorin e6 (Ce6)-hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate can be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophage cells. MacTNP are nonfluorescent and nonphototoxic in their native state. However, when treated with ROS, especially peroxynitrite, they become highly fluorescent and phototoxic. In vitro cell studies show that MacTNP emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence inside activated macrophages. The NIR fluorescence is quenched in the extracellular environment. MacTNP are nontoxic in macrophages up to a Ce6 concentration of 10 μM in the absence of light. However, MacTNP become phototoxic upon illumination in a light dose-dependent manner. In particular, significantly higher phototoxic effect is observed in the activated macrophage cells compared to human dermal fibroblasts and non-activated macrophages. The ROS-responsive MacTNP, with their high target-to-background ratio, may have a significant potential in selective NIR fluorescence imaging and in subsequent photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis with minimum side effects.

  9. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  10. Ixmyelocel-T, an expanded multicellular therapy, contains a unique population of M2-like macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction M2 macrophages promote tissue repair and regeneration through various mechanisms including immunomodulation and scavenging of tissue debris. Delivering increased numbers of these cells to ischemic tissues may limit tissue injury and promote repair. Ixmyelocel-T is an expanded, autologous multicellular therapy cultured from bone-marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs). The purpose of this study was to characterize further a unique expanded population of M2-like macrophages, generated in ixmyelocel-T therapy. Methods Approximately 50 ml of whole bone marrow was obtained from healthy donors and shipped overnight. BMMNCs were produced by using density-gradient separation and cultured for approximately 12 days to generate ixmyelocel-T. CD14+ cells were isolated from ixmyelocel-T with positive selection for analysis. Cell-surface phenotype was examined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and expression of cytokines and chemokines was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Quantitative real-time PCR was used to analyze expression of genes in BMMNCs, ixmyelocel-T, the CD14+ population from ixmyelocel-T, and M1 and M2 macrophages. Ixmyelocel-T was cultured with apoptotic BMMNCs, and then visualized under fluorescence microscopy to assess efferocytosis. Results Macrophages in ixmyelocel-T therapy expressed surface markers of M2 macrophages, CD206, and CD163. These cells were also found to express several M2 markers, and few to no M1 markers. After stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), they showed minimal secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) compared with M1 and M2 macrophages. Ixmyelocel-T macrophages efficiently ingested apoptotic BMMNCs. Conclusions Ixmyelocel-T therapy contains a unique population of M2-like macrophages that are characterized by expression of M2 markers, decreased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines after inflammatory stimuli, and efficient

  11. Gold nanorods as a theranostic platform for in vitro and in vivo imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jinbao; Peng, Zhiyou; Li, Bo; Ye, Kaichuang; Zhang, Yuxin; Yuan, Fukang; Yang, Xinrui; Huang, Lijia; Hu, Junqing; Lu, Xinwu

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory macrophages play pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Theranostics, a promising approach for local imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages, has drawn increasing attention in biomedical research. In this study, gold nanorods (Au NRs) were synthesized, and their in vitro photothermal effects on the macrophage cell line (Ana-1 cells) under 808 nm near infrared reflection (NIR) were investigated by the CCK8 assay, calcein AM/PI staining, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), silver staining and in vitro micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. These Au NRs were then applied to an apolipoprotein E knockout (Apo E) mouse model to evaluate their effects on in vivo CT imaging and their effectiveness as for the subsequent photothermal therapy of macrophages in femoral artery restenosis under 808 nm laser irradiation. In vitro photothermal ablation treatment using Au NRs exhibited a significant cell-killing efficacy of macrophages, even at relatively low concentrations of Au NRs and low NIR powers. In addition, the in vivo results demonstrated that the Au NRs are effective for in vivo imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages in femoral artery restenosis. This study shows that Au nanorods are a promising theranostic platform for the diagnosis and photothermal therapy of inflammation-associated diseases.Inflammatory macrophages play pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Theranostics, a promising approach for local imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages, has drawn increasing attention in biomedical research. In this study, gold nanorods (Au NRs) were synthesized, and their in vitro photothermal effects on the macrophage cell line (Ana-1 cells) under 808 nm near infrared reflection (NIR) were investigated by the CCK8 assay, calcein AM/PI staining, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), silver staining and in vitro micro-computed tomography

  12. Consolidation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma Using Busulfan/Melphalan, Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Anti-GD2 Antibody, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, Interleukin-2, and Haploidentical Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Talleur, Aimee C; Triplett, Brandon M; Federico, Sara; Mamcarz, Ewelina; Janssen, William; Wu, Jianrong; Shook, David; Leung, Wing; Furman, Wayne L

    2017-07-18

    The treatment of pediatric high-risk neuroblastoma is intensive and multimodal. Despite the introduction of immunotherapy for minimal residual disease, survival rates remain suboptimal and new therapies are needed. As part of a phase 2 trial, we are using a consolidation therapy regimen that combines a busulfan/melphalan conditioning schema, autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT), and experimental immunotherapy with hu14.18K322A (a humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and IL-2, with or without the adoptive transfer of haploidentical natural killer cells (NKs). Here we report on 30 patients who have undergone AHCT with this experimental immunotherapy regimen, 21 of whom received haploidentical NKs. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 13 days (range, 10 to 28 days) and to platelet engraftment of at least 20  ×  103/mm(3) was 36.5 days (range, 0 to 102 days); no clinical difference was seen in those who did or did not receive NKs. Eight patients developed veno-occlusive disease, with 3 having multiorgan dysfunction. Toxicities were similar for patients who did or did not receive NKs. We conclude that this consolidation regimen is feasible and has an acceptable acute toxicity profile. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  14. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  15. Macrophage subtype predicts lymph node metastasis in oesophageal adenocarcinoma and promotes cancer cell invasion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenqing; Peters, Jeffrey H; Nieman, Dylan; Sharma, Meenal; Watson, Thomas; Yu, JiangZhou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently, there is a lack of ideal biomarkers for predicting nodal status in preoperative stage of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) to aid optimising therapeutic options. We studied the potential of applying subtype macrophages to predict lymph node metastasis and prognosis in EAC. Material and Methods: Fifty-three EAC resection specimens were immunostained with CD68, CD40 (M1), and CD163 (M2). Lymphatic vessel density (LVD) was estimated with the staining of D2-40. Subsequently, we tested if M2d macrophage could promote EAC cell migration and invasion. Results: In EAC without neoadjuvant treatment, an increase in M2-like macrophage was associated with poor patient survival, independent of the locations of macrophages in tumour. The M2/M1 ratio that represented the balance between M2- and M1-like macrophages was significantly higher in nodal-positive EACs than that in nodal-negative EACs, and inversely correlated with patient overall survival. The M2/M1 ratio was not related to LVD. EAC cell polarised THP1 cell into M2d-like macrophage, which promoted EAC cell migration and invasion. Neoadjuvant therapy appeared to diminish the correlation between the M2/M1 ratio and survival. Conclusions: The ratio of M2/M1 macrophage may serve as a sensitive marker to predict lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in EAC without neoadjuvant therapy. M2d macrophage may have important roles in EAC metastasis. PMID:26263481

  16. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  17. Gold nanorods as a theranostic platform for in vitro and in vivo imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jinbao; Peng, Zhiyou; Li, Bo; Ye, Kaichuang; Zhang, Yuxin; Yuan, Fukang; Yang, Xinrui; Huang, Lijia; Hu, Junqing; Lu, Xinwu

    2015-09-07

    Inflammatory macrophages play pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Theranostics, a promising approach for local imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages, has drawn increasing attention in biomedical research. In this study, gold nanorods (Au NRs) were synthesized, and their in vitro photothermal effects on the macrophage cell line (Ana-1 cells) under 808 nm near infrared reflection (NIR) were investigated by the CCK8 assay, calcein AM/PI staining, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), silver staining and in vitro micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. These Au NRs were then applied to an apolipoprotein E knockout (Apo E) mouse model to evaluate their effects on in vivo CT imaging and their effectiveness as for the subsequent photothermal therapy of macrophages in femoral artery restenosis under 808 nm laser irradiation. In vitro photothermal ablation treatment using Au NRs exhibited a significant cell-killing efficacy of macrophages, even at relatively low concentrations of Au NRs and low NIR powers. In addition, the in vivo results demonstrated that the Au NRs are effective for in vivo imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages in femoral artery restenosis. This study shows that Au nanorods are a promising theranostic platform for the diagnosis and photothermal therapy of inflammation-associated diseases.

  18. Embryonic stem cell-derived M2-like macrophages delay cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dreymueller, Daniela; Denecke, Bernd; Ludwig, Andreas; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-01-01

    In adults, repair of deeply injured skin wounds results in the formation of scar tissue, whereas in embryos wounds heal almost scar-free. Macrophages are important mediators of wound healing and secrete cytokines and tissue remodeling enzymes. In contrast to host defense mediated by inflammatory M1 macrophages, wound healing and tissue repair involve regulatory M2/M2-like macrophages. Embryonic/fetal macrophages are M2-like, and this may promote scar-free wound healing. In the present study, we asked whether atopical application of ex vivo generated, embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM) improve wound healing in mice. ESDM were tested side by side with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Compared to BMDM, ESDM resembled a less inflammatory and more M2-like macrophage subtype as indicated by their reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors, and reduced bacterial phagocytosis. Despite this anti-inflammatory phenotype in cell culture, ESDM prolonged the healing of deep skin wounds even more than BMDM. Healed wounds had more scar formation compared to wounds receiving BMDM or cell-free treatment. Our data indicate that atopical application of ex vivo generated macrophages is not a suitable cell therapy of dermal wounds. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Macrophage inhibitory factor 1 acts as a potential biomarker in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and is a target for antibody-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Xing-Ran; Yu, Xi-Ying; Wang, Lin; He, Shun; Feng, Fei-Yue; Guo, Li-Ping; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage inhibitory factor 1 (MIC1) is frequently altered in various cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of MIC1 for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Serum MIC1 of 286 ESCC and 250 healthy subjects was detected, the diagnostic performance was assessed and compared with SCC, CEA, CA199 and CA724, and the value as a prognostic indicator was also evaluated. The expression of MIC1 in ESCC cell lines, tissues were detected, and the inhibition of MIC1 antibody on ESCC was carried out in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the serum MIC1 of ESCC was significantly higher than normal groups (P < 0.001), and was positively associated with tumor invasion (P = 0.030) as well as lymph node metastasis (P = 0.007). The sensitivity of MIC1 was significantly better than SCC, CEA, CA199 and CA724, especially for stage I ESCC. Patients with higher serum MIC1 also had a poorer prognosis in relapse-free (P = 0.050) and tumor-specific survival (P = 0.005). In vitro studies showed that the expression of MIC1 was upregulated in 37.5% (3/8) ESCC cell lines and 45% (18/40) tissues, and the transcription of MIC1 in tumor tissues was significantly higher than paired adjacent normal tissues (P = 0.001). The antibody of MIC1 inhibited the tumor growth (P < 0.001), and showing preference for tumor tissues in xenograft model. The decreased formation of neovascularization lumen may be involved in the mechanism. We conclude that MIC1 plays an important role in the progression of ESCC and can serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for ESCC. PMID:24383865

  20. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    PubMed

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  1. HIV-1 Mutation and Recombination Rates Are Different in Macrophages and T-cells.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Deborah; Schlub, Timothy E; Smyth, Redmond P; Grimm, Andrew J; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Davenport, Miles P; Mak, Johnson

    2016-04-22

    High rates of mutation and recombination help human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to evade the immune system and develop resistance to antiretroviral therapy. Macrophages and T-cells are the natural target cells of HIV-1 infection. A consensus has not been reached as to whether HIV replication results in differential recombination between primary T-cells and macrophages. Here, we used HIV with silent mutation markers along with next generation sequencing to compare the mutation and the recombination rates of HIV directly in T lymphocytes and macrophages. We observed a more than four-fold higher recombination rate of HIV in macrophages compared to T-cells (p < 0.001) and demonstrated that this difference is not due to different reliance on C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) co-receptors between T-cells and macrophages. We also found that the pattern of recombination across the HIV genome (hot and cold spots) remains constant between T-cells and macrophages despite a three-fold increase in the overall recombination rate. This indicates that the difference in rates is a general feature of HIV DNA synthesis during macrophage infection. In contrast to HIV recombination, we found that T-cells have a 30% higher mutation rate than macrophages (p < 0.001) and that the mutational profile is similar between these cell types. Unexpectedly, we found no association between mutation and recombination in macrophages, in contrast to T-cells. Our data highlights some of the fundamental difference of HIV recombination and mutation amongst these two major target cells of infection. Understanding these differences will provide invaluable insights toward HIV evolution and how the virus evades immune surveillance and anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  2. Improved Method for Culturing Guinea-Pig Macrophage Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J.

    1982-01-01

    Proper nutrients and periodic changes in culture medium maintain cell viability for a longer period. New method uses a thioglycolate solution, instead of mineral oil, to induce macrophage cells in guinea pigs and also uses an increased percent of fetal-calf bovine serum in cultivation medium. Macrophage cells play significant roles in the body's healing and defense systems.

  3. Improved Method for Culturing Guinea-Pig Macrophage Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J.

    1982-01-01

    Proper nutrients and periodic changes in culture medium maintain cell viability for a longer period. New method uses a thioglycolate solution, instead of mineral oil, to induce macrophage cells in guinea pigs and also uses an increased percent of fetal-calf bovine serum in cultivation medium. Macrophage cells play significant roles in the body's healing and defense systems.

  4. Involvement of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy and Efficacy of Human iPS Cell-Derived Macrophages in Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ito, Takaaki; Senju, Satoru; Ando, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients. Furthermore, the proportion of intracellular TTR in CD14+ monocytes was reduced in peripheral blood compared with healthy donors. Based on these results, we next examined degradation and endocytosis of TTR in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid lineage cells (MLs), which function like macrophages. iPS-MLs express CD163 and CD206, and belong to the inhibitory macrophage category. In addition, iPS-MLs degrade both native and aggregated TTR in a cell-dependent manner in vitro. Further, iPS-MLs endocytose aggregated, and especially polymerized, TTR. These results suggest that decreased tissue-localized macrophages disrupt clearance of TTR-derived amyloid deposits, leading to progression of a pathological condition in FAP patients. To improve this situation, clinical application of pluripotent stem cell-derived MLs may be useful as an approach for FAP therapy. PMID:27695122

  5. Macrophage-tumor cell interactions regulate the function of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell-macrophage interactions change as the tumor progresses, and the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a major role in this interplay. In early stages, macrophages employ their killing mechanisms, particularly the generation of high concentrations of NO and its derivative reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to initiate tumor cell apoptosis and destroy emerging transformed cells. If the tumor escapes the immune system and grows, macrophages that infiltrate it are reprogramed in situ by the tumor microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) and immunosuppressive cytokines inhibit iNOS activity and lead to production of low amounts of NO/RNS, which are pro-angiogenic and support tumor growth and metastasis by inducing growth factors (e.g., VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We review here the different roles of NO/RNS in tumor progression and inhibition, and the mechanisms that regulate iNOS expression and NO production, highlighting the role of different subtypes of macrophages and the microenvironment. We finally claim that some tumor cells may become resistant to macrophage-induced death by increasing their expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which leads to inhibition of iNOS translation. This implies that some cooperation between tumor cells and macrophages is required to induce tumor cell death, and that tumor cells may control their fate. Thus, in order to induce susceptibility of tumors cells to macrophage-induced death, we suggest a new therapeutic approach that couples manipulation of miR-146a levels in tumors with macrophage therapy, which relies on ex vivo stimulation of macrophages and their re-introduction to tumors. PMID:23785333

  6. Intricate Macrophage-Colorectal Cancer Cell Communication in Response to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana T.; Pinto, Marta L.; Velho, Sérgia; Pinto, Marta T.; Cardoso, Ana P.; Figueira, Rita; Monteiro, Armanda; Marques, Margarida; Seruca, Raquel; Barbosa, Mário A.; Mareel, Marc; Oliveira, Maria J.; Rocha, Sónia

    2016-01-01

    Both cancer and tumour-associated host cells are exposed to ionizing radiation when a tumour is subjected to radiotherapy. Macrophages frequently constitute the most abundant tumour-associated immune population, playing a role in tumour progression and response to therapy. The present work aimed to evaluate the importance of macrophage-cancer cell communication in the cellular response to radiation. To address this question, we established monocultures and indirect co-cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages with RKO or SW1463 colorectal cancer cells, which exhibit higher and lower radiation sensitivity, respectively. Mono- and co-cultures were then irradiated with 5 cumulative doses, in a similar fractionated scheme to that used during cancer patients’ treatment (2 Gy/fraction/day). Our results demonstrated that macrophages sensitize RKO to radiation-induced apoptosis, while protecting SW1463 cells. Additionally, the co-culture with macrophages increased the mRNA expression of metabolism- and survival-related genes more in SW1463 than in RKO. The presence of macrophages also upregulated glucose transporter 1 expression in irradiated SW1463, but not in RKO cells. In addition, the influence of cancer cells on the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, upon radiation exposure, was also evaluated. In the presence of RKO or SW1463, irradiated macrophages exhibit higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF, IL6, CCL2 and CCR7, and of anti-inflammatory CCL18. However, RKO cells induce an increase of macrophage pro-inflammatory IL1B, while SW1463 cells promote higher pro-inflammatory CXCL8 and CD80, and also anti-inflammatory VCAN and IL10 levels. Thus, our data demonstrated that macrophages and cancer cells mutually influence their response to radiation. Notably, conditioned medium from irradiated co-cultures increased non-irradiated RKO cell migration and invasion and did not impact on angiogenesis in a chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane

  7. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies.

  8. A potential target gene for the host-directed therapy of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Pei; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xing; Yao, Yake; Jin, Xiaozheng; Sun, Yilan; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), one of the major bacterial pathogens for lethal infectious diseases, is capable of surviving within the phagosomes of host alveolar macrophages; therefore, host genetic variations may alter the susceptibility to MTB. In this study, to identify host genes exploited by MTB during infection, genes were non-selectively inactivated using lentivirus-based antisense RNA methods in Raw264.7 macrophages, and the cells that survived virulent MTB infection were then screened. Following DNA sequencing of the surviving cell clones, 26 host genes affecting susceptibility to MTB were identified and their pathways were analyzed by bioinformatics analysis. In total, 9 of these genes were confirmed as positive regulators of collagen α-5(IV) chain (Col4a5) expression, a gene encoding a type IV collagen subunit present on the cell surface. The knockdown of Col4a5 consistently suppressed intracellular mycobacterial viability, promoting the survival of Raw264.7 macrophages following mycobacterial infection. Furthermore, Col4a5 deficiency lowered the pH levels of intracellular vesicles, including endosomes, lysosomes and phagosomes in the Raw264.7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of Col4a5 post-translationally increased microsomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase activity in macrophages, leading to the acidification of intracellular vesicles. Our findings reveal a novel role for Col4a5 in the regulation of macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection and identify Col4a5 as a potential target for the host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapy.

  9. Increase in the nitric oxide release without changes in cell viability of macrophages after laser therapy with 660 and 808 nm lasers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Igor Henrique Morais; de Andrade, Samantha Cardoso; de Faria, Andreza Barkokebas Santos; Fonsêca, Deborah Daniela Diniz; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro; Carvalho, Alessandra Albuquerque Tavares; da Silva, Wylla Tatiana Ferreira; de Castro, Raul Manhães; Leão, Jair Carneiro

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with different parameters and wavelengths on nitric oxide (NO) release and cell viability. Irradiation was performed with Ga-Al-As laser, continuous mode and wavelengths of 660 and 808 nm at different energy and power densities. For each wavelength, powers of 30, 50, and 100 mW and times of 10, 30, and 60 s were used. NO release was measured using Griess reaction, and cell viability was evaluated by mitochondrial reduction of bromide 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to formazan. LLLT promoted statistically significant changes in NO release and MTT value only at the wavelength of 660 nm (p < 0.05). LLLT also promoted an increase in the NO release and cell viability when the energy densities 64 (p = 0.04) and 214 J/cm(2) (p = 0.012), respectively, were used. LLLT has a significant impact on NO release without affecting cell viability, but the significance of these findings in the inflammatory response needs to be further studied.

  10. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Macrophage-directed immunotherapy as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, M.; Naraparaju, V. R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) and adjuvant treatment with serum vitamin D3-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (DBPMAF) was examined using a mouse SCCVII tumour model (squamous cell carcinoma). The results show that DBPMAF can markedly enhance the curative effect of PDT. The most effective DBPMAF therapy consisted of a combination of intraperitoneal and peritumoral injections (50 and 0.5 ng kg-1 respectively) administered on days 0, 4, 8 and 12 after PDT. Used with a PDT treatment curative to 25% of the treated tumours, this DBPMAF regimen boosted the cures to 100%. The DBPMAF therapy alone showed no notable effect on the growth of SCCVII tumour. The PDT-induced immunosuppression, assessed by the evaluation of delayed-type contact hypersensitivity response in treated mice, was greatly reduced with the combined DBPMAF treatment. These observations suggest that the activation of macrophages in PDT-treated mice by adjuvant immunotherapy has a synergistic effect on tumour cures. As PDT not only reduces tumour burden but also induces inflammation, it is proposed that recruitment of the activated macrophages to the inflamed tumour lesions is the major factor for the complete eradication of tumours. PMID:9010027

  12. Macrophage-directed immunotherapy as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, M; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) and adjuvant treatment with serum vitamin D3-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (DBPMAF) was examined using a mouse SCCVII tumour model (squamous cell carcinoma). The results show that DBPMAF can markedly enhance the curative effect of PDT. The most effective DBPMAF therapy consisted of a combination of intraperitoneal and peritumoral injections (50 and 0.5 ng kg-1 respectively) administered on days 0, 4, 8 and 12 after PDT. Used with a PDT treatment curative to 25% of the treated tumours, this DBPMAF regimen boosted the cures to 100%. The DBPMAF therapy alone showed no notable effect on the growth of SCCVII tumour. The PDT-induced immunosuppression, assessed by the evaluation of delayed-type contact hypersensitivity response in treated mice, was greatly reduced with the combined DBPMAF treatment. These observations suggest that the activation of macrophages in PDT-treated mice by adjuvant immunotherapy has a synergistic effect on tumour cures. As PDT not only reduces tumour burden but also induces inflammation, it is proposed that recruitment of the activated macrophages to the inflamed tumour lesions is the major factor for the complete eradication of tumours.

  13. FUNCTIONAL PROTEOME OF MACROPHAGE CARRIED NANOFORMULATED ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY DEMONSTRATES ENHANCED PARTICLE CARRYING CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L.; Veerubhotla, Ram S.; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory has pioneered the development of long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART). NanoART serves to improve drug compliance, toxicities, and access to viral reservoirs. These all function to improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells’ functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  14. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor–node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages. PMID:27141406

  15. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  16. Spontaneous hybridization of macrophages and Meth A sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Busund, Lill-Tove R; Killie, Mette K; Bartnes, Kristian; Olsen, Randi; Seljelid, Rolf

    2002-04-01

    We present evidence of hybridization between Meth A sarcoma cells and syngeneic as well as semigeneic peritoneal macrophages. The resultant hybrids are characterized by morphology, membrane markers, ploidy, chromosomal content and functional features. Briefly, after a few days of coculture, cells appeared with morphology intermediate between the 2 original cell types. Typical macrophage surface molecules appeared in the hybrids. Meth A cells were labeled with red fluorescence and macrophages with green fluorescence. After 4 days in vitro, hybrids with yellow fluorescence appeared. Macrophages from BALB.K mice (H-2 K(k)) were cocultivated with Meth A cells from BALB/c mice (H-2 K(d)). The semigeneic hybrids displayed both specificities, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. The hybrids appeared moderately phagocytic, less so than the macrophages and markedly more so than the essentially nonphagocytic Meth A cells. The hybrids had a mean number of 76 chromosomes, as opposed to 53 in the Meth A cells and 40 in the macrophages. The macrophage DNA index was set at 1; Meth A cells were found to have an index of 1.6 in G1 phase, and the hybrids had a 2.6 index. The hybrids grew more slowly in vitro than Meth A cells, but grew faster in vivo.

  17. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Madden, Victoria; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T; Eron, Joseph J; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell-only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection.

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes breast cancer cell survival by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhong; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Lin, Yong; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Li, Hongyuan; Chouaib, Salem; Ren, Guosheng

    2015-10-06

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in cancer cell survival, however, the mechanism of which remains elusive. In this study, we found that COX-2 was abundantly expressed in breast TAMs, which was correlated to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Ectopic over-expression of COX-2 in TAMs enhanced breast cancer cell survival both in vitro and in vivo. COX-2 in TAMs was determined to be essential for the induction and maintenance of M2-phenotype macrophage polarity. COX-2(+) TAMs promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and survival by increasing Bcl-2 and P-gp and decreasing Bax in cancer cells. Furthermore, COX-2 in TAMs induced the expression of COX-2 in breast cancer cells, which in turn promoted M2 macrophage polarization. Inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in cancer cells suppressed COX-2(+) TAMs-induced cancer cell survival. These findings suggest that COX-2, functions as a key cancer promoting factor by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells, which could be exploited for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

  20. Kinetics of tumor necrosis factor production by photodynamic-therapy-activated macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pass, Harvey I.; Evans, Steven; Perry, Roger; Matthews, Wilbert

    1990-07-01

    The ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to activate macrophages and produce cytokines, specifically tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is unknown. Three day thioglycolate elicited macrophages were incubated with 25 ug/mi Photofrin II (P11) for 2 hour, after which they were subjected to 630 nm light with fluences of 0-1800 J/m. The amount of TNF produced in the system as well as macrophage viability was measured 1, 3, 6, and 18 hours after POT. The level of TNF produced by the macrophages was significantly elevated over control levels 6 hours after POT and the absolute level of tumor necrosis factor production was influenced by the treatment energy and the resulting macrophage cytotoxicity. These data suggest that POT therapy induced cytotoxicity in vivo may be amplified by macrophage stimulation to secrete cytokines and these cytokines may also participate in other direct/indirect photodynamic therapy effects, i.e. immunosuppression, vascular effects.

  1. Surface engineering of macrophages with nucleic acid aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shunsuke; Moriyama, Rui; Mori, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-21

    In order to enhance the interactions between macrophages and cancer cells, thiol-terminated nucleic acid aptamers were immobilized on methacryloyl-functionalised carbohydrates of macrophages. The adhesion of cancer cells on the surface modified macrophages was significantly accelerated.

  2. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  3. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T.; Eron, Joseph J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell–only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  4. Lectins Offer New Perspectives in the Development of Macrophage-Targeted Therapies for COPD/Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Mukaro, Violet R.; Bylund, Johan; Hodge, Greg; Holmes, Mark; Jersmann, Hubertus; Reynolds, Paul N.; Hodge, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the defective ability of alveolar macrophages (AM) to phagocytose apoptotic cells (‘efferocytosis’) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema (COPD) could be therapeutically improved using the C-type lectin, mannose binding lectin (MBL), although the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. An S-type lectin, galectin-3, is also known to regulate macrophage phenotype and function, via interaction with its receptor CD98. We hypothesized that defective expression of galectin/CD98 would be associated with defective efferocytosis in COPD and that mechanisms would include effects on cytoskeletal remodeling and macrophage phenotype and glutathione (GSH) availability. Galectin-3 was measured by ELISA in BAL from controls, smokers and current/ex-smokers with COPD. CD98 was measured on AM using flow cytometry. We assessed the effects of galectin-3 on efferocytosis, CD98, GSH, actin polymerisation, rac activation, and the involvement of PI3K (using β-actin probing and wortmannin inhibition) in vitro using human AM and/or MH-S macrophage cell line. Significant decreases in BAL galectin-3 and AM CD98 were observed in BAL from both current- and ex-smoker COPD subjects vs controls. Galectin 3 increased efferocytosis via an increase in active GTP bound Rac1. This was confirmed with β-actin probing and the role of PI3K was confirmed using wortmannin inhibition. The increased efferocytosis was associated with increases in available glutathione and expression of CD98. We provide evidence for a role of airway lectins in the failed efferocytosis in COPD, supporting their further investigation as potential macrophage-targeted therapies. PMID:23441163

  5. Lectins offer new perspectives in the development of macrophage-targeted therapies for COPD/emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mukaro, Violet R; Bylund, Johan; Hodge, Greg; Holmes, Mark; Jersmann, Hubertus; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the defective ability of alveolar macrophages (AM) to phagocytose apoptotic cells ('efferocytosis') in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema (COPD) could be therapeutically improved using the C-type lectin, mannose binding lectin (MBL), although the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. An S-type lectin, galectin-3, is also known to regulate macrophage phenotype and function, via interaction with its receptor CD98. We hypothesized that defective expression of galectin/CD98 would be associated with defective efferocytosis in COPD and that mechanisms would include effects on cytoskeletal remodeling and macrophage phenotype and glutathione (GSH) availability. Galectin-3 was measured by ELISA in BAL from controls, smokers and current/ex-smokers with COPD. CD98 was measured on AM using flow cytometry. We assessed the effects of galectin-3 on efferocytosis, CD98, GSH, actin polymerisation, rac activation, and the involvement of PI3K (using β-actin probing and wortmannin inhibition) in vitro using human AM and/or MH-S macrophage cell line. Significant decreases in BAL galectin-3 and AM CD98 were observed in BAL from both current- and ex-smoker COPD subjects vs controls. Galectin 3 increased efferocytosis via an increase in active GTP bound Rac1. This was confirmed with β-actin probing and the role of PI3K was confirmed using wortmannin inhibition. The increased efferocytosis was associated with increases in available glutathione and expression of CD98. We provide evidence for a role of airway lectins in the failed efferocytosis in COPD, supporting their further investigation as potential macrophage-targeted therapies.

  6. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-11-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth.

  7. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth. PMID:27683110

  8. Macrophages in Immunopathology of Atherosclerosis: A Target for Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor A; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Gratchev, Alexei; Kotyashova, Svetlana Y; Nikiforov, Nikita G; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Immunopathology plays important roles in the development of different life-threatening diseases, such as atherosclerosis and its consequences (acute myocardial infarction and stroke), cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases. Effective modulation of the immune system may significantly increase the efficacy of prevention and therapy efforts. Currently there are no marketed drugs capable of normalizing immune system function in an intrinsic and comprehensive way. Here, we describe a test system designed for complex analysis of monocyte activity in individuals to diagnose immunopathology and monitor treatment efficacy. This cell-based test system may also be useful for screening compounds with an immune-correcting effects. Both diagnostic and screening systems are based on primary culture of human monocytes and/or monocyte-derived macrophages. This is the first step in creating a method for assessment of macrophage activity, which is required for further development of immune-correcting drugs. The existing preliminary data provide the basis for realization of this idea. PMID:25312739

  9. Modulation of macrophage antitumor potential by apoptotic lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Voss, Jorine J L P; Ford, Catriona A; Petrova, Sofia; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Pound, John D; Holland, Pam; Giotti, Bruno; Freeman, Tom C; Gregory, Christopher D

    2017-06-01

    In aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), constitutive apoptosis of a proportion of the tumor cell population can promote net tumor growth. This is associated with the accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that clear apoptotic cells and exhibit pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation profiles characteristic of reparatory, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic programs. Here we consider further the activation status of these TAMs. We compare their transcriptomic profile with that of a range of other macrophage types from various tissues noting especially their expression of classically activated (IFN-γ and LPS) gene clusters - typically antitumor - in addition to their previously described protumor phenotype. To understand the impact of apoptotic cells on the macrophage activation state, we cocultured apoptotic lymphoma cells with classically activated macrophages (M(IFN-γ/LPS), also known as M1, macrophages). Although untreated and M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages were able to bind apoptotic lymphoma cells equally well, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages displayed enhanced ability to phagocytose them. We found that direct exposure of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages to apoptotic lymphoma cells caused switching towards a protumor activation state (often referred to as M2-like) with concomitant inhibition of antitumor activity that was a characteristic feature of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages. Indeed, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages exposed to apoptotic lymphoma cells displayed increased lymphoma growth-promoting activities. Antilymphoma activity by M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages was mediated, in part, by galectin-3, a pleiotropic glycoprotein involved in apoptotic cell clearance that is strongly expressed by lymphoma TAMs but not lymphoma cells. Intriguingly, aggressive lymphoma growth was markedly impaired in mice deficient in galectin-3, suggesting either that host galectin-3-mediated antilymphoma activity is required to sustain net tumor growth or that additional functions of galectin-3

  10. Modulation of macrophage antitumor potential by apoptotic lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Jorine J L P; Ford, Catriona A; Petrova, Sofia; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Pound, John D; Holland, Pam; Giotti, Bruno; Freeman, Tom C; Gregory, Christopher D

    2017-01-01

    In aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), constitutive apoptosis of a proportion of the tumor cell population can promote net tumor growth. This is associated with the accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that clear apoptotic cells and exhibit pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation profiles characteristic of reparatory, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic programs. Here we consider further the activation status of these TAMs. We compare their transcriptomic profile with that of a range of other macrophage types from various tissues noting especially their expression of classically activated (IFN-γ and LPS) gene clusters – typically antitumor – in addition to their previously described protumor phenotype. To understand the impact of apoptotic cells on the macrophage activation state, we cocultured apoptotic lymphoma cells with classically activated macrophages (M(IFN-γ/LPS), also known as M1, macrophages). Although untreated and M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages were able to bind apoptotic lymphoma cells equally well, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages displayed enhanced ability to phagocytose them. We found that direct exposure of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages to apoptotic lymphoma cells caused switching towards a protumor activation state (often referred to as M2-like) with concomitant inhibition of antitumor activity that was a characteristic feature of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages. Indeed, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages exposed to apoptotic lymphoma cells displayed increased lymphoma growth-promoting activities. Antilymphoma activity by M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages was mediated, in part, by galectin-3, a pleiotropic glycoprotein involved in apoptotic cell clearance that is strongly expressed by lymphoma TAMs but not lymphoma cells. Intriguingly, aggressive lymphoma growth was markedly impaired in mice deficient in galectin-3, suggesting either that host galectin-3-mediated antilymphoma activity is required to sustain net tumor growth or that additional functions of

  11. M1 macrophages promote aortic valve calcification mediated by microRNA-214/TWIST1 pathway in valvular interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Dong-Dong; Xu, Hai-Xia; Wang, Teng; Pan, Min; Shi, Jia-Hai; Zhu, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The identification of the biological function of M1 macrophages and the mechanism underlying their role in valvular interstitial cell (VIC) calcification may provide therapeutic targets for the prevention of aortic valve calcification (AVC). This study investigated the mechanism by which M1 macrophages and macrophage-derived microvesicles (MVs) affected the calcification of VICs. An additional aim was to investigate the involvement of the miR-214 pathway in this process. Methods: The M1 or M2 macrophage phenotype in human calcific aortic valve was confirmed by gene expression analysis of M1 or M2 macrophage markers. Two macrophage cell lines (BMDMs and RAW 264.7 macrophages) were transformed into M1 macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. To investigate the mechanism by which M1 macrophages promoted VIC calcification, the generated M1 macrophages and macrophage-derived MVs were co-cultured with VICs and VICs were then used for calcification or signals analysis. In addition, a hypercholesterolemic apoE-/- AVC murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of miR-214 specific-siRNA (miR-214 inhibitor). Results: Macrophages in calcific aortic valves showed M1-directed polarization. In the VICs co-cultured with LPS-stimulated M1 macrophages and macrophage-derived MVs, VIC calcification was enhanced, and the expression of TWIST1, a direct target of miR-214, was downregulated. We showed that knockdown of TWIST1 serves as a responding molecule for miR-214 and reversed the anti-calcification action of miR-214 inhibitor, mediating signal delivery by the M1 macrophage-derived MVs to VICs and promoting VIC calcification. When M1 macrophages co-cultured with VICs, TWIST1 overexpression in M1 macrophages had no effect on the expression of TWIST1 in VICs. As shown by intravenous therapy, knockdown of miR-214 in mice seemed to improve AVC in apoE-/- mice with high-cholesterol (HC)-diet induced AVC. Conclusions: These findings suggested that M1

  12. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  13. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury via the activation of M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanqiu; Zhang, Li; Fu, Bo; Zhang, Jianrong; Hong, Quan; Hu, Jie; Li, Diangeng; Luo, Congjuan; Cui, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Fei; Chen, Xiangmei

    2014-06-24

    The mortality of rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is still high, as there is no effective therapy. It has been shown that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can induce M2 macrophages, which mediate MSC protection in other experimental inflammation-related organ injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of macrophage activation in MSC therapy of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. MSCs were injected into glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis mice. Renal injury was evaluated using the serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, renal pathology and acute tubular necrosis score. The distribution of MSCs was detected using two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging. Immunofluorescence of anti-F4/80 and anti-CD206 was performed to determine macrophages and M2 macrophages in the tissues of the kidney, and M2 macrophage infiltration was also evaluated using western blotting analyses. After depletion of macrophages using clodronate liposomes at the phase of kidney repair, renal injury was re-evaluated. RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated with lipopolysaccharide and co-cultured with MSCs and subsequently visualised using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, disparate phenotype macrophages, including normal macrophages (M0), lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages (M1), and MSC-co-cultured macrophages (M2), were infused into mice with AKI, which were pre-treated with liposomal clodronate. In vivo infusion of MSCs protected AKI mice from renal function impairment and severe tubular injury, which was accompanied by a time-dependent increase in CD206-positive M2 macrophage infiltration. In addition, depleting macrophages with clodronate delayed restoration of AKI. In vitro, macrophages co-cultured with MSCs acquired an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, which was characterised by an increased expression of CD206 and the secretory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. The concentrations of IL-10, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor

  15. Dendritic Cells and Macrophages: Sentinels in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Weisheit, Christina K.; Engel, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells and macrophages) are closely related immune cells with central roles in anti-infectious defense and maintenance of organ integrity. The canonical function of dendritic cells is the activation of T cells, whereas macrophages remove apoptotic cells and microbes by phagocytosis. In the kidney, these cell types form an intricate system of mononuclear phagocytes that surveys against injury and infection and contributes to organ homeostasis and tissue repair but may also promote progression of CKD. This review summarizes the general functions and classification of dendritic cells and macrophages in the immune system and recapitulates why overlapping definitions and historically separate research have created controversy about their tasks. Their roles in acute kidney disease, CKD, and renal transplantation are described, and therapeutic strategy to modify these cells for therapeutic purposes is discussed. PMID:25568218

  16. Osteoclasts and giant cells: macrophage–macrophage fusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vignery, Agnès

    2000-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a ubiquitous event that occurs in a wide range of biological processes. While intracellular membrane fusion mediating organelle trafficking is well understood, much less is known about cell–cell fusion mediating sperm cell–oocyte, myoblast–myoblast and macrophage–macrophage fusion. In the case of mononuclear phagocytes, their fusion is not only associated with the differentiation of osteoclasts, cells which play a key role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, but also of giant cells that are present in chronic inflammatory reactions and in tumours. Despite the biological and pathophysiological importance of intercellular fusion events, the actual molecular mechanism of macrophage fusion is still unclear. One of the main research themes in my laboratory has been to investigate the molecular mechanism of mononuclear phagocyte fusion. Our hypothesis has been that macrophage–macrophage fusion, similar to virus–cell fusion, is mediated by specific cell surface proteins. But, in contrast with myoblasts and sperm cells, macrophage fusion is a rare event that occurs in specific instances. To test our hypothesis, we established an in vitro cell–cell fusion assay as a model system which uses alveolar macrophages. Upon multinucleation, these macrophages acquire the osteoclast phenotype. This indicates that multinucleation of macrophages leads to a specific and novel functional phenotype in macrophages. To identify the components of the fusion machinery, we generated four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which block the fusion of alveolar macrophages and purified the unique antigen recognized by these mAbs. This led us to the cloning of MFR (Macrophage Fusion Receptor). MFR was cloned simultaneously as P84/SHPS-1/SIRPα/BIT by other laboratories. We subsequently showed that the recombinant extracellular domain of MFR blocks fusion. Most recently, we identified a lower molecular weight form of MFR that is missing two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig

  17. Regulation of Macrophage, Dendritic Cell, and Microglial Phenotype and Function by the SOCS Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sarah M.; Heller, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells of dynamic phenotype that rapidly respond to external stimuli in the microenvironment by altering their phenotype to respond to and to direct the immune response. The ability to dynamically change phenotype must be carefully regulated to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses and subsequently to promote resolution of inflammation. The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play a key role in regulating macrophage phenotype. In this review, we summarize research to date from mouse and human studies on the role of the SOCS proteins in determining the phenotype and function of macrophages. We will also touch on the influence of the SOCS on dendritic cell (DC) and microglial phenotype and function. The molecular mechanisms of SOCS function in macrophages and DCs are discussed, along with how dysregulation of SOCS expression or function can lead to alterations in macrophage/DC/microglial phenotype and function and to disease. Regulation of SOCS expression by microRNA is discussed. Novel therapies and unanswered questions with regard to SOCS regulation of monocyte–macrophage phenotype and function are highlighted. PMID:26579124

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Controls M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Foam Cell Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisu; Riek, Amy E.; Weng, Sherry; Petty, Marvin; Kim, David; Colonna, Marco; Cella, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are essential in atherosclerosis progression, but regulation of the M1 versus M2 phenotype and their role in cholesterol deposition are unclear. We demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key regulator of macrophage differentiation and cholesterol deposition. Macrophages from diabetic patients were classically or alternatively stimulated and then exposed to oxidized LDL. Alternative stimulation into M2 macrophages lead to increased foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor CD36 and SR-A1 expression. ER stress induced by alternative stimulation was necessary to generate the M2 phenotype through JNK activation and increased PPARγ expression. The absence of CD36 or SR-A1 signaling independently of modified cholesterol uptake decreased ER stress and prevented the M2 differentiation typically induced by alternative stimulation. Moreover, suppression of ER stress shifted differentiated M2 macrophages toward an M1 phenotype and subsequently suppressed foam cell formation by increasing HDL- and apoA-1-induced cholesterol efflux indicating suppression of macrophage ER stress as a potential therapy for atherosclerosis. PMID:22356914

  19. Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Charriere, Guillaume M.; Cousin, Beatrice; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Saillan-Barreau, Corinne; Andre, Mireille; Massoudi, Ali; Dani, Christian; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis . E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

    2006-10-15

    We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

  20. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Suppress Phagolysosome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric; Choe, Yoona; Ng, Tat Fong; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The eye is an immune-privileged microenvironment that has adapted several mechanisms of immune regulation to prevent inflammation. One of these potential mechanisms is retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) altering phagocytosis in macrophages. Methods The conditioned media of RPE eyecups from eyes of healthy mice and mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) were used to treat primary macrophage phagocytizing pHrodo bacterial bioparticles. In addition, the neuropeptides were depleted from the conditioned media of healthy RPE eyecups and used to treat phagocytizing macrophages. The conditioned media from healthy and EAU RPE eyecups were assayed for IL-6, and IL-6 was added to the healthy conditioned media, and neutralized in the EAU conditioned media. The macrophages were treated with the conditioned media and assayed for fluorescence. The macrophages were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity, relative to active phagolysosomes, was measured. Also, the macrophages were assayed using fluorescent viability dye staining. Results The conditioned media from healthy, but not from EAU RPE eyecups suppressed phagolysosome activation. Depletion of the neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y from the healthy RPE eyecup conditioned media resulted in macrophage death. In the EAU RPE eyecup conditioned media was 0.96 ± 0.18 ng/mL of IL-6, and when neutralized the conditioned media suppressed phagolysosome activation. Conclusions The healthy RPE through soluble molecules, including alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y, suppresses the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages. In EAU, the IL-6 produced by the RPE promotes the activation of phagolysosomes in macrophages. These results demonstrate that under healthy conditions, RPE promotes an altered pathway of phagocytized material in macrophages with implications on antigen processing and clearance. PMID:28241314

  2. Bone marrow derived macrophages fuse with intestine stromal cells and contribute to chronic fibrosis after radiation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Han; Chang, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Yi-Chih; Chen, Su-Liang; Huang, Tze-Sing; Chiu, Jeng-Fong; Ch'ang, Hui-Ju

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been demonstrated to play a critical role in intestine regeneration. However, organ fibrosis was one of the major side effects of bone marrow (BM) transplantation. It warrants further investigation on the mechanisms of BM cell therapy in radiation induced intestine damage. We established three murine models to evaluate BMDC within intestines after radiation, including cre-loxP system of transgenic mice. In vitro co-culture between murine BM with human intestine stromal cells was also performed to measure the level of fusion and fibrosis after treatment with anti-fibrotic agents or after macrophage depletion. Despite complete recovery of epithelial mucosa from radiation damage, we found persistent proliferation and repopulation of BMDC within the lamina propria. Fusion between BM derived monocytic and intestine stromal cells correlated with the level of fibrosis and proliferation index. Depleting macrophages genetically using CD11b-DTR mouse model or pharmacologically using clodronate liposome reduced the level of cell fusion and intestine fibrosis. Fibrotic cues from intestine enhance fusion between BM-derived monocytes/macrophages with intestine stromal cells. The fusion hybrids promote cell cycle re-entry, proliferation and reinforce fibrosis signal. Depleting macrophages interferes with cell fusion and ameliorates radiation-induced intestine fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatic CD206-positive macrophages express amphiregulin to promote the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T cells in HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Sun, Xiaomei; Yang, Lihua; Gong, Zuojiong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a major cause of chronic liver inflammation worldwide. Innate and adaptive immune responses work together to restrain or eliminate hepatitis B virus in the liver. Compromised or failed adaptive immune response results in persistent virus replication and spread. How to promote antiviral immunity is a research focus for hepatitis B virus prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in the regulation of antiviral immunity. We found that F4/80(+)CD206(+)CD80(lo/+) macrophages were a particular hepatic macrophage subset that expressed amphiregulin in our mouse hepatitis B virus infection model. CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin promoted the immunosuppressive activity of intrahepatic regulatory T cells, demonstrated by higher expression of CTLA-4, ICOS, and CD39, as well as stronger inhibition of antiviral function of CD8(+) T cells. Amphiregulin-neutralizing antibody diminished the effect of CD206(+) macrophages on regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin activated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in regulatory T cells, and this mammalian target of rapamycin activation was essential for promotion of regulatory T cell activity by CD206(+) macrophages. Adoptive transfer of CD206(+) macrophages into hepatitis B virus-infected mice increased cytoplasmic hepatitis B virus DNA in hepatocytes and also increased serum hepatitis B surface antigen. The antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells was decreased after macrophage transfer. Therefore, our research indicated that amphiregulin produced by CD206(+) macrophages plays an important role in modulating regulatory T cell function and subsequently restrains the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells. Our study offers new insights into the immunomodulation in hepatitis B virus infection.

  4. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  5. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

    PubMed

    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  6. An assay for macrophage-mediated regulation of endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aslam Ali; Apte, Rajendra S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an assay that quantifies the potential of macrophages to regulate proliferation of endothelial cells. We show that young mice macrophages can be distinguished from old mice macrophages by their ability to inhibit vascular endothelial cell proliferation. While young mice macrophages robustly inhibit proliferation, old mice macrophages fail to do so and actually promote the proliferation of endothelial cells. In this report, we outline a technique that directly assesses the effect of macrophages on modulation of endothelial cell proliferation. This assay will help us in understanding the mechanisms of macrophage function in several disease states characterized by abnormal angiogenesis including cancers, angiogenic eye disease and atherosclerotic heart disease.

  7. Cell and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh C; Zacks, David N

    2014-01-01

    Replacement or repair of a dysfunctional gene combined with promoting cell survival is a two-pronged approach that addresses an unmet need in the therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we discuss various strategies toward achieving both goals: transplantation of wild-type cells to replace degenerating cells and to rescue gene function, sequential gene and cell therapy, and in vivo reprogramming of rods to cones. These approaches highlight cutting-edge advances in cell and gene therapy, and cellular lineage conversion in order to devise new therapies for various retinal degenerative diseases.

  8. Macrophages: supportive cells for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2014-03-01

    Macrophages, and more broadly inflammation, have been considered for a long time as bad markers of tissue homeostasis. However, if it is indisputable that macrophages are associated with many diseases in a deleterious way, new roles have emerged, showing beneficial properties of macrophages during tissue repair and regeneration. This discrepancy is likely due to the high plasticity of macrophages, which may exhibit a wide range of phenotypes and functions depending on their environment. Therefore, regardless of their role in immunity, macrophages play a myriad of roles in the maintenance and recovery of tissue homeostasis. They take a major part in the resolution of inflammation. They also exert various effects of parenchymal cells, including stem and progenitor cell, of which they regulate the fate. In the present review, few examples from various tissues are presented to illustrate that, beyond their specific properties in a given tissue, common features have been described that sustain a role of macrophages in the recovery and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  9. M2 polarization of macrophages facilitates arsenic-induced cell transformation of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiajun; Xu, Wenhua; Chen, Jian; Li, Hui; Dai, Lu; Frank, Jacqueline A; Peng, Shaojun; Wang, Siying; Chen, Gang

    2017-03-28

    The alterations in microenvironment upon chronic arsenic exposure may contribute to arsenic-induced lung carcinogenesis. Immune cells, such as macrophages, play an important role in mediating the microenvironment in the lungs. Macrophages carry out their functions after activation. There are two activation status for macrophages: classical (M1) or alternative (M2); the latter is associated with tumorigenesis. Our previous work showed that long-term arsenic exposure induces transformation of lung epithelial cells. However, the crosstalk between epithelial cells and macrophages upon arsenic exposure has not been investigated. In this study, using a co-culture system in which human lung epithelial cells are cultured with macrophages, we determined that long-term arsenic exposure polarizes macrophages towards M2 status through ROS generation. Co-culture with epithelial cells further enhanced the polarization of macrophages as well as transformation of epithelial cells, while blocking macrophage M2 polarization decreased the transformation. In addition, macrophage M2 polarization decreased autophagy activity, which may account for increased cell transformation of epithelial cells with co-culture of macrophages.

  10. M2 polarization of macrophages facilitates arsenic-induced cell transformation of lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Dai, Lu; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Peng, Shaojun; Wang, Siying; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The alterations in microenvironment upon chronic arsenic exposure may contribute to arsenic-induced lung carcinogenesis. Immune cells, such as macrophages, play an important role in mediating the microenvironment in the lungs. Macrophages carry out their functions after activation. There are two activation status for macrophages: classical (M1) or alternative (M2); the latter is associated with tumorigenesis. Our previous work showed that long-term arsenic exposure induces transformation of lung epithelial cells. However, the crosstalk between epithelial cells and macrophages upon arsenic exposure has not been investigated. In this study, using a co-culture system in which human lung epithelial cells are cultured with macrophages, we determined that long-term arsenic exposure polarizes macrophages towards M2 status through ROS generation. Co-culture with epithelial cells further enhanced the polarization of macrophages as well as transformation of epithelial cells, while blocking macrophage M2 polarization decreased the transformation. In addition, macrophage M2 polarization decreased autophagy activity, which may account for increased cell transformation of epithelial cells with co-culture of macrophages. PMID:28423485

  11. Therapeutic Antibodies Targeting CSF1 Impede Macrophage Recruitment in a Xenograft Model of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongwei; Clarkson, Paul W.; Gao, Dongxia; Pacheco, Marina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2010-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor is a neoplastic disease of joints that can cause severe morbidity. Recurrences are common following local therapy, and no effective medical therapy currently exists. Recent work has demonstrated that all cases overexpress macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1), usually as a consequence of an activating gene translocation, resulting in an influx of macrophages that form the bulk of the tumor. New anti-CSF1 drugs have been developed; however there are no preclinical models suitable for evaluation of drug benefits in this disease. In this paper, we describe a novel renal subcapsular xenograft model of tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Using this model, we demonstrate that an anti-CSF1 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibits host macrophage infiltration into this tumor. The results from this model support clinical trials of equivalent humanized agents and anti-CSF1R small molecule drugs in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor refractory to conventional local therapy. PMID:20981142

  12. Therapeutic Antibodies Targeting CSF1 Impede Macrophage Recruitment in a Xenograft Model of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongwei; Clarkson, Paul W; Gao, Dongxia; Pacheco, Marina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2010-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor is a neoplastic disease of joints that can cause severe morbidity. Recurrences are common following local therapy, and no effective medical therapy currently exists. Recent work has demonstrated that all cases overexpress macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1), usually as a consequence of an activating gene translocation, resulting in an influx of macrophages that form the bulk of the tumor. New anti-CSF1 drugs have been developed; however there are no preclinical models suitable for evaluation of drug benefits in this disease. In this paper, we describe a novel renal subcapsular xenograft model of tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Using this model, we demonstrate that an anti-CSF1 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibits host macrophage infiltration into this tumor. The results from this model support clinical trials of equivalent humanized agents and anti-CSF1R small molecule drugs in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor refractory to conventional local therapy.

  13. HIV-related proteins prolong macrophage survival through induction of Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhihong; Fan, Xian; Staitieh, Bashar; Bedi, Chetna; Spearman, Paul; Guidot, David M; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2017-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1(TREM-1) is a member of the superimmunoglobulin receptor family. We have previously shown that TREM-1 prolongs survival of macrophages treated with lipoolysaccharide through Egr2-Bcl2 signaling. Recent studies suggest a role for TREM-1 in viral immunity. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) targets the monocyte/macrophage lineage at varying stages of infection. Emerging data suggest that macrophages are key reservoirs for latent HIV even in individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Here, we investigated the potential role of TREM-1 in HIV latency in macrophages. Our data show that human macrophages infected with HIV show an increased expression of TREM-1. In parallel, direct exposure to the HIV-related proteins Tat or gp120 induces TREM-1 expression in macrophages and confers anti-apoptotic attributes.NF-κB p65 silencing identified that these proteins induce TREM-1 in p65-dependent manner. TREM-1 silencing in macrophages exposed to HIV-related proteins led to increased caspase 3 activation and reduced Bcl-2 expression, rendering them susceptible to apotosis. These novel data reveal that TREM-1 may play a critical role in establishing HIV reservoir in macrophages by inhibiting apoptosis. Therefore, targeting TREM-1 could be a novel therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of the HIV reservoir, at least within the macrophage pools. PMID:28181540

  14. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs.

  15. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D.; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25319335

  16. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  17. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  18. Rosmarinic acid potentiates ATRA-induced macrophage differentiation in acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4 cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sook-Kyoung; Noh, Eui-Kyu; Yoon, Dong-Joon; Jo, Jae-Cheol; Koh, SuJin; Baek, Jin Ho; Park, Jae-Hoo; Min, Young Joo; Kim, Hawk

    2015-01-15

    Rosmarinic acid (RA, an ester of caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid) has a number of biological activities, but little is known about anti-leukemic activities of RA combined with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. We examined the differentiation marker, CD11b, in bone marrow cells (BMC) of an APL patient, in NB4 cells (APL cell line), and in normal BMC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy subjects by flow cytometric analysis. ATRA/RA induced expression of CD11b in the BMC of the APL patient and in NB4 cells, but not in normal BMC or PBMC. Therefore, we realized that RA potentiated ATRA-induced macrophage differentiation in APL cells. Further characterization of the induced macrophages showed that they exhibited morphological changes and were able to phagocytose and generate reactive oxygen species. Th also had typical expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Moreover, the expression of CD11b(+) and CD14(+) cells depended on ERK-NF-κB axis activation. Together, these results indicate that RA potentiates ATRA-induced macrophage differentiation in APL cells. Thus, RA may play an important role as an appurtenant differentiation agent for functional macrophage differentiation in APL. Additionally, the differentiated macrophages might have a normal life span and, they could die. These data indicate that co-treatment with RA and ATRA has potential as an anti-leukemic therapy in APL.

  19. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  20. CCL2/EGF positive feedback loop between cancer cells and macrophages promotes cell migration and invasion in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-min; Yang, Jie-gang; Ren, Jian-Gang; He, Ke-fei; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents the most frequent malignancy in the head and neck region, and the survival rate has not been improved significantly over the past three decades. It has been reported the infiltrated macrophages contribute to the malignant progression of HNSCC. However, the crosstalk between macrophages and cancer cells remains poorly understood. In the present study, we explored interactions between monocytes/macrophages and HNSCC cells by establishing the direct co-culture system, and found that the crosstalk promoted the migration and invasion of cancer cells by enhancing the invadopodia formation through a CCL2/EGF positive feedback loop. Our results demonstrated HNSCC cells educated monocytes into M2-like macrophages by releasing C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2, or MCP-1). And the M2-like macrophages secreted epithelial growth factor (EGF), which increased the motility of HNSCC cells by enhancing the invadopodia formation. These subcellular pseudopodia degraded extracellular matrix (ECM), facilitating tumor local invasion and distant metastasis. Moreover, EGF up-regulated CCL2 expression in HNSCC cells, which recruited monocytes and turned them into M2-like macrophages, thus forming a positive feedback paracrine loop. Finally, we reported that curcumin, a powerful natural drug, suppressed the production of EGF and CCL2 in macrophages and cancer cells, respectively, blocking the feedback loop and suppressing the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells. These results shed light on the possibilities and approaches based on targeting the crosstalk between cancer cells and monocytes/macrophages in HNSCC for potential cancer therapy. PMID:27888616

  1. A mature macrophage is a principal HIV-1 cellular reservoir in humanized mice after treatment with long acting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Araínga, Mariluz; Edagwa, Benson; Mosley, R Lee; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E

    2017-03-09

    Despite improved clinical outcomes seen following antiretroviral therapy (ART), resting CD4+ T cells continue to harbor latent human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1). However, such cells are not likely the solitary viral reservoir and as such defining where and how others harbor virus is imperative for eradication measures. To such ends, we used HIV-1ADA-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdc (scid) Il2rg (tm1Wjl) /SzJ mice reconstituted with a human immune system to explore two long-acting ART regimens investigating their abilities to affect viral cell infection and latency. At 6 weeks of infection animals were divided into four groups. One received long-acting (LA) cabotegravir (CAB) and rilpivirine (RVP) (2ART), a second received LA CAB, lamivudine, abacavir and RVP (4ART), a third were left untreated and a fourth served as an uninfected control. After 4 weeks of LA ART treatment, blood, spleen and bone marrow (BM) cells were collected then phenotypically characterized. CD4+ T cell subsets, macrophages and hematopoietic progenitor cells were analyzed for HIV-1 nucleic acids by droplet digital PCR. Plasma viral loads were reduced by two log10 or to undetectable levels in the 2 and 4ART regimens, respectively. Numbers and distributions of CD4+ memory and regulatory T cells, macrophages and hematopoietic progenitor cells were significantly altered by HIV-1 infection and by both ART regimens. ART reduced viral DNA and RNA in all cell and tissue compartments. While memory cells were the dominant T cell reservoir, integrated HIV-1 DNA was also detected in the BM and spleen macrophages in both regimen-treated mice. Despite vigorous ART regimens, HIV-1 DNA and RNA were easily detected in mature macrophages supporting their potential role as an infectious viral reservoir.

  2. Macrophage-released ADAMTS1 promotes muscle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongqing; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Wosczyna, Michael N; Mueller, Alisa A; Cho, Joonseok; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Rando, Thomas A; Feldman, Brian J

    2017-09-22

    Coordinated activation of muscle stem cells (known as satellite cells) is critical for postnatal muscle growth and regeneration. The muscle stem cell niche is central for regulating the activation state of satellite cells, but the specific extracellular signals that coordinate this regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that macrophages at sites of muscle injury induce activation of satellite cells via expression of Adamts1. Overexpression of Adamts1 in macrophages in vivo is sufficient to increase satellite cell activation and improve muscle regeneration in young mice. We demonstrate that NOTCH1 is a target of ADAMTS1 metalloproteinase activity, which reduces Notch signaling, leading to increased satellite cell activation. These results identify Adamts1 as a potent extracellular regulator of satellite cell activation and have significant implications for understanding the regulation of satellite cell activity and regeneration after muscle injury.Satellite cells are crucial for growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Here the authors show that in response to muscle injury, macrophages secrete Adamts1, which induces satellite cell activation by modulating Notch1 signaling.

  3. ROS sets the stage for macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony; Byles, Vanessa; Horng, Tiffany

    2013-08-01

    While M1 macrophages are highly pro-inflammatory and microbicidal, M2 macrophages and the related tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) regulate tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and can display immunomodulatory activity. In July issue of Cell Research, Zhang et al. show that ROS production, critical for the activation and functions of M1 macrophages, is necessary for the differentiation of M2 macrophages and TAMs, and that antioxidant therapy blocks TAM differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer.

  4. Incorporation of resident macrophages in engineered tissues: Multiple cell type response to microenvironment controlled macrophage-laden gelatine hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dollinger, Camille; Ciftci, Sait; Knopf-Marques, Helena; Guner, Rabia; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Debry, Christian; Barthes, Julien; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2017-05-08

    The success of tissue engineering strategy is strongly related to the inflammatory response, mainly through the activity of macrophages that are key cells in initial immune response to implants. For engineered tissues, the presence of resident macrophages can be beneficial for maintenance of homeostasis and healing. Thus, incorporation of macrophages in engineered tissues can facilitate the integration upon implantation. In this study, an in-vitro model of interaction was developed between encapsulated naive monocytes, macrophages induced with M1/M2 stimulation and incoming cells for immune assisted tissue engineering applications. To mimic the wound healing cascade, naive THP-1 monocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts were seeded on the gels as incoming cells. The interaction was first monitored in the absence of the gels. To mimic resident macrophages, THP-1 cells were encapsulated in the presence or absence of IL-4 to control their phenotype and then these hydrogels were seeded with incoming cells. Without encapsulation, activated macrophages induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. Once encapsulated no adverse effects were seen. Macrophage-laden hydrogels attracted more endothelial cells and fibroblasts compared to monocytes-laden hydrogels. The induction (M2 stimulation) of encapsulated macrophages did not change the overall number of attracted cells; but significantly affected their morphology. M1 stimulation by a defined media resulted in more secretion of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to M2 stimulation. It was demonstrated that there is a distinct effect of encapsulated macrophages on the behaviour of the incoming cells; this effect can be harnessed to establish a microenvironment more prone to regeneration upon implantation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  6. Stem cell directed gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, B C; Kohn, D B

    1999-05-01

    A potential therapeutic approach to HIV-1 infection is the genetic modification of cells of a patient to make them resistant to HIV-1. Hematopoietic stem cells are an attractive target for gene therapy of AIDS because of their ability to generate a broad repertoire of mature T lymphocytes, as well as the monocytic cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia) which are also involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A number of synthetic "anti-HIV-1 genes" have been developed which inhibit HIV-1 replication. However, current methods for gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells, using retroviral vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus, have been minimally effective. Clinical trials performed to date in which hematopoietic cells from HIV-1-positive patients have been transduced with retroviral vectors and then reinfused have produced low to undetectable levels of gene-containing peripheral blood leukocytes. New vector delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors, need to be developed to ensure efficient gene transfer and persistent transgene expression to provide life-long resistance to the cells targeted by HIV-1.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  8. BIGH3 protein and macrophages in retinal endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mondragon, Albert A; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Moritz, Robert J; Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Navarro, Mary M; Kim, Hong Seok; Lee, Chi Fung; LeBaron, Richard G; Asmis, Reto; Tsin, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease with a higher occurrence in minority populations. The molecular mechanism to initiate diabetes-associated retinal angiogenesis remains largely unknown. We propose an inflammatory pathway of diabetic retinopathy in which macrophages in the diabetic eye provide TGFβ to retinal endothelial cells (REC) in the retinal microvasculature. In response to TGFβ, REC synthesize and secrete a pro-apoptotic BIGH3 (TGFβ-Induced Gene Human Clone 3) protein, which acts in an autocrine loop to induce REC apoptosis. Rhesus monkey retinal endothelial cells (RhREC) were treated with dMCM (cell media of macrophages treated with high glucose and LDL) and assayed for apoptosis (TUNEL), BIGH3 mRNA (qPCR), and protein (Western blots) expressions. Cells were also treated with ΤGFβ1 and 2 for BIGH3 mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition assays were carried out using antibodies for TGFβ1 and for BIGH3 to block apoptosis and mRNA expression. BIGH3 in cultured RhREC cells were identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Distribution of BIGH3 and macrophages in the diabetic mouse retina was examined with IHC. RhRECs treated with dMCM or TGFβ showed a significant increase in apoptosis and BIGH3 protein expression. Recombinant BIGH3 added to RhREC culture medium led to a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. Antibodies (Ab) directed against BIGH3 and TGFβ, as well as TGFβ receptor blocker resulted in a significant reduction in apoptosis induced by either dMCM, TGFβ or BIGH3. IHC showed that cultured RhREC constitutively expressed BIGH3. Macrophage and BIGH3 protein were co-localized to the inner retina of the diabetic mouse eye. Our results support a novel inflammatory pathway for diabetic retinopathy. This pathway is initiated by TGFβ released from macrophages, which promotes synthesis and release of BIGH3 protein by REC and REC apoptosis.

  9. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  10. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Mekasha, Samrawit; He, Xianbao; Gibson, Frank C; Ingalls, Robin R

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation is a key event in atherosclerosis. Several triggers induce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by macrophages to create foam cells, including infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two pathogens that have been linked to atherosclerosis. While gene regulation during foam cell formation has been examined, comparative investigations to identify shared and specific pathogen-elicited molecular events relevant to foam cell formation are not well documented. We infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with P. gingivalis or C. pneumoniae in the presence of LDL to induce foam cell formation, and examined gene expression using an atherosclerosis pathway targeted plate array. We found over 30 genes were significantly induced in response to both pathogens, including PPAR family members that are broadly important in atherosclerosis and matrix remodeling genes that may play a role in plaque development and stability. Six genes mainly involved in lipid transport were significantly downregulated. The response overall was remarkably similar and few genes were regulated in a pathogen-specific manner. Despite very divergent lifestyles, P. gingivalis and C. pneumoniae activate similar gene expression profiles during foam cell formation that may ultimately serve as targets for modulating infection-elicited foam cell burden, and progression of atherosclerosis.

  11. Neutrophils and Macrophages: the Main Partners of Phagocyte Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Manuel T.; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Biological cellular systems are groups of cells sharing a set of characteristics, mainly key function and origin. Phagocytes are crucial in the host defense against microbial infection. The previously proposed phagocyte cell systems including the most recent and presently prevailing one, the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), grouped mononuclear cells but excluded neutrophils, creating an unacceptable situation. As neutrophils are archetypical phagocytes that must be members of comprehensive phagocyte systems, Silva recently proposed the creation of a myeloid phagocyte system (MYPS) that adds neutrophils to the MPS. The phagocytes grouped in the MYPS include the leukocytes neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, macrophages, and immature myeloid DCs. Here the justifications behind the inclusion of neutrophils in a phagocyte system is expanded and the MYPS are further characterized as a group of dedicated phagocytic cells that function in an interacting and cooperative way in the host defense against microbial infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are considered the main arms of this system. PMID:22783254

  12. Metabolic and Epigenetic Coordination of T Cell and Macrophage Immunity.

    PubMed

    Phan, Anthony T; Goldrath, Ananda W; Glass, Christopher K

    2017-05-16

    Recognition of pathogens by innate and adaptive immune cells instructs rapid alterations of cellular processes to promote effective resolution of infection. To accommodate increased bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands, metabolic pathways are harnessed to maximize proliferation and effector molecule production. In parallel, activation initiates context-specific gene-expression programs that drive effector functions and cell fates that correlate with changes in epigenetic landscapes. Many chromatin- and DNA-modifying enzymes make use of substrates and cofactors that are intermediates of metabolic pathways, providing potential cross talk between metabolism and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we discuss recent studies of T cells and macrophages supporting a role for metabolic activity in integrating environmental signals with activation-induced gene-expression programs through modulation of the epigenome and speculate as to how this may influence context-specific macrophage and T cell responses to infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploiting macrophage autophagy-lysosomal biogenesis as a therapy for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergin, Ismail; Evans, Trent D.; Zhang, Xiangyu; Bhattacharya, Somashubhra; Stokes, Carl J.; Song, Eric; Ali, Sahl; Dehestani, Babak; Holloway, Karyn B.; Micevych, Paul S.; Javaheri, Ali; Crowley, Jan R.; Ballabio, Andrea; Schilling, Joel D.; Epelman, Slava; Weihl, Conrad C.; Diwan, Abhinav; Fan, Daping; Zayed, Mohamed A.; Razani, Babak

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages specialize in removing lipids and debris present in the atherosclerotic plaque. However, plaque progression renders macrophages unable to degrade exogenous atherogenic material and endogenous cargo including dysfunctional proteins and organelles. Here we show that a decline in the autophagy–lysosome system contributes to this as evidenced by a derangement in key autophagy markers in both mouse and human atherosclerotic plaques. By augmenting macrophage TFEB, the master transcriptional regulator of autophagy–lysosomal biogenesis, we can reverse the autophagy dysfunction of plaques, enhance aggrephagy of p62-enriched protein aggregates and blunt macrophage apoptosis and pro-inflammatory IL-1β levels, leading to reduced atherosclerosis. In order to harness this degradative response therapeutically, we also describe a natural sugar called trehalose as an inducer of macrophage autophagy–lysosomal biogenesis and show trehalose's ability to recapitulate the atheroprotective properties of macrophage TFEB overexpression. Our data support this practical method of enhancing the degradative capacity of macrophages as a therapy for atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:28589926

  14. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  15. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  16. Rapid adaptation to microgravity in mammalian macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; de Zélicourt, Diane; Tauber, Svantje; Adrian, Astrid; Franz, Markus; Simmet, Dana M; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Hauschild, Swantje; Krammer, Sonja; Christen, Miriam; Bradacs, Gesine; Paulsen, Katrin; Wolf, Susanne A; Braun, Markus; Hatton, Jason; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Franke, Stefanie; Tanner, Samuel; Cristoforetti, Samantha; Sick, Beate; Hock, Bertold; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    Despite the observed severe effects of microgravity on mammalian cells, many astronauts have completed long term stays in space without suffering from severe health problems. This raises questions about the cellular capacity for adaptation to a new gravitational environment. The International Space Station (ISS) experiment TRIPLE LUX A, performed in the BIOLAB laboratory of the ISS COLUMBUS module, allowed for the first time the direct measurement of a cellular function in real time and on orbit. We measured the oxidative burst reaction in mammalian macrophages (NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages) exposed to a centrifuge regime of internal 0 g and 1 g controls and step-wise increase or decrease of the gravitational force in four independent experiments. Surprisingly, we found that these macrophages adapted to microgravity in an ultra-fast manner within seconds, after an immediate inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst reaction. For the first time, we provided direct evidence of cellular sensitivity to gravity, through real-time on orbit measurements and by using an experimental system, in which all factors except gravity were constant. The surprisingly ultra-fast adaptation to microgravity indicates that mammalian macrophages are equipped with a highly efficient adaptation potential to a low gravity environment. This opens new avenues for the exploration of adaptation of mammalian cells to gravitational changes.

  17. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  18. Mathematical modelling predicts synergistic anti-tumor effects of combining a macrophage-based, hypoxia-targeted, gene therapy with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Markus R; Stamper, I Johanna; Muthana, Munitta; Richardson, Giles W; Dobson, Jon; Lewis, Claire E; Byrne, Helen M

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with low rates of cell proliferation and poor drug delivery, limiting the efficacy of many conventional therapies such as chemotherapy. Since many macrophages accumulate in hypoxic regions of tumors, one way to target tumor cells in these regions could be to use genetically engineered macrophages that express therapeutic genes when exposed to hypoxia. We describe here our use of a new mathematical model to simulate and compare the effects of conventional cyclophosphamide therapy with those induced when macrophages are used to deliver hypoxia-inducible cytochrome P450 to locally activate cyclophosphamide. Our mathematical model describes the spatio-temporal dynamics of vascular tumor growth and treats cells as distinct entities, each with its own cell cycle and subcellular signalling machinery. Moreover, the model simulates the delivery of systemically-applied therapies by a dynamic vascular network. We used this model to determine both the impact on tumors of combining conventional chemotherapy with macrophage-based gene delivery, and how the efficacy of macrophage-based therapies may be enhanced by pre-loading the cells with magnetic nanoparticles and applying a magnetic field to the tumor site. Major Findings Our results predict that combining conventional and macrophage-based therapies would be synergistic, producing greater anti-tumor effects than the additive effects of each form of therapy. Moreover, we found that timing is crucial in this combined approach with efficacy being greatest when the macrophage-based therapy is administered shortly before or concurrent with chemotherapy. Lastly, we show not only that macrophage delivery of therapeutic genes is markedly enhanced using the magnetic approach described above, but also that the disorganised nature of tumor blood vessels means that this enhancement depends mainly on the strength of the applied field, rather than its direction. This may be important in the treatment of non

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants.

  20. Macrophage origin of Reed-Sternberg cells: an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Payne, SV; Wright, DH; Jones, KJM; Judd, MA

    1982-01-01

    In an immunohistochemical study of 26 biopsies from 24 patients with Hodgkin's disease a granular staining pattern for alpha-1-antitrypsin (α1AT) and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (α1ACT) was seen in Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and mononuclear Hodgkin's (H) cells in over half the cases. The pattern of staining for these antiproteases seen in RS and H cells has previously only been observed in normal and malignant cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage within the lymphoreticular system. A faintly granular evenly distributed staining for IgG was found in viable RS and H cells. This staining was associated with a similar distribution of both light chains but not J chain, suggesting that the immunoglobulin had not been synthesised by these cells but had been taken up from the extracellular environment. It is suggested that this uptake is an active process occurring in viable RS and H cells, possibly via Fcγ receptors and further supports an origin from cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. IgA, IgD, albumin, fibrinogen, C1q, C4 and C3 were present in some cells, IgM was more rarely found and lysozyme was absent. The fact that cells staining for these serum proteins generally showed signs of degeneration and that the extent of staining correlated with the molecular weight, but not serum concentration, of the protein suggests that they are passively acquired by dead or dying cells and thus represent a separate phenomenon from IgG uptake. The function of IgG uptake and accumulation by RS cells and the α1AT and α1ACT markers may prove of use in identifying the macrophage subtype from which these cells are derived. Images PMID:7040482

  1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–secreting cellular immunotherapy in combination with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as postremission therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Borrello, Ivan M.; Stock, Wendy; Sher, Dorie; Qin, Lu; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Stone, Richard M.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Linker, Charles A.; Maslyar, Daniel J.; Hege, Kristen M.

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical models have demonstrated the efficacy of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cancer immunotherapies (GVAX platform) accompanied by immunotherapy-primed lymphocytes after autologous stem cell transplantation in hematologic malignancies. We conducted a phase 2 study of this combination in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Immunotherapy consisted of autologous leukemia cells admixed with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting K562 cells. “Primed” lymphocytes were collected after a single pretransplantation dose of immunotherapy and reinfused with the stem cell graft. Fifty-four subjects were enrolled; 46 (85%) achieved a complete remission, and 28 (52%) received the pretransplantation immunotherapy. For all patients who achieved complete remission, the 3-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was 47.4% and overall survival was 57.4%. For the 28 immunotherapy-treated patients, the RFS and overall survival rates were 61.8% and 73.4%, respectively. Posttreatment induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to autologous leukemia cells was associated with longer 3-year RFS rate (100% vs 48%). Minimal residual disease was monitored by quantitative analysis of Wilms tumor-1 (WT1), a leukemia-associated gene. A decrease in WT1 transcripts in blood was noted in 69% of patients after the first immunotherapy dose and was also associated with longer 3-year RFS (61% vs 0%). In conclusion, immunotherapy in combination with primed lymphocytes and autologous stem cell transplantation shows encouraging signals of potential activity in acute myeloid leukemia (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00116467). PMID:19556425

  2. Evidence for the opposing roles of different gamma delta T cell subsets in macrophage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Daniela; Andrew, Elizabeth M; Rhodes, Kate; Newton, Darren J; Carding, Simon R

    2006-07-01

    To ensure invading pathogens are eliminated with minimal damage to host tissues it is essential that macrophage activation be tightly regulated. Previously we demonstrated that a subset of gammadelta T cells (Vgamma1(+)) contributes to resolving pathogen-induced immune responses by killing activated macrophages. However, the exaggerated macrophage response seen in infected Vgamma1(+) T cell-deficient mice suggests that gammadelta T cells play a broader role in macrophage homeostasis and other subsets might promote macrophage activation. Using a macrophage:gammadelta T cell co-culture system we have shown that gammadelta T cells increase the activity of macrophages activated in vivo by Listeria monocytogenes infection. In a dose-dependent manner, gammadelta T cells up-regulated production of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10) and chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta) by Listeria-elicited macrophages. The ability to increase macrophage cytokine production was prominent among Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells. Reciprocally, Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells were activated by Listeria-elicited macrophages, resulting in production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. gammadelta T cell adoptive transfer experiments showed that Vgamma4(+) T cells protected TCRdelta(-/-) mice against Listeria-induced liver injury and necrosis. These findings identify distinct and non-overlapping roles for gammadelta T cell subsets in regulating macrophage function during pathogen-induced immune responses.

  3. CD47-blocking immunotherapies stimulate macrophage-mediated destruction of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine S; Schnorr, Peter J; Cristea, Sandra; Ring, Aaron M; Maute, Roy L; Volkmer, Anne K; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Liu, Jie; Lim, Jing Shan; Yang, Dian; Seitz, Garrett; Nguyen, Thuyen; Wu, Di; Jude, Kevin; Guerston, Heather; Barkal, Amira; Trapani, Francesca; George, Julie; Poirier, John T; Gardner, Eric E; Miles, Linde A; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lofgren, Shane M; Vogel, Hannes; Winslow, Monte M; Dive, Caroline; Thomas, Roman K; Rudin, Charles M; van de Rijn, Matt; Majeti, Ravindra; Garcia, K Christopher; Weissman, Irving L; Sage, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with limited treatment options. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that promotes immune evasion by engaging signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), which serves as an inhibitory receptor on macrophages. Here, we found that CD47 is highly expressed on the surface of human SCLC cells; therefore, we investigated CD47-blocking immunotherapies as a potential approach for SCLC treatment. Disruption of the interaction of CD47 with SIRPα using anti-CD47 antibodies induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human SCLC patient cells in culture. In a murine model, administration of CD47-blocking antibodies or targeted inactivation of the Cd47 gene markedly inhibited SCLC tumor growth. Furthermore, using comprehensive antibody arrays, we identified several possible therapeutic targets on the surface of SCLC cells. Antibodies to these targets, including CD56/neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promoted phagocytosis in human SCLC cell lines that was enhanced when combined with CD47-blocking therapies. In light of recent clinical trials for CD47-blocking therapies in cancer treatment, these findings identify disruption of the CD47/SIRPα axis as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy for SCLC. This approach could enable personalized immunotherapeutic regimens in patients with SCLC and other cancers.

  4. CD47-blocking immunotherapies stimulate macrophage-mediated destruction of small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Schnorr, Peter J.; Ring, Aaron M.; Maute, Roy L.; Volkmer, Anne K.; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Liu, Jie; Lim, Jing Shan; Yang, Dian; Seitz, Garrett; Nguyen, Thuyen; Wu, Di; Guerston, Heather; Trapani, Francesca; George, Julie; Poirier, John T.; Gardner, Eric E.; Miles, Linde A.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lofgren, Shane M.; Vogel, Hannes; Winslow, Monte M.; Dive, Caroline; Thomas, Roman K.; Rudin, Charles M.; van de Rijn, Matt; Majeti, Ravindra; Garcia, K. Christopher; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with limited treatment options. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that promotes immune evasion by engaging signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), which serves as an inhibitory receptor on macrophages. Here, we found that CD47 is highly expressed on the surface of human SCLC cells; therefore, we investigated CD47-blocking immunotherapies as a potential approach for SCLC treatment. Disruption of the interaction of CD47 with SIRPα using anti-CD47 antibodies induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human SCLC patient cells in culture. In a murine model, administration of CD47-blocking antibodies or targeted inactivation of the Cd47 gene markedly inhibited SCLC tumor growth. Furthermore, using comprehensive antibody arrays, we identified several possible therapeutic targets on the surface of SCLC cells. Antibodies to these targets, including CD56/neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promoted phagocytosis in human SCLC cell lines that was enhanced when combined with CD47-blocking therapies. In light of recent clinical trials for CD47-blocking therapies in cancer treatment, these findings identify disruption of the CD47/SIRPα axis as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy for SCLC. This approach could enable personalized immunotherapeutic regimens in patients with SCLC and other cancers. PMID:27294525

  5. Association of T Cell and Macrophage Activation with Arterial Vascular Health in HIV.

    PubMed

    Grome, Heather N; Barnett, Louise; Hagar, Cindy C; Harrison, David G; Kalams, Spyros A; Koethe, John R

    2017-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the arterial vascular functions affected by persistent innate and cellular immune activation are not well described. We assessed the relationship between immunologic and vascular parameters in 70 HIV-infected adults on efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine with more than 2 years of virologic suppression and no history of CVD. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using ultrasound and circulating intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) by multiple immunoassay. We also measured circulating naive (CD45RO(-)CCR7(+)CD27(+)), activated (CD38(+) and CD38(+)DR(+)), exhausted (PD1(+)), senescent (CD57(+)), and memory (CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets by flow cytometry, and macrophage activation markers by ELISA and multiple immunoassay. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and body mass index. Median age was 45 years (IQR 39, 50), median CD4(+) count 701 cells/μl (IQR 540, 954), and 43% were female. Lower brachial FMD was associated with a higher percentage of activated CD8(+) T cells (p < .01), but not associated with macrophage activation. In contrast, higher ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were associated with sCD163 (p < = .01 for both), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (p < = .02 for both), and sCD14 (p = .01 for ICAM-1 only). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that circulating CD8(+) T cell activation may impair arterial smooth muscle relaxation, while macrophage activation has a role in the expression of endothelial cell proteins involved in immune cell translocation. Both innate and cellular immune activation appear to promote arterial vascular disease in HIV-infected persons on ART using differing mechanisms.

  6. B cells Regulate Macrophage Phenotype and Response to Chemotherapy in Squamous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Terry R.; Gunderson, Andrew J.; Johansson, Magnus; Bornstein, Sophia; Bergsland, Emily; Steinhoff, Martin; Li, Yijin; Gong, Qian; Ma, Yan; Wiesen, Jane F.; Wong, Melissa H.; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Irving, Bryan; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY B cells foster squamous cell carcinogenesis (SCC) through deposition of immunoglobulin-containing immune complexes in premalignant tissue and Fcγreceptor-dependent activation of myeloid cells. Since human SCCs of the vulva and head and neck exhibited hallmarks of B cell infiltration, we examined B cell-deficient mice and found reduced ability to support SCC growth. Although ineffective as a single agent, treatment of mice bearing pre-existing SCCs with B cell-depleting αCD20 monoclonal antibodies improved response to platinum- and taxol-based chemotherapy. Improved chemo-responsiveness was dependent on altered chemokine expression by macrophages that fostered tumor infiltration of activated CD8+ T cells via CCR5-dependent mechanisms. These data reveal that B cells, and the downstream myeloid-based pathways they regulate, represent tractable targets for anti-cancer therapy in select tumors. PMID:24909985

  7. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  8. Macrophage selective photodynamic therapy by meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin loaded polymeric micelles: A possible treatment for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Wennink, Jos W H; Liu, Yanna; Mäkinen, Petri I; Setaro, Francesca; de la Escosura, Andrès; Bourajjaj, Meriem; Lappalainen, Jari P; Holappa, Lari P; van den Dikkenberg, Joep B; Al Fartousi, Mina; Trohopoulos, Panagiotis N; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Torres, Tomas; Hennink, Wim E; van Nostrum, Cornelus F

    2017-09-30

    Selective elimination of macrophages by photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new and promising therapeutic modality for the reduction of atherosclerotic plaques. m-Tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC, or Temoporfin) may be suitable as photosensitizer for this application, as it is currently used in the clinic for cancer PDT. In the present study, mTHPC was encapsulated in polymeric micelles based on benzyl-poly(ε-caprolactone)-b-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (Ben-PCL-mPEG) using a film hydration method, with loading capacity of 17%. Because of higher lipase activity in RAW264.7 macrophages than in C166 endothelial cells, the former cells degraded the polymers faster, resulting in faster photosensitizer release and higher in vitro photocytotoxicity of mTHPC-loaded micelles in those macrophages. However, we observed release of mTHPC from the micelles in 30min in blood plasma in vitro which explains the observed similar in vivo pharmacokinetics of the mTHPC micellar formulation and free mTHPC. Therefore, we could not translate the beneficial macrophage selectivity from in vitro to in vivo. Nevertheless, we observed accumulation of mTHPC in atherosclerotic lesions of mice aorta's which is probably the result of binding to lipoproteins upon release from the micelles. Therefore, future experiments will be dedicated to increase the stability and thus allow accumulation of intact mTHPC-loaded Ben-PCL-mPEG micelles to macrophages of atherosclerotic lesions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  10. The role of macrophage lineage cells in kidney graft rejection and survival.

    PubMed

    Rowshani, Ajda Tahereh; Vereyken, Elly Johanna Francisca

    2012-08-27

    Large numbers of macrophage lineage cells are present in transplants undergoing ischemia-reperfusion injury and rejection, and their presence correlates with a high probability of rejection. However, the extent to which monocytes and macrophages contribute to kidney graft rejection is poorly understood. The heterogeneity of the monocyte/macrophage lineage cells could be one of the reasons why these cells have been neglected up to now. Circulating monocytes can be divided into various subsets, which are able to give rise to tissue macrophages and dendritic cells. Macrophages are believed to be highly plastic cells that can respond to environmental signals by changing their phenotype and function. Macrophages have established roles in early and late kidney graft inflammation, tissue homeostasis, remodeling, and repair. In kidney transplantation, macrophages are believed to play a role in both damage and repair of the graft, depending on the type of macrophages involved, the environmental drive, and the time after transplantation. The heterogeneity and plasticity of monocytes and macrophages are obstacles to translating the functional relevance of this cell lineage to diagnostic and prognostic clinical parameters and to defining specific, macrophage-related, therapeutic targets. Recent evidence has indicated an immunomodulatory role for the so-called regulatory macrophages in induction of tolerance in kidney transplant recipients. In this article, we summarize current views on monocyte/macrophage immunobiology in kidney transplantation. Key issues for ongoing research are discussed.

  11. Macrophages eat cancer cells using their own calreticulin as a guide: roles of TLR and Btk.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingye; Chen, James Y; Weissman-Tsukamoto, Rachel; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Ho, Po Yi; McKenna, Kelly M; Cheshier, Samuel; Zhang, Michael; Guo, Nan; Gip, Phung; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-02-17

    Macrophage-mediated programmed cell removal (PrCR) is an important mechanism of eliminating diseased and damaged cells before programmed cell death. The induction of PrCR by eat-me signals on tumor cells is countered by don't-eat-me signals such as CD47, which binds macrophage signal-regulatory protein α to inhibit phagocytosis. Blockade of CD47 on tumor cells leads to phagocytosis by macrophages. Here we demonstrate that the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages synergizes with blocking CD47 on tumor cells to enhance PrCR. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) mediates TLR signaling in macrophages. Calreticulin, previously shown to be an eat-me signal on cancer cells, is activated in macrophages for secretion and cell-surface exposure by TLR and Btk to target cancer cells for phagocytosis, even if the cancer cells themselves do not express calreticulin.

  12. Activated mesenchymal stem cells increase wound tensile strength in aged mouse model via macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Szilagyi, Erzsebet; Chen, Lin; Premanand, Kavitha; DiPietro, Luisa A; Ennis, William; Bartholomew, Amelia M

    2013-05-01

    Wound healing is impaired in the aged. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can exert beneficial effects in wounds; however, promoting healing in the challenging setting of aged skin may require additional potency. MSCs can enhance the production of pro-regenerative cytokines and growth factors when activated with interferon gamma. We hypothesized that the increased potency of activated MSC could be used to facilitate wound healing in the aged mice. Young and old C57BL6 mice underwent incisional wounds and were treated with naive MSCs, activated MSCs, or vehicle to examine MSC effects on tensile strength in the aged skin. To test whether the benefits of MSC treatment could be attributed to the participation of host macrophages, liposomal clodronate was used to deplete host macrophages. In older mice, tensile strength of healing wounds was significantly lower than that in younger mice. Older mice treated with activated MSCs showed significant increases in tensile strength restoring the strength to that observed in younger mice. Macrophage depletion abrogated the beneficial effect of MSC. Activated MSCs restored wound tensile strength in the aged mice, and this effect was dependent on host macrophage activity. These data provide encouraging support for the development of activated MSC therapies for enhanced tissue regeneration, especially for older population groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tissue macrophages act as cellular chaperones for vascular anastomosis downstream of VEGF-mediated endothelial tip cell induction.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Alessandro; Vieira, Joaquim M; Gestri, Gaia; Denti, Laura; Schwarz, Quenten; Prykhozhij, Sergey; Peri, Francesca; Wilson, Stephen W; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2010-08-05

    Blood vessel networks expand in a 2-step process that begins with vessel sprouting and is followed by vessel anastomosis. Vessel sprouting is induced by chemotactic gradients of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which stimulates tip cell protrusion. Yet it is not known which factors promote the fusion of neighboring tip cells to add new circuits to the existing vessel network. By combining the analysis of mouse mutants defective in macrophage development or VEGF signaling with live imaging in zebrafish, we now show that macrophages promote tip cell fusion downstream of VEGF-mediated tip cell induction. Macrophages therefore play a hitherto unidentified and unexpected role as vascular fusion cells. Moreover, we show that there are striking molecular similarities between the pro-angiogenic tissue macrophages essential for vascular development and those that promote the angiogenic switch in cancer, including the expression of the cell-surface proteins TIE2 and NRP1. Our findings suggest that tissue macrophages are a target for antiangiogenic therapies, but that they could equally well be exploited to stimulate tissue vascularization in ischemic disease.

  14. Single-cell analysis reveals new subset markers of murine peritoneal macrophages and highlights macrophage dynamics upon Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Accarias, Solène; Genthon, Clémence; Rengel, David; Boullier, Séverine; Foucras, Gilles; Tabouret, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Resident macrophages play a central role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. Here, we used single cell-based qPCR coupled with flow cytometry analysis to further define the phenotypes of large and small resident peritoneal macrophages (LPMs and SPMs, respectively) in mice. We demonstrated that the expression of Cxcl13, IfngR1, Fizz-1 and Mrc-1 clearly distinguished between LPMs and SPMs subsets. Using these markers, the dynamics of peritoneal macrophages in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced peritonitis model were analyzed. We found that S. aureus infection triggers a massive macrophage disappearance reaction in both subsets. Thereafter, inflammatory monocytes rapidly infiltrated the cavity and differentiated to replenish the SPMs. Although phenotypically indistinguishable from resident SPMs by flow cytometry, newly recruited SPMs had a different pattern of gene expression dominated by M2 markers combined with M1 associated features (inos expression). Interestingly, S. aureus elicited SPMs showed a robust expression of Cxcl13, suggesting that these cells may endorse the role of depleted LPMs and contribute to restoring peritoneal homeostasis. These data provide information on both resident and recruited macrophages dynamics upon S. aureus infection and demonstrate that single-cell phenotyping is a promising and highly valuable approach to unraveling macrophage diversity and plasticity.

  15. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  16. Macrophages play an essential role in the long effects of low-dose photodynamic therapy on vessel permeability.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Mohamed, Mohamed Abdulkadir; Wei, Xiang; Cheng, Cai

    2016-02-01

    Low-dose photodynamic therapy (L-PDT) has been used to transiently increase the permeability of tumor vessels to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to lung tumors. However, the effects of L-PDT in a long-term on delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs are unknown. In this study, we studied this question as well as the underlying mechanisms. We found that the effects of L-PDT on tumor vessel permeability appeared to be prolonged. Moreover, L-PDT significantly increased the number of tumor associated macrophages, and appeared to induce macrophage polarization to a M1 phenotype. Further analyses showed that L-PDT upregulated stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in tumor to recruit macrophages through a SDF-1/Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis, which accounted for the prolonged effects of L-PDT on vessel permeability. Application of a specific CXCR4 inhibitor significantly suppressed the L-PDT-induced macrophage recruitment, resulting in abolishment of the prolonged effects of L-PDT on vessel permeability. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of Liporubicin™ on the growth of the implanted tumor in L-PDT-treated mice were significantly attenuated by CXCR4 inhibition. Thus, our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated long-lasting effect of L-PDT on vessel permeability, and suggest that this long-lasting effects of L-PDT treatment on vessel permeability may result from modulation of macrophage recruitment and polarization. Hence, L-PDT may be a promising method to assist chemotherapeutic approaches.

  17. What are the macrophages and stellate cells doing in pancreatic adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Pandol, Stephen J.; Edderkaoui, Mouad

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a devastating disease characterized by a dense desmoplastic stroma. Chemo- and radio-therapeutic strategies based on targeting cancer cells have failed in improving the outcome of this cancer suggesting important roles for stroma in therapy resistance. Cells in the tumor stroma have been shown to regulate proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and treatments, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of cancer cells. Stellate cells in their activated state have been thought over the past decade to only have tumor promoting roles. However, recent findings suggest that stellate cells may have protective roles as well. The present review highlights the latest findings on the role of two major components of tumor stroma, pancreatic stellate cells and macrophages, in promoting or inhibiting pancreatic cancer, focused on their effects on EMT and cancer stemness. PMID:26029109

  18. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  19. Simvastatin induces caspase-independent apoptosis in LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Chan; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Mi Hee; Kang, Kwang Il; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Kim, Young Sang . E-mail: young@cnu.ac.kr

    2006-01-20

    Macrophages participate in several inflammatory pathologies such as sepsis and arthritis. We examined the effect of simvastatin on the LPS-induced proinflammatory macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Co-treatment of LPS and a non-toxic dose of simvastatin induced cell death in RAW264.7 cells. The cell death was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), genomic DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation. Surprisingly, despite caspase-dependent apoptotic cascade being completely blocked by Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, the cell death was only partially repressed. In the presence of Z-VAD-fmk, DNA fragmentation was blocked, but DNA condensation, disruption of MMP, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor were obvious. The cell death by simvastatin and LPS was effectively decreased by both the FPP and GGPP treatments as well as mevalonate. Our findings indicate that simvastatin triggers the cell death of LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells through both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways, suggesting a novel mechanism of statins for the severe inflammatory disease therapy.

  20. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  1. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  2. [Immunological cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masahiko; Gonda, Kenji; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently there is a great advance in anti-colorectal cancer treatment. Several molecular targeting agents, mostly are antibody drugs, are playing an important role. It has recently been proven that new approaches using antibody to immunological checkpoints are effective against certain types of cancer. This is one of the reasons why cancer immunotherapy is now focused in the clinics. In this chapter, several effective immunotherapy against cancer are shown and discussed. Among several types of cancer immunotherapy, immunological cell therapy including lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), gamma delta T cell and dendritic cell therapies are reviewed. Major mechanisms that disturb cancer immunotherapy such as escape mechanisms are also discussed.

  3. Glioblastoma-associated microglia and macrophages: targets for therapies to improve prognosis.

    PubMed

    Poon, Candice C; Sarkar, Susobhan; Yong, V Wee; Kelly, John J P

    2017-06-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and most malignant primary adult human brain tumour. Diagnosis of glioblastoma carries a dismal prognosis. Treatment resistance and tumour recurrence are the result of both cancer cell proliferation and their interaction with the tumour microenvironment. A large proportion of the tumour microenvironment consists of an inflammatory infiltrate predominated by microglia and macrophages, which are thought to be subverted by glioblastoma cells for tumour growth. Thus, glioblastoma-associated microglia and macrophages are logical therapeutic targets. Their emerging roles in glioblastoma progression are reflected in the burgeoning research into therapeutics directed at their modification or elimination. Here, we review the biology of glioblastoma-associated microglia and macrophages, and model systems used to study these cells in vitro and in vivo. We discuss translation of results using these model systems and review recent advances in immunotherapies targeting microglia and macrophages in glioblastoma. Significant challenges remain but medications that affect glioblastoma-associated microglia and macrophages hold considerable promise to improve the prognosis for patients with this disease. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Cytokine release syndrome after blinatumomab treatment related to abnormal macrophage activation and ameliorated with cytokine-directed therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rheingold, Susan R.; Maude, Shannon L.; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Barrett, David M.; Seif, Alix E.; Nichols, Kim E.; Suppa, Erica K.; Kalos, Michael; Berg, Robert A.; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Aplenc, Richard; Gore, Lia; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell receptor-engaging (BiTE) antibody with efficacy in refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some patients treated with blinatumomab and other T cell-activating therapies develop cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We hypothesized that patients with more severe toxicity may experience abnormal macrophage activation triggered by the release of cytokines by T-cell receptor–activated cytotoxic T cells engaged by BiTE antibodies and leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We prospectively monitored a patient during blinatumomab treatment and observed that he developed HLH. He became ill 36 hours into the infusion with fever, respiratory failure, and circulatory collapse. He developed hyperferritinemia, cytopenias, hypofibrinogenemia, and a cytokine profile diagnostic for HLH. The HLH continued to progress after discontinuation of blinatumomab; however, he had rapid improvement after IL-6 receptor-directed therapy with tocilizumab. Patients treated with T cell-activating therapies, including blinatumomab, should be monitored for HLH, and cytokine-directed therapy may be considered in cases of life-threatening CRS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00103285. PMID:23678006

  5. Short Communication: HIV Controller T Cells Effectively Inhibit Viral Replication in Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Merlo, Christian A; Buckheit, Robert W; Lambert, Allison; Tarwater, Patrick; Kirk, Greg D; Drummond, M Bradley; Blankson, Joel N

    Macrophages are targets of HIV-1 infection, and control of viral replication within these cells may be an important component of a T-cell-based vaccine. Although several studies have analyzed the ability of CD8(+) T cells to inhibit viral replication in monocyte-derived macrophages, the effect of T cells on HIV-1-infected tissue macrophages is less clear. We demonstrate here that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell effectors from HIV controllers are capable of suppressing viral replication in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages. These findings have implications for HIV-1 vaccine and eradication strategies.

  6. Dynamics of Salmonella infection of macrophages at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Gog, Julia R; Murcia, Alicia; Osterman, Natan; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Achouri, Sarra; Wei, Bin; Mastroeni, Pietro; Wood, James L N; Maskell, Duncan J; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E

    2012-10-07

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of diseases. Salmonellae are intracellular parasites of macrophages, and the control of bacteria within these cells is critical to surviving an infection. The dynamics of the bacteria invading, surviving, proliferating in and killing macrophages are central to disease pathogenesis. Fundamentally important parameters, however, such as the cellular infection rate, have not previously been calculated. We used two independent approaches to calculate the macrophage infection rate: mathematical modelling of Salmonella infection experiments, and analysis of real-time video microscopy of infection events. Cells repeatedly encounter salmonellae, with the bacteria often remain associated with the macrophage for more than ten seconds. Once Salmonella encounters a macrophage, the probability of that bacterium infecting the cell is remarkably low: less than 5%. The macrophage population is heterogeneous in terms of its susceptibility to the first infection event. Once infected, a macrophage can undergo further infection events, but these reinfection events occur at a lower rate than that of the primary infection.

  7. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, A. T. Y.; Hale, C.; Xia, J.; Tate, P. H.; Goulding, D.; Keane, J. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Forrester, L.; Billker, O.; Skarnes, W. C.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Dougan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection. PMID:25752829

  8. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A T Y; Hale, C; Xia, J; Tate, P H; Goulding, D; Keane, J A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Forrester, L; Billker, O; Skarnes, W C; Hancock, R E W; Dougan, G

    2015-03-10

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection.

  9. A small hairpin RNA targeting myeloid cell leukemia-1 enhances apoptosis in host macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-yu; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wang, Xin-min; Wang, Chan; Wang, Xiao-fang; Wu, Jiang-dong; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wan-jiang; Zhang, Le

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) plays an important role in various cell survival pathways. Some studies indicated that the expression of Mcl-1 was upregulated in host cells during infection with the virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, H37Rv. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of inhibiting Mcl-1 expression both in vivo and in vitro on apoptosis of host macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis using a small hairpin (sh)RNA. Mcl-1 expression was detected by the real time-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were used to measure host macrophage apoptosis. We found elevated Mcl-1 levels in host macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The expression of Mcl-1 was downregulated efficiently in H37Rv-infected host macrophages using shRNA. Knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the extent of apoptosis in H37Rv-infected host macrophages significantly. The increased apoptosis correlated with a decrease in M. tuberculosis colony forming units recovered from H37Rv-infected cells that were treated with Mcl-1-shRNA. Reducing Mcl-1 accumulation by shRNA also reduced accumulation of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2, and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic gene, Bax, in H37Rv-infected host macrophages. Our results showed that specific knockdown of Mcl-1 expression increased apoptosis of host macrophages significantly and decreased the intracellular survival of a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. These data indicate that interference with Mcl-1 expression may provide a new avenue for tuberculosis therapy.

  10. Tetherin Can Restrict Cell-Free and Cell-Cell Transmission of HIV from Primary Macrophages to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sebastian; Marsh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Bst-2/Tetherin inhibits the release of HIV by tethering newly formed virus particles to the plasma membrane of infected cells. Although the mechanisms of Tetherin-mediated restriction are increasingly well understood, the biological relevance of this restriction in the natural target cells of HIV is unclear. Moreover, whether Tetherin exerts any restriction on the direct cell-cell spread of HIV across intercellular contacts remains controversial. Here we analyse the restriction endogenous Tetherin imposes on HIV transmission from primary human macrophages, one of the main targets of HIV in vivo. We find that the mRNA and protein levels of Tetherin in macrophages are comparable to those in T cells from the same donors, and are highly upregulated by type I interferons. Improved immunocytochemistry protocols enable us to demonstrate that Tetherin localises to the cell surface, the trans-Golgi network, and the macrophage HIV assembly compartments. Tetherin retains budded virions in the assembly compartments, thereby impeding the release and cell-free spread of HIV, but it is not required for the maintenance of these compartments per se. Notably, using a novel assay to quantify cell-cell spread, we show that Tetherin promotes the transfer of virus clusters from macrophages to T cells and thereby restricts the direct transmission of a dual-tropic HIV-1. Kinetic analyses provide support for the notion that this direct macrophage-T cell spread is mediated, at least in part, by so-called virological synapses. Finally, we demonstrate that the viral Vpu protein efficiently downregulates the cell surface and overall levels of Tetherin, and thereby abrogates this HIV restriction in macrophages. Together, our study shows that Tetherin, one of the most potent HIV restriction factors identified to date, can inhibit virus spread from primary macrophages, regardless of the mode of transmission. PMID:24991932

  11. ATF-2 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription in macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Noriyuki; Maekawa, Toshio; Shinagawa, Toshie; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2009-07-17

    The transcription factor ATF-2, a member of the ATF/CREB family, is a target of p38 that are involved in stress-induced apoptosis and in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signaling. Phosphorylation of ATF-2 at Thr-71 was enhanced by treating of RAW264.7 macrophage cells with either LPS, MALP-2, or CpG-ODN. LPS treatment enhanced the trans-activation capacity of ATF-2. Among multiple LPS-induced genes, the LPS-induced expression of Socs-3 was significantly reduced by the treatment of RAW264.7 cells with an Atf-2 siRNA. Transcription from the Socs-3 promoter was synergistically stimulated by ATF-2 and LPS, whereas it was suppressed by Atf-2 siRNA. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) interacted with ATF-2 after LPS treatment, but not before treatment. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of HDAC, suppressed the LPS-induced Socs-3 expression, suggesting that HDAC1 positively regulates the LPS-induced transcription of Socs-3. Thus, ATF-2 plays an important role in TLR-mediated transcriptional control in macrophage cells.

  12. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  13. Hyphal Growth of Phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum Causes Cell Lysis and Death of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

  14. Hyphal growth of phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum causes cell lysis and death of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host.

  15. Generation and characterization of bovine bone marrow-derived macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiajia; Xie, Rongxia; Li, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Wuju; Zhang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages, as the forefront of innate immune defense, have an important role in the host responses to mycobacterial infection. Therefore, a stable macrophage cell line is needed for future bovine immune system research on the bacterial infection. In this study, we established a bovine macrophage cell line by introducing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages (bBMMs). The TERT-bBMMs cells expressed macrophage surface antigen (CD11b, CD282) and upregulated expression of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α in response to bacterial invasion. These results demonstrate that this cell line provide reliable cell model system for future studies on interactions between the bovine macrophages and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Enhancement of CD147 on M1 macrophages induces differentiation of Th17 cells in the lung interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jie-jie; Zhang, Kui; Chen, Li-na; Miao, Jin-lin; Yao, Meng; Ren, Ying; Fu, Zhi-guang; Chen, Zhi-nan; Zhu, Ping

    2014-09-01

    Lung interstitial fibrosis is a chronic lung disease, and few effective therapies are available to halt or reverse the progression of the disease. In murine and human lung fibrosis, the expression of CD147 is increased. However, the role of CD147 in lung fibrosis has not been identified, and it remains to be determined whether lung fibrosis would be improved by decreasing the expression of CD147. A murine bleomycin-induced lung interstitial fibrosis model was used in the experiments, and HAb18 mAbs and CsA were administered during the induction of lung fibrosis. In our study, we found that the HAb18 mAbs markedly reduced the collagen score and down-regulated M1 macrophages and Th17 cells. In vitro, flow cytometry analysis showed that M1 macrophages induced higher Th17 differentiation than M2 macrophages. After treatment with HAb18 mAbs or after reducing the expression of CD147 by lentivirus interference in M1 macrophages, the level of Th17 cells were significantly inhibited. In conclusion, HAb18 mAbs or CsA treatment ameliorates lung interstitial fibrosis. CD147 promoted M1 macrophage and induced the differentiation of Th17 cells in lung interstitial fibrosis, perhaps by regulating some cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-23. These results indicated that CD147 may play an important role in the development of lung interstitial fibrosis.

  17. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; De Palma, Michele

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  18. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Educated Macrophages Ameliorate LPS-Induced Systemic Response

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaoqin; Qin, Chaojin; Zheng, Guoping; Tao, Huikang; Zhang, Yan; Qiu, Guanguan; Ge, Menghua; Huang, Lanfang; Chen, Lina; Cheng, Baoli

    2016-01-01

    Both bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) have immunomodulatory effects. The goal of this study was to determine whether ASCs-educated macrophages could directly ameliorate LPS-induced systemic response in a mouse model. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were cocultured with ASCs in a Transwell system for 2 days to educate macrophages. Mice were divided into 5 groups: control, LPS, LPS + ASCs, LPS + untreated macrophages, and LPS + educated macrophages. Educated macrophages decreased lung inflammation, weight loss, pulmonary edema, and inflammatory cytokine response. In vitro, ASCs increased expression of M2 macrophages independent of direct cell-to-cell contact when macrophages were treated with LPS or serum from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). When macrophages were cultured with serum from ARDS patients who were treated with ASCs or placebo in our previous clinical trial, there was no difference in M2 macrophage levels before and after ASCs treatment indicating a suboptimal response to the treatment protocol. ASCs also reduced the levels of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines in vitro which were mimicked by IL-10 and blocked by antibodies for IL-10 and IL-10 receptor supporting the notion that educated macrophages exert their anti-inflammatory effects via IL-10-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27546994

  20. The process of macrophage migration promotes matrix metalloproteinase-independent invasion by tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Guiet, Romain; Van Goethem, Emeline; Cougoule, Céline; Balor, Stéphanie; Valette, Annie; Al Saati, Talal; Lowell, Clifford A; Le Cabec, Véronique; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are known to amplify the malignant potential of tumors by secreting a variety of cytokines and proteases involved in tumor cell invasion and metastasis, but how these macrophages infiltrate tumors and whether the macrophage migration process facilitates tumor cell invasion remain poorly documented. To address these questions, we used cell spheroids of breast carcinoma SUM159PT cells as an in vitro model of solid tumors. We found that macrophages used both the mesenchymal mode requiring matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the amoeboid migration mode to infiltrate tumor cell spheroids. Whereas individual SUM159PT cells invaded Matrigel using an MMP-dependent mesenchymal mode, when they were grown as spheroids, tumor cells were unable to invade the Matrigel surrounding spheroids. When spheroids were infiltrated or in contact with macrophages, tumor cell invasiveness was restored. It was dependent on the capacity of macrophages to remodel the matrix and migrate in an MMP-independent mesenchymal mode. This effect of macrophages was much reduced when spheroids were infiltrated by Matrigel migration-defective Hck(-/-) macrophages. In the presence of macrophages, SUM159PT migrated into Matrigel in the proximity of macrophages and switched from an MMP-dependent mesenchymal migration to an amoeboid mode resistant to protease inhibitors.Thus, in addition to the well-described paracrine loop between macrophages and tumor cells, macrophages can also contribute to the invasiveness of tumor cells by remodeling the extracellular matrix and by opening the way to exit the tumor and colonize the surrounding tissues in an MMP-dispensable manner.

  1. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages.

  2. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages with anti-CSF-1R antibody reveals a strategy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ries, Carola H; Cannarile, Michael A; Hoves, Sabine; Benz, Jörg; Wartha, Katharina; Runza, Valeria; Rey-Giraud, Flora; Pradel, Leon P; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Klaman, Irina; Jones, Tobin; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Kaluza, Klaus; Gorr, Ingo H; Walz, Antje; Abiraj, Keelara; Cassier, Philippe A; Sica, Antonio; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; de Visser, Karin E; Italiano, Antoine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Levitsky, Hyam; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2014-06-16

    Macrophage infiltration has been identified as an independent poor prognostic factor in several cancer types. The major survival factor for these macrophages is macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). We generated a monoclonal antibody (RG7155) that inhibits CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) activation. In vitro RG7155 treatment results in cell death of CSF-1-differentiated macrophages. In animal models, CSF-1R inhibition strongly reduces F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages accompanied by an increase of the CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell ratio. Administration of RG7155 to patients led to striking reductions of CSF-1R(+)CD163(+) macrophages in tumor tissues, which translated into clinical objective responses in diffuse-type giant cell tumor (Dt-GCT) patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  4. Tumor-associated macrophages induce capillary morphogenesis of lymphatic endothelial cells derived from human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yukie; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Kanako; Tokumoto, Mao; Sakimura, Chie; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-08-01

    Tumor lymphangiogenesis is a major prognostic indicator of gastric cancer. Tumor-induced inflammation has been shown to attract tumor-associated macrophages that affect lymphangiogenesis. However, detailed mechanisms of macrophage-induced lymphangiogenesis have not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) derived from lymph nodes (LNs) of human gastric cancer. Lymphatic endothelial cells were directly or indirectly cocultured with macrophages from healthy human blood, with or without the supernatant of the gastric cancer cell line, OCUM-12. We analyzed the effect of cancer pretreated macrophages and of macrophages from metastatic LNs of gastric cancer on LECs. We observed morphological changes of LECs in coculture and assessed the gene expression of possible lymphangiogenic molecules of macrophages and LECs after contact coculture, and of cancer pretreated macrophages, by quantitative RT-PCR. Specimens of metastatic LN of gastric cancer were immunofluorescently stained. We found that tubulogenesis of LECs was observed only in the contact coculture model. OCUM-12 cells promoted macrophage-induced tubulogenesis of LECs. Relative gene expression of MMP and adhesion molecules was significantly upregulated in both capillary-forming LECs and cocultured macrophages. Cancer pretreated macrophages upregulated lymphangiogenic factors including inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, adhesion molecules, and vascular endothelial growth factor-C. Blocking of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and macrophage activation suppressed tubulogenesis of LECs. Immunohistochemistry showed macrophages localized around lymphatic vessels. Our results suggested that interaction between LECs and macrophages may be an important initial step of tumor lymphangiogenesis developing LN metastasis. Understanding of its mechanisms could be useful for future therapeutics of gastric cancer.

  5. Interaction with epithelial cells modifies airway macrophage response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca N; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Duncan, Kelly E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-03-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell-Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell-derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3.

  6. Krebs cycle rewired for macrophage and dendritic cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dylan Gerard; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2017-07-07

    The Krebs cycle is an amphibolic pathway operating in the mitochondrial matrix of all eukaryotic organisms. In response to proinflammatory stimuli, macrophages and dendritic cells undergo profound metabolic remodelling to support the biosynthetic and bioenergetic requirements of the cell. Recently, it has been discovered that this metabolic shift also involves the rewiring of the Krebs cycle to regulate cellular metabolic flux and the accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates, notably, citrate, succinate and fumarate. Interestingly, a new role for Krebs cycle intermediates as signalling molecules and immunomodulators that dictate the inflammatory response has begun to emerge. This review will discuss the latest developments in Krebs cycle rewiring and immune cell effector functions, with a particular focus on the regulation of cytokine production. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Splenic Damage during SIV Infection: Role of T-Cell Depletion and Macrophage Polarization and Infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dionna W; Engle, Elizabeth L; Shirk, Erin N; Queen, Suzanne E; Gama, Lucio; Mankowski, Joseph L; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E

    2016-08-01

    The effects of HIV infection on spleen and its cellular subsets have not been fully characterized, particularly for macrophages in which diverse populations exist. We used an accelerated SIV-infected macaque model to examine longitudinal effects on T-cell and macrophage populations and their susceptibilities to infection. Substantial lymphoid depletion occurred, characterized by follicular burn out and a loss of CD3 T lymphocytes, which was associated with cellular activation and transient dysregulations in CD4/CD8 ratios and memory effector populations. In contrast, the loss of CD68 and CD163(+)CD68(+) macrophages and increase in CD163 cells was irreversible, which began during acute infection and persisted until terminal disease. Mac387 macrophages and monocytes were transiently recruited into spleen, but were not sufficient to mitigate the changes in macrophage subsets. Type I interferon, M2 polarizing genes, and chemokine-chemokine receptor signaling were up-regulated in spleen and drove macrophage alterations. SIV-infected T cells were numerous within the white pulp during acute infection, but were rarely observed thereafter. CD68, CD163, and Mac387 macrophages were highly infected, which primarily occurred in the red pulp independent of T cells. Few macrophages underwent apoptosis, indicating that they are a long-lasting target for HIV/SIV. Our results identify macrophages as an important contributor to HIV/SIV infection in spleen and in promoting morphologic changes through the loss of specific macrophage subsets that mediate splenic organization.

  8. Macrophages are crucial for epithelial cell death and adipocyte repopulation during mammary gland involution.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jenean; Martinson, Holly; Durand-Rougely, Clarissa; Schedin, Pepper

    2012-01-01

    Mammary gland development is dependent on macrophages, as demonstrated by their requirement during the expansion phases of puberty and pregnancy. Equally dramatic tissue restructuring occurs following lactation, when the gland regresses to a state that histologically resembles pre-pregnancy through massive programmed epithelial cell death and stromal repopulation. Postpartum involution is characterized by wound healing-like events, including an influx of macrophages with M2 characteristics. Macrophage levels peak after the initial wave of epithelial cell death, suggesting that initiation and execution of cell death are macrophage independent. To address the role of macrophages during weaning-induced mammary gland involution, conditional systemic deletion of macrophages expressing colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was initiated just prior to weaning in the Mafia mouse model. Depletion of CSF1R(+) macrophages resulted in delayed mammary involution as evidenced by loss of lysosomal-mediated and apoptotic epithelial cell death, lack of alveolar regression and absence of adipocyte repopulation 7 days post-weaning. Failure to execute involution occurred in the presence of milk stasis and STAT3 activation, indicating that neither is sufficient to initiate involution in the absence of CSF1R(+) macrophages. Injection of wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) or M2-differentiated macrophages into macrophage-depleted mammary glands was sufficient to rescue involution, including apoptosis, alveolar regression and adipocyte repopulation. BMDMs exposed to the postpartum mammary involution environment upregulated the M2 markers arginase 1 and mannose receptor. These data demonstrate the necessity of macrophages, and implicate M2-polarized macrophages, for epithelial cell death during normal postpartum mammary gland involution.

  9. Mice spermatogonial stem cells transplantation induces macrophage migration into the seminiferous epithelium and lipid body formation: high-resolution light microscopy and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Dias, Felipe F; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Parreira, Gleydes G; Melo, Rossana C N

    2011-12-01

    Transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), the male germline stem cells, in experimental animal models has been successfully used to study mechanisms involved in SSC self-renewal and to restore fertility. However, there are still many challenges associated with understanding the recipient immune response for SSCs use in clinical therapies. Here, we have undertaken a detailed structural study of macrophages elicited by SSCs transplantation in mice using both high-resolution light microscopy (HRLM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We demonstrate that SSCs transplantation elicits a rapid and potent recruitment of macrophages into the seminiferous epithelium (SE). Infiltrating macrophages were derived from differentiation of peritubular monocyte-like cells into typical activated macrophages, which actively migrate through the SE, accumulate in the tubule lumen, and direct phagocytosis of differentiating germ cells and spermatozoa. Quantitative TEM analyses revealed increased formation of lipid bodies (LBs), organelles recognized as intracellular platforms for synthesis of inflammatory mediators and key markers of macrophage activation, within both infiltrating macrophages and Sertoli cells. LBs significantly increased in number and size in parallel to the augmented macrophage migration during different times post-transplantation. Our findings suggest that LBs may be involved with immunomodulatory mechanisms regulating the seminiferous tubule niche after SSC transplantation.

  10. Phagocytosis by macrophages and endothelial cells inhibits procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Gao, Chunyan; Li, Wen; Zhu, Jiuxin; Novakovic, Valerie; Wang, Jing; Ma, Ruishuang; Zhou, Jin; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2012-03-08

    The coagulopathy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is mainly related to procoagulant substances and fibrinolytic activators of APL blasts, but the fate of these leukemic cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of APL blasts by macrophages and endothelial cells in vitro and consequent procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of APL cells. We found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as THP-1 and monocyte-derived macrophages bound, engulfed, and subsequently degraded immortalized APL cell line NB4 and primary APL cells. Lactadherin promoted phagocytosis of APL cells in a time-dependent fashion. Furthermore, factor Xa and prothrombinase activity of phosphatidylserine-exposed target APL cells was time-dependently decreased after incubation with phagocytes (THP-1-derived macrophages or HUVECs). Thrombin production on target APL cells was reduced by 40%-45% after 2 hours of coincubation with phagocytes and 80% by a combination of lactadherin and phagocytes. Moreover, plasmin generation of target APL cells was inhibited 30% by 2 hours of phagocytosis and ∼ 50% by lactadherin-mediated engulfment. These results suggest that engulfment by macrophages and endothelial cells reduce procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of APL blasts. Lactadherin and phagocytosis could cooperatively ameliorate the clotting disorders in APL.

  11. Carbocisteine promotes phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masako; Ishibashi, Yuji; Nogawa, Hisashi; Yasue, Tokutaro

    2012-02-29

    Clearance of apoptotic cells, so-called efferocytosis, by alveolar macrophages (AMs) is important for lung homeostasis and is impaired in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, corrects the contents of fucose in airway mucus and has anti-inflammatory properties in airway inflammation. Thus, we conducted the present study to better understand the anti-inflammatory properties of carbocisteine. First, we induced airway inflammation in mice with lipopolysaccharide intratracheally. Carbocisteine significantly decreased neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the resolution phase of inflammation, implying the promotion of neutrophil clearance. Then, we investigated whether carbocisteine would enhance the efferocytosis by AMs isolated from mice and found that this drug promoted not only the phagocytosis but also the binding of apoptotic cells to AMs in vitro. Furthermore, carbocisteine decreased the fucose residues stained with fluorescent fucose-binding lectin, Lens culinaris agglutinin, on the cell surface of AMs. We found here that removing fucose residues from cell surfaces of AMs by fucosidase markedly enhanced both the binding and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Finally, AMs from mice orally given carbocisteine also promoted both the binding and phagocytosis ex vivo similarly to in vitro. These results suggest that carbocisteine could promote the clearance of apoptotic cells by AMs in airway. In addition, the present findings suggest that the binding and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells may be modulated by fucose residues on the cell surface of AMs.

  12. Macrophages Modulate Migration and Invasion of Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  13. The tumoricidal properties of inflammatory tissue macrophages and multinucleate giant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Poste, G.

    1979-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells from C3H/HeN mice infected with bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) and subcutaneous inflammatory macrophages from uninfected mice exhibit spontaneous cytotoxicity for tumor cells in vitro, but their tumoricidal activity can be increased by incubation in vitro with lymphokines released by mitogen- or antigen-stimulated lymphocytes. Inflammatory macrophages from these sites are only susceptible to activation in vitro by lymphokines for a short period (less than 4 days) following their initial emigration from the circulation to the site of inflammation. The expression of tumoricidal activity by activated macrophages is similarly short-lived (less than 4 days). Once the tumoricidal state is lost it cannot be restored by further incubation with lymphokines in vitro. Fusion of macrophages to form multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) accompanies the loss of tumoricidal activity and the onset of resistance to activation by lymphokines, but the fusion process is not responsible for these changes, since unfused macrophages are similarly affected. Activation and acquisition of tumoricidal properties is confined to young macrophages recruited from the circulation during acute inflammation. Older macrophages and MGCs in chronic inflammatory lesions in which recruitment of new macrophages has ceased are nontumoricidal and are refractory to activation by lymphokines in vitro. These findings are discussed in relation to the efficiency of macrophage-mediated destruction of tumors in vivo and the amplification of macrophage antitumor activity by immunotherapeutic agents. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:382866

  14. Adipokines from local fat cells shape the macrophage compartment of the creeping fat in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kredel, Lea Isabell; Batra, Arvind; Stroh, Thorsten; Kühl, Anja A; Zeitz, Martin; Erben, Ulrike; Siegmund, Britta

    2013-06-01

    The creeping fat in Crohn's disease (CD) is infiltrated by macrophages; local adipokine levels are increased. This study aimed to link these observations to define a role for macrophages in the pathology of human CD. Human peripheral blood CD14 cells were polarised in vitro into M1 and M2 macrophages. The effects on adipokine receptors, phenotypic surface markers, cytokines and chemokines were assessed after treatment with leptin and adiponectin. Immunohistochemistry visualised macrophage subtypes in samples of mesenteric fat tissue from patients with CD. The chemotactic potential of secreted macrophage products was determined by T cell migration and chemokine production in vitro. Although both adipokines altered the phenotype and function of M1 and M2 macrophages, M2 macrophages were more susceptible. M1 responded to leptin by increased cytokine production, but the stronger effect was seen in M2 macrophages with high expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor α. Adiponectin exerted similar effects and led to upregulated mannose receptor expression by M2 macrophages. Large macrophage numbers within the mesenteric fat tissue of patients with CD comprise a unique infiltration predominantly of M2 macrophages, leading to an IL-10-rich environment. While leptin increased the potency of both subtypes to attract CD3 T cells, adiponectin only affected M2 macrophages. The adipocyte-dependent microenvironment within the creeping fat of patients with CD modulates the local macrophage compartment to a preference for the M2 subtype. The findings in this study with human cells suggest a protective role for the mesenteric fat in CD in terms of an enveloping barrier with the potential to limit intestinal inflammation.

  15. Nanoparticle-loaded macrophage-mediated photothermal therapy: potential for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Catherine; Hong, Seok Jin; Trinidad, Anthony; Peng, Qian; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Gold-based nanoparticles have been used in a number of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of gold–silica nanoshells (AuNS) in photothermal therapy (PTT) of rat gliomas. Rat alveolar macrophages (Ma) were used as nanoparticle delivery vectors. Uptake of AuNS (bare and PEGylated) was investigated in Ma. AuNS were incubated with Ma for 24 h. Phase contrast microscopy was used to visualize the distribution of loaded Ma in three-dimensional glioma spheroids. PTT efficacy was evaluated for both empty (Ma) and AuNS-loaded Ma (MaNS) in both monolayers and spheroids consisting of C6 rat glioma cells and Ma. Monolayers/spheroids were irradiated for 5 min with light from an 810-nm diode laser at irradiances ranging from 7 to 28 W cm−2. Monolayer survival was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay while PTT efficacy in spheroids was determined from growth kinetics and live/dead fluorescence microscopy. PTT efficacy was investigated in vivo using a Sprague–Dawley rat glioma model. Five rats received direct intracranial injection of a mixture of 104 C6 glioma cells and, 2 days later, an equal number of MaNS. Three rats received laser treatment (810 nm; 10 min; 1 W) while the remaining two served as controls (no laser treatment). The uptake ratio of bare to PEGylated AuNS by Ma was 4:1. A significant photothermal effect was observed in vitro, albeit at relatively high radiant exposures (2.1–4.2 kJ cm−2). PTT proved effective in vivo in preventing or delaying tumor development in the PTT-treated animals. PMID:25794592

  16. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Calderon, Tina M; Coley, Jacqueline S; Berman, Joan W

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70 % of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers.

  17. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  18. Obligatory participation of macrophages in an angiopoietin 2-mediated cell death switch

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sujata; Lobov, Ivan B.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Tsujikawa, Kaoru; Shiojima, Ichiro; Akunuru, Shailaja; Walsh, Kenneth; Benjamin, Laura E.; Lang, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages have a critical function in the recognition and engulfment of dead cells. In some settings, macrophages also actively signal programmed cell death. Here we show that during developmentally scheduled vascular regression, resident macrophages are an obligatory participant in a signaling switch that favors death over survival. This switch occurs when the signaling ligand angiopoietin 2 has the dual effect of suppressing survival signaling in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and stimulating Wnt ligand production by macrophages. In response to the Wnt ligand, VECs enter the cell cycle and in the absence of survival signals, die from G1 phase of the cell cycle. We propose that this mechanism represents an adaptation to ensure that the macrophage and its disposal capability are on hand when cell death occurs. PMID:18039971

  19. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  20. Evolution of Cell-Autonomous Effector Mechanisms in Macrophages versus Non-Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Ryan G.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Specialized adaptations for killing microbes is synonymous with phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, inflammatory neutrophils and eosinophils. Recent genome sequencing of extant species, however, reveals analogous antimicrobial machineries exist in certain non-immune cells and also within species that ostensibly lack a well-defined immune system. Here we probe the evolutionary record for clues about the ancient and diverse phylogenetic origins of macrophage killing mechanisms and how some of their properties are shared with cells outside the traditional bounds of immunity in higher vertebrates such as mammals. PMID:28087931

  1. Alginic acid cell entrapment: a novel method for measuring in vivo macrophage cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Timothy J.; Chellan, Bijoy; Bhanvadia, Clarissa V.; Getz, Godfrey S.; Reardon, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage conversion to atherosclerotic foam cells is partly due to the balance of uptake and efflux of cholesterol. Cholesterol efflux from cells by HDL and its apoproteins for subsequent hepatic elimination is known as reverse cholesterol transport. Numerous methods have been developed to measure in vivo macrophage cholesterol efflux. Most methods do not allow for macrophage recovery for analysis of changes in cellular cholesterol status. We describe a novel method for measuring cellular cholesterol balance using the in vivo entrapment of macrophages in alginate, which retains incorporated cells while being permeable to lipoproteins. Recipient mice were injected subcutaneously with CaCl2 forming a bubble into which a macrophage/alginate suspension was injected, entrapping the macrophages. Cells were recovered after 24 h. Cellular free and esterified cholesterol mass were determined enzymatically and normalized to cellular protein. Both normal and cholesterol loaded macrophages undergo measureable changes in cell cholesterol when injected into WT and apoA-I-, LDL-receptor-, or apoE-deficient mice. Cellular cholesterol balance is dependent on initial cellular cholesterol status, macrophage cholesterol transporter expression, and apolipoprotein deficiency. Alginate entrapment allows for the in vivo measurement of macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and is a novel platform for investigating the role of genetics and therapeutic interventions in atherogenesis. PMID:25465389

  2. Effects of cadmium, lead, and zinc on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity toward tumor cells. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.J.; Kiremidjian-Schumacher, L.; Stotzky, G.

    1982-06-01

    Cadmium at 10/sup -5/ and 10/sup -6/ M significantly inhibited the ability of immune macrophages from C57BL/6J mice to destroy Sarcoma I cells. These concentrations of cadmium apparently interfered with the cytolytic mechanism(s) of macrophages, and the inhibition did not result from toxicity of the metal toward either cell type.

  3. Characterization of macrophage - cancer cell crosstalk in estrogen receptor positive and triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Roudnicky, Filip; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity may broadly influence the activation of tumor-associated macrophages. We aimed to dissect how breast cancer cells of different molecular characteristics contribute to macrophage phenotype and function. Therefore, we performed whole transcriptome sequencing of human monocytes that were co-cultured with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) or triple-negative (TNBC) breast cancer cell lines and studied the biological responses related to the differential gene activation in both monocytes and cancer cells by pathway analysis. ER+ and TNBC cancer cell lines induced distinctly different macrophage phenotypes with different biological functions, cytokine and chemokine secretion, and morphology. Conversely, ER+ and TNBC breast cancer cell lines were distinctly influenced by the presence of macrophages. ER+ cells demonstrated up-regulation of an acute phase inflammatory response, IL-17 signaling and antigen presentation pathway, whereas thioredoxin and vitamin D3 receptor pathways were down-regulated in the respective macrophages. The TNBC educated macrophages down-regulated citrulline metabolism and differentiated into M2-like macrophages with increased MMR protein expression and CCL2 secretion. These data demonstrate how different cancer cells educate the host cells to support tumor growth and might explain why high infiltration of macrophages in TNBC tumors associates with poor prognosis. PMID:25776849

  4. Chronic insulin therapy reduces adipose tissue macrophage content in LDL-receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J; Subramanian, S; Ding, Y; Wang, S; Goodspeed, L; Sullivan, B; Kim, J; O'Brien, K D; Chait, A

    2011-05-01

    Insulin has anti-inflammatory effects in short-term experiments. However, the effects of chronic insulin administration on inflammation are unknown. We hypothesised that chronic insulin administration would beneficially alter adipose tissue inflammation and several circulating inflammatory markers. We administered two forms of long-acting insulin, insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin) and insulin detemir (B29Lys[ε-tetradecanoyl],desB30 human insulin), to LDL-receptor-deficient mice. After 8 weeks on a diet that causes obesity, hyperglycaemia, adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and atherosclerosis, the mice received subcutaneous glargine, detemir or NaCl (control) for 12 weeks. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and serum amyloid P (SAP), metabolic variables, adipose tissue macrophages and aortic atherosclerosis were evaluated. Weight gain was equivalent in all groups. The glycated haemoglobin level fell equivalently in both insulin-treated groups. Plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, and hepatic triacylglycerol level significantly improved in the glargine compared with the detemir or control groups. Levels of mRNA expression for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and F4/80, a macrophage marker, in adipose tissue were decreased only in the glargine group (p < 0.05). Visceral adipose tissue macrophage content decreased in both insulin groups (p < 0.05), whereas atherosclerosis decreased only in the glargine group. Circulating SAA and SAP did not decrease in either insulin-treated group, but IL-6 levels fell in the glargine-treated mice. While chronic insulin administration did not decrease SAA and SAP, administration of glargine but not detemir insulin improved dyslipidaemia, IL-6 levels and atherosclerosis, and both insulins reduced macrophage accumulation in visceral adipose tissue. Thus, chronic insulin therapy has beneficial tissue effects independent of circulating inflammatory markers in this murine model of diet-induced obesity and

  5. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  6. Immune Cells in Cancer Therapy and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eyileten, Ceren; Majchrzak, Kinga; Pilch, Zofia; Tonecka, Katarzyna; Mucha, Joanna; Taciak, Bartlomiej; Ulewicz, Katarzyna; Witt, Katarzyna; Boffi, Alberto; Krol, Magdalena; Rygiel, Tomasz P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate the critical role of tumour associated macrophages, tumour associated neutrophils, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and natural killer cells in tumourigenesis. These cells can have a significant impact on the tumour microenvironment via their production of cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, products secreted from all these cells have defined specific roles in regulating tumour cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. They act in a protumour capacity in vivo as evidenced by the recent studies indicating that macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils may be manipulated to exhibit cytotoxic activity against tumours. Therefore therapy targeting these cells may be promising, or they may constitute drug or anticancer particles delivery systems to the tumours. Herein, we discussed all these possibilities that may be used in cancer treatment. PMID:27212807

  7. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Rebecca N.; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.; Duncan, Kelly E.

    2015-01-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell–Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell–derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell–Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell–derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3. PMID:25054807

  8. The Roles of Macrophages and Nitric Oxide in Interleukin-3-Enhanced HSV-Sr39tk-Mediated Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2013-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-sr39tk/GCV) system is a well-established prodrug system used in cancer gene therapy. However, this system is currently not effective enough to eradicate malignant tumors completely. This study aimed to evaluate whether co-expression of interleukin-3 (IL-3) could enhance the anti-tumor activity of HSV-sr39tk/GCV prodrug gene therapy using a murine TRAMP-C1 prostate tumor model. In vitro results demonstrated that HSV-sr39tk-transfected cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to the GCV prodrug, which was not affected by co-expression of the mIL-3 gene. However, in vivo studies showed that co-expression of the mIL-3 gene significantly increased the HSV-sr39tk/GCV-induced tumor growth delay and even cured the tumor. The TRAMP-C1-specific immune response of spleen lymphocytes from mice bearing HSV-sr39tk- and IL-3-expressing TRAMP-C1 tumors was measured by ELISA. Results showed that IL-3-activated IL-4-dominant lymphocytes became IFN-γ- dominant lymphocytes after combined HSV-sr39tk/GCV therapy. The efficacy of combined therapies on tumor regression was reduced when macrophages populations were depleted by carrageenan or NO production was inhibited by administration of the iNOS inhibitor, L-NAME. These results suggest that utilizing a bicistronic vector to express HSV-sr39tk and the IL-3 gene induced an enhanced macrophage- or NO-dependent anti-tumor effect. PMID:23441198

  9. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    PubMed Central

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  10. Control of growth and inflammatory response of macrophages and foam cells with nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2012-07-01

    Macrophages play an important role in modulating the immune function of the human body, while foam cells differentiated from macrophages with subsequent fatty streak formation play a key role in atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that nanotopography modulates the behavior and function of macrophages and foam cells without bioactive agent. In the present study, nanodot arrays ranging from 10- to 200-nm were used to evaluate the growth and function of macrophages and foam cells. In the quantitative analysis, the cell adhesion area in macrophages increased with 10- to 50-nm nanodot arrays compared to the flat surface, while it decreased with 100- and 200-nm nanodot arrays. A similar trend of adhesion was observed in foam cells. Immunostaining, specific to vinculin and actin filaments, indicated that a 50-nm surface promoted cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. On the contrary, 200-nm surfaces hindered cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. Further, based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data, expression of inflammatory genes was upregulated for the 100- and 200-nm surfaces in macrophages and foam cells. This suggests that nanodots of 100- and 200-nm triggered immune inflammatory stress response. In summary, nanotopography controls cell morphology, adhesions, and proliferation. By adjusting the nanodot diameter, we could modulate the growth and expression of function-related genes in the macrophages and foam cell system. The nanotopography-mediated control of cell growth and morphology provides potential insight for designing cardiovascular implants.

  11. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes alter macrophage and dendritic cell functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marton, Annamaria; Vizler, Csaba; Kusz, Erzsebet; Temesfoi, Viktoria; Szathmary, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Krisztina; Szegletes, Zsolt; Varo, Gyorgy; Siklos, Laszlo; Katona, Robert L; Tubak, Vilmos; Howard, O M Zack; Duda, Erno; Minarovits, Janos; Nagy, Katalin; Buzas, Krisztina

    2012-01-01

    To clarify controversies in the literature of the field, we have purified and characterized B16F1 melanoma cell derived exosomes (mcd-exosomes) then we attempted to dissect their immunological activities. We tested how mcd-exosomes influence CD4+ T cell proliferation induced by bone marrow derived dendritic cells; we quantified NF-κB activation in mature macrophages stimulated with mcd-exosomes, and we compared the cytokine profile of LPS-stimulated, IL-4 induced, and mcd-exosome treated macrophages. We observed that mcd-exosomes helped the maturation of dendritic cells, enhancing T cell proliferation induced by the treated dendritic cells. The exosomes also activated macrophages, as measured by NF-κB activation. The cytokine and chemokine profile of macrophages treated with tumor cell derived exosomes showed marked differences from those induced by either LPS or IL-4, and it suggested that exosomes may play a role in the tumor progression and metastasis formation through supporting tumor immune escape mechanisms.

  12. The Synthetic Immunomodulator Murabutide Controls Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication at Multiple Levels in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darcissac, Edith C. A.; Truong, Marie-José; Dewulf, Joëlle; Mouton, Yves; Capron, André; Bahr, George M.

    2000-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells are known to play an important role in the establishment and persistence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Besides antiretroviral therapy, several immune-based interventions are being evaluated with the aim of achieving better control of virus replication in reservoir cells. Murabutide is a safe synthetic immunomodulator presenting a capacity to enhance nonspecific resistance against viral infections and to target cells of the reticuloendothelial system. In this study, we have examined the ability of Murabutide to control HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in acutely infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (MDDCs). Highly significant suppression of viral replication was consistently observed in Murabutide-treated cultures of both cell types. Murabutide did not affect virus entry, reverse transcriptase activity, or early proviral DNA formation in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, treated MDMs and MDDCs showed a dramatic reduction in nuclear viral two-long terminal repeat circular form and viral mRNA transcripts. This HIV-1-suppressive activity was not mediated by inhibiting cellular DNA synthesis or by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, Murabutide-stimulated cells expressed reduced CD4 and CCR5 receptors and secreted high levels of β-chemokines, although neutralization of the released chemokines did not alter the HIV-1-suppressive activity of Murabutide. These results provide evidence that a clinically acceptable immunomodulator can activate multiple effector pathways in macrophages and in dendritic cells, rendering them nonpermissive for HIV-1 replication. PMID:10933686

  13. Studying the role of macrophages in circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaojun; Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a very complicated multi-step process and accounts for the low survival rate of the cancerous patients. To metastasize, the malignant cells must detach from the primary tumor and migrate to secondary sites in the body through either blood or lymph circulation. Macrophages appear to be directly involved in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of macrophages in affecting cancer metastasis has not been fully elucidated. Here, we have utilized an emerging technique, namely in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) to study the depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells in mice and how depletion of macrophages by the liposome-encapsulated clodronate affects the depletion kinetics. Our results show different depletion kinetics of PC-3 cells between macrophage-deficient group and the control group. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in macrophage-deficient group decreases in a slower manner compared to the control mice group. The differences in depletion kinetics indicate that the absence of macrophages facilitates the stay of prostate cancer cells in circulation. We speculate that macrophages might be able to arrest, phagocytose and digest PC-3 cells. Therefore, the phagocytosis may mainly contribute to the depletion kinetic differences. The developed methods here would be useful to study the relationship between macrophages and tumor metastasis in small animal cancer model.

  14. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  15. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F; Cliff, Jacqueline M; Clark, Taane G; Hibberd, Martin L

    2017-02-08

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Cell therapies for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2017-09-05

    In this review of cell therapies in Chagas disease, we cover aspects related to the disease, its treatment and world demographics, before proceeding to describe the preclinical and clinical trials performed using cell therapies in the search for an alternative therapy for the most severe and lethal form of this disease, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Small cell lung cancer: Recruitment of macrophages by circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilan J

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in tumor progression, suppression of antitumor immunity and dissemination. Blood monocytes infiltrate the tumor region and are primed by local microenvironmental conditions to promote tumor growth and invasion. Although many of the interacting cytokines and factors are known for the tumor-macrophage interactions, the putative contribution of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is not known so far. These specialized cells are characterized by increased mobility, ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to enter the blood stream and generate secondary lesions which is a leading cause of death for the majority of tumor patients. The first establishment of two permanent CTC lines, namely BHGc7 and 10, from blood samples of advanced stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients allowed us to investigate the CTC-immune cell interaction. Cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) with CTCs or addition of CTC-conditioned medium (CTC-CM) in vitro resulted in monocyte-macrophage differentiation and appearance of CD14(+), CD163(weak) and CD68(+) macrophages expressing markers of TAMs. Furthermore, we screened the supernatants of CTC-primed macrophages for presence of approximately 100 cytokines and compared the expression with those induced by the local metastatic SCLC26A cell line. Macrophages recruited by SCLC26A-CM showed expression of osteopontin (OPN), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, chitinase3-like 1 (CHI3L1), platelet factor (Pf4), IL-1ra and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) among other minor cytokines/chemokines. In contrast, BHGc7-CM induced marked overexpression of complement factor D (CFD)/adipsin and vitamin D-BP (VDBP), as well as increased secretion of OPN, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), CHI3L1, uPAR, MIP-1 and GDF-15/MIC-1. BHGc10, derived independently from relapsed SCLC, revealed an almost identical pattern with added expression of ENA-78/CXCL5. CMs of the non-tumor HEK

  18. Small cell lung cancer: Recruitment of macrophages by circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilan J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in tumor progression, suppression of antitumor immunity and dissemination. Blood monocytes infiltrate the tumor region and are primed by local microenvironmental conditions to promote tumor growth and invasion. Although many of the interacting cytokines and factors are known for the tumor-macrophage interactions, the putative contribution of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is not known so far. These specialized cells are characterized by increased mobility, ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to enter the blood stream and generate secondary lesions which is a leading cause of death for the majority of tumor patients. The first establishment of two permanent CTC lines, namely BHGc7 and 10, from blood samples of advanced stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients allowed us to investigate the CTC-immune cell interaction. Cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) with CTCs or addition of CTC-conditioned medium (CTC-CM) in vitro resulted in monocyte-macrophage differentiation and appearance of CD14+, CD163weak and CD68+ macrophages expressing markers of TAMs. Furthermore, we screened the supernatants of CTC-primed macrophages for presence of approximately 100 cytokines and compared the expression with those induced by the local metastatic SCLC26A cell line. Macrophages recruited by SCLC26A-CM showed expression of osteopontin (OPN), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, chitinase3-like 1 (CHI3L1), platelet factor (Pf4), IL-1ra and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) among other minor cytokines/chemokines. In contrast, BHGc7-CM induced marked overexpression of complement factor D (CFD)/adipsin and vitamin D-BP (VDBP), as well as increased secretion of OPN, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), CHI3L1, uPAR, MIP-1 and GDF-15/MIC-1. BHGc10, derived independently from relapsed SCLC, revealed an almost identical pattern with added expression of ENA-78/CXCL5. CMs of the non

  19. Infliximab therapy increases the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes and modifies macrophage cytokine response to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, N; Magro, F; Silva, J; Duro, M; Gracio, D; Coelho, R; Appelberg, R; Macedo, G; Sarmento, A

    2014-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has been correlated with altered macrophage response to microorganisms. Considering the efficacy of infliximab treatment on CD remission, we investigated infliximab effects on circulating monocyte subsets and on macrophage cytokine response to bacteria. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were obtained from CD patients, treated or not with infliximab. Macrophages were infected with Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) or M. avium subsp avium, and cytokine levels [tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10] were evaluated at different time-points. To evaluate infliximab-dependent effects on monocyte subsets, we studied CD14 and CD16 expression by peripheral blood monocytes before and after different infliximab administrations. We also investigated TNF secretion by macrophages obtained from CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes and the frequency of TNF(+) cells among CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocyte-derived macrophages from CD patients. Infliximab treatment resulted in elevated TNF and IL-10 macrophage response to bacteria. An infliximab-dependent increase in the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes (particularly the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset) was also observed (before infliximab: 4·65 ± 0·58%; after three administrations: 10·68 ± 2·23%). In response to MAP infection, macrophages obtained from CD16(+) monocytes were higher TNF producers and CD16(+) macrophages from infliximab-treated CD patients showed increased frequency of TNF(+) cells. In conclusion, infliximab treatment increased the TNF production of CD macrophages in response to bacteria, which seemed to depend upon enrichment of CD16(+) circulating monocytes, particularly of the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset. Infliximab treatment of CD patients also resulted in increased macrophage IL-10 production in response to bacteria, suggesting an infliximab-induced shift to M2 macrophages.

  20. Trastuzumab triggers phagocytic killing of high HER2 cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by interaction with Fcγ receptors on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Brezski, Randall J; Rycyzyn, Michael; Jordan, Robert E; Strohl, William R; Zou, Quanming; Zhang, Ningyan; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-05-01

    Trastuzumab has been used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer for more than a decade, but the mechanisms of action for the therapy are still being actively investigated. Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity mediated by NK cells is well recognized as one of the key mechanisms of action for trastuzumab, but trastuzumab-mediated Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) has not been established. In this study, we demonstrate that macrophages, by way of phagocytic engulfment, can mediate ADCP and cancer cell killing in the presence of trastuzumab. Increased infiltration of macrophages in the tumor tissue was associated with enhanced efficacy of trastuzumab whereas depletion of macrophages resulted in reduced antitumor efficacy in mouse xenograft tumor models. Among the four mouse FcγRs, FcγRIV exhibits the strongest binding affinity to trastuzumab. Knockdown of FcγRIV in mouse macrophages reduced cancer cell killing and ADCP activity triggered by trastuzumab. Consistently, an upregulation of FcγRIV expression by IFN-γ triggered an increased ADCP activity by trastuzumab. In an analogous fashion, IFN-γ priming of human macrophages increased the expression of FcγRIII, the ortholog of murine FcγRIV, and increased trastuzumab-mediated cancer cell killing. Thus, in two independent systems, the results indicated that activation of macrophages in combination with trastuzumab can serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating high HER2 breast cancer by boosting ADCP killing of cancer cells.

  1. Functional evaluation of gene silencing on macrophages derived from U937 cells using interference RNA (shRNA) in a model of macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Ovalle-Bracho, Clemencia; Londoño-Barbosa, Diana A; Franco-Muñoz, Carlos; Clavijo-Ramírez, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Leishmaniasis development is multifactorial; nonetheless, the establishment of the infection, which occurs by the survival and replication of the parasite inside its main host cell, the macrophage, is mandatory. Thus, the importance of studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the Leishmania-macrophage interaction is highlighted. The aim of this study was to characterize a cellular model of macrophages derived from U937 cells that would allow for the identification of infection phenotypes induced by genetic silencing with interference RNA in the context of macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. The model was standardized by silencing an exogenous gene (gfp), an endogenous gene (lmna) and a differentially expressed gene between infected and non-infected macrophages (gro-β). The silencing process was successful for the three genes studied, obtaining reductions of 88·9% in the GFP levels, 87·5% in LMNA levels and 74·4% for Gro-β with respect to the corresponding control cell lines. The cell model revealed changes in the infection phenotype of the macrophages in terms of number of amastigotes per infected macrophage, number of amastigotes per sampled macrophage and percentage of infected macrophages as a result of gene silencing. Thus, this cell model constitutes a research platform for the study of parasite-host interactions and for the identification of potentially therapeutic targets.

  2. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J; Schilling, Joel D

    2016-04-12

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  3. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  4. Macrophagic CD146 promotes foam cell formation and retention during atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongting; Duan, Hongxia; Qian, Yining; Feng, Liqun; Wu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Fei; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Qin, Zhihai; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    The persistence of cholesterol-engorged macrophages (foam cells) in the artery wall fuels the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism that regulates the formation of macrophage foam cells and impedes their emigration out of inflamed plaques is still elusive. Here, we report that adhesion receptor CD146 controls the formation of macrophage foam cells and their retention within the plaque during atherosclerosis exacerbation. CD146 is expressed on the macrophages in human and mouse atheroma and can be upregulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). CD146 triggers macrophage activation by driving the internalization of scavenger receptor CD36 during lipid uptake. In response to oxLDL, macrophages show reduced migratory capacity toward chemokines CCL19 and CCL21; this capacity can be restored by blocking CD146. Genetic deletion of macrophagic CD146 or targeting of CD146 with an antibody result in much less complex plaques in high-fat diet-fed ApoE−/− mice by causing lipid-loaded macrophages to leave plaques. Collectively, our findings identify CD146 as a novel retention signal that traps macrophages within the artery wall, and a promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:28084332

  5. Micro and Nano-patterned Topographical Cues for Regulating Macrophage Cell Shape and Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Thuy U.; Gott, Shannon C.; Woo, Bryan W. K.; Rao, Masaru P.; Liu, Wendy F.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the interactions between macrophages and biomaterials is critical for modulating the response to implants. While it has long been thought that biomaterial surface chemistry regulates the immune response, recent studies have suggested that material geometry may in fact dominate. Our previous work demonstrated that elongation of macrophages regulates their polarization towards a pro-healing phenotype. In this work, we elucidate how surface topology might be leveraged to alter macrophage cell morphology and polarization state. Using a deep etch technique, we fabricated titanium surfaces containing micro and nano-patterned grooves, which have been previously shown to promote cell elongation. Morphology, phenotypic markers, and cytokine secretion of murine bone marrow derived macrophages on different groove widths were analyzed. The results suggest that micro and nano-patterned grooves influenced macrophage elongation, which peaked on substrates with 400-500 nm wide grooves. Surface grooves did not affect inflammatory activation, but drove macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory, pro-healing phenotype. While secretion of TNF-alpha remained low in macrophages across all conditions, macrophages secreted significantly higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, on intermediate groove widths compared to cells on other Ti surfaces. Our findings highlight the potential of using surface topography to regulate macrophage function, and thus control the wound healing and tissue repair response to biomaterials. PMID:26605491

  6. Macrophagic CD146 promotes foam cell formation and retention during atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongting; Duan, Hongxia; Qian, Yining; Feng, Liqun; Wu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Fei; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Qin, Zhihai; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-03-01

    The persistence of cholesterol-engorged macrophages (foam cells) in the artery wall fuels the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism that regulates the formation of macrophage foam cells and impedes their emigration out of inflamed plaques is still elusive. Here, we report that adhesion receptor CD146 controls the formation of macrophage foam cells and their retention within the plaque during atherosclerosis exacerbation. CD146 is expressed on the macrophages in human and mouse atheroma and can be upregulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). CD146 triggers macrophage activation by driving the internalization of scavenger receptor CD36 during lipid uptake. In response to oxLDL, macrophages show reduced migratory capacity toward chemokines CCL19 and CCL21; this capacity can be restored by blocking CD146. Genetic deletion of macrophagic CD146 or targeting of CD146 with an antibody result in much less complex plaques in high-fat diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice by causing lipid-loaded macrophages to leave plaques. Collectively, our findings identify CD146 as a novel retention signal that traps macrophages within the artery wall, and a promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis treatment.

  7. High-multiplicity HIV-1 infection and neutralizing antibody evasion mediated by the macrophage-T cell virological synapse.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Williams, James P; Schiffner, Torben; Gärtner, Kathleen; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John; Russell, Rebecca A; Frater, John; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-02-01

    Macrophage infection is considered to play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis and persistence. Using a primary cell-based coculture model, we show that monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) efficiently transmit a high-multiplicity HIV-1 infection to autologous CD4(+) T cells through a viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) receptor- and actin-dependent virological synapse (VS), facilitated by interactions between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Virological synapse (VS)-mediated transmission by MDM results in high levels of T cell HIV-1 integration and is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more efficient than cell-free infection. This mode of cell-to-cell transmission is broadly susceptible to the activity of CD4 binding site (CD4bs) and glycan or glycopeptide epitope-specific broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNMAbs) but shows resistance to bNMAbs targeting the Env gp41 subunit membrane-proximal external region (MPER). These data define for the first time the structure and function of the macrophage-to-T cell VS and have important implications for bNMAb activity in HIV-1 prophylaxis and therapy. IMPORTANCE The ability of HIV-1 to move directly between contacting immune cells allows efficient viral dissemination with the potential to evade antibody attack. Here, we show that HIV-1 spreads from infected macrophages to T cells via a structure called a virological synapse that maintains extended contact between the two cell types, allowing transfer of multiple infectious events to the T cell. This process allows the virus to avoid neutralization by a class of antibody targeting the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoproteins. These results have implications for viral spread in vivo and the specificities of neutralizing antibody elicited by antibody-based vaccines.

  8. Monocyte/Macrophage: NK Cell Cooperation-Old Tools for New Functions.

    PubMed

    Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Dzik, Jolanta M

    Monocyte/macrophage and natural killer (NK) cells are partners from a phylogenetic standpoint of innate immune system development and its evolutionary progressive interaction with adaptive immunity. The equally conservative ways of development and differentiation of both invertebrate hemocytes and vertebrate macrophages are reviewed. Evolutionary conserved molecules occurring in macrophage receptors and effectors have been inherited by vertebrates after their common ancestor with invertebrates. Cytolytic functions of mammalian NK cells, which are rooted in immune cells of invertebrates, although certain NK cell receptors (NKRs) are mammalian new events, are characterized. Broad heterogeneity of macrophage and NK cell phenotypes that depends on surrounding microenvironment conditions and expression profiles of specific receptors and activation mechanisms of both cell types are discussed. The particular tissue specificity of macrophages and NK cells, as well as their plasticity and mechanisms of their polarization to different functional subtypes have been underlined. The chapter summarized studies revealing the specific molecular mechanisms and regulation of NK cells and macrophages that enable their highly specific cross-cooperation. Attention is given to the evolving role of human monocyte/macrophage and NK cell interaction in pathogenesis of hypersensitivity reaction-based disorders, including autoimmunity, as well as in cancer surveillance and progression.

  9. Role of macrophages in circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Wei, Xunbin

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages appear to be directly involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, the role of macrophages in influencing tumor metastasis has not been fully understood. Here, we have used an emerging technique, namely in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) to study the depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells in mice and how depletion of macrophages by the liposome-encapsulated clodronate affects the depletion kinetics. Our results show different depletion kinetics of PC-3 prostate cancer cells between macrophage-deficient group and the control group. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in macrophage-deficient group decreases in a slower manner compared to the control mice group. The differences in depletion kinetics indicate that the absence of macrophages might facilitate the stay of prostate tumor cells in circulation. We speculate that macrophages might be able to arrest, phagocytose and digest PC-3 cancer cells. Therefore, the phagocytosis may mainly contribute to the differences in depletion kinetics. The developed methods here would be useful to study the relationship between macrophages and cancer metastasis in small animal tumor model.

  10. Recurrent spleen enlargement during cyclic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delmer, A.; Karmochkine, M.; Cadiou, M.; Gerhartz, H.; Zittoun, R. )

    1990-05-01

    A 65-year-old woman with refractory anemia with excess of blasts received sequential courses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy (GM-CSF) and low-dose cytosine arabinoside. Each course of GM-CSF induced a rapid and tremendous increase in leukocyte count as well as in spleen size, 111-indium chloride scanning suggested a myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. This observation suggests that in some patients the granulopoietic response to the myeloid growth factor stimulation may be predominant in the spleen.

  11. Mast cells and macrophages in normal C57/BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Christine; Dewald, Oliver; Zoerlein, Martin; Michael, Lloyd H; Entman, Mark L; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2002-07-01

    Mast cells and macrophages have an important role in immunity and inflammation. Because mice are used extensively for experimental studies investigating immunological and inflammatory responses, we examined mast cell and macrophage distribution in normal murine tissues. Mast cells were abundant in the murine dermis, tongue, and skeletal muscle but were rarely found in the heart, lung, spleen, kidney, liver, and the bowel mucosa. In contrast, dogs exhibited large numbers of mast cells in the lung parenchyma, liver, and bowel. Some murine dermal mast cells had long cytoplasmic projections filled with granular content. Mouse mast cells demonstrated intense histamine immunoreactivity and were identified with histochemical enzymatic techniques for tryptase and chymase. Macrophages, identified using the monoclonal antibody F4/80, were abundant in the spleen, lung, liver, kidney, and bowel but relatively rare in the heart, tongue, and dermis. Using a nuclease protection assay we investigated mRNA expression of stem cell factor (SCF), a crucial survival factor for mast cells, and the macrophage growth factors macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Stem cell factor mRNA was highly expressed in the murine lung. Relatively low levels of SCF mRNA expression were found in the tongue and earlobe, which are tissues containing a high number of mast cells. Macrophage CSF and GM-CSF mRNA was highly expressed in the lung and spleen. The murine heart, an organ with a low macrophage content, expressed high levels of M-CSF but negligible levels of GM-CSF mRNA. Constitutive growth factor mRNA expression in murine tissues without significant populations of mast cells and macrophages may suggest an alternative role for these factors in tissue homeostasis.

  12. Comprehensive proteomic data sets for studying adipocyte-macrophage cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Anja; Weidner, Christopher; Witzke, Annabell; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Meierhofer, David; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-12-01

    Cellular communication is a fundamental process in biology. The interaction of adipocytes with macrophages is a key event in the development of common diseases such as type 2 diabetes. We applied an established bilayer cell co-culture system and comprehensive mass spectrometry analysis to detect proteome-wide the paracrine interaction of murine adipocytes and macrophages. Altogether, we identified 4486 proteins with at least two unique peptides of which 2392 proteins were informative for 3T3-L1 adipocytes and 2957 proteins for RAW 264.7 macrophages. Further, we observed over 12,000 phosphorylation sites of which we could assign 3,200 informative phosphopeptides with a single phosphosite for adipocytes and 4,514 for macrophages. Using protein set enrichment and phosphosite analyses, we deciphered regulatory protein pathways involved in cellular stress and inflammation, which can contribute to metabolic impairment of cells including insulin resistance and other disorders. The generated data sets provide a holistic, molecular pathway-centric view on the interplay of adipocytes and macrophages in disease processes and a resource for further studies.

  13. Differential expression of distinct surface markers in early endothelial progenitor cells and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Meng; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Lin, Wei-Shing; Lin, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in postnatal angiogenesis. Currently, EPCs are defined as early and late EPCs based on their biological properties and their time of appearance during in vitro culture. Reports have shown that early EPCs share common properties and surface markers with adherent blood cells, especially CD14+ monocytes. Distinguishing early EPCs from circulating monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) is therefore crucial to obtaining pure endothelial populations before they can be applied as part of clinical therapies. We compared the gene expression profiles of early EPCs, blood cells (including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes, and MDMs), and various endothelial lineage cells (including mature endothelial cells, late EPCs, and CD133+ stem cells). We found that early EPCs expressed an mRNA profile that showed the greatest similarity to MDMs than any other cell type tested. The functional significance of this molecular profiling data was explored by Gene Ontology database search. Novel plasma membrane genes that might potentially be novel isolation biomarkers were also pinpointed. Specifically, expression of CLEC5A was high in MDMs, whereas early EPCs expressed abundant SIGLEC8 and KCNE1. These detailed mRNA expression profiles and the identified functional modules will help to develop novel cell isolation approaches that will allow EPCs to be purified; these can then be used to target cardiovascular disease, tumor angiogenesis, and various ischemia-related diseases.

  14. Potentiation of photodynamic therapy by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krosl, Gorazd; Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Jana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    1995-03-01

    The murine squamous carcinoma cell line (SCCVII) was genetically engineered to produce high levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Lethally irradiated GM-CSF producing cells were injected under the subcutaneously growing parental SCCVII tumor at various times before and/or after PDT. Even a single treatment with GM- CSF producing cells injected two days before PDT markedly enhanced the tumor cure rate when compared to the PDT treatment alone. Effective potentiation was observed with PDT mediated either by Photofrin or by benzoporphyrin derivative.

  15. Macrophage recruitment and epithelial repair following hair cell injury in the mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Hirose, Keiko; Rubel, Edwin W; Warchol, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The sensory organs of the inner ear possess resident populations of macrophages, but the function of those cells is poorly understood. In many tissues, macrophages participate in the removal of cellular debris after injury and can also promote tissue repair. The present study examined injury-evoked macrophage activity in the mouse utricle. Experiments used transgenic mice in which the gene for the human diphtheria toxin receptor (huDTR) was inserted under regulation of the Pou4f3 promoter. Hair cells in such mice can be selectively lesioned by systemic treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT). In order to visualize macrophages, Pou4f3-huDTR mice were crossed with a second transgenic line, in which one or both copies of the gene for the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 were replaced with a gene for GFP. Such mice expressed GFP in all macrophages, and mice that were CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) lacked the necessary receptor for fractalkine signaling. Treatment with DT resulted in the death of ∼70% of utricular hair cells within 7 days, which was accompanied by increased numbers of macrophages within the utricular sensory epithelium. Many of these macrophages appeared to be actively engulfing hair cell debris, indicating that macrophages participate in the process of 'corpse removal' in the mammalian vestibular organs. However, we observed no apparent differences in injury-evoked macrophage numbers in the utricles of CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice vs. CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) mice, suggesting that fractalkine signaling is not necessary for macrophage recruitment in these sensory organs. Finally, we found that repair of sensory epithelia at short times after DT-induced hair cell lesions was mediated by relatively thin cables of F-actin. After 56 days recovery, however, all cell-cell junctions were characterized by very thick actin cables.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage immune responses to Leishmania major infection in both susceptible and resistance mice.

    PubMed

    Dameshghi, Safura; Zavaran-Hosseini, Ahmad; Soudi, Sara; Shirazi, Fatemeh Jalali; Nojehdehi, Shahrzad; Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attracted to inflammation site and switch immune system to modulate inflammatory responses. This ability makes MSCs the best candidate cells for stem cell therapy of infection diseases. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the modulatory effect of adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) on macrophages in Leishmania (L.) major infection. Macrophages and MSCs were isolated from both susceptible (BALB/c) and resistance (C57BL/6) strains. After co-culture of AD-MSCs with macrophages using a transwell system, we assessed MSCs-educated macrophage responses to L. major infection. Our results indicated suppression in levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) of MSCs co-cultured macrophages in response to L. major infection. To clarify the effects of this suppression on inflammatory conditions, TNF-α/IL-10 ratio was calculated, indicating an increase in TNF-α/IL-10 ratio in MSCs co-cultured groups. The higher TNF-α/IL-10 ratio was observed in BALB/c macrophages co-cultured with BALB/c MSCs. Nitric oxide (NO) assay presented a significant reduction in the supernatant of all MSCs co-cultured groups compared to control. We observed a significant reduction in phagocytosis of MSCs co-cultured groups in response to L. major infection without any significant differences in the phagocytic index. In conclusion, our results represented a new spectrum of immunomodulation induced by MSCs co-cultured with macrophages in response to L. major infection. The magnitude of immunoregulation was different between BALB/c and C57BL/6 strains. Our findings also showed that MSCs exerted potential effect of M1 polarization due to unequal decrease in levels of TNF-α and IL-10 when we considered TNF-α and IL-10as representatives of M1 and M2 phenotypes, respectively. Induction of inflammatory cytokine milieu and reduction in level of IL-10 provides a new hope for stem cell therapy of leishmaniasis in susceptible models.

  17. Lipoprotein lipase is synthesized by macrophage-derived foam cells in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, K D; Gordon, D; Deeb, S; Ferguson, M; Chait, A

    1992-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hydrolyzes the core triglycerides of lipoproteins, thereby playing a role in their maturation. LPL may be important in the metabolic pathways that lead to atherosclerosis, since it is secreted in vitro by both of the predominant cell types of the atherosclerotic plaque, i.e., macrophages and smooth muscle cells. Because of uncertainty concerning the primary cellular source of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions, in situ hybridization assays for LPL mRNA were performed on 12 coronary arteries obtained from six cardiac allograft recipients. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells were identified on adjacent sections with cell-specific antibodies and foam cells were identified morphologically. LPL protein was localized using a polyclonal antibody. LPL mRNA was produced by a proportion of plaque macrophages, particularly macrophage-derived foam cells, but was not detected in association with any intimal or medial smooth muscle cells. These findings were confirmed by combined immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization on the same tissue sections. LPL protein was detected in association with macrophage-derived foam cells, endothelial cells, adventitial adipocytes, and medial smooth muscle cells, and, to a lesser extent, in intimal smooth muscle cells and media underlying well-developed plaque. These results indicate that macrophage-derived foam cells are the primary source of LPL in atherosclerotic plaques and are consistent with a role for LPL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:1569193

  18. Circadian expression of clock genes in mouse macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Adam C.; Arjona, Alvaro; Hughes, Michael E.; Nitabach, Michael N.; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian and daily rhythms influence nearly all aspects of physiology, ranging from behavior to gene expression. Functional molecular clocks have been described in the murine spleen and splenic NK cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the existence of molecular clock mechanisms in other immune cells. Therefore, we measured the circadian changes in gene expression of clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Clock) and clock-controlled transcription factors (Rev-erbα and Dbp) in splenic enriched macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells in both mice entrained to a light-dark cycle and under constant environmental conditions. Our study reveals the existence of functional molecular clock mechanisms in splenic macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. PMID:22019350

  19. Cell therapy of pseudarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Filho, Ricardo; Lermontov, Simone; Borojevic, Radovan; Schott, Paulo Cezar; Gameiro, Vinicius Schott; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficiency of cell therapy for pseudarthrosis. Implant of the bone marrow aspirate was compared to mononuclear cells purified extemporaneously using the Sepax® equipment. Methods Six patients with nonunion of the tibia or femur were treated. Four received a percutaneous infusion of autologous bone marrow aspirated from the iliac crest, and two received autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells separated from the aspirate with the Sepax®. The primary fixation method was unchanged, and the nonunion focus was not exposed. Physical examination and radiographies were performed 2, 4 and 6 months after the treatment by the same physician. After consolidation of the fracture the satisfaction of the patients was estimated using the adapted QALY scale. Results No complications occurred as a result of the referred procedures. Bone consolidation was obtained in all cases within 3 to 24 weeks. The degree of patient satisfaction before and after bone consolidation was assessed, with the average value increasing from two to nine (p=0.0156). Conclusion We conclude that the proposed method is effective and safe for the treatment of nonunion of long bones regardless of the stabilization method used. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study PMID:24453616

  20. Local Inhibition of Macrophage and Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation to Suppress Plaque Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sukhovershin, Roman A.; Toledano Furman, Naama E.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Trachtenberg, Barry H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex process responsible for a major burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are abundant within atherosclerotic plaques. This review discusses the role of macrophages and SMCs in plaque progression and provides an overview of nanoparticle-based approaches and other current methods for local targeting of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27826367

  1. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells promote angiogenesis via prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Kerstin; Weigert, Andreas; Hu, Jiong; Popp, Rüdiger; Fisslthaler, Beate; Korff, Thomas; Fleming, Ingrid; Geisslinger, Gerd; Brüne, Bernhard

    2011-07-01

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis in the developing as well as the adult organism. They promote tissue regeneration and remodeling after injury, which requires efficient neoangiogenesis. Signaling pathways activating an angiogenic program in macrophages are still poorly defined. We report that apoptotic cells (ACs), which originate from stressed or damaged tissues, can induce angiogenic properties in primary human macrophages. The signal originating from ACs is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which activates S1P1/3 on macrophages to up-regulate cyclooxygenase-2. The formation and liberation of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) then stimulates migration of endothelial cells. This is demonstrated by using PGE(2) receptor antagonists or a neutralizing PGE(2) antibody in vitro, thereby attenuating endothelial cell migration using a Boyden chamber assay. In vivo, neutralization of PGE(2) from proangiogenic macrophage supernatants blocked vessel formation into Matrigel plugs. In particular, apoptotic cancer cells shifted prostanoid formation in macrophages selectively toward PGE(2) by up-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES1), while down-regulating the PGE(2)-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) or prostaglandin-D synthase (PGDS). Angiogenic programming of macrophages by ACs, therefore, may control responses to tissue stress such as in tumors, where macrophages support cancer progression.

  2. Two-Dimensional Motility of a Macrophage Cell Line on Microcontact-Printed Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Hind, Laurel E.; MacKay, Joanna L.; Cox, Dianne; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of macrophages to migrate to sites of infection and inflammation is critical for their role in the innate immune response. Macrophage cell lines have made it possible to study the roles of individual proteins responsible for migration using molecular biology, but it has not been possible to reliably elicit the motility of macrophage cell lines in two-dimensions. In the past, measurements of the motility of macrophage cell lines have been largely limited to transwell assays which provide limited quantitative information on motility and limited ability to visualize cell morphology. We used microcontact printing to create polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces functionalized with fibronectin that otherwise support little macrophage adhesion. We used these surfaces to measure macrophage migration in two-dimensions and found that these cells migrate efficiently in a uniform field of colony-stimulating factor-1, CSF-1. Knockdown of Cdc42 led to a non-statistically significant reduction in motility, whereas chemical inhibition of PI3K activity led to a complete loss of motility. Inhibition of the RhoA kinase, ROCK, did not abolish the motility of these cells but caused a quantitative change in motility, reducing motility significantly on high concentrations of fibronectin but not on low concentrations. This study illustrates the importance of studying cell motility on well controlled materials to better understand the exact roles of specific proteins on macrophage migration. PMID:25186818

  3. Immunostaining of macrophages, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prashanthi; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The atherosclerotic mouse aorta consists of a heterogeneous population of cells, including macrophages, endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC), that play critical roles in cardiovascular disease. Identification of these vascular cells in the vessel wall is important to understanding their function in pathological conditions. Immunohistochemistry is an invaluable technique used to detect the presence of cells in different tissues. Here, we describe immunohistochemical techniques commonly used for the detection of the vascular cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta using cell specific markers. PMID:26445786

  4. Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be focused at sites of tumor growth by products of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, R.J.; Gruber, S.A.; Sawyer, M.D.; Hoffman, R.; Ochoa, A.; Bach, F.H.; Simmons, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    Successful adoptive cancer immunotherapy presumably depends on the accumulation of tumoricidal leukocytes at the sites of tumor growth. Large numbers of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be generated in vitro by growth in high concentrations of interleukin-2 (IL-2), but relatively few arrive at the tumor site after intravenous injection. We hypothesize that the delivery of LAK cells to tumor sites may be augmented by previously demonstrated lymphocyte-recruiting factors, including activated macrophage products such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor. /sup 111/Indium-labeled LAK cells were injected intravenously into syngeneic mice bearing the macrophage activator endotoxin (LPS) in one hind footpad, and saline solution was injected into the contralateral footpad. Significantly more activity was recovered from the LPS-bearing footpad at all times during a 96-hour period. Recombinant IL-1 also attracted more LAK cells after injection into tumor-free hind footpads. Furthermore, LAK cells preferentially homed to hind footpads that were bearing 3-day established sarcomas after intralesional injections of LPS, IL-1, or tumor necrosis factor when compared with contralateral tumor-bearing footpads injected with saline solution alone. In preliminary experiments, mice with hind-footpad tumors appeared to survive longer after combined systemic IL-2 and LAK therapy if intralesional LPS was administered. These studies demonstrate that macrophage activation factors that have been shown capable of attracting circulating normal lymphocytes can also effectively attract LAK cells from the circulation. By the stimulation of macrophages at the sites of tumor growth, more LAK cells can be attracted. It is hoped that by focusing the migration of LAK cells to tumors, LAK cells and IL-2 would effect tumor regression more efficiently and with less toxicity.

  5. Lipid A binding sites in membranes of macrophage tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, R.Y.; Golenbock, D.T.; Raetz, C.R.

    1988-10-15

    Lipopolysaccharide affects a variety of eukaryotic cells and mammalian organisms. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. Many of the actions of lipopolysaccharide are believed to be caused by its active moiety, lipid A. Our laboratory has previously identified a bioactive lipid A precursor, termed lipid IVA, which can be labeled with 32P of high specific activity and purified. In this work we have used the labeled probe, 4'-32P-lipid IVA, to develop a novel assay for the specific binding of lipid IVA to whole cells. We have also demonstrated its use in a ligand blotting assay of immobilized cellular proteins. Using the whole cell assay, we show that 4'-32P-lipid IVA specifically binds to RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cultured cells. The binding is saturable, is inhibited with excess unlabeled lipid IVA, and is proteinase K-sensitive. It displays cellular and pharmacological specificity. Using the ligand blotting assay, we show that several RAW 264.7 cell proteins can bind 4'-32P-lipid IVA. The two principal binding proteins have Mr values of 31 and 95 kDa, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Fractionation studies indicate that the 31-kDa protein is enriched in the nuclear fraction and may be a histone, whereas the 95-kDa protein is enriched in the membrane fraction. The binding assays that we have developed should lead to a clearer understanding of lipid A/animal cell interactions.

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages favor C26 murine colon carcinoma cell proliferation in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Luput, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Laura, Patras; Alupei, Marius Costel; Banciu, Manuela

    2017-02-17

    The role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the development of colon carcinoma is still controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the TAM‑driven processes that may affect colon cancer cell proliferation. To achieve this purpose, murine macrophages were co-cultured with C26 murine colon carcinoma cells at a cell density ratio that approximates physiological conditions for colon carcinoma development in vivo. In this respect, the effects of TAM-mediated angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative stress on the proliferative capacity of C26 murine colon carcinoma cells were studied. To gain insight into the TAM-driven oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase, the main pro-oxidant enzyme in macrophages, was inhibited. Our data revealed that the stimulatory effects of TAMs on C26 cell proliferation may be related mainly to their pro-oxidant actions exerted by NADPH oxidase activity, which maintains the redox status and the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic effects of TAMs on tumor cells were found to create a favorable microenvironment for C26 colon carcinoma development and progression. In conclusion, our data confirmed the protumor role of TAMs in the development of colon carcinoma in an oxidative stress-dependent manner that potentiates the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. These data may offer valuable information for future tumor-targeted therapies based on TAM 're-education' strategies.

  7. Chemotherapy-Induced IL34 Enhances Immunosuppression by Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Mediates Survival of Chemoresistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Muhammad; Wada, Haruka; Nakanishi, Sayaka; Abe, Hirotake; Han, Nanumi; Putra, Wira Eka; Endo, Daisuke; Watari, Hidemichi; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Miyagi, Yohei; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Takano, Atsushi; Daigo, Yataro; Seino, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-10-15

    The ability of tumor cells to escape immune destruction and their acquired resistance to chemotherapy are major obstacles to effective cancer therapy. Although immune checkpoint therapies such as anti-PD-1 address these issues in part, clinical responses remain limited to a subpopulation of patients. In this report, we identified IL34 produced by cancer cells as a driver of chemoresistance. In particular, we found that IL34 modulated the functions of tumor-associated macrophages to enhance local immunosuppression and to promote the survival of chemoresistant cancer cells by activating AKT signaling. Targeting IL34 in chemoresistant tumors resulted in a remarkable inhibition of tumor growth when accompanied with chemotherapy. Our results define a pathogenic role for IL34 in mediating immunosuppression and chemoresistance and identify it as a tractable target for anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(20); 6030-42. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Macrophage cell lines derived from major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Two bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell lines, C2D and C2Dt, were isolated from major histocompatibility class II negative knock-out mice. The C2D cell line was stabilized by continuous culture in colony-stimulating factor-1 and the C2Dt cell line was transformed with SV40 virus large T antigen. These cells exhibited phenotypic properties of macrophages including morphology and expression of Mac 1 and Mac 2 cell surface molecules. These cells also had comparable growth to the bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line B6MP102. These new cell lines were not spontaneously cytotoxic and were only capable of modest killing of F5b tumor cells when stimulated with LPS and interferon-gamma, but not when stimulated with LPS alone or with staphylococcal exotoxin. C2D and C2Dt cells phagocytosed labeled Staphylococcus aureus similarly to B6MP102 cells but less well than C2D peritoneal macrophages. These cell lines secreted interleukin-6, but not tumor necrosis factor or nitric oxide in response to LPS or staphlococcal enterotoxins A or B C2D(t) cells were tumorigenic in C2D and C57BL/6J mice but C2D cells were not. These data suggest that macrophage cell lines can be established from bone marrow cells of major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice.

  9. Macrophage cell lines derived from major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Two bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell lines, C2D and C2Dt, were isolated from major histocompatibility class II negative knock-out mice. The C2D cell line was stabilized by continuous culture in colony-stimulating factor-1 and the C2Dt cell line was transformed with SV40 virus large T antigen. These cells exhibited phenotypic properties of macrophages including morphology and expression of Mac 1 and Mac 2 cell surface molecules. These cells also had comparable growth to the bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line B6MP102. These new cell lines were not spontaneously cytotoxic and were only capable of modest killing of F5b tumor cells when stimulated with LPS and interferon-gamma, but not when stimulated with LPS alone or with staphylococcal exotoxin. C2D and C2Dt cells phagocytosed labeled Staphylococcus aureus similarly to B6MP102 cells but less well than C2D peritoneal macrophages. These cell lines secreted interleukin-6, but not tumor necrosis factor or nitric oxide in response to LPS or staphlococcal enterotoxins A or B C2D(t) cells were tumorigenic in C2D and C57BL/6J mice but C2D cells were not. These data suggest that macrophage cell lines can be established from bone marrow cells of major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice.

  10. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI), being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1), pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2), growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS) and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight (< 10 kD) fraction of neuronal conditioned medium, while CA macrophages were attracted in higher numbers by astrocyte- and oligodendrocyte conditioned medium. Intrinsic motility was twice as high in AA macrophages compared to CA macrophages. The adhesion to extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) was significantly enhanced in CA macrophages compared to control and AA macrophages. The actin cytoskeleton was differentially organized between CA and AA macrophages, possibly due to greater activity of the GTPases RhoA and Rac in CA macrophages. Phagocytosis of myelin and neuronal fragments was increased in CA macrophages compared to AA macrophages. The increase in myelin phagocytosis was associated with higher expression of CR3/MAC-1 in CA macrophages. Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might

  11. LECT2 drives haematopoietic stem cell expansion and mobilization via regulating the macrophages and osteolineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin-Jiang; Chen, Qiang; Rong, Ye-Jing; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Hong; Xu, Ning-Yi; Yu, Chao-Hui; Wang, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Shun; Shi, Yu-Hong; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can differentiate into cells of all lineages in the blood. However, the mechanisms by which cytokines in the blood affect HSC homeostasis remain largely unknown. Here we show that leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 (LECT2), a multifunctional cytokine, induces HSC expansion and mobilization. Recombinant LECT2 administration results in HSC expansion in the bone marrow and mobilization to the blood via CD209a. The effect of LECT2 on HSCs is reduced after specific depletion of macrophages or reduction of osteolineage cells. LECT2 treatment reduces the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) expression in macrophages and osteolineage cells. In TNF knockout mice, the effect of LECT2 on HSCs is reduced. Moreover, LECT2 induces HSC mobilization in irradiated mice, while granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not. Our results illustrate that LECT2 is an extramedullar cytokine that contributes to HSC homeostasis and may be useful to induce HSC mobilization. PMID:27596364

  12. Depletion of cutaneous macrophages and dendritic cells promotes growth of basal cell carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    König, Simone; Nitzki, Frauke; Uhmann, Anja; Dittmann, Kai; Theiss-Suennemann, Jennifer; Herrmann, Markus; Reichardt, Holger M; Schwendener, Reto; Pukrop, Tobias; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Hahn, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) belongs to the group of non-melanoma skin tumors and is the most common tumor in the western world. BCC arises due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene Patched1 (Ptch). Analysis of the conditional Ptch knockout mouse model for BCC reveals that macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) of the skin play an important role in BCC growth restraining processes. This is based on the observation that a clodronate-liposome mediated depletion of these cells in the tumor-bearing skin results in significant BCC enlargement. The depletion of these cells does not modulate Ki67 or K10 expression, but is accompanied by a decrease in collagen-producing cells in the tumor stroma. Together, the data suggest that cutaneous macrophages and DC in the tumor microenvironment exert an antitumor effect on BCC.

  13. PEDF increases the tumoricidal activity of macrophages towards prostate cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner; Volpert, Olga V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although inflammation and prostate cancer (PCa) have been linked, the molecular interactions between macrophages and PCa cells are poorly explored. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor. We previously showed that PEDF induces macrophages recruitment in vitro, correlates with macrophages density in human prostate, and stimulates macrophages polarization towards the classically activated pathway. Here, we demonstrate that PEDF modulates the interaction between macrophages and PCa cells through a bidirectional signalling leading to tumor cell apoptosis and phagocytosis. Methods RAW 264.7 and THP-1 cells, and BMDMs were grown in vitro as mono- or co-cultures with PC3 or CL1 tumor cells. The effects of PEDF and its derived P18 peptide were measured on macrophages differentiation, migration, and superoxide production, and tumor cell apoptosis and phagocytosis. PEDF receptors (ATP5B, PNPLA2, and LRP6) and CD47 mRNA and protein expression were quantified in macrophages and tumor cells by quantitative RT-PCR, western blot, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Results We found that PEDF induced the migration of macrophages towards tumor 3D spheroids and 2D cultures. In co-culture, PEDF increased PCa cells phagocytosis through an indirect apoptosis-dependent mechanism. Moreover, PEDF stimulated the production of superoxide by macrophages. Conditioned media from macrophages exposed to PEDF induced tumor cells apoptosis in contrast to control conditioned media suggesting that ROS may be involved in tumor cells apoptosis. ATP5B and PNPLA2 PEDF receptors on macrophages and CD47 on tumor cells were respectively up- and down-regulated by PEDF. As PEDF, blocking CD47 induced phagocytosis. Inhibiting ATP5B reduced phagocytosis. Inversely, PNPLA2 inhibition blocks differentiation but maintains phagocytosis. CD47-induced phagocytosis was partially reverted by ATP5B inhibition suggesting a complementary action. Similar effects

  14. The Metabolic Prospective and Redox Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; Carter, A Brent

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage plasticity is an important feature of these innate immune cells. Macrophage phenotypes are divided into two categories, the classically activated macrophages (CAM, M1 phenotype) and the alternatively activated macrophages (AAM, M2 phenotype). M1 macrophages are commonly associated with the generation of proinflammatory cytokines, whereas M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory and often associated with tumor progression and fibrosis development. Macrophages produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent evidence suggests ROS can potentially regulate macrophage phenotype. In addition, macrophages phenotypes are closely related to their metabolic patterns, particularly fatty acid/cholesterol metabolism. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in macrophage polarization with special attention to their relevance to specific disease conditions and metabolic regulation of polarization. Understanding these metabolic switches can facilitate the development of targeted therapies for various diseases. PMID:26962470

  15. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Steiniche, Torben; Borre, Michael; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-11-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential mechanism inducing the CD163 expression in tumor cells. A high CD163 mRNA expression (n = 87) was significantly associated with a poor 13-year overall survival (log-rank test, χ(2) = 8.931; p = 0.0028). Moreover, CD163 mRNA expression was significantly increased in muscle invasive (T2-T4), p = 0.017, and aggressive (grade III/IV) cancers (p = 0.015). The expression strongly correlated with local expression of IL-6 (r = 0.72; p <0.0001) and IL-10 (r = 0.75; p <0.0001), mediators known to induce CD163 expression in vitro. CD163 immunostaining (n = 46) confirmed the association between dense TAM infiltration and histologically advanced disease. In 39% of the biopsies, CD163 immunoreactivity was also observed in tumor cells, and CD163-expressing metastatic cells were identified in lymph node biopsies (n = 8). Bladder cancer cell lines did not express CD163; however, when cocultured with macrophages the bladder cancer cell expression of CD163 was significantly induced in an IL-6/IL-10 independent manner. In conclusion, we show a strong association between CD163 mRNA expression in bladder cancer biopsies and poor patient outcome. CD163 expression was not confined to the infiltrating TAMs, but was also expressed by a significant portion of the malignant cells in both tumors and lymph nodes. CD163 expressing tumor cells may constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells with a phenotypic shift associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased metastatic activity induced by TAMs. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  16. Mannosylated bioreducible nanoparticle-mediated macrophage-specific TNF-α RNA interference for IBD therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Laroui, Hamed; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Viennois, Emilie; Charania, Moiz A.; Zhang, Yuchen; Merlin, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The application of RNA interference (RNAi) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) therapy has been limited by the lack of non-cytotoxic, efficient and targetable small interfering RNA (siRNA) carriers. TNF-α is the major pro-inflammatory cytokine mainly secreted by macrophages during IBD. Here, a mannosylated bioreducible cationic polymer (PPM) was synthesized and further spontaneously assembled nanoparticles (NPs) assisted by sodium triphosphate (TPP). The TPP-PPM/siRNA NPs exhibited high uniformity (polydispersity index = 0.004), a small particle size (211–275 nm), excellent bioreducibility, and enhanced cellular uptake. Additionally, the generated NPs had negative cytotoxicity compared to control NPs fabricated by branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, 25 kDa) or Oligofectamine (OF) and siRNA. In vitro gene silencing experiments revealed that TPP-PPM/TNF-α siRNA NPs with a weight ratio of 40:1 showed the most efficient inhibition of the expression and secretion of TNF-α (approximately 69.9%, which was comparable to the 71.4% obtained using OF/siRNA NPs), and its RNAi efficiency was highly inhibited in the presence of mannose (20 mM). Finally, TPP-PPM/siRNA NPs showed potential therapeutic effects on colitis tissues, remarkably reducing TNF-α level. Collectively, these results suggest that non-toxic TPP-PPM/siRNA NPs can be exploited as efficient, macrophage-targeted carriers for IBD therapy. PMID:23820013

  17. Mannosylated bioreducible nanoparticle-mediated macrophage-specific TNF-α RNA interference for IBD therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Laroui, Hamed; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Viennois, Emilie; Charania, Moiz A; Zhang, Yuchen; Merlin, Didier

    2013-10-01

    The application of RNA interference (RNAi) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) therapy has been limited by the lack of non-cytotoxic, efficient and targetable small interfering RNA (siRNA) carriers. TNF-α is the major pro-inflammatory cytokine mainly secreted by macrophages during IBD. Here, a mannosylated bioreducible cationic polymer (PPM) was synthesized and further spontaneously assembled nanoparticles (NPs) assisted by sodium triphosphate (TPP). The TPP-PPM/siRNA NPs exhibited high uniformity (polydispersity index = 0.004), a small particle size (211-275 nm), excellent bioreducibility, and enhanced cellular uptake. Additionally, the generated NPs had negative cytotoxicity compared to control NPs fabricated by branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, 25 kDa) or Oligofectamine (OF) and siRNA. In vitro gene silencing experiments revealed that TPP-PPM/TNF-α siRNA NPs with a weight ratio of 40:1 showed the most efficient inhibition of the expression and secretion of TNF-α (approximately 69.9%, which was comparable to the 71.4% obtained using OF/siRNA NPs), and its RNAi efficiency was highly inhibited in the presence of mannose (20 mm). Finally, TPP-PPM/siRNA NPs showed potential therapeutic effects on colitis tissues, remarkably reducing TNF-α level. Collectively, these results suggest that non-toxic TPP-PPM/siRNA NPs can be exploited as efficient, macrophage-targeted carriers for IBD therapy.

  18. Crosstalk of mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages promotes cardiac muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Zhang, Guoru; Wang, Yaling; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yang; An, Yu; Li, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has potential therapeutic effects on cardiac muscle repair. However, the underlying mechanism remains not completely clarified. Here we show that transplantation of MSCs significantly increased local recruitment of macrophages to facilitate cardiac muscle repair. MSCs-induced recovery of cardiac function and attenuation of fibrosis after injury were all abolished by either impaired macrophage infiltration, or by MSCs depletion after macrophage recruitment. However, angiogenesis seemed to be only affected by depletion of macrophages, but not by depletion of MSCs, suggesting that macrophages are responsible for the augmented angiogenesis after MSCs transplantation, while MSCs do not directly contribute to angiogenesis in the functional cardiac repair. Moreover, high level of transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1) was detected in macrophages and high level of BMP7 was detected in MSCs, suggesting that MSCs not only may recruit macrophages to enhance angiogenesis to promote regeneration, but also may secrete BMP7 to contradict the fibrogenic effect of TGFβ1 by macrophages. Our study thus sheds new insight on the interaction of MSCs and macrophages in a functional cardiac repair triggered by MSCs transplantation.

  19. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H.; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization. PMID:28205544

  20. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H; Lo, Eng H; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-02-16

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization.

  1. Melanoma-initiating cells exploit M2 macrophage TGFβ and arginase pathway for survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Muly; Tan, Kar Wai; Keeble, Jo; Wang, Xiaojie; Hubert, Sandra; Barron, Luke; Tan, Nguan Soon; Kato, Masashi; Prevost-Blondel, Armelle; Angeli, Veronique; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    M2 macrophages promote tumor growth and metastasis, but their interactions with specific tumor cell populations are poorly characterized. Using a mouse model of spontaneous melanoma, we showed that CD34− but not CD34+ tumor-initiating cells (TICs) depend on M2 macrophages for survival and proliferation. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and macrophage-conditioned media protected CD34− TICs from chemotherapy in vitro. In vivo, while inhibition of CD115 suppressed the macrophage-dependent CD34− TIC population, chemotherapy accelerated its development. The ability of TICs to respond to TAMs was acquired during melanoma progression and immediately preceded a surge in metastatic outgrowth. TAM-derived transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and polyamines produced via the Arginase pathway were critical for stimulation of TICs and synergized to promote their growth. PMID:25294815

  2. Host response. Inflammation-induced disruption of SCS macrophages impairs B cell responses to secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Mauro; Castello, Angelo; Montaner, Beatriz; Rogers, Neil; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo D

    2015-02-06

    The layer of macrophages at the subcapsular sinus (SCS) captures pathogens entering the lymph node, preventing their global dissemination and triggering an immune response. However, how infection affects SCS macrophages remains largely unexplored. Here we show that infection and inflammation disrupt the organization of SCS macrophages in a manner that involves the migration of mature dendritic cells to the lymph node. This disrupted organization reduces the capacity of SCS macrophages to retain and present antigen in a subsequent secondary infection, resulting in diminished B cell responses. Thus, the SCS macrophage layer may act as a sensor or valve during infection to temporarily shut down the lymph node to further antigenic challenge. This shutdown may increase an organism's susceptibility to secondary infections.

  3. Epithelial basal cells are distinct from dendritic cells and macrophages in the mouse epididymis.

    PubMed

    Shum, Winnie W; Smith, Tegan B; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Grigoryeva, Lubov S; Roy, Jeremy W; Hill, Eric; Pittet, Mikael J; Breton, Sylvie; Da Silva, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The epithelium that lines the epididymal duct establishes the optimal milieu in which spermatozoa mature, acquire motility, and are stored. This finely tuned environment also protects antigenic sperm against pathogens and autoimmunity, which are potential causes of transient or permanent infertility. The epididymal epithelium is pseudostratified and contains basal cells (BCs) that are located beneath other epithelial cells. Previous studies showed that in the mouse epididymis, BCs possess macrophage-like characteristics. However, we previously identified a dense population of cells belonging to the mononuclear phagocyte (MP) system (comprised of macrophages and dendritic cells) in the basal compartment of the mouse epididymis and showed that a subset of MPs express the macrophage marker F4/80. In the present study, we evaluate the distribution of BCs and MPs in the epididymis of transgenic CD11c-EYFP mice, in which EYFP is expressed exclusively in MPs, using antibodies against the BC marker keratin 5 (KRT5) and the macrophage marker F4/80. Immunofluorescence labeling for laminin, a basement membrane marker, showed that BCs and most MPs are located in the basal region of the epithelium. Confocal microscopy showed that in the initial segment, both BCs and MPs project intraepithelial extensions and establish a very intricate network. Flow cytometry experiments demonstrated that epididymal MPs and BCs are phenotypically distinct. BCs do not express F4/80, and MPs do not express KRT5. Therefore, despite their proximity and some morphological similarities with peritubular macrophages and dendritic cells, BCs do not belong to the MP system.

  4. TRANSFORMATION OF MONOCYTES IN TISSUE CULTURE INTO MACROPHAGES, EPITHELIOID CELLS, AND MULTINUCLEATED GIANT CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jerry S.; Weiss, Leon

    1966-01-01

    The sequential transformation of chicken monocytes into macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinucleated giant cells in vitro was studied by electron microscopy after fixation and embedment in situ. The following changes occur. In the nucleus, margination of chromatin, evident in monocytes, decreases in later forms. Nucleoli become more complex and nuclear pores increase in number. In cytoplasm, a progressive increase in volume of the ectoplasm and endoplasm occurs in culture. Lysosomes increase in number and size prior to phagocytosis. During phagocytosis (most active from 1 to 3 days of culture) lysosome depletion occurs. Lysosomes are present in greatest number and show maximal structural variation in the epithelioid and young giant cells. Aging giant cells lose lysosomes. All stages possess variably large quantities of rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum and free ribosomes. The Golgi apparatus, small in monocytes, increases in size and complexity. Massive accumulations of lysosomes within the Golgi apparatus of macrophages and epithelioid cells suggest that lysosomes originate there. In giant cells, multiple Golgi regions occur, often ringing the nuclei. Monocytes and macrophages have few mitochondria. Mitochondria of epithelioid cells are larger, more numerous, and may have discontinuous outer membranes. Mitochondria are most numerous in giant cells where they increase with age and become polymorphous. Cytoplasmic filaments are approximately 50 to 60 A in diameter and of indeterminate length. They occur both singly and in bundles which touch cytoplasmic vesicles and mitochondria. Few filaments occur in monocytes and macrophages. A large increase in the number of filaments occurs in epithelioid cells, where filaments (90 to 100 A) surround the cytocentrum as a distinctive annular bundle often branching into the cytoplasm. The greatest concentration of filaments occurs in aged giant cells. Pseudopodia are always present. They are short and filiform in

  5. The CSF Immune Response in HIV-1-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis: Macrophage Activation, Correlates of Disease Severity, and Effect of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Scriven, James E; Graham, Lisa M; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J; Wilkinson, Katalin A; Wilkinson, Robert J; Boulware, David R; Urban, Britta C; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G

    2017-07-01

    Immune modulation may improve outcome in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis. Animal studies suggest alternatively activated macrophages are detrimental but human studies are limited. We performed a detailed assessment of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immune response and examined immune correlates of disease severity and poor outcome, and the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We enrolled persons ≥18 years with first episode of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis. CSF immune response was assessed using flow cytometry and multiplex cytokine analysis. Principal component analysis was used to examine relationships between immune response, fungal burden, intracranial pressure and mortality, and the effects of recent ART initiation (<12 weeks). CSF was available from 57 persons (median CD4 34/μL). CD206 (alternatively activated macrophage marker) was expressed on 54% CD14 and 35% CD14 monocyte-macrophages. High fungal burden was not associated with CD206 expression but with a paucity of CD4, CD8, and CD4CD8 T cells and lower interleukin-6, G-CSF, and interleukin-5 concentrations. High intracranial pressure (≥30 cm H2O) was associated with fewer T cells, a higher fungal burden, and larger Cryptococcus organisms. Mortality was associated with reduced interferon-gamma concentrations and CD4CD8 T cells but lost statistical significance when adjusted for multiple comparisons. Recent ART was associated with increased CSF CD4/CD8 ratio and a significantly increased macrophage expression of CD206. Paucity of CSF T cell infiltrate rather than alternative macrophage activation was associated with severe disease in HIV-associated cryptococcosis. ART had a pronounced effect on the immune response at the site of disease.

  6. Differential gene expression in human, murine, and cell line-derived macrophages upon polarization.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Kara L; Wrona, Emily A; Romero-Torres, Saly; Pallotta, Isabella; Graney, Pamela L; Witherel, Claire E; Panicker, Leelamma M; Feldman, Ricardo A; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Santambrogio, Laura; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freytes, Donald O

    2016-09-10

    The mechanisms by which macrophages control the inflammatory response, wound healing, biomaterial-interactions, and tissue regeneration appear to be related to their activation/differentiation states. Studies of macrophage behavior in vitro can be useful for elucidating their mechanisms of action, but it is not clear to what extent the source of macrophages affects their apparent behavior, potentially affecting interpretation of results. Although comparative studies of macrophage behavior with respect to cell source have been conducted, there has been no direct comparison of the three most commonly used cell sources: murine bone marrow, human monocytes from peripheral blood (PB), and the human leukemic monocytic cell line THP-1, across multiple macrophage phenotypes. In this study, we used multivariate discriminant analysis to compare the in vitro expression of genes commonly chosen to assess macrophage phenotype across all three sources of macrophages, as well as those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), that were polarized towards four distinct phenotypes using the same differentiation protocols: M(LPS,IFN) (aka M1), M(IL4,IL13) (aka M2a), M(IL10) (aka M2c), and M(-) (aka M0) used as control. Several differences in gene expression trends were found among the sources of macrophages, especially between murine bone marrow-derived and human blood-derived M(LPS,IFN) and M(IL4,IL13) macrophages with respect to commonly used phenotype markers like CCR7 and genes associated with angiogenesis and tissue regeneration like FGF2 and MMP9. We found that the genes with the most similar patterns of expression among all sources were CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 for M(LPS,IFN) and CCL17 and CCL22 for M(IL4,IL13). Human PB-derived macrophages and human iPSC-derived macrophages showed similar gene expression patterns among the groups and genes studied here, suggesting that iPSC-derived monocytes have the potential to be used as a reliable cell source of human macrophages

  7. IK acts as an immunoregulator of inflammatory arthritis by suppressing TH17 cell differentiation and macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Lim; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Min, Jun-Ki; Moon, Su-Jin; Kim, Inki; Kang, Kyung-Won; Park, Sooho; Choi, SeulGi; Jung, Ha-Na; Lee, Dong-Hee; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic T helper cells (TH) and macrophages have been implicated in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which can lead to severe synovial inflammation and bone destruction. A range of therapies have been widely used for RA, including specific monoclonal antibodies and chemical inhibitors against inflammatory cytokines produced by these cells. However, these have not been sufficient to meet the medical need. Here, we show that in transgenic mice expressing truncated IK (tIK) cytokine, inflammatory arthritis symptoms were ameliorated as the result of suppression of the differentiation of TH1 and TH17 cells and of macrophage activation. During inflammatory responses, tIK cytokine systemically regulated macrophage functions and TH17 cell differentiation through inactivation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Interestingly, the level of tIK cytokine was higher in synovial fluid of RA patients compared with that in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Our observations suggest that tIK cytokine can counterbalance the induction of inflammatory cells related to RA and thus could be a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:28071693

  8. Macrophage Folate Receptor-Targeted Antiretroviral Therapy Facilitates Drug Entry, Retention, Antiretroviral Activities and Biodistribution for Reduction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Puligujja, Pavan; McMillan, JoEllyn; Kendrick, Lindsey; Li, Tianyuzi; Balkundi, Shantanu; Smith, Nathan; Veerubhotla, Ram S.; Edagwa, Benson J.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E.; Liu, Xin-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages serve as vehicles for the carriage and delivery of polymer-coated nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART). Although superior to native drug, high drug concentrations are required for viral inhibition. Herein, folate-modified atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r)-encased polymers facilitated macrophage receptor targeting for optimizing drug dosing. Folate coating of nanoART ATV/r significantly enhanced cell uptake, retention and antiretroviral activities without altering cell viability. Enhanced retentions of folate-coated nanoART within recycling endosomes provided a stable subcellular drug depot. Importantly, five-fold enhanced plasma and tissue drug levels followed folate-coated formulation injection in mice. Folate polymer encased ATV/r improves nanoART pharmacokinetics bringing the technology one step closer to human use. PMID:23680933

  9. 3-D individual cell based computational modeling of tumor cell–macrophage paracrine signaling mediated by EGF and CSF-1 gradients†

    PubMed Central

    Knutsdottir, Hildur; Condeelis, John S.; Palsson, Eirikur

    2016-01-01

    High density of macrophages in mammary tumors has been associated with a higher risk of metastasis and thus increased mortality in women. The EGF/CSF-1 paracrine signaling increases the number of invasive tumor cells by both recruiting tumor cells further away and manipulating the macrophages’ innate ability to open up a passage into blood vessels thus promoting intravasation and finally metastasis. A 3-D individual-cell-based model is introduced, to better understand the tumor cell–macrophage interactions, and to explore how changing parameters of the paracrine signaling system affects the number of invasive tumor cells. The simulation data and videos of the cell movements correlated well with findings from both in vitro and in vivo experimental results. The model demonstrated how paracrine signaling is necessary to achieve co-migration of tumor cells and macrophages towards a specific signaling source. We showed how the paracrine signaling enhances the number of both invasive tumor cells and macrophages. The simulations revealed that for the in vitro experiments the imposed no-flux boundary condition might be affecting the results, and that changing the setup might lead to different experimental findings. In our simulations, the 3 : 1 tumor cell/macrophage ratio, observed in vivo, was robust for many parameters but sensitive to EGF signal strength and fraction of macrophages in the tumor. The model can be used to identify new agents for targeted therapy and we suggest that a successful strategy to prevent or limit invasion of tumor cells would be to block the tumor cell–macrophage paracrine signaling. This can be achieved by either blocking the EGF or CSF-1 receptors or supressing the EGF or CSF-1 signal. PMID:26686751

  10. Phototherapy-treated apoptotic tumor cells induce pro-inflammatory cytokines production in macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Wei, Yanchun; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy, high fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) induces mitochondrial superoxide anion burst, resulting in oxidative damage to tumor cells. In this study, we further explored the immunological effects of HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells. When macrophages were co-incubated with apoptotic cells induced by HF-LPLI, we observed the increased levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production in macrophages. Further experiments showed that NF-κB was activated in macrophages after co-incubation with HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic cells, and inhibition of NF-κB activity by pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid (PDTC) reduced the elevated levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production. These data indicate that HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, which may be helpful for better understanding the biological effects of cancer phototherapy.

  11. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-06-16

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment.

  12. A Distinct Macrophage Population Mediates Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Establishment and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Binzhi; Deng, Yan; Im, Jae Hong; Muschel, Ruth J.; Zou, Yiyu; Li, Jiufeng; Lang, Richard A.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Background The stromal microenvironment and particularly the macrophage component of primary tumors influence their malignant potential. However, at the metastatic site the role of these cells and their mechanism of actions for establishment and growth of metastases remain largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using animal models of breast cancer metastasis, we show that a population of host macrophages displaying a distinct phenotype is recruited to extravasating pulmonary metastatic cells regardless of species of origin. Ablation of this macrophage population through three independent means (genetic and chemical) showed that these macrophages are required for efficient metastatic seeding and growth. Importantly, even after metastatic growth is established, ablation of this macrophage population inhibited subsequent growth. Furthermore, imaging of intact lungs revealed that macrophages are required for efficient tumor cell extravasation. Conclusion/Significance These data indicate a direct enhancement of metastatic growth by macrophages through their effects on tumor cell extravasation, survival and subsequent growth and identifies these cells as a new therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic disease. PMID:19668347

  13. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, differential transcriptional responses of RAW264.7 cells infected with two forms of Mtb, CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb, were studied by microarray analysis. Some of the differentially regulated genes were confirmed by RT-qPCR in both RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway was used to analyze functions of differentially expressed genes. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb group. Mapt was up-regulated, while NOS2 and IL-11 were down-regulated in CWD-Mtb infected RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages compared with normal Mtb infected ones. Many deregulated genes were found to be related to macrophages activation, immune response, phagosome maturation, autophagy and lipid metabolism. KEGG analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in MAPK signaling pathway, nitrogen metabolism, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and focal adhesion. Taken together, the present study showed that differential macrophage responses were induced by intracellular CWD-Mtb an normal Mtb infection, which suggested that interactions between macrophages and different phenotypic Mtb are very complex. The results provide evidence for further understanding of pathogenesis of CWD-Mtb and may help in improving strategies to eliminate intracellular CWD-Mtb. PMID:25552926

  14. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Suhua

    2016-08-05

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. -- Highlights: •miR-150 inhibits macrophage foam cell formation. •miR-150 accelerates cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. •miR-150 suppresses macrophage foam cell

  15. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-albumin from activated macrophage is critical in human mesenchymal stem cells survival and post-ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Son, Myeongjoo; Kang, Woong Chol; Oh, Seyeon; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Ahn, Hyosang; Lee, Jaesuk; Park, Hyunjin; Lee, Sojung; Choi, Junwon; Lee, Hye Sun; Yang, Phillip C; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-09-14

    Post-ischemic reperfusion injury (PIRI) triggers an intense inflammatory response which is essential for repair but is also implicated in pathogenesis of post-ischemic remodeling in several organs in human. Stem cell therapy has recently emerged as a promising method for treatment of PIRI in human. However, satisfactory results have not been reported due to severe loss of injected stem cells in PIRI including critical limb ischemia (CLI). For investigating the advanced glycation end-product-albumin (AGE-albumin) from activated macrophages is critical in both muscle cell and stem cell death, we evaluated the recovery of PIRI-CLI by injection of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBD-MSCs) with or without soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE). Our results showed that activated M1 macrophages synthesize and secrete AGE-albumin, which induced the skeletal muscle cell death and injected hBD-MSCs in PIRI-CLI through RAGE increase. Combined injection of sRAGE and hBD-MSCs resulted in enhanced survival of hBD-MSCs and angiogenesis in PIRI-CLI mice. Taken together, AGE-albumin from activated macrophages is critical for both skeletal muscle cell and hBD-MSCs death in PIRI-CLI. Therefore, the inhibition of AGE-albumin from activated macrophages could be a successful therapeutic strategy for treatment of PIRI including CLI with or without stem cell therapy.

  16. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor produced in lesioned peripheral nerves induces the up-regulation of cell surface expression of MAC-2 by macrophages and Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is followed by Wallerian degeneration which is characterized by cellular and molecular events that turn the degenerating nerve into a tissue that supports nerve regeneration. One of these is the removal, by phagocytosis, of myelin that contains molecules which inhibit regeneration. We have recently documented that the scavenger macrophage and Schwann cells express the galactose- specific lectin MAC-2 which is significant to myelin phagocytosis. In the present study we provide evidence for a mechanism leading to the augmented expression of cell surface MAC-2. Nerve lesion causes noneuronal cells, primarily fibroblasts, to produce the cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In turn, GM- CSF induces Schwann cells and macrophages to up-regulate surface expression of MAC-2. The proposed mechanism is based on the following novel observations. GM-CSF mRNA was detected by PCR in in vitro and in vivo degenerating nerves, but not in intact nerves. The GM-CSF molecule was detected by ELISA in medium conditioned by in vitro and in vivo degenerating peripheral nerves as of the 4th h after injury. GM-CSF activity was demonstrated by two independent bioassays, and repressed by activity blocking antibodies. Significant levels of GM-CSF were produced by nerve derived fibroblasts, but neither by Schwann cells nor by nerve derived macrophages. Mouse rGM-CSF enhanced MAC-2 production in nerve explants, and up-regulated cell surface expression of MAC-2 by Schwann cells and macrophages. Interleukin-1 beta up-regulated GM-CSF production thus suggesting that injury induced GM-CSF production may be mediated by interleukin-1 beta. Our findings highlight the fact that fibroblasts, by producing GM-CSF and thereby affecting macrophage and Schwann function, play a significant role in the cascade of molecular events and cellular interactions of Wallerian degeneration. PMID:8601605

  17. Modulation of cytokine production and enhancement of cell viability by TLR7 and TLR9 ligands during anthrax infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sabet, Mojgan; Cottam, Howard B; Guiney, Donald G

    2006-08-01

    Inhalation of Bacillus anthracis, a bioterrorism agent, results in a high mortality rate despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Macrophages appear to be a key factor in B. anthracis pathogenesis. The burst of pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages could be a major cause of death in anthrax. However, preactivation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) could modify the host response. TLR ligands stimulate the release of activating cytokines but may also down-modulate the subsequent deleterious cytokine response to pathogens. We developed a cell culture model to measure macrophage responses to B. anthracis spores and bacilli. We found that germination from spores to bacilli produced a substantial stimulus for the secretion of the cytokines IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, and IL-12 p40. Our studies showed that pretreatment of mouse macrophages with the TLR9 ligand ISS-1018, or the TLR7 ligands R-848 and IT-37, results in a substantial decrease in the subsequent secretion of IL-6 and TNF-alpha in response to B. anthracis infection of macrophages. Furthermore, the TLR7 and TLR9 ligands significantly decreased anthrax-induced cytotoxicity in the macrophages. These findings suggest that TLR ligands may contribute to the enhancement of innate immunity in B. anthracis infection by suppressing potentially deleterious pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and by improving macrophage viability.

  18. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  19. Human Mesenchymal stem cells program macrophage plasticity by altering their metabolic status via a PGE2-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vasandan, Anoop Babu; Jahnavi, Sowmya; Shashank, Chandanala; Prasad, Priya; Kumar, Anujith; Prasanna, S. Jyothi

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are speculated to act at macrophage-injury interfaces to mediate efficient repair. To explore this facet in-depth this study evaluates the influence of MSCs on human macrophages existing in distinct functional states. MSCs promoted macrophage differentiation, enhanced respiratory burst and potentiated microbicidal responses in naïve macrophages (Mφ). Functional attenuation of inflammatory M1 macrophages was associated with a concomitant shift towards alternatively activated M2 state in MSC-M1 co-cultures. In contrast, alternate macrophage (M2) activation was enhanced in MSC-M2 co-cultures. Elucidation of key macrophage metabolic programs in Mo/MSC, M1/MSC and M2/MSC co-cultures indicated changes in Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1 expression/glucose uptake, IDO1 protein/activity, SIRTUIN1 and alterations in AMPK and mTOR activity, reflecting MSC-instructed metabolic shifts. Inability of Cox2 knockdown MSCs to attenuate M1 macrophages and their inefficiency in instructing metabolic shifts in polarized macrophages establishes a key role for MSC-secreted PGE2 in manipulating macrophage metabolic status and plasticity. Functional significance of MSC-mediated macrophage activation shifts was further validated on human endothelial cells prone to M1 mediated injury. In conclusion, we propose a novel role for MSC secreted factors induced at the MSC-macrophage interface in re-educating macrophages by manipulating metabolic programs in differentially polarized macrophages. PMID:27910911

  20. De novo Generation of Cells within Human Nurse Macrophages and Consequences following HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gartner, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Nurse cells are defined as those that provide for the development of other cells. We report here, that in vitro, human monocyte-derived macrophages can behave as nurse cells with functional capabilities that include de novo generation of CD4+ T-lymphocytes and a previously unknown small cell with monocytoid characteristics. We named these novel cells “self-renewing monocytoid cells” (SRMC), because they could develop into nurse macrophages that produced another generation of SRMC. SRMC were not detectable in blood. Their transition to nurse behavior was characterized by expression of CD10, a marker of thymic epithelium and bone marrow stroma, typically absent on macrophages. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling and immunostaining for cdc6 expression confirmed DNA synthesis within nurse macrophages. T-cell excision circles were detected in macrophages, along with expression of pre-T-cell receptor alpha and recombination activating gene 1, suggesting that genetic recombination events associated with generation of the T-cell receptor were occurring in these cells. SRMC expressed CCR5, the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 isolates, and were highly susceptible to HIV-1 entry leading to productive infection. While expressing HIV-1, SRMC could differentiate into nurse macrophages that produced another generation of HIV-1-expressing SRMC. The infected nurse macrophage/SRMC cycle could continue in vitro for multiple generations, suggesting it might represent a mechanism whereby HIV-1 can maintain persistence in vivo. HIV-1 infection of nurse macrophages led to a decline in CD4+ T-cell production. There was severe, preferential loss of the CCR5+ CD4+ T-cell subpopulation. Confocal microscopy revealed individual HIV-1-expressing nurse macrophages simultaneously producing both HIV-1-expressing SRMC and non-expressing CD3+ cells, suggesting that nurse macrophages might be a source of latently infected CD4+ T-cells. Real-time PCR experiments confirmed this by demonstrating 10-fold more HIV-1

  1. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  2. Differentiation Between Virulent and Avirulent Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii by Macrophage-Like Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Jenifer; Winkler, Herbert H.

    1982-01-01

    The growth of avirulent (E) and virulent (Breinl) strains of Rickettsia prowazekii was compared in four mouse macrophage-like cell lines (RAW264.7, J774.1, P388D1, and PU5), one human macrophage-like cell line (U937-1), and the mouse fibroblast line L929. The E and Breinl strains grew equally well in L929 cells. However, all of the mouse macrophage-like cell lines clearly differentiated between the two strains by restricting the growth of the E strain relative to that of the Breinl strain. A nonuniform response to infection was sometimes observed in which E strain rickettsiae were cleared from the majority of the infected cells, but multiplied in some of the remaining infected cells. The human line U937-1 was not very effective at differentiating the E and Breinl strains. Addition of rabbit antirickettsial antiserum to the Breinl or E strains of R. prowazekii immediately before infection of L929 cells caused a marked decrease in the initial infection but had no effect on the subsequent growth of the rickettsiae in the L929 cells. In contrast, addition of antiserum to Breinl or E strain rickettsiae immediately before infection of macrophage-like cell lines caused either no change or an increase in the initial infection. Most of the rickettsiae that infected the mouse macrophage-like cell lines in the presence of antiserum were destroyed in these cell lines. Thus, when the infection took place in the presence of antiserum, the mouse macrophage-like cell lines no longer differentiated between the E and Breinl strains. These data indicate that mouse macrophage-like cell lines should be a useful model system for defining the differences between the E and Breinl strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, differences which should lead to an understanding of the biochemical basis of virulence in this organism. PMID:6802758

  3. An inflammatory gene signature distinguishes neurofibroma Schwann cells and macrophages from cells in the normal peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwangmin; Komurov, Kakajan; Fletcher, Jonathan S.; Jousma, Edwin; Cancelas, Jose A.; Wu, Jianqiang; Ratner, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Neurofibromas are benign peripheral nerve tumors driven by NF1 loss in Schwann cells (SCs). Macrophages are abundant in neurofibromas, and macrophage targeted interventions may have therapeutic potential in these tumors. We generated gene expression data from fluorescence-activated cell sorted (FACS) SCs and macrophages from wild-type and mutant nerve and neurofibroma to identify candidate pathways involved in SC-macrophage cross-talk. While in 1-month-old Nf1 mutant nerve neither SCs nor macrophages significantly differed from their normal counterparts, both macrophages and SCs showed significantly altered cytokine gene expression in neurofibromas. Computationally reconstructed SC-macrophage molecular networks were enriched for inflammation-associated pathways. We verified that neurofibroma SC conditioned medium contains macrophage chemo-attractants including colony stimulation factor 1 (CSF1). Network analysis confirmed previously implicated pathways and predict novel paracrine and autocrine loops involving cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Network analysis also predicted a central role for decreased type-I interferon signaling. We validated type-I interferon expression in neurofibroma by protein profiling, and show that treatment of neurofibroma-bearing mice with polyethylene glycolyated (PEGylated) type-I interferon-α2b reduces the expression of many cytokines overexpressed in neurofibroma. These studies reveal numerous potential targetable interactions between Nf1 mutant SCs and macrophages for further analyses. PMID:28256556

  4. Real-time detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential in THP-1 macrophages during ultrasonic irradiation for optimal sonodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Xu, Haobo; Shen, Jing; Guo, Shuyuan; Shi, Sa; Dan, Juhua; Tian, Fang; Tian, Yanfeng; Tian, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss have been proven recently to be involved in sonodynamic therapy (SDT)-induced macrophage apoptosis and necrosis. This study aims to develop an experimental system to monitor intracellular ROS and MMP in real-time during ultrasonic irradiation in order to achieve optimal effect in SDT. Cultured THP-1 derived macrophages were incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and then sonicated at different intensities. Intracellular ROS elevation and MMP loss were detected in real-time by fluorospectrophotometer using fluorescence probe DCFH-DA and jc-1, respectively. Ultrasound at low intensities (less than 0.48W/cm(2)) had no influence on ROS and MMP in macrophages, whereas at an intensity of 0.48W/cm(2), ROS elevation and MMP loss were observed during ultrasonic irradiation. These effects were strongly enhanced in the presence of ALA. Quantitative analysis showed that ROS elevation and MMP loss monotonically increased with the rise of ultrasonic intensity between 0.48 and 1.16W/cm(2). SDT at 0.48 and 0.84W/cm(2) induced mainly apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages while SDT at 1.16W/cm(2) mainly cell necrosis. This study supports the validity and potential utility of real-time ROS and MMP detection as a dosimetric tool for the determination of optimal SDT.

  5. Macrophage and epithelial cell H-ferritin expression regulates renal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Hull, Travis D; Traylor, Amie M; Perianayagam, Anjana; Joseph, Reny; Kamal, Ahmed I; Arosio, Paolo; Soares, Miguel P; Jeney, Viktoria; Balla, Jozsef; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation culminating in fibrosis contributes to progressive kidney disease. Cross-talk between the tubular epithelium and interstitial cells regulates inflammation by a coordinated release of cytokines and chemokines. Here we studied the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the heavy subunit of ferritin (FtH) in macrophage polarization and renal inflammation. Deficiency in HO-1 was associated with increased FtH expression, accumulation of macrophages with a dysregulated polarization profile, and increased fibrosis following unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice: a model of renal inflammation and fibrosis. Macrophage polarization in vitro was predominantly dependent on FtH expression in isolated bone marrow-derived mouse monocytes. Using transgenic mice with conditional deletion of FtH in the proximal tubules (FtH(PT-/-)) or myeloid cells (FtH(LysM-/-)), we found that myeloid FtH deficiency did not affect polarization or accumulation of macrophages in the injured kidney compared with wild-type (FtH(+/+)) controls. However, tubular FtH deletion led to a marked increase in proinflammatory macrophages. Furthermore, injured kidneys from FtH(PT-/-) mice expressed significantly higher levels of inflammatory chemokines and fibrosis compared with kidneys from FtH(+/+) and FtH(LysM-/-) mice. Thus, there are differential effects of FtH in macrophages and epithelial cells, which underscore the critical role of FtH in tubular-macrophage cross-talk during kidney injury.

  6. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  7. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  8. The Interplay Between Monocytes/Macrophages and CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Dickinson, Abigail K.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis). The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation, and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells (both proinflammatory and regulatory). The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function, and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA. PMID:26635790

  9. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status.

  10. IL-10/TGF-beta-modified macrophages induce regulatory T cells and protect against adriamycin nephrosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Wang, Yiping; Zheng, Dong; Sun, Yan; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Zheng, Guoping; Tan, Thian Kui; Ince, Jon; Alexander, Stephen I; Harris, David C H

    2010-06-01

    IL-10/TGF-beta-modified macrophages, a subset of activated macrophages, produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that they may protect against inflammation-mediated injury. Here, macrophages modified ex vivo by IL-10/TGF-beta (IL-10/TGF-beta Mu2) significantly attenuated renal inflammation, structural injury, and functional decline in murine adriamycin nephrosis (AN). These cells deactivated effector macrophages and inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation. IL-10/TGF-beta Mu2 expressed high levels of the regulatory co-stimulatory molecule B7-H4, induced regulatory T cells from CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro, and increased the number of regulatory T cells in lymph nodes draining the kidneys in AN. The phenotype of IL-10/TGF-beta Mu2 did not switch to that of effector macrophages in the inflamed kidney, and these cells did not promote fibrosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that IL-10/TGF-beta-modified macrophages effectively protect against renal injury in AN and may become part of a therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory disease.

  11. Culture supernatants of cervical cancer cells induce an M2 phenotypic profile in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Brindis, Eliza Julia; Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; López-López, Brenda Anahí; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2016-12-01

    Patients with cervical cancer (CxCa) typically present an infiltrate of tumor-associated macrophages, which is associated with a poor prognosis. We found that CxCa cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A) secreted factors involved in regulating tumor growth including IL-6, IL-4, PDGFAA, HGF, VEGF, ANG-2, and TGF-β3. We assessed the effects of culture supernatants from these cell lines on macrophages derived from the THP-1 cell line. Macrophages treated with culture supernatants from CxCa cells developed an M2-like phenotype with expression of CD163, low nitric oxide release, and high secretion of IL-6, PDGFAA, HGF, ANG-2, and VEGF. The macrophages continued to produce PDGFAA, PDGFBB, and VEGF 48h after the CxCa cell culture supernatants were removed. The induction of M2 macrophages in vivo favors tumor growth, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and metastasis. These results demonstrated that factors secreted by CxCa cells induced a stable M2 phenotype in THP-1 macrophages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The efficacy and mechanism of apoptosis induction by hypericin-mediated sonodynamic therapy in THP-1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuesong; Gao, Lei; Zheng, Longbin; Kou, Jiayuan; Zhu, Xing; Jiang, Yueqing; Zhong, Zhaoyu; Dan, Juhua; Xu, Haobo; Yang, Yang; Li, Hong; Shi, Sa; Cao, Wenwu; Zhao, Yajun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the sonoactivity of hypericin (HY), together with its sonodynamic effect on THP-1 macrophages and the underlying mechanism. Materials and methods CCK-8 was used to examine cell viability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was performed to assess the localization of HY in cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) after different treatments. Apoptosis was analyzed using Hoechst–propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) collapse was detected via fluorescence microscopy. Lipoprotein oxidation was determined in malondialdehyde (MDA) assays. Western blotting was conducted to determine the translocation of BAX and cytochrome C and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Results HY was sublocalized among the nuclei and the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and lysosome in the cytosol of THP-1 macrophages. Under low-intensity ultrasound irradiation, HY significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, greater ROS generation, higher MDA levels, and greater ΔΨm loss were observed in the sonodynamic therapy (SDT) group. Both ROS generation and MDA levels were significantly reduced by the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and the singlet oxygen scavenger sodium azide. Most of the loss of ΔΨm was inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, sodium azide, and the mPTP inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA). mPTP opening was induced upon SDT but was reduced by pretreatment with bongkrekic acid, 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid disodium, CsA, and NAC. Western blot analyses revealed translocation of BAX and cytochrome C, downregulated expression of Bcl-2, and upregulated expression of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in the SDT group, which were reversed by NAC. Conclusion HY mediated SDT-induced apoptosis in THP-1

  13. The efficacy and mechanism of apoptosis induction by hypericin-mediated sonodynamic therapy in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Gao, Lei; Zheng, Longbin; Kou, Jiayuan; Zhu, Xing; Jiang, Yueqing; Zhong, Zhaoyu; Dan, Juhua; Xu, Haobo; Yang, Yang; Li, Hong; Shi, Sa; Cao, Wenwu; Zhao, Yajun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the sonoactivity of hypericin (HY), together with its sonodynamic effect on THP-1 macrophages and the underlying mechanism. CCK-8 was used to examine cell viability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was performed to assess the localization of HY in cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) after different treatments. Apoptosis was analyzed using Hoechst-propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) collapse was detected via fluorescence microscopy. Lipoprotein oxidation was determined in malondialdehyde (MDA) assays. Western blotting was conducted to determine the translocation of BAX and cytochrome C and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. HY was sublocalized among the nuclei and the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and lysosome in the cytosol of THP-1 macrophages. Under low-intensity ultrasound irradiation, HY significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, greater ROS generation, higher MDA levels, and greater ΔΨm loss were observed in the sonodynamic therapy (SDT) group. Both ROS generation and MDA levels were significantly reduced by the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and the singlet oxygen scavenger sodium azide. Most of the loss of ΔΨm was inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, sodium azide, and the mPTP inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA). mPTP opening was induced upon SDT but was reduced by pretreatment with bongkrekic acid, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium, CsA, and NAC. Western blot analyses revealed translocation of BAX and cytochrome C, downregulated expression of Bcl-2, and upregulated expression of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in the SDT group, which were reversed by NAC. HY mediated SDT-induced apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages via ROS generation. Then, the proapoptotic factor

  14. Quantification of macrophage cell surface molecules in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hessian, P A; Highton, J; Palmer, D G

    1989-01-01

    The response of macrophages to stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in vitro is characterized by an increase in the cell surface expression of MHC class II HLA-DR antigen (HLA-DR) and the high-affinity Fc-receptor for immunoglobulin G (FcRI) while the expression of the C3b-receptor (CR1) is reduced. Based on these observations, we have examined further the possibility that IFN-gamma may modulate the activation of mononuclear phagocytes (Mph) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As reported by others, we found low levels of IFN-gamma in the synovial fluid of these patients (less than 0.3 IU/ml using radioimmunoassay). As an alternative means of establishing whether Mph are influenced by levels of IFN-gamma too low to measure directly, we have quantified the expression of membrane associated HLA-DR, FcRI and CR1 on cell populations isolated from synovial fluid and peripheral blood. The expression of these molecules by Mph is known to be influenced by IFN-gamma. We found that Mph isolated from the synovial fluid of patients with RA showed a significantly increased HLA-DR expression. Significantly less CR1 was associated with the synovial fluid Mph than with peripheral blood monocytes. However the expression of the FcRI by the synovial fluid Mph and peripheral blood monocyte populations was similar. The quantitative changes in HLA-DR and CR1 expression by synovial fluid Mph (but not those of FcRI) were consistent with those seen following IFN-gamma activation of monocytes in vitro. While these results indicate that IFN-gamma may have a role in activating the Mph present in synovial fluid, the apparent independent regulation of FcRI observed suggests other mediators may also be involved. PMID:2527651

  15. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Glioblastoma Multiforme—A Suitable Target for Somatostatin Receptor-Based Imaging and Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Linsenmann, Thomas; Lückerath, Katharina; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Stoffer, Carolin; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Buck, Andreas K.; Löhr, Mario; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN′,N″,N′″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE) labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM. Methods 15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68), proliferative activity (Ki67) as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry. Results The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from <10% to >50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns. Conclusion SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell division in neuroblastoma cells and bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sans-Fons, M Gloria; Sole, Sonia; Sanfeliu, Coral; Planas, Anna M

    2010-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix and carry out key functions in cell development, cancer, injury, and regeneration. In addition to its well recognized extracellular action, functional intracellular MMP activity under certain conditions is supported by increasing evidence. In this study, we observed higher gelatinase activity by in situ zymography and increased MMP-9 immunoreactivity in human neuroblastoma cells and in bone marrow macrophages undergoing mitosis compared with resting cells. We studied the pattern of immunoreactivity at the different stages of cell division by confocal microscopy. Immunostaining with different monoclonal antibodies against MMP-9 revealed a precise, dynamic, and well orchestrated localization of MMP-9 at the different stages of cell division. The cellular distribution of MMP-9 staining was studied in relation to that of microtubules. The spatial pattern of MMP-9 immunoreactivity suggested some participation in both the reorganization of the nuclear content and the process of chromatid segmentation. We then used several MMP-9 inhibitors to find out whether MMP-9 might be involved in the cell cycle. These drugs impaired the entry of cells into mitosis, as revealed by flow cytometry, and reduced cell culture growth. In addition, the silencing of MMP-9 expression with small interfering RNA also reduced cell growth. Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular MMP-9 is involved in the process of cell division in neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of macrophages.

  17. Electroporation Formulation for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiemiao; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Cell transfection efficiency often determines the success of cell-based gene therapy. Cell transfection via Nucleofector technology yields high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. However, owing to trade secrecy, the components in each buffer are unknown, which not only increases the cost of electroporation studies but also limits the application of Nucelofector in clinical cell-based gene therapies. Thus, we developed a three-step method to determine the optimal conditions, including buffer, program and additional polymer, in electroporation for multiple cancers and stem cell lines. This method could reduce the cost, allow researchers to find the optimal electroporation conditions for their cell lines of interest, and greatly boost the application potential of electroporation in clinical cell-based gene therapies. PMID:24510811

  18. Splenic B cells from Hymenolepis diminuta-infected mice ameliorate colitis independent of T cells and via cooperation with macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Wang, Arthur; Fernando, Maria R; Graepel, Rabea; Leung, Gabriella; van Rooijen, Nico; Sigvardsson, Mikael; McKay, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites provoke multicellular immune responses in their hosts that can suppress concomitant disease. The gut lumen-dwelling tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta, unlike other parasites assessed as helminth therapy, causes no host tissue damage while potently suppressing murine colitis. With the goal of harnessing the immunomodulatory capacity of infection with H. diminuta, we assessed the putative generation of anti-colitic regulatory B cells following H. diminuta infection. Splenic CD19(+) B cells isolated from mice infected 7 [HdBc(7(d))] and 14 d (but not 3 d) previously with H. diminuta and transferred to naive mice significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-, oxazolone-, and dextran-sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Mechanistic studies with the DNBS model, revealed the anti-colitic HdBc(7(d)) was within the follicular B cell population and its phenotype was not dependent on IL-4 or IL-10. The HdBc(7(d)) were not characterized by increased expression of CD1d, CD5, CD23, or IL-10 production, but did spontaneously, and upon LPS plus anti-CD40 stimulation, produce more TGF-β than CD19(+) B cells from controls. DNBS-induced colitis in RAG1(-/-) mice was inhibited by administration of HdBc(7(d)), indicating a lack of a requirement for T and B cells in the recipient; however, depletion of macrophages in recipient mice abrogated the anti-colitic effect of HdBc(7(d)). Thus, in response to H. diminuta, a putatively unique splenic CD19(+) B cell with a functional immunoregulatory program is generated that promotes the suppression of colitis dominated by TH1, TH2, or TH1-plus-TH2 events, and may do so via the synthesis of TGF-β and the generation of, or cooperation with, a regulatory macrophage. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Effect of age on proteasomal activity of T cells and macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    T cell function is impaired with aging. Proteasome activity in T cells is important for T cell activation and its activity in macrophages is required for processing antigens in order to be presented via class I major histocompatibility complex to CD8+ T cells. Since studies have demonstrated that pr...

  20. Start of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus promotes the influx of macrophages into subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Jansen, H J; Stienstra, R; van Diepen, J A; Hijmans, A; van der Laak, J A; Vervoort, G M M; Tack, C J

    2013-12-01

    Insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by weight gain characterised by an increase in abdominal fat mass. The expansion of adipose tissue mass is generally paralleled by profound morphological and inflammatory changes. We hypothesised that the insulin-associated increase in fat mass would also result in changes in the morphology of human subcutaneous adipose tissue and in increased inflammation, especially when weight gain was excessive. We investigated the effects of weight gain on adipocyte size, macrophage influx, and mRNA expression and protein levels of key inflammatory markers within the adipose tissue in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus before and 6 months after starting insulin therapy. As expected, insulin therapy significantly increased body weight. At the level of the subcutaneous adipose tissue, insulin treatment led to an influx of macrophages. When comparing patients gaining no or little weight with patients gaining >4% body weight after 6 months of insulin therapy, both subgroups displayed an increase in macrophage influx. However, individuals who had gained weight had higher protein levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, TNF-α and IL-1β after 6 months of insulin therapy compared with those who had not gained weight. We conclude that insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus improved glycaemic control but also induced body weight gain and an influx of macrophages into the subcutaneous adipose tissue. In patients characterised by a pronounced insulin-associated weight gain, the influx of macrophages into the adipose tissue was accompanied by a more pronounced inflammatory status. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00781495. The study was funded by European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes and the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation.

  1. Bone marrow-derived cells serve as proangiogenic macrophages but not endothelial cells in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yuji; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Kishi, Kazuo; Suda, Toshio; Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2011-05-12

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) contribute to postnatal vascular growth by differentiating into endothelial cells or secreting angiogenic factors. However, the extent of their endothelial differentiation highly varies according to the angiogenic models used. Wound healing is an intricate process in which the skin repairs itself after injury. As a process also observed in cancer progression, neoangiogenesis into wound tissues is profoundly involved in this healing process, suggesting the contribution of BMDCs. However, the extent of the differentiation of BMDCs to endothelial cells in wound healing is unclear. In this study, using the green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chim-eric experiment and high resolution confocal microscopy at a single cell level, we observed no endothelial differentiation of BMDCs in 2 acute wound healing models (dorsal excisional wound and ear punch) and a chronic wound healing model (decubitus ulcer). Instead, a major proportion of BMDCs were macrophages. Indeed, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) inhibition depleted approximately 80% of the BMDCs at the wound healing site. CSF-1-mutant (CSF-1(op/op)) mice showed significantly reduced neoangiogenesis into the wound site, supporting the substantial role of BMDCs as macrophages. Our data show that the proangiogenic effects of macrophages, but not the endothelial differentiation, are the major contribution of BMDCs in wound healing.

  2. HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells induce NO production in macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wu, Shengnan; Xing, Da

    2013-02-01

    High fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) provides a new stimulator to trigger cell apoptosis, and it is well known that apoptotic cells provide antigens to effectively trigger recognition by the immune system. In order to investigate the effect of HF-LPLI on the professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) function, in our primary study, we focused our attention on the effect of HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells on macrophages phagocytosis and NO production. Both confocal microscopy and flowcytometry analysis showed that HF-LPLI (120 J/cm2) induced significantly EMT6 death. Further experiments showed that HF-LPLI-treated EMT6 cells could be phagocyted by the murine macrophage cells RAW264.7, and could induce NO production in macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells effectively regulated the immune system. The HF-LPLI effect on the APC function needs to be further studied.

  3. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol inhibits the cell surface expression of activation markers in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Waché, Yann J; Hbabi-Haddioui, Laila; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Belkhelfa, Haouaria; Roques, Christine; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2009-08-21

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. It exhibits several toxic effects including impaired growth and immune dysregulation. Macrophages play pivotal role in the host defense; upon activation, they express several specific cell surface receptors that are important in adhesion and cell signaling. Several studies have demonstrated that DON can affect macrophages, however, very few data are available concerning the effect of DON on human macrophages, and the effect on macrophage cell surface receptors is unknown. In the present study, human blood monocytes, differentiated in vitro into macrophages, were activated with IFN-gamma, in the presence or absence of low concentrations of DON. The expression of CD11c, CD13, CD14, CD18, CD33, CD35, CD54, CD119 and HLA-DP/DQ/DR was analyzed by flow cytometry. As expected, macrophage activation by IFN-gamma upregulated the expression of CD54, CD14, CD119 and HLA-DP/DQ/DR. Incubation with DON decrease the cell surface expression of these activation markers in a dose-dependent manner. When cells were treated with 5muM DON, the mean fluorescence intensity measured for the expression of these receptors was the same as that observed in non-activated macrophages. This inhibitory effect of DON was only observed when the mycotoxin was applied before the activation signal. Taken together, our results suggest that low concentration of DON alter macrophage activation as measured by the expression of cell surface markers. This may have implications for human health when consuming DON contaminated feed.

  4. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Eyayu; Hayes, Brian J.; Blau, C. Anthony; Torok-Storb, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS) that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP), intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4), CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions. PMID:28135323

  5. Nonresolving macrophage-mediated inflammation in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-08-31

    Tumors are populated with different cells of the immune system, each of which has the potential for pro- or antitumor functions. Macrophages are the numerically dominant type of myeloid cell in cancer and are suspected of having predominantly protumor functions. Key questions in cancer research concern the relationships between macrophages and anatomically different kinds of cancers, what specific properties of macrophages are involved in protumor functions and whether either macrophage numbers or functions can be modulated to enhance existing cancer therapies, for example, by reducing the immunosuppressive milieu such that anti-tumor T cells can provoke antitumor immunity. Accordingly, several antimacrophage preclinical modalities have been attempted and revealed substantial clinical barriers to their use. Therefore, understanding and targeting the specific pathways associated with protumor functions of macrophages, rather than macrophages themselves is a promising approach for both basic research and therapeutic development. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Enhancement of macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing by bacterial outer membrane proteins (porins).

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, J B; Ribi, E; Wheat, R W

    1983-01-01

    Various microbial products are known to influence the function of mouse peritoneal macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and certain lipid A-associated proteins are known to enhance the tumoricidal effects of macrophages. The purpose of this study was to determine whether porins (outer membrane proteins) of Salmonella typhimurium G30/C21 would influence the activity of macrophages from lipid A-responsive and -unresponsive mice. Porins, extracted by a combined sodium dodecyl sulfate-EDTA method from cell walls, were free of LPS as determined by Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and appeared as a band at approximately 36,000 molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In tumor cell killing assays done under LPS-free conditions, the porins in doses of 1 to 10 ng/ml enhanced the tumoricidal effect of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN or C3H/HeJ mice. Protein-free LPS enhanced the tumoricidal activity of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice. The tumoricidal-enhancing activity of protein-free LPS was blocked by the lipid A-binding antibiotic polymyxin B sulfate, but the effects of porins were not altered by the polymyxin B sulfate. These results suggest that porins, proteins known to alter membrane function, may alter macrophage function by interaction with macrophage membranes. Images PMID:6311745

  7. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies. PMID:27833923

  8. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis; Garcia, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  9. Recent progress in understandıng the function of intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelsall, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses must be tightly controlled, particularly in the intestine, As members of the mononuclear phagocyte family, dendritic cells and macrophages, are well represented in intestinal tissues, and have developed unique functional niches. This review will focus on recent findings on antigen uptake and processing in the intestine, and the role of DCs in the imprinting homing receptors on T and B cells, the induction of IgA B cell responses, and the differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It will also address the unique phenotype of intestinal macrophages and briefly what is known regarding the relationships between these cell types. PMID:19079213

  10. Cell memory-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers 'memory-based therapy', which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. T CELL THERAPIES FOR HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sharon; Bollard, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has improved the quality of life for HIV+ individuals but efficacy requires strict adherence and treatment is not curative. Recently, the use of T cells as therapeutic agents have been in the spotlight in the settings of post-transplant opportunistic infections and cancer. Whether T cell therapy can be harnessed for treating HIV remains to be determined but there are a few studies that seek to answer that question. Infusion of ex vivo expanded HIV-specific T cells showed limited efficacy but no adverse events. Genetically modified T cells expressing CD4 chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) have recently been shown to have persistence that outperforms CARs used for cancers. Although the results have not yet been published for many clinical studies using T cells for HIV, preclinical studies and the clinical data that is available highlight the potential for T cell therapy to decrease or eliminate HIV patients’ dependency on ART. PMID:23557423

  12. Granulocyte, granulocyte–macrophage, and macrophage colony-stimulating factors can stimulate the invasive capacity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, X-H; Nakanishi, Y; Takayama, K; Bai, F; Hara, N

    1999-01-01

    We and other researchers have previously found that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), which generally include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), promote invasion by lung cancer cells. In the present study, we studied the effects of these CSFs on gelatinase production, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) production and their activity in human lung cancer cells. Gelatin zymographs of conditioned media derived from human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed two major bands of gelatinase activity at 68 and 92 kDa, which were characterized as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 respectively. Treatment with CSFs increased the 68- and 92-kDa activity and converted some of a 92-kDa proenzyme to an 82-kDa enzyme that was consistent with an active form of the MMP-9. Plasminogen activator zymographs of the conditioned media from the cancer cells showed that CSF treatment resulted in an increase in a 48–55 kDa plasminogen-dependent gelatinolytic activity that was characterized as human uPA. The conditioned medium from the cancer cells treated with CSFs stimulated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, providing a direct demonstration of the ability of enhanced uPA to increase plasmin-dependent proteolysis. The enhanced invasive behaviour of the cancer cells stimulated by CSFs was well correlated with the increase in MMPs and uPA activities. These data suggest that the enhanced production of extracellular matrix-degrading proteinases by the cancer cells in response to CSF treatment may represent a biochemical mechanism which promotes the invasive behaviour of the cancer cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408691

  13. Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage lines model inflammatory monocytic cells with important similarity to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Marcela; Osorio, Fabiola; Robinson, Matthew J; Davies, Luke C; Dierkes, Nicola; Jones, Simon A; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Taylor, Philip R

    2011-02-01

    We have examined the potential to generate bona fide macrophages (MØ) from conditionally immortalised murine bone marrow precursors. MØ can be derived from Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage precursor cell lines (MØP) using either M-CSF or GM-CSF. When differentiated in GM-CSF (GM-MØP) the resultant cells resemble GM-CSF bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) in morphological phenotype, antigen phenotype and functional responses to microbial stimuli. In spite of this high similarity between the two cell types and the ability of GM-MØP to effectively present antigen to a T-cell hybridoma, these cells are comparatively poor at priming the expansion of IFN-γ responses from naïve CD4(+) T cells. The generation of MØP from transgenic or genetically aberrant mice provides an excellent opportunity to study the inflammatory role of GM-MØP, and reduces the need for mouse colonies in many studies. Hence differentiation of conditionally immortalised MØPs in GM-CSF represents a unique in vitro model of inflammatory monocyte-like cells, with important differences from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, which will facilitate functional studies relating to the many 'sub-phenotypes' of inflammatory monocytes.

  14. Inhibition of tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase by macrophage-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Stuehr, D J; Nathan, C F

    1991-10-01

    Macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO) is cytostatic to tumor cells and microbial pathogens. We tested whether one molecular target for the cytostatic action of NO may be ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a rate-limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. In a concentration-dependent manner, NO gas and lysates of activated macrophages that generated comparable amounts of NO led to the same degree of inhibition of partially purified RR from L1210 mouse lymphoma cells. Lysates from nonactivated macrophages, which do not produce NO, were noninhibitory. With lysates from activated macrophages, RR was protected by omitting L-arginine or by adding the NO synthase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium, N omega-methyl-L-arginine, or N omega-amino-L-arginine. L-Arginine, but not D-arginine, abolished the protective effect of N omega-amino-L-arginine. The prototypic pharmacologic inhibitor of RR is hydroxyurea. Its structural resemblance to N omega-hydroxy-L-arginine, a reaction intermediate of NO synthase, prompted us to test if hydroxyurea can generate NO. In the presence of H2O2 and CuSO4, hydroxyurea produced NO2-/NO3-, aerobic reaction products of NO. Addition of morpholine blocked NO2-/NO3- generation from hydroxyurea and led to formation of nitrosomorpholine, as detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Thus, hydroxyurea can produce an NO-like, nitrosating rectant. L1210 cell DNA synthesis was inhibited completely by activated macrophages or by hydroxyurea, and was partially restored to the same degree in both settings by providing deoxyribonucleosides to bypass the block in RR. Thus, both NO gas and NO generated by activated macrophage lysates inhibit tumor cell RR. The RR inhibitor hydroxyurea can also generate an NO-like species. Similar, partial restoration of tumor cell DNA synthesis by deoxyribonucleosides in the presence of activated macrophages or hydroxyurea suggests that cytostasis by activated macrophages and by hydroxyurea has comparable mechanisms, including, but

  15. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophages cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. Although alginate lyase did not significantly restore efferocytosis in the presence of exogenous alginate, it had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to ongoing airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate production and

  16. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  17. The interaction of gamma delta T cells with activated macrophages is a property of the V gamma 1 subset.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jane E; Pearson, Jayne; Scott, Phillip; Carding, Simon R

    2003-12-15

    Immunoregulation is an emerging paradigm of gammadelta T cell function. The mechanisms by which gammadelta T cells mediate this function, however, are not clear. Studies have identified a direct role for gammadelta T cells in resolving the host immune response to infection, by eliminating populations of activated macrophages. The aim of this study was to identify macrophage-reactive gammadelta T cells and establish the requirements/outcomes of macrophage-gammadelta T cell interactions during the immune response to the intracellular bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Using a macrophage-T cell coculture system in which peritoneal macrophages from naive or Lm-infected TCRdelta(-/-) mice were incubated with splenocytes from naive and Lm-infected alphabeta/gammadelta T cell-deficient and wild-type mice, the ability to bind macrophages was shown to be restricted to gammadelta T cells and the GV5S1 (Vgamma1) subset of gammadelta T cells. Macrophage adherence resulted in a 4- to 10-fold enrichment of Vgamma1(+) T cells. Enrichment of Vgamma1 T cells was dependent upon the activation status of macrophages, but independent of the activation status of gammadelta T cells. Vgamma1 T cells were cytotoxic for activated macrophages with both the binding to and killing of macrophages being TCR dependent because anti-TCRgammadelta Abs inhibited both Vgamma1 binding and killing activities. These studies establish the identity of macrophage cytotoxic gammadelta T cells, the conditions under which this interaction occurs, and the outcome of this interaction. These findings are concordant with the involvement of Vgamma1 T cells in macrophage homeostasis during the resolution of pathogen-mediated immune responses.

  18. [Cell therapy for Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2009-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell research have raised hopes of creating novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson disease (PD), although double-blinded clinical trials have met with controversial success in patients implanted with fetal midbrain tissue and autopsy results have shown that some of the grafted fetal neurons displayed pathological changes typical of PD. Dopaminergic neurons have been efficiently derived from stem cells using various methods, and beneficial effects after transplantation have been demonstrated in animal models of PD. Some obstacles remain to be overcome before stem cell therapy can be routinely and safely used to treat PD in humans. A widely used prodrug/suicide gene therapy would be applied to stem cells to reduce risk of tumor formation. Since grafts were transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra in most current protocols, surviving dopaminergic neurons would not have to be the same subtype as the nigral cells. If the main mechanism underlying any functional recovery achieved by cell therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes represents a more straightforward approach. Future targets for cell therapy should include some types of Parkinsonism with degeneration of striatal neurons.

  19. Macrophages regulate expression of α1,2-fucosyltransferase genes in human endometrial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Jasper, Melinda J; Hull, M Louise; Aplin, John D; Robertson, Sarah A

    2012-04-01

    The epithelial cell surface of the endometrium undergoes substantial biochemical changes to allow embryo attachment and implantation in early pregnancy. We hypothesized that tissue macrophages influence these events to promote uterine receptivity. To investigate the role of macrophages in regulating epithelial cell expression of genes linked to glycan-mediated embryo adhesion, Ishikawa, RL95-2 and HEC1A endometrial epithelial cells were cultured alone or with unactivated or lipopolysaccharide-activated monocytic U937 cells, separated using transwell inserts. Expression of mRNAs encoding two α1,2-fucosyltransferases (FUT1, FUT2) was increased in all three epithelial cell lines following co-culture with U937 cells, and was associated with increased fucosylation of cell surface glycoproteins detected using lectins from Ulex europaeus (UEA-1) and Dolichos biflorus (DBA). FUT1 induction by U937 cells also occurred in primary endometrial epithelial cells collected in luteal but not proliferative phase. Activation of the interleukin-6 (IL6)/leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) cytokine signaling pathway with phosphorylation of STAT3 and elevated SOCS3 mRNA expression was evident in epithelial cells stimulated by U937 co-culture. Several recombinant macrophage-secreted cytokines exerted stimulatory or inhibitory effects on FUT1 and FUT2 mRNA expression, and the macrophage-derived cytokine LIF partially replicated the effects of U937 cells on both FUT1 and FUT2 expression and UEA-1 and DBA lectin reactivity in Ishikawa cells. These results suggest that macrophage-derived factors including LIF might facilitate development of an implantation-receptive endometrium by regulating surface glycan structures in epithelial cells. Abnormal phenotypes or altered abundance of uterine macrophages could contribute to the pathophysiology of primary unexplained infertility in women.

  20. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues.

  1. Metformin-treated cancer cells modulate macrophage polarization through AMPK-NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Fu; Chao, Ting-Ting; Su, Yu-Fu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chien, Chu-Yen; Chiu, Kuo-Chou; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Shieh, Yi-Shing

    2017-03-28

    Accumulating evidence is indicating metformin to possess the potential ability in preventing tumor development and suppressing cancer growth. However, the exact mechanism of its antitumorigenic effects is still not clear. We found that metformin suppressed the ability of cancer to skew macrophage toward M2 phenotype. Metformin treated cancer cells increased macrophage expression of M1-related cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α and attenuated M2-related cytokines IL-8, IL-10, and TGF-β expression. Furthermore, metformin treated cancer cells displayed inhibited secretion of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13; cytokines important for inducing M2 macrophages. Conversely, M1 inducing cytokine IFN-γ was upper-regulated in cancer cells. Additionally, through increasing AMPK and p65 phosphorylation, metformin treatment activated AMPK-NF-κB signaling of cancer cells that participate in regulating M1 and M2 inducing cytokines expression. Moreover, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, significantly increased IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 expression while BAY-117082, an NF-κB inhibitor, decreased expression. In metformin-treated tumor tissue, the percentage of M2-like macrophages decreased while M1-like macrophages increased. These findings suggest that metformin activates cancer AMPK-NF-κB signaling, a pathway involved in regulating M1/M2 expression and inducing genes for macrophage polarization to anti-tumor phenotype.

  2. The role of macrophages in the generation of T-helper cells. II. The genetic control of the macrophage-T-cell interaction for helper cell induction with soluble antigens

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Helper cell induction to nonparticle antigens in vitro requires the cooperation of T cells and macrophages, but does not occur if the macrophages are allogenic. The reasons for this were investigated. Malfunction of allogenic macrophages was excluded by cultures with their syngenic T cells; suppressor cell induction was excluded by admixture experiments. Thus, T cells and macrophages only cooperated if they were genetically similar. The genetic locus (loci) involved was mapped. Using congenic lines differing only at the H-2 complex, the genetic control of T-macrophage interaction was localized in the H- 2 region. Mice with intra H-2 recombinants were used to map the T- macrophage interaction locus in the I-A region of the H-2 complex (formerly known as poly-D, L-ala-poly-L-lys. Recombinants were also used to exclude the presence of another T-macrophage locus either the K, I-B, or I-C, SS-Slp, or D regions of the H-2 complex. Genetic restrictions for T-macrophage interaction in helper cell induction was shown in mice of the H-2-k, d, b, q, s genotypes as well as in H-2 recombinants. The possible mechanisms and significance of this genetic restriction are discussed. PMID:1079849

  3. Immunostimulatory conventional dendritic cells evolve into regulatory macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jun; Mikhailova, Anastassia; Tang, Michael; Gu, Hongtao; Zhao, Jun; Cattral, Mark S

    2012-05-24

    Dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis in peripheral tissues reflect a balance between DC generation, migration, and death. The current model of DC ontogeny indicates that pre-cDCs are committed to become terminal conventional DCs (cDCs). Here, we report the unexpected finding that proliferating immunostimulatory CD11c(+) MHC class II(+) cDCs derived from pre-cDCs can lose their DC identity and generate progeny that exhibit morphologic, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of regulatory macrophages. DC-derived-macrophages (DC-d-Ms) potently suppress T-cell responses through the production of immunosuppressive molecules including nitric oxide, arginase, and IL-10. Relative deficiency of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) provided a permissive signal for DC-d-M generation. Using a transgenic mouse model that allows tracking of CD11c(+) cells in vivo, we found that DC-d-M development occurs commonly in cancer, but not in lymphoid or nonlymphoid tissues under steady-state conditions. We propose that this developmental pathway serves as an alternative mechanism of regulating DC homeostasis during inflammatory processes.

  4. Tumour-educated macrophages display a mixed polarisation and enhance pancreatic cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Karnevi, Emelie; Andersson, Roland; Rosendahl, Ann H

    2014-07-01

    At the time of diagnosis, almost 80% of pancreatic cancer patients present with new-onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) or impaired glucose tolerance. T2D and pancreatic cancer are both associated with low-grade inflammation. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have a key role in cancer-related inflammation, immune escape, matrix remodelling and metastasis. In this study, the interplay between tumour cells and immune cells under the influence of different glucose levels was investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed in vitro to conditioned medium from BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells, in normal (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose levels. Flow cytometry analyses demonstrated that tumour-derived factors stimulated differentiation of macrophages, with a mixed classical (M1-like) and alternatively activated (M2-like) phenotype polarisation (CD11c(+)CD206(+)). High-glucose conditions further enhanced the tumour-driven macrophage enrichment and associated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 cytokine levels. In addition, hyperglycaemia enhanced the responsiveness of tumour-educated macrophages to lipopolysaccharide, with elevated cytokine secretion compared with normal glucose levels. Tumour-educated macrophages were found to promote pancreatic cancer cell invasion in vitro, which was significantly enhanced at high glucose. The anti-diabetic drug metformin shifted the macrophage phenotype polarisation and reduced the tumour cell invasion at normal, but not high, glucose levels. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that pancreatic cancer cells stimulate differentiation of macrophages with pro-tumour properties that are further enhanced by hyperglycaemia. These findings highlight important crosstalk between tumour cells and TAMs in the local tumour microenvironment that may contribute to disease progression in pancreatic cancer patients with hyperglycaemia and T2D.

  5. Autophagy Regulates Cholesterol Efflux from Macrophage Foam Cells via Lysosomal Acid Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Franklin, Vivian; Mak, Esther; Liao, Xianghai; Tabas, Ira; Marcel, Yves L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The lipid droplet (LD) is the major site of cholesterol storage in macrophage foam cells and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol, stored as cholesteryl esters (CEs), is liberated from this organelle and delivered to cholesterol acceptors. The current paradigm attributes all cytoplasmic CE hydrolysis to the action of neutral CE hydrolases. Here, we demonstrate an important role for lysosomes in LD CE hydrolysis in cholesterol-loaded macrophages, in addition to that mediated by neutral hydrolases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LDs are delivered to lysosomes via autophagy, where lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) acts to hydrolyze LD CE to generate free cholesterol mainly for ABCA1-dependent efflux; this process is specifically induced upon macrophage cholesterol loading. We conclude that, in macrophage foam cells, lysosomal hydrolysis contributes to the mobilization of LD-associated cholesterol for reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:21641547

  6. SCS macrophages suppress melanoma by restricting tumor-derived vesicle-B cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Ferdinando; Garris, Christopher; Lai, Charles P; Newton, Andita; Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Alvarez, David; Sprachman, Melissa; Evavold, Charles; Magnuson, Angela; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Glatz, Katharina; Breakefield, Xandra O; Mempel, Thorsten R; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-04-08

    Tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) are important signals in tumor-host cell communication, yet it remains unclear how endogenously produced tEVs affect the host in different areas of the body. We combined imaging and genetic analysis to track melanoma-derived vesicles at organismal, cellular, and molecular scales to show that endogenous tEVs efficiently disseminate via lymphatics and preferentially bind subcapsular sinus (SCS) CD169(+) macrophages in tumor-draining lymph nodes (tdLNs) in mice and humans. The CD169(+) macrophage layer physically blocks tEV dissemination but is undermined during tumor progression and by therapeutic agents. A disrupted SCS macrophage barrier enables tEVs to enter the lymph node cortex, interact with B cells, and foster tumor-promoting humoral immunity. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages may act as tumor suppressors by containing tEV spread and ensuing cancer-enhancing immunity.

  7. Progastrin Represses the Alternative Activation of Human Macrophages and Modulates Their Influence on Colon Cancer Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Carlos; Barrachina, María Dolores; Cosín-Roger, Jesús; Ortiz-Masiá, Dolores; Álvarez, Ángeles; Terrádez, Liria; Nicolau, María Jesús; Alós, Rafael; Esplugues, Juan Vicente; Calatayud, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive) to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral). Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells) was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells) was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10) with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12). Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization. PMID:24901518

  8. Progastrin represses the alternative activation of human macrophages and modulates their influence on colon cancer epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carlos; Barrachina, María Dolores; Cosín-Roger, Jesús; Ortiz-Masiá, Dolores; Álvarez, Ángeles; Terrádez, Liria; Nicolau, María Jesús; Alós, Rafael; Esplugues, Juan Vicente; Calatayud, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive) to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral). Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells) was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells) was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10) with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12). Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization.

  9. Activated macrophages promote Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Loilome, Watcharin; Bungkanjana, Pornpan; Techasen, Anchalee; Namwat, Nisana; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Puapairoj, Anucha; Khuntikeo, Narong; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is pathologically activated in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Here, we determined the expression profile as well as biological role of activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CCA. The quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that Wnt3a, Wnt5a, and Wnt7b mRNA were significantly higher in CCA tissues than adjacent non-tumor tissues and normal liver tissues. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Wnt3a, Wnt5a, and Wnt7b were positive in 92.1, 76.3, and 100 % of 38 CCA tissues studied. It was noted that Wnt3 had a low expression in tumor cells, whereas a high expression was mainly found in inflammatory cells. Interestingly, a high expression level of Wnt5a was significantly correlated to poor survival of CCA patients (P=0.009). Membrane localization of β-catenin was reduced in the tumors compared to normal bile duct epithelia, and we also found that 73.7 % of CCA cases showed the cytoplasmic localization. Inflammation is known to be a risk factor for CCA development, and we tested whether this might induce Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) elevated the expression of Wnt3 both mRNA and protein levels in the macrophage cell line. Additionally, the conditioned media taken from LPS-induced activated macrophage culture promoted β-catenin accumulation in CCA cells. Furthermore, transient suppression of β-catenin by siRNA significantly induced growth inhibition of CCA cells, concurrently with decreasing cyclin D1 protein level. In conclusion, the present study reports the abundant expression of Wnt protein family and β-catenin in CCA as well as the effect of inflammatory condition on Wnt/β-catenin activation in CCA cells. Importantly, abrogation of β-catenin expression caused significant CCA cell growth inhibition. Thus, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may contribute to CCA cell proliferation and hence may serve as a prognostic marker for CCA progression and provide a

  10. The Effect of Local Anesthetic on Pro-inflammatory Macrophage Modulation by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Andrea; Marrero-Berrios, Ileana; Weinberg, Jonathan; Manchikalapati, Devasena; SchianodiCola, Joseph; Schloss, Rene S.; Yarmush, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Administering local anesthetics (LAs) peri- and post-operatively aims to prevent or mitigate pain in surgical procedures and after tissue injury in cases of osteoarthritis (OA) and other degenerative diseases. Innovative tissue protective and reparative therapeutic interventions such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are likely to be exposed to co-administered drugs such as LAs. Therefore, it is important to determine how this exposure affects the therapeutic functions of MSCs and other cells in their target microenvironment. In these studies, we measured the effect of LAs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, on macrophage viability and pro-inflammatory secretion. We also examined their effect on modulation of the macrophage pro-inflammatory phenotype in an in vitro co-culture system with MSCs, by quantifying macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion and MSC prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. Our studies indicate that both LAs directly attenuated macrophage TNF-α secretion, without significantly affecting viability, in a concentration- and potency-dependent manner. LA-mediated attenuation of macrophage TNF-α was sustained in co-culture with MSCs, but MSCs did not further enhance this anti-inflammatory effect. Concentration- and potency-dependent reductions in macrophage TNF-α were concurrent with decreased PGE2 levels in the co-cultures further indicating MSC-independent macrophage attenuation. MSC functional recovery from LA exposure was assessed by pre-treating MSCs with LAs prior to co-culture with macrophages. Both MSC attenuation of TNF-α and PGE2 secretion were impaired by pre-exposure to the more potent bupivacaine and high dose of lidocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, LAs can affect anti-inflammatory function by both directly attenuating macrophage inflammation and MSC secretion and possibly by altering the local microenvironment which can secondarily reduce MSC function. Furthermore, the LA effect on MSC function may persist

  11. The effect of local anesthetic on pro-inflammatory macrophage modulation by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Andrea; Marrero-Berrios, Ileana; Weinberg, Jonathan; Manchikalapati, Devasena; SchianodiCola, Joseph; Schloss, Rene S; Yarmush, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Administering local anesthetics (LAs) peri- and post-operatively aims to prevent or mitigate pain in surgical procedures and after tissue injury in cases of osteoarthritis (OA) and other degenerative diseases. Innovative tissue protective and reparative therapeutic interventions such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are likely to be exposed to co-administered drugs such as LAs. Therefore, it is important to determine how this exposure affects the therapeutic functions of MSCs and other cells in their target microenvironment. In these studies, we measured the effect of LAs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, on macrophage viability and pro-inflammatory secretion. We also examined their effect on modulation of the macrophage pro-inflammatory phenotype in an in vitro co-culture system with MSCs, by quantifying macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion and MSC prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. Our studies indicate that both LAs directly attenuated macrophage TNF-α secretion, without significantly affecting viability, in a concentration- and potency-dependent manner. LA-mediated attenuation of macrophage TNF-α was sustained in co-culture with MSCs, but MSCs did not further enhance this anti-inflammatory effect. Concentration- and potency-dependent reductions in macrophage TNF-α were concurrent with decreased PGE2 levels in the co-cultures further indicating MSC-independent macrophage attenuation. MSC functional recovery from LA exposure was assessed by pre-treating MSCs with LAs prior to co-culture with macrophages. Both MSC attenuation of TNF-α and PGE2 secretion were impaired by pre-exposure to the more potent bupivacaine and high dose of lidocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, LAs can affect anti-inflammatory function by both directly attenuating macrophage inflammation and MSC secretion and possibly by altering the local microenvironment which can secondarily reduce MSC function. Furthermore, the LA effect on MSC function may persist

  12. [Cell based therapy for COPD].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    To develop a new cell based therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we need to understand 1) the role of tissue-specific and bone marrow-derived stem cells, 2) extracellular matrix, and 3) growth factors. Recently, bronchioalveolar stem cells were identified in murine distal lungs. Impairment of these stem cells may cause improper lung repair after inflammation, resulting in pulmonary emphysema. Bone marrow-derived cells are necessary to repair injured lungs. However, the long term role of these cells is not understood yet. Although we need more careful analysis and additional experiments, growth factors, such as hepatocyte growth factor, are good candidates for the new cell based therapy for COPD. Lung was believed as a non-regenerative organ. Based on these recent reports about lung regeneration and stem cells, however, new strategies to treat COPD and a new point of view to understand the pathophysiology of COPD are rising.

  13. Pure populations of murine macrophages from cultured embryonic stem cells. Application to studies of chemotaxis and apoptotic cell clearance.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Lihui; Pound, John D; Willems, Jorine J L P; Taylor, A Helen; Forrester, Lesley M; Gregory, Christopher D

    2012-11-30

    Embryonic stem cells provide a potentially convenient source of macrophages in the laboratory. Given the propensity of macrophages for plasticity in phenotype and function, standardised culture and differentiation protocols are required to ensure consistency in population output and activity in functional assays. Here we detail the development of an optimised culture protocol for the production of murine embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM). This protocol provides improved yields of ESDM and we demonstrate that the cells are suitable for application to the study of macrophage responses to apoptotic cells. ESDM so produced were of higher purity than commonly used primary macrophage preparations and were functional in chemotaxis assays and in phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Maturation of ESDM was found to be associated with reduced capacity for directed migration and increased capacity for phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. These results show ESDM to be functionally active in sequential phases of interaction with apoptotic cells and establish these macrophage populations as useful models for further study of molecular mechanisms underlying the recognition and removal of apoptotic cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pre-B cell to macrophage transdifferentiation without significant promoter DNA methylation changes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Ciudad, Laura; Gómez-Cabrero, David; Parra, Maribel; Bussmann, Lars H; di Tullio, Alessandro; Kallin, Eric M; Tegnér, Jesper; Graf, Thomas; Ballestar, Esteban

    2012-03-01

    Transcription factor-induced lineage reprogramming or transdifferentiation experiments are essential for understanding the plasticity of differentiated cells. These experiments helped to define the specific role of transcription factors in conferring cell identity and played a key role in the development of the regenerative medicine field. We here investigated the acquisition of DNA methylation changes during C/EBPα-induced pre-B cell to macrophage transdifferentiation. Unexpectedly, cell lineage conversion occurred without significant changes in DNA methylation not only in key B cell- and macrophage-specific genes but also throughout the entire set of genes differentially methylated between the two parental cell types. In contrast, active and repressive histone modification marks changed according to the expression levels of these genes. We also demonstrated that C/EBPα and RNA Pol II are associated with the methylated promoters of macrophage-specific genes in reprogrammed macrophages without inducing methylation changes. Our findings not only provide insights about the extent and hierarchy of epigenetic events in pre-B cell to macrophage transdifferentiation but also show an important difference to reprogramming towards pluripotency where promoter DNA demethylation plays a pivotal role.

  15. ATP Release from Dying Autophagic Cells and Their Phagocytosis Are Crucial for Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ayna, Gizem; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Petrovski, Goran; Vandenabeele, Peter; Fésüs, László

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen-activated and damage-associated molecular patterns activate the inflammasome in macrophages. We report that mouse macrophages release IL-1β while co-incubated with pro-B (Ba/F3) cells dying, as a result of IL-3 withdrawal, by apoptosis with autophagy, but not when they are co-incubated with living, apoptotic, necrotic or necrostatin-1 treated cells. NALP3-deficient macrophages display reduced IL-1β secretion, which is also inhibited in macrophages deficient in caspase-1 or pre-treated with its inhibitor. This finding demonstrates that the inflammasome is activated during phagocytosis of dying autophagic cells. We show that activation of NALP3 depends on phagocytosis of dying cells, ATP release through pannexin-1 channels of dying autophagic cells, P2X7 purinergic receptor activation, and on consequent potassium efflux. Dying autophagic Ba/F3 cells injected intraperitoneally in mice recruit neutrophils and thereby induce acute inflammation. These findings demonstrate that NALP3 performs key upstream functions in inflammasome activation in mouse macrophages engulfing dying autophagic cells, and that these functions lead to pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:22768222

  16. Real-time monitoring of mesangial cell-macrophage cross-talk using SEAP in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yiman; Kasai, Ayumi; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Takeda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Fujio; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Yao, Jian; Kitamura, Masanori

    2005-08-01

    Macrophage-mesangial cell interaction plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis. We established a novel system for continuous, real-time monitoring of cross-talk between macrophages and mesangial cells in vitro and ex vivo. Rat mesangial cells were genetically engineered to produce secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) enhancer elements. The established sensor cells were exposed to macrophages or macrophage-derived factors, and the level of SEAP production was evaluated. In vitro, the established cells expressed and secreted SEAP when exposed to activated macrophages or to cytokines produced by macrophages. The kinetics of SEAP activity in culture media was closely correlated with the expression level of SEAP mRNA. The sensor cells also secreted SEAP in response to media conditioned by macrophage-accumulating, inflamed rat glomeruli. When the sensor cells were transferred adoptively into rat glomeruli subjected to acute anti-Thy 1 glomerulonephritis, the isolated glomeruli containing sensor cells secreted SEAP rapidly and progressively. These data suggested that the established system provides simple and useful tools for monitoring of cross-talk between macrophages and mesangial cells in vitro and ex vivo. This approach would be useful for investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in mesangial cell-macrophage interaction and also for screening of therapeutic agents that efficiently interfere with the link between infiltrating leukocytes and resident glomerular cells.

  17. Non-Lethal Sonodynamic Therapy Inhibits Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression in ApoE-/- Mice and Attenuates ox-LDL-mediated Macrophage Impairment by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Wei; Xu, Haobo; Sun, Yan; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Yongxing; Yao, Jianting; Tian, Ye

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies from our group showed that low-intensity sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has protective effects on atherosclerosis (AS). However, because the intensity of ultrasound passing through tissue is attenuated, the consequences of very low-intensity SDT, referred to as non-lethal SDT (NL-SDT), on atherosclerotic plaques are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NL-SDT affects atherosclerotic plaques and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. An AS model was established using ApoE-/- mice fed a western diet. En face Oil Red O staining was used to measure atherosclerotic plaque size. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining were used to observe plaque morphology and assess the location of macrophages and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in AS plaques were evaluated by real-time PCR and western blotting. Human THP-1 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages were used in this study. Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of cellular proteins after NL-SDT. Macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL assays and flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI double staining. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured with 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl benzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) staining, respectively. NL-SDT significantly inhibited AS progression and reduced the necrotic core area. NL-SDT induced HO-1 expression in lesional macrophages and in cultured macrophages. NL-SDT activated the protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) pathways and the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2).NL-SDT significantly reduced oxidized LDL (ox-LDL)-induced macrophage MMP collapse, ROS production and cell apoptosis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1-specific inhibitor, reversed the protective effects of NL-SDT. NL-SDT inhibits

  18. [Stem cell therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2009-03-01

    Medicine will be faced with a major challenge in coming years, namely how to treat for tissue dysfunction due to disease and aging There are two basic options: drug therapy and cell therapy. Stem cells have been the subject of intense speculation and controversy for several years, as they open up radically new therapeutic possibilities. Classical drugs can only smoothen consequences of tissue dysfunction, whereas cell therapy has the potential to restore tissue function by providing fresh cells. Cell therapy is totally different from organ transplantation, which can only benefit a limited number of patients. The use of the generic term "stem cells" to designate a whole variety of cell types that are present throughout life, is a source of confusion and ambiguity. It will take years of cognitive research to unravel the molecular mechanisms that govern a stem cell's multi- or totipotent status before we can fully exploit this therapeutic tool to the full. The younger a stem cell the greater its potential and, probably, the more durable its benefits, but the use of embryonic stem cells raises ethical issues. The redundancy or equivalence of diferent categories of cells is another source of controversy, yet researchers must be able to study stem cells in all their diversity, as complementary rather than competitive alternatives, in an acceptable ethical and regulatory environment. We briefly describe the three types of stem cells: pluripotent embryonic stem cells, fetal and adult stem cells, and pluripotent reprogrammed adult somatic cells. Only the former two categories have physiological functions: the first gives rise to tissues and organs while the second maintains tissue function during adulthood

  19. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  20. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  1. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M; Lewis, Claire

    2015-08-18

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and apply pulsed magnetic field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumours, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumour burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues.

  2. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Munitta; Kennerley, Aneurin J.; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M.; Lewis, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and apply pulsed magnetic field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumours, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumour burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues. PMID:26284300

  3. Keratin pearl degradation in oral squamous cell carcinoma: reciprocal roles of neutrophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Essa, Ahmed A M; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Abé, Tatsuya; Babkair, Hamzah; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We have reported that neutrophilic infiltration was associated with round-shaped dyskeratosis foci, a kind of keratin pearl, of oral carcinoma in situ and that those inflammatory cells are recruited from intra-epithelially entrapped blood vessels. Based on these lines of evidence, we have formulated a hypothesis that keratin pearls are terminally degraded by neutrophils. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemically stepwise degradation of keratin pearls in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to clarify any other type scavenger cells in addition to neutrophils are involved in this particular degradation process. Neutrophils (neutrophil elastase) and macrophage subpopulations (CD68, CD163 and CD204) were immunohistochemically localized in 30 cases of oral SCC with typical round-shaped keratin pearls. SCC cells were revealed by immunohistochemistry for keratin (K) 17, and blood vessels were demonstrated by CD31. Keratin pearl degradation process was divided into four steps: (i) intact stage: no macrophage infiltration but minimal neutrophils were found in keratin pearls; (ii) neutrophil recruit stage: no macrophage infiltration but focal neutrophilic infiltration within the pearls; (iii) neutrophil predominant stage: dense neutrophil infiltration with minimal macrophages and segregated keratinized cancer cells strongly positive for K17; and (iv) macrophage predominant stage: dense infiltration of CD68-, CD163 (mononuclear)- and CD204 (multinucleated)-positive macrophages engulfing detached keratinized SCC cells. Keratin pearl degradation in oral SCC is strictly regulated by two types of scavenger cells: neutrophils, which perform initial tasks, and macrophages, which reciprocally take over from neutrophils the role to finalize the degradation processes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Chitosan drives anti-inflammatory macrophage polarisation and pro-inflammatory dendritic cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta I; Santos, Susana G; Oliveira, Maria J; Torres, Ana L; Barbosa, Mário A

    2012-07-24

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) share the same precursor and play key roles in immunity. Modulation of their behaviour to achieve an optimal host response towards an implanted device is still a challenge. Here we compare the differentiation process and polarisation of these related cell populations and show that they exhibit different responses to chitosan (Ch), with human monocyte-derived macrophages polarising towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype while their DC counterparts display pro-inflammatory features. Macrophages and DC, whose interactions with biomaterials are frequently analysed using fully differentiated cells, were cultured directly on Ch films, rather than exposed to the polymer after complete differentiation. Ch was the sole stimulating factor and activated both macrophages and DC, without leading to significant T cell proliferation. After 10 d on Ch, macrophages significantly down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory markers, CD86 and MHCII. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF-α, decreased with time for cells cultured on Ch, while anti-inflammatory IL-10 and TGF-β1, significantly increased. Altogether, these results suggest an M2c polarisation. Also, macrophage matrix metalloproteinase activity was augmented and cell motility was stimulated by Ch. Conversely, DC significantly enhanced CD86 expression, reduced IL-10 secretion and increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Our findings indicate that cells with a common precursor may display different responses, when challenged by the same biomaterial. Moreover, they help to further comprehend macrophage/DC interactions with Ch and the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals associated with implant biomaterials. We propose that an overall pro-inflammatory reaction may hide the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, likely relevant for tissue repair/regeneration.

  5. Recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages by dual release of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and a macrophage recruitment agent enhances wound closure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang-Hee; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the wound closure of mouse skin defects was examined in terms of recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and macrophages. For the cells recruitment, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) of a MSC recruitment agent and sphingosine-1 phosphate agonist (SEW2871) of a macrophages recruitment agent were incorporated into gelatin hydrogels, and then released in a controlled fashion. When applied to a skin wound defect of mice, gelatin hydrogels incorporating mixed 500 ng SDF-1 and 0.4, 0.8, or 1.6 mg SEW2871-micelles recruited a higher number of both MSC and macrophages than those incorporating SDF-1 or phosphate buffered saline. However, the number of M1 phenotype macrophages for the hydrogel incorporating mixed SDF-1 and SEW2871-micelles recruited was remarkably low to a significant extent compared with that for those hydrogel incorporating 0.4, 0.8, or 1.6 mg SEW2871-micelles. On the other hand, the number of M2 macrophages 3 days after the implantation of the hydrogels incorporating SDF-1 and 0.4 mg SEW2871-micelles significantly increased compared with that for other hydrogels. In vivo experiments revealed the hydrogels incorporating SDF-1 and 0.4 mg SEW2871-micelles promoted the wound closure of skin defect to a significant stronger extent than those incorporating SEW2871-micelles, SDF-1, and a mixture of SDF-1 and higher doses of SEW2871-micelles. It is concluded that the in vivo recruitment of MSC and macrophages to the defects may contribute to the tissue regeneration of skin wound.

  6. Development and characterization of two porcine monocyte-derived macrophage cell lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cell lines Cdelta2+ and Cdelta2- were developed from monocytes obtained from a 10-month-old, crossbred, female pig. These cells morphologically resembled macrophages, stained positively for a-naphthyl esterase and negatively for peroxidase. The cell lines were bactericidal and highly phagocytic. ...

  7. Plasma-dependent chemotaxis of macrophages toward BCG cell walls and the mycobacterial glycolipid P3.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M T

    1977-01-01

    BCG cell walls, associated with oil droplets in the form of emulsions in saline, generate macrophage chemotactic activity from fresh guinea pig plasma. Serum and heat-inactivated plasma were inactive, suggesting involvement of complement or fibrinogen-derived chemotactic factors. Suspensions of cell walls and oil droplets each generated chemotactic activity from plasma, and the activity of the cell wall vaccine was due to the additive effects of these two components. A mycobacterial glycolipid (P3), which is a constituent of BCG cell walls, also had plasma-dependent chemotactic activity. The results suggest that macrophage chemotaxis may be an important part of the immunopotentiating activity of these mycobacterial products.

  8. Monosodium Urate Crystals Induce Upregulation of NK1.1-Dependent Killing by Macrophages and Support Tumor-Resident NK1.1+ Monocyte/Macrophage Populations in Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Stefanie; Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca; Harper, Jacquie L

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages display phenotypic and functional heterogeneity dependent on the changing inflammatory microenvironment. Under some conditions, macrophages can acquire effector functions commonly associated with NK cells. In the current study, we investigated how the endogenous danger signal monosodium urate (MSU) crystals can alter macrophage functions. We report that naive, primary peritoneal macrophages rapidly upregulate the expression of the NK cell-surface marker NK1.1 in response to MSU crystals but not in response to LPS or other urate crystals. NK1.1 upregulation by macrophages was associated with mechanisms including phagocytosis of crystals, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and autocrine proinflammatory cytokine signaling. Further analysis demonstrated that MSU crystal-activated macrophages exhibited NK cell-like cytotoxic activity against target cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of tumor hemopoietic cell populations showed that effective, MSU-mediated antitumor activity required coadministration with Mycobacterium smegmatis to induce IL-1β production and significant accumulation of monocytes and macrophages (but not granulocytes or dendritic cells) expressing elevated levels of NK1.1. Our findings provide evidence that MSU crystal-activated macrophages have the potential to develop tumoricidal NK cell-like functions that may be exploited to boost antitumor activity in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Macrophages retain hematopoietic stem cells in the spleen via VCAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Friedrich Felix; Grigoryeva, Lubov S.; Sager, Hendrik B.; Leuschner, Florian; Courties, Gabriel; Borodovsky, Anna; Novobrantseva, Tatiana; Ruda, Vera M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Sun, Yuan; Da Silva, Nicolas; Libby, Peter; Anderson, Daniel G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Splenic myelopoiesis provides a steady flow of leukocytes to inflamed tissues, and leukocytosis correlates with cardiovascular mortality. Yet regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity in the spleen is incompletely understood. Here, we show that red pulp vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1)+ macrophages are essential to extramedullary myelopoiesis because these macrophages use the adhesion molecule VCAM-1 to retain HSCs in the spleen. Nanoparticle-enabled in vivo RNAi silencing of the receptor for macrophage colony stimulation factor (M-CSFR) blocked splenic macrophage maturation, reduced splenic VCAM-1 expression and compromised splenic HSC retention. Both, depleting macrophages in CD169 iDTR mice or silencing VCAM-1 in macrophages released HSCs from the spleen. When we silenced either VCAM-1 or M-CSFR in mice with myocardial infarction or in ApoE−/− mice with atherosclerosis, nanoparticle-enabled in vivo RNAi mitigated blood leukocytosis, limited inflammation in the ischemic heart, and reduced myeloid cell numbers in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25800955

  10. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-12-09

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats.

  11. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats. PMID:27934903

  12. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may in itself result in damage to the tissue. They also take part in alternative activation which is associated with anti-inflammatory mediators, tissue remodelling and homeostasis, cancer, helminth infections and immunophenotype switch. ICC become damaged under various circumstances - surgical resection, possibly post-operative ileus in rodents - where innate activation takes place, and in helminth infections - where alternative activation takes place. During alternative activation the muscularis macrophage can switch phenotype resulting in up-regulation of F4/80 and the mannose receptor. In more chronic conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered.

  13. Physiology of Continuous Bone Marrow Culture Derived Permanent Granulocyte-Macrophage Progenitor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    capable of differentiating to mature neutrophillic granulocytes and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells . Several T- cell lines including K45, JURKAT...CEM, K230 have been screened for produc- tion of Interleukin-3 by assay of supernatant from cell lines for proliferation of mouse IL-3 dependent...hematopoietic progeni- tor cell lines Lines 45 and 230 produce low levels of activity. "In contrast, IL-2 (T- cell growth factor) dependent human T- cell

  14. Treponemal infection specifically enhances node T-cell regulation of macrophage activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, D R; Bagasra, O; Jacobs, R F

    1986-01-01

    Hamsters experimentally inoculated in the inguinal region with Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum develop considerable pathology at that site. We examined the cell populations from these inguinal lymph nodes to determine their intercellular responses to infection. In vitro, syphilitic-node T cells markedly suppressed C3b receptor-mediated ingestion (C3bMI) in syphilitic macrophages derived from sites both proximal and distal to the inoculation. This activity was more pronounced when node T cells rather than peritoneal T cells were used. When treponemal preparations or live treponemes were added to the coculture system, the suppression was specifically enhanced, whereas the addition of heterologous agents did not promote this effect. Syphilitic macrophages from either compartment cultured alone showed no significant inhibition of C3bMI. In parallel studies on syphilitic macrophages, we observed that the expression of Ia quickly became elevated and was sustained throughout the infection. Moreover, in vitro culturing of the syphilitic-node T cells with these macrophages did not alter this function. These observations suggest that the syphilitic node contains a subpopulation of T cells that can selectively suppress macrophage C3bMI activity and concurrently regulate their cellular response to treponemal infection. PMID:3531014

  15. Antigen targeting reveals splenic CD169+ macrophages as promoters of germinal center B‐cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Veninga, Henrike; Borg, Ellen G. F.; Vreeman, Kyle; Taylor, Philip R.; Kalay, Hakan; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kraal, Georg; Martinez‐Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Ag delivery to specific APCs is an attractive approach in developing strategies for vaccination. CD169+ macrophages in the marginal zone of the spleen represent a suitable target for delivery of Ag because of their strategic location, which is optimal for the capture of blood‐borne Ag and their close proximity to B cells and T cells in the white pulp. Here we show that Ag targeting to CD169+ macrophages in mice resulted in strong, isotype‐switched, high‐affinity Ab production and the preferential induction and long‐term persistence of Ag‐specific GC B cells and follicular Th cells. In agreement with these observations, CD169+ macrophages retained intact Ag, induced cognate activation of B cells, and increased expression of costimulatory molecules upon activation. In addition, macrophages were required for the production of cytokines that promote B‐cell responses. Our results identify CD169+ macrophages as promoters of high‐affinity humoral immune responses and emphasize the value of CD169 as target for Ag delivery to improve vaccine responses. PMID:25487358

  16. Glioblastoma-infiltrated innate immune cells resemble M0 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Healy, Luke M; Maiti, Sourindra N; Thomas, Ginu; Zhou, Shouhao; Wang, Qianghu; Elakkad, Ahmed; Liebelt, Brandon D; Yaghi, Nasser K; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Huang, Neal; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Prabhu, Sujit S; Rao, Ganesh; Sawaya, Raymond; Langford, Lauren A; Bruner, Janet M; Fuller, Gregory N; Bar-Or, Amit; Li, Wei; Colen, Rivka R; Curran, Michael A; Bhat, Krishna P; Antel, Jack P; Cooper, Laurence J; Sulman, Erik P; Heimberger, Amy B

    Glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by diverse immune cells, including microglia, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Understanding the mechanisms by which glioblastoma-associated myeloid cells (GAMs) undergo metamorphosis into tumor-supportive cells, characterizing the heterogeneity of immune cell phenotypes within glioblastoma subtypes, and discovering new targets can help the design of new efficient immunotherapies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive battery of immune phenotyping, whole-genome microarray analysis, and microRNA expression profiling of GAMs with matched blood monocytes, healthy donor monocytes, normal brain microglia, nonpolarized M0 macrophages, and polarized M1, M2a, M2c macrophages. Glioblastoma patients had an elevated number of monocytes relative to healthy donors. Among CD11b(+) cells, microglia and MDSCs constituted a higher percentage of GAMs than did macrophages. GAM profiling using flow cytometry studies revealed a continuum between the M1- and M2-like phenotype. Contrary to current dogma, GAMs exhibited distinct immunological functions, with the former aligned close to nonpolarized M0 macrophages.

  17. Glioblastoma-infiltrated innate immune cells resemble M0 macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Healy, Luke M.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Wang, Qianghu; Elakkad, Ahmed; Liebelt, Brandon D.; Yaghi, Nasser K.; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Huang, Neal; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Rao, Ganesh; Sawaya, Raymond; Langford, Lauren A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Bar-Or, Amit; Li, Wei; Colen, Rivka R.; Curran, Michael A.; Bhat, Krishna P.; Antel, Jack P.; Cooper, Laurence J.; Sulman, Erik P.; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by diverse immune cells, including microglia, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Understanding the mechanisms by which glioblastoma-associated myeloid cells (GAMs) undergo metamorphosis into tumor-supportive cells, characterizing the heterogeneity of immune cell phenotypes within glioblastoma subtypes, and discovering new targets can help the design of new efficient immunotherapies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive battery of immune phenotyping, whole-genome microarray analysis, and microRNA expression profiling of GAMs with matched blood monocytes, healthy donor monocytes, normal brain microglia, nonpolarized M0 macrophages, and polarized M1, M2a, M2c macrophages. Glioblastoma patients had an elevated number of monocytes relative to healthy donors. Among CD11b+ cells, microglia and MDSCs constituted a higher percentage of GAMs than did macrophages. GAM profiling using flow cytometry studies revealed a continuum between the M1- and M2-like phenotype. Contrary to current dogma, GAMs exhibited distinct immunological functions, with the former aligned close to nonpolarized M0 macrophages. PMID:26973881

  18. Macrophage/Epithelium Cross-Talk Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Migration in Pancreatic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, Linsey; Gearhart, Addie; Jimenez-Caliani, Antonio J.; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Crisa, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages populate the mesenchymal compartment of all organs during embryogenesis and have been shown to support tissue organogenesis and regeneration by regulating remodeling of the extracellular microenvironment. Whether this mesenchymal component can also dictate select developmental decisions in epithelia is unknown. Here, using the embryonic pancreatic epithelium as model system, we show that macrophages drive the epithelium to execute two developmentally important choices, i.e. the exit from cell cycle and the acquisition of a migratory phenotype. We demonstrate that these developmental decisions are effectively imparted by macrophages activated toward an M2 fetal-like functional state, and involve modulation of the adhesion receptor NCAM and an uncommon “paired-less” isoform of the transcription factor PAX6 in the epithelium. Over-expression of this PAX6 variant in pancreatic epithelia controls both cell motility and cell cycle progression in a gene-dosage dependent fashion. Importantly, induction of these phenotypes in embryonic pancreatic transplants by M2 macrophages in vivo is associated with an increased frequency of endocrine-committed cells emerging from ductal progenitor pools. These results identify M2 macrophages as key effectors capable of coordinating epithelial cell cycle withdrawal and cell migration, two events critical to pancreatic progenitors' delamination and progression toward their differentiated fates. PMID:24586821

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induces an Atypical Cell Death Mode to Escape from Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinhee; Repasy, Teresa; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage cell death following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a central role in tuberculosis disease pathogenesis. Certain attenuated strains induce extrinsic apoptosis of infected macrophages but virulent strains of M. tuberculosis suppress this host response. We previously reported that virulent M. tuberculosis induces cell death when bacillary load exceeds ∼20 per macrophage but the precise nature of this demise has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the characteristics of cell death in primary murine macrophages challenged with virulent or attenuated M. tuberculosis complex strains. We report that high intracellular bacillary burden causes rapid and primarily necrotic death via lysosomal permeabilization, releasing hydrolases that promote Bax/Bak-independent mitochondrial damage and necrosis. Cell death was independent of cathepsins B or L and notable for ultrastructural evidence of damage to lipid bilayers throughout host cells with depletion of several host phospholipid species. These events require viable bacteria that can respond to intracellular cues via the PhoPR sensor kinase system but are independent of the ESX1 system. Conclusions/Significance Cell death caused by virulent M. tuberculosis is distinct from classical apoptosis, pyroptosis or pyronecrosis. Mycobacterial genes essential for cytotoxicity are regulated by the PhoPR two-component system. This atypical death mode provides a mechanism for viable bacilli to exit host macrophages for spreading infection and the eventual transition to extracellular persistence that characterizes advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:21483832

  20. Galectin-3 promotes caspase-independent cell death of HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Fu, Chunyan; Cong, Zhe; Peng, Lingjuan; Peng, Zhuoying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Hong; Wei, Qiang; Qin, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1-infected macrophages are a key contributor to the formation of a viral reservoir and new treatment strategies focus on eliminating this pool of virus. Galectin-3 is a potent apoptosis-inducing protein that regulates diverse cellular activities. In the present study, we investigated whether galectin-3 could induce cell death in HIV-1-infected macrophages using HIV-1-infected THP1 monocytes (THP1-MNs) and THP1-derived macrophages (THP1-MΦs) as in vitro cellular models. We found that THP1-MΦs were more resistant than the THP1-MNs to HIV-1 infection-induced death, and that HIV-1 infection of the THP1-MΦs increased expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Additionally, galectin-3 but not FasL, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand or TNF-α, could induce cell death in HIV-1-infected THP1-MΦs. A similar result was shown for primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. Galectin-3-induced cell death was also significantly increased in macrophages obtained from SIVmac251-infected macaques compared to that of macrophages from healthy macaques. Furthermore, galectin-3-induced cell death in HIV-1-infected THP1-MΦs was caspase independent. Interestingly, endonuclease G (Endo G) was increased in the nucleus and decreased in the cytoplasm of galectin-3-treated cells; thus, galectin-3-induced cell death in HIV-1-infected THP1-MΦs is most likely related to the translocation of Endo G from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These findings suggest that galectin-3 may potentially aid in the eradication of HIV-1/SIV-infected macrophages.

  1. Stem cell therapies: California dreamin'?

    PubMed

    Novak, Kris

    2010-01-08

    Ready or not, stem cells are a step closer to the clinic, thanks to approximately $230 million awarded by CIRM to 14 California-based research groups to develop stem cell-based therapies within 4 years. But, as Kris Novak reports, some of these projects are closer to therapeutic reality than others.

  2. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  3. Anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 therapy in CCI neuropathy decreases thermal hyperalgesia, macrophage recruitment, and endoneurial TNF-alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Janjigian, M; Myers, R R

    1998-01-01

    The chronic constriction injury model of mononeuropathy is a direct, partial nerve injury yielding thermal hyperalgesia. The inflammation that results from this injury is believed to contribute importantly to both the neuropathological and behavioral sequelae. This study involved administering a single dose (250 ng) of interleukin-10 (IL-10), an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide, at the site and time of a chronic constriction injury (CCI) lesion to determine if IL-10 administration could attenuate the inflammatory response of the nerve to CCI and resulting thermal hyperalgesia. In IL-10-treated animals, thermal hyperalgesia was significantly reduced following CCI (days 3, 5 and 9). Histological sections from the peripheral nerve injury site of those animals had decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for ED-1, a marker of recruited macrophages, at both times studied (2 and 5 days post-CCI). IL-10 treatment also decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) at day 2, but not day 5. Qualitative light microscopic assessment of neuropathology at the lesion site did not suggest substantial differences between IL-10 and vehicle-treated sections. The authors propose that initial production of TNF-alpha and perhaps other proinflammatory cytokines at the peripheral nerve lesion site importantly influences the long-term behavioral outcome of nerve injury, and that IL-10 therapy may accomplish this by downregulating the inflammatory response of the nerve to injury.

  4. Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Elkarim, Rihab; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2014-08-01

    The scavenger receptor, CD163, is a macrophage-specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression as a macrophage trait in cancer cells, and macrophage infiltration and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer. Immunostaining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens, earlier analyzed for CD31, D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 75 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data. CD163 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 % of colorectal cancer patients and was related to advanced tumor stages (P = 0.008) and unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.001). High macrophage infiltration was related to shorter survival and positive CD163 expression in tumor cells. The prognostic impact of macrophage infiltration was independent of tumor stage and CD163 expression in cancer cells (p = 0.034). The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with macrophage density in tumor stroma and lower survival rates. Macrophage infiltration has an independent prognostic impact on mortality in colorectal cancer. In accordance with previous experimental studies, these findings provide new insights into the role of macrophages in colorectal cancer.

  5. HIV Infection of Macrophages: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Kiera L; Garcia, J Victor; Clements, Janice E; Walker, Bruce D

    2017-01-01

    Although CD4(+) T cells represent the major reservoir of persistent HIV and SIV infection, accumulating evidence suggests that macrophages also contribute. However, investigations of the role of macrophages are often underrepresented at HIV pathogenesis and cure meetings. This was the impetus for a scientific workshop dedicated to this area of study, held in Cambridge, MA in January 2017. The workshop brought together experts in the fields of HIV/SIV immunology and virology, macrophage biology and immunology, and animal models of HIV/SIV infection to discuss the role of macrophages as a physiologically relevant viral reservoir, and the implications of macrophage infection for HIV pathogenesis and strategies for cure. While still controversial, there is an emerging theory that infected macrophages likely persist in the setting of combination antiretroviral therapy. These macrophages could then drive persistent inflammation and contribute to the viral reservoir, which indicates the importance of addressing macrophages as well as CD4(+) T cells with future therapeutic strategies.

  6. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology

    PubMed Central

    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis. PMID:28793333

  7. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Sato, Miwa; Li, Liangzhu; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup) markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly upregulated neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2–3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but not macrophage CSF, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently upregulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly upregulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment. PMID:26834744

  8. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  9. Spontaneously formed tumorigenic hybrids of Meth A sarcoma cells and macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Busund, Lill-Tove R; Killie, Mette K; Bartnes, Kristian; Seljelid, Rolf

    2003-08-20

    We have recently demonstrated that malignant cells can hybridize with tissue macrophages in vitro, giving rise to tumorigenic hybrids. We now demonstrate that this can occur spontaneously in vivo as a result of fusion between inoculated Meth A sarcoma cells and host cells, presumably macrophages. Thus, from tumor cell suspensions prepared by collagenase perfusion and density centrifugation, hybrid cells could be isolated that were neoplastic but in contrast to Meth A expressed macrophage markers and had phagocytic capacity. Their morphologic features were intermediate between Meth A and macrophages. By taking advantage of a semiallogeneic experimental system by inoculation of Meth A cells from BALB/c (H-2 K(d)) into (BALB.K x BALB/c) F(1) (H-2(k/d)), hybrid cells from these tumors could be shown to express MHC antigens of both the Meth A and the host haplotypes. Hybrid cells grew faster than Meth A cells in vivo, indicating acquisition of growth-promoting properties through heterotypic cell fusion.

  10. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Brooks, Patricia J.; Barzilay, Oriyah; Fine, Noah; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a better understanding of

  11. Cell Therapy Strategies to Combat Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Elizabeth C; Brown, Bryan N

    2015-01-01

    abstract Declining function of the immune system, termed “immunosenescence,” leads to a higher incidence of infection, cancer, and autoimmune disease related mortalities in the elderly population.1 Increasing interest in the field of immunosenescence is well-timed, as 20% of the United States population is expected to surpass the age of 65 by the year 2030.2 Our current understanding of immunosenescence involves a shift in function of both adaptive and innate immune cells, leading to a reduced capacity to recognize new antigens and widespread chronic inflammation. The present review focuses on changes that occur in haematopoietic stem cells, macrophages, and T-cells using knowledge gained from both rodent and human studies. The review will discuss emerging strategies to combat immunosenescence, focusing on cellular and genetic therapies, including bone marrow transplantation and genetic reprogramming. A better understanding of the mechanisms and implications of immunosenescence will be necessary to combat age-related mortalities in the future. PMID:26588595

  12. Tumour cell conditioned medium reveals greater M2 skewing of macrophages in the absence of properdin

    PubMed Central

    Al‐Rayahi, Izzat A.M.; Browning, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The tumour microenvironment is shaped by the interaction of immune, non immune, and tumour cells present in close proximity. Tumour cells direct the development of a locally immune suppressed state, affecting the activity of anti tumour T cells and preparing the escape phase of tumour development. Macrophages in the tumour typically develop into so‐called tumour associated macrophages with a distinct profile of activities which lead to a reduction in inflammation and antigen presentation. The direct impact of tumour cell conditioned medium on the activity profile of macrophages in dependence of their complement component expression has not yet been investigated. Methods In our in vitro study, macrophages differentiated from bone marrows of properdin deficient and wildtype mice were stimulated with conditioned medium of a syngeneic tumour cell line, B16F10, a mouse melanoma subline. Results In comparison with macrophages from wildtype mice, those from congenic properdin deficient mice showed skewing towards M2 profile, encompassing mRNA expression for genes involved in arginine metabolism, production of type 2 cytokines, and relatively lower surface expression of molecules needed for antigen presentation. Conclusions These data suggest that properdin insufficiency promotes a tumour environment that helps the tumour evade the immune response. PMID:28250926

  13. Single-cell RNA-seq ties macrophage polarization to growth rate of intracellular Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Li, Lei; Westermann, Alexander J; Appenzeller, Silke; Stapels, Daphne A C; Schulte, Leon N; Helaine, Sophie; Vogel, Jörg

    2016-11-14

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens can exhibit large heterogeneity in growth rate inside host cells, with major consequences for the infection outcome. If and how the host responds to this heterogeneity remains poorly understood. Here, we combined a fluorescent reporter of bacterial cell division with single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis to study the macrophage response to different intracellular states of the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The transcriptomes of individual infected macrophages revealed a spectrum of functional host response states to growing and non-growing bacteria. Intriguingly, macrophages harbouring non-growing Salmonella display hallmarks of the proinflammatory M1 polarization state and differ little from bystander cells, suggesting that non-growing bacteria evade recognition by intracellular immune receptors. By contrast, macrophages containing growing bacteria have turned into an anti-inflammatory, M2-like state, as if fast-growing intracellular Salmonella overcome host defence by reprogramming macrophage polarization. Additionally, our clustering approach reveals intermediate host functional states between these extremes. Altogether, our data suggest that gene expression variability in infected host cells shapes different cellular environments, some of which may favour a growth arrest of Salmonella facilitating immune evasion and the establishment of a long-term niche, while others allow Salmonella to escape intracellular antimicrobial activity and proliferate.

  14. Characterization of adipose tissue macrophages and adipose-derived stem cells in critical wounds

    PubMed Central

    Tilstam, Pathricia V.; Springenberg-Jung, Katrin; Boecker, Arne Hendrick; Schmitz, Corinna; Heinrichs, Daniel; Hwang, Soo Seok; Stromps, Jan Philipp; Ganse, Bergita; Kopp, Ruedger; Knobe, Matthias; Bernhagen, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose tissue macrophages and adipose-derived stem cells which both play a key role in wound repair. While macrophages can be divided into the classically-activated M1 and the alternatively-activated M2 phenotype, ASCs are characterized by the expression of specific stem cell markers. Methods In the present study, we have investigated the expression of common macrophage polarization and stem cell markers in acutely inflamed adipose tissue. Subcutaneous adipose tissue adjacent to acutely inflamed wounds of 20 patients and 20 healthy subjects were harvested and underwent qPCR and flow cytometry analysis. Results Expression levels of the M1-specific markers CD80, iNOS, and IL-1b were significantly elevated in inflammatory adipose tissue when compared to healthy adipose tissue, whereas the M2-specific markers CD163 and TGF-β were decreased. By flow cytometry, a significant shift of adipose tissue macrophage populations towards the M1 phenotype was confirmed. Furthermore, a decrease in the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD29, CD34, and CD105 was observed whereas CD73 and CD90 remained unchanged. Discussion This is the first report describing the predominance of M1 adipose tissue macrophages and the reduction of stem cell marker expression in acutely inflamed, non-healing wounds. PMID:28070458

  15. Splenic red pulp macrophages are intrinsically superparamagnetic and contaminate magnetic cell isolates

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Lars; Klein, Marika; Spasova, Marina; Elsukova, Anna; Wiedwald, Ulf; Welz, Meike; Knolle, Percy; Farle, Michael; Limmer, Andreas; Kurts, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A main function of splenic red pulp macrophages is the degradation of damaged or aged erythrocytes. Here we show that these macrophages accumulate ferrimagnetic iron oxides that render them intrinsically superparamagnetic. Consequently, these cells routinely contaminate splenic cell isolates obtained with the use of MCS, a technique that has been widely used in immunological research for decades. These contaminations can profoundly alter experimental results. In mice deficient for the transcription factor SpiC, which lack red pulp macrophages, liver Kupffer cells take over the task of erythrocyte degradation and become superparamagnetic. We describe a simple additional magnetic separation step that avoids this problem and substantially improves purity of magnetic cell isolates from the spleen. PMID:26260698

  16. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Soucie, Erinn L.; Weng, Ziming; Geirsdóttir, Laufey; Molawi, Kaaweh; Maurizio, Julien; Fenouil, Romain; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Gimenez, Gregory; VanHille, Laurent; Beniazza, Meryam; Favret, Jeremy; Berruyer, Carole; Perrin, Pierre; Hacohen, Nir; Andrau, J.-C.; Ferrier, Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sidow, Arend; Sieweke, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long-term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network controlling self-renewal. Single cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down-regulation of Maf transcription factors. The network also controls embryonic stem cell self-renewal but is associated with distinct embryonic stem cell-specific enhancers. This indicates that distinct lineage-specific enhancer platforms regulate a shared network of genes that control self-renewal potential in both stem and mature cells. PMID:26797145

  17. Cell memory-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers ‘memory-based therapy’, which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  18. Phorbal esters and calcium ionophore can prime murine peritoneal macrophages for tumor cell destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, S.D.; Weiel, J.E.; Hamilton, T.A.; Adams, D.O.

    1986-06-01

    Murine macrophages from sites of inflammation develop toward tumoricidal competence by exposure to a macrophage-activating factor such as interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..). To explore the biochemical transductional events initiated by IFN-..gamma.., peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6J mice elicited by various sterile irritants were treated in vitro with two pharmacologic agents that mimic the action of certain second messengers. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the ionophore A23187 cooperatively reproduced the ability of IFN-..gamma.. to prime macrophages for tumoricidal function. Neither agent alone was able to prime macrophages. The two agents acted on the macrophages, and target susceptibility to kill was not altered by PMA and A23187. Only active phorbol esters, which are known to bind and stimulate protein kinase C, were able to cooperate with A23187 to induce priming. A cell-permeable synthetic diacylglycerol (sn-1,2-dioctanoyl glycerol) could also prime for cytolysis. In the presence of PMA, A23187, and EGTA, addition of Ca/sup + +/ was sufficient for priming, whereas the addition of Mg/sup + +/ was much less efficient. Priming by IFN-..gamma.., however, was not blocked by EGTA. Efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ from preloaded cells was significantly increased by A23187 and by IFN-..gamma... Quin-2/AM, an intracellular chelator of Ca/sup + +/, blocked priming by IFN-..gamma...

  19. Cell Therapy in Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Counsel, Peter D.; Bates, Daniel; Boyd, Richard; Connell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage possesses poor natural healing mechanisms, and a variety of non-cell-based and cell-based treatments aim to promote regeneration of hyaline cartilage. Data Sources: A review of the literature to December 2013 using PubMed with search criteria including the keywords stem cell, cell therapy, cell transplantation, cartilage, chondral, and chondrogenic. Study Selection: Forty-five articles were identified that employed local mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy for joint disorders in humans. Nine comparative studies were identified, consisting of 3 randomized trials, 5 cohort studies, and 1 case-control study. Study Type: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: Studies were assessed for stem cell source, method of implantation, comparison groups, and concurrent surgical techniques. Results: Two studies comparing MSC treatment to autologous chondrocyte implantation found similar efficacy. Three studies reported clinical benefits with intra-articular MSC injection over non-MSC controls for cases undergoing debridement with or without marrow stimulation, although a randomized study found no significant clinical difference at 2-year follow-up but reported better 18-month magnetic resonance imaging and histologic scores in the MSC group. No human studies have compared intra-articular MSC therapy to non-MSC techniques for osteoarthritis in the absence of surgery. Conclusion: Mesenchymal stem cell–based therapies appear safe and effective for joint disorders in large animal preclinical models. Evidence for use in humans, particularly, comparison with more established treatments such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and microfracture, is limited. PMID:25553210

  20. Modulation of macrophage apoptosis by antimycobacterial therapy: physiological role of apoptosis in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Diana; Garcia, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2003-07-15

    Apoptosis is a form of cell death that avoids inflammatory responses. We had previously reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) induce apoptosis in murine macrophages. The production of TNFalpha and IL-10 in response to Mtb infection modulates apoptosis by controlling nitric oxide production and caspase activation. Furthermore, Mtb triggers calcium influx responsible for mitochondrial alterations, an early pathway of apoptosis, independently of TNFalpha and IL-10. In tuberculosis patients apoptotic macrophages are found in granulomas and bronchoalveolar lavages, suggesting that apoptosis may participate in the control of Mtb. To further explore the role of macrophage apoptosis in tuberculosis, we studied the capacity of standard antimycobacterial drugs to modulate different events associated with the induction of apoptosis. The B10R murine macrophage line was infected or not with Mtb (5:1 bacteria to macrophage ratio) or exposed to PPD (10 microg/ml), in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (1-20 microg/ml) of anti mycobacterial drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, thiacetazone, streptomycin, and ethambutol). Inhibition of the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis by all drugs studied/correlated with inhibition of permeability transition (PT) alterations; TNFalpha, IL-10, and nitric oxide production, and caspase-1 activation. However, these drugs did not affect PPD-induced apoptosis or its associated events, suggesting that the ability of antimycobacterial drugs to block macrophage apoptosis could be explained by their effects on the metabolic activities of Mtb. All drugs, except isoniazid, at higher concentrations, induced PT alterations in noninfected macrophages in a way that appears to be dependent of calcium, since a calcium chelator prevented it. The results presented herein suggest that the pharmacological manipulation of pathways associated with macrophage apoptosis may affect the intracellular growth of

  1. B-1 cells modulate the murine macrophage response to Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Angelica F; Nunes, Marise P; Silva-Junior, Elias B; Leandro, Monique; da Rocha, Juliana Dutra Barbosa; Morrot, Alexandre; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo

    2017-05-26

    To investigate the modulatory effect of B-1 cells on murine peritoneal macrophages infected with Leishmania major (L. major) in vitro. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from BALB/c and BALB/c XID mice were infected with L. major and cultured in the presence or absence of B-1 cells obtained from wild-type BALB/c mice. Intracellular amastigotes were counted, and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production was quantified in the cellular supernatants using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined using a PGE2 enzyme immunoassay kit (Cayman Chemical, Ann Arbor, MI), and the number of lipid bodies was quantified in the cytoplasm of infected macrophages in the presence and absence of B-1 cells. Culturing the cells with selective PGE2-neutralizing drugs inhibited PGE2 production and confirmed the role of this lipid mediator in IL-10 production. In contrast, we demonstrated that B-1 cells derived from IL-10 KO mice did not favor the intracellular growth of L. major. We report that B-1 cells promote the growth of L. major amastigotes inside peritoneal murine macrophages. We demonstrated that the modulatory effect was independent of physical contact between the cells, suggesting that soluble factor(s) were released into the cultures. We demonstrated in our co-culture system that B-1 cells trigger IL-10 production by L. major-infected macrophages. Furthermore, the increased secretion of IL-10 was attributed to the presence of the lipid mediator PGE2 in supernatants of L. major-infected macrophages. The presence of B-1 cells also favors the production of lipid bodies by infected macrophages. In contrast, we failed to obtain the same effect on parasite replication inside L. major-infected macrophages when the B-1 cells were isolated from IL-10 knockout mice. Our results show that elevated levels of PGE2 and IL-10 produced by B-1 cells increase L. major growth, as indicated by the number of parasites in cell cultures.

  2. B-1 cells modulate the murine macrophage response to Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, Angelica F; Nunes, Marise P; Silva-Junior, Elias B; Leandro, Monique; da Rocha, Juliana Dutra Barbosa; Morrot, Alexandre; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the modulatory effect of B-1 cells on murine peritoneal macrophages infected with Leishmania major (L. major) in vitro. METHODS Peritoneal macrophages obtained from BALB/c and BALB/c XID mice were infected with L. major and cultured in the presence or absence of B-1 cells obtained from wild-type BALB/c mice. Intracellular amastigotes were counted, and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production was quantified in the cellular supernatants using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined using a PGE2 enzyme immunoassay kit (Cayman Chemical, Ann Arbor, MI), and the number of lipid bodies was quantified in the cytoplasm of infected macrophages in the presence and absence of B-1 cells. Culturing the cells with selective PGE2-neutralizing drugs inhibited PGE2 production and confirmed the role of this lipid mediator in IL-10 production. In contrast, we demonstrated that B-1 cells derived from IL-10 KO mice did not favor the intracellular growth of L. major. RESULTS We report that B-1 cells promote the growth of L. major amastigotes inside peritoneal murine macrophages. We demonstrated that the modulatory effect was independent of physical contact between the cells, suggesting that soluble factor(s) were released into the cultures. We demonstrated in our co-culture system that B-1 cells trigger IL-10 production by L. major-infected macrophages. Furthermore, the increased secretion of IL-10 was attributed to the presence of the lipid mediator PGE2 in supernatants of L. major-infected macrophages. The presence of B-1 cells also favors the production of lipid bodies by infected macrophages. In contrast, we failed to obtain the same effect on parasite replication inside L. major-infected macrophages when the B-1 cells were isolated from IL-10 knockout mice. CONCLUSION Our results show that elevated levels of PGE2 and IL-10 produced by B-1 cells increase L. major growth, as indicated by the number of

  3. Evidence for differential effects of hepcidin in macrophages and intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chaston, T; Chung, B; Mascarenhas, M; Marks, J; Patel, B; Srai, S K; Sharp, P

    2008-03-01

    Reticulo-endothelial macrophages together with duodenal enterocytes coordinate body iron homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory actions of the hormone hepcidin on ferroportin expression in these two cell types. We investigated the in vitro effects of hepcidin in well-characterised human cell culture models of macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells) and intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 cells). The in vivo effects of hepcidin were also investigated in mice injected with a synthetic hepcidin peptide. Exposure to hepcidin (presented either as conditioned medium from interleukin-6-stimulated HuH7 cells or as a synthetic peptide) resulted in a rapid (within 4 h) decrease in ferroportin expression in THP-1 macrophages but had no effect on ferroportin levels in Caco-2 cells. To determine whether these rapid effects of hepcidin were also evident in vivo we injected mice with a synthetic hepcidin peptide. Four hours post-injection, ferroportin levels in the macrophage-rich red pulp of the spleen were decreased significantly and the hepcidin-treated mice developed hypoferraemia. Interestingly, in the same mice there was no effect of hepcidin on duodenal ferroportin protein expression or duodenal iron transport. These data suggests that the rapid response to hepcidin is cell type and tissue specific. Upon its release, hepcidin initially targets macrophage iron recycling. The duodenum appears to be less sensitive to this initial rise in hepcidin levels. We believe the fact that macrophages respond more acutely to a hepcidin challenge is fully consistent with their central role in maintaining body iron homeostasis.

  4. Morphine decreases the pro-angiogenic interaction between breast cancer cells and macrophages in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Nassar, Zeyad D.; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the various cell types that constitute a solid tumour are essential to the biology of the tumour. We evaluated the effect of morphine on the proangiogenic interaction taking place between macrophages and breast cancer cells in vitro. The conditioned medium (CM) from breast cancer cells co-cultured with macrophages elicited endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. This effect was inhibited if the co-culture occurred in the presence of morphine. The CM from breast cancer cells or macrophages grown individually, whether or not prepared in the presence of morphine, was ineffective in stimulating EC proliferation or tube formation. Using a mouse antibody array, we identified several angiogenesis-regulating factors differentially expressed in the CM of co-cultured cells prepared in the presence or absence of morphine, amongst which interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. VEGF was induced in both cell types by the co-culture and this was prevented by morphine in a non-naloxone reversible fashion. The effect of CM from co-cultured cells on endothelial tube formation, but not proliferation, was prevented by anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody. Our results indicate that morphine prevents, in part via modulating VEGF-A expression, the pro-angiogenic interaction between macrophages and breast cancer cells. PMID:27514308

  5. T cells and macrophages responding to oxidative damage cooperate in pathogenesis of a mouse model of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Guilloty, Fernando; Saeed, Ali M; Duffort, Stephanie; Cano, Marisol; Ebrahimi, Katayoon B; Ballmick, Asha; Tan, Yaohong; Wang, Hua; Laird, James M; Salomon, Robert G; Handa, James T; Perez, Victor L

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major disease affecting central vision, but the pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood. Using a mouse model, we examined the relationship of two factors implicated in AMD development: oxidative stress and the immune system. Carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP) is a lipid peroxidation product associated with AMD in humans and AMD-like pathology in mice. Previously, we demonstrated that CEP immunization leads to retinal infiltration of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages before overt retinal degeneration. Here, we provide direct and indirect mechanisms for the effect of CEP on macrophages, and show for the first time that antigen-specific T cells play a leading role in AMD pathogenesis. In vitro, CEP directly induced M1 macrophage polarization and production of M1-related factors by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In vivo, CEP eye injections in mice induced acute pro-inflammatory gene expression in the retina and human AMD eyes showed distinctively diffuse CEP immunolabeling within RPE cells. Importantly, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing CEP-specific T cells were identified ex vivo after CEP immunization and promoted M1 polarization in co-culture experiments. Finally, T cell immunosuppressive therapy inhibited CEP-mediated pathology. These data indicate that T cells and M1 macrophages activated by oxidative damage cooperate in AMD pathogenesis.

  6. Granulocyte and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors as therapy in human and veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varón, Emilio; Villamayor, Lucía

    2007-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSFs) are endogenous cytokines that regulate granulocyte colonies and play a major role in the stimulation of granulopoiesis (neutrophils, basophils and eosinophils) and in the regulation of microbicidal functions. There are numerous pathological conditions in which neutrophils are decreased, the most common being neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, which increases the risk of serious microbial infections developing with the potential for high morbidity and mortality. New methods in molecular biology have led to the identification and cloning of CSF genes and biopharmaceutical production. Since then, CSFs have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, for mobilising haematopoietic cell precursors, and for other neutropenia-related pathologies. This review focuses on the use of CSFs within both human and veterinary medicine. Clinical applications, pharmacology, tolerability and the potential role of these factors in veterinary medicine are considered.

  7. Differential expression of CD14, CD36 and the LDL receptor on human monocyte-derived macrophages. A novel cell culture system to study macrophage differentiation and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wintergerst, E S; Jelk, J; Asmis, R

    1998-09-01

    Macrophages are key players in many aspects of human physiology and disease. It has been hypothesized that in a given microenvironment monocytes differentiate into specific subpopulations with distinct functions. In order to study the role of macrophage heterogeneity in atherogenesis, we established a novel isolation and culture technique for human monocyte-derived macrophages. The present technique does not select for monocyte subpopulations prior to the onset of differentiation. Monocytes were cultured for 2 weeks in the presence of autologous lymphocytes before being plated quantitatively. They differentiated into mature macrophages in terms of morphology, lipid composition, and biological activity. Based on phagocytic activity as well as on the expression of CD14, CD36, and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, we have identified macrophage subpopulations that may play distinct roles in atherogenesis. While virtually all adherence-purified monocytes expressed CD14, CD36, and the LDL-R, we characterized three subpopulations of macrophages based on the expression of these antigens: CD36+CD14-LDL-R-(58+/-12%), CD36+CD14+LDL-R+(18+/-5%), the remaining cells being CD36-CD14- LDL-R-. The first two subsets decreased in size during further differentiation (51+/-12% and 8+/-3%, respectively). Our culture technique may also serve as a good model for studying the implications of macrophage heterogeneity in diseases other than atherosclerosis.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide downregulates macrophage-derived IL-22 to modulate alcohol-induced hepatocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaming; Verma, Vikas K; Malhi, Harmeet; Gores, Greg J; Kamath, Patrick S; Sanyal, Arun; Chalasani, Naga; Gao, Bin; Shah, Vijay H

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a Th17 cell hepatoprotective cytokine that is undergoing clinical trials to treat patients with alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation of macrophage is implicated in hepatocyte cell death and pathogenesis of AH. The role of IL-22 production from macrophage, its regulation by LPS, and effects on alcohol-induced hepatocyte cell death are unexplored and were examined in this study. Low levels of IL-22 mRNA/protein were detected in macrophage but were significantly upregulated by 6.5-fold in response to the tissue reparative cytokine IL-10. Conversely, LPS significantly decreased IL-22 mRNA levels in a temporal and concentration-dependent manner with a maximum reduction of 5-fold. LPS downregulation of IL-22 mRNA levels was rescued in the presence of a pharmacological inhibitor of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and by JNK knockdown. Next, we explored whether macrophage-derived IL-22 regulated ethanol-induced hepatocyte death. Conditioned media from IL-10-stimulated macrophages attenuated ethanol-induced hepatocyte caspase-3/7 activity, and apoptosis as assessed by fluorometric assay and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining, respectively. This effect was diminished in conditioned media from macrophages with IL-22 knockdown. Cytokine analysis in sera samples of patients with AH revealed that IL-22 levels were significantly elevated compared with healthy controls and heavy-drinking controls, implying a state of IL-22 resistance in human AH. Macrophage-derived IL-22 protects hepatocytes from ethanol-induced cell death. IL-22 downregulation is a new regulatory target of LPS in the pathogenesis of AH.

  9. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  10. Macrophage-derived microvesicles promote proliferation and migration of Schwann cell on peripheral nerve repair

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chuan Ma, Cheng-bin; Yuan, Hong-mou; Cao, Bao-yuan; Zhu, Jia-jun

    2015-12-04

    Background: Macrophages have been implicated in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, whether macrophages-derived microvesicles (MVs) are involved in this process remains unknown. In the present study, the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on proliferation and migration of Schwann cells (SCs) were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Human monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1) was successfully driven to M1 and M2 phenotypes by delivery of either IFN-γ or IL-4, respectively. SCs incubated with M1 or M2 macrophages-derived MVs, the cell migration and proliferation were assessed, and expression levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and Laminin were measured. A rat model of sciatic nerve was established and the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on nerve regeneration were investigated. Results: M2-derived MVs elevated migration, proliferation, NFG and Laminin protein levels of SCs compared with M1-or M0-derived MVs. The relative expression levels of miR-223 were also increased in M2 macrophages and M2-derived MVs. Transfected M2 macrophages with miR-223 inhibitor then co-incubated with SCs, an inhibition of cell migration and proliferation and a down-regulated levels of NFG and Laminin protein expression were observed. In vivo, M2-derived MVs significantly increased the infiltration and axon number of SCs. Conclusion: M2-derived MVs promoted proliferation and migration of SCs in vitro and in vivo, which provided a therapeutic strategy for nerve regeneration. - Highlights: • M2 macrophages-derived MVs elevated migration and proliferation of SCs. • M2 macrophages-derived MVs up-regulated NFG and Laminin expression of SCs. • MiR-223 expression was increased in M2 macrophages-derived MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor reduced migration and proliferation of SCs co-incubated with MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor down-regulated NFG and Laminin levels of SCs co-incubated with MVs.

  11. Impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells causes accumulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Jinku; Yang, Dongki; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Lee, Dae Ho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Byung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of tissue macrophages is a significant characteristic of disease-associated chronic inflammation, and facilitates the progression of disease pathology. However, the functional roles of these bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in aging are unclear. Here, we identified age-dependent macrophage accumulation in the bone marrow, showing that aging significantly increases the number of M1 macrophages and impairs polarization of BMDMs. We found that age-related dysregulation of BMDMs is associated with abnormal overexpression of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. BMDM dysregulation in aging impairs the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in B-cell maturation and activation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by BMDMs was reduced because of low expression of phagocytic receptor CD14, indicating that increased apoptotic cells may result from defective phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in the BM of aged mice. Therefore, CD14 may represent a promising target for preventing BMDM dysregulation, and macrophage accumulation may provide diagnostic and therapeutic clues. PMID:27866511

  12. TIPE2 regulates tumor-associated macrophages in skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an essential role in the immunology, growth, invasion, and metastases of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation and regulation of TAMs by SCC are not completely understood. Here, in a Transwell co-culture system, we found that SCC cells induced polarization of macrophages to a M2 phenotype, evident by expression of surface markers CD163, CD206, and CD301, as well as reduction of cellular iNOS levels and augmentation of cellular arginase levels. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) was induced in macrophages by co-culturing with SCC cells. Depletion of TIPE2 in macrophages abolished the effects of co-cultured SCC cells on phenotypic modification of macrophages. Furthermore, patients with SCC were divided into two groups based on TIPE2 levels in TAMs at the time of tumor resection. We found that patients with high-TIPE2 TAMs had an overall poor 5-year survival. Together, our data suggest a previously unappreciated role of TIPE2 in the crosstalk between skin SCC and TAMs and highlight TIPE2 as a promising novel target for skin SCC treatment.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cooperates in Zearalenone-Induced Cell Death of RAW 264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenglei; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhe; Lin, Pengfei; Lei, Lanjie; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2015-08-20

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a fungal mycotoxin that causes cell apoptosis and necrosis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of ZEA toxicity. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of ZEA on the proliferation and apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages and to uncover the signaling pathway underlying the cytotoxicity of ZEA in RAW 264.7 macrophages. This study demonstrates that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway cooperated in ZEA-induced cell death of the RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that ZEA treatment reduced the viability of RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT) and flow cytometry assay. Western blots analysis revealed that ZEA increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), two ER stress-related marker genes. Furthermore, treating the cells with the ER stress inhibitors 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) or knocking down CHOP, using lentivirus encoded short hairpin interfering RNAs (shRNAs), significantly diminished the ZEA-induced increases in GRP78 and CHOP, and cell death. In summary, our results suggest that ZEA induces the apoptosis and necrosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner via the ER stress pathway in which the activation of CHOP plays a critical role.

  14. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.

  15. Impaired T cell function in malignant pleural effusion is caused by TGF-β derived predominantly from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jieyao; Yue, Dongli; Chen, Xinfeng; Ping, Yu; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is an indication of advanced cancer. Immune dysfunction often occurs in MPE. We aimed to identify the reason for impaired T cell activity in MPE from lung cancer patients and to provide clues toward potential immune therapies for MPE. The surface inhibitory molecules and cytotoxic activity of T cells in MPE and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Levels of inflammatory cytokines in MPE and PB were tested using ELISA. TGF-β expression in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) was also analyzed. The effect of TAMs on T cells was verified in vitro. Lastly, changes in T cells were evaluated following treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody. We found that expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 in T cells from MPE were upregulated compared with those from PB, but levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were downregulated (p < 0.05). The amount of TGF-β was significantly higher in MPE than in PB (p < 0.05). TGF-β was mainly produced by TAMs in MPE. When T cells were co-cultured with TAMs, expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 were significantly higher than controls, whereas levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were significantly decreased, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). In vitro treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody restored the impaired T cell cytotoxic activity in MPE. Our results indicate that macrophage-derived TGF-β plays an important role in impaired T cell cytotoxicity. It will therefore be valuable to develop therapeutic strategies against TGF-β pathway for MPE therapy of lung cancer.

  16. Responses of macrophages to the danger signals released from necrotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Sayama, Aoi; MaruYama, Takashi; Muta, Tatsushi

    2014-12-01

    The immune system maintains homeostasis by recognizing and responding to cell death caused by various stresses. The immune response is considered to be elicited by 'danger signals' released from necrotic cells. However, the identity of the danger signals remains elusive. In this study, we focused on the expression of chemokines by macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. In mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3 was induced at both the mRNA and protein levels in response to heat-killed murine cells. The induction of MCP-3 was also observed in MyD88-deficient macrophages, indicating that Toll-like receptors and the IL-1 receptor are not involved in this response. Consistent with this observation, the activation of NF-κB was not detected in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. Treatments with proteinase K, DNaseI or RNaseA did not affect the ' STIMULATING ACTIVITY': of necrotic cells. In contrast, treatment with apyrase, which removes phosphates from nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates, abolished the inducing activity. Purified UDP at 30 µM concentration elicited similar induction of MCP-3 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the UDP receptor P2Y6 in RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells, but not its induction by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the P2Y6 receptor in HEK293 cells conferred responsiveness to necrotic cells. These results suggest that UDP released by necrotic cells plays a critical role as an endogenous danger signal and that P2Y6 is required for the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells.

  17. Myeloid Cells as Targets for Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Medler, Terry R.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that cancer development ensues based on reciprocal interactions between genomically altered neoplastic cells and diverse populations of recruited “host” cells co-opted to support malignant progression. Among the host cells recruited into tumor microenvironments, several subtypes of myeloid cells, including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, and granulocytes contribute to tumor development by providing tumor-promoting factors as well as a spectrum of molecules that suppress cytotoxic activities of T lymphocytes. Based on compelling preclinical data revealing that inhibition of critical myeloid-based programs leads to tumor suppression, novel immune-based therapies and approaches are now entering the clinic for evaluation. This review discusses mechanisms underlying protumorigenic programming of myeloid cells and discusses how targeting of these has potential to attenuate solid tumor progression via the induction and of mobilization CD8+ cytotoxic T cell immunity. PMID:26222088

  18. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  19. Fc-receptor induced cell spreading during frustrated phagocytosis in J774A.1 macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovari, Daniel; Curtis, Jennifer; Wei, Wenbin

    2014-03-01

    Phagocytosis is the process where by cells engulf foreign particles. It is the primary mechanism through which macrophages and neutrophils (white blood cells) eliminate pathogens and debris from the body. The behavior is the result of a cascade of chemical and mechanical cues, which result in the actin-driven expansion of the cell's membrane around its target. For macrophages undergoing Fc-mediated phagocytosis, we show that above a minimum threshold the spreading rate and maximum cell-target contact area are independent of the target's opsonin density. Qualitatively, macrophage phagocytic spreading is similar to the spreading of other cell types (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and Dict.d.). Early spreading is most likely the result of ``passive'' alignment of the cell to the target surface. This is followed by an active expansion period driven by actin. Finally upon reaching a maximum contact area, typically 2-3 times the size of ``non-activated'' cells, macrophages often undergo a period of rapid contraction not reported in other cell types. We hypothesize that this, as yet unexplained, transition may be specific to the chemical and mechanical machinery associated with phagocytosis. This work was funded by NSF grant PHYS 0848797 and NSF grant DMR 0820382.

  20. Nocardia brasiliensis Induces Formation of Foamy Macrophages and Dendritic Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meester, Irene; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian Geovanni; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Foamy cells have been described in various infectious diseases, for example in actinomycetoma induced by Nocardia brasiliensis. These cells are generally considered to be macrophages, although they present dendritic cell (DC)-specific surface markers. In this study, we determined and confirmed the lineage of possible precursors of foamy cells in vitro and in vivo using an experimental actinomycetoma model in BALB/c mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) or DC (BMDC) were infected in vitro with N. brasiliensis or labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE). Both, macrophages and DC, differentiated into foamy cells after in vitro infection. CFSE-labeled BMDM or BMDC were tested for phagocytosis and CD11c/CD11b receptors markers expression before being transferred into the actinomycetoma lesion site of infected mice. In vivo studies showed that BMDM and BMDC were traced at the site where foamy cells are present in the experimental actinomycetoma. Interestingly, many of the transferred BMDM and BMDC were stained with the lipid-droplet fluorophore Nile Red. In conclusion, macrophages and DC cells can be differentiated into foamy cells in vitro and in vivo during N. brasiliensis infection. PMID:24936860

  1. M3 Macrophages Stop Division of Tumor Cells In Vitro and Extend Survival of Mice with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Sergey; Lyamina, Svetlana; Manukhina, Eugenia; Malyshev, Yuri; Raetskaya, Anastasiya; Malyshev, Igor

    2017-01-26

    BACKGROUND M1 macrophages target tumor cells. However, many tumors produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, which reprogram the anti-tumor M1 macrophages into the pro-tumor M2 macrophages. We have hypothesized that the problem of pro-tumor macrophage reprogramming could be solved by using a special M3 switch phenotype. The M3 macrophages, in contrast to the M1 macrophages, should respond to anti-inflammatory cytokines by increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines to retain its anti-tumor properties. Objectives of the study were to form an M3 switch phenotype in vitro and to evaluate the effect of M3 macrophages on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in vitro and in vivo. MATERIAL AND METHODS Tumor growth was initiated by an intraperitoneal injection of EAC cells into C57BL/6J mice. RESULTS 1) The M3 switch phenotype can be programed by activation of M1-reprogramming pathways with simultaneous inhibition of the M2 phenotype transcription factors, STAT3, STAT6, and/or SMAD3. 2) M3 macrophages exerted an anti-tumor effect both in vitro and in vivo, which was superior to anti-tumor effects of cisplatin or M1 macrophages. 3) The anti-tumor effect of M3 macrophages was due to their anti-proliferative effect. CONCLUSIONS Development of new biotechnologies for restriction of tumor growth using in vitro reprogrammed M3 macrophages is very promising.

  2. M3 Macrophages Stop Division of Tumor Cells In Vitro and Extend Survival of Mice with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, Sergey; Lyamina, Svetlana; Manukhina, Eugenia; Malyshev, Yuri; Raetskaya, Anastasiya; Malyshev, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Background M1 macrophages target tumor cells. However, many tumors produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, which reprogram the anti-tumor M1 macrophages into the pro-tumor M2 macrophages. We have hypothesized that the problem of pro-tumor macrophage reprogramming could be solved by using a special M3 switch phenotype. The M3 macrophages, in contrast to the M1 macrophages, should respond to anti-inflammatory cytokines by increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines to retain its anti-tumor properties. Objectives of the study were to form an M3 switch phenotype in vitro and to evaluate the effect of M3 macrophages on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in vitro and in vivo. Material/Methods Tumor growth was initiated by an intraperitoneal injection of EAC cells into C57BL/6J mice. Results 1) The M3 switch phenotype can be programed by activation of M1-reprogramming pathways with simultaneous inhibition of the M2 phenotype transcription factors, STAT3, STAT6, and/or SMAD3. 2) M3 macrophages exerted an anti-tumor effect both in vitro and in vivo, which was superior to anti-tumor effects of cisplatin or M1 macrophages. 3) The anti-tumor effect of M3 macrophages was due to their anti-proliferative effect. Conclusions Development of new biotechnologies for restriction of tumor growth using in vitro reprogrammed M3 macrophages is very promising. PMID:28123171

  3. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  4. Macrophages help NK cells to attack tumor cells by stimulatory NKG2D ligand but protect themselves from NK killing by inhibitory ligand Qa-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixia; Zhang, Cai; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and their crosstalk with other immune cells are important for innate immunity against tumor. To explore the role of the interaction between NK cells and macrophages in the regulation of anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we here demonstrate that poly I:C-treated macrophages increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against target tumor cells in NKG2D-dependent manner. In addition, IL-15, IL-18, and IFN-β secreted by poly I:C-treated macrophages are also involved in NKG2D expression and NK cell activation. Interestingly, the increase in expression of NKG2D ligands on macrophages induced a highly NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, but not against macrophages themselves. Notably, a high expression level of Qa-1, a NKG2A ligand, on macrophages may contribute to such protection of macrophages from NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, Qa-1 or NKG2A knockdown and Qa-1 antibody blockade caused the macrophages to be sensitive to NK cytolysis. These results suggested that macrophages may activate NK cells to attack tumor by NKG2D recognition whereas macrophages protect themselves from NK lysis via preferential expression of Qa-1.

  5. Expression of CD86 on human marrow CD34(+) cells identifies immunocompetent committed precursors of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryncarz, R E; Anasetti, C

    1998-05-15

    Macrophages and dendritic cells derive from a hematopoietic stem cell and the existence of a common committed progenitor has been hypothesized. We have recently found in normal human marrow a subset of CD34(+) cells that constitutively expresses HLA-DR and low levels of CD86, a natural ligand for the T cell costimulation receptor CD28. This CD34(+) subset can elicit responses from allogeneic T cells. In this study, we show that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells can also present tetanus toxoid antigen to memory CD4(+) T cells. CD86 is expressed at low levels in macrophages and high levels in dendritic cells. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are the common precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. CD34(+)/CD86(+) marrow cells cultured in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-generated macrophages. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF generated a predominant population of granulocytes. CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generated almost exclusively CD1a+/CD83(+) dendritic cells. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha generated a variety of cell types, including a small population of dendritic cells. In addition, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor failed to generate CD15(+) granulocytes. Therefore, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are committed precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. The ontogeny of dendritic cells was recapitulated by stimulation of CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells with TNF-alpha that induced expression of CD86. Subsequent costimulation of CD86(+) cells with GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha lead to expression of CD83 and produced terminal dendritic cell differentiation. Thus, expression of CD86 on hematopoietic progenitor cells is regulated by TNF-alpha and denotes differentiation towards the macrophage or dendritic cell lineages.

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Capacity of Elite Suppressor CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells To Inhibit HIV-1 Replication in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E. K.; Buckheit, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elite controllers or suppressors (ESs) are HIV-1-infected individuals who are able to maintain viral loads below the limit of detection of clinical assays without antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms of virologic control are not fully understood, but ESs have been shown to have a more effective CD8+ T cell response to infected CD4+ T cells than chronic progressors (CPs). While macrophages are another cell type productively infected by HIV-1, few studies have examined the ability of primary effector T cells to suppress HIV-1 replication in these target cells. Here, we compared the ability of unstimulated primary CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells to suppress viral replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in ESs and CPs. While CD4+ effector T cells were capable of inhibiting viral replication in MDMs, the magnitude of this response was not significantly different between ESs and CPs. In contrast, the CD8+ T cells from ESs were significantly more effective than those from CPs at inhibiting viral replication in MDMs. The CD4+ T cell response was partially mediated by soluble factors, while the CD8+ T cell response required cell-to-cell interaction. Our results suggest that the individual contributions of various effector cells should be considered in rational vaccine design and in ongoing eradication efforts. IMPORTANCE Elite suppressors are individuals capable of maintaining low-level viremia in HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral drugs. Their T cell responses have been implicated in eliminating infected CD4+ T cells, and as such, elite suppressors may represent a model of a functional cure of HIV-1 infection. Here, we sought to determine whether the suppressive T cell responses against infected CD4+ T cells also apply to infected macrophages by comparing the responses of elite suppressors and HIV-1-positive individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Our results show that the CD8+ cells but not CD4+ T cells from elite suppressors

  7. Comparative analysis of the capacity of elite suppressor CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E K; Buckheit, Robert W; Blankson, Joel N

    2014-09-01

    Elite controllers or suppressors (ESs) are HIV-1-infected individuals who are able to maintain viral loads below the limit of detection of clinical assays without antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms of virologic control are not fully understood, but ESs have been shown to have a more effective CD8+ T cell response to infected CD4+ T cells than chronic progressors (CPs). While macrophages are another cell type productively infected by HIV-1, few studies have examined the ability of primary effector T cells to suppress HIV-1 replication in these target cells. Here, we compared the ability of unstimulated primary CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells to suppress viral replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in ESs and CPs. While CD4+ effector T cells were capable of inhibiting viral replication in MDMs, the magnitude of this response was not significantly different between ESs and CPs. In contrast, the CD8+ T cells from ESs were significantly more effective than those from CPs at inhibiting viral replication in MDMs. The CD4+ T cell response was partially mediated by soluble factors, while the CD8+ T cell response required cell-to-cell interaction. Our results suggest that the individual contributions of various effector cells should be considered in rational vaccine design and in ongoing eradication efforts. Elite suppressors are individuals capable of maintaining low-level viremia in HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral drugs. Their T cell responses have been implicated in eliminating infected CD4+ T cells, and as such, elite suppressors may represent a model of a functional cure of HIV-1 infection. Here, we sought to determine whether the suppressive T cell responses against infected CD4+ T cells also apply to infected macrophages by comparing the responses of elite suppressors and HIV-1-positive individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Our results show that the CD8+ cells but not CD4+ T cells from elite suppressors have a response

  8. Improving the methods for isolation of monocyte and establishing macrophage cell culture in caprine model.

    PubMed

    Shaqinah, Nurrul Nasruddin; Mazlina, Mazlan; Zamri-Saad, M; Hazilawati, Hamzah; Jasni, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Monocytes are widely used for immunological research, especially in the study of innate immune system. Although methods for isolation of human monocytes have been established, the procedure for non-human monocyte has not been well developed. This paper describes an improved method for isolation of monocyte and the subsequent macrophage cultivation from caprine blood. Monocytes were isolated from 16 ml of heparinized caprine blood using double density methods; the Ficoll and Percoll. The number of monocytes obtained was 5.12 ± 0.89 × 10(7) cells/ml at 70 % purity. The isolated monocytes were maintained in 10 % fetal bovine serum-enriched Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium for maturation to form macrophage cell culture. At the end of the experiment, the harvested macrophage was 2.48 ± 0.33 × 10(6) cells/ml.

  9. Dendritic cells that phagocytose apoptotic macrophages loaded with mycobacterial antigens activate CD8 T cells via cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cueto, Patricia; Magallanes-Puebla, Alejandro; Castellanos, Carlos; Mancilla, Raul

    2017-01-01

    While homeostatic apoptosis is immunologically silent, macrophage apoptosis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection can potentially induce an immune response against the mycobacteria. To examine the role of dendritic cells in this response, macrophage apoptosis was induced by incubating the macrophage with cell wall extracts of mycobacteria expressing LpqH. The apoptogenic proteins of the cell wall extracts were engulfed by the macrophage and then were translocated from the cytosol to the nuclei of the dying cells. Dendritic cells that engulfed the apoptotic macrophages acquired an immunogenic phenotype that included upregulation of MHC-I, increased expression of the costimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80, and CD86, and increased production of IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α, and TGF-β. In addition, the dendritic cells triggered a proliferative response of CD8+ T cells with IFN-γ production via cross-presentation. Taken together, these findings support a model in which phagocytosis of whole apoptotic cells carrying mycobacterial antigens promotes a potentially protective immune response.

  10. Dendritic cells that phagocytose apoptotic macrophages loaded with mycobacterial antigens activate CD8 T cells via cross-presentation