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Sample records for macrophage derived factor

  1. [Purification and bioassay of macrophage-derived neurotrophic factor].

    PubMed

    Li, S L; Guo, W H; Gu, X F

    1998-06-01

    Macrophage-derived neurotrophic factor (M phi DNF) is purified from macrophage conditioned medium by a procedure consisting of column chromatography with Sephacryl S-100-HR, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a final step using reverse-phase HPLC. The product shows a single protein band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel. It has a molecular weight of 60.5 kD and an isoelectric point of pI 5.1 and contains more leucine, lysine, glutamine and aspartic acids in its amino acid composition. Purified M phi DNF can promote the survival, activity, and neurite outgrowth of cultured cerebellar cortical neurons and that this effect reaches maximal levels with concentrations of the M phi DNF ranging from 500-1000 ng/ml.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor 21 enhances cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wei; Yu, Xuejing; Wang, Honglian; Chen, Tielin; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xianggui; Zhou, Puhui; Nie, Fang; Zhou, Qin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic regulator. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux and the expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1 and G1 in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Furthermore, the present study aimed to investigate the role of the liver X receptor (LXR) α in this process. A model of oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cells from human THP-1 cells was established. The effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux was analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. FGF21 was found to enhance apolipoprotein A1- and high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux. FGF21 was also observed to increase the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Furthermore, LXRα-short interfering RNA attenuated the stimulatory effects induced by FGF21. These findings suggest that FGF21 may have a protective effect against atherosclerosis by enhancing cholesterol efflux through the induction of LXRα-dependent ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 21 enhances cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wei; Yu, Xuejing; Wang, Honglian; Chen, Tielin; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xianggui; Zhou, Puhui; Nie, Fang; Zhou, Qin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic regulator. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux and the expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1 and G1 in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Furthermore, the present study aimed to investigate the role of the liver X receptor (LXR) α in this process. A model of oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cells from human THP-1 cells was established. The effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux was analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. FGF21 was found to enhance apolipoprotein A1- and high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux. FGF21 was also observed to increase the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Furthermore, LXRα-short interfering RNA attenuated the stimulatory effects induced by FGF21. These findings suggest that FGF21 may have a protective effect against atherosclerosis by enhancing cholesterol efflux through the induction of LXRα-dependent ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. PMID:25334019

  4. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  5. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  6. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  7. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  8. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  9. Modulation of Decidual Macrophage Polarization by Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Derived from First-Trimester Decidual Cells: Implication in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Piao, Longzhu; Chen, Chie-Pein; Wu, Xianqing; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Masch, Rachel; Chang, Chi-Chang; Huang, S Joseph

    2016-05-01

    During human pregnancy, immune tolerance of the fetal semiallograft occurs in the presence of abundant maternal leukocytes. At the implantation site, macrophages comprise approximately 20% of the leukocyte population and act as primary mediators of tissue remodeling. Decidual macrophages display a balance between anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory phenotypes. However, a shift to an M1 subtype is reported in preeclampsia. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) are major differentiating factors that mediate M1 and M2 polarization, respectively. Previously, we observed the following: i) the preeclamptic decidua contains an excess of both macrophages and GM-CSF, ii) the preeclampsia-associated proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, markedly enhance GM-CSF and M-CSF expression in cultured leukocyte-free first-trimester decidual cells (FTDCs), iii) FTDC-secreted GM-CSF polarizes macrophages toward an M1 subtype. The microenvironment is a key determinant of macrophage phenotype. Thus, we examined proinflammatory stimulation of FTDC-secreted M-CSF and its role in macrophage development. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated elevated M-CSF-positive decidual cell numbers in preeclamptic decidua. In FTDCs, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α signal through the NF-κB pathway to induce M-CSF production, which does the following: i) enhances differentiation of and elevates CD163 expression in macrophages, ii) increases macrophage phagocytic capacity, and iii) inhibits signal-regulatory protein α expression by macrophages. These findings suggest that FTDC-secreted M-CSF modulates the decidual immune balance by inducing M2 macrophage polarization and phagocytic capacity in response to proinflammatory stimuli.

  10. Thrombin binds to murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and enhances colony-stimulating factor-1-driven mitogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Clohisy, D.R.; Erdmann, J.M.; Wilner, G.D. )

    1990-05-15

    The binding and mitogenic properties of thrombin have been established in various transformed cell lines. In such systems, thrombin induces cell division in the absence of exogenous growth factors, and the enzyme is considered to act directly as a mitogen. This study explores thrombin's interaction with nontransformed, growth factor-dependent cells. Binding of 125I-alpha-thrombin to colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1-dependent bone marrow-derived macrophages is saturable, time-dependent, and displaceable by both unlabeled alpha-thrombin, and esterolytically inactive thrombin. Both dissociation studies of pre-bound radio-labeled thrombin and Scatchard analysis assisted by the program Ligand suggest adherence of thrombin-binding data to a multi-site model. There are an estimated 2 x 10(4) high affinity sites (Kd = 7 x 10(-9)M) and 2 x 10(6) low affinity sites (Kd = 9 x 10(-7)M) per cell. Quiescent bone marrow-derived macrophages were cultured with either 10(-8)M thrombin, 1000 units of CSF-1/ml, or both and (3H)thymidine incorporation was determined. Thrombin alone did not induce mitogenesis. CSF-1 induced mitogenesis with peak (3H) thymidine incorporation occurring 24 h after addition of the mitogen. This CSF-1-dependent mitogenic influence was enhanced greater than 2-fold by treatment with thrombin.

  11. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Yukiyo; Hashitani, Susumu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  12. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    TOYOHARA, YUKIYO; HASHITANI, SUSUMU; KISHIMOTO, HIROMITSU; NOGUCHI, KAZUMA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUTO; URADE, MASAHIRO

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  13. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats.

  14. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  15. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  16. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor promotes tumor growth and metastasis by inducing Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kendra D.; Templeton, Dennis J.; Cross, Janet V.

    2012-01-01

    The Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine, is overexpressed in many solid tumors and is associated with poor prognosis. We previously identified inhibitors of MIF within a class of natural products with demonstrated anti-cancer activities. We therefore sought to determine how MIF contributes to tumor growth and progression. We show here that, in murine tumors including the 4T1 model of aggressive, spontaneously metastatic breast cancer in immunologically intact mice, tumor-derived MIF promotes tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis through control of inflammatory cells within the tumor. Specifically, MIF increases the prevalence of a highly immune suppressive subpopulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor. In vitro, MIF promotes differentiation of myeloid cells into the same population of MDSCs. Pharmacologic inhibition of MIF reduces MDSC accumulation in the tumor similar to MIF depletion, and blocks the MIF-dependent in vitro differentiation of MDSCs. Our results demonstrate that MIF is a therapeutically targetable mechanism for control of tumor growth and metastasis through regulation of the host immune response, and support the potential utility of MIF inhibitors, either alone or in combination with standard tumor-targeting therapeutic or immunotherapy approaches. PMID:23125418

  17. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Turaga, Soumya M; Sorensen, Mia D; Rayman, Patricia; Flavahan, William A; Hale, James S; Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Wu, Qiulian; Jarrar, Awad; Kim, Sung-Hak; Fox, Paul L; Nakano, Ichiro; Rich, Jeremy N; Ransohoff, Richard M; Finke, James; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-08-01

    Shifting the balance away from tumor-mediated immune suppression toward tumor immune rejection is the conceptual foundation for a variety of immunotherapy efforts currently being tested. These efforts largely focus on activating antitumor immune responses but are confounded by multiple immune cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) in a low-dose administration paradigm, which resulted in prolonged survival in a syngeneic mouse model of glioma. In coculture studies, patient-derived CSCs but not nonstem tumor cells selectively drove MDSC-mediated immune suppression. A cytokine screen revealed that CSCs secreted multiple factors that promoted this activity, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was produced at high levels by CSCs. Addition of MIF increased production of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase-1 in MDSCs in a CXCR2-dependent manner, whereas blocking MIF reduced arginase-1 production. Similarly to 5-FU, targeting tumor-derived MIF conferred a survival advantage to tumor-bearing animals and increased the cytotoxic T cell response within the tumor. Importantly, tumor cell proliferation, survival, and self-renewal were not impacted by MIF reduction, demonstrating that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039. PMID:27145382

  18. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Turaga, Soumya M; Sorensen, Mia D; Rayman, Patricia; Flavahan, William A; Hale, James S; Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Wu, Qiulian; Jarrar, Awad; Kim, Sung-Hak; Fox, Paul L; Nakano, Ichiro; Rich, Jeremy N; Ransohoff, Richard M; Finke, James; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-08-01

    Shifting the balance away from tumor-mediated immune suppression toward tumor immune rejection is the conceptual foundation for a variety of immunotherapy efforts currently being tested. These efforts largely focus on activating antitumor immune responses but are confounded by multiple immune cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) in a low-dose administration paradigm, which resulted in prolonged survival in a syngeneic mouse model of glioma. In coculture studies, patient-derived CSCs but not nonstem tumor cells selectively drove MDSC-mediated immune suppression. A cytokine screen revealed that CSCs secreted multiple factors that promoted this activity, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was produced at high levels by CSCs. Addition of MIF increased production of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase-1 in MDSCs in a CXCR2-dependent manner, whereas blocking MIF reduced arginase-1 production. Similarly to 5-FU, targeting tumor-derived MIF conferred a survival advantage to tumor-bearing animals and increased the cytotoxic T cell response within the tumor. Importantly, tumor cell proliferation, survival, and self-renewal were not impacted by MIF reduction, demonstrating that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039.

  19. Antitumor effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Koga, Y; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1999-01-01

    Cancerous cells secrete alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) into the blood stream, resulting in deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (known as Gc protein), which is a precursor for macrophage activating factor (MAF). Incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF). Administration of GcMAF to cancer-bearing hosts can bypass the inactivated MAF precursor and act directly on macrophages for efficient activation. Therapeutic effects of GcMAF on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice were assessed by survival time and serum NaGalase activity, because serum NaGalase activity was proportional to tumor burden. A single administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) to eight mice on the same day after transplantation of the tumor (5 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 21 +/- 3 days for seven mice, with one mouse surviving more than 60 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 13 +/- 2 days. Six of the eight mice that received two GcMAF administrations, at Day 0 and Day 4 after transplantation, survived up to 31 +/- 4 days whereas, the remaining two mice survived for more than 60 days. Further, six of the eight mice that received three GcMAF administrations with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 60 days, and serum NaGalase levels were as low as those of control mice throughout the survival period. The cure with subthreshold GcMAF-treatments (administered once or twice) of tumor-bearing mice appeared to be a consequence of sustained macrophage activation by inflammation resulting from the macrophage-mediated tumoricidal process. Therefore, a protracted macrophage activation induced by a few administrations of minute amounts of GcMAF eradicated the murine ascites tumor. PMID:9893164

  20. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo JV; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort of patients with histologically diverse, advanced neoplasms, generally considered as “incurable” diseases. In most cases, GcMAF therapy was initiated at late stages of tumor progression. As this is an open-label, non-controlled, retrospective analysis, caution must be employed when establishing cause-effect relationships between the administration GcMAF and disease outcome. However, the response to GcMAF was generally robust and some trends emerged. All patients (n = 20) presented with elevated serum nagalase activity, well above normal values. All patients but one showed a significant decrease of serum nagalase activity upon weekly GcMAF injections. Decreased nagalase activity was associated with improved clinical conditions and no adverse side effects were reported. The observations reported here confirm and extend previous results and pave the way to further studies aimed at assessing the precise role and indications for GcMAF-based anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:24179708

  1. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo Jv; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-08-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort of patients with histologically diverse, advanced neoplasms, generally considered as "incurable" diseases. In most cases, GcMAF therapy was initiated at late stages of tumor progression. As this is an open-label, non-controlled, retrospective analysis, caution must be employed when establishing cause-effect relationships between the administration GcMAF and disease outcome. However, the response to GcMAF was generally robust and some trends emerged. All patients (n = 20) presented with elevated serum nagalase activity, well above normal values. All patients but one showed a significant decrease of serum nagalase activity upon weekly GcMAF injections. Decreased nagalase activity was associated with improved clinical conditions and no adverse side effects were reported. The observations reported here confirm and extend previous results and pave the way to further studies aimed at assessing the precise role and indications for GcMAF-based anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:24179708

  2. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia. PMID:25782915

  3. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia.

  4. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years. PMID:19031451

  5. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients. PMID:18058096

  6. Effect of salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell-derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase on the bioactivity of macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Takashi; Uematsu, Takashi; Yamaoka, Minoru; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) produced by human salivary gland adenocarcinoma (SGA) cells on the bioactivity of macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). High exo-alpha-NaGalase activity was detected in the SGA cell line HSG. HSG alpha-NaGalase had both exo- and endo-enzyme activities, cleaving the Gal-GalNAc and GalNAc residues linked to Thr/Ser but not releasing the [NeuAc2-6]GalNac residue. Furthermore, GcMAF enzymatically prepared from the Gc protein enhanced the superoxide-generation capacity and phagocytic activity of monocytes/macrophages. However, GcMAF treated with purified alpha-NaGalase did not exhibit these effects. Thus, HSG possesses the capacity to produce larger quantities of alpha-NaGalase, which inactivates GcMAF produced from Gc protein, resulting in reduced phagocytic activity and superoxide-generation capacity of monocytes/macrophages. The present data strongly suggest that HSG alpha-NaGalase acts as an immunodeficiency factor in cancer patients. PMID:14767536

  7. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years. PMID:17935130

  8. Glioblastoma-derived Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (MCSF) Induces Microglial Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein 1 (IGFBP1) to Promote Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nijaguna, Mamatha Bangalore; Patil, Vikas; Urbach, Serge; Shwetha, Shivayogi D; Sravani, Kotha; Hegde, Alangar S; Chandramouli, Bangalore A; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Marin, Philippe; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2015-09-18

    Glioblastoma (grade IV glioma/GBM) is the most common primary adult malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis. To characterize molecular determinants of tumor-stroma interaction in GBM, we profiled 48 serum cytokines and identified macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) as one of the elevated cytokines in sera from GBM patients. Both MCSF transcript and protein were up-regulated in GBM tissue samples through a spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-dependent activation of the PI3K-NFκB pathway. Ectopic overexpression and silencing experiments revealed that glioma-secreted MCSF has no role in autocrine functions and M2 polarization of macrophages. In contrast, silencing expression of MCSF in glioma cells prevented tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells elicited by the supernatant from monocytes/microglial cells treated with conditioned medium from glioma cells. Quantitative proteomics based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture showed that glioma-derived MCSF induces changes in microglial secretome and identified insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) as one of the MCSF-regulated proteins secreted by microglia. Silencing IGFBP1 expression in microglial cells or its neutralization by an antibody reduced the ability of supernatants derived from microglial cells treated with glioma cell-conditioned medium to induce angiogenesis. In conclusion, this study shows up-regulation of MCSF in GBM via a SYK-PI3K-NFκB-dependent mechanism and identifies IGFBP1 released by microglial cells as a novel mediator of MCSF-induced angiogenesis, of potential interest for developing targeted therapy to prevent GBM progression.

  9. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  10. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja; Milatovic, Dejan; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP-2 or

  11. A Novel Carboline Derivative Inhibits Nitric Oxide Formation in Macrophages Independent of Effects on Tumor Necrosis Factor α and Interleukin-1β Expression

    PubMed Central

    Poola, Bhaskar; Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Nantz, Michael H.; Lein, Pamela J.; Gorin, Fredric

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a maladaptive immune response to peripheral nerve injury that causes a chronic painful condition refractory to most analgesics. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), has been implicated as a key factor in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. β-Carbolines are a large group of natural and synthetic indole alkaloids, some of which block activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), a predominant transcriptional regulator of NOS expression. Here, we characterize the inhibitory effects of a novel 6-chloro-8-(glycinyl)-amino-β-carboline (8-Gly carb) on NO formation and NF-κB activation in macrophages. 8-Gly carb was significantly more potent than the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester in inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation in primary rat macrophages. 8-Gly carb interfered with NF-κB–mediated gene expression in differentiated THP1-XBlue cells, a human NF-κB reporter macrophage cell line, but only at concentrations severalfold higher than needed to significantly inhibit NO production. 8-Gly carb also had no effect on tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)–induced phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in differentiated THP1 cells, and did not inhibit lipopolysaccharide- or TNFα-stimulated expression of TNFα and interleukin-1β. These data demonstrate that relative to other carbolines and pharmacologic inhibitors of NOS, 8-Gly carb exhibits a unique pharmacological profile by inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation independent of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression. Thus, this novel carboline derivative holds promise as a parent compound, leading to therapeutic agents that prevent the development of neuropathic pain mediated by macrophage-derived NO without interfering with cytokine expression required for neural recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25538105

  12. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor is an intrinsic keratinocyte-derived growth factor for human melanocytes in UVA-induced melanosis.

    PubMed

    Imokawa, G; Yada, Y; Kimura, M; Morisaki, N

    1996-01-15

    Recently we demonstrated that endothelins secreted from human keratinocytes act as intrinsic mitogens and melanogens for human melanocytes in UVB-induced melanosis. We show here that UVA-induced melanosis is associated with other keratinocyte-derived growth factors, secretion of which is specifically stimulated after exposure of human keratinocytes to UVA. Medium conditioned by UVA-exposed human keratinocytes elicited a significant increase in DNA synthesis by cultured human melanocytes in a UVA dose-dependent manner. Analysis of endothelin-1 and interleukin (IL)-1 alpha in the conditioned medium by ELISA, both of which are major keratinocyte-derived cytokines involved in UVB-associated melanocyte activation, revealed that UVA exposure did not cause human keratinocytes to stimulate the secretion of the two cytokines. In contrast, the levels of several other cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were significantly increased in the conditioned medium of human keratinocytes after exposure to UVA at a dose of 1.0 J/cm2. The gel chromatographic profile of UVA-exposed keratinocyte-conditioned medium demonstrated that there were two factors (P-1 and P-2) with molecular masses of approx. 20 and 1 kDa respectively that stimulate DNA synthesis in human melanocytes, and the larger species (P-1) also increased melanization as assessed by [14C]thiouracil incorporation. Quantitative analysis of cytokines in chromatographic fractions by ELISA revealed the P-1 fraction to be consistent with the molecular mass profile of GM-CSF. Furthermore the stimulatory effect of the P-1 fraction on DNA synthesis in human melanocytes was neutralized by antibodies to GM-CSF, but not to basic fibroblast growth factor or stem cell factor. Binding and proliferation assays with recombinant GM-CSF demonstrated that human melanocytes possess specific binding sites for GM-CSF(Kd 2.11 nM; binding sites, 2.5-3.5 x 10(4) per cell), and recombinant GM

  13. A novel role for a major component of the vitamin D axis: vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor induces human breast cancer cell apoptosis through stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-07-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This allows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects. PMID:23857228

  14. A Novel Role for a Major Component of the Vitamin D Axis: Vitamin D Binding Protein-Derived Macrophage Activating Factor Induces Human Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis through Stimulation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J. V.; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This al1ows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects. PMID:23857228

  15. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-01

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  16. Is chondroitin sulfate responsible for the biological effects attributed to the GC protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF)?

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Marco; Reinwald, Heinz; Pacini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesize that a plasma glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate, may be responsible for the biological and clinical effects attributed to the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF), a protein that is extracted from human blood. Thus, Gc protein binds chondroitin sulfate on the cell surface and such an interaction may occur also in blood, colostrum and milk. This interpretation would solve the inconsistencies encountered in explaining the effects of GcMAF in vitro and in vivo. According to our model, the Gc protein or the GcMAF bind to chondroitin sulfate both on the cell surface and in bodily fluids, and the resulting multimolecular complexes, under the form of oligomers trigger a transmembrane signal or, alternatively, are internalized and convey the signal directly to the nucleus thus eliciting the diverse biological effects observed for both GcMAF and chondroitin sulfate. PMID:27515218

  17. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice. PMID:9682967

  18. Structural definition of a potent macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein with adjuvant activity for antibody production.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N

    1996-10-01

    Incubation of human vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), with a mixture of immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, efficiently generated a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, and isolation of the intermediates with immobilized lectins, revealed that either sequence of hydrolysis of Gc glycoprotein by these glycosidases yields the macrophage-activating factor, implying that Gc protein carries a trisaccharide composed of N-acetylgalactosamine and dibranched galactose and sialic acid termini. A 3 hr incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with picomolar amounts of the enzymatically generated macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) resulted in a greatly enhanced phagocytic activity. Administration of a minute amount (10-50 pg/mouse) of GcMAF resulted in a seven- to nine-fold enhanced phagocytic activity of macrophages. Injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) along with GcMAF into mice produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. PMID:9070663

  19. Analysis of cellular factors influencing the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type I in human macrophages derived from blood of different healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Eisert, V; Kreutz, M; Becker, K; Königs, C; Alex, U; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H; Andreesen, R; von Briesen, H

    2001-07-20

    We analyzed parameters influencing HIV-1 infectibility of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage (MO/MAC) isolated from different healthy donors. The proportion of in vitro-infected cells and replication kinetics in different donor MAC ranged from 0.03 to 99% p24 antigen-positive MAC and from undetectable RT activity up to 5 x 10(6) cpm/ml/90 min, respectively. As a quantitative measurement for HIV-1 susceptibility of donor MO/MAC, we determined TCID(50) values of defined virus stocks which varied up to 3000-fold depending on the donor MAC used for titration. As host factors which may influence the viral infection we determined the expression of virus receptors CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 as well as the secretion of the natural ligands of CCR5, which altogether showed no correlation with HIV-1 infectibility of the cells. Moreover, other MO-derived secretory factors which might affect viral infection of these cells could be excluded. Furthermore, expression of maturation-related antigens CD14, CD16, HLA-DR, and MAX.1/CPM was determined. Analysis of the reverse transcription process revealed that restricted HIV-1 infection was reflected by highly reduced or even undetectable full-length HIV-1 DNA formation, although early and intermediate transcripts appeared, suggesting that viral replication is blocked after entry at the level of early reverse transcription.

  20. Comparative pharmacokinetics of single-dose administration of mammalian and bacterially-derived recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D; Mortensen, B T; Schifter, S; Nissen, N I

    1993-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of recombinant human non-glycosylated bacterially-synthesized (E. coli) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were studied following single intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) bolus injection, and compared to equivalent doses of glycosylated mammalian-derived CHO-GM-CSF. Each route of administration gave a different GM-CSF concentration-time profile. The highest peak serum concentrations (Cmax) were observed following i.v. bolus injection. After i.v. administration, a two-phase decline in concentration was noted for both types of GM-CSF with a significantly shorter t1/2 alpha of 7.8 minutes for the E. coli GM-CSF versus 20.0 min for the CHO-GM-CSF, while no significant difference was observed for the terminal phase. Following s.c. administration of equivalent doses, a higher peak serum concentration was observed in the E. coli-treated patients and, again, a faster elimination where pretreatment serum levels were reached after 16-20 h, versus more than 48 h after administration of CHO-GM-CSF. Although the non-glycosylated E. coli GM-CSF thus seems to undergo a faster elimination that the glycosylated CHO-GM-CSF no significant difference could be demonstrated in the in vivo effect of corresponding doses of the two compounds with respect to stimulation of granulopoiesis--with reservation for small patient numbers and a large individual variations in response.

  1. Distinct functional roles of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) colony-stimulating factor-1- and interleukin-34-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Although Mϕ represent the most primordial immune cell subsets, the mechanisms governing their functional heterogeneity remain poorly defined. However, it is well established that the CSF-1 cytokine contributes to monopoiesis and to this heterogeneity, whereas the unrelated IL-34 also binds the CSF-1R toward poorly understood immunologic roles. To delineate the molecular and evolutionary basis behind vertebrate Mϕ functional heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive transcriptional and functional studies of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) BM (in vitro) and PER (in vivo) Mϕ derived by rXlCSF-1 and rXlIL-34. Our findings indicate that these amphibian cytokines promote morphologically and functionally distinct Mϕ populations. Mϕ induced by rXlCSF-1 possess more robust iNOS gene expression, are substantially more phagocytic, display greater NO responses, and exhibit enhanced bactericidal capacities. By contrast, rXlIL-34-derived Mϕ express greater levels of Arg-1 and NADPH oxidase components and possess greater respiratory burst responses. Most notably, whereas CSF-1 Mϕ are highly susceptible to the emerging FV3 ranavirus, rXlIL-34 Mϕ exhibit potent antiviral activity against this pathogen, which is dependent on reactive oxygen production. This work marks an advance in our understanding of the possible mechanisms governing vertebrate Mϕ functional heterogeneity. PMID:26136505

  2. Modulation of adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells during the late asthmatic reaction: role of macrophage-derived tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Lassalle, P; Gosset, P; Delneste, Y; Tsicopoulos, A; Capron, A; Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B

    1993-01-01

    In a previous work we have demonstrated that in patients exhibiting a late allergic reaction (LAR), alveolar macrophages (AM) collected 18 h after bronchial allergen challenge produced high levels of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) which is known to up-regulate the endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules participating in the development of the inflammatory reaction in bronchial asthma. For these reasons, we evaluated the effect of AM supernatants from asthmatic patients developing an LAR on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) expression by human endothelial cells. The expression of adhesion molecules was assessed by an ELISA method and compared with the effect of an optimal dose of human recombinant (hr) TNF. Results showed that AM supernatants, from challenged asthmatics developing an LAR, increased significantly the ICAM-1 and ELAM-1 expression on endothelial cells to a level similar to that obtained in the presence of hrTNF (500 U/ml) (P < 0.001 in both cases, respectively 90.4% and 75.2% of the level obtained with hrTNF). In contrast, AM supernatants from asthmatics at baseline or exhibiting, after challenge, a single early reaction had no significant effect on these parameters (P = NS in both cases, respectively 23.5% and 24.7% of the ICAM-1 expression, 22.7% and 15.3% of the ELAM-1 expression obtained with hrTNF). AM-derived TNF present in these supernatants was thought to play a key role in endothelial cell stimulation, since: (i) TNF concentration in AM supernatants correlated with its effect on ICAM-1 (r = 0.80, P < 10(-4)) and ELAM-1 expression (r = 0.88, P < 10(-5)); and (ii) a neutralizing anti-TNF antibody decreased their effect (68% and 80% respectively on ICAM-1 and ELAM-1 expression). Moreover, the role of IL-6 was excluded on the basis both of the hrIL-6 inefficiency to induce ICAM-1 and ELAM-1 synthesis, even in costimulation with hrTNF, and of anti-IL-6 antibody

  3. Synthesis of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor as homogeneous glycoforms and early comparisons with yeast cell-derived material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Johnston, Eric V.; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A. S.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a medicinally important glycoprotein, used as an immunostimulant following bone-marrow transplant. On the basis of reports of its potential utility as an anticancer vaccine adjuvant, we undertook to develop a synthetic route toward single-glycoform GM-CSF. We describe herein a convergent total synthesis of GM-CSF aglycone and two homogeneous glycoforms. Analytical and biological studies confirm the structure and activity of these synthetic congeners. PMID:24516138

  4. Investigation of macrophage polarization using bone marrow derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Cheruku, Patali S; Bazer, Fuller W; Safe, Stephen H; Zhou, Beiyan

    2013-06-23

    The article describes a readily easy adaptive in vitro model to investigate macrophage polarization. In the presence of GM-CSF/M-CSF, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow are directed into monocytic differentiation, followed by M1 or M2 stimulation. The activation status can be tracked by changes in cell surface antigens, gene expression and cell signaling pathways.

  5. Aging impairs peritoneal but not bone marrow-derived macrophage phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Eimear; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Snoddy, Rachel; Fallon, Padraic G; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Fitzgerald, Denise C

    2014-08-01

    Aging results in deterioration of the immune system, which is associated with increased susceptibility to infection and impaired wound healing in the elderly. Phagocytosis is an essential process in both wound healing and immune defence. As such, age-related impairments in phagocytosis impact on the health of the elderly population. Phagocytic efficiency in peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow monocytes from young and old mice was investigated. Aging significantly impaired phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo. However, bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow monocytes did not exhibit age-related impairments in phagocytosis, suggesting no intrinsic defect in these cells. We sought to investigate underlying mechanisms in age-related impairments in phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages. We hypothesized that microenvironmental factors in the peritoneum of old mice impaired macrophage phagocytosis. Indeed, macrophages from young mice injected into the peritoneum of old mice exhibited impaired phagocytosis. Proportions of peritoneal immune cells were characterized, and striking increases in numbers of T cells, B1 and B2 cells were observed in the peritoneum of old mice compared with young mice. In addition, B cell-derived IL-10 was increased in resting and LPS-activated peritoneal cell cultures from old mice. These data demonstrate that aging impairs phagocytosis by tissue-resident peritoneal macrophages, but not by bone marrow-derived macrophages/monocytes, and suggest that age-related defects in macrophage phagocytosis may be due to extrinsic factors in the tissue microenvironment. As such, defects may be reversible and macrophages could be targeted therapeutically in order to boost immune function in the elderly.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of T cells derived from lymph nodes draining a poorly immunogenic tumor transduced to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Arca, M J; Krauss, J C; Aruga, A; Cameron, M J; Shu, S; Chang, A E

    1996-01-01

    We examined the host immune response to the poorly immunogenic B16-BL6 melanoma, which was transduced to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (450 ng/10(6)/24 h). Tumor growth after subcutaneous inoculation was not significantly altered, although an influx of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages was evident within tumors and draining lymph nodes (LNs). Immunization with irradiated transduced cells did not induce systemic immunity to the parental tumor. However, vaccination with transduced tumors significantly augmented in vivo sensitization of draining LN cells. These tumor-draining LN (TDLN) cells, when secondarily stimulated in vitro with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and expanded in interleukin-2 (10 U/ml), exhibited greater release of GM-CST and interferon-gamma against tumor compared with TDLN cells from animals with parental tumor. In adoptive immunotherapy, activated LN cells draining transduced tumors mediated significant reductions of the numbers of established pulmonary metastases compared with LN cells draining parental tumor, which were ineffective. In addition, the therapeutic efficacy of LN cells draining transduced tumors was significantly better than LN cells primed in vivo with tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum, which we have previously described as an approach to generate immune cells. Thus, GM-CSF appears to be an important adjuvant in the induction of tumor immunity. PMID:8785710

  7. Augmentation of Human Macrophage Candidacidal Capacity by Recombinant Human Myeloperoxidase and GranulocyteMacrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Maródi, László; Tournay, Christophe; Káposzta, Rita; Johnston, Richard B.; Moguilevsky, Nicole

    1998-01-01

    Phagocyte myeloperoxidase (MPO) is believed to be particularly important in defense against candida infection. We reported earlier that monocytes, rich in MPO, killed Candida albicans at a significantly higher rate and extent than did monocyte-derived macrophages, known to lack MPO, and that C. albicans is less resistant to MPO-dependent oxidants than less pathogenic Candida species. We hypothesized, therefore, that the capacity of macrophages to kill C. albicans might be improved in the presence of MPO. In this study, we evaluated the ability of recombinant human MPO (rhMPO) to augment the killing of C. albicans by resident macrophages and macrophages activated by recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Addition of rhMPO (concentration range, 0.8 to 6.4 U/ml) to suspensions of resident and activated macrophages and opsonized C. albicans resulted in concentration-dependent and significant increases in candida killing. This enhancement was particularly pronounced with activated macrophages, whether C. albicans was opsonized or unopsonized and ingested through the macrophage mannose receptor. rhMPO did not affect the killing of C. albicans by monocytes, nor did it affect phagocytosis of opsonized or unopsonized C. albicans. These results indicate that exogenous rhMPO can augment the candidacidal capacity of both resident and activated macrophages, with a more profound effect on activated cells. We suggest that rhMPO may be effective in the treatment of invasive candidiasis. PMID:9596743

  8. Replication of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Stephanie K; Binder, Kelsey A; Starr, Tregei; Cooper, Kendal G; Chong, Audrey; Carmody, Aaron B; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common cause of food-borne gastrointestinal illness, but additionally it causes potentially fatal bacteremia in some immunocompromised patients. In mice, systemic spread and replication of the bacteria depend upon infection of and replication within macrophages, but replication in human macrophages is not widely reported or well studied. In order to assess the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to replicate in human macrophages, we infected primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) that had been differentiated under conditions known to generate different phenotypes. We found that replication in MDM depends greatly upon the phenotype of the cells, as M1-skewed macrophages did not allow replication, while M2a macrophages and macrophages differentiated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) alone (termed M0) did. We describe how additional conditions that alter the macrophage phenotype or the gene expression of the bacteria affect the outcome of infection. In M0 MDM, the temporal expression of representative genes from Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2) and the importance of the PhoP/Q two-component regulatory system are similar to what has been shown in mouse macrophages. However, in contrast to mouse macrophages, where replication is SPI2 dependent, we observed early SPI2-independent replication in addition to later SPI2-dependent replication in M0 macrophages. Only SPI2-dependent replication was associated with death of the host cell at later time points. Altogether, our results reveal a very nuanced interaction between Salmonella and human macrophages. PMID:25895967

  9. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, A. T. Y.; Hale, C.; Xia, J.; Tate, P. H.; Goulding, D.; Keane, J. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Forrester, L.; Billker, O.; Skarnes, W. C.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Dougan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection. PMID:25752829

  10. Immunotherapy of BALB/c mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumor with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1997-06-01

    Vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) is the precursor of macrophage activating factor (MAF). Treatment of mouse DBP with immobilized beta-galactosidase or treatment of human Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated a remarkably potent MAF, termed DBPMAF or GcMAF, respectively. The domain of Gc protein responsible for macrophage activation was cloned and enzymatically converted to the cloned MAF, designated CdMAF. In Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice, tumor-specific serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) activity increased linearly with time as the transplanted tumor cells grew in the peritoneal cavity. Therapeutic effects of DBPMAF, GcMAF, and CdMAF on mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumor were assessed by survival time, the total tumor cell count in the peritoneal cavity, and serum NaGalase activity. Mice that received a single administration of DBPMAF or GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) on the same day after transplantation of tumor (1 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 35 +/- 4 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 16 +/- 2 days. When mice received the second DBPMAF or GcMAF administration at day 4, they survived more than 50 days. Mice that received two DBPMAF administrations, at days 4 and 8 after transplantation of 1 x 10(5) tumor cells, survived up to 32 +/- 4 days. At day 4 posttransplantation, the total tumor cell count in the peritoneal cavity was approximately 5 x 10(5) cells. Mice that received two DBPMAF administrations, at days 0 and 4 after transplantation of 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, also survived up to 32 +/- 4 days, while control mice that received the 5 x 10(5) ascites tumor cells only survived for 14 +/- 2 days. Four DBPMAF, GcMAF, or CdMAF administrations to mice transplanted with 5 x 10(5) Ehrlich ascites tumor cells with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 90 days and an insignificantly low serum NaGalase level between days 30 and 90

  11. Effects of gamma interferon, interleukin-10, and transforming growth factor beta on the survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in monocyte-derived macrophages from naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh, M S; Stabel, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) plays a significant role in the control of mycobacterial infections, including Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. However, the contribution of other immunoregulatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), in Johne's disease has not been investigated as yet. In this study, we examined the effects of in vivo and in vitro infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis on the production of IFN-gamma, IL-10, and TGF-beta by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We also examined the effects of exogenous IFN-gamma, IL-10, and TGF-beta on M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis survival in the cell cultures. PBMC obtained from naturally infected cows, regardless of their disease status, specifically upregulated IL-10 and TGF-beta in culture supernatants in response to stimulation with live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Nonstimulated PBMC recovered from subclinically infected animals secreted the lowest levels of TGF-beta, but after stimulation with live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, TGF-beta levels in the culture supernatants increased to levels similar to that produced by PBMC from healthy animals. The numbers of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from cultures from naturally infected animals were higher than those from healthy cows after in vitro infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The addition of exogenous IL-10 and TGF-beta to PBMC isolated from healthy cows inhibited the bactericidal activity of these cells as evidenced by the increased number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from these cultures compared to cell cultures containing medium alone. These data suggest important immune regulatory roles for IL-10 and TGF-beta during infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis that may be directly related to their effects on macrophage activation and killing of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  12. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  13. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk Inhibitor (BBI) Inhibits HIV Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tong-Cui; Zhou, Run-Hong; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Sang, Ming; Zhou, Li; Zhuang, Ke; Hou, Wei; Guo, De-Yin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, is known to have anti-inflammatory effect in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Macrophages play a key role in inflammation and immune activation, which is implicated in HIV disease progression. Here, we investigated the effect of BBI on HIV infection of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. We demonstrated that BBI could potently inhibit HIV replication in macrophages without cytotoxicity. Investigation of the mechanism(s) of BBI action on HIV showed that BBI induced the expression of IFN-β and multiple IFN stimulated genes (ISGs), including Myxovirus resistance protein 2 (Mx2), 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS-1), Virus inhibitory protein (viperin), ISG15 and ISG56. BBI treatment of macrophages also increased the expression of several known HIV restriction factors, including APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G and tetherin. Furthermore, BBI enhanced the phosphorylation of IRF3, a key regulator of IFN-β. The inhibition of IFN-β pathway by the neutralization antibody to type I IFN receptor (Anti-IFNAR) abolished BBI-mediated induction of the anti-HIV factors and inhibition of HIV in macrophages. These findings that BBI could activate IFN-β-mediated signaling pathway, initialize the intracellular innate immunity in macrophages and potently inhibit HIV at multiple steps of viral replication cycle indicate the necessity to further investigate BBI as an alternative and cost-effective anti-HIV natural product. PMID:27734899

  14. Alternatively activated macrophages derived from monocytes and tissue macrophages are phenotypically and functionally distinct

    PubMed Central

    Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Girgis, Natasha M.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Jenkins, Stephen; Ward, Lauren N.; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Wiens, Kirsten E.; Tang, Mei San; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Allen, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages adopt an alternatively activated phenotype (AAMs) when activated by the interleukin-4receptor(R)α. AAMs can be derived either from proliferation of tissue resident macrophages or recruited inflammatory monocytes, but it is not known whether these different sources generate AAMs that are phenotypically and functionally distinct. By transcriptional profiling analysis, we show here that, although both monocyte and tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of Arg1, Chi3l3, and Retnla, only monocyte-derived AAMs up-regulated Raldh2 and PD-L2. Monocyte-derived AAMs were also CX3CR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)high and expressed CD206, whereas tissue-derived AAMs were CX3CR1-GFP and CD206 negative. Monocyte-derived AAMs had high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and promoted the differentiation of FoxP3+ cells from naïve CD4+ cells via production of retinoic acid. In contrast, tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of uncoupling protein 1. Hence monocyte-derived AAM have properties associated with immune regulation, and the different physiological properties associated with AAM function may depend on the distinct lineage of these cells. PMID:24695852

  15. Macrophage cell lines derived from major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Two bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell lines, C2D and C2Dt, were isolated from major histocompatibility class II negative knock-out mice. The C2D cell line was stabilized by continuous culture in colony-stimulating factor-1 and the C2Dt cell line was transformed with SV40 virus large T antigen. These cells exhibited phenotypic properties of macrophages including morphology and expression of Mac 1 and Mac 2 cell surface molecules. These cells also had comparable growth to the bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line B6MP102. These new cell lines were not spontaneously cytotoxic and were only capable of modest killing of F5b tumor cells when stimulated with LPS and interferon-gamma, but not when stimulated with LPS alone or with staphylococcal exotoxin. C2D and C2Dt cells phagocytosed labeled Staphylococcus aureus similarly to B6MP102 cells but less well than C2D peritoneal macrophages. These cell lines secreted interleukin-6, but not tumor necrosis factor or nitric oxide in response to LPS or staphlococcal enterotoxins A or B C2D(t) cells were tumorigenic in C2D and C57BL/6J mice but C2D cells were not. These data suggest that macrophage cell lines can be established from bone marrow cells of major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice.

  16. Reactive microglia and macrophage facilitate the formation of Müller glia-derived retinal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andy J; Zelinka, Christopher; Gallina, Donika; Scott, Melissa A; Todd, Levi

    2014-10-01

    In retinas where Müller glia have been stimulated to become progenitor cells, reactive microglia are always present. Thus, we investigated how the activation or ablation of microglia/macrophage influences the formation of Müller glia-derived progenitor cells (MGPCs) in the retina in vivo. Intraocular injections of the Interleukin-6 (IL6) stimulated the reactivity of microglia/macrophage, whereas other types of retinal glia appear largely unaffected. In acutely damaged retinas where all of the retinal microglia/macrophage were ablated, the formation of proliferating MGPCs was greatly diminished. With the microglia ablated in damaged retinas, levels of Notch and related genes were unchanged or increased, whereas levels of ascl1a, TNFα, IL1β, complement component 3 (C3) and C3a receptor were significantly reduced. In the absence of retinal damage, the combination of insulin and Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) failed to stimulate the formation of MGPCs when the microglia/macrophage were ablated. In addition, intraocular injections of IL6 and FGF2 stimulated the formation of MGPCs in the absence of retinal damage, and this generation of MGPCs was blocked when the microglia/macrophage were absent. We conclude that the activation of microglia and/or infiltrating macrophage contributes to the formation of proliferating MGPCs, and these effects may be mediated by components of the complement system and inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Acute Adipose Tissue Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Rongisch, Robert; Hager, Stephan; Grieb, Gerrit; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Bucala, Richard; Bernhagen, Juergen; Pallua, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine and has been implicated in inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the regulation of MIF in adipose tissue and its impact on wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate MIF expression in inflamed adipose and determine its role in inflammatory cell recruitment and wound healing. Adipose tissue was harvested from subcutaneous adipose tissue layers of 24 healthy subjects and from adipose tissue adjacent to acutely inflamed wounds of 21 patients undergoing wound debridement. MIF protein and mRNA expression were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. Cell-specific MIF expression was visualized by immunohistochemistry. The functional role of MIF in cell recruitment was investigated by a chemotaxis assay and by flow cytometry of labeled macrophages that were injected into Mif-/-and wildtype mice. Wound healing was evaluated by an in vitro scratch assay on human fibroblast monolayers. MIF protein levels of native adipose tissue and supernatants from acutely inflamed wounds were significantly elevated when compared to healthy controls. MIF mRNA expression was increased in acutely inflamed adipose tissue indicating the activation of MIF gene transcription in response to adipose tissue inflammation. MIF is expressed in mature adipocytes and in infiltrated macrophages. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell migration was significantly increased towards supernatants derived from inflamed adipose tissue. This effect was partially abrogated by MIF-neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, when compared to wildtype mice, Mif-/-mice showed reduced infiltration of labeled macrophages into LPS-stimulated epididymal fat pads in vivo. Finally, MIF antibodies partially neutralized the detrimental effect of MIF on fibroblast wound healing. Our results indicate that increased MIF expression and rapid activation of the MIF gene in fat tissue adjacent to acute wound healing disorders may play a role in cell

  18. Functional characterization of the turkey macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to clone the turkey MIF (TkMIF) gene, express the active protein, and characte...

  19. The transcription factor NR4A1 is essential for the development of a novel macrophage subset in the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Tacke, Robert; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Garner, Hannah; Waterborg, Claire; Park, Kiwon; Nowyhed, Heba; Hanna, Richard N.; Wu, Runpei; Swirski, Filip K.; Geissmann, Frederic; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue macrophages function to maintain homeostasis and regulate immune responses. While tissue macrophages derive from one of a small number of progenitor programs, the transcriptional requirements for site-specific macrophage subset development are more complex. We have identified a new tissue macrophage subset in the thymus and have discovered that its development is dependent on transcription factor NR4A1. Functionally, we find that NR4A1-dependent macrophages are critically important for clearance of apoptotic thymocytes. These macrophages are largely reduced or absent in mice lacking NR4A1, and Nr4a1-deficient mice have impaired thymocyte engulfment and clearance. Thus, NR4A1 functions as a master transcription factor for the development of this novel thymus-specific macrophage subset. PMID:26091486

  20. Amyloid fibril formation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuel, Hilal A. . E-mail: hilal.lashuel@epfl.ch; Aljabari, Bayan; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Metz, Christine N.; Leng Lin; Callaway, David J.E.; Bucala, Richard

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in the brain and not previously considered to be amyloidogenic, forms amyloid fibrils similar to those derived from the disease associated amyloidogenic proteins {beta}-amyloid and {alpha}-synuclein. Acid denaturing conditions were found to readily induce MIF to undergo amyloid fibril formation. MIF aggregates to form amyloid-like structures with a morphology that is highly dependent on pH. The mechanism of MIF amyloid formation was probed by electron microscopy, turbidity, Thioflavin T binding, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The fibrillar structures formed by MIF bind Congo red and exhibit the characteristic green birefringence under polarized light. These results are consistent with the notion that amyloid fibril formation is not an exclusive property of a select group of amyloidogenic proteins, and contribute to a better understanding of the factors which govern protein conformational changes and amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  1. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF. PMID:21170647

  2. Host and Bacterial Factors Involved in the Innate Ability of Mouse Macrophages To Eliminate Internalized Unopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Terri S.; Havell, Edward A.; Horton, John R.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to better understand genetic and cellular factors that influence innate immunity, we examined host and bacterial factors involved in the nonopsonic phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli K-12 by mouse macrophages. Unelicited (resident) peritoneal macrophages from five different mouse strains, BALB/c, C57BL/6, CD-1, C3H/HeJ, and C3H/HeN, were employed. Additional macrophage populations were obtained from CD-1 mice (bone marrow-derived macrophages). Also, for BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, peritoneal macrophages elicited with either thioglycolate or proteose peptone, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and macrophage-like cell lines derived from the two strains were employed. Two E. coli K-12 strains that differed specifically in their abilities to produce type 1 pili containing the adhesive protein FimH were examined. The parameters used to assess macrophage bacteriocidal activity were (i) the killing of internalized (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during the approximately 4-h assay and (ii) the initial rate at which internalized E. coli were eliminated. Data on these parameters allowed the following conclusions: (i) unelicited or proteose peptone-elicited peritoneal macrophages were significantly better at eliminating internalized bacteria than thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages, or macrophage cell lines; (ii) the host genetic background had no significant effect upon the ability of unelicited peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli (even though the mouse strains differ widely in their in vivo susceptibilities to bacterial infection); and (iii) the FimH phenotype had no significant effect upon E. coli survival once the bacterium was inside a macrophage. Additionally, there was no correlation between the bacteriocidal effectiveness of a macrophage population and the number of bacteria bound per macrophage. However, macrophage populations that were the least bacteriocidal tended to bind higher ratios of FimH+ to Fim

  3. Macrophage activation: role of toll-like receptors, nitric oxide, and nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Billack, Blase

    2006-10-15

    Macrophages play an important role in host-defense and inflammation. In response to an immune challenge, macrophages become activated and produce proinflammatory mediators that contribute to nonspecific immunity. The mediators released by activated macrophages include: superoxide anion; reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite; bioactive lipids; and cytokines. Although essential to the immune response, overproduction of certain macrophage-derived mediators during an immune challenge or inflammatory response can result in tissue injury and cellular death. The present report is focused on understanding some of the molecular mechanisms used by macrophages to produce reactive nitrogen intermediates in response to immunostimulatory agents such as heat shock protein 60 and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The role of Toll-like receptors and transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the innate immune response is also described. A basic understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for macrophage activation should serve as a foundation for novel drug development aimed at modulating macrophage activity.

  4. Fate mapping analysis reveals that adult microglia derive from primitive macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Greter, Melanie; Leboeuf, Marylene; Nandi, Sayan; See, Peter; Gokhan, Solen; Mehler, Mark F; Conway, Simon J; Ng, Lai Guan; Stanley, E Richard; Samokhvalov, Igor M; Merad, Miriam

    2010-11-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system and are associated with the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative and brain inflammatory diseases; however, the origin of adult microglia remains controversial. We show that postnatal hematopoietic progenitors do not significantly contribute to microglia homeostasis in the adult brain. In contrast to many macrophage populations, we show that microglia develop in mice that lack colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) but are absent in CSF-1 receptor-deficient mice. In vivo lineage tracing studies established that adult microglia derive from primitive myeloid progenitors that arise before embryonic day 8. These results identify microglia as an ontogenically distinct population in the mononuclear phagocyte system and have implications for the use of embryonically derived microglial progenitors for the treatment of various brain disorders.

  5. Effects of Two Fullerene Derivatives on Monocytes and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pacor, Sabrina; Grillo, Alberto; Đorđević, Luka; Zorzet, Sonia; Lucafò, Marianna; Da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Sava, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Two fullerene derivatives (fullerenes 1 and 2), bearing a hydrophilic chain on the pyrrolidinic nitrogen, were developed with the aim to deliver anticancer agents to solid tumors. These two compounds showed a significantly different behaviour on human neoplastic cell lines in vitro in respect to healthy leukocytes. In particular, the pyrrolidinium ring on the fullerene carbon cage brings to a more active compound. In the present work, we describe the effects of these fullerenes on primary cultures of human monocytes and macrophages, two kinds of immune cells representing the first line of defence in the immune response to foreign materials. These compounds are not recognized by circulating monocytes while they get into macrophages. The evaluation of the pronecrotic or proapoptotic effects, analysed by means of analysis of the purinergic receptor P2X7 activation and of ROS scavenging activity, has allowed us to show that fullerene 2, but not its analogue fullerene 1, displays toxicity, even though at concentrations higher than those shown to be active on neoplastic cells.

  6. The effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophage growth factor secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated increased secretion of fibroblast growth factor (MDGF) activity by alveolar macrophages obtained from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism by which bleomycin promotes this increase in MDGF secretion is not clear, however. The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophages. Normal rat alveolar macrophages obtained by lavage were cultured in the presence or absence of bleomycin; conditioned media from these cultures were dialyzed to remove bleomycin and then assayed in vitro for MDGF activity. Alveolar macrophages incubated with 0.01 microgram to 1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 18 hours secreted significantly more MDGF than macrophages incubated without bleomycin. Viability of macrophages as determined by exclusion of trypan blue and release of LDH was unaffected by any dose tested. Maximal MDGF production was seen with bleomycin doses of greater than or equal to 0.1 microgram/ml. When alveolar macrophages were incubated with 0.1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 0.5-18 hours, MDGF activity was detected as early as 1 hour, with peak responses found at 4-8 hours. Macrophages stimulated with bleomycin continued to produce significant amounts of MDGF even after bleomycin was removed and replaced with fresh (bleomycin-free) media. MDGF secretion by bleomycin-stimulated alveolar macrophages was inhibited by cycloheximide, and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors NDGA (nordihydroguairetic acid) and BW755c, indicating not only a requirement for protein synthesis but also for metabolites of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism for full expression of activity(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2464942

  7. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  8. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  9. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  10. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor induction of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and osteophyte-inducing factors in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dankbar, Berno; Neugebauer, Katja; Wunrau, Christina; Tibesku, Carsten O; Skwara, Adrian; Pap, Thomas; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne

    2007-05-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is supposed to play a role in cartilage repair. Because the development of osteophytes is a major characteristic of OA and thought to be part of an attempted repair process, the purpose of this study was to determine whether HGF may be involved in osteophyte formation. HGF levels in synovial fluids from 41 patients assessed by enzyme immunosorbant assay were correlated with disease severity and osteophyte formation, evaluated by anteroposterior weight-bearing radiographs. Detection of HGF, c-Met, and CD68 in cartilage and synovial tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Effects of HGF on the secretion of TGF-beta1 and BMP-2 by chondrocytes, fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS), and macrophages as well as HGF-induced secretion of MCP-1 by FLS and chondrocytes were determined by ELISA. HGF was detected in all synovial fluids and concentrations correlated highly with disease severity and osteophyte formation (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed weak synovial staining for HGF, whereas increasing numbers of HGF expressing chondrocytes were detected depending on disease severity. In addition, an increased number of macrophages in synovial specimens was observed, which was likewise severity dependent. In a series of subsequent in vitro studies, HGF remarkable induced MCP-1 secretion by FLS in a dose-dependent manner. No effect on TGF-beta1 and BMP-2 secretion by FLS and chondrocytes was evident upon HGF stimulation, whereas secretion of these growth factors by PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells was significantly increased by HGF. The results indicate that HGF may facilitate osteophyte development by promoting MCP-1-mediated entry of monocytes/macrophages into the OA-affected joint and/or by stimulating macrophage-derived growth factors.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator of macrophage helminthotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J; Goldenberg, S; Meltzer, M S; Pearce, E

    1990-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated macrophages are cytotoxic for larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. That soluble secreted factors may mediate this cytotoxicity was suggested by the observation that culture supernatant fluids from stimulated macrophages also exhibited larvacidal activity. These fluids contain the monokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Several observations indicated that TNF is directly toxic to schistosome larvae. Cytotoxic sera taken from BCG- or S. mansoni-immunized mice after endotoxin challenge killed schistosomula in vitro, and upon gel filtration the larvacidal factor(s) in the sera co-eluted with the tumoricidal activity defined as TNF. Recombinant-derived TNF exhibited direct toxicity to schistosomula at high concentrations, or at lower concentrations in the presence of IFN gamma. The larvacidal activity of macrophage supernatant fluids was abrogated by addition of either anti-TNF antisera or Zn+2, which has been shown to inhibit TNF-induced damage of tumour cells. Anti-TNF and Zn+2 likewise suppressed schistosomulum killing by lymphokine-activated peritoneal macrophages or the IC-21 macrophage line, indicating that TNF also plays a role in the effector mechanism of larval killing by whole cells. PMID:2314921

  13. Serum factors, cell membrane CD14, and beta2 integrins are not required for activation of bovine macrophages by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Jungi, T W; Sager, H; Adler, H; Brcic, M; Pfister, H

    1997-01-01

    The role of serum factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and of macrophage-expressed CD14 and beta2 integrins in the activation of bovine macrophages by LPS was investigated. Macrophage activation was determined by measuring tumor necrosis factor production, NO generation, and upregulation of procoagulant activity by LPS (Escherichia coli O55:B5) at concentrations of 100 pg/ml to 100 ng/ml. The 50% effective dose for LPS was 1 order of magnitude higher than that for activating human macrophages. Macrophages were activated by LPS in the presence of serum or in the presence of albumin demonstrated to be free of LBP. The capacity to react to LPS in the absence of LBP was not due to the acquisition of LBP during a previous culture in serum. It was then established which CD14-specific antibodies block LPS binding to monocytes. Among the CD14-specific antibodies recognizing bovine mononuclear phagocytes (60bca, 3C10, My4, CAM36, VPM65, CMRF31, and TUK4), the first four blocked the binding of LPS-fluorescein isothiocyanate to bovine monocytes at low concentrations. Anti-CD14 antibodies did not block LPS-mediated activation of bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages, monocyte-derived macrophages, and alveolar macrophages. This was observed in experiments in which anti-CD14 concentrations exceeded the 50% inhibitory dose by >30-fold (3C10 and My4) or >300-fold (60bca), as defined in the binding assay described above. Monocyte-derived macrophages from an animal deficient in beta2 integrins and control macrophages were activated by similar concentrations of LPS, suggesting that beta2 integrins are not important bovine LPS receptors. Thus, in bovine macrophages, LPS recognition pathways which are independent of exogenous LBP, of membrane-expressed CD14, and of beta2 integrins may exist. PMID:9284122

  14. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  15. Differential induction of bone marrow macrophage proliferation by mycoplasmas involves granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, P M; Cassell, G H; Woodward, J G

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the ability of three different Mycoplasma species to induce proliferation of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM). We observed a significant mitogenic effect when BMM cells from BALB/c, DBA/2J, SJL, and C57BL/6 mice were incubated with membranes derived from Mycoplasma arginini or M. arthritidis but not when they were incubated with an equivalent amount of M. pulmonis membrane. We also determined that pretreatment of mycoplasma membrane preparations with papain eliminated the ability of these preparations to induce BMM proliferation. To determine whether these membrane fractions acted indirectly by stimulating the production of soluble factors known to stimulate proliferation of BMM cells, we performed blocking studies with antibodies directed against colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Our results indicate that antibodies directed against either CSF-1 or IL-3 failed to block mycoplasma-initiated proliferation of BMM cells. However, when anti-GM-CSF was added to proliferative cultures at the time of initiation, we saw a dose-dependent reduction of mycoplasma-initiated proliferation. We conclude that the ability of mycoplasma membranes to initiate the proliferation of BMM is not shared by all species of mycoplasma and that it involves the production of GM-CSF by an as yet undetermined cell. PMID:2228227

  16. Probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens mediate M1 macrophage polarization in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Hu, Sheng-Lan; Cui, Zhi-Wen; Li, Wei-Fen

    2013-05-01

    Depending on the microenvironment, macrophages can acquire distinct functional phenotypes, referred to as classically activated M1 and M2. M1 macrophages are considered potent effector cells that kill intracellular pathogens, and M2 macrophages promote the resolution of wound healing. In this study, we are interested to know whether probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (Ba) can induce macrophages polarization. Real-time fluorescence PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of IL-1β, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 genes for M1 macrophages was significantly increased at 1.5 h after probiotic Ba treatment compared to the probiotic Ba-free treatment (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of M2 macrophage marker genes (Arg1, Fizz1, MR, Ym1) was decreased (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the phagocytic activity was dramatically increased in the Ba-treated BMDMs using a FITC-dextran endocytosis assay. Together, these findings indicated that probiotic Ba facilitated polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytic capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about probiotic function-involved macrophage polarization.

  17. Myeloid cell-derived inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses M1 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Geming; Zhang, Ruihua; Geng, Shuo; Peng, Liang; Jayaraman, Padmini; Chen, Chun; Xu, Feifong; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Qin; Zheng, Hao; Shen, Kimberly; Wang, Juan; Liu, Xiyu; Wang, Weidong; Zheng, Zihan; Qi, Chen-Feng; Si, Chuanping; He, John Cijiang; Liu, Kebin; Lira, Sergio A; Sikora, Andrew G; Li, Liwu; Xiong, Huabao

    2015-03-27

    Here we show that iNOS-deficient mice display enhanced classically activated M1 macrophage polarization without major effects on alternatively activated M2 macrophages. eNOS and nNOS mutant mice show comparable M1 macrophage polarization compared with wild-type control mice. Addition of N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine dihydrochloride, an iNOS inhibitor, significantly enhances M1 macrophage polarization while S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, a NO donor, suppresses M1 macrophage polarization. NO derived from iNOS mediates nitration of tyrosine residues in IRF5 protein, leading to the suppression of IRF5-targeted M1 macrophage signature gene activation. Computational analyses corroborate a circuit that fine-tunes the expression of IL-12 by iNOS in macrophages, potentially enabling versatile responses based on changing microenvironments. Finally, studies of an experimental model of endotoxin shock show that iNOS deficiency results in more severe inflammation with an enhanced M1 macrophage activation phenotype. These results suggest that NO derived from iNOS in activated macrophages suppresses M1 macrophage polarization.

  18. Changes of transmembrane Ca2+ gradient in the formation of macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, F

    2000-02-01

    Macrophages from C57BL/6J mice, an animal susceptible to atherosclerosis, were chosen as target cells to study changes in the transmembrane Ca2+ gradient during the formation of macrophage-derived foam cells. The transmembrane Ca2+ gradients of single living cells were examined-using Fura-2/AM combined with Fluo-3/AM by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Exposure to Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein, decreases the Ca2+ gradient across macrophage plasma membrane, but increases that across the nuclear membrane. The altered transmembrane Ca2+ gradients could induce the up-regulation of scavenger receptor in macrophages, resulting in the formation of foam cells.

  19. Interleukin-1 released by blood-monocyte-derived macrophages from patients with leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Ridel, P R; Jamet, P; Robin, Y; Bach, M A

    1986-01-01

    In highly purified blood-monocyte-derived macrophages collected from patients with leprosy and from healthy individuals and cultured in vitro with mycobacterial antigens such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Mycobacterium leprae, we nonspecifically induced the synthesis of interleukin-1. Normally, all supernatants from cultured macrophages of all subjects tested produced similar amounts of interleukin-1. However, only in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M. leprae, but not BCG, induced high-level synthesis of prostaglandin E2, which acted as a suppressor factor in the mouse thymocyte proliferative assay used to measure the interleukin-1 content of the supernatants. Normal interleukin-1 content of those supernatants was demonstrated by blocking the prostaglandin E2 synthesis by the addition of indomethacin to the medium throughout the experimental procedure. We also tested the efficiency of a combination of BCG and M. leprae in reducing the prostaglandin E2 synthesis, but with the methodology used, we did not observe any beneficial effect of such a combination. These results demonstrate the possible role of M. leprae in the induction of at least one of the suppressive monokines and are additional arguments for the involvement of macrophages in the suppression of the specific cell-mediated immunity to M. leprae observed in lepromatous leprosy. PMID:3514458

  20. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6-8 wk) and old (18-22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  1. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age. PMID:26940652

  2. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  3. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  4. The Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Homolog of Entamoeba histolytica Binds to and Immunomodulates Host Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moonah, Shannon N.; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M.; Haque, Rashidul

    2014-01-01

    The host inflammatory response contributes to the tissue damage that occurs during amebic colitis, with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) being a key mediator of the gut inflammation observed. Mammalian macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in the exacerbation of a wide range of inflammatory diseases, including colitis. We identified a MIF gene homolog in the Entamoeba histolytica genome, raising the question of whether E. histolytica MIF (EhMIF) has proinflammatory activity similar to that of mammalian MIF. In this report, we describe the first functional characterization of EhMIF. Antibodies were prepared against recombinantly expressed EhMIF and used to demonstrate that EhMIF is expressed as a 12-kDa protein localized to the cytoplasm of trophozoites. In a manner similar to that of mammalian MIF, EhMIF interacted with the MIF receptor CD74 and bound to macrophages. EhMIF induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production. In addition, EhMIF enhanced TNF-α secretion by amplifying TNF-α production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and by inhibiting the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of TNF-α secretion. EhMIF was expressed during human infection, as evidenced by the presence of anti-EhMIF antibodies in the sera of children living in an area where E. histolytica infection is endemic. Anti-EhMIF antibodies did not cross-react with human MIF. The ability of EhMIF to modulate host macrophage function may promote an exaggerated proinflammatory immune response and contribute to the tissue damage seen in amebic colitis. PMID:24818664

  5. Embryonic and adult-derived resident cardiac macrophages are maintained through distinct mechanisms at steady state and during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J; Beaudin, Anna E; Sojka, Dorothy K; Carrero, Javier A; Calderon, Boris; Brija, Thaddeus; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Ivanov, Stoyan; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Schilling, Joel D; Schwendener, Reto; Sergin, Ismail; Razani, Babak; Forsberg, E Camilla; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Unanue, Emil R; Colonna, Marco; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Mann, Douglas L

    2014-01-16

    Cardiac macrophages are crucial for tissue repair after cardiac injury but are not well characterized. Here we identify four populations of cardiac macrophages. At steady state, resident macrophages were primarily maintained through local proliferation. However, after macrophage depletion or during cardiac inflammation, Ly6c(hi) monocytes contributed to all four macrophage populations, whereas resident macrophages also expanded numerically through proliferation. Genetic fate mapping revealed that yolk-sac and fetal monocyte progenitors gave rise to the majority of cardiac macrophages, and the heart was among a minority of organs in which substantial numbers of yolk-sac macrophages persisted in adulthood. CCR2 expression and dependence distinguished cardiac macrophages of adult monocyte versus embryonic origin. Transcriptional and functional data revealed that monocyte-derived macrophages coordinate cardiac inflammation, while playing redundant but lesser roles in antigen sampling and efferocytosis. These data highlight the presence of multiple cardiac macrophage subsets, with different functions, origins, and strategies to regulate compartment size.

  6. Protective effects of macrophage-derived interferon against encephalomyocarditis virus-induced diabetes mellitus in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, K; Ogiso, Y; Takeda, M; Lee, M J; Itagaki, S; Doi, K

    1995-12-01

    The involvement of macrophages in protection against diabetes mellitus in mice of BALB/c (susceptible) and C57BL (resistant) strains infected with the B (non-diabetogenic) or D (highly diabetogenic) variant of encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus was examined. Pretreatment with the B variant of EMC virus (EMC-B), avirulent interferon (IFN) inducer, or Corynebacterium parvum inhibited diabetes in BALB/c mice infected with the D variant of EMC virus (EMC-D). Treatment of C57BL mice with carrageenan to compromise macrophage function rendered C57BL mice susceptible to EMC-D-induced diabetes. In macrophage culture for BALB/c mice, EMC-B induced IFN at an earlier stage than did EMC-D. The C57BL mouse-derived macrophages produced more IFN than did BALB/c mouse-derived macrophages after stimulation with EMC-D. Moreover, C. parvum increased IFN production in macrophage cultures from BALB/c mice, whereas carrageenan inhibited that in macrophage cultures from C57BL mice. These results suggest that IFN derived from macrophages may have an important role in protecting mice against EMC virus infection. PMID:8746525

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  8. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamir,D.; Zierow, S.; Leng, L.; Cho, Y.; Diaz, Y.; Griffith, J.; McDonald, C.; Merk, M.; Mitchell, R.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 A). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (K(d) = 2.9 x 10(-8) M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction.

  9. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Kamir, Daniela; Zierow, Swen; Leng, Lin; Cho, Yoonsang; Diaz, Yira; Griffith, Jason; McDonald, Courtney; Merk, Melanie; Mitchell, Robert A.; Trent, John; Chen, Yibang; Kwong, Yuen-Kwan Amy; Xiong, Huabao; Vermeire, Jon; Cappello, Michael; McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Walker, John; Bernhagen, Jurgen; Lolis, Elias; Bucala, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 Å). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (Kd = 2.9 × 10−8 M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction. PMID:18523291

  10. Adsorbed Fibrinogen Enhances Production of Bone- and Angiogenic-Related Factors by Monocytes/Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Joana; Oliveira, Marta I.; Colton, Erica; McNally, Amy K.; Oliveira, Carla; Anderson, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells with great importance in guiding multiple stages of inflammation and tissue repair. By producing a large number of biologically active molecules, they can affect the behavior of other cells and events, such as the foreign body response and angiogenesis. Since protein adsorption to biomaterials is crucial for the inflammatory process, we addressed the ability of the pro-inflammatory molecule fibrinogen (Fg) to modulate macrophage behavior toward tissue repair/regeneration. For this purpose, we used chitosan (Ch) as a substrate for Fg adsorption. Freshly isolated human monocytes were seeded on Ch substrates alone or previously adsorbed with Fg, and allowed to differentiate into macrophages for 10 days. Cell adhesion and morphology, formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGC), and secretion of a total of 80 cytokines and growth factors were evaluated. Both substrates showed similar numbers of adherent macrophages along differentiation as compared with RGD-coated surfaces, which were used as positive controls. Fg did not potentiate FBGC formation. In addition, actin cytoskeleton staining revealed the presence of punctuate F-actin with more elongated and interconnecting cells on Ch substrates. Antibody array screening and quantification of inflammation- and wound-healing-related factors indicated an overall reduction in Ch-based substrates versus RGD-coated surfaces. At late times, most inflammatory agents were down-regulated in the presence of Fg, in contrast to growth factor production, which was stimulated by Fg. Importantly, on Ch+Fg substrates, fully differentiated macrophages produced significant amounts of macrophage inflammatory protein-1delta (MIP-1δ), platelet-derived growth factor-BB, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-5, and BMP-7 compared with Ch alone. In addition, other important factors involved in bone homeostasis and wound healing, such as growth hormone, transforming growth factor-β3, and insulin-like growth factor

  11. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation.

  12. Polarized Macrophages Have Distinct Roles in the Differentiation and Migration of Embryonic Spinal-cord-derived Neural Stem Cells After Grafting to Injured Sites of Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Jingjing; Bian, Ganlan; Liu, Ling; Xue, Qian; Liu, Fangfang; Yu, Caiyong; Zhang, Haifeng; Song, Bing; Chung, Sookja K; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently provokes serious detrimental outcomes because neuronal regeneration is limited in the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the creation of a permissive environment for transplantation therapy with neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) is a promising strategy to replace lost neuronal cells, promote repair, and stimulate functional plasticity after SCI. Macrophages are important SCI-associated inflammatory cells and a major source of secreted factors that modify the lesion milieu. Here, we used conditional medium (CM) from bone marrow-derived M1 or M2 polarized macrophages to culture murine NS/PCs. The NS/PCs showed enhanced astrocytic versus neuronal/oligodendrocytic differentiation in the presence of M1- versus M2-CM. Similarly, cotransplantation of NS/PCs with M1 and M2 macrophages into intact or injured murine spinal cord increased the number of engrafted NS/PC-derived astrocytes and neurons/oligodendrocytes, respectively. Furthermore, when cotransplantated with M2 macrophages, the NS/PC-derived neurons integrated into the local circuitry and enhanced locomotor recovery following SCI. Interesting, engrafted M1 macrophages promoted long-distance rostral migration of NS/PC-derived cells in a chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4)-dependent manner, while engrafted M2 macrophages resulted in limited cell migration of NS/PC-derived cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that the cotransplantation of NS/PCs together with polarized macrophages could constitute a promising therapeutic approach for SCI repair.

  13. Fine-tuning of macrophage activation using synthetic rocaglate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Devine, William G.; Kobzik, Lester; Beeler, Aaron B.; Porco, John A.; Kramnik, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria represent a significant global threat. Given the dearth of new antibiotics, host-directed therapies (HDTs) are especially desirable. As IFN-gamma (IFNγ) plays a central role in host resistance to intracellular bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we searched for small molecules to augment the IFNγ response in macrophages. Using an interferon-inducible nuclear protein Ipr1 as a biomarker of macrophage activation, we performed a high-throughput screen and identified molecules that synergized with low concentration of IFNγ. Several active compounds belonged to the flavagline (rocaglate) family. In primary macrophages a subset of rocaglates 1) synergized with low concentrations of IFNγ in stimulating expression of a subset of IFN-inducible genes, including a key regulator of the IFNγ network, Irf1; 2) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and type I IFN and 3) induced autophagy. These compounds may represent a basis for macrophage-directed therapies that fine-tune macrophage effector functions to combat intracellular pathogens and reduce inflammatory tissue damage. These therapies would be especially relevant to fighting drug-resistant pathogens, where improving host immunity may prove to be the ultimate resource. PMID:27086720

  14. Embryonic stem cell-derived M2-like macrophages delay cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dreymueller, Daniela; Denecke, Bernd; Ludwig, Andreas; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-01-01

    In adults, repair of deeply injured skin wounds results in the formation of scar tissue, whereas in embryos wounds heal almost scar-free. Macrophages are important mediators of wound healing and secrete cytokines and tissue remodeling enzymes. In contrast to host defense mediated by inflammatory M1 macrophages, wound healing and tissue repair involve regulatory M2/M2-like macrophages. Embryonic/fetal macrophages are M2-like, and this may promote scar-free wound healing. In the present study, we asked whether atopical application of ex vivo generated, embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM) improve wound healing in mice. ESDM were tested side by side with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Compared to BMDM, ESDM resembled a less inflammatory and more M2-like macrophage subtype as indicated by their reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors, and reduced bacterial phagocytosis. Despite this anti-inflammatory phenotype in cell culture, ESDM prolonged the healing of deep skin wounds even more than BMDM. Healed wounds had more scar formation compared to wounds receiving BMDM or cell-free treatment. Our data indicate that atopical application of ex vivo generated macrophages is not a suitable cell therapy of dermal wounds.

  15. Functional significance of macrophage-derived exosomes in inflammation and pain.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Marguerite K; Tian, Yuzhen; Qureshi, Rehman A; Gormley, Michael; Ertel, Adam; Gao, Ruby; Aradillas Lopez, Enrique; Alexander, Guillermo M; Sacan, Ahmet; Fortina, Paolo; Ajit, Seena K

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes, secreted microvesicles transporting microRNAs (miRNAs), mRNAs, and proteins through bodily fluids, facilitate intercellular communication and elicit immune responses. Exosomal contents vary, depending on the source and the physiological conditions of cells, and can provide insights into how cells and systems cope with physiological perturbations. Previous analysis of circulating miRNAs in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a debilitating chronic pain disorder, revealed a subset of miRNAs in whole blood that are altered in the disease. To determine functional consequences of alterations in exosomal biomolecules in inflammation and pain, we investigated exosome-mediated information transfer in vitro, in a rodent model of inflammatory pain, and in exosomes from patients with CRPS. Mouse macrophage cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharides secrete exosomes containing elevated levels of cytokines and miRNAs that mediate inflammation. Transcriptome sequencing of exosomal RNA revealed global alterations in both innate and adaptive immune pathways. Exosomes from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cells were sufficient to cause nuclear factor-κB activation in naive cells, indicating functionality in recipient cells. A single injection of exosomes attenuated thermal hyperalgesia in a murine model of inflammatory pain, suggesting an immunoprotective role for macrophage-derived exosomes. Macrophage-derived exosomes carry a protective signature that is altered when secreting cells are exposed to an inflammatory stimulus. We also show that circulating miRNAs altered in patients with complex regional pain syndrome are trafficked by exosomes. With their systemic signaling capabilities, exosomes can induce pleiotropic effects potentially mediating the multifactorial pathology underlying chronic pain, and should be explored for their therapeutic utility.

  16. Effects of yeast-derived beta-glucans on blood cholesterol and macrophage functionality.

    PubMed

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of two different yeast-derived beta-glucans on macrophage functionality and blood cholesterol levels in mice. After establishing their ability to act as a strong stimulator of macrophages, we measured the capacities of the glucans to lower blood cholesterol. Our results showed that consumption of diets containing yeast-derived beta-glucan indicated a dose-dependent decrease in plasma cholesterol levels, with Betamune having a significantly stronger effect than WGP (Whole Glucan Particles). In hypercholesterolemic subjects, the cholesterol- and triglycerides-lowering effects of Betamune were again significantly stronger. The results of this investigation demonstrated that highly purified yeast-derived beta-glucans modify plasma cholesterol levels and other indicators associated with artherogenic progression in mice. The fact that these glucans also strongly stimulated both monocytes and macrophages supports the hypothesis that there could be a macrophage-cholesterol (metabolism) axis involvement in these outcomes.

  17. Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages in Post-Transplant, Relapsed Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Are Donor-Derived

    PubMed Central

    Morsberger, Laura A.; Yonescu, Raluca; Thiess, Michele L.; Batista, Denise A. S.; Ning, Yi; Burns, Kathleen H.; Vuica-Ross, Milena; Borowitz, Michael J.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated inflammatory cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) typically outnumber the neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, particularly the fraction of macrophages, has been associated with clinical behavior. Emerging work from animal models demonstrates that most tissue macrophages are maintained by a process of self-renewal under physiologic circumstances and certain inflammatory states, but the contribution from circulating monocytes may be increased in some disease states. This raises the question of the source of macrophages involved in human disease, particularly that of CHL. Patients with relapsed CHL following allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) provide a unique opportunity to begin to address this issue. We identified 4 such patients in our archives. Through molecular chimerism and/or XY FISH studies, we demonstrated the DNA content in the post-BMT recurrent CHL was predominantly donor-derived, while the H/RS cells were derived from the patient. Where possible to evaluate, the cellular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, including the percentage of macrophages, was similar to that of the original tumor. Our findings suggest that the H/RS cells themselves define the inflammatory environment. In addition, our results demonstrate that tumor-associated macrophages in CHL are predominantly derived from circulating monocytes rather than resident tissue macrophages. Given the association between tumor microenvironment and disease progression, a better understanding of macrophage recruitment to CHL may open new strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27685855

  18. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S.; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  19. GEC-derived SFRP5 inhibits Wnt5a-induced macrophage chemotaxis and activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenghai; Bu, Xianmin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Tingxian; Ma, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant macrophage infiltration and activation has been implicated in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis. Overexpression of Wnt5a and downregulation of SFRP5, a Wnt5a antagonist, were both observed in gastric cancers recently. This study attempted to explore whether Wnt5a/SFRP5 axis was involved in macrophage chemotaxis and activation. It was found that both Wnt5a transfection and recombinant Wnt5a (rWnt5a) treatment upregulated CCL2 expression in macrophages, involving JNK and NFκB signals. Conditioned medium from Wnt5a-treated macrophages promoted macrophage chemotaxis mainly dependent on CCL2. SFRP5 from gastric epithelial cells (GECs) inhibited Wnt5a-induced CCL2 expression and macrophage chemotaxis. In addition, Wnt5a treatment stimulated macrophages to produce inflammatory cytokines and COX-2/PGE2, which was also suppressed by SFRP5 from GECs. These results demonstrate that Wnt5a induces macrophage chemotaxis and activation, which can be blocked by GEC-derived SFRP5, suggesting that Wnt5a overproduction and SFRP5 deficiency in gastric mucosa may together play an important role in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis.

  20. CXCL10 induces the recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages into kidney, which aggravate puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis.

    PubMed

    Petrovic-Djergovic, D; Popovic, M; Chittiprol, S; Cortado, H; Ransom, R F; Partida-Sánchez, S

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism responsible for trafficking of monocyte-derived macrophages into kidney in the puromycin aminonucleoside model of nephrotic syndrome in rats (PAN-NS), and the significance of this infiltration, remain largely unknown. CXCL10, a chemokine secreted in many T helper type 1 (Th1) inflammatory diseases, exhibits important roles in trafficking of monocytes and activated T cells. We hypothesized that induction of circulating interferon (IFN)-γ and glomerular tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α during PAN-NS would stimulate the release of CXCL10 by podocytes, leading to infiltration of activated immune cells and greater glomerular injury. We found that serum IFN-γ, glomerular Cxcl10 mRNA and intra- and peri-glomerular macrophage infiltration were induced strongly during the late acute phase of PAN-NS in Wistar rats, but not in nude (Foxn1(rnu/rnu) ) rats lacking functional effector T lymphocytes. Wistar rats also developed significantly greater proteinuria than nude rats, which could be abolished by macrophage depletion. Stimulation of cultured podocytes with both IFN-γ and TNF-α markedly induced the expression of Cxcl10 mRNA and CXCL10 secretion. Together, these data support our hypothesis that increased circulating IFN-γ and glomerular TNF-α induce synergistically the production and secretion of CXCL10 by podocytes, attracting activated macrophages into kidney tissue. The study also suggests that IFN-γ, secreted from Th1 lymphocytes, may prime proinflammatory macrophages that consequently aggravate renal injury.

  1. Protein Kinase C and NF-κB-dependent CD4 down-regulation in macrophages induced by T cell-derived soluble factors: consequences for HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Trudgian, David C.; Thomas, Benjamin; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Cowley, Sally A.; James, William

    2013-01-01

    Upon activation, CD4+ T cells release cytokines, chemokines and other soluble factors that influence the kinetics of HIV-1 replication in macrophages (Mϕ). Here, we show that activation of human primary T cells suppresses the early stages of HIV-1 replication in human primary Mϕ by down-regulating the main cellular receptor for the virus, CD4. The secreted factors responsible for this effect have a molecular weight greater than conventional cytokines, are independent of Th1 or Th2 polarization, and are not IFN-γ, IL-16, RANTES nor MIF, as revealed by cytokine array analysis and neutralization assays. CD4 down-regulation is entirely post-translational and involves serine phosphorylation of CD4 and its targeting to an intracellular compartment destined for acidification and degradation. CD4 down-regulation is dependent on the activities of both protein kinase C (PKC) and NF-κB, as well as the proteasomes. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis in conjugation with label free protein quantitation software we found that proteins that promote Mϕ adherence and spreading, such as attractin, fibronectin and galectin-3-binding protein, were significantly over-represented in the activated T cell supernatant fractions. These results reveal the existence of previously unreported anti-HIV-1 proteins, released by activated T cells that down-regulate CD4 expression and are of fundamental importance to understand the kinetics of HIV infection in vivo. PMID:21666058

  2. Macrophage-derived Lipocalin-2 contributes to ischemic resistance mechanisms by protecting from renal injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Michaela; Brüne, Bernhard; Hotter, Georgina; Sola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury triggers an inflammatory response associated to infiltrating macrophages which determines the further outcome of disease. Brown Norway rats are known to show endogenous resistance to ischemia-induced renal damage. By contrast, Sprague Dawley rats exhibit a higher susceptibility to ischemic injury. In order to ascertain cytoprotective mechanisms, we focused on the implication of lipocalin-2 protein in main resistance mechanisms in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by using adoptive macrophage administration, genetically modified ex vivo either to overexpress or to knockdown lipocalin-2. In vitro experiments with bone marrow-derived macrophages both from Brown Norway rats and from Sprague Dawley rats under hypoxic conditions showed endogenous differences regarding cytokine and lipocalin-2 expression profile in the two strains. Most interestingly, we observed that macrophages of the resistant strain express significantly more lipocalin-2. In vivo studies showed that tubular epithelial cell apoptosis and renal injury significantly increased and reparative markers decreased in Brown Norway rats after injection of lipocalin-2-knockdown macrophages, while the administration of lipocalin-2-overexpressing cells significantly decreased Sprague Dawley susceptibility. These data point to a crucial role of macrophage-derived lipocalin-2 in endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms. We conclude that expression of lipocalin-2 in tissue-infiltrating macrophages is pivotal for kidney-intrinsic cytoprotective pathways during ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:26911537

  3. In-vivo blockage of neutrophil migration by LPS is mimicked by a factor released from LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, F. Q.; Souza, G. E.; Souza, C. A.; Cerqueira, B. C.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effect of an intravenous injection of the macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MNCF) (Cunha & Ferreira 1986) on neutrophil migration to rat peritoneal cavities, which were challenged with chemotactic stimuli. Macrophage monolayers stimulated by LPS release a factor (MW greater than 10,000 D) which, when injected intravenously, blocked neutrophil migration in carrageenin-induced peritonitis. This inhibition was dependent on dose and lasted more than 2 h. It was not due to neutropaenia, hypotension or LPS contamination. Neutrophil migration induced by LPS, MNCF, the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also blocked by intravenous administration of the factor. Intravenous injection of recombinant interleukin 1 beta or tumour necrosis factor-alpha, present in the samples of the factor, failed to reproduce the described inhibitory effect on neutrophil migration. The release of this factor by LPS-stimulated macrophage monolayers was inhibited by dexamethasone but not by indomethacin. It is suggested that the failure of neutrophils to migrate during septicaemia may be the result of a continuous release of chemotactic factors in the circulation, particularly of the macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor(s). PMID:2647118

  4. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  5. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Is a Novel Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Maria Cristina; Vercelli, Alessandro; Repici, Mariaelena; Follenzi, Antonia; Comoglio, Paolo M.

    2001-01-01

    Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP), also known as hepatocyte growth factor-like, is a soluble cytokine that belongs to the family of the plasminogen-related growth factors (PRGFs). PRGFs are α/β heterodimers that bind to transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors. MSP was originally isolated as a chemotactic factor for peritoneal macrophages. Through binding to its receptor, encoded by the RON gene, it stimulates dissociation of epithelia and works as an inflammatory mediator by repressing the production of nitric oxide (NO). Here, we identify a novel role for MSP in the central nervous system. As a paradigm to analyze this function we chose the hypoglossal system of adult mice. We demonstrate in vivo that either administration of exogenous MSP or transplantation of MSP-producing cells at the proximal stump of the resected nerve is sufficient to prevent motoneuron atrophy upon axotomy. We also show that the MSP gene is expressed in the tongue, the target of the hypoglossal nerve, and that MSP induces biosynthesis of Ron receptor in the motoneuron somata. Finally, we show that MSP suppresses NO production in the injured hypoglossal nuclei. Together, these data suggest that MSP is a novel neurotrophic factor for cranial motoneurons and, by regulating the production of NO, may have a role in brain plasticity and regeneration. PMID:11359926

  6. Involvement of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy and Efficacy of Human iPS Cell-Derived Macrophages in Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ito, Takaaki; Senju, Satoru; Ando, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients. Furthermore, the proportion of intracellular TTR in CD14+ monocytes was reduced in peripheral blood compared with healthy donors. Based on these results, we next examined degradation and endocytosis of TTR in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid lineage cells (MLs), which function like macrophages. iPS-MLs express CD163 and CD206, and belong to the inhibitory macrophage category. In addition, iPS-MLs degrade both native and aggregated TTR in a cell-dependent manner in vitro. Further, iPS-MLs endocytose aggregated, and especially polymerized, TTR. These results suggest that decreased tissue-localized macrophages disrupt clearance of TTR-derived amyloid deposits, leading to progression of a pathological condition in FAP patients. To improve this situation, clinical application of pluripotent stem cell-derived MLs may be useful as an approach for FAP therapy. PMID:27695122

  7. Activated Human Mast Cells Induce LOX-1-Specific Scavenger Receptor Expression in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Alanne-Kinnunen, Mervi; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Results Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1), which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell –induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages. Conclusions Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis. PMID:25250731

  8. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Hankey, Pamela; Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary; Yu, Shan; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  9. Diverse HLA-I Peptide Repertoires of the APC Lines MUTZ3-Derived Immature and Mature Dendritic Cells and THP1-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nyambura, Lydon Wainaina; Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Baleeiro, Renato Brito; Walden, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are specialized APCs that process and present self-Ags for induction of tolerance and foreign Ags to initiate T cell-mediated immunity. Related to differentiation states they have specific phenotypes and functions. However, the impact of these differentiations on Ag processing and presentation remains poorly defined. To gain insight into this, we analyzed and compared the HLA-I peptidomes of MUTZ3-derived human immature and mature DC lines and THP1-derived macrophages by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We found that the HLA-I peptidomes were heterogeneous and individualized and were dominated by nonapeptides with similar HLA-I binding affinities and anchor residues. MUTZ3-derived DCs and THP1-derived macrophages were able to sample peptides from source proteins of almost all subcellular locations and were involved in various cellular functions in similar proportion, with preference to proteins involved in cell communication, signal transduction, protein metabolism, and transcription factor/regulator activity. PMID:27543614

  10. Particulate matter phagocytosis induces tissue factor in differentiating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Milano, M; Dongiovanni, P; Artoni, A; Gatti, S; Rosso, L; Colombo, F; Bollati, V; Maggioni, M; Mannucci, P M; Bertazzi, P A; Fargion, S; Valenti, L

    2016-01-01

    Airborne exposure to particulate matter with diameter < 10 mcM (PM10) has been linked to an increased risk of thromboembolic events, but the mechanisms are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PM10 phagocytosis on the release of procoagulant molecules in human differentiating macrophages, and that of PM10 inhalation in an experimental model in rats. Human monocytes were separated from the peripheral blood by the lymphoprep method, differentiated in vitro and treated with standard PM10 or vehicle. Sprague-Dawley rats were instilled intratracheally with PM10 or vehicle alone. The outcome was expression of proinflammatory genes and of tissue factor (TF). In human differentiating macrophages, PM10 exposure upregulated inflammatory genes, but most consistently induced TF mRNA and protein levels, but not TF protein inhibitor, resulting in increased TF membrane expression and a procoagulant phenotype. Differentiation towards the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype inhibited PM10 -mediated TF expression. TF induction required phagocytosis of PM10 , whereas phagocytosis of inert particles was less effective. PM10 phagocytosis was associated with a gene expression profile consistent with intracellular retention of iron, inducing oxidative stress. Both PM10 and iron activated the stress kinases ERK1/2 pathway, involved in the induction of TF expression. In rats, alveolar exposure to PM10 was associated with pulmonary recruitment of inflammatory cells and resulted in local, but not systemic, induction of TF expression, which was sufficient to increase circulating TF levels. In conclusion, TF induction by differentiating lung macrophages, activated following phagocytosis, contributes to the increased risk of thromboembolic complications associated with PM10 exposure.

  11. Human umbilical cord blood-derived f-macrophages retain pluripotentiality after thrombopoietin expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yong . E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu; Mazzone, Theodore

    2005-11-01

    We have previously characterized a new type of stem cell from human peripheral blood, termed fibroblast-like macrophage (f-M{phi}). Here, using umbilical cord blood as a source, we identified cells with similar characteristics including expression of surface markers (CD14, CD34, CD45, CD117, and CD163), phagocytosis, and proliferative capacity. Further, thrombopoietin (TPO) significantly stimulated the proliferation of cord blood-derived f-M{phi} (CB f-M{phi}) at low dosage without inducing a megakaryocytic phenotype. Additional experiments demonstrated that TPO-expanded cord blood-derived f-M{phi} (TCB f-M{phi}) retained their surface markers and differentiation ability. Treatment with vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) gave rise to endothelial-like cells, expressing Flt-1, Flk-1, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), CD31, acetylated low density lipoprotein internalization, and the ability to form endothelial-like cell chains. In the presence of lipopolyssacharide (LPS) and 25 mM glucose, the TCB f-M{phi} differentiated to express insulin mRNA, C-peptide, and insulin. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that these insulin-positive cells could release insulin in response to glucose and other secretagogues. These findings demonstrate a potential use of CB f-M{phi} and may lead to develop new therapeutic strategy for treating dominant disease.

  12. FNDC4 acts as an anti-inflammatory factor on macrophages and improves colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, Madeleen; Gerling, Marco; Pasto, Jenny; Georgiadi, Anastasia; Graham, Evan; Shilkova, Olga; Iwata, Yasunori; Almer, Sven; Söderman, Jan; Toftgård, Rune; Wermeling, Fredrik; Boström, Elisabeth Almer; Boström, Pontus Almer

    2016-01-01

    FNDC4 is a secreted factor sharing high homology with the exercise-associated myokine irisin (FNDC5). Here we report that Fndc4 is robustly upregulated in several mouse models of inflammation as well as in human inflammatory conditions. Specifically, FNDC4 levels are increased locally at inflamed sites of the intestine of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Interestingly, administration of recombinant FNDC4 in the mouse model of induced colitis markedly reduces disease severity compared with mice injected with a control protein. Conversely, mice lacking Fndc4 develop more severe colitis. Analysis of binding of FNDC4 to different immune cell types reveals strong and specific binding to macrophages and monocytes. FNDC4 treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro results in reduced phagocytosis, increased cell survival and reduced proinflammatory chemokine expression. Hence, treatment with FNDC4 results in a state of dampened macrophage activity, while enhancing their survival. Thus, we have characterized FNDC4 as a factor with direct therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel disease and possibly other inflammatory diseases. PMID:27066907

  13. Transcriptional Response of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages after the Infection with Different Argentinean Mycobacterium bovis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Caimi, Karina; Blanco, Federico; Soria, Marcelo; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    Infection of bovines with Mycobacterium bovis causes important financial hardship in many countries presenting also a risk for humans. M. bovis is known to be adapted to survive and thrive within the intramacrophage environment. In spite of its relevance, at present the information about macrophage expression patterns is scarce, particularly regarding the bovine host. In this study, transcriptomic analysis was used to detect genes differentially expressed in macrophages derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells at early stages of infection with two Argentinean strains of M. bovis, a virulent and an attenuated strains. The results showed that the number of differentially expressed genes in the cells infected with the virulent strain (5) was significantly lower than those in the cells infected with the attenuated strain (172). Several genes were more strongly expressed in infected macrophages. Among them, we detected encoding transcription factors, anthrax toxin receptor, cell division and apoptosis regulator, ankyrin proteins, cytoskeleton proteins, protein of cell differentiation, and regulators of endocytic traffic of membrane. Quantitative real-time PCR of a selected group of differentially expressed genes confirmed the microarrays results. Altogether, the present results contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in the early interaction of M. bovis with the bovine macrophage. PMID:23484118

  14. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Methods Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/− IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ–activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10–polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti

  15. Critical Prosurvival Roles for C/EBPβ and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Macrophage Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wessells, Jennifer; Yakar, Shoshana; Johnson, Peter F.

    2004-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of leukemic cells is their ability to proliferate and survive in the absence of exogenous growth factors (GFs). However, the molecular mechanisms used by myeloid tumor cells to escape apoptosis are not fully understood. Here we report that Myc/Raf-transformed macrophages require the transcription factor C/EBPβ to prevent cell death. In contrast to wild-type cells, C/EBPβ−/− macrophages were completely dependent on macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for survival and displayed impaired tumorigenicity in vivo. Microarray analysis revealed that C/EBPβ-deficient cells expressed significantly reduced levels of the prosurvival factor insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Overexpression of C/EBPβ stimulated transcription from the IGF-I promoter, indicating that IGF-I is a direct transcriptional target of C/EBPβ. Serological neutralization of IGF-I in C/EBPβ+/+ tumor cell cultures induced apoptosis, showing that IGF-I functions as an autocrine survival factor in these cells. Macrophage tumor cells derived from IGF-I−/− mice were GF dependent, similar to C/EBPβ-deficient cells. Forced expression of either C/EBPβ or IGF-I in C/EBPβ−/− bone marrow cells restored Myc/Raf-induced transformation and permitted neoplastic growth without exogenous GFs. Thus, our findings demonstrate that C/EBPβ is essential for oncogenic transformation of macrophages and functions at least in part by regulating expression of the survival factor IGF-I. PMID:15060147

  16. Killing of Leishmania parasites in activated murine macrophages is based on an L-arginine-dependent process that produces nitrogen derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Maul, J.R.; Ransijn, A.; Buchmueller-Rouiller, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    The experiments described in this report were aimed at determining whether L-arginine (L-arg)-derived nitrogen oxidation products (nitric oxide, nitrous acid, nitrites) are involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania parasites by activated murine macrophages in vitro. Peritoneal or bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with L. enriettii or L. major, then activated by exposure to recombinant murine interferon-gamma or to macrophage activating factor (MAF)-rich media in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Activation of macrophages in regular (i.e., arginine-containing) culture medium led to complete destruction of the microorganisms within 24 h (L. enriettii) or 48 h (L. major), concomitant with accumulation of nitrites (NO2-) in the culture fluids. When macrophage activation was carried out in L-arg-free medium, however, neither parasite killing nor NO2- production was obtained. A similar inhibition of macrophage leishmanicidal activity and of NO2- release was observed using media treated with arginase (which converts L-arg to urea and ornithine), or supplemented with NG-monomethyl-L-arg or guanidine (which inhibit the conversion of L-arg to nitrogen oxidation products). In all these situations, an excellent correlation between the levels of NO2- production by macrophages and intracellular killing of Leishmania was observed, whereas no strict correlation was detectable between leishmanicidal activity and superoxide production. Intracellular parasite killing by activated macrophages could be prevented by addition of iron salts to the incubation fluids. Incubation of free parasites with NaNO2 at acid pH led to immobilisation, multiplication arrest, and morphological degeneration of the microorganisms. Similarly, exposure of infected cells to NaNO2 led to killing of the intracellular parasite without affecting macrophage viability.

  17. Orthologs of macrophage migration inhibitory factor from parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jon J.; Cho, Yoonsang; Lolis, Elias; Bucala, Richard; Cappello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic helminth infections are associated with modulation of host cellular immune responses, presumably to prolong parasite survival within the mammalian host. This phenomenon is attributed, at least in part, to the elaboration of parasite molecules, including orthologs of host cytokines and receptors, at the host–parasite interface. This review describes recent progress in the characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) orthologs from parasitic nematodes. The roles of these molecules in parasite developmental biology and pathogenesis are discussed. Further knowledge of the species-specific activities and three-dimensional structures of human and parasitic nematode MIF molecules should make them ideal targets for drug- and/or vaccine-based strategies aimed at nematode disease control. PMID:18603473

  18. Xylitol, an Anticaries Agent, Exhibits Potent Inhibition of Inflammatory Responses in Human THP-1-Derived Macrophages Infected With Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunjoo; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Sheon Min; Wallet, Shannon; Cha, Seunghee; Chung, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Xylitol is a well-known anticaries agent and has been used for the prevention and treatment of dental caries. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of xylitol are evaluated for possible use in the prevention and treatment of periodontal infections. Methods Cytokine expression was stimulated in THP-1 (human monocyte cell line)-derived macrophages by live Porphyromonas gingivalis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a commercial multiplex assay kit were used to determine the effects of xylitol on live P. gingivalis–induced production of cytokine. The effects of xylitol on phagocytosis and the production of nitric oxide were determined using phagocytosis assay, viable cell count, and Griess reagent. The effects of xylitol on P. gingivalis adhesion were determined by immunostaining, and costimulatory molecule expression was examined by flow cytometry. Results Live P. gingivalis infection increased the production of representative proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, in a multiplicity of infection– and time-dependent manner. Live P. gingivalis also enhanced the release of cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-12 p40, eotaxin, interferon γ–induced protein 10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1. The pretreatment of xylitol significantly inhibited the P. gingivalis– induced cytokines production and nitric oxide production. In addition, xylitol inhibited the attachment of live P. gingivalis on THP-1-derived macrophages. Furthermore, xylitol exerted anti-phagocytic activity against both Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis. Conclusion These findings suggest that xylitol acts as an antiinflammatory agent in THP-1-derived macrophages infected with live P. gingivalis, which supports its use in periodontitis. PMID:24592909

  19. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    PubMed

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Induction of Mitophagy in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-activated (TNFα) Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christina; English, Luc; Boulais, Jonathan; Chemali, Magali; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Desjardins, Michel; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity as professional phagocytes capable of internalizing and degrading pathogens to derive antigens for presentation to T cells. They also produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) that mediate local and systemic responses and direct the development of adaptive immunity. The present work describes the use of label-free quantitative proteomics to profile the dynamic changes of proteins from resting and TNF-α-activated mouse macrophages. These analyses revealed that TNF-α activation of macrophages led to the down-regulation of mitochondrial proteins and the differential regulation of several proteins involved in vesicle trafficking and immune response. Importantly, we found that the down-regulation of mitochondria proteins occurred through mitophagy and was specific to TNF-α, as other cytokines such as IL-1β and IFN-γ had no effect on mitochondria degradation. Furthermore, using a novel antigen presentation system, we observed that the induction of mitophagy by TNF-α enabled the processing and presentation of mitochondrial antigens at the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. These findings highlight an unsuspected role of TNF-α in mitophagy and expanded our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for MHC presentation of self-antigens. PMID:23674617

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages by Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Guadalupe; Celentano, Ana M.; Solana, María E.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Martínez Peralta, Liliana A.; Dolcini, Guillermina L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. Methodology/Principal Findings By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p<0.001) in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In different infection schemes with luciferase-reporter VSV-G or BaL pseudotyped HIV-1 and trypomastigotes, T. cruzi induced a significant reduction of luciferase level for both pseudotypes in all the infection schemes (p<0.001), T. cruzi-HIV (>99%) being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (∼90% for BaL and ∼85% for VSV-G) infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01). By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05). Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a ∼60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in

  2. Human macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces macrophage colonies after L-phenylalanine methylester treatment of human marrow.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, C S; Evans, C; Shadduck, R K

    1990-11-01

    Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) has well-known effects on murine bone marrow, but its colony stimulating activity for human bone marrow is controversial. After treatment of human bone marrow with L-phenylalanine methylester (PME), macrophage-colonies (CFU-M) were induced by M-CSF in a dose-dependent fashion. The optimal concentration of recombinant human-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhM-CSF) was 1,000 U/mL. Purified human urine M-CSF had colony stimulating activity similar to rhM-CSF. Further studies were performed to determine the factors responsible for the enhanced CFU-M formation from PME treated marrow. Compared with nylon wool and carbonyl iron monocyte depletion methods, PME eliminated significantly more monocytes and myeloid cells. This observation suggested that these cells may release hematopoietic inhibitory factors for CFU-M. Low concentrations (1%) but not normal (10%) concentrations of blood monocytes were inhibitory (mean inhibition, 48%) to CFU-M. High concentrations of monocytes (50%) augmented CFU-M colonies. HL-60 conditioned media was used to simulate secretory products of early myeloid cells. HL-60 conditioned media (1%) inhibited CFU-M formation but not granulocyte macrophage or granulocyte colonies. We conclude that M-CSF has colony stimulating activity for human marrow that can be recognized after removal of inhibitory cells by PME treatment. PMID:2224128

  3. Influence of cadmium, lead, and zinc on the ability of guinea pig macrophages to interact with macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kiremidjian-Schumacher, L.; Stotzky, G.; Dickstein, R.A.; Schwartz, J.

    1981-02-01

    The effects of cadmium, lead, and zinc on the ability of guinea pig macrophages to migrate and to interact with migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were studied by cell electrophoresis and the indirect migration inhibition assay. The metals significantly inhibited the motility of the cells and decreased or abolished the effect of MIF on their migration.

  4. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking.

  5. The Role of Macrophage Derived Urokinase Plasminogen Activator in Myocardial Infarct Repair

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Elina; Castellani, Chiara; Malchodi, Laura; Deem, Jennifer; Bertko, Kate; Meznarich, Jessica; Dishmon, Monja; Murry, Charles E.; Stempien-Otero, April

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac plasmin activity is increased following myocardial ischemia. To test the hypothesis that macrophage-derived uPA is a key mediator of repair following myocardial infarction we performed myocardial infarction on mice with macrophage specific over-expression of uPA (SR-uPA mice). SR-uPA+/0 mice and wild-type littermates were sacrificed at 5 days or 4 weeks after infarction and cardiac content of macrophages, collagen, and myofibroblasts was quantified. Cardiac function and dimensions were assessed by echocardiography at baseline and at 4 weeks post-infarction. At 4 weeks after myocardial infarction, macrophage counts were increased in SR-uPA+/0 mice in the infarct (13.1 vs. 4.9 %, P < 0.001) and distant uninfarcted regions (5.9 vs. 2.4%, P < 0.001). Infarct scar was thicker in SR-uPA+/0 mice (0.54 ± 0.03mm vs. 0.45 ± 0.03mm, P <0.05) and infarct cardiac collagen content was increased (72.4 ± 3.3% vs. 63.0 ± 3.6%, P < 0.06). Functionally, these changes resulted in mildly improved fractional shortening in SR-uPA+/o mice compared to controls (24.6 ±1.68 vs. 19.8 ± 1.3% P = 0.03). At 5 days after infarction there was increased collagen content in the scar without increases in macrophages or myofibroblasts. To understand the mechanisms by which macrophage derived uPA increases collagen, cardiac fibroblasts were treated with macrophage conditioned medium or plasmin and expression of ColIα1 measured by qPCR. Conditioned media from SR-uPA+/o or plasmin-treated nontransgenic macrophages but not plasmin alone increased collagen expression in isolated cardiac fibroblasts. We hypothesize that plasmin generation in the heart in response to injury may induce activation of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype to allow rapid formation of collagenous scar. PMID:20380835

  6. Chronicity following ischaemia-reperfusion injury depends on tubular-macrophage crosstalk involving two tubular cell-derived CSF-1R activators: CSF-1 and IL-34.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Two structurally unrelated ligands activate the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R, c-fms, CD115): M-CSF/CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34). Both ligands promote macrophage proliferation, survival and differentiation. IL-34 also activates the protein-tyrosine phosphatase ζ receptor (PTP-ζ, PTPRZ1). Both receptors and cytokines are increased during acute kidney injury. While tubular cell-derived CSF-1 is required for kidney repair, Baek et al (J Clin Invest 2015; 125: 3198-3214) have now identified tubular epithelial cell-derived IL-34 as a promoter of kidney neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and tubular cell destruction during experimental kidney ischaemia-reperfusion, leading to chronic injury. IL-34 promoted proliferation of both intrarenal macrophages and bone marrow cells, increasing circulating neutrophils and monocytes and their kidney recruitment. Thus, injured tubular cells release two CSF-1R activators, one (CSF-1) that promotes tubular cell survival and kidney repair and another (IL-34) that promotes chronic kidney damage. These results hold promise for the development of IL-34-targeting strategies to prevent ischaemia-reperfusion kidney injury in contexts such as kidney transplantation. However, careful consideration should be given to the recent characterization by Bezie et al. (J Clin Invest 2015; 125: 3952-3964) of IL-34 as a T regulatory cell (Treg) cytokine that modulates macrophage responses so that IL-34-primed macrophages potentiate the immune suppressive capacity of Tregs and promote graft tolerance. PMID:27190368

  7. Characterization of macrophages from the bony fish gilthead seabream using an antibody against the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mulero, Iván; Pilar Sepulcre, M; Roca, Francisco J; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Mulero, Victoriano

    2008-01-01

    Two major professional phagocyte populations have been described in fish, namely granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Although the distribution and localization of macrophages have been documented in several teleost species using mainly light and/or electron microscopy, the lack of appropriate markers for these cells has hampered our in-depth knowledge of their biology. We report here the generation of a monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibody against the gilthead seabream macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (Mcsfr), which is an excellent marker of macrophages in mammals and the zebrafish. The anti-Mcsfr has been found to be very useful in immunohistochemistry (IHC) to specifically immunostain the purified macrophages (adherent cells) obtained from the head-kidney as well as different cell populations in paraffin-embedded organs, including the head-kidney, spleen, thymus, gills and liver. Unexpectedly, however, no Mcsfr immunoreactive (Mcsfr(+)) cells were observed in the brain and intestine of the gilthead seabream. We also show that the distribution of Mcsfr(+) cells in the head-kidney and the spleen is unaltered following infection with the fish pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum and that the Il1b-producing cells in these two organs after infection are exclusively acidophilic granulocytes. Finally, as the epitope recognized by the anti-Mcsfr is well conserved, we illustrate the potential usefulness of this antibody in other teleost species, such as the European seabass.

  8. Glioblastoma cells induce differential glutamatergic gene expressions in human tumor-associated microglia/macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Judy; Stradmann-Bellinghausen, Beate; Yakubov, Eduard; Savaskan, Nicolai E; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells produce and release high amounts of glutamate into the extracellular milieu and subsequently can trigger seizure in patients. Tumor-associated microglia/macrophages (TAMs), consisting of both parenchymal microglia and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDMs) recruited from the blood, are known to populate up to 1/3 of the glioblastoma tumor environment and exhibit an alternative, tumor-promoting and supporting phenotype. However, it is unknown how TAMs respond to the excess extracellular glutamate in the glioblastoma microenvironment. We investigated the expressions of genes related to glutamate transport and metabolism in human TAMs freshly isolated from glioblastoma resections. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed (i) significant increases in the expressions of GRIA2 (GluA2 or AMPA receptor 2), SLC1A2 (EAAT2), SLC1A3 (EAAT1), (ii) a near-significant decrease in the expression of SLC7A11 (cystine-glutamate antiporter xCT) and (iii) a remarkable increase in GLUL expression (glutamine synthetase) in these cells compared to adult primary human microglia. TAMs co-cultured with glioblastoma cells also exhibited a similar glutamatergic profile as freshly isolated TAMs except for a slight increase in SLC7A11 expression. We next analyzed these genes expressions in cultured human MDMs derived from peripheral blood monocytes for comparison. In contrast, MDMs co-cultured with glioblastoma cells compared to MDMs co-cultured with normal astrocytes exhibited decreased expressions in the tested genes except for GLUL. This is the first study to demonstrate transcriptional changes in glutamatergic signaling of TAMs in a glioblastoma microenvironment, and the findings here suggest that TAMs and MDMs might potentially elicit different cellular responses in the presence of excess extracellular glutamate. PMID:26047211

  9. Krüppel like factor 4 promoter undergoes active demethylation during monocyte/macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karpurapu, Manjula; Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Xiao, Lei; Nirujogi, Teja Srinivas; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2014-01-01

    The role of different lineage specific transcription factors in directing hematopoietic cell fate towards myeloid lineage is well established but the status of epigenetic modifications has not been defined during this important developmental process. We used non proliferating, PU.1 inducible myeloid progenitor cells and differentiating bone marrow derived macrophages to study the PU.1 dependent KLF4 transcriptional regulation and its promoter demethylation during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. Expression of KLF4 was regulated by active demethylation of its promoter and PU.1 specifically bound to KLF4 promoter oligo harboring the PU.1 consensus sequence. Methylation specific quantitative PCR and Bisulfite sequencing indicated demethylation of CpG residues most proximal to the transcription start site of KLF4 promoter. Cloned KLF4 promoter in pGL3 Luciferase and CpG free pcpgf-bas vectors showed accentuated reporter activity when co-transfected with the PU.1 expression vector. In vitro methylation of both KLF4 promoter oligo and cloned KLF4 promoter vectors showed attenuated in vitro DNA binding activity and Luciferase/mouse Alkaline phosphotase reporter activity indicating the negative influence of KLF4 promoter methylation on PU.1 binding. The Cytosine deaminase, Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AICDA) was found to be critical for KLF4 promoter demethylation. More importantly, knock down of AICDA resulted in blockade of KLF4 promoter demethylation, decreased F4/80 expression and other phenotypic characters of macrophage differentiation. Our data proves that AICDA mediated active demethylation of the KLF4 promoter is necessary for transcriptional regulation of KLF4 by PU.1 during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. PMID:24695324

  10. Krüppel Like Factor 4 Promoter Undergoes Active Demethylation during Monocyte/Macrophage Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Karpurapu, Manjula; Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Xiao, Lei; Nirujogi, Teja Srinivas; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2014-01-01

    The role of different lineage specific transcription factors in directing hematopoietic cell fate towards myeloid lineage is well established but the status of epigenetic modifications has not been defined during this important developmental process. We used non proliferating, PU.1 inducible myeloid progenitor cells and differentiating bone marrow derived macrophages to study the PU.1 dependent KLF4 transcriptional regulation and its promoter demethylation during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. Expression of KLF4 was regulated by active demethylation of its promoter and PU.1 specifically bound to KLF4 promoter oligo harboring the PU.1 consensus sequence. Methylation specific quantitative PCR and Bisulfite sequencing indicated demethylation of CpG residues most proximal to the transcription start site of KLF4 promoter. Cloned KLF4 promoter in pGL3 Luciferase and CpG free pcpgf-bas vectors showed accentuated reporter activity when co-transfected with the PU.1 expression vector. In vitro methylation of both KLF4 promoter oligo and cloned KLF4 promoter vectors showed attenuated in vitro DNA binding activity and Luciferase/mouse Alkaline phosphotase reporter activity indicating the negative influence of KLF4 promoter methylation on PU.1 binding. The Cytosine deaminase, Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AICDA) was found to be critical for KLF4 promoter demethylation. More importantly, knock down of AICDA resulted in blockade of KLF4 promoter demethylation, decreased F4/80 expression and other phenotypic characters of macrophage differentiation. Our data proves that AICDA mediated active demethylation of the KLF4 promoter is necessary for transcriptional regulation of KLF4 by PU.1 during monocyte/macrophage differentiation. PMID:24695324

  11. A synthetic peptide derived from the D1 domain of flagellin induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in fish macrophages.

    PubMed

    González-Stegmaier, Roxana; Guzmán, Fanny; Albericio, Fernando; Villarroel-Espíndola, Franz; Romero, Alex; Mulero, Victoriano; Mercado, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Flagellin is the main protein component of flagellum in Gram negative and positive bacteria, and it is also the ligand that activates the Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) in fish and mammals. In higher vertebrates, flagellin induces the activation of the membrane-bound TLR5 (TLR5M), which promotes the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and other immunological functions. We have previously reported that recombinant flagellin from Vibrio anguillarum and its ND1 domain are able to upregulate the expression of genes encoding major the proinflammatory mediators in gilthead seabream and rainbow trout macrophages. Considering the key role of D1 domain of flagellin for binding to TLR5M and its immunostimulatory activity, we designed and chemically synthesized a peptide derived of this region. The effects of the synthetic peptide were evaluated in vitro using head kidney macrophages from gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L., Perciformes, Sparidae) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss W., Salmoniformes, Salmonidae). In both species the expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the chemokine IL-8, was induced upon stimulation of macrophages with the D1 domain synthetic peptide. IL-1β and IL-8 were the most upregulated genes and to a lesser extent TNF-α. Interestingly, however, the induction activity of the synthetic peptide was higher in gilthead seabream than in rainbow trout macrophages. The results were confirmed at the protein levels for IL-8. Collectively, these results suggest that synthetic peptide derived from flagelling could be a promising approach for the immunostimulation and vaccination of farmed fish. PMID:26363237

  12. Platelet-derived CXCL12 regulates monocyte function, survival, differentiation into macrophages and foam cells through differential involvement of CXCR4–CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; von Ungern-Sternberg, S N I; Seizer, P; Schlegel, F; Büttcher, M; Sindhu, N A; Müller, S; Mack, A; Gawaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and release CXCL12 (SDF-1), which governs differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into either endothelial or macrophage-foam cells. CXCL12 ligates CXCR4 and CXCR7 and regulates monocyte/macrophage functions. This study deciphers the relative contribution of CXCR4–CXCR7 in mediating the effects of platelet-derived CXCL12 on monocyte function, survival, and differentiation. CXCL12 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that ligate CXCR4–CXCR7 induced a dynamic bidirectional trafficking of the receptors, causing CXCR4 internalization and CXCR7 externalization during chemotaxis, thereby influencing relative receptor availability, unlike MCP-1. In vivo we found enhanced accumulation of platelets and platelet-macrophage co-aggregates in peritoneal fluid following induction of peritonitis in mice. The relative surface expression of CXCL12, CXCR4, and CXCR7 among infiltrated monocytes was also enhanced as compared with peripheral blood. Platelet-derived CXCL12 from collagen-adherent platelets and recombinant CXCL12 induced monocyte chemotaxis specifically through CXCR4 engagement. Adhesion of monocytes to immobilized CXCL12 and CXCL12-enriched activated platelet surface under static and dynamic arterial flow conditions were mediated primarily through CXCR7 and were counter-regulated by neutralizing platelet-derived CXCL12. Monocytes and culture-derived-M1–M2 macrophages phagocytosed platelets, with the phagocytic potential of culture-derived-M1 macrophages higher than M2 involving CXCR4–CXCR7 participation. CXCR7 was the primary receptor in promoting monocyte survival as exerted by platelet-derived CXCL12 against BH3-mimetic induced apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential). In co-culture experiments with platelets, monocytes predominantly differentiated into CD163+ macrophages, which was attenuated upon CXCL12 neutralization and CXCR4/CXCR7 blocking antibodies

  13. Small heat-shock proteins, IbpAB, protect non-pathogenic Escherichia coli from killing by macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Goeser, Laura; Fan, Ting-Jia; Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Stasulli, Nikolas; Goldman, William E; Sartor, R Balfour; Hansen, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens possess virulence factors that prevent detection and killing by macrophages. However, similar virulence factors in non-pathogenic bacteria are less well-characterized and may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease. We hypothesize that the small heat shock proteins IbpAB, which have previously been shown to reduce oxidative damage to proteins in vitro and be upregulated in luminal non-pathogenic Escherichia strain NC101 during experimental colitis in vivo, protect commensal E. coli from killing by macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using real-time PCR, we measured ibpAB expression in commensal E. coli NC101 within wild-type (wt) and ROS-deficient (gp91phox(-/-)) macrophages and in NC101 treated with the ROS generator paraquat. We also quantified survival of NC101 and isogenic mutants in wt and gp91phox(-/-) macrophages using gentamicin protection assays. Similar assays were performed using a pathogenic E. coli strain O157:H7. We show that non-pathogenic E. coli NC101inside macrophages upregulate ibpAB within 2 hrs of phagocytosis in a ROS-dependent manner and that ibpAB protect E. coli from killing by macrophage-derived ROS. Moreover, we demonstrate that ROS-induced ibpAB expression is mediated by the small E. coli regulatory RNA, oxyS. IbpAB are not upregulated in pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and do not affect its survival within macrophages. Together, these findings indicate that ibpAB may be novel virulence factors for certain non-pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:25798870

  14. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor-induced Zn Sequestration Enhances Macrophage Superoxide and Limits Intracellular Pathogen Survival

    PubMed Central

    Vignesh, Kavitha Subramanian; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Porollo, Aleksey; Caruso, Joseph A.; Deepe, George S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Macrophages possess numerous mechanisms to combat microbial invasion, including sequestration of essential nutrients, like Zn. The pleiotropic cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances antimicrobial defenses against intracellular pathogens such as Histoplasma capsulatum, but its mode of action remains elusive. We have found that GM-CSF activated infected macrophages sequestered labile Zn by inducing binding to metallothioneins (MTs) in a STAT3 and STAT5 transcription factor-dependent manner. GM-CSF upregulated expression of Zn exporters, Slc30a4 and Slc30a7 and the metal was shuttled away from phagosomes and into the Golgi apparatus. This distinctive Zn sequestration strategy elevated phagosomal H+ channel function and triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by NADPH oxidase. Consequently, H. capsulatum was selectively deprived of Zn, thereby halting replication and fostering fungal clearance. GM-CSF mediated Zn sequestration via MTs in vitro and in vivo in mice and in human macrophages. These findings illuminate a GM-CSF-induced Zn-sequestration network that drives phagocyte antimicrobial effector function. PMID:24138881

  15. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor c-fms is a novel target of imatinib.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Andrea L; Cambareri, Antony C; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Miller, Bernadette L; Doherty, Kathleen V; Hughes, Timothy P; Lyons, A Bruce

    2005-04-15

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that suppresses the growth of bcr-abl-expressing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor cells by blockade of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding site of the kinase domain of bcr-abl. Imatinib also inhibits the c-abl, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor, abl-related gene (ARG) and stem-cell factor (SCF) receptor tyrosine kinases, and has been used clinically to inhibit the growth of malignant cells in patients with CML and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Although initially considered to have minimal effects of normal hematopoiesis, recent studies show that imatinib also inhibits the growth of some nonmalignant hematopoietic cells, including monocyte/macrophages. This inhibition could not be attributed to the known activity profile of imatinib. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that imatinib targets the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor c-fms. Phosphorylation of c-fms was inhibited by therapeutic concentrations of imatinib, and this was not due to down-regulation in c-fms expression. Imatinib was also found to inhibit M-CSF-induced proliferation of a cytokine-dependent cell line, further supporting the hypothesis that imatinib affects the growth and development of monocyte and/or macrophages through inhibition of c-fms signaling. Importantly, these results identify an additional biologic target to those already defined for imatinib. Imatinib should now be assessed for activity in diseases where c-fms activation is implicated, including breast and ovarian cancer and inflammatory conditions.

  16. Phenotype and Function of CD209+ Bovine Blood Dendritic Cells, Monocyte-Derived-Dendritic Cells and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Mack, Victoria; Fry, Lindsay M.; Davis, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenic comparisons of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) of humans and mice demonstrate phenotypic divergence of dendritic cell (DC) subsets that play similar roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Although differing in phenotype, DC can be classified into four groups according to ontogeny and function: conventional DC (cDC1 and cDC2), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), and monocyte derived DC (MoDC). DC of Artiodactyla (pigs and ruminants) can also be sub-classified using this system, allowing direct functional and phenotypic comparison of MoDC and other DC subsets trafficking in blood (bDC). Because of the high volume of blood collections required to study DC, cattle offer the best opportunity to further our understanding of bDC and MoDC function in an outbred large animal species. As reported here, phenotyping DC using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD209 revealed CD209 is expressed on the major myeloid population of DC present in blood and MoDC, providing a phenotypic link between these two subsets. Additionally, the present study demonstrates that CD209 is also expressed on monocyte derived macrophages (MoΦ). Functional analysis revealed each of these populations can take up and process antigens (Ags), present them to CD4 and CD8 T cells, and elicit a T-cell recall response. Thus, bDC, MoDC, and MoΦ pulsed with pathogens or candidate vaccine antigens can be used to study factors that modulate DC-driven T-cell priming and differentiation ex vivo. PMID:27764236

  17. Regulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene transcription by macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, K J; Fowles, L F; Colman, M S; Ostrowski, M C; Hume, D A

    1995-01-01

    The mouse urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene was used as a model macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-inducible gene to investigate CSF-1 signalling pathways. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that induction of uPA mRNA by CSF-1 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was at the transcriptional level in bone marrow-derived macrophages. CSF-1 and PMA synergized strongly in the induction of uPA mRNA, showing that at least some components of CSF-1 action are mediated independently of protein kinase C. Promoter targets of CSF-1 signalling were investigated with NIH 3T3 cells expressing the human CSF-1 receptor (c-fms). uPA mRNA was induced in these cells by treatment with CSF-1, and a PEA3/AP-1 element at -2.4 kb in the uPA promoter was involved in this response. Ets transcription factors can act through PEA3 sequences, and the involvement of Ets factors in the induction of uPA was confirmed by use of a dominant negative Ets-2 factor. Expression of the DNA binding domain of Ets-2 fused to the lacZ gene product prevented CSF-1-mediated induction of uPA mRNA in NIH 3T3 cells expressing the CSF-1 receptor. Examination of ets-2 mRNA expression in macrophages showed that it was also induced synergistically by CSF-1 and PMA. In the macrophage cell line RAW264, the uPA PEA3/AP-1 element mediated a response to both PMA and cotransfected Ets-2. uPA promoter constructs were induced 60- to 130-fold by Ets-2 expression, and the recombinant Ets-2 DNA binding domain was able to bind to the uPA PEA3/AP-1 element. This work is consistent with a proposed pathway for CSF-1 signalling involving sequential activation of fms, ras, and Ets factors. PMID:7760840

  18. Non-identical twins - microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages in acute injury and autoimmune inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Steffen; Schwartz, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The brain has been commonly regarded as a "tissue behind walls." Appearance of immune cells in the brain has been taken as a sign of pathology. Moreover, since infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages and activated resident microglia were indistinguishable by conventional means, both populations were considered together as inflammatory cells that should be mitigated. Yet, because the microglia permanently reside in the brain, attributing to them negative properties evoked an ongoing debate; why cells that are supposed to be the brain guardians acquire only destructive potential? Studies over the last two decades in the immune arena in general, and in the context of central nervous system pathology in particular, have resulted in a paradigm shift toward a more balanced appreciation of the contributions of immune cells in the context of brain maintenance and repair, and toward the recognition of distinct roles of resident microglia and infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages. PMID:22566968

  19. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  20. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Clinical Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mårten; Miller, Edmund J.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, and markers of myocardial damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody-associated vasculitis, plasma MIF levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of CKDs, whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. PMID:26858715

  1. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Clinical Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mårten; Miller, Edmund J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, and markers of myocardial damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody-associated vasculitis, plasma MIF levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of CKDs, whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. PMID:26858715

  2. Allosteric inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor revealed by ibudilast

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoonsang; Crichlow, Gregg V.; Vermeire, Jon J.; Leng, Lin; Du, Xin; Hodsdon, Michael E.; Bucala, Richard; Cappello, Michael; Gross, Matt; Gaeta, Federico; Johnson, Kirk; Lolis, Elias J.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:20534506

  3. An integrated signal transduction network of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Variar, Prathyaksha; Advani, Jayshree; Nair, Bipin; Shankar, Subramanian; Gowda, Harsha; Saussez, Sven; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a glycosylated multi-functional protein that acts as an enzyme as well as a cytokine. MIF mediates its actions through a cell surface class II major histocompatibility chaperone, CD74 and co-receptors such as CD44, CXCR2, CXCR4 or CXCR7. MIF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Although MIF is a molecule of biomedical importance, a public resource of MIF signaling pathway is currently lacking. In view of this, we carried out detailed data mining and documentation of the signaling events pertaining to MIF from published literature and developed an integrated reaction map of MIF signaling. This resulted in the cataloguing of 68 molecules belonging to MIF signaling pathway, which includes 24 protein-protein interactions, 44 post-translational modifications, 11 protein translocation events and 8 activation/inhibition events. In addition, 65 gene regulation events at the mRNA levels induced by MIF signaling have also been catalogued. This signaling pathway has been integrated into NetPath ( http://www.netpath.org ), a freely available human signaling pathway resource developed previously by our group. The MIF pathway data is freely available online in various community standard data exchange formats. We expect that data on signaling events and a detailed signaling map of MIF will provide the scientific community with an improved platform to facilitate further molecular as well as biomedical investigations on MIF. PMID:27139435

  4. Cloning the human gene for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Paralkar, V.; Wistow, G. )

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was originally identified as a lymphokine. However, recent work strongly suggests a wider role for MIF beyond the immune system. It is expressed specifically in the differentiating cells of the immunologically privileged eye lens and brain, is a delayed early response gene in fibroblasts, and is expressed in many tissues. Here, the authors report the structure of the remarkably small gene for human MIF that has three exons separated by introns of only 189 and 95 bp and covers less than 1 kb. The cloned sequence also includes 1 kb of 5[prime] flanking region. Primer extension and 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) of human brain RNA both indicate the presence of a single transcription start site in a TATA-less promoter. Northern blot analysis shows a single size of MIF mRNA (about 800 nt) in all human tissues examined. In contrast to previous reports, they find no evidence for multiple genes for MIF in the human genome. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Kühn, L C

    1993-09-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. PMID:7504626

  6. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  7. BDMC33, A Curcumin Derivative Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Macrophage-Like Cellular System: Role of Inhibition in NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ka-Heng; Chow, Yuh-Lit; Sharmili, Vidyadaran; Abas, Faridah; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Shaari, Khozirah; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Syahida, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Our preliminary screening has shown that curcumin derivative BDMC33 [2,6-bis(2,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone] exerted promising nitric oxide inhibitory activity in activated macrophages. However, the molecular basis and mechanism for its pharmacological action is yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of BDMC33 and elucidate its underlying mechanism action in macrophage cells. Our current study demonstrated that BDMC33 inhibits the secretion of major pro-inflammatory mediators in stimulated macrophages, and includes NO, TNF-α and IL-1β through interference in both nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activator protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in IFN-γ/LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, BDMC33 also interrupted LPS signaling through inhibiting the surface expression of CD-14 accessory molecules. In addition, the inhibitory action of BDMC33 not only restricted the macrophages cell (RAW264.7), but also inhibited the secretion of NO and TNF-α in IFN-γ/LPS-challenged microglial cells (BV-2). The experimental data suggests the inflammatory action of BDMC33 on activated macrophage-like cellular systems, which could be used as a future therapeutic agent in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22489138

  8. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory markers in primary bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages by naturally occurring flavonoids: analysis of the structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Comalada, Mònica; Ballester, Isabel; Bailón, Elvira; Sierra, Saleta; Xaus, Jordi; Gálvez, Julio; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2006-10-16

    Flavonoids possess several biological/pharmacological activities including anticancer, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antioxidant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of flavonoids on macrophage physiology. For this purpose we selected some flavonoids belonging to the most common and abundant groups (flavonols--quercetin and kaempferol; flavones--diosmetin, apigenin, chrysin and luteolin; isoflavones--genistein and daidzein and flavanones--hesperetin). We decided to use primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as cellular model, since they represent a homogenous, non-transformed population of macrophages that can be stimulated in vitro to proliferate by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) or activated by LPS. In this regard, we demonstrated that most of the flavonoids assayed reduce macrophage M-CSF-induced proliferation without affecting cellular viability. Moreover, some flavonoids also inhibit TNFalpha production as well as iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-activated macrophages, an effect that has been associated with the inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway. We also found that luteolin and quercetin are able to stimulate the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 at low concentrations (<50microM). Analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed that four hydroxylations at positions 5, 7, 3' and 4', together with the double bond at C(2)-C(3) and the position of the B ring at 2, seem to be necessary for the highest anti-inflammatory effect.

  9. In vitro inhibition of murine macrophage migration by Bordetella pertussis lymphocytosis-promoting factor.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, B D; Kind, P D; Ewell, J B; McGrath, P P; Manclark, C R

    1984-01-01

    Lymphocytosis promoting factor (LPF) of Bordetella pertussis is a protein toxin which may have a role in the pathogenesis of pertussis. Since macrophages have an important role in the control of respiratory infections, the in vitro effects of LPF on macrophages from C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice and on a murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW264, were examined. LPF inhibited random migration of resident peritoneal macrophages as well as the chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages and the cell line. Fifty percent inhibition of chemotaxis occurred at 0.2 to 0.3 ng of LPF per ml for the macrophages and at 1 to 2 ng of LPF per ml for the cell line. When LPF was either heated at 80 degrees C for 5 min or premixed with specific antibodies, it failed to inhibit migration. At 20 ng/ml, LPF inhibited chemotaxis by more than 80% and also decreased Fc-mediated phagocytosis by 25 to 35%. At this dose, LPF was not a chemoattractant for murine macrophages and did not reduce macrophage viability, adherence, or opsonized zymosan-stimulated superoxide release. When LPF-treated macrophages were added to tissue culture dishes and then examined microscopically after 4 h, the LPF-treated cells adhered but failed to spread and elongate as well as control macrophages. These data indicate that LPF specifically inhibits macrophage migration in vitro and suggest that a possible role for LPF in pathogenesis is to inhibit migration of macrophages to the site of B. pertussis infection. Images PMID:6088394

  10. Resistance of LPS-activated bone marrow derived macrophages to apoptosis mediated by dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Haim, Yasmin Ohana; Unger, Naamit Deshet; Souroujon, Miriam C.; Mittelman, Moshe; Neumann, Drorit

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) display pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Macrophages are a major target for GC action. Here we show that dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic GC, decreased viability of naïve bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), involving an apoptotic mechanism. Administration of DEX together with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) protected BMDM against DEX-mediated cell death, suggesting that activated BMDM respond to DEX differently than naïve BMDM. An insight to the molecular basis of LPS actions was provided by a 7 fold increase in mRNA levels of glucocorticoid receptor beta (GRβ), a GR dominant-negative splice variant which inhibits GRα's transcriptional activity. LPS did not inhibit all DEX-mediated effects on BMDM; DEX significantly reduced the percentage of BMDM expressing high levels of the cell surface markers F4/80 and CD11b and led to a decrease in macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1-α) mRNA and protein levels. These two DEX-mediated effects were not prevented by LPS. Our finding that LPS did not reduce the DEX-induced elevation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a mediator of GCs anti-inflammatory actions, may provide an underlying mechanism. These findings enable a better understanding of clinical states, such as sepsis, in which macrophages are activated by endotoxins and treatment by GCs is considered. PMID:24608810

  11. Macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species protects against autoimmune priming with a defined polymeric adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvants and the immune priming events in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, is a key challenge to identify their aetiology. Adjuvants are, however, complex structures with inflammatory and immune priming properties. Synthetic polymers provide a possibility to separate these functions and allow studies of the priming mechanisms in vivo. A well-balanced polymer, poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNiPAAm) mixed with collagen type II (CII) induced relatively stronger autoimmunity and arthritis compared with more hydrophilic (polyacrylamide) or hydrophobic (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide and poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide) polymers. Clearly, all the synthesized polymers except the more hydrophobic poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide induced arthritis, especially in Ncf1-deficient mice, which are deficient in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We identified macrophages as the major infiltrating cells present at PNiPAAm-CII injection sites and demonstrate that ROS produced by the macrophages attenuated the immune response and the development of arthritis. Our results reveal that thermo-responsive polymers with high immune priming capacity could trigger an autoimmune response to CII and the subsequent arthritis development, in particular in the absence of NOX2 derived ROS. Importantly, ROS from macrophages protected against the autoimmune priming, demonstrating a critical regulatory role of macrophages in immune priming events. PMID:26455429

  12. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-κB activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization.

  13. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-κB activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization. PMID:26664149

  14. A Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A.; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A.; Powell, Thomas J.; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases. PMID:22782901

  15. Interferon-alpha inhibits murine macrophage transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, S; Huang, M; Wang, J; Dubinett, S M

    1994-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional polypeptide is produced by a wide variety of cells and regulates a broad array of physiological and pathological functions. TGF-beta appears to play a central role in pulmonary fibrosis and may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. Alveolar macrophages are a rich source of TGF-beta and are intimately involved in lung inflammation. We therefore chose to study TGF-beta regulation in murine alveolar macrophages as well as an immortalized peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21). Murine macrophages were incubated with cytokines to evaluate their role in regulating TGF-beta mRNA expression. We conclude that IFN-alpha downregulates TGF-beta mRNA expression in murine macrophages. PMID:8088926

  16. [The modulation of low-level laser on polarization of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages].

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Song, Jiwei; Liang, Zhuowen; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Zhe; Hu, Xueyu

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of 810 nm low-level laser of different energy on the polarization of macrophages. Methods The macrophages were isolated from the bone borrow of BALB/c mice and cultured in macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) conditioned cultural medium. The expression of F4/80 was examined by flow cytometry for identification. After lipopolysaccharide-γ interferon (LPS-IFN-γ) induced polarization status in the macrophages, the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase 1 (Arg1) and CD86 were detected by reverse transcription PCR, and the protein expressions of iNOS and Arg1 were tested by Western blotting. Thereafter, the M1 macrophages were exposed to 810 nm low-level laser of (1, 2, 3, 4) J/cm(2), and then the cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay; the expressions of iNOS and Arg1 were observed by immunofluorescent cytochemical staining; the mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and Arg1 were studied by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. Results Flow cytometry showed that the percentage of F4/80 positive cells cultured with M-CSF conditioned medium was 99.9%. The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and CD86 in macrophages were both significantly raised after induction by LPS-IFN-γ. Compared with the control cells, the viability of M1 cells significantly decreased when the energy of the low-level laser exposure was 4 J/cm(2), while the viability remained unchanged when the energy was 1, 2 or 3 J/cm(2). Immunocytochemistry revealed that the percentage of Arg1 positive cells that represent M2 macrophages was not significantly different from the control group when the irradiation dose was 1 or 2 J/cm(2), however, the Arg1 positive cells significantly increased and the iNOS positive cells that represent M1 macrophages significantly decreased when the irradiation dose was 3 or 4 J/cm(2). When the irradiation dose was 1 or 2 J/cm(2), the mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and Arg1 remained unchanged

  17. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-08-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP‑1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP‑1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co‑localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN‑γ stimulation‑induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  18. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  19. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, Caroline; Richardson, Julia M.; Williams, Roderick A. M.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Roberts, Craig W.; Alexander, James; Henriquez, Fiona L.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory molecule in mammals that, unusually for a cytokine, exhibits tautomerase and oxidoreductase enzymatic activities. Homologues of this well conserved protein are found within diverse phyla including a number of parasitic organisms. Herein, we produced recombinant histidine-tagged Toxoplasma gondii MIF (TgMIF), a 12-kDa protein that lacks oxidoreductase activity but exhibits tautomerase activity with a specific activity of 19.3 μmol/min/mg that cannot be inhibited by the human MIF inhibitor ISO-1. The crystal structure of the TgMIF homotrimer has been determined to 1.82 Å, and although it has close structural homology with mammalian MIFs, it has critical differences in the tautomerase active site that account for the different inhibitor sensitivity. We also demonstrate that TgMIF can elicit IL-8 production from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells while also activating ERK MAPK pathways in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. TgMIF may therefore play an immunomodulatory role during T. gondii infection in mammals. PMID:23443656

  20. Biochemical and immunological characterization of Toxoplasma gondii macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Caroline; Richardson, Julia M; Williams, Roderick A M; Mottram, Jeremy C; Roberts, Craig W; Alexander, James; Henriquez, Fiona L

    2013-05-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory molecule in mammals that, unusually for a cytokine, exhibits tautomerase and oxidoreductase enzymatic activities. Homologues of this well conserved protein are found within diverse phyla including a number of parasitic organisms. Herein, we produced recombinant histidine-tagged Toxoplasma gondii MIF (TgMIF), a 12-kDa protein that lacks oxidoreductase activity but exhibits tautomerase activity with a specific activity of 19.3 μmol/min/mg that cannot be inhibited by the human MIF inhibitor ISO-1. The crystal structure of the TgMIF homotrimer has been determined to 1.82 Å, and although it has close structural homology with mammalian MIFs, it has critical differences in the tautomerase active site that account for the different inhibitor sensitivity. We also demonstrate that TgMIF can elicit IL-8 production from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells while also activating ERK MAPK pathways in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. TgMIF may therefore play an immunomodulatory role during T. gondii infection in mammals.

  1. Processing of newly synthesized cachectin/tumor necrosis factor in endotoxin-stimulate macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, Dae-Myung; Sherry, B.; Luedke, C.; Manogue, K.R.; Cerami, A. )

    1990-09-11

    The biosynthesis and processing of cachetin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were examined in the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7. Lipipolysaccharide-stimulated cells secreted both glycosylated and nonglycosylated 17-kilodalton (kDa) mature cachectin/TNF into the culture medium. Secreted cachectin/TNF was derived from membrane-associated precursors that were precipitated by polyclonal antisera raised against either the mature protein or synthetic peptide fragments of the 79 amino acid cachectin/TNF prohormone sequence. About half of the precursors were N-glycosylated, apparently cotranslationally. The cachectin/TNF precursors were then proteolytically cleaved to release soluble mature cytokine into the medium, while the membrane-bound 14-kDa prosequence remained cell associated. During the period of LPS stimulation, the amount of macrophage cell surface cachectin/TNF remained at a low level, suggesting that both nonglycosylated and glycosylated precursors of cachectin/TNF are efficiently cleaved by these cells. These findings suggest the presence of a unique mechanism for the secretion of cachectin/TNF.

  2. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S.; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Results A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC–UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. Conclusions These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. PMID

  3. Expression of macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) in atherosclerosis and regulation by histamine via the H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Akihide; Wang, Ke-Yong; Shimajiri, Shohei; Guo, Xin; Tasaki, Takashi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) is a member of the CC-family of chemokines and is synthesized by monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we investigate the relationship between monocytes/macrophages and histamine in atherosclerosis and discover that histamine levels regulate various immunologically important molecules and influences atherosclerotic progression. Immunohistochemical analysis of human atherosclerotic lesions revealed that macrophages and DCs express CCL22. The human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) adhered to culture plates and morphologically changed to macrophage-like cells when treated with tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Macrophage-like cells derived from THP-1 cells and cultivated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) show similar expression of CCL22. Gene expression of CCL22 was also detected in THP-1 cells treated with histamine and the expression of the protein produced by the CCL22 gene is similar in PBMCs and THP-1 cells. In addition, the histamine H2 receptor mediated these reactions. Our results suggest that CCL22 expression in monocytes is regulated by histamine, and that CCL22 is involved centrally in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In conclusion, CCL22 is a marker that is a characteristic of the monocytes/ macrophages migrating into atherosclerotic lesions and histamine plays a role in regulating its expression.

  4. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gibbings, Sophie L; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A Nicole; Leach, Sonia M; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M; Bratton, Donna L; Janssen, William; Jakubzick, Claudia V

    2015-09-10

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell. PMID:26232173

  5. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gibbings, Sophie L.; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A. Nicole; Leach, Sonia M.; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M.; Bratton, Donna L.; Janssen, William

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell. PMID:26232173

  6. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gibbings, Sophie L; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A Nicole; Leach, Sonia M; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M; Bratton, Donna L; Janssen, William; Jakubzick, Claudia V

    2015-09-10

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell.

  7. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection of cattle does not diminish peripheral blood-derived macrophage mycobactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, J; Zhang, W; Simutis, F

    2006-09-15

    Ruminants infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis consistently develop a multibacillary form of disease that is centered on the ileum. Mechanisms responsible for failure of macrophage function during multibacillary disease are incompletely characterized. Our data suggest that mycobactericidal functions are present, and potentially enhanced, in monocyte-derived macrophages from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle. Addition of CD4(+) T cells from infected animals to autologous in vitro infected macrophages did not increase bacterial killing. In contrast, CD4(+) T cells from non-infected animals did increase bacterial killing in autologous macrophages. In macrophages from both infected and non-infected cattle, bacterial killing appeared to be independent of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and nitric oxide production.

  8. Metabolic profiling during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Montero, Catherine; Schinazi, Raymond F; Munger, Joshua; Kim, Baek

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated cellular metabolism profiles of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). First, HIV-2 GL-AN displays faster production kinetics and greater amounts of virus as compared to HIV-1s: YU-2, 89.6 and JR-CSF. Second, quantitative LC-MS/MS metabolomics analysis demonstrates very similar metabolic profiles in glycolysis and TCA cycle metabolic intermediates between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected macrophages, with a few notable exceptions. The most striking metabolic change in MDMs infected with HIV-2 relative to HIV-1-infected MDMs was the increased levels of quinolinate, a metabolite in the tryptophan catabolism pathway that has been linked to HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. Third, both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected MDMs showed elevated levels of ribose-5-phosphate, a key metabolic component in nucleotide biosynthesis. Finally, HIV-2 infected MDMs display increased dNTP concentrations as predicted by Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Collectively, these data show differential metabolic changes during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of macrophages.

  9. Peroxynitrite, a potent macrophage-derived oxidizing cytotoxin to combat invading pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Prolo, Carolina; Álvarez, María Noel; Radi, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the first cellular actors facing the invasion of microorganisms. These cells are able to internalize pathogens and destroy them by means of toxic mediators, many of which are produced enzymatically and have strong oxidizing capacity. Indeed, macrophages count on the NADPH oxidase complex activity, which is triggered during pathogen invasion and leads to the production of superoxide radical inside the phagosome. At the same time, the induction of nitric oxide synthase results in the production of nitric oxide in the cytosol which is able to readily diffuse to the phagocytic vacuole. Superoxide radical and nitric oxide react at diffusion controlled rates with each other inside the phagosome to yield peroxynitrite, a powerful oxidant capable to kill microorganisms. Peroxynitrite toxicity resides on oxidations and nitrations of biomolecules in the target cell. The central role of peroxynitrite as a key effector molecule in the control of infections has been proven in a wide number of models. However, some microorganisms and virulent strains adapt to survive inside the potentially hostile oxidizing microenvironment of the phagosome by either impeding peroxynitrite formation or rapidly detoxifying it once formed. In this context, the outcome of the infection process is a result of the interplay between the macrophage-derived oxidizing cytotoxins such as peroxynitrite and the antioxidant defense machinery of the invading pathogens. PMID:24281946

  10. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  11. Mononuclear phagocyte accumulates a stearic acid derivative during differentiation into macrophages. Effects of stearic acid on macrophage differentiation and Mycobacterium tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Restrepo, Sergio Fabián; Caro, Ana Cecilia; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos Alberto; Rojas, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The fatty acid composition of monocytes changes substantially during differentiation into macrophages, increasing the proportion of saturated fatty acids. These changes prompted us to investigate whether fatty acid accumulation in the extracellular milieu could affect the differentiation of bystander mononuclear phagocytes. An esterified fatty acid derivative, stearate, was the only fatty acid that significantly increased in macrophage supernatants, and there were higher levels when cells differentiated in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv or purified protein derivative (PPD). Exogenous stearic acid enhanced the expression of HLA-DR and CD64; there was also accumulation of IL-12, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1 α and β and a reduction in MCP-1 and the bacterial load. These results suggested that during differentiation, a derivative of stearic acid, which promotes the process as well as the effector mechanisms of phagocytes against the mycobacterium, accumulates in the cell supernatants.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes macrophage apoptosis through stimulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT).

    PubMed

    Petreaca, Melissa L; Yao, Min; Ware, Carl; Martins-Green, Manuela M

    2008-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is critical for normal wound healing. Inflammation is prolonged and fails to resolve properly in chronic wounds. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces macrophage apoptosis and to delineate mechanisms involved in this process. VEGF inhibition during wound healing leads to an increased number of macrophages remaining in wounds, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in removal of these cells from the wound. If this effect has physiological relevance, it likely occurs via apoptosis. We show that VEGF increases apoptosis of macrophages in vitro using Annexin V-FITC staining and caspase activation. Microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting showed that VEGF increases the expression of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT) in macrophages. We also show that in macrophages LIGHT promotes apoptosis through the lymphotoxin beta receptor. Moreover, inhibition of LIGHT prevents VEGF-induced death, suggesting that LIGHT mediates VEGF-induced macrophage apoptosis. Taken together, our results identify a novel role for VEGF and for LIGHT in macrophage apoptosis during wound healing, an event critical in the resolution of inflammation. This finding may lead to the development of new strategies to improve resolution of inflammation in problematic wounds. PMID:19128255

  13. Expression of Phospholipases A2 in Primary Human Lung Macrophages. Role of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2–α in Arachidonic Acid Release and Platelet Activating Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Giorgio; Lai, Ying; Granata, Francescopaolo; Mounier, Carine M.; Nallan, Laxman; Oslund, Rob; Leslie, Christina C.; Marone, Gianni; Lambeau, Gérard; Gelb, Michael H.; Triggiani, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are a major source of lipid mediators in the human lung. Expression and contribution of cytosolic (cPLA2) and secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) to the generation of lipid mediators in human macrophages is unclear. We investigated the expression and role of different PLA2s in the production of lipid mediators in primary human lung macrophages. Macrophages express the alpha, but not the zeta isoform of group IV and group VIA cPLA2 (iPLA2). Two structurally-divergent inhibitors of group IV cPLA2 completely block arachidonic acid release by macrophages in response to non-physiological (Ca2+ ionophores and phorbol esters) and physiological agonists (lipopolysaccharide and Mycobacterium protein derivative). These inhibitors also reduce by 70% the synthesis of platelet-activating factor by activated macrophages. Among the full set of human sPLA2s, macrophages express group IIA, IID, IIE, IIF, V, X and XIIA, but not group IB and III enzymes. Me-Indoxam, a potent and cell impermeable inhibitor of several sPLA2s, has no effect on arachidonate release or platelet-activating factor production. Agonist-induced exocytosis is not influenced by cPLA2 inhibitors at concentrations that block arachidonic acid release. Our results indicate that human macrophages express cPLA2-alpha, iPLA2 and several sPLA2s. Cytosolic PLA2-alpha is the major enzyme responsible for lipid mediator production in human macrophages. PMID:19130898

  14. Interferon induction in marrow-derived macrophages: regulation by L cell conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Fleit, H B; Rabinovitch, M

    1981-09-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in medium enriched with L cell conditioned medium (LCM) as a source of colony stimulating factor (CSF) yield populations of adherent macrophages which are quite sensitive to induction of interferon (IFN) by viral and nonviral inducers. We examined the role of LCM in the sensitivity of marrow macrophage cultures to IFN induction. Removal of LCM from the cultures for as little as 3 hours markedly reduced the IFN titers induced by a double stranded ribopolynucleotide (poly I:C) or a lipopolysaccharide (LPS), while induction by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was unaffected. Addition of anti-CSF serum to LCM medium also reduced IFN titers in response to polyI:C but had no effect on NDV induction. The inhibitory effect of anit-CSF indicates that the LCM requirement is at least partially related to the colony stimulating activity of the medium. We postulate that CSF regulates the initial interaction of macrophages with polyI:C or LPS rather than the synthesis and secretion of interferon by the phagocytes. Nearly complete restoration of IFN induction with polyI:C was obtained when LCM deprived cultures were reincubated with LCM medium previously conditioned by marrow cultures.

  15. Phosphorylation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) protects macrophages from silica-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Federica; Di, Peter; Niu, Xiaomei; Friedman, Mitchell; Hammond, Timothy; Riches, David W H; Ortiz, Luis A

    2004-01-16

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in silicosis in part by removing silica particles and producing inflammatory mediators in response to silica. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a prominent mediator in silicosis. Silica induction of apoptosis in macrophages might be mediated by TNFalpha. However, TNFalpha also activates signal transduction pathways (NF-kappaB and AP-1) that rescue cells from apoptosis. Therefore, we studied the TNFalpha-mediated mechanisms that confer macrophage protection against the pro-apoptotic effects of silica. We will show that exposure to silica induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, but not by IC-21. Silica-induced activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ERK activation in response to silica exposure was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, whereas activation of p38 phosphorylation was predominantly observed in IC-21 macrophages. No changes in JNK activity were observed in either cell line in response to silica exposure. Silica induced apoptosis in both macrophage cell lines, but the induction of apoptosis was significantly larger in IC-21 cells. Protection against apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells in response to silica was mediated by enhanced NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNFalpha receptor. Inhibition of these two protective mechanisms by specific pharmacological inhibitors or transfection of dominant negative mutants that inhibit IkappaBalpha or ERK phosphorylation significantly increased silica-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These data suggest that NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNF receptor are important cell survival mechanisms in the macrophage response to silica exposure. PMID:14570868

  16. Modulation of Innate Host Factors by Mycobacterium avium Complex in Human Macrophages Includes Interleukin 17

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Nancy; Rekka, Sofia; Gliozzi, Maria; Feng, Carl G.; Amarnath, Shoba; Orenstein, Jan M.; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although opportunistic infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) have been less common since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, globally, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)–positive patients remain predisposed to these infections. Absence of a properly functioning acquired immune response allows MAC persistence within macrophages localized in lymph nodes coinfected with HIV and MAC. Although a deficiency in interferon γ appears to play a part in the ability of MAC to deflect the macrophage-associated antimicrobial attack, questions about this process remain. Our study examines the ability of MAC to regulate interleukin 17 (IL-17), a proinflammatory cytokine involved in host cell recruitment. Methods. Coinfected lymph nodes were examined for IL-17 by immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro, macrophages exposed to mycobacteria were evaluated for transcription activities, proteins, and signaling pathways responsible for IL-17 expression. Infected macrophages were also analyzed for expression of interleukin 21 (IL-21) and negative regulators of immune responses. Results. Infection of macrophages triggered synthesis of IL-17, correlating with IL-17 expression by macrophages in coinfected lymph nodes. Infected macrophages exposed to exogenous IL-17 expressed CXCL10, which favors recruitment of new macrophages as targets for infection. Blockade of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways suppressed mycobacteria-induced IL-17 expression. MAC triggered expression of IL-21, IRF4, and STAT3 genes related to IL-17 regulation, as well as expression of the negative immunoregulators CD274(PD-L1) and suppressors of cytokine signaling. Conclusions. MAC-infected macrophages can provide an alternative source for IL-17 that favors accumulation of new targets for perpetuating bacterial and viral infection while suppressing host antimicrobial immune responses. PMID

  17. Effect of size of man-made and natural mineral fibers on chemiluminescent response in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, M; Otake, T; Morinaga, K

    2001-01-01

    Fiber size is an important factor in the tumorigenicity of various mineral fibers and asbestos fibers in animal experiments. We examined the time course of the ability to induce lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) from human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Japan Fibrous Material standard reference samples (glass wool, rock wool, micro glass fiber, two types of refractory ceramic fiber, refractory mullite fiber, potassium titanium whisker, silicon carbide whisker, titanium oxide whisker, and wollastonite). We determined how fiber length or width might modify the response of cells. We found that the patterns of time-dependent increase of CL (sigmoid type) were similar for each sample except wollastonite. We observed a strong correlation between geometric-mean length and ability to induce CL in seven samples > 6 microm in length over the time course (largest r(2) = 0.9760). Although we also observed a close positive correlation between geometric-mean width and the ability to induce CL in eight samples < 1.8 microm in width at 15 min (r(2) = 0.8760), a sample of 2.4 microm in width had a low ability to induce CL. Moreover, the relationship between width and the rate of increase in ability to induce CL had a negative correlation at 30-60 min (largest r(2) = 0.7473). Our findings suggest that the release of superoxide from macrophages occurs nonspecifically for various types of mineral fibers depending on fiber length. PMID:11675268

  18. Regulation of the arachidonic acid mobilization in macrophages by combustion-derived particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute exposure to elevated levels of environmental particulate matter (PM) is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. These adverse health effects, e.g. culminating in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, have been demonstrated by a multitude of epidemiological studies. However, the underlying mechanisms relevant for toxicity are not completely understood. Especially the role of particle-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress and inflammatory responses is of particular interest. In this in vitro study we examined the influence of particle-generated ROS on signalling pathways leading to activation of the arachidonic acid (AA) cascade. Incinerator fly ash particles (MAF02) were used as a model for real-life combustion-derived particulate matter. As macrophages, besides epithelial cells, are the major targets of particle actions in the lung murine RAW264.7 macrophages and primary human macrophages were investigated. Results The interaction of fly ash particles with macrophages induced both the generation of ROS and as part of the cellular inflammatory responses a dose- and time-dependent increase of free AA, prostaglandin E2/thromboxane B2 (PGE2/TXB2), and 8-isoprostane, a non-enzymatically formed oxidation product of AA. Additionally, increased phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) JNK1/2, p38 and ERK1/2 was observed, the latter of which was shown to be involved in MAF02-generated AA mobilization and phosphorylation of the cytosolic phospolipase A2. Using specific inhibitors for the different phospolipase A2 isoforms the MAF02-induced AA liberation was shown to be dependent on the cytosolic phospholipase A2, but not on the secretory and calcium-independent phospholipase A2. The initiation of the AA pathway due to MAF02 particle exposure was demonstrated to depend on the formation of ROS since the presence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) prevented the MAF02-mediated enhancement of

  19. Enhanced uptake of multiple sclerosis-derived myelin by THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) is myelin phagocytosis. It remains unclear why microglia and macrophages demyelinate axons in MS, but previously found or yet-unknown changes in the myelin of MS patients could contribute to this process. We therefore studied whether myelin from normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of MS donors is phagocytosed more efficiently than myelin from control donors. Methods Myelin was isolated from 11 MS and 12 control brain donors and labeled with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye pHrodo to quantify uptake in lysosomes. Phagocytosis by differentiated THP-1 macrophages and by primary human microglia was quantified with flow cytometry. Whereas myelin uptake by THP-1 macrophages reached a plateau after approximately 24 hours, uptake by primary human microglia showed an almost linear increase over a 72–hour period. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann–Whitney U test. Results MS-derived myelin was phagocytosed more efficiently by THP-1 macrophages after 6-hour incubation (P = 0.001 for the percentage of myelin-phagocytosing cells and P = 0.0005 for total myelin uptake) and after 24-hour incubation (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0001, respectively), and by microglia after 24-hour incubation (P = 0.0106 for total myelin uptake). This enhanced uptake was not due to differences in the oxidation status of the myelin. Interestingly, myelin phagocytosis correlated negatively with the age of myelin donors, whereas the age of microglia donors showed a positive trend with myelin phagocytosis. Conclusions Myelin isolated from normal-appearing white matter of MS donors was phagocytosed more efficiently than was myelin isolated from control brain donors by both THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia. These data indicate that changes in MS myelin might precede phagocyte activation and subsequent demyelination in MS. Identifying these myelin changes responsible for enhancing phagocytic ability

  20. The in vitro GcMAF effects on endocannabinoid system transcriptionomics, receptor formation, and cell activity of autism-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immune system dysregulation is well-recognized in autism and thought to be part of the etiology of this disorder. The endocannabinoid system is a key regulator of the immune system via the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) which is highly expressed on macrophages and microglial cells. We have previously published significant differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell CB2R gene expression in the autism population. The use of the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF), an endogenous glycosylated vitamin D binding protein responsible for macrophage cell activation has demonstrated positive effects in the treatment of autistic children. In this current study, we investigated the in vitro effects of GcMAF treatment on the endocannabinoid system gene expression, as well as cellular activation in blood monocyte-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from autistic patients compared to age-matched healthy developing controls. Methods To achieve these goals, we used biomolecular, biochemical and immunocytochemical methods. Results GcMAF treatment was able to normalize the observed differences in dysregulated gene expression of the endocannabinoid system of the autism group. GcMAF also down-regulated the over-activation of BMDMs from autistic children. Conclusions This study presents the first observations of GcMAF effects on the transcriptionomics of the endocannabinoid system and expression of CB2R protein. These data point to a potential nexus between endocannabinoids, vitamin D and its transporter proteins, and the immune dysregulations observed with autism. PMID:24739187

  1. Activation of human monocyte-derived macrophages cultured on Teflon: response to interferon-gamma during terminal maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Andreesen, R; Gadd, S; Brugger, W; Löhr, G W; Atkins, R C

    1988-05-01

    Macrophages (M phi) are potential antitumor effector cells derived from circulating blood monocytes (mo). Most studies on human mo/M phi biology and function have been performed using immature mo precursor cells. However, the conclusions drawn may be questionable, as mo have to undergo terminal differentiation before they reach relevant tissue sites of inflammation and immune reaction. We have analyzed the ability of mo-derived, teflon-cultured M phi to respond to activating stimuli with an increased tumor cytotoxic effector cell function using recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IFN-alpha 2, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin(IL) 2, IL 1 alpha, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as mediator molecules. It could be shown that the response of M phi to the most potent activator molecule, IFN-gamma, depends on the terminal differentiation from the mo stage to the mature M phi. Whereas adherent mo could be activated only moderately, M phi increased their cytotoxicity by a factor of up to 400. IFN-gamma activation positively correlated with the effector cell number, the time of incubation and the dosage used. Activation did not depend on the presence of LPS, and was lost within 24 to 48 h. LPS itself activated cells only in the microgram range. IFN-alpha 2 activated M phi only at a two log higher concentration than IFN-gamma; GM-CSF was only slightly effective, whereas M phi incubation with IL 1 alpha or IL 2 did not result in M phi activation. Thus, the ability of human M phi to become activated appears to be a function of cellular maturation and is acquired during the terminal step of M phi differentiation. Teflon-cultured M phi could facilitate studies of the activation of human M phi and may be more suitable cells for adoptive immunotherapy in cancer patients than blood monocytes. PMID:3136081

  2. Adoptive Transfer of Ex Vivo HO-1 Modified Bone Marrow–derived Macrophages Prevents Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Bibo; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Ji, Haofeng; Qiao, Bo; Zhai, Yuan; Farmer, Douglas G; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in the pathophysiology of liver ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury (IRI). However, macrophages that overexpress antioxidant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) may exert profound anti-inflammatory functions. This study explores the cytoprotective effects and mechanisms of ex vivo modified HO-1-expressing bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDMs) in well-defined mouse model of liver warm ischemia followed by reperfusion. Adoptive transfer of Ad-HO-1-transduced macrophages prevented IR-induced hepatocellular damage, as evidenced by depressed serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (sGOT) levels and preserved liver histology (Suzuki scores), compared to Ad-β-gal controls. This beneficial effect was reversed following concomitant treatment with HO-1 siRNA. Ad-HO-1-transfected macrophages significantly decreased local neutrophil accumulation, TNF-α/IL-1β, IFN-γ/E-selectin, and IP-10/MCP-1 expression, caspase-3 activity, and the frequency of apoptotic cells, as compared with controls. Unlike in controls, Ad-HO-1-transfected macrophages markedly increased hepatic expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2/Bcl-xl and depressed caspase-3 activity. These results establish the precedent for a novel investigative tool and provide the rationale for a clinically attractive new strategy in which native macrophages can be transfected ex vivo with cytoprotective HO-1 and then infused, if needed, to prospective recipients exposed to hepatic IR–mediated local inflammation, such as during liver transplantation, resection, or trauma. PMID:20029397

  3. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Zhang, Tian-Xia; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mangoura, Safwat A.; Abdel-Raheem, Mahmoud H.; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1) into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2). Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages), but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages) 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair. PMID:27764217

  4. Tissue factor activity. A marker of alveolar macrophage maturation in rabbits. Effects of granulomatous pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberger, H; McGee, M P; Lee, T K

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to examine relationships between alveolar macrophage maturity and amounts of tissue factor (Clotting Factor III) in these cells under physiologic conditions and during immunologically induced pneumonitis. Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, alveolar macrophages from healthy rabbits were rapidly isolated into five subpopulations at different stages of maturation, as demonstrated by morphologic and morphometric evaluation. Very large amounts of tissue factor activity were found in fully mature cells that were purified in the lowest density subpopulation and assayed without preliminary in vitro stimulation or culture. In the remaining four subpopulations of increasing density, amounts of tissue factor were found to progressively diminish in direct correlation with declines of cell maturity. These differences at mean levels were as great as 35-fold. In addition, blood monocytes had less than 1/219 and less than 1/6 of the activity of the fully mature and the least mature subpopulations, respectively. After 16 h culture of the five isolated subpopulations in the absence of lymphokines or of significant numbers of lymphocytes, tissue factor activity increased in inverse correlation with the preincubation stage of cell maturity (2,387 and 109% in the least mature and most mature subpopulations, respectively). These increases required protein synthesis and were accompanied by morphologic and morphometric changes which indicated cellular maturation during the period of tissue factor activity generation in vitro, thus further demonstrating relationships between macrophage maturity and tissue factor content. In additional experiments, direct correlations between cell maturity and tissue factor activity content were also found in activated alveolar macrophage populations from rabbits with Bacillus Calmette Guering (BCG)-induced granulomatous pneumonitis. However, as compared with controls, the BCG populations had increased total

  5. Protective role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Daniel; Berres, Marie-Luise; Coeuru, Melanie; Knauel, Meike; Nellen, Andreas; Fischer, Petra; Philippeit, Claudia; Bucala, Richard; Trautwein, Christian; Wasmuth, Hermann E; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    MIF is an inflammatory cytokine but is hepatoprotective in models of hepatotoxin-induced liver fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis can also develop from metabolic liver disease, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH). We investigated the role of MIF in high-fat or methionine- and choline-deficient diet mouse models of NASH. Mif(-/-) mice showed elevated liver triglyceride levels (WT, 53±14 mg/g liver; Mif(-/-), 103±7 mg/g liver; P<0.05) and a 2-3-fold increased expression of lipogenic genes. Increased fatty degeneration in the livers of Mif(-/-) mice was associated with increased hepatic inflammatory cells (1.6-fold increase in F4/80(+) macrophages) and proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., 2.3-fold increase in Tnf-α and 2-fold increase in Il-6 expression). However, inflammatory cells and cytokines were decreased by 50-90% in white adipose tissue (WAT) of Mif(-/-) mice. Subset analysis showed that macrophage phenotypes in livers of Mif(-/-) mice were skewed toward M2 (e.g., 1.7-fold and 2.5-fold increase in Arg1 and Il-13, respectively, and 2.5-fold decrease in iNos), whereas macrophages were generally reduced in WAT of these mice (70% reduction in mRNA expression of F4/80(+) macrophages). The protective MIF effect was scrutinized in isolated hepatocytes. MIF reversed inflammation-induced triglyceride accumulation in Hepa1-6 cells and primary hepatocytes and also attenuated oleic acid-elicited triglyceride increase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Protection from fatty hepatocyte degeneration was paralleled by a 2- to 3-fold reduction by MIF of hepatocyte proinflammatory cytokine production. Blockade of MIF receptor cluster of differentiation 74 (CD74) but not of CXCR2 or CXCR4 fully reverted the protective effect of MIF, comparable to AMPK inhibition. In summary, we demonstrate that MIF mediates hepatoprotection through the CD74/AMPK pathway in hepatocytes in metabolic models of liver injury. PMID:25122558

  6. Protective role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Daniel; Berres, Marie-Luise; Coeuru, Melanie; Knauel, Meike; Nellen, Andreas; Fischer, Petra; Philippeit, Claudia; Bucala, Richard; Trautwein, Christian; Wasmuth, Hermann E; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    MIF is an inflammatory cytokine but is hepatoprotective in models of hepatotoxin-induced liver fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis can also develop from metabolic liver disease, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH). We investigated the role of MIF in high-fat or methionine- and choline-deficient diet mouse models of NASH. Mif(-/-) mice showed elevated liver triglyceride levels (WT, 53±14 mg/g liver; Mif(-/-), 103±7 mg/g liver; P<0.05) and a 2-3-fold increased expression of lipogenic genes. Increased fatty degeneration in the livers of Mif(-/-) mice was associated with increased hepatic inflammatory cells (1.6-fold increase in F4/80(+) macrophages) and proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., 2.3-fold increase in Tnf-α and 2-fold increase in Il-6 expression). However, inflammatory cells and cytokines were decreased by 50-90% in white adipose tissue (WAT) of Mif(-/-) mice. Subset analysis showed that macrophage phenotypes in livers of Mif(-/-) mice were skewed toward M2 (e.g., 1.7-fold and 2.5-fold increase in Arg1 and Il-13, respectively, and 2.5-fold decrease in iNos), whereas macrophages were generally reduced in WAT of these mice (70% reduction in mRNA expression of F4/80(+) macrophages). The protective MIF effect was scrutinized in isolated hepatocytes. MIF reversed inflammation-induced triglyceride accumulation in Hepa1-6 cells and primary hepatocytes and also attenuated oleic acid-elicited triglyceride increase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Protection from fatty hepatocyte degeneration was paralleled by a 2- to 3-fold reduction by MIF of hepatocyte proinflammatory cytokine production. Blockade of MIF receptor cluster of differentiation 74 (CD74) but not of CXCR2 or CXCR4 fully reverted the protective effect of MIF, comparable to AMPK inhibition. In summary, we demonstrate that MIF mediates hepatoprotection through the CD74/AMPK pathway in hepatocytes in metabolic models of liver injury.

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  8. Macrophage-derived extracellular vesicle-packaged WNTs rescue intestinal stem cells and enhance survival after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhrajit; Aranda, Evelyn; Hayakawa, Yoku; Bhanja, Payel; Atay, Safinur; Brodin, N Patrik; Li, Jiufeng; Asfaha, Samuel; Liu, Laibin; Tailor, Yagnesh; Zhang, Jinghang; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Wang, Timothy C.; Guha, Chandan; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-catenin signalling is crucial for intestinal homoeostasis. The intestinal epithelium and stroma are the major source of WNT ligands but their origin and role in intestinal stem cell (ISC) and epithelial repair remains unknown. Macrophages are a major constituent of the intestinal stroma. Here, we analyse the role of macrophage-derived WNT in intestinal repair in mice by inhibiting their release using a macrophage-restricted ablation of Porcupine, a gene essential for WNT synthesis. Such Porcn-depleted mice have normal intestinal morphology but are hypersensitive to radiation injury in the intestine compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Porcn-null mice are rescued from radiation lethality by treatment with WT but not Porcn-null bone marrow macrophage-conditioned medium (CM). Depletion of extracellular vesicles (EV) from the macrophage CM removes WNT function and its ability to rescue ISCs from radiation lethality. Therefore macrophage-derived EV-packaged WNTs are essential for regenerative response of intestine against radiation. PMID:27734833

  9. Elastin-Derived Peptides Promote Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D; Meisinger, Trevor M; Casale, George P; Baxter, B Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix degradation. Damage to elastin in the extracellular matrix results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury, but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. Abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio in which proinflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the current study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57BL/6 mice, Ab-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2-polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a proinflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization, and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  10. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  11. The roles of blood-derived macrophages and resident microglia in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted Intracortical microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Sunil, Smrithi; Black, James; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Haung, Alex Y.; Miller, Robert H.; Selkirk, Stephen M.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages have both been implicated to play a dominant role in mediating the neuroinflammatory response affecting implanted intracortical microelectrodes. However, the distinction between each cell type has not been demonstrated due to a lack of discriminating cellular markers. Understanding the subtle differences of each cell population in mediating neuroinflammation can aid in determining the appropriate therapeutic approaches to improve microelectrode performance. Therefore, the goal of this study is to characterize the role of infiltrating blood-derived cells, specifically macrophages, in mediating neuroinflammation following intracortical microelectrode implantation. Interestingly, we found no correlation between microglia and neuron populations at the microelectrode-tissue interface. On the other hand, blood-borne macrophages consistently dominated the infiltrating cell population following microelectrode implantation. Most importantly, we found a correlation between increased populations of blood-derived cells (including the total macrophage population) and neuron loss at the microelectrode-tissue interface. Specifically, the total macrophage population was greatest at two and sixteen weeks post implantation, at the same time points when we observed the lowest densities of neuronal survival in closest proximity to the implant. Together, our results suggest a dominant role of infiltrating macrophages, and not resident microglia, in mediating neurodegeneration following microelectrode implantation. PMID:24973296

  12. The roles of blood-derived macrophages and resident microglia in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Sunil, Smrithi; Black, James; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Haung, Alex Y; Miller, Robert H; Selkirk, Stephen M; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2014-09-01

    Resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages have both been implicated to play a dominant role in mediating the neuroinflammatory response affecting implanted intracortical microelectrodes. However, the distinction between each cell type has not been demonstrated due to a lack of discriminating cellular markers. Understanding the subtle differences of each cell population in mediating neuroinflammation can aid in determining the appropriate therapeutic approaches to improve microelectrode performance. Therefore, the goal of this study is to characterize the role of infiltrating blood-derived cells, specifically macrophages, in mediating neuroinflammation following intracortical microelectrode implantation. Interestingly, we found no correlation between microglia and neuron populations at the microelectrode-tissue interface. On the other hand, blood-borne macrophages consistently dominated the infiltrating cell population following microelectrode implantation. Most importantly, we found a correlation between increased populations of blood-derived cells (including the total macrophage population) and neuron loss at the microelectrode-tissue interface. Specifically, the total macrophage population was greatest at two and sixteen weeks post implantation, at the same time points when we observed the lowest densities of neuronal survival in closest proximity to the implant. Together, our results suggest a dominant role of infiltrating macrophages, and not resident microglia, in mediating neurodegeneration following microelectrode implantation.

  13. Role of membrane-anchored heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor and CD9 on macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, N; Kihara, S; Yamashita, S; Higashiyama, S; Nakagawa, T; Shimomura, I; Funahashi, T; Kameda-Takemura, K; Kawata, S; Taniguchi, N; Matsuzawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal-growth-factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a potent mitogen for smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) belonging to the EGF family. We have previously determined that HB-EGF is expressed in macrophages and SMCs of human atherosclerotic lesions and that its membrane-anchored precursor, proHB-EGF, also has a juxtacrine mitogenic activity which is markedly enhanced by CD9, a surface marker of lymphohaemopoietic cells. Therefore, when both proHB-EGF and CD9 are expressed on macrophages, they may strongly promote the development of atherosclerosis. In the present study we have investigated the changes in proHB-EGF and CD9 in THP-1 cells during differentiation into macrophages and by the addition of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (OxLDL) and assessed juxtacrine growth activity of THP-1 macrophages for human aortic SMCs. HB-EGF and CD9 at both the mRNA and the protein level were up-regulated after differentiation into macrophages, and further expression of HB-EGF was induced by the addition of OxLDL or lysophosphatidylcholine. Juxtacrine induction by formalin-fixed growth was suppressed to control levels by an inhibitor of HB-EGF and was partially decreased by anti-CD9 antibodies. These results suggest that co-expression of proHB-EGF and CD9 on macrophages plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis by a juxtacrine mechanism. PMID:9396739

  14. Integration is required for productive infection of monocyte-derived macrophages by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Englund, G; Theodore, T S; Freed, E O; Engelman, A; Martin, M A

    1995-01-01

    Certain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are able to productively infect nondividing cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. We have used a molecular genetic approach to construct two different HIV-1 integrase mutants that were studied in the context of an infectious, macrophage-tropic HIV-1 molecular clone. One mutant, HIV-1 delta D(35)E, containing a 37-residue deletion within the central, catalytic domain of integrase, was noninfectious in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. The HIV-1 delta D(35)E mutant, however, exhibited defects in the assembly and/or release of progeny virions in transient transfection assays, as well as defects in entry and/or viral DNA synthesis during the early stages of monocyte-derived macrophage infection. The second mutant, HIV-1D116N/8, containing a single Asp-to-Asn substitution at the invariant Asp-116 residue of integrase, was also noninfectious in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages but, in contrast to HIV-1 delta D(35)E, was indistinguishable from wild-type virus in reverse transcriptase production. PCR analysis indicated that HIV-1D116N/8 entered monocyte-derived macrophages efficiently and reverse transcribed its RNA but was unable to complete its replication cycle because of a presumed block to integration. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that integration is an obligate step in productive HIV-1 infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary human macrophage cultures. PMID:7707554

  15. c-Maf-dependent growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a CD14(hi) subpopulation of monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Rohan; Bandaru, Anuradha; Barnes, Peter F; Saha, Sudipto; Tvinnereim, Amy; Nayak, Ramesh C; Paidipally, Padmaja; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Rao, L Vijaya Mohan; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2011-02-01

    Macrophages are a major component of the innate immune response, comprising the first line of defense against various intracellular pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this report, we studied the factors that regulate growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv in subpopulations of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). In healthy donors, M. tuberculosis H37Rv grew 5.6-fold more rapidly in CD14(hi) MDMs compared with that in CD14(lo)CD16(+) MDMs. Compared with CD14(lo)CD16(+) cells, M. tuberculosis H37Rv-stimulated CD14(hi) monocytes produced more IL-10 and had increased mRNA expression for c-Maf, a transcription factor that upregulates IL-10 gene expression. c-Maf small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited IL-10 production and growth of M. tuberculosis in CD14(hi) cells. Compared with CD14(lo)CD16(+) monocytes, M. tuberculosis H37Rv-stimulated CD14(hi) cells had increased expression of 22 genes whose promoters contained a c-Maf binding site, including hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1). c-Maf siRNA inhibited HAS1 expression in M. tuberculosis-stimulated CD14(hi) monocytes, and HAS1 siRNA inhibited growth of M. tuberculosis in CD14(hi) MDMs. M. tuberculosis H37Rv upregulated expression of HAS1 protein and its product, hyaluronan, in CD14(hi) MDMs. We conclude that M. tuberculosis grows more rapidly in CD14(hi) than in CD14(lo)CD16(+) MDMs because CD14(hi) cells have increased expression of c-Maf, which increases production of two key factors (hyaluronan and IL-10) that promote growth of M. tuberculosis.

  16. Class I and class II major histocompatibility molecules play a role in bone marrow-derived macrophage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Simske, S. J.; Beharka, A. A.; Balch, S.; Luttges, M. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play significant roles in T cell development and immune function. We show that MHCI- and MHCII-deficient mice have low numbers of macrophage precursors and circulating monocytes, as well as abnormal bone marrow cell colony-stimulating factor type 1 secretion and bone composition. We suggest that MHCI and MHCII molecules play a significant role in macrophage development.

  17. Inhibition of macrophage-derived foam cell formation by ezetimibe via the caveolin-1/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Yang, Yun-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xin; Zhu, Neng; Liu, Zheng; Ni, Ya-Guang; Li, Shun-Xiang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-02-01

    Ezetimibe, a selective inhibitor of intestinal cholesterol absorption, effectively reduces plasma cholesterol, but its effect on atherosclerosis is unclear. Foam cell formation has been implicated as a key mediator during the development of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ezetimibe on foam cell formation and explore the underlying mechanism. The results presented here show that ezetimibe reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE-/-) mice by lowering cholesterol levels. Treatment of macrophages with Chol:MβCD resulted in foam cell formation, which was concentration-dependently inhibited by the presence of ezetimibe. Mechanically, ezetimibe treatment downregulated the expression of CD36 and scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1), but upregulated the expression of apoE and caveolin-1 in macrophage-derived foam cells, which kept consistent with our microarray results. Moreover, treatment with ezetimibe abrogated the increase of phospho-extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and their nuclear accumulation in foam cells. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway by the MEK inhibitor PD98059 attenuated the inhibitory effect of ezetimibe on the expression of p-ERK1/2 and caveolin-1. Taken together, these results showed that ezetimibe suppressed foam cell formation via the caveolin-1/MAPK signalling pathway, suggesting that inhibition of foam cell formation might be a novel mechanism underlying the anti-atherosclerotic effect of ezetimibe.

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor acts as a neurotrophin in the developing inner ear.

    PubMed

    Bank, Lisa M; Bianchi, Lynne M; Ebisu, Fumi; Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov; Smiley, Elizabeth C; Shen, Yu-chi; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Thompson, Deborah L; Roth, Therese M; Beck, Christine R; Flynn, Matthew; Teller, Ryan S; Feng, Luming; Llewellyn, G Nicholas; Holmes, Brandon; Sharples, Cyrrene; Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Linn, Stephanie A; Chervenak, Andrew P; Dolan, David F; Benson, Jennifer; Kanicki, Ariane; Martin, Catherine A; Altschuler, Richard; Koch, Alisa E; Koch, Alicia E; Jewett, Ethan M; Germiller, John A; Barald, Kate F

    2012-12-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an immune system 'inflammatory' cytokine that is released by the developing otocyst, plays a role in regulating early innervation of the mouse and chick inner ear. We demonstrate that MIF is a major bioactive component of the previously uncharacterized otocyst-derived factor, which directs initial neurite outgrowth from the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) to the developing inner ear. Recombinant MIF acts as a neurotrophin in promoting both SAG directional neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival and is expressed in both the developing and mature inner ear of chick and mouse. A MIF receptor, CD74, is found on both embryonic SAG neurons and adult mouse spiral ganglion neurons. Mif knockout mice are hearing impaired and demonstrate altered innervation to the organ of Corti, as well as fewer sensory hair cells. Furthermore, mouse embryonic stem cells become neuron-like when exposed to picomolar levels of MIF, suggesting the general importance of this cytokine in neural development.

  19. Macrophages commit postnatal endothelium-derived progenitors to angiogenesis and restrict endothelial to mesenchymal transition during muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zordan, P; Rigamonti, E; Freudenberg, K; Conti, V; Azzoni, E; Rovere-Querini, P; Brunelli, S

    2014-01-01

    The damage of the skeletal muscle prompts a complex and coordinated response that involves the interactions of many different cell populations and promotes inflammation, vascular remodeling and finally muscle regeneration. Muscle disorders exist in which the irreversible loss of tissue integrity and function is linked to defective neo-angiogenesis with persistence of tissue necrosis and inflammation. Here we show that macrophages (MPs) are necessary for efficient vascular remodeling in the injured muscle. In particular, MPs sustain the differentiation of endothelial-derived progenitors to contribute to neo-capillary formation, by secreting pro-angiogenic growth factors. When phagocyte infiltration is compromised endothelial-derived progenitors undergo a significant endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndoMT), possibly triggered by the activation of transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling, collagen accumulates and the muscle is replaced by fibrotic tissue. Our findings provide new insights in EndoMT in the adult skeletal muscle, and suggest that endothelial cells in the skeletal muscle may represent a new target for therapeutic intervention in fibrotic diseases. PMID:24481445

  20. Chronic ethanol ingestion in rats decreases granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor expression and downstream signaling in the alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pratibha C; Applewhite, Lisa; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse; Fernandez, Alberto L; Eaton, Douglas C; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M

    2005-11-15

    Although it is well recognized that alcohol abuse impairs alveolar macrophage immune function and renders patients susceptible to pneumonia, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Alveolar macrophage maturation and function requires priming by GM-CSF, which is produced and secreted into the alveolar space by the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that although chronic ethanol ingestion (6 wk) in rats had no effect on GM-CSF expression within the alveolar space, it significantly decreased membrane expression of the GM-CSF receptor in alveolar macrophages. In parallel, ethanol ingestion decreased cellular expression and nuclear binding of PU.1, the master transcription factor that activates GM-CSF-dependent macrophage functions. Furthermore, treatment of ethanol-fed rats in vivo with rGM-CSF via the upper airway restored GM-CSF receptor membrane expression as well as PU.1 protein expression and nuclear binding in alveolar macrophages. Importantly, GM-CSF treatment also restored alveolar macrophage function in ethanol-fed rats, as reflected by endotoxin-stimulated release of TNF-alpha and bacterial phagocytosis. We conclude that ethanol ingestion dampens alveolar macrophage immune function by decreasing GM-CSF receptor expression and downstream PU.1 nuclear binding and that these chronic defects can be reversed relatively quickly with rGM-CSF treatment in vivo.

  1. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) induces pro-inflammatory gene expression and enhances antimicrobial responses of goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) macrophages.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Hanington, Patrick C; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2009-03-01

    We report on the regulation of pro-inflammatory functions of goldfish macrophages and induction of gene expression by recombinant goldfish CSF-1 (rgCSF-1). Recombinant goldfish TNFalpha-2 (rg TNFalpha-2), rgIFNgamma but not rgTGFbeta induced time-dependent increase of CSF-1 expression in macrophages. Treatment of goldfish macrophages with rgCSF-1 increased expression of several immune genes including CXCL-8 (=IL-8), CCL-1, TNFalpha-1, TNFalpha-2, IL-1beta-1, IL-1beta-2, IL-12-p35, IL-12-p40, IFN, IL-10 and iNOS A and B. The rgCSF-1 treatment did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of TGFbeta and NRAMP in macrophages up to 48h post treatment. However, at 72h post treatment, the expression of TGFbeta increased whereas that of NRAMP decreased. The treatment of macrophages with rgCSF-1 enhanced their respiratory burst and nitric oxide responses that were abrogated after addition of soluble CSF-1 receptor (sCSF-1R) to cell cultures. Macrophages exhibited a concentration-dependent chemotactic response toward rgCSF-1 as well as an increase in phagocytic activity that was abrogated after addition of sCSF-1R to cell cultures. Our results indicate that in addition to being an important growth factor of goldfish macrophages, rgCSF-1 also plays a central role in the regulation of their pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:19130890

  2. Viral and host factors induce macrophage activation and loss of Toll Like Receptor tolerance in chronic HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Norkina, Oxana; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Bakis, Gennadiy; Marshall, Christopher; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2007-01-01

    Background&Aims Persistent inflammation contributes to progression of liver damage in chronic HCV (cHCV) infection. Repeated exposure to Toll like receptor (TLR) ligands results in tolerance, a protective mechanism aimed at limiting inflammation. Methods Monocytes/macrophages were repeatedly stimulated via pro-inflammatory cytokine-inducing TLRs and evaluated for activation markers. Results Unlike monocytes (Mo) of controls or patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, the Mo of cHCV patients were hyper-responsive and failed to show homo- or hetero-tolerance to TLR ligands, manifested by elevated TNFα production. Serum levels of IFNγ, endotoxin (TLR4 ligand) and HCV core protein (TLR2 ligand) were elevated in cHCV patients suggesting potential mechanisms for in vivo monocyte pre-activation. Treatment of normal monocytes with IFNγ resulted in loss of tolerance to LPS or HCV core protein. Further, we found increased levels of MyD88-IRAK1 complexes and NFκB activity both in monocytes of cHCV patients and in normal monocytes that lost TLR tolerance after IFNγ+LPS pretreatment. In vitro differentiation of TLR tolerant cHCV monocytes into macrophages restored their capacity to exhibit TLR tolerance to LPS and HCV core protein and this could be reversed by administration of IFNγ. cHCV patients exhibited increased TNFα in the circulation and in the liver. In cHCV livers we found Kupffer cell/macrophage activation indicated by increased CD163 and CD33 expression. Conclusions We identified that host-derived factors (IFNγ and endotoxin) and viral factors (HCV core protein) act in tandem to induce and maintain monocyte/macrophage activation, thus favoring persistent inflammation in patients with cHCV infection. PMID:17916356

  3. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  4. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  5. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  6. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages. PMID:27599426

  7. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages.

  8. Proteinase Activated Receptor 1 Mediated Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Liver Injury: A Role for Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kallis, Yiannis N.; Scotton, Christopher J.; MacKinnon, Alison C.; Goldin, Robert D.; Wright, Nicholas A.; Iredale, John P.; Chambers, Rachel C.; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment. PMID:24475094

  9. Nerve growth factor promotes killing of Leishmania donovani by macrophages through the induction of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Rieko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Katakura, Ken; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is protozoonosis that occurs worldwide and still requires effective therapies with less toxicity. In this study, we examined the antileishmanial effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) using a murine infection model. NGF blocked the infection of macrophages by Leishmania donovani, which was completely cancelled by a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor. In vivo, not only did NGF show antileishmanial effects, but combination therapy of NGF and sodium stibogluconate synergistically exhibited the activity more potently than each monotherapy. These results indicate that NGF exerts antileishmanial effect by stimulating hydrogen peroxide production in macrophages and can be a novel therapy for leishmaniasis.

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF): A Key Player in Protozoan Infections

    PubMed Central

    de Dios Rosado, Juan; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine produced by the pituitary gland and multiple cell types, including macrophages (Mø), dendritic cells (DC) and T-cells. Upon releases MIF modulates the expression of several inflammatory molecules, such as TNF-α, nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). These important MIF characteristics have prompted investigators to study its role in parasite infections. Several reports have demonstrated that MIF plays either a protective or deleterious role in the immune response to different pathogens. Here, we review the role of MIF in the host defense response to some important protozoan infections. PMID:22110378

  11. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  12. Long-lived self-renewing bone marrow-derived macrophages displace embryo-derived cells to inhabit adult serous cavities

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Calum C.; Hawley, Catherine A.; Garner, Hannah; Scott, Charlotte L.; Schridde, Anika; Steers, Nicholas J.; Mack, Matthias; Joshi, Anagha; Guilliams, Martin; Mowat, Allan Mc I.; Geissmann, Frederic; Jenkins, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages are one of the most studied macrophage populations in the body, yet the composition, developmental origin and mechanisms governing the maintenance of this compartment are controversial. Here we show resident F4/80hiGATA6+ macrophages are long-lived, undergo non-stochastic self-renewal and retain cells of embryonic origin for at least 4 months in mice. However, Ly6C+ monocytes constitutively enter the peritoneal cavity in a CCR2-dependent manner, where they mature into short-lived F4/80loMHCII+ cells that act, in part, as precursors of F4/80hiGATA6+ macrophages. Notably, monocyte-derived F4/80hi macrophages eventually displace the embryonic population with age in a process that is highly gender dependent and not due to proliferative exhaustion of the incumbent embryonic population, despite the greater proliferative activity of newly recruited cells. Furthermore, although monocyte-derived cells acquire key characteristics of the embryonic population, expression of Tim4 was impaired, leading to cumulative changes in the population with age. PMID:27292029

  13. Long-lived self-renewing bone marrow-derived macrophages displace embryo-derived cells to inhabit adult serous cavities.

    PubMed

    Bain, Calum C; Hawley, Catherine A; Garner, Hannah; Scott, Charlotte L; Schridde, Anika; Steers, Nicholas J; Mack, Matthias; Joshi, Anagha; Guilliams, Martin; Mowat, Allan Mc I; Geissmann, Frederic; Jenkins, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages are one of the most studied macrophage populations in the body, yet the composition, developmental origin and mechanisms governing the maintenance of this compartment are controversial. Here we show resident F4/80(hi)GATA6(+) macrophages are long-lived, undergo non-stochastic self-renewal and retain cells of embryonic origin for at least 4 months in mice. However, Ly6C(+) monocytes constitutively enter the peritoneal cavity in a CCR2-dependent manner, where they mature into short-lived F4/80(lo)MHCII(+) cells that act, in part, as precursors of F4/80(hi)GATA6(+) macrophages. Notably, monocyte-derived F4/80(hi) macrophages eventually displace the embryonic population with age in a process that is highly gender dependent and not due to proliferative exhaustion of the incumbent embryonic population, despite the greater proliferative activity of newly recruited cells. Furthermore, although monocyte-derived cells acquire key characteristics of the embryonic population, expression of Tim4 was impaired, leading to cumulative changes in the population with age. PMID:27292029

  14. Identification of Novel Formyl Peptide Receptor-Like 1 Agonists that Induce Macrophage Tumor Necrosis Factor α Production

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Tian, Jun; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Ye, Richard D.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Development of immunomodulatory agents that enhance innate immune responses represents a promising strategy for combating infectious diseases. In the present studies, we screened a series of 71 arylcarboxylic acid hydrazide derivatives for their ability to induce macrophage tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production and identified 6 such compounds, including one compound previously shown to be a formyl peptide receptor (FPR/FPRL1) agonist. The two most potent compounds [Compound 1: nicotinic acid [5-(3-bromophenyl)-2-furyl]methylene-hydrazide; Compound 2: 4-fluoro-benzoic acid [5-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-furyl]methylene-hydrazide] were selected for further analysis. These compounds induced de novo production of TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human and murine monocyte/macrophage cell lines and in primary macrophages. These compounds also induced mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, production of reactive oxygen species, and chemotaxis in human and murine phagocytes. Induction of macrophage TNF-α production was pertussis toxin-sensitive, and analysis of the cellular target of these compounds showed that they were FPRL1-specific agonists and that this response was blocked by FPR/FPRL1 and FPRL1-specific antagonists. Additionally, pharmacophore modeling showed a high degree of similarity for low-energy conformations of these two compounds to the current pharmacophore model for FPR ligands (Edwards et al., 2005). Overall, these compounds represent novel FPRL1 agonists that induce TNF-α, a response distinct from those induced by other known FPR and FPRL1 agonists. PMID:18458054

  15. Flagella from Five Cronobacter Species Induce Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Macrophage Derivatives from Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314–6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39–359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2–96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95–100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria. PMID:23284883

  16. Functional endothelial progenitor cells selectively recruit neurovascular protective monocyte-derived F4/80(+) /Ly6c(+) macrophages in a mouse model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shinichi; Nagano, Masumi; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Kimura, Kenichi; Tsuboi, Ikki; Salazar, Georgina; Ueno, Shinji; Kondo, Mineo; Kunath, Tilo; Oshika, Tetsuro; Ohneda, Osamu

    2013-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of inherited eye disorders that result in profound vision loss with characteristic retinal neuronal degeneration and vasculature attenuation. In a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) from bone marrow rescued the vasculature and photoreceptors. However, the mechanisms and cell types underlying these protective effects were uncertain. We divided EPC, which contribute to angiogenesis, into two subpopulations based on their aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and observed that EPC with low ALDH activity (Alde-Low) had greater neuroprotection and vasoprotection capabilities after injection into the eyes of an rd1 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa compared with EPC with high ALDH activity (Alde-High). Of note, Alde-Low EPC selectively recruited F4/80(+) /Ly6c(+) monocyte-derived macrophages from bone marrow into retina through CCL2 secretion. In addition, the mRNA levels of CCR2, the neurotrophic factors TGF-β1 and IGF-1, and the anti-inflammatory mediator interleukin-10 were higher in migrated F4/80(+) /Ly6c(+) monocyte-derived macrophages as compared with F4/80(+) /Ly6c(-) resident retinal microglial cells. These results suggest a novel therapeutic approach using EPC to recruit neuroprotective macrophages that delay the progression of neural degenerative disease.

  17. Tissue-resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-resident macrophages are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill tissue-specific and niche-specific functions. These range from dedicated homeostatic functions, such as clearance of cellular debris and iron processing, to central roles in tissue immune-surveillance, response to infection and the resolution of inflammation. Recent studies highlight marked heterogeneity in the origins of tissue macrophages that arise from hematopoietic versus self-renewing embryo-derived populations. We discuss the tissue–niche-specific factors that dictate cell phenotype, the definition of which will allow novel strategies to promote the restoration of tissue homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms that dictate tissue macrophage heterogeneity should explain why simplified paradigms of macrophage activation do not explain the extent of heterogeneity seen in vivo. PMID:24048120

  18. Role of spleen-derived monocytes/macrophages in acute ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhee; Yang, Jiwon; Beltran, Cesar D; Cho, Sunghee

    2014-08-01

    Monocytes/macrophages (MMs), mononuclear phagocytes, have been implicated in stroke-induced inflammation and injury. However, the presence of pro-inflammatory Ly-6C(high) and antiinflammatory Ly-6C(low) monocyte subsets raises uncertainty regarding their role in stroke pathologic assessment. With recent identification of the spleen as an immediate reservoir of MMs, this current study addresses whether the spleen-derived MMs are required for stroke pathologic assessment. We observed that the spleen was contracted in poststroke animals and the contraction was accompanied by decreased number of Ly-6C(high) and Ly-6C(low) subsets in the spleen. The deployment of these subsets from the spleen temporally coincided with respective increases in the ischemic brain. Compared to mice with the spleen, mice receiving a splenectomy just before the stroke displayed less accumulation of Ly-6C(high) and Ly-6C(low) MMs in the brain. Despite the reduced accumulation of both subsets, infarct size and swelling were not reduced in the asplenic mice. The dissociative findings of infarct size and extent of MM infiltration in the postischemic brain indicate minimal involvement of spleen-derived total MMs in acute infarct development. Selective Ly-6C(high) or Ly-6C(low) MM targeting is suggested to address the contribution of the individual subset to acute stroke pathologic assessment.

  19. Synthesis of antimony complexes of yeast mannan and mannan derivatives and their effect on Leishmania-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cantos, G; Barbieri, C L; Iacomini, M; Gorin, P A; Travassos, L R

    1993-01-01

    Antimony(Sb)-yeast mannan complexes were synthesized as a strategy to introduce Sb into macrophages infected with Leishmania amastigotes. The complexes were taken up by endocytosis after specific recognition by alpha-D-mannosyl receptors on the macrophage membrane. About 90% of the intracellular parasites were destroyed by Sb-mannan in vitro, whereas the corresponding Sb concentration used as the pentavalent antimonial drug glucantime destroyed about 60% of the amastigotes. None of the Sb complexes prepared with mannan acid or basic derivatives was as effective as the simple Sb-mannan complex in clearing macrophage infection by Leishmania (L) amazonensis. The leishmanicidal effect of Sb-mannan was also demonstrated in vivo with infected hamsters. The alternative use of Sb-mannan complex in the treatment of human leishmaniasis is envisaged on the basis of parasite-killing efficiency and the use of a low antimony dose.

  20. [Differential growth inhibition of mycobacteria by interferon-gamma-or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-treated murine peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tomioka, H; Saito, H

    1996-11-01

    Growth inhibition of the intracellular mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. fortuitum, and M. chelonae subsp. abscessus by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)- or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-treated murine peritoneal macrophages elicited by proteose peptone was studied in vitro. Macrophages were infected with slowly growing mycobacteria and the extracellular mycobacteria were washed out. Then, macrophages were treated with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha at a concentration of 10 to 1000 U/ml for 2 days. In another experiment, macrophages were pretreated with these cytokines for 1 day then infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria as before. Macrophages were cultured with or without IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha for additional day. Mycobacterial growth was assessed by determination of colony-forming units on 7H11 agar plates after destruction of the macrophages. Stimulation of macrophages with IFN-gamma reduced the growth of mycobacteria. However, except for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, growth was not inhibited by macrophages treated with TNF-alpha. IFN-gamma seems to be an important cytokine for the activation of mycobactericidal mechanisms in murine macrophages. Stimulation with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha and subsequent phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis or M. intracellulare increased O2- production, which was assayed by the method of cytochrome C reduction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-triggered-O2- production was also elevated by the cytokine pretreatment of the macrophages, suggesting that mycobacterial growth inhibition did not parallel the production of reactive oxygen intermediates in TNF alpha-activated murine peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that bactericidal mechanisms of murine macrophages against nontuberculous mycobacteria may not depend on reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8958673

  1. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhou, Xia; Fan, Lucy X.; Yao, Ying; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I.; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Wallace, Darren P.; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Yu, Alan; Grantham, Jared J.; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by renal cyst formation, inflammation, and fibrosis. Macrophages infiltrate cystic kidneys, but the role of these and other inflammatory factors in disease progression are poorly understood. Here, we identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as an important regulator of cyst growth in ADPKD. MIF was upregulated in cyst-lining epithelial cells in polycystin-1–deficient murine kidneys and accumulated in cyst fluid of human ADPKD kidneys. MIF promoted cystic epithelial cell proliferation by activating ERK, mTOR, and Rb/E2F pathways and by increasing glucose uptake and ATP production, which inhibited AMP-activated protein kinase signaling. MIF also regulated cystic renal epithelial cell apoptosis through p53-dependent signaling. In polycystin-1–deficient mice, MIF was required for recruitment and retention of renal macrophages, which promoted cyst expansion, and Mif deletion or pharmacologic inhibition delayed cyst growth in multiple murine ADPKD models. MIF-dependent macrophage recruitment was associated with upregulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. TNF-α induced MIF expression, and MIF subsequently exacerbated TNF-α expression in renal epithelial cells, suggesting a positive feedback loop between TNF-α and MIF during cyst development. Our study indicates MIF is a central and upstream regulator of ADPKD pathogenesis and provides a rationale for further exploration of MIF as a therapeutic target for ADPKD. PMID:25961459

  2. The transcription factor NFATc3 modulates the function of macrophages in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Xiao, Lei; Joo, Myungsoo; Christman, John W.; Karpurapu, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    The role of the transcription factor, Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT), was initially identified in T and B cell gene expression, but their role in regulating gene expression in macrophage during sepsis is not known. Our data show that NFATc3 regulates expression of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Selective inhibition of NFAT by cyclosporine A and a competitive peptide inhibitor 11R-VIVIT inhibited endotoxin induced expression of iNOS-NO release. Macrophages from NFATc3 knock-out mice show reduced iNOS expression-NO release and attenuated bactericidal activity. Gel shift and chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) assays show that endotoxin challenge increases the NFATc3 binding to iNOS promoter resulting in transcriptional activation of iNOS. The binding of NFATc3 to the iNOS promoter is abolished by NFAT inhibitors. NFATc3 KO mice subjected to sepsis show that NFATc3 is necessary for bacterial clearance in mouse lungs during sepsis. Our study demonstrates for the first time that NFATc3 is necessary for macrophage iNOS expression during sepsis which is essential for containment of bacterial infections. PMID:24970700

  3. Pericellular mobilization of the tissue-destructive cysteine proteinases, cathepsins B, L, and S, by human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V Y; Zhang, Q Y; Weiss, S J

    1995-01-01

    Human macrophages are believed to damage host tissues in chronic inflammatory disease states, but these cells have been reported to express only modest degradative activity in vitro. However, while examining the ability of human monocytes to degrade the extracellular matrix component elastin, we identified culture conditions under which the cells matured into a macrophage population that displayed a degradative phenotype hundreds of times more destructive than that previously ascribed to any other cell population. The monocyte-derived macrophages synthesized elastinolytic matrix metalloproteinases (i.e., gelatinase B and matrilysin) as well as cysteine proteinases (i.e., cathepsins B, L, and S), but only the cathepsins were detected in the extracellular milieu as fully processed, mature enzymes by either vital fluorescence or active-site labeling. Consistent with these observations, macrophage-mediated elastinolytic activity was not affected by matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors but could be almost completely abrogated by inhibiting cathepsins L and S. These data demonstrate that human macrophages mobilize cysteine proteinases to arm themselves with a powerful effector mechanism that can participate in the pathophysiologic remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7731994

  4. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito . E-mail: zakay@ri.imcj.go.jp

    2005-12-23

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application.

  5. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-12-10

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release 'messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial 'apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50-120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  6. Epithelial cell-derived microvesicles activate macrophages and promote inflammation via microvesicle-containing microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heedoo; Zhang, Duo; Zhu, Ziwen; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Jin, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communications between lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages play an essential role in host defense against acute lung injury. Hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress is an established model to mimic human lung injury. We show that after hyperoxia-associated oxidative stress, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are detectable in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and culture medium of lung epithelial cells. Microvesicles (MVs), but not exosomes (Exos) or apoptotic bodies (Abs), are the main type of EVs found in the early stages after hyperoxia. Among all the MV compositions, small RNAs are altered the most significantly after hyperoxia-associated oxidative stress. We further confirmed that hyperoxia up-regulates the levels of certain specific miRNAs in the epithelial cell-derived MVs, such as the miR-320a and miR-221. Functionally, the hyperoxia-induced epithelial MVs promote macrophage activation in vitro and facilitate the recruitment of immunomodulatory cells in vivo detected in BALF. Using MV as a cargo, delivery of the specific miRNA-enriched epithelial MVs (miR-221 and/or miR-320a) also triggers macrophage-mediated pro-inflammatory effects. Collectively, epithelial cell-derived MVs promote macrophage-regulated lung inflammatory responses via MV-shuttling miRNAs. PMID:27731391

  7. Anti-I-J alloantisera elicited by immunization of B10.A(3R) (I-Jb) mice with bone marrow-derived macrophages from B10.A(5R) (I-Jk) mice.

    PubMed

    Bradley, L M; Shiigi, S M; Malley, A

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we describe production of alloantisera specific for determinants encoded by I-J gene loci expressed on macrophages. B10.A(3R) (I-Jb) mice were hyperimmunized with pure macrophages grown in vitro from bone marrow stem cells of congenic B10.A(5R) mice. The antisera contained predominantly IgM antibody that was non-adherent to protein-A-Sepharose with a minor component of IgG1, and IgG2a antibodies that were adherent to protein-A-Sepharose. The protein-A non-adherent antibody completely blocked the in vitro generation of humoral immune responses to sheep erythrocytes by spleen cell from B10.A(5R) mice and from inbred strains that share the I-Jk haplotypes, but did not alter the responses of spleen cells of the I-Jb haplotype. In the presence of complement, both protein-A adherent and protein-A non-adherent antibodies eliminated the capacity of B10.A(5R) spleen cells to generate humoral and proliferative responses, but the functional activity of B10.A(3R) cells was unaffected. These data indicate the I-Jk specificity of the antisera. The capacity of the anti-macrophage antibody to block humoral immune induction was removed by absorption with bone marrow-derived macrophages from B10.A(5R) mice, but not from B10.A(3R) mice. Further, the B10.A(5R) macrophages completely restored the humoral responses of antibody- and complement-treated B10.A(5R) spleen cells, but B10.A(3R) macrophages showed only partial restoration that was consistent with a factor-mediated allogeneic effect. These data demonstrate the specificity of our anti-I-J sera for macrophages and indicate that bone marrow-derived macrophages express surface I-J encoded molecules.

  8. Divergent antiviral roles of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) macrophages elicited by colony-stimulating factor-1 and interleukin-34

    PubMed Central

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are integral to amphibian immunity against RVs, as well as to the infection strategies of these pathogens. Although CSF-1 was considered to be the principal mediator of macrophage development, the IL-34 cytokine, which shares no sequence identity with CSF-1, is now believed to contribute to vertebrate monopoiesis. However, the respective roles of CSF-1- and IL-34-derived macrophages are still poorly understood. To delineate the contribution of these macrophage populations to amphibian immunity against the RV FV3, we identified the Xenopus laevis IL-34 and transcriptionally and functionally compared this cytokine with the previously identified X. laevis CSF-1. The X. laevis CSF-1 and IL-34 displayed strikingly nonoverlapping developmental and tissue-specific gene-expression patterns. Furthermore, only CSF-1 but not IL-34 was up-regulated in the kidneys of FV3-challenged tadpoles. Intriguingly, recombinant forms of these cytokines (rXlCSF-1, rXlIL-34) elicited morphologically distinct tadpole macrophages, and whereas rXlCSF-1 pretreatment decreased the survival of FV3-infected tadpoles, rXlIL-34 administration significantly prolonged FV3-challenged animal survival. Compared with rXlIL-34-elicited macrophages, macrophages derived by rXlCSF-1 were more phagocytic but also significantly more susceptible to in vitro FV3 infections. By contrast, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited significantly greater in vitro antiranaviral activity and displayed substantially more robust gene expression of the NADPH oxidase components (p67phox, gp91phox) and type I IFN. Moreover, FV3-challenged, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited several orders of magnitude greater up-regulation of the type I IFN gene expression. This marks the first report of the disparate roles of CSF-1 and IL-34 in vertebrate antiviral immunity. PMID:25190077

  9. Divergent antiviral roles of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) macrophages elicited by colony-stimulating factor-1 and interleukin-34.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages are integral to amphibian immunity against RVs, as well as to the infection strategies of these pathogens. Although CSF-1 was considered to be the principal mediator of macrophage development, the IL-34 cytokine, which shares no sequence identity with CSF-1, is now believed to contribute to vertebrate monopoiesis. However, the respective roles of CSF-1- and IL-34-derived macrophages are still poorly understood. To delineate the contribution of these macrophage populations to amphibian immunity against the RV FV3, we identified the Xenopus laevis IL-34 and transcriptionally and functionally compared this cytokine with the previously identified X. laevis CSF-1. The X. laevis CSF-1 and IL-34 displayed strikingly nonoverlapping developmental and tissue-specific gene-expression patterns. Furthermore, only CSF-1 but not IL-34 was up-regulated in the kidneys of FV3-challenged tadpoles. Intriguingly, recombinant forms of these cytokines (rXlCSF-1, rXlIL-34) elicited morphologically distinct tadpole macrophages, and whereas rXlCSF-1 pretreatment decreased the survival of FV3-infected tadpoles, rXlIL-34 administration significantly prolonged FV3-challenged animal survival. Compared with rXlIL-34-elicited macrophages, macrophages derived by rXlCSF-1 were more phagocytic but also significantly more susceptible to in vitro FV3 infections. By contrast, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited significantly greater in vitro antiranaviral activity and displayed substantially more robust gene expression of the NADPH oxidase components (p67(phox), gp91(phox)) and type I IFN. Moreover, FV3-challenged, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited several orders of magnitude greater up-regulation of the type I IFN gene expression. This marks the first report of the disparate roles of CSF-1 and IL-34 in vertebrate antiviral immunity.

  10. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26885857

  11. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  12. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  13. Immune Enhancing Activity of β-(1,3)-Glucan Isolated from Genus Agrobacterium in Bone-Marrow Derived Macrophages and Mice Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Jang, Beom-Su; Byun, Eui-Hong; Sung, Nak-Yun

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for activating macrophages and deriving a Th1 immune response could be used to improve the defenses of hosts. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulation effect and the related signaling mechanism of [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan, isolated from the Agrobacterium species. Here, we found that [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan predominantly induced the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], IL-6, IL-12p70, and nitric oxide, which was dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-[Formula: see text]B signaling. Additionally, [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan treatment significantly up-regulated the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, and also significantly increased the expression of iNOS and Dectin-1, which is a transmembrane protein that binds [Formula: see text]-glucan and associates with macrophage activation. Importantly, the splenic T cells co-cultured with [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan-treated macrophages produced the a Th1 cytokine profile that includes high levels of IFN-[Formula: see text], but not IL-4 (Th2 cytokine), indicating that [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan contributes to Th1 polarization of the immune response. Taken together, our results suggest that [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan isolated from Agrobacterium species can induce macrophage activation through the MAPK and NF-[Formula: see text]B signaling pathway, as well as Th1 polarization. PMID:27430908

  14. Microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages: functionally distinct populations that act in concert in CNS plasticity and repair

    PubMed Central

    London, Anat; Cohen, Merav; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Functional macrophage heterogeneity is recognized outside the central nervous system (CNS), where alternatively activated macrophages can perform immune-resolving functions. Such functional heterogeneity was largely ignored in the CNS, with respect to the resident microglia and the myeloid-derived cells recruited from the blood following injury or disease, previously defined as blood-derived microglia; both were indistinguishably perceived detrimental. Our studies have led us to view the myeloid-derived infiltrating cells as functionally distinct from the resident microglia, and accordingly, to name them monocyte-derived macrophages (mo-MΦ). Although microglia perform various maintenance and protective roles, under certain conditions when they can no longer provide protection, mo-MΦ are recruited to the damaged CNS; there, they act not as microglial replacements but rather assistant cells, providing activities that cannot be timely performed by the resident cells. Here, we focus on the functional heterogeneity of microglia/mo-MΦ, emphasizing that, as opposed to the mo-MΦ, microglia often fail to timely acquire the phenotype essential for CNS repair. PMID:23596391

  15. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  16. Leonurus sibiricus induces nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Se-Eun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyung; Choi, In-Young; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Il Kwang; Lee, Ju-Young; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Using mouse peritoneal macrophages, we have examined the mechanism by which Leonurus sibiricus (LS) regulates nitric oxide (NO) production. When LS was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production; however, LS by itself had no effect on NO production. The increased production of NO from rIFN-gamma plus LS-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB. Furthermore, treatment of peritoneal macrophages with rIFN-gamma plus LS caused a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. PDTC also decreased the effect of LS on TNF-alpha production significantly. Because NO and TNF-alpha play an important role in immune function and host defense, LS treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms as a result of stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  18. Depletion of Bone Marrow-derived Macrophages Perturbs the Innate Immune Response to Surgery and Reduces Postoperative Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Degos, Vincent; Vacas, Susana; Han, Zhenying; van Rooijen, Nico; Gressens, Pierre; Su, Hua; Young, William L.; Maze, Mervyn

    2013-01-01

    Background According to rodent models of postoperative cognitive decline, activation of the innate immune response following aseptic surgical trauma results in the elaboration of hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines, which are capable of disrupting long-term potentiation, the neurobiologic correlate of memory. We hypothesize that hippocampal recruitment of bone marrow-derived (BMD) macrophages plays a causal role in these processes, resulting in memory dysfunction. Methods Clodrolip injection (liposomal formulation of clodronate) prior to stabilized tibial fracture under general anesthesia was used to deplete BMD macrophages. Systemic and neuroinflammation were studied on postoperative day 1, and memory in a fear-trace conditioning paradigm was assessed on postoperative day 3. CX3CR1GFP/+ CCR2RFP/+ mice were used to identify BMD macrophages. Results Clodrolip effectively depleted splenic CCR2+ BMD macrophages. It also attenuated the surgery-induced increase of interleukin-6 in the serum and the hippocampus, and prevented hippocampal infiltration of CCR2+ cells without affecting the number of CX3CR1+ microglia. It did not alter the surgery-induced increase in hippocampal MCP-1, the recruitment signal for CCR2+ cells. Clodrolip prevented surgery-induced memory dysfunction, as evidenced by a significant increase in freezing time (29%, 95% CI: 21 to 38% vs. 48%, 95% CI: 38 to 58%, n= 20, P = 0.004), but did not affect memory in nonsurgical mice. Conclusion Depletion of BMD macrophages prevents hippocampal neuroinflammation and memory dysfunction after experimental tibial fracture. These data suggest that the hippocampal recruitment of BMD macrophages is a necessary mechanism in murine postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Interventions designed to prevent its activation and/or migration into the brain may represent a feasible preemptive strategy. PMID:23426204

  19. NK-derived IFN-γ/IL-4 triggers the sexually disparate polarization of macrophages in CVB3-induced myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Yue, Yan; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common etiology of myocarditis with an increased morbidity and mortality in males. We previously reported that differential polarization of macrophages contributed to sexually dimorphic susceptibility of mice to CVB3-induced myocarditis. However, the underlying kinetics, impetus as well as the molecular mechanism remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that myocardial macrophages started to polarize at as early as day 5 post CVB3 infection in both genders of BALB/c mice, with M1 phenotype detected in males and M2a phenotype in females, and this trend was further amplified at day 7 when myocarditis reached peak. In addition, we identified that prevailed IFN-γ in males and dominant IL-4 in females were critical myocardial cytokines for the disparate macrophage polarization, which respectively activated JAK1-STAT1 and JAK3-STAT6 pathways. Strikingly, we found that the main source of IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokines in both genders were myocardial infiltrating NK cells, which differentially secreted cytokines in various microenvironments manifested synergistically by sex hormones and CVB3 infection. Consistently, depletion of NK cells significantly impeded the myocardial macrophage polarization in both genders of CVB3-infected mice. Collectively, these data indicated that myocardial NK-derived IFN-γ/IL-4 was critical for the differential polarization of macrophages in CVB3-induced myocarditis via activating JAK1-STAT1 and JAK3-STAT6 pathways respectively. Our study may help understand the mechanism of sexually differential polarization of macrophages and provide clues for the gender bias in CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  20. [Successful treatment of agranulocytosis caused by carbimazole using recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor].

    PubMed

    Kreze, A; Kuviková, A; Laca, L; Kompis, S; Dobáková, M; Babusík, P; Matecek, L; Pekárová, E

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe a patient with hyperthyroidism who developed after three weeks' treatment with carbimazole agranulocytosis and the condition was complicated by septic shock. The authors used for treatment in addition to antibiotics and corticoids, for the first time in their practice, human recombinant granulocyte macrophage colonies stimulating factor (rHuGM-CSF) which produced a very favourable effect. In the meantime the patient was prepared for goitrectomy, operated and discharged in a satisfactory condition to have ambulatory treatment.

  1. Macrophage response in patients diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head presenting different risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Diana; Trăistaru, Rodica; Kamal, Constantin Kamal; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Grecu, Dan Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a condition caused by partial or total interruption of blood supply to the femoral head. The diminished blood supply causes necrosis of the cellular elements and of the bone marrow, followed by the collapse of the bone structure, events that ultimately lead to the destruction of the bone tissue, the appearance of local pain and loss of function in the affected coxofemoral joint. The importance of this condition is that it mainly affects young adults aged 30-50 years, active from a socio-professional standpoint, and increased life expectancy. The material studied to achieve CD68 immunostaining was represented by bone fragments from the area of necrosis and from the adjacent areas of the femoral heads, harvested from 39 patients when performing hip arthroplasty surgery. The patients were diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head and hospitalized in the Clinic of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, from June 2014 to January 2015. The 39 patients included in the study were divided into four categories according to presented risk factors (alcohol, alcohol and smoking, trauma, corticosteroids). All the 39 cases had positive immunostaining for CD68, macrophage being highlighted both in the area of necrosis and in the adjacent areas. We noted significant differences in the number and arrangement of macrophages in patients presenting different risk factors. The highest number of macrophages was present in patients presenting a risk factor corticosteroids, and the lowest number of macrophages was found in patients who had trauma as the main risk factor.

  2. Dual transcriptome sequencing reveals resistance of TLR4 ligand-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages to inflammation mediated by the BET inhibitor JQ1.

    PubMed

    Das, Amitabh; Chai, Jin Choul; Yang, Chul-Su; Lee, Young Seek; Das, Nando Dulal; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent macrophage activation is associated with the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes, cytokines and chemokines, which may initiate or amplify inflammatory disorders. A novel synthetic BET inhibitor, JQ1, was proven to exert immunosuppressive activities in macrophages. However, a genome-wide search for JQ1 molecular targets has not been undertaken. The present study aimed at evaluating the anti-inflammatory function and underlying genes that are targeted by JQ1 in LPS-stimulated primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) using global transcriptomic RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. Among the annotated genes, transcriptional sequencing of BMDMs that were treated with JQ1 revealed a selective effect on LPS-induced gene expression in which the induction of cytokines/chemokines, interferon-stimulated genes, and prominent (transcription factors) TFs was suppressed. Additionally, we found that JQ1 reduced the expression of previously unidentified genes that are important in inflammation. Importantly, these inflammatory genes were not affected by JQ1 treatment alone. Furthermore, we confirmed that JQ1 reduced cytokines/chemokines in the supernatants of LPS treated BMDMs. Moreover, the biological pathways and gene ontology of the differentially expressed genes were determined in the JQ1 treatment of BMDMs. These unprecedented results suggest that the BET inhibitor JQ1 is a candidate for the prevention or therapeutic treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:26582142

  3. Dual transcriptome sequencing reveals resistance of TLR4 ligand-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages to inflammation mediated by the BET inhibitor JQ1

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amitabh; Chai, Jin Choul; Yang, Chul-su; Lee, Young Seek; Das, Nando Dulal; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent macrophage activation is associated with the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes, cytokines and chemokines, which may initiate or amplify inflammatory disorders. A novel synthetic BET inhibitor, JQ1, was proven to exert immunosuppressive activities in macrophages. However, a genome-wide search for JQ1 molecular targets has not been undertaken. The present study aimed at evaluating the anti-inflammatory function and underlying genes that are targeted by JQ1 in LPS-stimulated primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) using global transcriptomic RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. Among the annotated genes, transcriptional sequencing of BMDMs that were treated with JQ1 revealed a selective effect on LPS-induced gene expression in which the induction of cytokines/chemokines, interferon-stimulated genes, and prominent (transcription factors) TFs was suppressed. Additionally, we found that JQ1 reduced the expression of previously unidentified genes that are important in inflammation. Importantly, these inflammatory genes were not affected by JQ1 treatment alone. Furthermore, we confirmed that JQ1 reduced cytokines/chemokines in the supernatants of LPS treated BMDMs. Moreover, the biological pathways and gene ontology of the differentially expressed genes were determined in the JQ1 treatment of BMDMs. These unprecedented results suggest that the BET inhibitor JQ1 is a candidate for the prevention or therapeutic treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:26582142

  4. A Brucella Virulence Factor Targets Macrophages to Trigger B-cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Spera, Juan M.; Herrmann, Claudia K.; Roset, Mara S.; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Juan E.

    2013-01-01

    Brucella spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are two intracellular pathogens that have no evolutionary common origins but share a similar lifestyle as they establish chronic infections for which they have to circumvent the host immune response. Both pathogens have a virulence factor (prpA in Brucella and tcPrac in T. cruzi) that induces B-cell proliferation and promotes the establishment of the chronic phase of the infectious process. We show here that, even though PrpA promotes B-cell proliferation, it targets macrophages in vitro and is translocated to the cytoplasm during the intracellular replication phase. We observed that PrpA-treated macrophages induce the secretion of a soluble factor responsible for B-cell proliferation and identified nonmuscular myosin IIA (NMM-IIA) as a receptor required for binding and function of this virulence factor. Finally, we show that the Trypanosoma cruzi homologue of PrpA also targets macrophages to induce B-cell proliferation through the same receptor, indicating that this virulence strategy is conserved between a bacterial and a protozoan pathogen. PMID:23720774

  5. Mechanisms of amphibian macrophage development: characterization of the Xenopus laevis colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-lineage cells are indispensable to vertebrate homeostasis and immunity. In turn, macrophage development is largely regulated through colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) binding to its cognate receptor (CSF1R). To study amphibian monopoiesis, we identified and characterized the X. laevis CSF1R cDNA transcript. Quantitative analysis revealed that CSF1R tissue gene expression increased with X. laevis development, with greatest transcript levels detected in the adult lung, spleen and liver tissues. Notably, considerable levels of CSF1R mRNA were also detected in the regressing tails of metamorphosing animals, suggesting macrophage involvement in this process, and in the adult bone marrow; corroborating the roles for this organ in Xenopus monopoiesis. Following animal infections with the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3), both tadpole and adult X. laevis exhibited increased kidney CSF1R gene expression. Conversely, while FV3-infected tadpoles increased their spleen and liver CSF1R mRNA levels, the FV3-challenged adults did not. Notably, FV3 induced elevated bone marrow CSF1R expression, and while stimulation of tadpoles with heat-killed E. coli had no transcriptional effects, bacterial stimulation of adult frogs resulted in significantly increased spleen, liver and bone marrow CSF1R expression. We produced the X. laevis CSF1R in recombinant form (rXlCSF1R) and determined, via in vitro cross-linking studies, that two molecules of rXlCSF1R bound the dimeric rXlCSF1. Finally, administration of rXlCSF1R abrogated the rXlCSF1-induced tadpole macrophage recruitment and differentiation as well as bacterial and FV3-elicited peritoneal leukocyte accumulation. This work marks a step towards garnering greater understanding of the unique mechanisms governing amphibian macrophage biology.

  6. The transcription factor PU.1 promotes alternative macrophage polarization and asthmatic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Lee, Yong Gyu; Zhu, Jimmy; Karpurapu, Manjula; Chung, Sangwoon; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Xiao, Lei; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2015-12-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is involved in regulation of macrophage differentiation and maturation. However, the role of PU.1 in alternatively activated macrophage (AAM) and asthmatic inflammation has yet been investigated. Here we report that PU.1 serves as a critical regulator of AAM polarization and promotes the pathological progress of asthmatic airway inflammation. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, conditional PU.1-deficient (PU/ER(T)(+/-)) mice displayed attenuated allergic airway inflammation, including decreased alveolar eosinophil infiltration and reduced production of IgE, which were associated with decreased mucous glands and goblet cell hyperplasia. The reduced asthmatic inflammation in PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice was restored by adoptive transfer of IL-4-induced wild-type (WT) macrophages. Moreover, after treating PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice with tamoxifen to rescue PU.1 function, the allergic asthmatic inflammation was significantly restored. In vitro studies demonstrate that treatment of PU.1-deficient macrophages with IL-4 attenuated the expression of chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym-1) and resistin-like molecule alpha 1 (Fizz-1), two specific markers of AAM polarization. In addition, PU.1 expression in macrophages was inducible in response to IL-4 challenge, which was associated with phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, DRA challenge in sensitized mice almost abrogated gene expression of Ym-1 and Fizz-1 in lung tissues of PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice compared with WT mice. These data, all together, indicate that PU.1 plays a critical role in AAM polarization and asthmatic inflammation.

  7. Diminished adherence and/or ingestion of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by monocyte-derived macrophages from patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, J; Arias, M; Maya, J R; García, L F

    1998-09-01

    The interaction between the macrophage and Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by a variety of macrophage membrane-associated proteins. Complement receptors have been implicated in the adherence of M. tuberculosis to macrophages. In the present work, the adherence and/or ingestion of M. tuberculosis H37Rv to human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy controls was measured by microscopical examination, [3H]uracil incorporation, and CFU. The adherence and/or ingestion was enhanced by fresh serum and inhibited by heat inactivation, EDTA treatment, and anti-CR1 and anti-CR3 antibodies. Comparison of MDM from TB patients and healthy controls showed that the former exhibited a significantly decreased capacity to adhere and/or ingest M. tuberculosis, as determined by the number of CFU and 3H incorporation. The expression of CR1 (CD35) and CR3 (CD11b/CD18) on MDM from TB patients and healthy controls, as determined by flow cytometry, did not show significant differences. These results suggest that the lower ingestion of M. tuberculosis by MDM from TB patients is not due to defects in complement receptors, and therefore, there might be other molecules involved in the adherence and/or ingestion process that render MDM from TB patients ingest less mycobacteria than those from healthy controls.

  8. Macrophage-dependent clearance of systemically administered B16BL6-derived exosomes from the blood circulation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Takafumi; Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kato, Kana; Morishita, Masaki; Yamashita, Takuma; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Charoenviriyakul, Chonlada; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using B16BL6-derived exosomes labelled with gLuc–lactadherin (gLuc-LA), a fusion protein of Gaussia luciferase (a reporter protein) and lactadherin (an exosome-tropic protein), showed that the exosomes quickly disappeared from the systemic circulation after intravenous injection in mice. In the present study, the mechanism of rapid clearance of intravenously injected B16BL6 exosomes was investigated. gLuc-LA-labelled exosomes were obtained from supernatant of B16BL6 cells after transfection with a plasmid DNA encoding gLuc-LA. Labelling was stable when the exosomes were incubated in serum. By using B16BL6 exosomes labelled with PKH26, a lipophilic fluorescent dye, it was demonstrated that PKH26-labelled B16BL6 exosomes were taken up by macrophages in the liver and spleen but not in the lung, while PKH26-labelled exosomes were taken up by the endothelial cells in the lung. Subsequently, gLuc-LA-labelled B16BL6 exosomes were injected into macrophage-depleted mice prepared by injection with clodronate-containing liposomes. The clearance of the intravenously injected B16BL6 exosomes from the blood circulation was much slower in macrophage-depleted mice than that in untreated mice. These results indicate that macrophages play important roles in the clearance of intravenously injected B16BL6 exosomes from the systemic circulation. PMID:25669322

  9. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor expressed in non-cancer tissues provides predictive powers for recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Furuya, Shinji; Hara, Michio; Hirayama, Kazuyoshi; Akazawa, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Yuuki; Tsuchiya, Masato; Hosomura, Naohiro; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgery. METHODS Expression of M-CSF, distribution of M2 macrophages (MΦs), and angiogenesis were assessed in the liver, including tumors and peritumoral liver tissues. The prognostic power of these factors was assessed. Mouse isolated hepatic MΦs or monocytes were cultured with media containing M-CSF. The concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in media was assessed. Furthermore, the role of the M-CSF-matured hepatic MΦs on proliferation of the vascular endothelial cell (VEC) was investigated. RESULTS A strong correlation between the expressions of M-CSF and CD163 was observed in the peritumoral area. Also, groups with high density of M-CSF, CD163 or CD31 showed a significantly shorter time to recurrence (TTR) than low density groups. Multivariate analysis revealed the expression of M-CSF or hepatic M2MΦs in the peritumoral area as the most crucial factor responsible for shorter TTR. Moreover, the expression of M-CSF and hepatic M2MΦs in the peritumoral area had better predictable power of overall survival. Values of VEGF in culture media were significantly greater in the hepatic MΦs compared with the monocytes. Proliferation of the VEC was greatest in the cells co-cultured with hepatic MΦs when M-CSF was present in media. CONCLUSION M-CSF increases hepatocarcinogenesis, most likely by enhancing an angiogenic factor derived from hepatic MΦ and could be a useful target for therapy against HCC.

  10. Effect of cortisol and/or DHEA on THP1-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Bettina; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; D'Attilio, Luciano; Leon-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Bottasso, Oscar; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Bay, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response to be controlled. Macrophages play a central role in the response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Given our prior studies in which adrenal steroids were found to modify the cellular immune responses from TB patients, it was sensible to analyze the immunomodulatory capability of cortisol and DHEA on macrophages infected with Mtb. The human macrophage-like THP-1 cells were infected with the H37Rv strain of Mtb and treated with Cortisol and DHEA at different doses. We monitored phagocytosis, intracellular-bacterial growth, autophagosoma formation, as well as cytokine gene expression and production. Cultures exposed to cortisol showed a decreased production of IL-1β, TNF-α, with DHEA being unable to modify the pattern of cytokine production or to reverse the cortisol inhibitory effects. Interestingly the intra-macrophagic bacterial burden was found reduced by DHEA treatment. While this effect was not related to a different cytokine pattern, in terms their production or mRNA expression, DHEA treatment did promote autophagy in Mtb-infected macrophages, irrespective of Cortisol presence. In essence, the better control of Mtb load by DHEA-treated macrophages seems to be dependent on an autophagic mechanism. The present results are relevant for two reasons as autophagy is not only important for clearance of mycobacteria but also for the prevention of tissue damage.

  11. The binding of rabbit IgG and its enzymatically derived fragments to homologous peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ganczakowski, M; Leslie, R G

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit IgG and its Fab, Fc and pFc' fragments, prepared by papain or peptic digestion, were assayed for binding to homologous peritoneal macrophages. The binding affinity of IgG for the peritoneal macrophages (Ka = 5.9 +/- 1.6 x 10(5) L/M) was comparable to that recorded with alveolar macrophages (7.6 +/- 1.8 x 10(5) L/M, Arend & Mannik, 1973) but the number of receptor sites per peritoneal cell (4.6 +/- 2.1 x10(6)) was about four-fold greater than on the latter. Of the fragments, only Fc bound to macrophages with an affinity comparable to intact IgG; pFc' bound weakly and Fab was totally inactive. These data, taken with a recent study involving rabbit IgG and guinea-pig macrophages (Ovary, Saluk, Quijada & Lamm, 1976), indicate that the primary IgG binding site for macrophages is located in the C gamma 2 domain. PMID:437840

  12. Involvement of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in cancer and novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kindt, Nadège; Journe, Fabrice; Laurent, Guy; Saussez, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was originally identified in 1966 by Bloom and Bennett as a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the inhibition of macrophage motility. Since then, studies have investigated the functional contribution of this pro-inflammatory cytokine in several immune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematous. Recently, MIF has been reported to be involved in a variety of neoplastic diseases. The present review discusses previous cancer research studies that have investigated the involvement of MIF in carcinogenesis, disease prognosis, tumor cell proliferation and invasion, and tumor-induced angiogenesis. Finally, potential therapeutic approaches based on the use of MIF antagonists and neutralizing antibodies are examined. The review concludes that MIF could be a good prognostic biomarker in several types of cancer, but also that the inhibition of MIF could represent a novel therapy against cancer. PMID:27698786

  13. Involvement of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in cancer and novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kindt, Nadège; Journe, Fabrice; Laurent, Guy; Saussez, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was originally identified in 1966 by Bloom and Bennett as a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the inhibition of macrophage motility. Since then, studies have investigated the functional contribution of this pro-inflammatory cytokine in several immune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematous. Recently, MIF has been reported to be involved in a variety of neoplastic diseases. The present review discusses previous cancer research studies that have investigated the involvement of MIF in carcinogenesis, disease prognosis, tumor cell proliferation and invasion, and tumor-induced angiogenesis. Finally, potential therapeutic approaches based on the use of MIF antagonists and neutralizing antibodies are examined. The review concludes that MIF could be a good prognostic biomarker in several types of cancer, but also that the inhibition of MIF could represent a novel therapy against cancer.

  14. Characterization of the cytotoxin produced by macrophages in response to dengue virus-induced cytotoxic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, L.; Chaturvedi, U. C.; Mathur, A.

    1983-01-01

    We have observed earlier that dengue type 2 virus-induced cytotoxic factor (CF) induces macrophages to produce a cytotoxin (CF2) which kills mainly the macrophages, some of the T lymphocytes and has no effect on B-lymphocytes of normal mouse spleen. The findings of the present study show that CF2 is heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive and unstable at acid and alkaline pH. It is a low molecular weight product as it is dialysable, non-sedimentable on ultracentrifugation at 103,500 g for 3 h and passes through 0.22 micron Millipore filter. It is adsorbed onto the target normal mouse spleen cells. The properties of CF and CF2 have been compared. PMID:6849814

  15. Interleukin-12 gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages stimulated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG: cytokine regulation and effect of NK cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Suzuki, K; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tanaka, E; Amitani, R; Maeda, A; Yamamoto, K; Sasada, M; Kuze, F

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage-derived interleukin-12 (IL-12) is essential for the activation of a protective immune response against intracellular pathogens. In this study, we examined the regulation of IL-12 mRNA expression by monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG stimulation. A reverse transcription-PCR assay detected p40 mRNA of IL-12 at 3 h and showed a peak at 6 to 12 h with a subsequent decline. Semiquantitation of mRNA levels by competitive PCR revealed that pretreatment with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) amplified the expression approximately 100-fold, while pretreatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augmented this expression about 10-fold. In contrast, pretreatment with IL-10 and IL-4 inhibited IL-12 mRNA expression. These results were further confirmed by measuring the p70 bioactive protein level in each conditioned medium by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Since IL-12 mRNA expression was weak without cytokine pretreatment and IFN-gamma strongly augmented production, we speculated that IFN-gamma might have a role in BCG stimulation of IL-12 mRNA expression. Unexpectedly, the addition of three different kinds of anti-IFN-gamma antibodies and anti-IFN-gamma receptor antibody and the coaddition of anti-TNF-alpha antibody with anti-IFN-gamma receptor antibody all failed to inhibit IL-12 mRNA expression. However, the MiniMACS method used to remove NK cells from a mononuclear cell suspension inhibited the expression of p40 mRNA but not the expression of mRNA of TNF-alpha or IL-1beta. We concluded that the coexistence of NK cells was essential for the induction of IL-12 in MDM stimulated with BCG rather than through the secretion of IFN-gamma. PMID:9353012

  16. Butyrate affects differentiation, maturation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Millard, A L; Mertes, P M; Ittelet, D; Villard, F; Jeannesson, P; Bernard, J

    2002-01-01

    We studied the in vitro effects of butyric acid on differentiation, maturation and function of dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ) generated from human monocytes. A non-toxic dose of butyrate was shown to alter the phenotypic differentiation process of DC as assessed by a persistence of CD14, and a decreased CD54, CD86 and HLA class II expression. The more immature differentiation stage of treated cells was confirmed further by their increased phagocytic capability, their altered capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-12, and their weak allostimulatory abilities. Butyrate also altered DC terminal maturation, regardless of the maturation inducer, as demonstrated by a strong down-regulation of CD83, a decreased expression of CD40, CD86 and HLA class II. Similarly, butyrate altered MΦ differentiation, down-regulating the expression of the restricted membrane antigens and reducing the phagocytic capacity of treated cells. To investigate further the mechanism by which butyrate hampers the monocyte dual differentiation pathway, we studied the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 alone or in combination with butyrate on the phenotypic features of DC. Unlike 1,25(OH)2D3, butyrate inhibited DC differentiation without redirecting it towards MΦ. Combined treatment gave rise to a new cell subset (CD14high, CD86 and HLA-DRlow) phenotypically distinct from monocytes. These results reveal an alternative mechanism of inhibition of DC and MΦ differentiation. Altogether, our data demonstrate a novel immune suppression property of butyrate that may modulate both inflammatory and immune responses and support further the interest for butyrate and its derivatives as new immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:12390312

  17. Effect of particle size on hydroxyapatite crystal-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Imad; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Philippidis, Pandelis; Whelan, Linda C; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Haskard, Dorian O; Landis, R Clive

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages may promote a vicious cycle of inflammation and calcification in the vessel wall by ingesting neointimal calcific deposits (predominantly hydroxyapatite) and secreting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, itself a vascular calcifying agent. Here we have investigated whether particle size affects the proinflammatory potential of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro and whether the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway plays a role in the macrophage TNFalpha response. The particle size and nano-topography of nine different crystal preparations was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and gas sorbtion analysis. Macrophage TNFalpha secretion was inversely related to hydroxyapatite particle size (P=0.011, Spearman rank correlation test) and surface pore size (P=0.014). A necessary role for the NF-kappaB pathway was demonstrated by time-dependent I kappaB alpha degradation and sensitivity to inhibitors of I kappaB alpha degradation. To test whether smaller particles were intrinsically more bioactive, their mitogenic activity on fibroblast proliferation was examined. This showed close correlation between TNFalpha secretion and crystal-induced fibroblast proliferation (P=0.007). In conclusion, the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate macrophage TNFalpha secretion depends on NF-kappaB activation and is inversely related to particle and pore size, with crystals of 1-2 microm diameter and pore size of 10-50 A the most bioactive. Microscopic calcific deposits in early stages of atherosclerosis may therefore pose a greater inflammatory risk to the plaque than macroscopically or radiologically visible deposits in more advanced lesions.

  18. Increased macrophage colony-stimulating factor in neonatal and adult autoimmune MRL-lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Yui, M. A.; Brissette, W. H.; Brennan, D. C.; Wuthrich, R. P.; Rubin-Kelley, V. E.

    1991-01-01

    Abnormal macrophages in MRL-lpr mice are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. These mice die of lupus nephritis by 5 to 6 months of age. This study reports that MRL-lpr mice have an increased level of circulating macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) detectable as early as 1 week of age. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor decreased between 2 and 4 months and then steadily increased beginning at 4 months of age. In contrast, M-CSF was not detected in sera from congenic MRL-++ mice, normal C3H/FeJ mice, two other mouse strains with the lpr gene (B6-lpr and C3H-lpr), or another lupus model, the NZB/W mouse. These observations indicate that the lpr gene alone is not responsible for inducing this growth factor, and elevated M-CSF is not required for all forms of murine lupus. The entire source of serum M-CSF is not clear. The unique T cells regulated by the lpr gene are not responsible for the increased serum M-CSF levels, as no M-CSFs could be detected in supernatants from cultured lymph nodes from MRL-lpr mice, and the steady-state levels of M-CSF mRNA in lymph nodes and spleens in MRL-lpr, C3H-lpr mice and in their respective congenic strains were similar. The steady-state M-CSF mRNA transcripts in liver, lung, and bone marrow in MRL-lpr, MRL-++, and C3H/FeJ mice were also similar. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor transcripts were clearly elevated in the kidneys of MRL-lpr mice, suggesting a renal source of circulating M-CSF. The increase of M-CSF might be responsible for the increased numbers and enhanced functions of macrophages, which in turn cause tissue destruction in MRL-lpr mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1867317

  19. Novel anti-inflammatory chalcone derivatives inhibit the induction of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Guillén, I; Dominguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1999-06-18

    In a previous work, we tested a series of chalcone derivatives as possible anti-inflammatory compounds. We now investigate the effects of three of those compounds, CHI, CH8 and CH12, on nitric oxide and prostanoid generation in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and in the mouse air pouch injected with zymosan, where they showed a dose-dependent inhibition with inhibitory concentration 50% values in the microM range. This effect was not the consequence of a direct inhibitory action on enzyme activities. Our results demonstrated that chalcone derivatives inhibited de novo inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 synthesis, being a novel therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases.

  20. Reduced uptake of oxidized low density lipoproteins in monocyte-derived macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, S; Kashiwagi, H; Yamashita, S; Nakagawa, T; Kostner, B; Tomiyama, Y; Nakata, A; Ishigami, M; Miyagawa, J; Kameda-Takemura, K

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the physiological roles of CD36 as an oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) receptor, we analyzed the monocyte-derived macrophages from normal and two CD36-deficient subjects, since we identified the molecular abnormalities (Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, Y. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, R. H. Lipsky, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa 1994. Blood. 83:3545-3552; and Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, S. Honda, S. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, N. Nagao, S. Sekiguchi, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa. 1995. J. Clin. Invest. 95:1040-1046). Scatchard analysis of 125I-OxLDL binding showed a linear plot and the maximum binding was lower by approximately 40% in the macrophages from subjects with CD36 deficiency than those from normal controls. Competition studies showed that the uptake of 125I-OxLDL was suppressed by OKM5, an antibody against CD36, by 53% in normal control macrophages, but not in the CD36-deficient macrophages. After incubation with OxLDL for 24 h, cholesteryl ester mass accumulation was reduced by approximately 40% in the macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects than those from normal controls. These results suggest that CD36 is one of the physiological receptors for OxLDL. Since specific binding of OxLDL was only reduced by approximately 40% in spite of the complete deficiency of CD36, several other receptors also may have some role in OxLDL uptake. Further studies will be needed to assess the quantitative role of CD36 in foam cell formation in vivo. Images PMID:7560077

  1. Fate mapping reveals that microglia and recruited monocyte-derived macrophages are definitively distinguishable by phenotype in the retina

    PubMed Central

    O’Koren, E. G.; Mathew, R.; Saban, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The recent paradigm shift that microglia are yolk sac-derived, not hematopoietic-derived, is reshaping our knowledge about the isolated role of microglia in CNS diseases, including degenerative conditions of the retina. However, unraveling microglial-specific functions has been hindered by phenotypic overlap of microglia with monocyte-derived macrophages. The latter are differentiated from recruited monocytes in neuroinflammation, including retina. Here we demonstrate the use of fate mapping wherein microglia and monocyte-derived cells are endogenously labeled with different fluorescent reporters. Combining this method with 12-color flow cytometry, we show that these two populations are definitively distinguishable by phenotype in retina. We prove that retinal microglia have a unique CD45lo CD11clo F4/80lo I-A/I-E− signature, conserved in the steady state and during retinal injury. The latter was observed in the widely used light-induced retinal degeneration model and corroborated in other models, including whole-body irradiation/bone-marrow transplantation. The literature contains conflicting observations about whether microglia, including in the retina, increase expression of these markers in neuroinflammation. We show that monocyte-derived macrophages have elevated expression of these surface markers, not microglia. Our resolution of such phenotypic differences may serve as a robust way to help characterize isolated roles of these cells in retinal neuroinflammation and possibly elsewhere in CNS. PMID:26856416

  2. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor as a potential prognostic factor in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-Jun; Xie, Dan; Hu, Pin-Jin; Liao, Yi-Ji; Deng, Hai-Xia; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Zhu, Sen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression and its clinical relevance in gastric cancer, and effects of MIF knockdown on proliferation of gastric cancer cells. METHODS: Tissue microarray containing 117 samples of gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancer normal tissues was studied for MIF expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) semiquantitatively, and the association of MIF expression with clinical parameters was analyzed. MIF expression in gastric cancer cell lines was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Two pairs of siRNA targeting the MIF gene (MIF si-1 and MIF si-2) and one pair of scrambled siRNA as a negative control (NC) were designed and chemically synthesized. All siRNAs were transiently transfected in AGS cells with OligofectamineTM to knock down the MIF expression, with the NC group and mock group (OligofectamineTM alone) as controls. At 24, 48, and 72 h after transfection, MIF mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR, and MIF and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins were detected by Western blot. The proliferative rate of AGS cells was assessed by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and colony forming assay. RESULTS: The tissue microarray was informative for IHC staining, in which the MIF expression in gastric cancer tissues was higher than that in adjacent non-cancer normal tissues (P < 0.001), and high level of MIF was related to poor tumor differentiation, advanced T stage, advanced tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor patient survival (P < 0.05 for all). After siRNA transfection, MIF mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, and MIF protein and PCNA were assessed by Western blot analysis. We found that compared to the NC group and mock group, MIF expression was knocked down successfully in gastric cancer cells, and PCNA expression was downregulated with MIF knockdown as well. The cell counts and the doubling times were assayed by MTT 4 d after transfection, and

  3. Streptococcal Histone Induces Murine Macrophages To Produce Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Ignatowski, Tracey A.; Spengler, Robert N.; Noble, Bernice; Stinson, Murray W.

    1999-01-01

    The histone-like protein (HlpA) is highly conserved among streptococci. After lysis of streptococci in infected tissues, HlpA can enter the bloodstream and bind to proteoglycans in the glomerular capillaries of kidneys, where it can react with antibodies or stimulate host cell receptors. Deposits of streptococcal antigens in tissues have been associated with localized acute inflammation. In this study, we measured the ability of purified HlpA (5 to 100 μg/ml), from Streptococcus mitis, to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cultured, murine peritoneal macrophages. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) was time and concentration dependent and was not diminished by the presence of polymyxin B. Exposure of macrophages to a mixture of HlpA and lipoteichoic acid resulted in a synergistic response in the production of both TNF-α and IL-1. Stimulation with a mixture of HlpA and heparin resulted in reduced cytokine production (50% less IL-1 and 76% less TNF-α) compared to that by cells incubated with HlpA alone. The inclusion of antibodies specific to HlpA in macrophage cultures during stimulation with HlpA did not affect the quantity of TNF-α or IL-1 produced. These observations suggest that streptococcal histone may contribute to tissue injury at infection sites by promoting monocytes/macrophages to synthesize and release cytokines that initiate and exacerbate inflammation. Streptococcus pyogenes, which can infect tissues in enormous numbers, may release sufficient amounts of HlpA to reach the kidneys and cause acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. PMID:10569765

  4. Role of macrophages in serum colony-stimulating factor induction by Lactobacillus casei in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nanno, M; Shimizu, T; Mike, A; Ohwaki, M; Mutai, M

    1988-01-01

    Heat-killed Lactobacillus casei YIT9018 (LC9018), when injected intravenously into mice at a dose of 4 to 40 mg/kg, induced the production of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF). Since this induction was observed in both C3H/HeJ and C3H/HeN mice, LC9018 was considered to act differently from lipopolysaccharide. The amount of serum CSF induced by LC9018 in nude mice and whole-body-X-ray-irradiated mice was similar to that in control mice, but the induction of serum CSF was suppressed by the previous administration of carrageenan, indicating that macrophages, but not T cells, were responsible for serum CSF induction by LC9018. To determine whether macrophages themselves produce CSF or help other cells produce CSF in response to LC9018, we prepared adherent cells from the peritoneal cavity of normal mice and examined CSF activity in their conditioned media. Peritoneal adherent cells did not produce CSF without LC9018, but when cultivated with 1 mg of LC9018 per ml, they produced CSF at the same time that serum CSF was induced after the intravenous administration of LC9018. Additionally, in vitro-induced CSF formed macrophage, granulocyte, and mixed colonies, as serum CSF did. CSF production by peritoneal adherent cells was completely inhibited by cycloheximide (50 micrograms/ml), and neither the elimination of T cells from the peritoneal adherent cells by treating them with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement nor the addition of T cells affected CSF production. These results suggest that heat-killed LC9018 induces serum CSF in mice via direct stimulation of macrophages to produce CSF de novo. PMID:3123388

  5. Mouse neutrophilic granulocytes express mRNA encoding the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) as well as many other macrophage-specific transcripts and can transdifferentiate into macrophages in vitro in response to CSF-1.

    PubMed

    Sasmono, R Tedjo; Ehrnsperger, Achim; Cronau, Stephen L; Ravasi, Timothy; Kandane, Rangi; Hickey, Michael J; Cook, Andrew D; Himes, S Roy; Hamilton, John A; Hume, David A

    2007-07-01

    The differentiation of macrophages from their progenitors is controlled by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1), which binds to a receptor (CSF-1R) encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. We have previously used the promoter region of the CSF-1R gene to direct expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene to resident macrophage populations in transgenic mice. In this paper, we show that the EGFP reporter is also expressed in all granulocytes detected with the Gr-1 antibody, which binds to Ly-6C and Ly-6G or with a Ly-6G-specific antibody. Transgene expression reflects the presence of CSF-1R mRNA but not CSF-1R protein. The same pattern is observed with the macrophage-specific F4/80 marker. Based on these findings, we performed a comparative array profiling of highly purified granulocytes and macrophages. The patterns of mRNA expression differed predominantly through granulocyte-specific expression of a small subset of transcription factors (Egr1, HoxB7, STAT3), known abundant granulocyte proteins (e.g., S100A8, S100A9, neutrophil elastase), and specific receptors (fMLP, G-CSF). These findings suggested that appropriate stimuli might mediate rapid interconversion of the major myeloid cell types, for example, in inflammation. In keeping with this hypothesis, we showed that purified Ly-6G-positive granulocytes express CSF-1R after overnight culture and can subsequently differentiate to form F4/80-positive macrophages in response to CSF-1.

  6. Chronic Iron Overload Results in Impaired Bacterial Killing of THP-1 Derived Macrophage through the Inhibition of Lysosomal Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Jun-Kai; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ho, Li-Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for living organisms and the disturbance of iron homeostasis is associated with altered immune function. Additionally, bacterial infections can cause major complications in instances of chronic iron overload, such as patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Monocytes and macrophages play important roles in maintaining systemic iron homoeostasis and in defense against invading pathogens. However, the effect of iron overload on the function of monocytes and macrophages is unclear. We elucidated the effects of chronic iron overload on human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and THP-1 derived macrophages (TDM) by continuously exposing them to high levels of iron (100 μM) to create I-THP-1 and I-TDM, respectively. Our results show that iron overload did not affect morphology or granularity of I-THP-1, but increased the granularity of I-TDM. Bactericidal assays for non-pathogenic E. coli DH5α, JM109 and pathogenic P. aeruginosa all revealed decreased efficiency with increasing iron concentration in I-TDM. The impaired P. aeruginosa killing ability of human primary monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) was also found when cells are cultured in iron contained medium. Further studies on the bactericidal activity of I-TDM revealed lysosomal dysfunction associated with the inhibition of lysosomal acidification resulting in increasing lysosomal pH, the impairment of post-translational processing of cathepsins (especially cathepsin D), and decreased autophagic flux. These findings may explain the impaired innate immunity of thalassemic patients with chronic iron overload, suggesting the manipulation of lysosomal function as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27244448

  7. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Supports Homing of Osteoclast Precursors to Peripheral Osteolytic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Ishii, Takenobu; Albassam, Abdullah; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Howait, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Ruiz-Torruella, Montserrat; Bahammam, Laila; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Van Dyke, Thomas; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-09-01

    By binding to its chemokine receptor CXCR4 on osteoclast precursor cells (OCPs), it is well known that stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) promotes the chemotactic recruitment of circulating OCPs to the homeostatic bone remodeling site. However, the engagement of circulating OCPs in pathogenic bone resorption remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated a possible chemoattractant role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), another ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), in the recruitment of circulating OCPs to the bone lytic lesion. To accomplish this, we used Csf1r-eGFP-knock-in (KI) mice to establish an animal model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced calvarial osteolysis. In the circulating Csf1r-eGFP+ cells of healthy Csf1r-eGFP-KI mice, Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells showed a greater degree of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis compared to a subset of Csf1r+/RANK+ cells in vitro. Therefore, Csf1r-eGFP+/CD11b+ cells were targeted as functionally relevant OCPs in the present study. Although expression of the two cognate receptors for MIF, CXCR2 and CXCR4, was elevated on Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells, transmigration of OCPs toward recombinant MIF in vitro was facilitated by ligation with CXCR4, but not CXCR2. Meanwhile, the level of PMMA-induced bone resorption in calvaria was markedly greater in wild-type (WT) mice compared to that detected in MIF-knockout (KO) mice. Interestingly, in contrast to the elevated MIF, diminished SDF-1 was detected in a particle-induced bone lytic lesion of WT mice in conjunction with an increased number of infiltrating CXCR4+ OCPs. However, such diminished SDF-1 was not found in the PMMA-injected calvaria of MIF-KO mice. Furthermore, stimulation of osteoblasts with MIF in vitro suppressed their production of SDF-1, suggesting that MIF can downmodulate SDF-1 production in bone tissue. Systemically administered anti-MIF neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited the homing of CXCR4+ OCPs, as well as

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates Tolerance in Macrophages Stimulated with Toxoplasma gondii-Derived Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Hye-Seong; Aosai, Fumie; Norose, Kazumi; Piao, Lian-Xun; Fang, Hao; Akira, Shizuo; Yano, Akihiko

    2005-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages (PMs) from toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice were responsive to recombinant Toxoplasma gondii-derived heat shock protein 70 (rTgHSP70) and natural TgHSP70 (nTgHSP70) in NO release, but those from TLR2-, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-, and interleukin-1R-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4)-deficient mice were not. Polymyxin B did not inhibit PM activation by TgHSP70 and nTgHSP70 from WT and TLR4-deficient mice, while it inhibited PM activation by lipopolysaccharide. Pretreatment of PMs from WT but not from TLR4-deficient mice with rTgHSP70 resulted in suppression of NO release on restimulation with rTgHSP70. Similarly, pretreatment of PMs from WT but not TLR4-deficient mice with nTgHSP70 resulted in suppression of NO release on restimulation with nTgHSP70. Polymyxin B did not inhibit rTgHSP70- and nTgHSP70-induced tolerance of PMs from TLR4-deficient mice. Furthermore, PMs from WT mice increased suppressor of cytokine-signaling-1 (SOCS-1) expression after restimulation with rTgHSP70, while those from TLR4-deficient mice did not. Phosphorylation of JNK and I-κBα occurred in rTgHSP70-induced tolerance of PMs from TLR4-deficient mice, but not in that from WT mice. These data indicated that TgHSP70 signaling mechanisms were mediated by TLR2, MyD88, and IRAK4, but not by TLR4. On the other hand, signaling of TgHSP70-induced tolerance was mediated by TLR4, and the expression of SOCS-1 suppressed the TLR2 signaling pathway. PMID:16040976

  9. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  10. Association between high expression macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) alleles and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Das, Rituparna; Loughran, Kerry; Murchison, Charles; Qian, Feng; Leng, Lin; Song, Yan; Montgomery, Ruth R; Loeb, Mark; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV) is usually asymptomatic but can lead to severe WNV encephalitis. The innate cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), is elevated in patients with WNV encephalitis and promotes viral neuroinvasion and mortality in animal models. In a case-control study, we examined functional polymorphisms in the MIF locus in a cohort of 454 North American patients with neuroinvasive WNV disease and found patients homozygous for high-expression MIF alleles to be >20-fold (p=0.008) more likely to have WNV encephalitis. These data indicate that MIF is an important determinant of severity of WNV neuropathogenesis and may be a therapeutic target.

  11. Neutrophil-derived alpha defensins control inflammation by inhibiting macrophage mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Brook, Matthew; Tomlinson, Gareth H; Miles, Katherine; Smith, Richard W P; Rossi, Adriano G; Hiemstra, Pieter S; van 't Wout, Emily F A; Dean, Jonathan L E; Gray, Nicola K; Lu, Wuyuan; Gray, Mohini

    2016-04-19

    Neutrophils are the first and most numerous cells to arrive at the site of an inflammatory insult and are among the first to die. We previously reported that alpha defensins, released from apoptotic human neutrophils, augmented the antimicrobial capacity of macrophages while also inhibiting the biosynthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. In vivo, alpha defensin administration protected mice from inflammation, induced by thioglychollate-induced peritonitis or following infection withSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium. We have now dissected the antiinflammatory mechanism of action of the most abundant neutrophil alpha defensin, Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 (HNP1). Herein we show that HNP1 enters macrophages and inhibits protein translation without inducing the unfolded-protein response or affecting mRNA stability. In a cell-free in vitro translation system, HNP1 powerfully inhibited both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation while maintaining mRNA polysomal association. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a peptide released from one cell type (neutrophils) directly regulating mRNA translation in another (macrophages). By preventing protein translation, HNP1 functions as a "molecular brake" on macrophage-driven inflammation, ensuring both pathogen clearance and the resolution of inflammation with minimal bystander tissue damage. PMID:27044108

  12. Low-Dose Oxygen Enhances Macrophage-Derived Bacterial Clearance following Cigarette Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bain, William G.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Mandke, Pooja; Gans, Jonathan H.; D'Alessio, Franco R.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Aggarwal, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, smoking-related lung disease. Patients with COPD frequently suffer disease exacerbations induced by bacterial respiratory infections, suggestive of impaired innate immunity. Low-dose oxygen is a mainstay of therapy during COPD exacerbations; yet we understand little about whether oxygen can modulate the effects of cigarette smoke on lung immunity. Methods. Wild-type mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 5 weeks, followed by intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) and 21% or 35–40% oxygen. After two days, lungs were harvested for PAO1 CFUs, and bronchoalveolar fluid was sampled for inflammatory markers. In culture, macrophages were exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen (40%) for 24 hours and then incubated with PAO1, followed by quantification of bacterial phagocytosis and inflammatory markers. Results. Mice exposed to 35–40% oxygen after cigarette smoke and PAO1 had improved survival and reduced lung CFUs and inflammation. Macrophages from these mice expressed less TNF-α and more scavenger receptors. In culture, macrophages exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen also demonstrated decreased TNF-α secretion and enhanced phagocytosis of PAO1 bacteria. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate a novel, protective role for low-dose oxygen following cigarette smoke and bacteria exposure that may be mediated by enhanced macrophage phagocytosis. PMID:27403445

  13. Cell-autonomous sex differences in gene expression in chicken bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M; Clinton, Mike; Hume, David A

    2015-03-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome-specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes.

  14. Cell-Autonomous Sex Differences in Gene Expression in Chicken Bone Marrow–Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A.; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M.; Clinton, Mike

    2015-01-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome–specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN–responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes. PMID:25637020

  15. Integrated MicroRNA-mRNA-Analysis of Human Monocyte Derived Macrophages upon Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharbati, Jutta; Lewin, Astrid; Kutz-Lohroff, Barbara; Kamal, Elisabeth; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2011-01-01

    Background Many efforts have been made to understand basal mechanisms of mycobacterial infections. Macrophages are the first line of host immune defence to encounter and eradicate mycobacteria. Pathogenic species have evolved different mechanisms to evade host response, e.g. by influencing macrophage apoptotic pathways. However, the underlying molecular regulation is not fully understood. A new layer of eukaryotic regulation of gene expression is constituted by microRNAs. Therefore, we present a comprehensive study for identification of these key regulators and their targets in the context of host macrophage response to mycobacterial infections. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed microRNA as well as mRNA expression analysis of human monocyte derived macrophages infected with several Mycobacterium avium hominissuis strains by means of microarrays as well as quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). The data revealed the ability of all strains to inhibit apoptosis by transcriptional regulation of BCL2 family members. Accordingly, at 48 h after infection macrophages infected with all M. avium strains showed significantly decreased caspase 3 and 7 activities compared to the controls. Expression of let-7e, miR-29a and miR-886-5p were increased in response to mycobacterial infection at 48 h. The integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression as well as target prediction pointed out regulative networks identifying caspase 3 and 7 as potential targets of let-7e and miR-29a, respectively. Consecutive reporter assays verified the regulation of caspase 3 and 7 by these microRNAs. Conclusions/Significance We show for the first time that mycobacterial infection of human macrophages causes a specific microRNA response. We furthermore outlined a regulatory network of potential interactions between microRNAs and mRNAs. This study provides a theoretical concept for unveiling how distinct mycobacteria could manipulate host cell response. In addition, functional

  16. Gaucher iPSC-derived macrophages produce elevated levels of inflammatory mediators and serve as a new platform for therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Leelamma M.; Miller, Diana; Awad, Ola; Bose, Vivek; Lun, Yu; Park, Tea Soon; Zambidis, Elias T.; Sgambato, Judi A.; Feldman, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene. The hallmark of GD is the presence of lipid-laden Gaucher macrophages, which infiltrate bone marrow and other organs. These pathological macrophages are believed to be the source of elevated levels of inflammatory mediators present in the serum of GD patients. The alteration in the immune environment caused by GD is believed to play a role in the increased risk of developing multiple myeloma and other malignancies in GD patients. To determine directly whether Gaucher macrophages are abnormally activated and if their functional defects can be reversed by pharmacological intervention, we generated GD macrophages by directed differentiation of human iPS cells (hiPSC) derived from patients with types 1, 2, and 3 GD. GD hiPSC-derived macrophages expressed higher levels of TNF alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta than control cells, and this phenotype was exacerbated by treatment with LPS. In addition, GD hiPSC macrophages exhibited a striking delay in clearance of phagocytosed red blood cells, recapitulating the presence of RBC remnants in Gaucher macrophages from bone marrow aspirates. Incubation of GD hiPSC macrophages with recombinant glucocerebrosidase, or with the chaperones isofagomine and ambroxol, corrected the abnormal phenotypes of GD macrophages to an extent that reflected their known clinical efficacies. We conclude that Gaucher macrophages are the likely source of the elevated levels of inflammatory mediators in the serum of GD patients, and that GD hiPSC are valuable new tools for studying disease mechanisms and drug discovery. PMID:24801745

  17. The effects of Phyllanthus niruri aqueous extract on the activation of murine lymphocytes and bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nworu, C S; Akah, P A; Okoye, F B C; Proksch, P; Esimone, C O

    2010-01-01

    Phyllanthus niruri L. (Euphorbiaceae) is acclaimed world-wide for its versatile ethnomedicinal uses. It features in recipes used by some herbalists to manage different diseases, including claims of efficacy against many life-threatening infections, such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. In order to understand the mechanisms and the involvement of the immune system in mediating these activities, the effects of the aqueous extract of P. niruri on the activation of murine lymphocytes and macrophages were investigated. The study showed that the extract of P. niruri is a potent murine lymphocytes mitogen, inducing significant (p < 0.01) increases in the expression of surface activation maker (CD69) and proliferation of B and T lymphocytes. The production of interferon-gamma (IFN- gamma) and interleukine-4 (IL-4) by P. niruri extract-stimulated naïve splenocytes cultures was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Various indices of activation and functions murine bone marrow-derived macrophages were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced by pre-treatment with the extract, including phagocytosis, lysosomal enzymes activity, and TNF-alpha release. Phyllanthus niruri extract was also shown to modulate nitric oxide release by macrophages. These activities suggest that stimulation of the immune system by the extracts of P. niruri could be partly responsible for the ethnomedicinal applications in the management of infectious diseases. PMID:20380522

  18. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-α accelerates the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis in mice by targeting profibrotic lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Redente, Elizabeth F; Keith, Rebecca C; Janssen, William; Henson, Peter M; Ortiz, Luis A; Downey, Gregory P; Bratton, Donna L; Riches, David W H

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a relentless, fibrotic parenchymal lung disease in which alternatively programmed macrophages produce profibrotic molecules that promote myofibroblast survival and collagen synthesis. Effective therapies to treat patients with IPF are lacking, and conventional therapy may be harmful. We tested the hypothesis that therapeutic lung delivery of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α into wild-type fibrotic mice would reduce the profibrotic milieu and accelerate the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrosis was assessed in bleomycin-instilled wild-type and TNF-α(-/-) mice by measuring hydroxyproline levels, static compliance, and Masson's trichrome staining. Macrophage infiltration and programming status was assessed by flow cytometry of enzymatically digested lung and in situ immunostaining. Pulmonary delivery of TNF-α to wild-type mice with established pulmonary fibrosis was found to reduce their fibrotic burden, to improve lung function and architecture, and to reduce the number and programming status of profibrotic alternatively programmed macrophages. In contrast, fibrosis and alternative macrophage programming were prolonged in bleomycin-instilled TNF-α(-/-) mice. To address the role of the reduced numbers of alternatively programmed macrophages in the TNF-α-induced resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis, we conditionally depleted macrophages in MAFIA (MAcrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis) mice. Conditional macrophage depletion phenocopied the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis observed after therapeutic TNF-α delivery. Taken together, our results show for the first time that TNF-α is involved in the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis via a mechanism involving reduced numbers and programming status of profibrotic macrophages. We speculate that pulmonary delivery of TNF-α or augmenting its signaling pathway represent a novel therapeutic strategy to resolve

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis homolog of macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces prostate cell growth, invasiveness, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Twu, Olivia; Dessí, Daniele; Vu, Anh; Mercer, Frances; Stevens, Grant C; de Miguel, Natalia; Rappelli, Paola; Cocco, Anna Rita; Clubb, Robert T; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Johnson, Patricia J

    2014-06-01

    The human-infective parasite Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Infections in men may result in colonization of the prostate and are correlated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We have found that T. vaginalis secretes a protein, T. vaginalis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TvMIF), that is 47% similar to human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (HuMIF), a proinflammatory cytokine. Because HuMIF is reported to be elevated in prostate cancer and inflammation plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancers, we have explored a role for TvMIF in prostate cancer. Here, we show that TvMIF has tautomerase activity, inhibits macrophage migration, and is proinflammatory. We also demonstrate that TvMIF binds the human CD74 MIF receptor with high affinity, comparable to that of HuMIF, which triggers activation of ERK, Akt, and Bcl-2-associated death promoter phosphorylation at a physiologically relevant concentration (1 ng/mL, 80 pM). TvMIF increases the in vitro growth and invasion through Matrigel of benign and prostate cancer cells. Sera from patients infected with T. vaginalis are reactive to TvMIF, especially in males. The presence of anti-TvMIF antibodies indicates that TvMIF is released by the parasite and elicits host immune responses during infection. Together, these data indicate that chronic T. vaginalis infections may result in TvMIF-driven inflammation and cell proliferation, thus triggering pathways that contribute to the promotion and progression of prostate cancer.

  1. High-mobility Group Box 1 Protein Initiates Postoperative Cognitive Decline by Engaging Bone Marrow-derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vacas, Susana; Degos, Vincent; Tracey, Kevin J.; Maze, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Background Aseptic trauma engages the innate immune response to trigger a neuroinflammatory reaction that results in postoperative cognitive decline. We sought to determine whether high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), an ubiquitous nucleosomal protein, initiates this process through activation and trafficking of circulating bone marrow-derived macrophages to the brain. Methods The effects of HMGB1 on memory (using trace fear conditioning) were tested in adult C57BL/6J male mice; separate cohorts were tested after bone marrow-derived macrophages were depleted by clodrolip. The effect of anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody on the inflammatory and behavioral responses to tibial surgery were investigated. Results A single injection of HMGB1 caused memory decline, as evidenced by a decrease in freezing time (52 ± 11% vs. 39 ± 5%; n = 16-17); memory decline was prevented when bone marrow-derived macrophages were depleted (39 ± 5% vs. 50 ± 9%; n = 17). Disabling HMGB1 with a blocking monoclonal antibody, before surgery, reduced postoperative memory decline (52 ± 11% vs. 29 ± 5%, n = 15-16); also, hippocampal expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) was prevented by the neutralizing antibody (n = 6). Neither the systemic nor the hippocampal inflammatory responses to surgery occurred in mice pre-treated with anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody (n = 6). Discussion Postoperative neuroinflammation and cognitive decline can be prevented by abrogating the effects of HMGB1. Following the earlier characterization of the resolution of surgery-induced memory decline, the mechanisms of its initiation are now described. Together, these data may be used to preoperatively test the risk to surgical patients for the development of exaggerated and prolonged postoperative memory decline that is reflected in delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, respectively. PMID:24162463

  2. Analysis of the Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage Response to Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis Infection Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Maura E.; Meade, Kieran G.; Nalpas, Nicolas C.; Taraktsoglou, Maria; Browne, John A.; Killick, Kate E.; Park, Stephen D. E.; Gormley, Eamonn; Hokamp, Karsten; Magee, David A.; MacHugh, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Johne’s disease, caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, (MAP), is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants with serious economic consequences for cattle production in the United States and elsewhere. During infection, MAP bacilli are phagocytosed and subvert host macrophage processes, resulting in subclinical infections that can lead to immunopathology and dissemination of disease. Analysis of the host macrophage transcriptome during infection can therefore shed light on the molecular mechanisms and host-pathogen interplay associated with Johne’s disease. Here, we describe results of an in vitro study of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) transcriptome response during MAP infection using RNA-seq. MDM were obtained from seven age- and sex-matched Holstein-Friesian cattle and were infected with MAP across a 6-h infection time course with non-infected controls. We observed 245 and 574 differentially expressed (DE) genes in MAP-infected versus non-infected control samples (adjusted P value ≤0.05) at 2 and 6 h post-infection, respectively. Functional analyses of these DE genes, including biological pathway enrichment, highlighted potential functional roles for genes that have not been previously described in the host response to infection with MAP bacilli. In addition, differential expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes, such as those associated with the IL-10 signaling pathway, and other immune-related genes that encode proteins involved in the bovine macrophage response to MAP infection emphasize the balance between protective host immunity and bacilli survival and proliferation. Systematic comparisons of RNA-seq gene expression results with Affymetrix® microarray data generated from the same experimental samples also demonstrated that RNA-seq represents a superior technology for studying host transcriptional responses to intracellular infection. PMID:25699042

  3. Cell viability, adhesion and function of RAW 264.7 macrophages on fluorinated xerogel-derived nitric oxide permeable membrane for the application of cellular sensing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wook Sung; Seo, Bochan; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Ok-Kyun; Shin, Jae Ho; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-11-01

    Organically modified xerogels have an advantage over gas sensing applications due to their open, rigid structure and hydrophobicity. Here we evaluated the biocompatibility of xerogel-derived nitric oxide (NO) permeable membranes modified with fluorinated functional groups for application in cellular sensing by growing RAW 264.7 macrophages on them. We examined the cell viability, adhesion and growth of RAW 264.7 macrophages on NO permselective membrane and other cell-adhesive matrices, poly L-lysine and collagen. The surface roughness of each membrane was obtained from topographic atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. In addition, we measured the level of NO release of RAW 264.7 macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation using a Griess assay to confirm the function of cells. The fluorinated xerogel-derived membrane had a very smooth surface with rms roughness 2.1 Å and did not show cytotoxic effects in RAW 264.7 macrophages. As a result, the morphology and function of adhering RAW 264.7 macrophage showed no differences from those of other cell-adhesive membranes. Finally, we successfully detected NO release in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated by LPS, using a planar-type xerogel-derived NO sensor. Therefore, we suggest that fluorinated xerogel-derived membrane could be used as both a NO permeable and cell-adhesive membrane for cellular sensing applications. PMID:25958535

  4. The effect of HA, TCP and ALCAP bioceramic capsules on the viability of human monocyte and monocyte derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ross, L; Benghuzzi, H; Tucci, M; Callender, M; Cason, Z; Spence, L

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between various bioceramics used in surgical implantation and inflammatory cellular response has not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various biomedical ceramics such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), and aluminum-calcium-phosphorous oxide (ALCAP) on the adherence and viability of human monocyte and monocyte derived macrophages in vitro. The monocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood and seeded at a density of 5 x 10(5) cells/well according to standard laboratory procedures. Cells were considered macrophages after remaining in culture for 24 hours. Cells were then plated in each microtiter well loaded with ceramic capsules (HA, TCP and ALCAP) and buffered control. At the end of 1, 2, 3, and 7 days the viability and cell number of monocyte or monocyte derived macrophages were determined using an established assay. Cell number was determined in control wells with known amounts of cell number, a standard curve was generated by plotting absorbance units versus cell number. Biochemical analysis was performed on the aliquots obtained from the experimental and control wells at the end of each phase of the investigation. The data from this experiment suggest that: (I) monocytes and macrophages are capable of adhering to the surface of HA, TCP and ALCAP in an in vitro environment for over a 7 day period. (II) Long term incubation of ceramic capsules with macrophages revealed that the cells experienced gradual disassociation phenomenon with a greater number of cell detachment seen in the ALCAP contained wells. (III) SEM analysis of representative capsules demonstrated that there is an increase in the number of micropores on the surface of the materials after contacting a cellular environment. This observation suggest that the material surface has been modified (TCP > HA = ALCAP). (IV) Biochemical analysis of aliquots at the end of each phase showed a significant change (P < 0

  5. Reversal of impaired wound healing in irradiated rats by platelet-derived growth factor-BB

    SciTech Connect

    Mustoe, T.A.; Purdy, J.; Gramates, P.; Deuel, T.F.; Thomason, A.; Pierce, G.F. )

    1989-10-01

    This study examined the potential influence of platelet-derived growth factor-BB homodimers (PDGF-BB) on surgical incisions in irradiated animals with depressed wound healing. Rats were irradiated with either 800 rads total body or 2,500 rads surface irradiation. Parallel dorsal skin incisions were made 2 days later, and PDGF-BB was applied topically a single time to one of two incisions. In total body-irradiated rats, bone marrow-derived elements were severely depressed, wound macrophages were virtually eliminated, and PDGF-BB treatment was ineffective. However, in surface-irradiated rats, PDGF-BB treatment recruited macrophages into wounds and partially reversed impaired healing on day 7 (p less than 0.005) and day 12 (p less than 0.001). PDGF-BB-treated wounds were 50 percent stronger than the paired control wounds. The results suggest PDGF requires bone marrow-derived cells, likely wound macrophages, for activity and that it may be useful as a topical agent in postirradiation surgical incisions.

  6. Norwalk Virus Does Not Replicate in Human Macrophages or Dendritic Cells Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Susceptible Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Margarita K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Guix, Susana; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; He, Hong; Neill, Frederick H.; Sastry, Jagannadha K.; Yao, Qizhi; Estes, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Human noroviruses are difficult to study due to the lack of an efficient in vitro cell culture system or small animal model. Murine norovirus replicates in murine macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs), raising the possibility that human NoVs might replicate in such human cell types. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated DCs and MΦ derived from monocyte subsets and CD11c+ DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals susceptible to Norwalk virus (NV) infection. These cells were exposed to NV and replication was evaluated by immunofluorescence and by quantitative RT-PCR. A few PBMC-derived DCs expressed NV proteins. However, NV RNA did not increase in any of the cells tested. These results demonstrate that NV does not replicate in human CD11c+ DCs, monocyte-derived DCs and MΦ, but abortive infection may occur in a few DCs. These results suggest that NV tropism is distinct from that of murine noroviruses. PMID:20667573

  7. Dual regulation of SPI1/PU.1 transcription factor by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) during macrophage differentiation of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Jego, G; Lanneau, D; De Thonel, A; Berthenet, K; Hazoumé, A; Droin, N; Hamman, A; Girodon, F; Bellaye, P-S; Wettstein, G; Jacquel, A; Duplomb, L; Le Mouël, A; Papanayotou, C; Christians, E; Bonniaud, P; Lallemand-Mezger, V; Solary, E; Garrido, C

    2014-08-01

    In addition to their cytoprotective role in stressful conditions, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in specific differentiation pathways, for example, we have identified a role for HSP90 in macrophage differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes that are exposed to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Here, we show that deletion of the main transcription factor involved in heat shock gene regulation, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), affects M-CSF-driven differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells. HSF1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus of human monocytes undergoing macrophage differentiation, including M-CSF-treated peripheral blood monocytes and phorbol ester-treated THP1 cells. We demonstrate that HSF1 has a dual effect on SPI1/PU.1, a transcription factor essential for macrophage differentiation and whose deregulation can lead to the development of leukemias and lymphomas. Firstly, HSF1 regulates SPI1/PU.1 gene expression through its binding to a heat shock element within the intron 2 of this gene. Furthermore, downregulation or inhibition of HSF1 impaired both SPI1/PU.1-targeted gene transcription and macrophage differentiation. Secondly, HSF1 induces the expression of HSP70 that interacts with SPI1/PU.1 to protect the transcription factor from proteasomal degradation. Taken together, HSF1 appears as a fine-tuning regulator of SPI1/PU.1 expression at the transcriptional and post-translational levels during macrophage differentiation of monocytes.

  8. CD14 and tissue factor expression by bacterial lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Carter, C D; Miller, M S; Bochsler, P N

    1995-01-01

    The membrane-associated CD14 receptor (mCD14) is a monocyte/macrophage differentiation antigen, and it has been demonstrated to serve as a receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin). Binding of LPS to mCD14 has been shown to be associated with LPS-induced macrophage, monocyte, and neutrophil activation in humans. In this report, we describe the presence and function of an mCD14-like receptor on bovine alveolar macrophages (bAM). An immunofluorescence technique and flow cytometric analysis indicated binding of anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) My4, 3C10, and 60bd to bAM. Binding of anti-CD14 MAb (3C10 and MY4) was reduced over 20% by pretreatment of bAM with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (0.5 to 1.0 U/ml), indicating that bovine mCD14 is a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. In addition, pretreatment of bAM with anti-CD14 MAb decreased binding of 125I-labeled LPS to macrophages, suggesting that bovine mCD14 serves as a receptor for LPS. A cDNA probe based on the human sequence for CD14 was used in Northern (RNA) blot analysis, and hybridization to human monocyte CD14 yielded the expected 1.5-kb band. Hybridization to bovine mRNA yielded a 1.5-kb band plus an unexpected 3.1-kb band. Constitutive expression of bovine CD14 mRNA was observed, and the expression level was modestly elevated in bAM stimulated for 24 h with LPS (1 ng/ml) in the presence of bovine serum. The function and activation of bAM were assessed by quantitation of tissue factor (TF) expression on the cells using an activated factor X-related chromogenic assay and S-2222 substrate. LPS (1 ng/ml)-mediated upregulation of TF expression on bAM was dependent on the presence of bovine serum components, and TF expression was inhibited by anti-CD14 MAb. In addition, TF mRNA levels in LPS-stimulated bAM were decreased by pretreatment of cells with anti-CD14 MAb (MAb 60bd, 10 micrograms/ml). PMID:7528735

  9. Somatostatin and macrophage function: modulation of hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor release.

    PubMed

    Chao, T C; Cheng, H P; Walter, R J

    1995-07-21

    Recent studies have shown that somatostatin modulates lymphocyte function, but the effects of somatostatin on macrophage function are not clearly defined. In the present study, peritoneal macrophages (Mluminal diameter) obtained from male rats were treated in vitro with somatostatin or octreotide and their effects on the release of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitrite, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) determined. Macrophages treated with somatostatin (10(-9) M to 10(-7) M) or octreotide (10(-8) M and 10(-7) M) released significantly greater amounts of PMA-stimulated H2O2 than did the untreated controls. In addition, 10(-9) M of somatostatin significantly enhanced PMA-stimulated H2O2 release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. Octreotide had no effect on H2O2 release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. At concentrations of 10(-14) M, 10(-13) M, or greater than 10(-8) M, somatostatin or octreotide suppressed nitrite release by Mluminal diameter. Somatostatin or octreotide did not affect nitrite release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. On the other hand, Mluminal diameter treated with 10(-11) M of somatostatin or octreotide released greater amounts of TNF than did the untreated controls. In contrast, TNF release by Mluminal diameter treated with 10(-9) M to 10(-5) M of somatostatin or 10(-7) M to 10(-5) M of octreotide was less than that of the controls. Anti-TNF antibody (1:1000) caused a reduction in the release of H2O2 and nitrite. These findings demonstrate that somatostatin and octreotide modulate the release of H2O2, nitric oxide, and TNF by Mluminal diameter depending on the concentration of hormones used.

  10. Lysosomal cross-correction by hematopoietic stem cell-derived macrophages via tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Naphade, Swati; Sharma, Jay; Chevronnay, Héloïse P. Gaide; Shook, Michael A.; Yeagy, Brian A.; Rocca, Celine J.; Ur, Sarah N.; Lau, Athena J.; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite controversies on the potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to promote tissue repair, we previously showed that HSC transplantation could correct cystinosis, a multi-systemic lysosomal storage disease, caused by a defective lysosomal membrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS). Addressing the cellular mechanisms, we here report vesicular cross-correction after HSC differentiation into macrophages. Upon co-culture with cystinotic fibroblasts, macrophages produced tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) allowing transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes into Ctns-deficient cells, which exploited the same route to retrogradely transfer cystine-loaded lysosomes to macrophages, providing a bidirectional correction mechanism. TNT formation was enhanced by contact with diseased cells. In vivo, HSCs grafted to cystinotic kidneys also generated nanotubular extensions resembling invadopodia that crossed the dense basement membranes and delivered cystinosin into diseased proximal tubular cells. This is the first report of correction of a genetic lysosomal defect by bidirectional vesicular exchange via TNTs and suggests broader potential for HSC transplantation for other disorders due to defective vesicular proteins. PMID:25186209

  11. Sesquiterpene lactones induce distinct forms of cell death that modulate human monocyte-derived macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    López-Antón, Nancy; Hermann, Corinna; Murillo, Renato; Merfort, Irmgard; Wanner, Gerhard; Vollmar, Angelika M; Dirsch, Verena M

    2007-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SQTLs) are shown to possess anti-inflammatory as well as cytotoxic activity. No study, however, links both activities. We, therefore, hypothesized that SQTL-treated, dying cells might induce an anti-inflammatory response in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that SQTLs bearing either an alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclopentenone or an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone induce different forms of cell death. Whereas the cyclopentenone SQTL induced typical apoptosis, the alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs-induced cell death lacked partly classical signs of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation. All SQTLs, however, activated caspases and the nuclear morphology of cell death was dependent on caspase activation. Most interestingly, alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs induced a more pronounced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure than the cyclopentenone SQTL. Especially, 7-hydroxycostunolide (HC), with an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone substituted with a hydroxyl group, showed a striking fast and pronounced PS translocation. This result was in agreement with a strong activation of phagocytosis in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, HC-treated Jurkat cells led to an early (3.5 h) but transient increase in TNF-alpha levels in macrophage coculture. Release of TGF-beta remained unaffected after 18 h. We propose that this type of SQTL may influence local inflammation by transiently activating the immune system and help to clear cells by inducing a form of cell death that promotes phagocytosis.

  12. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  13. Bone marrow-derived macrophages distinct from tissue-resident macrophages play a pivotal role in Concanavalin A-induced murine liver injury via CCR9 axis

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Takeru; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Chu, Po-sung; Teratani, Toshiaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Fukuchi, Yumi; Taniki, Nobuhito; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shiba, Shunsuke; Miyake, Rei; Katayama, Tadashi; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism how heterogeneous hepatic macrophage (Mφ) subsets fulfill diverse functions in health and disease has not been elucidated. We recently reported that CCR9+ inflammatory Mφs play a critical role in the course of acute liver injury. To clarify the origin and differentiation of CCR9+Mφs, we used a unique partial bone marrow (BM) chimera model with liver shielding for maintaining hepatic resident Mφs. First, irradiated mice developed less liver injury with less Mφs accumulation by Concanavalin A (Con A) regardless of liver shielding. In mice receiving further BM transplantation, CD11blowF4/80high hepatic-resident Mφs were not replaced by transplanted donors under steady state, while under inflammatory state by Con A, CCR9+Mφs were firmly replaced by donors, indicating that CCR9+Mφs originate from BM, but not from hepatic-resident cells. Regarding the mechanism of differentiation and proliferation, EdU+CCR9+Mφs with a proliferative potential were detected specifically in the inflamed liver, and in vitro study revealed that BM-derived CD11b+ cells co-cultured with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or stimulated with retinoic acids could acquire CCR9 with antigen-presenting ability. Collectively, our study demonstrates that inflammatory Mφs originate from BM and became locally differentiated and proliferated by interaction with HSCs via CCR9 axis during acute liver injury. PMID:27725760

  14. The transcription factor GFI1 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liuluan; Meng, Qingcai; Liang, Shuntao; Ma, Yaluan; Li, Rui; Li, Guoli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-11-28

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is tightly controlled at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in the maturation of pro-IL-1β, with NLRP3 expression identified as the limiting factor for inflammasome activation. Previously, we had demonstrated that the zinc-finger protein GFI1 inhibits pro-IL-1β transcription. Here, we show that GFI1 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in macrophages. GFI1 suppressed Nlrp3 transcription via two mechanisms: (1) by binding to the Gli-responsive element 1 (GRE1) in the Nlrp3 promoter; and (2) by antagonizing the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Thus, GFI1 negatively regulates TLR-mediated IL-1β production at both transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  15. Silica-induced apoptosis in murine macrophage: involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Gozal, Evelyne; Ortiz, Luis A; Zou, Xiaoyan; Burow, Matthew E; Lasky, Joseph A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2002-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in silica-induced lung fibrosis. Silica exposure induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and apoptotic mechanisms have been implicated in silica-induced pathogenesis. To characterize potential relationships between these signaling events, we studied their induction in two murine macrophage cell lines. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was more sensitive, and the IC-21 macrophage cell line more tolerant to silica exposure (0.2 or 1 mg/ml for 6 h) as evidenced by significantly higher apoptotic responses in RAW 264.7 (P < 0.05). RAW 264.7 macrophages exhibited enhanced TNF-alpha production and NF-kappaB activation in response to silica, whereas IC-21 macrophages did not produce TNF-alpha in response to silica and did not induce NF-kappaB nuclear binding. Inhibition of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells with BAY11-7082 significantly increased apoptosis while inhibiting TNF-alpha release. In addition, TNF-alpha and NF-kappaB activation, but not apoptosis, were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in both cell lines, and NF-kappaB inhibition reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. These data suggest that TNF-alpha induction is dependent on NF-kappaB activation in both cell lines. However, silica can induce apoptosis in murine macrophages, independently of TNF-alpha stimulation, as in IC-21 macrophages. Furthermore, NF-kappaB activation in macrophages may play dual roles, both pro- and antiapoptotic during silica injury. PMID:12091251

  16. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Naizhen; Gates, Khalilah L.; Trejo, Humberto; Favoreto, Silvio; Schleimer, Robert P.; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Beitel, Greg J.; Sporn, Peter H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated blood and tissue CO2, or hypercapnia, is common in severe lung disease. Patients with hypercapnia often develop lung infections and have an increased risk of death following pneumonia. To explore whether hypercapnia interferes with host defense, we studied the effects of elevated PCO2 on macrophage innate immune responses. In differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human and mouse alveolar macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other Toll-like receptor ligands, hypercapnia inhibited expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent cytokines critical for antimicrobial host defense. Inhibition of IL-6 expression by hypercapnia was concentration dependent, rapid, reversible, and independent of extracellular and intracellular acidosis. In contrast, hypercapnia did not down-regulate IL-10 or interferon-β, which do not require NF-κB. Notably, hypercapnia did not affect LPS-induced degradation of IκBα, nuclear translocation of RelA/p65, or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, but it did block IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. Elevated PCO2 also decreased phagocytosis of opsonized polystyrene beads and heat-killed bacteria in THP-1 and human alveolar macrophages. By interfering with essential innate immune functions in the macrophage, hypercapnia may cause a previously unrecognized defect in resistance to pulmonary infection in patients with advanced lung disease.—Wang, N., Gates, K. L., Trejo, H., Favoreto, Jr., S., Schleimer, R. P., Sznajder, J. I., Beitel, G. J., Sporn, P. H. S. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage. PMID:20181940

  17. Monocyte-derived macrophages exhibit distinct and more restricted HIV-1 integration site repertoire than CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kok, Yik Lim; Vongrad, Valentina; Shilaih, Mohaned; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Kuster, Herbert; Kouyos, Roger; Günthard, Huldrych F; Metzner, Karin J

    2016-01-01

    The host genetic landscape surrounding integrated HIV-1 has an impact on the fate of the provirus. Studies analysing HIV-1 integration sites in macrophages are scarce. We studied HIV-1 integration site patterns in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and activated CD4(+) T cells derived from seven antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-1-infected individuals whose cells were infected ex vivo with autologous HIV-1 isolated during the acute phase of infection. A total of 1,484 unique HIV-1 integration sites were analysed. Their distribution in the human genome and genetic features, and the effects of HIV-1 integrase polymorphisms on the nucleotide selection specificity at these sites were indistinguishable between the two cell types, and among HIV-1 isolates. However, the repertoires of HIV-1-hosting gene clusters overlapped to a higher extent in MDMs than in CD4(+) T cells. The frequencies of HIV-1 integration events in genes encoding HIV-1-interacting proteins were also different between the two cell types. Lastly, HIV-1-hosting genes linked to clonal expansion of latently HIV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells were over-represented in gene hotspots identified in CD4(+) T cells but not in those identified in MDMs. Taken together, the repertoire of genes targeted by HIV-1 in MDMs is distinct from and more restricted than that of CD4(+) T cells.

  18. HJB-1, a 17-hydroxy-jolkinolide B derivative, inhibits LPS-induced inflammation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei-Chang; Xu, Xiao-Han; Zhang, Na-Na; Liu, Ning; Wu, Dong-Lin; Wang, Yang; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Vandenplas, Michel; Wang, Hong-Bing; Sun, Wan-Chun

    2014-08-01

    Jolkinolide B (JB) and 17-hydroxy-JB (HJB) are diterpenoids from plants and it has been reported that the presence of a C-17 hydroxy group in JB significantly enhances the anti-inflammatory potency of JB. In this study, two HJB derivatives HJB-1 and HJB-2 were generated by the chemical modification of a 17-hydroxy group of HJB. HJB-1 more effectively inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 release in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. In addition, HJB-1 reduced LPS-induced mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in a concentration-dependent manner, but did not alter IL-10 mRNA expression. LPS-induced NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation were also effectively inhibited by HJB-1. These results demonstrate that HJB-1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages by inhibiting NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation and modification of a 17-hydroxy group of HJB may enhance the anti-inflammatory potency of HJB derivatives.

  19. Monocyte-derived macrophages exhibit distinct and more restricted HIV-1 integration site repertoire than CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Yik Lim; Vongrad, Valentina; Shilaih, Mohaned; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Kuster, Herbert; Kouyos, Roger; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Metzner, Karin J.

    2016-01-01

    The host genetic landscape surrounding integrated HIV-1 has an impact on the fate of the provirus. Studies analysing HIV-1 integration sites in macrophages are scarce. We studied HIV-1 integration site patterns in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and activated CD4+ T cells derived from seven antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-1-infected individuals whose cells were infected ex vivo with autologous HIV-1 isolated during the acute phase of infection. A total of 1,484 unique HIV-1 integration sites were analysed. Their distribution in the human genome and genetic features, and the effects of HIV-1 integrase polymorphisms on the nucleotide selection specificity at these sites were indistinguishable between the two cell types, and among HIV-1 isolates. However, the repertoires of HIV-1-hosting gene clusters overlapped to a higher extent in MDMs than in CD4+ T cells. The frequencies of HIV-1 integration events in genes encoding HIV-1-interacting proteins were also different between the two cell types. Lastly, HIV-1-hosting genes linked to clonal expansion of latently HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells were over-represented in gene hotspots identified in CD4+ T cells but not in those identified in MDMs. Taken together, the repertoire of genes targeted by HIV-1 in MDMs is distinct from and more restricted than that of CD4+ T cells. PMID:27067385

  20. Macrophage-T Cell Interactions Mediate Neuropathic Pain through the Glucocorticoid-induced Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand System*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Fukazawa, Yohji; Saika, Fumihiro; Maeda, Takehiko; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuroinflammation caused by activated immune cells can provoke neuropathic pain. Herein, we investigate the actions of macrophages and T cells through glucocorticoid-induced tumor neurosis factor receptor ligand (GITRL) and its receptor (GITR) in neuropathic pain. After partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) in enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) chimeric mice generated by the transplantation of eGFP+ bone marrow cells, eGFP+ macrophages, and T cells markedly migrated to the injured site after PSL. Administration of agents to deplete macrophages (liposome-clodronate and Clophosome-ATM) or T cells (anti-CD4 antibody and FTY720) could suppress PSL-induced thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. The expression levels of co-stimulatory molecules GITRL and GITR were increased on infiltrating macrophages and T cells, respectively. The perineural injection of a GITRL neutralizing antibody that could inhibit the function of the GITRL-GITR pathway attenuated PSL-induced neuropathic pain. Additionally, the induction of inflammatory cytokines and the accumulation of GITR+ T cells in the injured SCN were abrogated after macrophage depletion by Clophosome-ATM. In conclusion, GITRL expressed on macrophages drives cytokine release and T cell activation, resulting in neuropathic pain via GITR-dependent actions. The GITRL-GITR pathway might represent a novel target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25787078

  1. L-cystathionine inhibits oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced THP-1-derived macrophage inflammatory cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 generation via the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Selena Y; Bu, Dingfang; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2015-05-28

    This study aimed to explore whether and how L-cystathionine had any regulatory effect on the inflammatory response in THP-1-derived macrophages cultured in vitro under oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) stimulation. The human monocyte line THP-1 cell was cultured in vitro and differentiated into macrophages after 24 hours of PMA induction. Macrophages were pretreated with L-cystathionine and then treated with ox-LDL. The results showed that compared with the controls, ox-LDL stimulation significantly upregulated the expression of THP-1-derived macrophage MCP-1 by enhancing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA binding with the MCP-1 promoter. Compared with the ox-LDL group, 0.3 mmol/L and 1.0 mmol/L L-cystathionine significantly inhibited the expression of THP-1-derived macrophage MCP-1. Mechanistically, 0.3 mmol/L and 1.0 mmol/L L-cystathionine suppressed phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 protein, as well as the DNA binding activity and DNA binding level of NF-κB with the MCP-1 promoter, which resulted in a reduced THP-1-derived macrophage MCP-1 generation. This study suggests that L-cystathionine could inhibit the expression of MCP-1 in THP-1-derived macrophages induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and binding of the MCP-1 promoter sequence after entry into the nucleus.

  2. Transcription factors STAT6 and KLF4 implement macrophage polarization via the dual catalytic powers of MCPIP.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Nidhi; Niu, Jianli; Saad, Yasser; Kumar, Sanjay; Sirakova, Tatiana; Becerra, Edilu; Li, Xiaoman; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E

    2015-06-15

    Macrophage polarization plays a critical role in tissue homeostasis, disease pathogenesis, and inflammation and its resolution. IL-4-induced macrophage polarization involves induction of STAT6 and Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), which induce each other and promote M2 polarization. However, how these transcription factors implement M2 polarization is not understood. We report that in murine macrophages MCP-1-induced protein (MCPIP), induced by KLF4, inhibits M1 polarization by inhibiting NF-κB activation and implements M2 polarization using both its deubiquitinase and RNase activities that cause sequential induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and autophagy required for M2 polarization. MCPIP also induces C/EBPβ and PPARγ, which promote M2 polarization. Macrophages from mice with myeloid-targeted overexpression of MCPIP show elevated expression of M2 markers and reduced response to LPS, whereas macrophages from mice with myeloid-specific deletion of MCPIP manifest elevated M1 polarization with enhanced phagocytic activity. Thus, both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that the transcription factors STAT6 and KLF4 implement IL-4-induced M2 polarization via the dual catalytic activities of MCPIP.

  3. Structural Interactions Dictate the Kinetics of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Inhibition by Different Cancer-Preventive Isothiocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Crichlow, Gregg V.; Fan, Chengpeng; Keeler, Camille; Hodsdon, Michael; Lolis, Elias J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cellular processes by dietary nutrients is known to affect the likelihood of cancer development. One class of cancer preventive nutrients, isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from consumption of cruciferous vegetables, is known to have various effects on cellular biochemistry. One target of ITCs is macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a widely expressed protein with known inflammatory, pro-tumorigenic, pro-angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic properties. MIF is covalently inhibited by a variety of ITCs, which in part, may explain how they exert their cancer-preventive effects. We report the crystallographic structures of human MIF bound to phenethylisothiocyanate and to L-sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanates derived from watercress and broccoli, respectively), and correlate structural features of these two isothiocyanates with their second-order rate constants for MIF inactivation. We also characterize changes in the MIF structure using NMR HSQC spectra of these complexes and observe many changes at the subunit interface. While a number of chemical shifts do not change, many of those that change do not have similar features in magnitude or direction for the two isothiocyanates. The difference in the binding modes of these two ITCs provides a means of using structure-activity relationships to reveal insights into MIF biological interactions. The results of this study provide a framework for the development of therapeutics that target MIF. PMID:22931430

  4. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  5. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  6. The glycosylation and characterization of the candidate Gc macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Ravnsborg, Tina; Olsen, Dorthe T; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Christiansen, Maja; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The vitamin D binding protein, Gc globulin, has in recent years received some attention for its role as precursor for the extremely potent macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). An O-linked trisaccharide has been allocated to the threonine residue at position 420 in two of the three most common isoforms of Gc globulin (Gc1s and Gc1f). A substitution for a lysine residue at position 420 in Gc2 prevents this isoform from being glycosylated at that position. It has been suggested that Gc globulin subjected sequentially to sialidase and galactosidase treatment generates GcMAF in the form of Gc globulin with only a single GalNAc attached to T420. In this study we confirm the location of a linear trisaccharide on T420. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence of the generation of the proposed GcMAF by use of glycosidase treatment and mass spectrometry. Additionally the generated GcMAF candidate was tested for its effect on cytokine release from macrophages in human whole blood. PMID:20079467

  7. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-06-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGM-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet miniosmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated in this paper.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 transactivates the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor and synergizes with colony-stimulating factor-1 in the induction of macrophage migration via the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Graziana; Ziche, Marina; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Donnini, Sandra; Rovida, Elisabetta

    2015-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a key mediator of immunity, inflammation, and cancer, acts through 4 G-protein-coupled E-prostanoid receptors (EPs 1-4). Crosstalk between EPs and receptor tyrosine kinases also occurs. Colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is an RTK that sustains the survival, proliferation, and motility of monocytes/macrophages, which are an essential component of innate immunity and cancer development. The aim of this study was to investigate on a possible crosstalk between EP and CSF-1R. In BAC1.2F5 and RAW264.7 murine macrophages, CSF-1 (EC₅₀ = 18.1 and 10.2 ng/ml, respectively) and PGE2 (EC₅₀ = 1.5 and 5.5 nM, respectively) promoted migration. PGE2 induced rapid CSF-1R phosphorylation that was dependent on Src family kinases (SFKs). CSF-1R inhibition reduced PGE2-elicited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and macrophage migration, indicating that CSF-1R plays a role in PGE2-mediated immunoregulation. EP4 appeared responsible for functional PGE2/CSF-1R crosstalk. Furthermore, PGE2 synergized with CSF-1 in inducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and macrophage migration. ERK1/2 inhibition completely blocked migration induced by the combination CSF-1/PGE2. CSF-1/PGE2 functional interaction with respect to migration also occurred in bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (EC₅₀ CSF-1, 6.7 ng/ml; EC₅₀ PGE2, 16.7 nM). These results indicated that PGE2 transactivates CSF-1R and synergizes with its signaling at ERK1/2 level in promoting macrophage migration.

  9. Secreted aspartic protease 2 of Candida albicans inactivates factor H and the macrophage factor H-receptors CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18).

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Eliška; Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Lermann, Ulrich; Staib, Peter; Kremlitzka, Mariann; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Barz, Dagmar; Erdei, Anna; Józsi, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans employs several mechanisms to interfere with the human complement system. This includes the acquisition of host complement regulators, the release of molecules that scavenge complement proteins or block cellular receptors, and the secretion of proteases that inactivate complement components. Secreted aspartic protease 2 (Sap2) was previously shown to cleave C3b, C4b and C5. C. albicans also recruits the complement inhibitor factor H (FH), but yeast-bound FH can enhance the antifungal activity of human neutrophils via binding to complement receptor type 3 (CR3). In this study, we characterized FH binding to human monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition studies with antibodies and siRNA targeting CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18), as well as analysis of colocalization of FH with these integrins indicated that both function as FH receptors on macrophages. Preincubation of C. albicans yeast cells with FH induced increased production of IL-1β and IL-6 in macrophages. Furthermore, FH enhanced zymosan-induced production of these cytokines. C. albicans Sap2 cleaved FH, diminishing its complement regulatory activity, and Sap2-treatment resulted in less detectable CR3 and CR4 on macrophages. These data show that FH enhances the activation of human macrophages when bound on C. albicans. However, the fungus can inactivate both FH and its receptors on macrophages by secreting Sap2, which may represent an additional means for C. albicans to evade the host innate immune system.

  10. Association of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-B Chain with Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Potula, Raghava; Dhillion, Navneet; Sui, Yongjun; Zien, Christopher A.; Funa, Keiko; Pinson, David; Mayo, Matthew S.; Singh, Dinesh K.; Narayan, Opendra; Buch, Shilpa

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines and cytokines play a critical role in HIV infection, serving both to modulate virus replication and to recruit target cells to the site of infection. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a mitogen and chemoattractant for a wide variety of cells, is secreted by macrophages. Since macrophages are the target cells for lentiviral infection in the brain and PDGF is a known inducer of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP)-1, a potent chemokine closely associated with HIV encephalitis, we investigated the association of PDGF-B chain (PDGF-B) with encephalitis in macaques caused by simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), a chimera of HIV and SIV. Northern blot analysis confirmed elevated expression of PDGF-B chain mRNA in the brains from encephalitic macaques. Validation of these in vivo studies was confirmed in rhesus macrophage cultures infected with SHIVKU2 in which we demonstrated heightened expression of PDGF-B chain mRNA. Nuclear run-off analysis established transcriptional up-regulation of PDGF-B chain in virus-inoculated macrophage cultures. Reciprocally, addition of exogenous PDGF enhanced virus replication and MCP-1 expression in these cells. Inhibition of virus replication by tyrosine kinase inhibitor, STI-571, and by PDGF-B antisense oligonucleotides confirmed the specificity of the PDGF effect. Relevance of these findings was confirmed by analysis of archival brain tissue from SHIV encephalitic and non-encephalitic macaques for PDGF-B chain expression. PDGF-B chain protein expression was observed in the virus-infected cells in microglial nodules in the brains of SHIV-encephalitic macaques. PMID:15331406

  11. Antigen-specific suppression in genetic responder mice to L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10 (GAT). Characterization of conventional and hybridoma-derived factors produced by suppressor T cells from mice injected as neonates with syngeneic GAT macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, C M; Pierce, C W

    1982-12-01

    Spleen cells from C57BL/10 mice injected with syngeneic B10 L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10 (GAT)-pulsed macrophages (GAT-M phi) within 18 h of birth were unable to respond to soluble GAT, GAT-methylated bovine serum albumin, or B10 GAT-M phi as adults. Spleen cells from these neonatally treated mice responded at control levels to GAT presented in allogeneic M phi and to sheep erythrocytes. Partially purified T cells from these neonatally treated mice suppressed responses by syngeneic virgin, but not primed, spleen cells in an antigen-specific manner and acted during the early phases of the response. These responder GAT-specific suppressor T cells (GAT-TSR) were sensitive to anti-Thy-1 + C and 500-rad irradiation and have the phenotype Ly-1-2+, I-J+; GAT-TSR cells can only suppress responses by spleen cells syngeneic with the GAT-TSR cells at the I-J subregion of H-2. Restimulation of these Ts cells with syngeneic GAT-M phi induces an antigen-specific suppressor factor within the supernatant fluid. The factor, GAT-TsFR, is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight between 48,000 and 63,000, as determined by gel filtration chromatography using isotonic buffers; it bears serologically detectable determinants encoded by the I-J subregion of the H-2 complex, has an antigen-binding site for GAT and L-glutamic acid50-L-tyrosine50, and shares idiotypic determinants with anti-GAT antibodies. The presence of GAT-TsFR in the first 36 h of in vitro culture is required for significant suppression. Furthermore, only responses by spleen cell syngeneic with the cells producing GAT-TsFR at the I-J subregion are suppressed. The fusion of GAT-TsFR-producing cells with BW5147 resulted in generation of two hybridomas with properties and characteristics identical to those of the conventional GAT-TsFR with one exception: conventional and hybridoma 372.D6.5 GAT-TsFR only suppress responses by spleen cells of the I-Jb haplotype, whereas suppression mediated by the second hybridoma

  12. Tumor necrosis factor as an autocrine and paracrine signal controlling the macrophage secretory response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Pitzurra, L; Bartoli, A; Puliti, M; Bistoni, F

    1994-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the hyphal form of Candida albicans (H-Candida), but not the yeast form (Y-Candida), acts as a macrophage-stimulating agent. The early response (1 to 3 h) of the macrophage cell line ANA-1 to H-Candida results in enhanced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) transcription and production. Here we show that when coincubation times are prolonged (3 to 24 h), Y-Candida also exhibits stimulatory properties. This phenomenon has been ascribed to the occurrence of the dimorphic transition, as demonstrated by microscopic evaluation of the cultures and by experiments in which both killed Y-Candida and the agerminative strain C. albicans PCA-2 failed to induce cytokine production. TNF produced in response to H-Candida acts as an autocrine and paracrine signal controlling the macrophage secretory response to C. albicans. In fact, addition of anti-TNF polyclonal antibodies to the coculture of ANA-1 macrophages and H-Candida results in a marked and time-dependent decrease of TNF transcript levels. Moreover, pretreatment of macrophages with recombinant TNF for 3 h enhances TNF and induces interleukin-1 production in response to both forms of Candida, while pretreatment for 18 h renders macrophages refractory to any stimuli. Interestingly, the kinetics of interleukin-1 transcription and secretion in response to H-Candida are delayed with respect to those of TNF. Overall, these data indicate that TNF, produced by macrophages in response to H-Candida, regulates its own production as well as that of other soluble factors, thus suggesting that this cytokine plays multiple roles in the immune mechanisms involved in Candida infection. Images PMID:8132326

  13. Ovarian ascites-derived Hospicells promote angiogenesis via activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Castells, Magali; Thibault, Benoît; Mery, Eliane; Golzio, Muriel; Pasquet, Marlene; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bourin, Philippe; Mirshahi, Massoud; Delord, Jean Pierre; Querleu, Denis; Couderc, Bettina

    2012-12-29

    Within the microenvironment, Carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (Hospicells) are able to influence ovarian tumor development via, among others, the facilitation of angiogenesis in the tumor site allowing an accelerated tumor growth. We demonstrate the presence of a chemotactism between endothelial cells and Hospicells, and a cell line specific increased secretion of pro-angiogenic cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF from ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. Hospicells are also able to attract and activate macrophages to a M2 phenotype and allow them to secrete a huge quantity of pro-angiogenic cytokines, favorable to tumor progression of all the associated ovarian adenocarcinoma cells tested.

  14. The macrophage-colony stimulating factor gene is a growth factor-inducible immediate early gene in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ryseck, R P; Macdonald-Bravo, H; Bravo, R

    1991-02-01

    Polypeptide growth factors rapidly induce the expression of a group of genes during the onset of cell proliferation. We report that one of these genes, which is induced by several mitogens in NIH 3T3 cells, is identical to the gene for macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). In contrast to other immediate early genes, the expression of the M-CSF gene lasted for several hours. Run-on assays demonstrated that the increased level of M-CSF mRNA following stimulation was mainly due to transcriptional activation. Our results support the notion that the products of the immediate early genes are not all mediators of fibroblasts growth but that some play an important role in other physiological responses such as wound repair. PMID:1712227

  15. Development of ostrich thrombocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in culture and the control of Toxoplasma gondii reproduction after macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen J B; Damasceno-Sá, João Cláudio; DaMatta, Renato A

    2016-01-01

    Raising ostriches became an important economic activity after their products became commodities. The health of farm animals is of paramount importance, so assessing basic immunological responses is necessary to better understand health problems. We developed a method to obtain ostrich thrombocytes and macrophages. The thrombocytes died by apoptosis after 48 h in culture, and the macrophages expanded in size and increased the number of acidic compartments. Macrophages were activated by chicken interferon-γ, producing high levels of nitric oxide. Toxoplasma gondii was able to infect these macrophages, and activation controlled parasitic reproduction. T. gondii, however, persisted in these cells, and infection reduced the production of nitric oxide. These results are important for the future assessment of the basic cellular and immunobiology of ostriches and demonstrate T. gondii suppression of nitric oxide production. PMID:26794839

  16. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor dependent monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity post-autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nagler, A; Shur, I; Barak, V; Fabian, I

    1996-08-01

    We investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of monocytes derived from autologous bone marrow transplanted (ABMT) patients treated in vivo with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Thirty-four patients (17 female, 17 male), median age 42 (range 3-57) years, were enrolled in the study. Fourteen patients were diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), eight with Hodgkin's disease (HD), nine with breast cancer and three with neuroblastoma. Six patients who did not receive GM-CSF post-ABMT served as controls. We assessed cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), expression of the activation antigen CD16, and cytokine production by an enriched population of monocytes (> 90% CD+14) pre-, during and post-GM-CSF administration. Within the group of patients receiving treatment, ADCC was significantly higher during in vivo GM-CSF administration than post-therapy (P < 0.05) and in 50% of these patients, ADCC increased during in vivo GM-CSF administration over pretreatment values. In addition, in vivo GM-CSF administration caused the monocytes to secrete elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and GM-CSF (P < 0.05). We conclude that GM-CSF augments monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity post-ABMT, and therefore may have a role in controlling minimal residual disease post-transplant.

  17. Cytokine response in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages after infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kimberly K.; Hill, Terence E.; Davis, Melissa N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is the most pathogenic member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, and can cause severe disease in humans and livestock. Until recently, limited information has been published on the cellular host response elicited by RVFV, particularly in macrophages and dendritic cells, which play critical roles in stimulating adaptive and innate immune responses to viral infection. In an effort to define the initial response of host immunomodulatory cells to infection, primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were infected with the pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501, or attenuated strains MP-12 or MP-12 based Clone13 type (rMP12-C13 type), and cytokine secretion profiles examined. The secretion of T helper (Th)1-associated antiviral cytokines, chemokines and various interleukins increased rapidly after infection with the attenuated rMP12-C13 type RVFV, which lacks a functional NSs virulence gene. In comparison, infection with live-attenuated MP-12 encoding a functional NSs gene appeared to cause a delayed immune response, while pathogenic ZH501 ablates the immune response almost entirely. These data demonstrate that NSs can inhibit components of the BMDM antiviral response and supports previous work indicating that NSs can specifically regulate the type I interferon response in macrophages. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that genetic differences between ZH501 and MP-12 reduce the ability of MP-12 to inhibit antiviral signalling and subsequently reduce virulence in BMDM, demonstrating that viral components other than NSs play a critical role in regulating the host response to RVFV infection. PMID:25759029

  18. Candida albicans induces selective development of macrophages and monocyte derived dendritic cells by a TLR2 dependent signalling.

    PubMed

    Yáñez, Alberto; Megías, Javier; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M Luisa

    2011-01-01

    As TLRs are expressed by haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), these receptors may play a role in haematopoiesis in response to pathogens during infection. We have previously demonstrated that in in vitro defined conditions inactivated yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans induce HSPCs proliferation and differentiation towards the myeloid lineage by a TLR2/MyD88 dependent pathway. In this work, we showed that C. albicans invasive infection with a low virulence strain results in a rapid expansion of HSPCs (identified as LKS cells: Lin(-) c-Kit(+) Sca-1(+) IL-7Rα(-)), that reach the maximum at day 3 post-infection. This in vivo expansion of LKS cells in TLR2(-/-) mice was delayed until day 7 post- infection. Candidiasis was, as expected, accompanied by an increase in granulopoiesis and decreased lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow. These changes were more pronounced in TLR2(-/-) mice correlating with their higher fungal burden. Accordingly, emigration of Ly6C(high) monocytes and neutrophils to spleen was increased in TLR2(-/-) mice, although the increase in macrophages and inflammatory macrophages was completely dependent on TLR2. Similarly, we detected for the first time, in the spleen of C. albicans infected control mice, a newly generated population of dendritic cells that have the phenotype of monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDCs) that were not generated in TLR2(-/-) infected mice. In addition, C. albicans signalling through TLR2/MyD88 and Dectin-1 promotes in vitro the differentiation of Lin(-) cells towards moDCs that secrete TNF-α and are able to kill the microorganism. Therefore, our results indicate that during infection C. albicans can directly stimulate progenitor cells through TLR2 and Dectin-1 to generate newly formed inflammatory macrophages and moDCs that may fulfill an essential role in defense mechanisms against the pathogen.

  19. Candida albicans Induces Selective Development of Macrophages and Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells by a TLR2 Dependent Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Alberto; Megías, Javier; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M. Luisa

    2011-01-01

    As TLRs are expressed by haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), these receptors may play a role in haematopoiesis in response to pathogens during infection. We have previously demonstrated that in in vitro defined conditions inactivated yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans induce HSPCs proliferation and differentiation towards the myeloid lineage by a TLR2/MyD88 dependent pathway. In this work, we showed that C. albicans invasive infection with a low virulence strain results in a rapid expansion of HSPCs (identified as LKS cells: Lin− c-Kit+ Sca-1+ IL-7Rα−), that reach the maximum at day 3 post-infection. This in vivo expansion of LKS cells in TLR2−/− mice was delayed until day 7 post- infection. Candidiasis was, as expected, accompanied by an increase in granulopoiesis and decreased lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow. These changes were more pronounced in TLR2−/− mice correlating with their higher fungal burden. Accordingly, emigration of Ly6Chigh monocytes and neutrophils to spleen was increased in TLR2−/− mice, although the increase in macrophages and inflammatory macrophages was completely dependent on TLR2. Similarly, we detected for the first time, in the spleen of C. albicans infected control mice, a newly generated population of dendritic cells that have the phenotype of monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDCs) that were not generated in TLR2−/− infected mice. In addition, C. albicans signalling through TLR2/MyD88 and Dectin-1 promotes in vitro the differentiation of Lin− cells towards moDCs that secrete TNF-α and are able to kill the microorganism. Therefore, our results indicate that during infection C. albicans can directly stimulate progenitor cells through TLR2 and Dectin-1 to generate newly formed inflammatory macrophages and moDCs that may fulfill an essential role in defense mechanisms against the pathogen. PMID:21935459

  20. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  1. Transcription factors STAT6 and KLF4 implement macrophage polarization via the dual catalytic powers of MCPIP

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Nidhi; Niu, Jianli; Saad, Yasser; Kumar, Sanjay; Sirakova, Tatiana; Becerra, Edilu; Li, Xiaoman; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage polarization plays a critical role in tissue homeostasis, disease pathogenesis, and inflammation and its resolution. IL-4-induced macrophage polarization involves induction of STAT6 and KLF4 that induce each other and promote M2 polarization. However, how these transcription factors implement M2 polarization is not understood. We report that in murine macrophages MCPIP, induced by KLF4, inhibits M1 polarization by inhibiting NF-κB activation and implements M2 polarization using both its deubiquitinase and RNase activities that cause sequential induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy required for M2 polarization. MCPIP also induces C/EBPβ and PPARγ that promote M2 polarization. Macrophages from mice with myeloid-targeted overexpression of MCPIP show elevated expression of M2 markers and reduced response to LPS, whereas macrophages from mice with myeloid-specific deletion of MCPIP manifest elevated M1 polarization with enhanced phagocytic activity. Thus, both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that the transcription factors STAT6 and KLF4 implement IL-4-induced M2 polarization via the dual catalytic activities of MCPIP. PMID:25934862

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha transcription in macrophages is attenuated by an autocrine factor that preferentially induces NF-kappaB p50.

    PubMed

    Baer, M; Dillner, A; Schwartz, R C; Sedon, C; Nedospasov, S; Johnson, P F

    1998-10-01

    Macrophages are a major source of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which are expressed during conditions of inflammation, infection, or injury. We identified an activity secreted by a macrophage tumor cell line that negatively regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of TNF-alpha. This activity, termed TNF-alpha-inhibiting factor (TIF), suppressed the induction of TNF-alpha expression in macrophages, whereas induction of three other proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta [IL-1beta], IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) was accelerated or enhanced. A similar or identical inhibitory activity was secreted by IC-21 macrophages following LPS stimulation. Inhibition of TNF-alpha expression by macrophage conditioned medium was associated with selective induction of the NF-kappaB p50 subunit. Hyperinduction of p50 occurred with delayed kinetics in LPS-stimulated macrophages but not in fibroblasts. Overexpression of p50 blocked LPS-induced transcription from a TNF-alpha promoter reporter construct, showing that this transcription factor is an inhibitor of the TNF-alpha gene. Repression of the TNF-alpha promoter by TIF required a distal region that includes three NF-kappaB binding sites with preferential affinity for p50 homodimers. Thus, the selective repression of the TNF-alpha promoter by TIF may be explained by the specific binding of inhibitory p50 homodimers. We propose that TIF serves as a negative autocrine signal to attenuate TNF-alpha expression in activated macrophages. TIF is distinct from the known TNF-alpha-inhibiting factors IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta and may represent a novel cytokine. PMID:9742085

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Transcription in Macrophages Is Attenuated by an Autocrine Factor That Preferentially Induces NF-κB p50

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Mark; Dillner, Allan; Schwartz, Richard C.; Sedon, Constance; Nedospasov, Sergei; Johnson, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages are a major source of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which are expressed during conditions of inflammation, infection, or injury. We identified an activity secreted by a macrophage tumor cell line that negatively regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of TNF-α. This activity, termed TNF-α-inhibiting factor (TIF), suppressed the induction of TNF-α expression in macrophages, whereas induction of three other proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) was accelerated or enhanced. A similar or identical inhibitory activity was secreted by IC-21 macrophages following LPS stimulation. Inhibition of TNF-α expression by macrophage conditioned medium was associated with selective induction of the NF-κB p50 subunit. Hyperinduction of p50 occurred with delayed kinetics in LPS-stimulated macrophages but not in fibroblasts. Overexpression of p50 blocked LPS-induced transcription from a TNF-α promoter reporter construct, showing that this transcription factor is an inhibitor of the TNF-α gene. Repression of the TNF-α promoter by TIF required a distal region that includes three NF-κB binding sites with preferential affinity for p50 homodimers. Thus, the selective repression of the TNF-α promoter by TIF may be explained by the specific binding of inhibitory p50 homodimers. We propose that TIF serves as a negative autocrine signal to attenuate TNF-α expression in activated macrophages. TIF is distinct from the known TNF-α-inhibiting factors IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β and may represent a novel cytokine. PMID:9742085

  4. Macrophage biology and their activation by protozoan-derived glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors and hemozoin.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Jerry R; Vogel, Ian A

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in medical technology and a global effort to improve public health and hygiene, parasitic infections remain a major health and economic burden worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that about 1/3 of the world's population is currently infected with a soil-transmitted helminth, and millions more suffer from diseases caused by protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, and Leishmania species. Due to the selective pressure applied by parasitic and other infections, animals have evolved an intricate immune system; however, the current worldwide prevalence of parasitic infections clearly indicates that these pathogens have adapted equally well. Thus, developing a better understanding of the host-parasite relationship, particularly by focusing on the host immune response and the mechanisms by which parasites evade this response, is a critical first step in mitigating the detrimental effects of parasitic diseases. Macrophages are critical contributors during the host response to protozoan parasites, and the success or failure of these cells often tips the balance in favor of the host or parasite. Herein, we briefly discuss macrophage biology and provide an update on our current understanding of how these cells recognize glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors from protozoan parasites as well as malarial hemozoin.

  5. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor as a component of selective vulnerability of motor neurons in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hamad, Salah; Israelson, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause about 20 percent of familial ALS which is accompanied by accumulation of misfolded SOD1 onto intracellular organelles. Recently, we identified the 12 kDa macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a chaperone for mutant SOD1 which is abundant in non-neuronal tissues. Purified recombinant MIF was shown to directly inhibit mutant SOD1 misfolding and association with mitochondria and ER. Elevating MIF in neuronal cells inhibited the accumulation of misfolded SOD1 and its association with mitochondria and ER, and extended survival of mutant SOD1-expressing motor neurons. Our results revealed that the levels of MIF protein are very low in motor neurons, implicating low chaperone activity as a component of selective vulnerability of motor neurons to mutant SOD1 misfolding and toxicity. PMID:26459694

  6. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor interacts with HBx and inhibits its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shimeng; Lin Ruxian; Zhou Zhe; Wen Siyuan; Lin Li; Chen Suhong; Shan Yajun; Cong Yuwen; Wang Shengqi . E-mail: sqwang@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-04-07

    HBx, a transcriptional transactivating protein of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. We used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify that HBx interacts with MIF directly. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation, cell growth, and even tumor formation. The interaction between HBx and MIF was verified with co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, and cellular colocalization. The expression of MIF was up-regulated in HBV particle producing cell 2.2.15 compared with HepG2 cell. Both HBx and MIF cause HepG2 cell G /G{sub 1} phase arrest, proliferation inhibition, and apoptosis. However, MIF can counteract the apoptotic effect of HBx. These results may provide evidence to explain the link between HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Scene kinetics mitigation using factor analysis with derivative factors.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W.; Melgaard, David Kennett; Scholand, Andrew Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Line of sight jitter in staring sensor data combined with scene information can obscure critical information for change analysis or target detection. Consequently before the data analysis, the jitter effects must be significantly reduced. Conventional principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to obtain basis vectors for background estimation; however PCA requires image frames that contain the jitter variation that is to be modeled. Since jitter is usually chaotic and asymmetric, a data set containing all the variation without the changes to be detected is typically not available. An alternative approach, Scene Kinetics Mitigation, first obtains an image of the scene. Then it computes derivatives of that image in the horizontal and vertical directions. The basis set for estimation of the background and the jitter consists of the image and its derivative factors. This approach has several advantages including: (1) only a small number of images are required to develop the model, (2) the model can estimate backgrounds with jitter different from the input training images, (3) the method is particularly effective for sub-pixel jitter, and (4) the model can be developed from images before the change detection process. In addition the scores from projecting the factors on the background provide estimates of the jitter magnitude and direction for registration of the images. In this paper we will present a discussion of the theoretical basis for this technique, provide examples of its application, and discuss its limitations.

  8. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) of the protozoan parasite Eimeria influences the components of the immune system of its host, the chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble factor produced by sensitized T lymphocytes that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. Homologues of MIF from invertebrates have been identified making it an interesting molecule from a functional perspective. In the present study, ...

  9. Augmentation of the human monocyte/macrophage chemiluminescence response during short-term exposure to interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Bates, E J; Kowanko, I C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of short-term (30 min) pre-incubation of human monocytes and macrophages (3-day cultured monocytes) with leucocyte-derived human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) were examined. Pre-incubation of either monocytes or macrophages with rTNF-alpha or IFN-gamma (100 U/5 x 10(5) cells) augmented their respiratory burst to formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP), measured by the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assay. In addition, both cell types showed a burst of respiratory activity in the presence of rTNF-alpha or IFN-gamma only. The effects of IFN-gamma were removed by adsorption with an anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody and those of rTNF-alpha were abolished by heating at 100 degrees C, or by the addition of anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody. The results demonstrate that both IFN-gamma and rTNF-alpha are stimulators of monocytes and macrophages, and rapidly alter the capacity of the cells to respond to fMLP, which binds to cell surface receptors. PMID:2113442

  10. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling networks inhibit mouse macrophage inflammatory responses by induction of microRNA-21.

    PubMed

    Caescu, Cristina I; Guo, Xingyi; Tesfa, Lydia; Bhagat, Tushar D; Verma, Amit; Zheng, Deyou; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-19

    Macrophage polarization between the M2 (repair, protumorigenic) and M1 (inflammatory) phenotypes is seen as a continuum of states. The detailed transcriptional events and signals downstream of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) that contributes to amplification of the M2 phenotype and suppression of the M1 phenotype are largely unknown. Macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling promotes cell motility and enhancement of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Combining analysis of cellular systems for CSF-1R gain of function and loss of function with bioinformatic analysis of the macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721-regulated transcriptome, we uncovered microRNA-21 (miR-21) as a downstream molecular switch controlling macrophage activation and identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB as CSF-1R pTyr-721-regulated signaling nodes. We show that CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling suppresses the inflammatory phenotype, predominantly by induction of miR-21. Profiling of the miR-21-regulated messenger RNAs revealed that 80% of the CSF-1-regulated canonical miR-21 targets are proinflammatory molecules. Additionally, miR-21 positively regulates M2 marker expression. Moreover, miR-21 feeds back to positively regulate its own expression and to limit CSF-1R-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB. Consistent with an anti-inflammatory role of miRNA-21, intraperitoneal injection of mice with a miRNA-21 inhibitor increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and enhances the peritoneal monocyte/macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. These results identify the CSF-1R-regulated miR-21 network that modulates macrophage polarization.

  11. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling networks inhibit mouse macrophage inflammatory responses by induction of microRNA-21

    PubMed Central

    Caescu, Cristina I.; Guo, Xingyi; Tesfa, Lydia; Bhagat, Tushar D.; Verma, Amit; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage polarization between the M2 (repair, protumorigenic) and M1 (inflammatory) phenotypes is seen as a continuum of states. The detailed transcriptional events and signals downstream of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) that contributes to amplification of the M2 phenotype and suppression of the M1 phenotype are largely unknown. Macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling promotes cell motility and enhancement of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Combining analysis of cellular systems for CSF-1R gain of function and loss of function with bioinformatic analysis of the macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721–regulated transcriptome, we uncovered microRNA-21 (miR-21) as a downstream molecular switch controlling macrophage activation and identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB as CSF-1R pTyr-721–regulated signaling nodes. We show that CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling suppresses the inflammatory phenotype, predominantly by induction of miR-21. Profiling of the miR-21–regulated messenger RNAs revealed that 80% of the CSF-1–regulated canonical miR-21 targets are proinflammatory molecules. Additionally, miR-21 positively regulates M2 marker expression. Moreover, miR-21 feeds back to positively regulate its own expression and to limit CSF-1R–mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB. Consistent with an anti-inflammatory role of miRNA-21, intraperitoneal injection of mice with a miRNA-21 inhibitor increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and enhances the peritoneal monocyte/macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. These results identify the CSF-1R–regulated miR-21 network that modulates macrophage polarization. PMID:25573988

  12. Bactericidal Activity of Human Macrophages: Analysis of Factors Influencing the Killing of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Martin J.

    1970-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of listericidal activity of human macrophages grown from blood monocytes. Phagocytosis of Listeria monocytogenes was inhibited by a glycolytic poison (NaF) but was unaffected by anaerobic conditions, cyanide, or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). Killing by macrophages was slower than that by neutrophils, and Listeria phagocytized by macrophages began to synthesize deoxyribonucleic acid within 3 hr of the time of ingestion. Differentiated macrophages ingested and killed more organisms per cell than newly isolated monocytes. Maximal killing of Listeria required oxygen but was unaffected by cyanide or DNP. Macrophages isolated from patients with chronic intracellular infection (leprosy, tuberculosis, fungal diseases) and from patients with active Hodgkin's disease were more bactericidal than macrophages from normal subjects. Images PMID:16557814

  13. Lentinan mitigates therarubicin-induced myelosuppression by activating bone marrow-derived macrophages in an MAPK/NF-κB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Dong, Lei; Li, Hong; Yuan, Jia; Peng, Yuping; Dai, Shejiao

    2016-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) suppression (also known as myelosuppression) is the most common and most severe side-effect of therarubicin (THP) and thereby limits the clinical application of this anticancer agent. Lentinan (LNT), a glucan extracted from dried shiitake mushrooms (Lentinula edodes), exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of LNT on the myelosuppression of THP-treated mice and to examine the pharmacological mechanism of these effects. In vivo experiments indicated that non-cytotoxic levels of LNT strongly increased blood myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity; improved BM structural injuries; increased the numbers of leukocytes and neutrophils in the blood and BM; elevated the blood levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF); and reduced the self-healing period in THP-treated mice. In vitro experiments indicated that LNT increased the viability of BM-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in a time- and dose-dependent manner without toxic side-effects and markedly increased the release of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF by BMDMs. Further analyses revealed that LNT activated the NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways and promoted the nuclear import of p65 and that BAY 11-7082 (a specific inhibitor of NF-κB) suppressed the release of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF. Furthermore, we found that U0126, SB203580 and SP600125 (specific inhibitors of ERK, p38 and JNK, respectively) markedly inhibited the IKK/IκB/NF-κB-dependent release of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF. In conclusion, LNT induces the production of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF by activating the MAPK/NF-κB signalling pathway in BM cells, thereby mitigating THP-induced myelosuppression. PMID:27121155

  14. MDP(Lysyl)GDP, a nontoxic muramyl dipeptide derivative, inhibits cytokine production by activated macrophages and protects mice from phorbol ester- and oxazolone-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zunic, M; Bahr, G M; Mudde, G C; Meingassner, J G; Lam, C

    1998-07-01

    High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide are proposed to orchestrate pathophysiologic mechanism(s) associated with various inflammatory dermatoses. This study examines whether a water soluble 3-O-[N-acetylmuramyl-L-lysyl-D-iso]-2-di-on-glycine [MDP(Lysyl)GDP], a nontoxic and nonpyrogenic derivative of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), can inhibit the in vitro production of inflammatory mediators by lipopolysaccharide- or interferon-gamma-activated macrophages, and whether such an inhibitory effect can translate into in vivo protection of mice from irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. Thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages cultured in medium alone or in medium supplemented with MDP(Lysyl)GDP (1-100 microg per ml) expressed neither mRNA transcripts for inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nor cytokine proteins and nitric oxide activity. Incubation of the cells with either lipopolysaccharide or interferon-gamma for 6 h resulted in a significant induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA, and the accumulation of high levels of monokines and nitrites in cultures by 24 h. Co-incubation of the macrophages with lipopolysaccharide or interferon-gamma and MDP(Lysyl)GDP (1-100 microg per ml) resulted in a concentration-dependent suppression of the steady-state mRNA transcripts for inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1beta, induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by interferon-gamma. In mouse models of phorbol ester- and oxazolone-induced ear inflammation, topical application of MDP(Lysyl)GDP significantly suppressed ear swelling in a dose-dependent manner. Likewise, oral treatment with MDP(Lysyl)GDP at days -3, -2, and -1 before elicitation with oxazolone also significantly inhibited ear inflammation. Taken together, our findings suggest that MDP(Lysyl)GDP has the potential to be a therapeutic application in

  15. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Antonella; Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W; Henriquez, Fiona L; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-10-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  16. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W.; Henriquez, Fiona L.; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2α regulates macrophage function in mouse models of acute and tumor inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Imtiyaz, Hongxia Z.; Williams, Emily P.; Hickey, Michele M.; Patel, Shetal A.; Durham, Amy C.; Yuan, Li-Jun; Hammond, Rachel; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α display unique and sometimes opposing activities in regulating cellular energy homeostasis, cell fate decisions, and oncogenesis. Macrophages exposed to hypoxia accumulate both HIF-1α and HIF-2α, and overexpression of HIF-2α in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is specifically correlated with high-grade human tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of HIF-2α during macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses remains unclear. To fully characterize cellular hypoxic adaptations, distinct functions of HIF-1α versus HIF-2α must be elucidated. We demonstrate here that mice lacking HIF-2α in myeloid cells (Hif2aΔ/Δ mice) are resistant to lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia and display a marked inability to mount inflammatory responses to cutaneous and peritoneal irritants. Furthermore, HIF-2α directly regulated proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression in macrophages activated in vitro. Hif2aΔ/Δ mice displayed reduced TAM infiltration in independent murine hepatocellular and colitis-associated colon carcinoma models, and this was associated with reduced tumor cell proliferation and progression. Notably, HIF-2α modulated macrophage migration by regulating the expression of the cytokine receptor M-CSFR and the chemokine receptor CXCR4, without altering intracellular ATP levels. Collectively, our data identify HIF-2α as an important regulator of innate immunity, suggesting it may be a useful therapeutic target for treating inflammatory disorders and cancer. PMID:20644254

  18. Mycobacterium leprae-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor I attenuates antimicrobial mechanisms, promoting bacterial survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Batista-Silva, L. R.; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Vivarini, Aislan de Carvalho; Costa, Fabrício da Mota Ramalho; Mattos, Katherine Antunes de; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Toledo-Pinto, T. G.; Dias, André Alves; Moura, Danielle Fonseca; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, can subvert macrophage antimicrobial activity by mechanisms that remain only partially understood. In the present study, the participation of hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in this phenomenum was investigated. Macrophages from the dermal lesions of the disseminated multibacillary lepromatous form (LL) of leprosy expressed higher levels of IGF-I than those from the self-limited paucibacillary tuberculoid form (BT). Higher levels of IGF-I secretion by ML-infected macrophages were confirmed in ex vivo and in vitro studies. Of note, the dampening of IGF-I signaling reverted the capacity of ML-infected human and murine macrophages to produce antimicrobial molecules and promoted bacterial killing. Moreover, IGF-I was shown to inhibit the JAK/STAT1-dependent signaling pathways triggered by both mycobacteria and IFN-γ most probably through its capacity to induce the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Finally, these in vitro findings were corroborated by in vivo observations in which higher SOCS3 expression and lower phosphorylation of STAT1 levels were found in LL versus BT dermal lesions. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IGF-I contributes to the maintenance of a functional program in infected macrophages that suits ML persistence in the host, reinforcing a key role for IGF-I in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:27282338

  19. Epidermal growth factor treatment of the adult brain subventricular zone leads to focal microglia/macrophage accumulation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Olle R; Brederlau, Anke; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-04-01

    One of the major components of the subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenic niche is the specialized vasculature. The SVZ vasculature is thought to be important in regulating progenitor cell proliferation and migration. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogen with a wide range of effects. When stem and progenitor cells in the rat SVZ are treated with EGF, using intracerebroventricular infusion, dysplastic polyps are formed. Upon extended infusion, blood vessels are recruited into the polyps. In the current study we demonstrate how polyps develop through distinct stages leading up to angiogenesis. As polyps progress, microglia/macrophages accumulate in the polyp core concurrent with increasing cell death. Both microglia/macrophage accumulation and cell death peak during angiogenesis and subsequently decline following polyp vascularization. This model of inducible angiogenesis in the SVZ neurogenic niche suggests involvement of microglia/macrophages in acquired angiogenesis and can be used in detail to study angiogenesis in the adult brain.

  20. Murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, R M; Hinsdill, R D; Sandok, P L; Horowitz, S D

    1978-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions involving the initial contact of peritoneal, spleen, or thymus lymphocytes with peritoneal macrophage processes or microprocesses followed by clustering of lymphocytes over the central nuclear area of the macrophages. Lymphocyte-lymphocyte clustering was not observed in the absence of macrophages. Attachment and subsequent clustering appeared not to require the presence of serum or antigen; the attachment of allogeneic or xenogeneic lymphocytes was comparable to that seen in the syngeneic system, but central clustering of these lymphocytes failed to occur. No attachment or clustering was observed when thymic lymphocytes were cultured with thymus derived fibroblasts rather than with peritoneal macrophages. Lymphocyte attachment to immune, antigen-activated, syngeneic macrophages occurred more rapidly than that to normal unstimulated syngeneic macrophages; however, lymphocytes attached to the "activated" macrophages appeared to be killed by a nonphagocytic mechanism. A similar increase in the rate of lymphocyte attachment to macrophages occurred in the presence of migration inhibitory factor. Subsequent lymphocyte clustering on macrophages was observed in the migration inhibitory factor-stimulated cultures. In addition, lymphocyte-macrophage interactions similar to those in vitro were observed to occur in vivo on intraperitoneally implanted cover slips. Images PMID:101458

  1. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage.

    PubMed

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-09-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  2. Structural characterization and chromosomal location of the mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, M.; Gerard, C.; Kolakowski, L.F. Jr.

    1995-06-10

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, is a cytokine released by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and the pituitary gland that serves to integrate peripheral and central inflammatory responses. Ubiquitous expression and developmental regulation suggest that MIF may have additional roles outside of the immune system. Here we report the structure and chromosomal location of the mouse Mif gene and the partial characterization of five Mif pseudogenes. The mouse Mif gene spans less than 0.7 kb of chromosomal DNA and is composed of three exons. A comparison between the mouse and the human genes shows a similar gene structure and common regulatory elements in both promoter regions. The mouse Mif gene maps to the middle region of chromosome 10, between Bcr and S100b, which have been mapped to human chromosomes 22q11 and 21q22.3, respectively. The entire sequence of two pseudogenes demonstrates the absence of introns, the presence of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the cDNA, a 3{prime} poly(A) tail, and the lack of sequence similarity with untranscribed regions of the gene. The five pseudogenes are highly homologous to the cDNA, but contain a variable number of mutations that would produce mutated or truncated MIF-like proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of MIF genes and pseudogenes indicate several independent genetic events that can account for multiple genomic integrations. Three of the Mif pseudogenes were also mapped by interspecific backcross to chromosomes 1, 9, and 17. These results suggest that Mif pseudogenes originated by retrotransposition. 46 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Biolistic expression of the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor in organotypic cultures induces an inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Olivera M; Robinson, Christopher C; Tenen, Daniel G; Lee, Yuen Ling; Poon, Clara; Murphy, Greer M

    2004-08-01

    The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSFR; c-fms) is expressed at increased levels by microglia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in mouse models for AD. Increased expression of M-CSFR on cultured microglia results in a strong proinflammatory response, but the relevance of this cell culture finding to intact brain is unknown. To determine the effects of increased microglial expression of M-CSFR in a complex organotypic environment, we developed a system for biolistic transfection of microglia in hippocampal slice cultures. The promoter for the Mac-1 integrin alpha subunit CD11b is active in cells of myeloid origin. In the brain, CD11b expression is restricted to microglia. Constructs consisting of the promoter for CD11b and a c-fms cDNA or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cDNA were introduced into monotypic cultures of microglia, neurons, and astrocytes. Strong CD11b promoter activity was observed in microglia, whereas little activity was observed in other cell types. Biolistic transfection of organotypic hippocampal cultures with the CD11b/c-fms construct resulted in expression of the c-fms mRNA and protein that was localized to microglia. Furthermore, biolistic overexpression of M-CSFR on microglia resulted in significantly increased production by the hippocampal cultures of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1alpha), and trends toward increased production of IL-6 and M-CSF. These findings demonstrate that microglial overexpression of M-CSFR in an organotypic environment induces an inflammatory response, and suggest that increased microglial expression of M-CSFR could contribute to the inflammatory response observed in AD brain.

  4. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  5. Discovery of Salmonella Virulence Factors Translocated via Outer Membrane Vesicles to Murine Macrophages.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    We have previously shown that the regulators SpvR, FruR, IHF, PhoP/PhoQ, SsrA/SsrB, SlyA, Hnr, RpoE, SmpB, CsrA, RpoS, Crp, OmpR/EnvZ, and Hfq are essential for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in mice. Here we use quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics profiling of in-frame deletion mutants of these 14 regulators to identify proteins that are coordinately regulated by these virulence regulators and are thus presumably novel factors contributing to Salmonella pathogenesis. Putative candidate proteins from proteomics analysis were determined, which exhibited similar abundance profiles to those of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 type III secretion system (TTSS) proteins. A subset of 5 proteins including STM0082, STM1548, PdgL, STM1633, and STM3595 was selected for further analysis. All 5 proteins were expressed inside macrophage cells and STM0082 (SrfN) was secreted into host cytoplasm. Furthermore, deletion of STM0082 attenuated virulence in mice when administered intraperitoneally as determined by competitive index. srfN transcription was positively regulated by SsrAB, however, secretion was independent of SPI-2 TTSS as well as SPI-1 TTSS and flagella. Proteins including PagK and STM2585A, which are positively regulated by PhoP/PhoQ, have sec signal peptides as predicted for SrfN and were secreted into macrophage cytoplasm regardless of SPI-2 TTSS. Isolation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) revealed the presence of SrfN, PagK, and STM2585A inside vesicle compartments. This result is the first case showing delivery of virulence effectors via OMVs in S. Typhimurium. Moreover, Hfq regulation of SrfN translation suggests that small non-coding RNAs may be responsible for regulating effector protein expression.

  6. Grapefruit-derived nanovectors deliver miR-18a for treatment of liver metastasis of colon cancer by induction of M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yun; Mu, Jingyao; Hu, Xin; Samykutty, Abhilash; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhongbin; Zhang, Lifeng; Cao, Pengxiao; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2016-01-01

    Liver metastasis accounts for many of the cancer deaths in patients. Effective treatment for metastatic liver tumors is not available. Here, we provide evidence for the role of miR-18a in the induction of liver M1 (F4/80+interferon gamma (IFNγ)+IL-12+) macrophages. We found that miR-18a encapsulated in grapefruit-derived nanovector (GNV) mediated inhibition of liver metastasis that is dependent upon the induction of M1 (F4/80+IFNγ+IL-12+) macrophages; depletion of macrophages eliminated its anti-metastasis effect. Furthermore, the miR-18a mediated induction of macrophage IFNγ by targeting IRF2 is required for subsequent induction of IL-12. IL-12 then activates natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells for inhibition of liver metastasis of colon cancer. This conclusion is supported by the fact that knockout of IFNγ eliminates miR-18a mediated induction of IL-12, miR-18a treatment has an anti-metastatic effects in T cell deficient mice but there is no anti-metastatic effect on NK and NKT deficient mice. Co-delivery of miR-18a and siRNA IL-12 to macrophages did not result in activation of co-cultured NK and NKT cells. Taken together our results indicate that miR-18a can act as an inhibitor for liver metastasis through induction of M1 macrophages. PMID:27028860

  7. HIV-Derived ssRNA Binds to TLR8 to Induce Inflammation-Driven Macrophage Foam Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Mark A.; Han, Xinbing; Inderbitzin, Sonya; Agbim, Ifunanya; Zhao, Hui; Koziel, Henry; Tachado, Souvenir D.

    2014-01-01

    Even though combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) dramatically improves patient survival, they remain at a higher risk of being afflicted with non-infectious complications such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). This increased risk is linked to persistent inflammation and chronic immune activation. In this study, we assessed whether this complication is related to HIV-derived ssRNAs inducing in macrophages increases in TNFα release through TLR8 activation leading to foam cell formation. HIV ssRNAs induced foam cell formation in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in a dose-dependent manner. This response was reduced when either endocytosis or endosomal acidification was inhibited by dynasore or chloroquine, respectively. Using a flow cytometry FRET assay, we demonstrated that ssRNAs bind to TLR8 in HEK cells. In MDMs, ssRNAs triggered a TLR8-mediated inflammatory response that ultimately lead to foam cell formation. Targeted silencing of the TLR8 and MYD88 genes reduced foam cell formation. Furthermore, foam cell formation induced by these ssRNAs was blocked by an anti-TNFα neutralizing antibody. Taken together in MDMs, HIV ssRNAs are internalized; bind TLR8 in the endosome followed by endosomal acidification. TLR8 signaling then triggers TNFα release and ultimately leads to foam cell formation. As this response was inhibited by a blocking anti-TNFα antibody, drug targeting HIV ssRNA-driven TLR8 activation may serve as a potential therapeutic target to reduce chronic immune activation and inflammation leading to CVD in HIV+ patients. PMID:25090652

  8. Glycosylation and Sialylation of Macrophage-derived Human Apolipoprotein E Analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youra; Kockx, Maaike; Raftery, Mark J.; Jessup, Wendy; Griffith, Renate; Kritharides, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a 34-kDa glycoprotein secreted from various cells including hepatocytes and macrophages and plays an important role in remnant lipoprotein clearance, immune responses, Alzheimer disease, and atherosclerosis. Cellular apoE and plasma apoE exist as multiple glycosylated and sialylated glycoforms with plasma apoE being less glycosylated/sialylated than cell-derived apoE. Some of the glycan structures on plasma apoE are characterized; however, the more complicated structures on plasma and cellular/secreted apoE remain unidentified. We investigated glycosylation and sialylation of cellular and secreted apoE from primary human macrophages by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Our results identify eight different glycoforms with (HexNAc)2-Hex2-(NeuAc)2 being the most complex glycan detected on Thr194 in both cellular and secreted apoE. Four additional glycans were identified on apoE(283–299), and using β-elimination/alkylation by methylamine in vitro, we identified Ser290 as a novel site of glycan attachment. Comparison of plasma and cellular/secreted apoE from the same donor confirmed that cell-derived apoE is more extensively sialylated than plasma apoE. Given the importance of the C terminus of apoE in regulating apoE solubility, stability, and lipid binding, these results may have important implications for our understanding of apoE biochemistry. PMID:20511397

  9. Establishing Porcine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Systems for Studying the Interaction with PRRSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Helen; Graham, Simon P.; Bodman-Smith, Katherine B.; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) are two model systems well established in human and rodent systems that can be used to study the interaction of pathogens with host cells. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is known to infect myeloid cells, such as macrophages (MØ) and dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, this study aimed to establish systems for the differentiation and characterization of MoMØ and MoDC for subsequent infection with PRRSV-1. M-CSF differentiated MoMØ were stimulated with activators for classical (M1) or alternative (M2) activation. GM-CSF and IL-4 generated MoDC were activated with the well established maturation cocktail containing PAMPs and cytokines. In addition, MoMØ and MoDC were treated with dexamethasone and IL-10, which are known immuno-suppressive reagents. Cells were characterized by morphology, phenotype, and function and porcine MØ subsets highlighted some divergence from described human counterparts, while MoDC, appeared more similar to mouse and human DCs. The infection with PRRSV-1 strain Lena demonstrated different replication kinetics between MoMØ and MoDC and within subsets of each cell type. While MoMØ susceptibility was significantly increased by dexamethasone and IL-10 with an accompanying increase in CD163/CD169 expression, MoDC supported only a minimal replication of PRRSV These findings underline the high variability in the susceptibility of porcine myeloid cells toward PRRSV-1 infection. PMID:27313573

  10. Establishing Porcine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Systems for Studying the Interaction with PRRSV-1.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Helen; Graham, Simon P; Bodman-Smith, Katherine B; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) are two model systems well established in human and rodent systems that can be used to study the interaction of pathogens with host cells. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is known to infect myeloid cells, such as macrophages (MØ) and dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, this study aimed to establish systems for the differentiation and characterization of MoMØ and MoDC for subsequent infection with PRRSV-1. M-CSF differentiated MoMØ were stimulated with activators for classical (M1) or alternative (M2) activation. GM-CSF and IL-4 generated MoDC were activated with the well established maturation cocktail containing PAMPs and cytokines. In addition, MoMØ and MoDC were treated with dexamethasone and IL-10, which are known immuno-suppressive reagents. Cells were characterized by morphology, phenotype, and function and porcine MØ subsets highlighted some divergence from described human counterparts, while MoDC, appeared more similar to mouse and human DCs. The infection with PRRSV-1 strain Lena demonstrated different replication kinetics between MoMØ and MoDC and within subsets of each cell type. While MoMØ susceptibility was significantly increased by dexamethasone and IL-10 with an accompanying increase in CD163/CD169 expression, MoDC supported only a minimal replication of PRRSV These findings underline the high variability in the susceptibility of porcine myeloid cells toward PRRSV-1 infection.

  11. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and nucleoside analogue therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brites, C; Gilbert, M J; Pedral-Sampaio, D; Bahia, F; Pedroso, C; Alcantara, A P; Sasaki, M D; Matos, J; Renjifo, B; Essex, M; Whitmore, J B; Agosti, J M; Badaro, R

    2000-11-01

    Preliminary preclinical and clinical data suggest that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may decrease viral replication. Therefore, 105 individuals with AIDS who were receiving nucleoside analogue therapy were enrolled in a placebo-controlled, double-blind study and were randomized to receive either 125 microgram/m(2) of yeast-derived, GM-CSF (sargramostim) or placebo subcutaneously twice weekly for 6 months. Subjects were evaluated for toxicity and disease progression. A significant decrease in mean virus load (VL) was observed for the GM-CSF treatment group at 6 months (-0.07 log(10) vs. -0.60 log(10); P=.02). More subjects achieved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-RNA levels <500 copies/mL at >/=2 evaluations (2% on placebo vs. 11% on GM-CSF; P=.04). Genotypic analysis of 46 subjects demonstrated a lower frequency of zidovudine-resistant mutations among those receiving GM-CSF (80% vs. 50%; P=.04). No difference was observed in the incidence of opportunistic infections (OIs) through 6 months or survival, despite a higher risk for OI among GM-CSF recipients. GM-CSF reduced VL and limited the evolution of zidovudine-resistant genotypes, potentially providing adjunctive therapy in HIV disease.

  12. Structure of the chromosomal gene for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: comparison of the mouse and human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, S; Otsuka, T; Yokota, T; Lee, F; Arai, K

    1985-01-01

    A cDNA clone that expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in COS-7 cells has been isolated from a pcD library prepared from mRNA derived from concanavalin A-activated mouse helper T cell clones. Based on homology with the mouse GM-CSF cDNA sequence, the mouse GM-CSF gene was isolated. The human GM-CSF gene was also isolated based on homology with the human GM-CSF cDNA sequence. The nucleotide sequences determined for the genes and their flanking regions revealed that both the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are composed of three introns and four exons. The organization of the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are highly homologous and strong sequence homology between the two genes is found both in the coding and non-coding regions. A 'TATA'-like sequence was found 20-25 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. In the 5'-flanking region, there is a highly homologous region extending 330 bp upstream of the putative TATA box. This sequence may play a role in regulation of expression of the GM-CSF gene. These structures are compared with those of different lymphokine genes and their regulatory regions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3876930

  13. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  14. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  15. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis.

  16. Curcumin enhanced cholesterol efflux by upregulating ABCA1 expression through AMPK-SIRT1-LXRα signaling in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-long; Liu, Mi-Hua; Hu, Hui-Jun; Feng, Hong-ru; Fan, Xiao-Juan; Zou, Wei-wen; Pan, Yong-quan; Hu, Xue-mei; Wang, Zuo

    2015-09-01

    Curcumin, a traditional Chinese derivative from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, is beneficial to health by modulating lipid metabolism and suppressing atherogenesis. A key part of atherosclerosis is the failure of macrophages to restore their cellular cholesterol homeostasis and the formation of foam cells. In this study, results showed that curcumin dramatically increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), promoted cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells, and reduced cellular cholesterol levels. Curcumin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and SIRT1, and then activated LXRα in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Inhibiting AMPK/SIRT1 activity by its specific inhibitor or by small interfering RNA could inhibit LXRα activation and abolish curcumin-induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Thus, curcumin enhanced cholesterol efflux by upregulating ABCA1 expression through activating AMPK-SIRT1-LXRα signaling in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. This study describes a possible mechanism for understanding the antiatherogenic effects of curcumin on attenuating the progression of atherosclerosis.

  17. Induction of cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1996-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to macrophages is mediated by different ligands and receptors and induces various intracellular molecular responses. In the present study, induction of cytokines and chemokines, especially granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), was examined, following bacterial attachment, with regard to the ligand-receptor systems involved. Attachment of Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages increased the steady-state levels of cellular mRNAs for the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and GM-CSF as well as the chemokines MIP-1beta, MIP-2, and KC. However, when macrophages were treated with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside (alphaMM), a competitor of glycopeptide ligands, induction of cytokine mRNAs was inhibited, but the levels of chemokine mRNAs were not. Pretreatment of the bacteria with fresh mouse serum enhanced the level of GM-CSF mRNA but not the level of MIP-2 mRNA. In addition, serum treatment reduced the inhibitory effect of alphaMM on GM-CSF mRNA. These results indicate that bacterial attachment increases the steady-state levels of the cytokine and chemokine mRNAs tested by at least two distinct receptor-ligand systems, namely, one linked to cytokine induction and involving mannose or other sugar residues and the other linked to chemokine induction and relatively alphaMM insensitive. Furthermore, opsonization with serum engages other pathways in the cytokine response which are relatively independent of the alphaMM-sensitive system. Regarding bacterial surface ligands involved in cytokine mRNA induction, evidence is presented that the flagellum may be important in stimulating cytokine GM-CSF message but not chemokine MIP-2 message. Analysis of cytokine GM-CSF and chemokine MIP-2 signaling pathways with protein kinase inhibitors revealed the involvement of calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase in GM-CSF but not MIP-2 m

  18. Live Brucella spp. fail to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha excretion upon infection of U937-derived phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Caron, E; Peyrard, T; Köhler, S; Cabane, S; Liautard, J P; Dornand, J

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a central role in activation of first-line defenses of a host against foreign organisms. To determine whether Brucella infection modulated TNF-alpha production, we measured the biological activity of this cytokine in supernatants of U937 cell-derived macrophages and of fresh human monocytes infected with Brucella spp. Neither the smooth nor rough Brucella strains used induced any measurable TNF-alpha excretion upon infection. On the contrary, as reported before for other gram-negative bacteria, phagocytosis of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli was followed by a rapid and transient induction of TNF-alpha release, suggesting an involvement of this cytokine in some autocrine process. As expected, the Brucella strains tested survived and/or multiplied within U937-derived macrophages, whereas E. coli was rapidly eliminated after phagocytosis. Immunoglobulin G opsonization of E. coli strains enhanced their intracellular killing and strongly potentiated TNF-alpha secretion. Immunoglobulin G opsonization of Brucella strains, in contrast, did not lead to TNF-alpha production, although their rate of intracellular multiplication was reduced. Killed brucellae, however, promoted a significant excretion of TNF-alpha from U937-derived macrophages into cell culture supernatants. We finally demonstrated that pretreatment of U937-derived macrophages with exogenous TNF-alpha significantly inhibited intracellular multiplication of Brucella spp. These results and experiments performed on fresh human monocytes or with isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) showed that (i) differences in TNF-alpha production observed during macrophage infection by Brucella spp. and E. coli were not due to differences in LPS structure but resulted from active inhibition of TNF-alpha production by a specific process linked to Brucella spp. and (ii) the capacity of Brucella spp. to use pathways avoiding TNF-alpha production during infection may be considered a major

  19. Action of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors: studies using a human leukemia cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lusis, A J; Koeffler, H P

    1980-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) have previously been shown to stimulate colony formation in soft agar culture by a human myelogenous leukemia cell line known as KG-1. We have used KG-1 cells as a model system to investigate the interaction of CSF with myeloid cells. We now report that exposure of KG-1 cells to human CSFs in liquid culture results in a rapid (within 3 hr) burst of RNA synthesis and, after a lag of about 10 hr, a stimulation of DNA and protein synthesis. RNA and protein synthesis were maximally stimulated about 2-fold and DNA synthesis was stimulated about 2.5-fold. The stimulation was specific; various growth factors, hormones, and mouse CSFs had no effect on KG-1 macromolecular synthesis. Treatment with CSF did not discernibly alter the morphological appearance of the KG-1 cells (primarily myeloblasts) nor did it qualitatively affect the pattern of newly synthesized proteins separable by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Several myeloid leukemia cell lines that were not responsive to CSF in agar culture, including a dedifferentiated variant of KG-1, showed little or no stimulation of macromolecular synthesis upon exposure to CSF. We have used the CSF-dependent stimulation of macromolecular synthesis of KG-1 to develop a rapid, sensitive microassay for human CSFs. The assay, involving thymidine incorporation by the cells, should be useful for characterization and purification of human CSFs. Images PMID:6159645

  20. Serum levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor are associated with rheumatoid arthritis course.

    PubMed

    Llamas-Covarrubias, Mara Anaís; Valle, Yeminia; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa Elena; Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris Paola; Ramírez-Dueñas, María Guadalupe; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown etiology. Many cytokines have been found to be associated with RA pathogenesis and among them is macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The aim of this study was to determine whether MIF serum levels are associated with RA course, clinical activity, and clinical biomarkers of the disease. MIF levels were determined in serum samples of 54 RA patients and 78 healthy subjects (HS) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Disease activity was evaluated using the DAS28 score. Patients were subgrouped according to disease activity and years of evolution of disease. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS 10.0 and GraphPad Prism 5 software. RA patients presented increased levels of MIF as compared to HS. MIF levels were raised on early stages of RA and tend to decrease according to years of evolution. Moreover, MIF levels positively correlated with rheumatoid factor in RA patients and with C reactive protein in all individuals studied. Our findings suggest that MIF plays a role in early stages of RA.

  1. Neuroendocrine-like cells -derived CXCL10 and CXCL11 induce the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophage leading to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Xu, He-Yang; Wang, Jie; Chu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that neuroendocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer is one of the important factors leading to worse prognosis. In this study, we apply immunohistochemical staining, Western-blot, RT-PCR and ELISA to investigate the underlying mechanism that how the neuroendocrine differentiation to affect the prognosis of colorectal cancer. The interaction of colorectal cancer cells, neuroendocrine-like cells and tumor-associated macrophages in colorectal cancer progress is also investigated. By analyzing 82 cases of colorectal cancer patients treated in our institution, we found that colorectal adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation had increasing number of tumor-associated macrophages and worse prognosis. Further evaluation of cytology showed that neuroendocrine cells have the ability to recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate the tumor tissue, and the tumor-associated macrophages enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of the colon cancer cells. Moreover, we confirmed that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are the key chemokines in neuroendocrine-like cells and they promote the chemotaxis activity of tumor-associated macrophages. The secretion of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by neuroendocrine-like cells can recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate in tumor tissues. The latter enhances the proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cell and lead to poor prognosis. PMID:27034164

  2. The Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Mast Cell-Stimulated Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Ningyan, Gu; Xu, Yao; Hongfei, Shi; Jingjing, Chen; Min, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical and translational studies have shown that mast cell plays a pivotal role in multiple fibrotic diseases including scleroderma. However, the lack of mature human mast cell culture model exhibits a major obstacle for further dissection of cytokines and signaling molecules required for mast cell mediated fibrosis in various diseases. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a mast cell released pro-inflammatory cytokine which is deregulated in scleroderma patients and is also involved in non-scleroderma related fibrosis. In the current study, we successfully generated a practical and reliable human mast cell culture system with bone marrow CD34+ hematopietic precursors. The derivative mast cell is normal in terms of both morphology and function as manifested by normal degranulation. More importantly, we were able to show mast cell conditioned medium as well as MIF supplementation augments fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. This positive regulatory effect of mast cell conditioned medium can be dampened by MIF antibody. In addition, MIF-knockdown significantly inhibits pro-fibrotic activities of CD34+ hematopietic precursor derived mast cells. These data strongly suggest that mast cell released MIF is required for mast cell mediated fibrogenic activities. The current manuscript seems to be the first mechanistic report showing the significance of MIF in mast cell mediated fibrosis, which may pave the way for the development of potential MIF-targeted therapy for fibrotic diseases to a further extent. Moreover, we strongly believe mast cell culture and differentiation model as well as corresponding genetic manipulation methodology will be helpful in characterizing novel mast cell based therapeutic targets. PMID:25826375

  3. Exosome-like vesicles derived by Schistosoma japonicum adult worms mediates M1 type immune- activity of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifu; Li, Zhitao; Shen, Jia; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Jinyi; Wu, Xiaoying; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are 30-100-nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released into the extracellular space upon fusion of the multi-vesicular bodies (MVB) with the plasma membrane, while initial studies described that the role of exosomes was a reticulocyte cargo-disposal mechanism allowing remodeling of the plasma membrane during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes. Recent studies indicate that exosomes are secreted by most cells and pathogens and play an important role in intercellular signaling and exert regulatory function by carrying bioactive molecules. As numerous pathogens, adult worm of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) reside in mesenteric veins of definitive host including man and mammal animals. It was reported that the worms or the eggs also have specialized secretion systems to export effector proteins or other molecules into host target cells. However, the mechanisms involved remained unclear. This study investigated the isolation of the exosome-like vesicles secreted by S. japonicum adult worms and its immune activity on microphage in vitro. In this report, we identified exosome-based secretion as a new mechanism for protein secretion by S. japonicum. Electron microscopy tomography revealed the previously unidentified ultrastructural detail of exosome-like vesicles with high resolution; they were found to be typical spherical shape and to have a diverse population that varies in size of 30-100 nm. Exosome-like vesicles isolated from S. japonicum contained a significantly different protein compared with debris pelleted and the apoptosis body. We also demonstrate that macrophages were preferentially differentiated into the M1 subtype while being treated with S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles. This study reveals there are exosome-like vesicles derived by S. japonicum adult worms, and the exosome-like vesicles can mediate M1-type immune- activity of macrophage.

  4. Impaired T cell function in malignant pleural effusion is caused by TGF-β derived predominantly from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jieyao; Yue, Dongli; Chen, Xinfeng; Ping, Yu; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is an indication of advanced cancer. Immune dysfunction often occurs in MPE. We aimed to identify the reason for impaired T cell activity in MPE from lung cancer patients and to provide clues toward potential immune therapies for MPE. The surface inhibitory molecules and cytotoxic activity of T cells in MPE and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Levels of inflammatory cytokines in MPE and PB were tested using ELISA. TGF-β expression in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) was also analyzed. The effect of TAMs on T cells was verified in vitro. Lastly, changes in T cells were evaluated following treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody. We found that expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 in T cells from MPE were upregulated compared with those from PB, but levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were downregulated (p < 0.05). The amount of TGF-β was significantly higher in MPE than in PB (p < 0.05). TGF-β was mainly produced by TAMs in MPE. When T cells were co-cultured with TAMs, expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 were significantly higher than controls, whereas levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were significantly decreased, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). In vitro treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody restored the impaired T cell cytotoxic activity in MPE. Our results indicate that macrophage-derived TGF-β plays an important role in impaired T cell cytotoxicity. It will therefore be valuable to develop therapeutic strategies against TGF-β pathway for MPE therapy of lung cancer. PMID:27459735

  5. Acute Stress Reduces Wound-Induced Activation of Microbicidal Potential of Ex Vivo Isolated Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Miho; Stemmer, Andreas; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress delays wound healing but the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Macrophages play an important role in wound healing, in particular by killing microbes. We hypothesized that (a) acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), and (b) that these reductions are modulated by stress hormone release. Methods Fourty-one healthy men (mean age 35±13 years) were randomly assigned to either a stress or stress-control group. While the stress group underwent a standardized short-term psychological stress task after catheter-induced wound infliction, stress-controls did not. Catheter insertion was controlled. Assessing the microbicidal potential, we investigated PMA-activated superoxide anion production by HMDM immediately before and 1, 10 and 60 min after stress/rest. Moreover, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine and salivary cortisol were repeatedly measured. In subsequent in vitro studies, whole blood was incubated with norepinephrine in the presence or absence of phentolamine (norepinephrine blocker) before assessing HMDM microbicidal potential. Results Compared with stress-controls, HMDM of the stressed subjects displayed decreased superoxide anion-responses after stress (p’s <.05). Higher plasma norepinephrine levels statistically mediated lower amounts of superoxide anion-responses (indirect effect 95% CI: 4.14–44.72). Norepinephrine-treated HMDM showed reduced superoxide anion-production (p<.001). This effect was blocked by prior incubation with phentolamine. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of HMDM and that this reduction is mediated by norepinephrine. This might have implications for stress-induced impairment in wound healing. PMID:23431364

  6. Impaired T cell function in malignant pleural effusion is caused by TGF-β derived predominantly from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jieyao; Yue, Dongli; Chen, Xinfeng; Ping, Yu; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is an indication of advanced cancer. Immune dysfunction often occurs in MPE. We aimed to identify the reason for impaired T cell activity in MPE from lung cancer patients and to provide clues toward potential immune therapies for MPE. The surface inhibitory molecules and cytotoxic activity of T cells in MPE and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Levels of inflammatory cytokines in MPE and PB were tested using ELISA. TGF-β expression in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) was also analyzed. The effect of TAMs on T cells was verified in vitro. Lastly, changes in T cells were evaluated following treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody. We found that expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 in T cells from MPE were upregulated compared with those from PB, but levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were downregulated (p < 0.05). The amount of TGF-β was significantly higher in MPE than in PB (p < 0.05). TGF-β was mainly produced by TAMs in MPE. When T cells were co-cultured with TAMs, expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 were significantly higher than controls, whereas levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were significantly decreased, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). In vitro treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody restored the impaired T cell cytotoxic activity in MPE. Our results indicate that macrophage-derived TGF-β plays an important role in impaired T cell cytotoxicity. It will therefore be valuable to develop therapeutic strategies against TGF-β pathway for MPE therapy of lung cancer.

  7. Plasma Level of Placenta-Derived Macrophage-Stimulating Protein -Chain in Preeclampsia before 20 Weeks of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingling; Chen, Ruihua

    2016-01-01

    Object This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of placenta-derived macrophage-stimulating protein α-chain (MSP-α) before the 20th week of gestation for the early diagnosis of preeclampsia (PE). Methods and Materials Two parts of this nested case-control study were simultaneously executed, and 1500 pregnant women were recruited. A total of 124 pregnant women were included in the plasma analysis part of this study. The MSP-α plasma level was measured before the 20th week of gestation, and the participants were followed until delivery. A case group of 62 women with PE and a control group of 62 women matched by gestational age, maternal age, and pre-pregnancy BMI (with normotensive pregnancies) were evaluated. In the placenta analysis part of this nested case-control study, the placentas of 34 pregnant women were randomly obtained. The placental levels of MSP were measured in 17 individuals with PE (case group) and in 17 women with a normotensive pregnancy matched by gestational age and maternal age (control group). Results The plasma level of MSP-α was higher in the PE group than in the control group before the 20th week of gestation (p < 0.001). In addition, compared to the women with severe features in the PE group, those without severe features had a significantly higher plasma MSP-α level before the 20th week of gestation (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of MSP-α before the 20th week of gestation was 0.905 (95% CI, 0.811–0.962) for the women with early-onset PE without severe features. With regard to the placenta, the PE group (accumulated optical density, IOD [SUM] = 8862.37 ± 2064.42) exhibited increased MSP staining (more intense MSP staining or more extensive staining) compared with the control group (normal pregnancies (IOD [SUM] = 447.92 ± 114.72, P < 0.001). Furthermore, increased MSP staining was detected among the women without severe features compared with those with severe features in

  8. Biochemical and ultrastructural analysis of. beta. -VLDL and AC-LDL metabolism by pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    It is proposed that monocyte-derived foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions of White Carneau pigeons become lipid-filled through the uptake of lipoproteins including ..beta..-migrating very low density lipoproteins (..beta..-VLDL) and acetylated low density lipoproteins (Ac-LDL). Using iodinated forms of the above lipoproteins, specific and saturable receptors for both ..beta..-VLDL and Ac-LDL were detected on the surface of White Carneau pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages in culture. Competition studies demonstrated the high degree of binding specificity for /sup 125/I-Ac-LDL. Likewise, binding of /sup 125/I-..beta..-VLDL to its receptor was significantly inhibited by excess ..beta..-VLDL, however LDL from both hyper- and normocholesterolemic pigeons were also recognized by the receptor. Upon binding of ..beta..-VLDL and Ac-LDL to their respective receptors, the lipoproteins were rapidly internalized and delivered to intracellular sites of degradation. As measured by the amount of /sup 14/C-oleate incorporated into cholesteryl /sup 14/C-oleate, the cholesterole liberated from the degradation of both ..beta..-VLDL and Ac-LDL stimulated cholesteryl ester synthesis in the pigeon cells. Using lipoproteins conjugated to colloidal gold of visualization with transmission electron microscopy, a major difference in the binding and uptake properties of ..beta..-VLDL-Gold and Ac-LDL-Gold was documented.

  9. Bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages have different inflammatory response to oxLDL and M1/M2 marker expression – implications for atherosclerosis research

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, Line S.; Mogensen, Christina K.; Rosendahl, Alexander; Cucak, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Rasmussen, Salka E.; Pedersen, Tanja X.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and can polarize into specific subsets, e.g. pro-inflammatory M1-like and re-modelling M2-like macrophages. To determine if peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) or bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) resembled aortic macrophages from ApoE−/− mice, their M1/M2 phenotype, inflammatory status, and lipid metabolism signatures were compared. oxLDL accumulation was similar in PEMs and BMDMs. On protein expression level, BMDMs showed an M2-like CD206highCD11clow profile, while cholesterol loading led to enhanced CD11c expression and reduced MCP-1 secretion. In contrast, PEMs expressed low levels of CD206 and CD11c, and responded to cholesterol loading by increasing CD11c expression and MCP-1 secretion. mRNA expression of M1/M2 markers was higher in PEMS than BMDMs, while lipid metabolism genes were similarly expressed. Whole aorta flow cytometry showed an accumulation of M2-like CD206highCD11clow macrophages in advanced versus early atherosclerotic disease in ApoE−/− mice. In isolated lesions, mRNA levels of the M2 markers Socs2, CD206, Retnla, and IL4 were downregulated with increasing disease severity. Likewise, mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes (SREBP2, ACSL1, SRB1, DGAT1, and cpt1a) was decreased in advanced versus early lesions. In conclusion, PEMs and BMDMs are phenotypically distinct and differ from macrophages in lesions with respect to expression of M1/M2 markers and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27734926

  10. Differences in the kinetics of activation of protein kinases and extracellular signal-related protein kinase 1 in colony-stimulating factor 1-stimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworowski, A; Christy, E; Yusoff, P; Byrne, R; Hamilton, J A

    1996-01-01

    To determine the relevance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity to macrophage proliferation, we measured the stimulation of myelin basic protein (MBP) kinase and extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) activity in a macrophage cell line (BAC1.2F5), bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) and resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM). By using an 'ingel' MBP kinase assay the activities of renaturable MBP kinases were detected, including several with molecular masses similar to those of ERK-1 and ERK-2. These represented a minor fraction of total activity and were not activated to an appreciable extent by colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). By using a sensitive and specific immune-complex kinase assay, activation of ERK-1 by CSF-1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was demonstrated. Two kinetically distinct pathways of ERK-1 activation by CSF-1 were resolved, with peak activations occurring at 5 and 15 min. The kinetics and degree of activation were similar in BMM, BAC1.2F5 cells and RPM. LPS activated ERK-1 with a single peak at 10-15 min, corresponding to the later peak of activation by CSF-1. Thus there was no strict correlation between ERK activation and macrophage proliferation. PMID:9003393

  11. Discovery of Salmonella virulence factors translocated via outer membrane vesicles to murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an intracellular pathogen and leading cause of food-borne illness, encodes a plethora of virulence effectors. Salmonella virulence factors are translocated into host cells and manipulate host cellular activities, providing a more hospitable environment for bacterial proliferation. In this study, we report a new set of virulence factors that is translocated into the host cytoplasm via bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV). PagK (or PagK1), PagJ, and STM2585A (or PagK2) are small proteins composed of ∼70 amino acids and have high sequence homology to each other (>85% identity). Salmonella lacking all three homologues was attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model, suggesting at least partial functional redundancy among the homologues. While each homologue was translocated into the macrophage cytoplasm, their translocation was independent of all three Salmonella gene-encoded type III secretion systems (T3SSs)-Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) T3SS, SPI-2 T3SS, and the flagellar system. Selected methods, including direct microscopy, demonstrated that the PagK-homologous proteins were secreted through OMV, which were enriched with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and outer membrane proteins. Vesicles produced by intracellular bacteria also contained lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), suggesting the possibility of OMV convergence with host cellular components during intracellular trafficking. This study identified novel Salmonella virulence factors secreted via OMV and demonstrated that OMV can function as a vehicle to transfer virulence determinants to the cytoplasm of the infected host cell.

  12. Differential polarization of alveolar macrophages and bone marrow-derived monocytes following chemically and pathogen-induced chronic lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Redente, Elizabeth F.; Higgins, David M.; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D.; Orme, Ian M.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Malkinson, Alvin M.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages and BDMCs undergo sequential biochemical changes during the chronic inflammatory response to chemically induced lung carcinogenesis in mice. Herein, we examine two chronic lung inflammation models—repeated exposure to BHT and infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis—to establish whether similar macrophage phenotype changes occur in non-neoplastic pulmonary disease. Exposure to BHT or M. tuberculosis results in pulmonary inflammation characterized by an influx of macrophages, followed by systemic effects on the BM and other organs. In both models, pulmonary IFN-γ and IL-4 production coincided with altered polarization of alveolar macrophages. Soon after BHT administration or M. tuberculosis infection, IFN-γ content in BALF increased, and BAL macrophages became classically (M1) polarized, as characterized by increased expression of iNOS. As inflammation progressed in both models, the amount of BALF IFN-γ content and BAL macrophage iNOS expression decreased, and BALF IL-4 content and macrophage arginase I expression rose, indicating alternative/M2 polarization. Macrophages present in M. tuberculosis-induced granulomas remained M1-polarized, implying that these two pulmonary macrophage populations, alveolar and granuloma-associated, are exposed to different activating cytokines. BDMCs from BHT-treated mice displayed polarization profiles similar to alveolar macrophages, but BDMCs in M. tuberculosis-infected mice did not become polarized. Thus, only alveolar macrophages in these two models of chronic lung disease exhibit a similar progression of polarization changes; polarization of BDMCs was specific to BHT-induced pulmonary inflammation, and polarization of granuloma macrophages was specific to the M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:20360403

  13. Modulation of macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide: Stem cell requirements, accessory lymphocyte involvement, and IA-inducing factor production

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, P.A.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1989-07-01

    The mechanism of induction of murine macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied. Intraperitoneal injection of 1 microgram of LPS resulted in a 3- to 10-fold increase in the number of IA-positive peritoneal macrophages (flow cytometry and immunofluorescence) and a 6-to 16-fold increase by radioimmunoassay. The isolated lipid A moiety of LPS was a potent inducer of macrophage Ia expression. Ia induction required a functional myelopoietic system as indicated by the finding that the response to LPS was eliminated in irradiated (900 rads) mice and reinstated by reconstitution with bone marrow cells. Comparison of LPS-induced Ia expression in normal and LPS-primed mice revealed a faster secondary response to LPS. The memory response could be adoptively transferred to normal mice with nonadherent spleen cells prepared 60 days after LPS injection. Spleen cells prepared 5 days after LPS injection caused Ia induction in LPS-nonresponder mice; such induction was not observed in irradiated (900 rads) recipients. The cell responsible for this phenomenon was identified as a Thy-1+, immunoglobulin-negative nonadherent cell. The biosynthesis and expression of Ia were not increased by direct exposure of macrophages to LPS in vitro. Small amounts of LPS inhibited Ia induction by gamma interferon. LPS showed positive regulatory effects on Ia expression by delaying the loss of Ia expression on cultured macrophages and by stimulating the production of Ia-inducing factors. Supernatants from cultured spleen cells stimulated with LPS in vitro contained antiviral and Ia-inducing activity that was acid labile, indicating that the active factor is gamma interferon. We conclude that induction of Ia expression by LPS in vivo is a bone-marrow-dependent, radiation-sensitive process which involves the stimulation of a gamma interferon-producing accessory lymphocyte and a delay in Ia turnover.

  14. In vivo effect of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on megakaryocytopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Monzeglio, C.; Sanavio, F.; Apra, F.; Morelli, S.; Stacchini, A.; Piacibello, W.; Bussolino, F.; Bagnara, G.; Zauli, G. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production was investigated in patients with normal hematopoiesis. Three findings indicated that GM-CSF plays a role in megakaryocytopoiesis. During treatment with GM-CSF (recombinant mammalian, glycosylated; Sandoz/Schering-Plough, 5.5 micrograms protein/kg/d, subcutaneously for 3 days) the percentage of megakaryocyte progenitors (megakaryocyte colony forming unit (CFU-Mk)) in S phase (evaluated by the suicide technique with high 3H-Tdr doses) increased from 31% +/- 16% to 88% +/- 11%; and the maturation profile of megakaryocytes was modified, with a relative increase in more immature stage I-III forms. Moreover, by autoradiography (after incubation of marrow cells with 125I-labeled GM-CSF) specific GM-CSF receptors were detectable on megakaryocytes. Nevertheless, the proliferative stimulus induced on the progenitors was not accompanied by enhanced platelet production (by contrast with the marked granulomonocytosis). It may be suggested that other cytokines are involved in the regulation of the intermediate and terminal stages of megakaryocytopoiesis in vivo and that their intervention is an essential prerequisite to turn the GM-CSF-induced proliferative stimulus into enhanced platelet production.

  15. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor deletion exacerbates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy through mitigating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xihui; Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan; Bucala, Richard; Ren, Jun

    2014-03-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been shown to be cardioprotective under various pathological conditions. However, the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. In this study, we revealed that MIF deficiency overtly exacerbated abdominal aorta constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and contractile anomalies. MIF deficiency interrupted myocardial autophagy in hypertrophied hearts. Rapamycin administration mitigated the exacerbated hypertrophic responses in MIF(-/-) mice. Using the phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in vitro model in H9C2 myoblasts, we confirmed that MIF governed the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin-autophagy cascade. Confocal microscopic examination demonstrated that MIF depletion prevented phenylephrine-induced mitophagy in H9C2 myoblasts. Myocardial Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase and a marker for mitophagy, was significantly upregulated after sustained pressure overload, the effect of which was prevented by MIF knockout. Furthermore, our data exhibited that levels of MIF, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and autophagy were elevated concurrently in human failing hearts. These data indicate that endogenous MIF regulates the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling to activate autophagy to preserve cardiac geometry and protect against hypertrophic responses. PMID:24366076

  17. Identification and expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Cote, N M; Jaworski, D C; Wasala, N B; Morgan, M S; Arlian, L G

    2013-09-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine produced by many mammalian tissues including skin. It is also found in many invertebrate parasites of mammals including ticks and may function to aid the parasite to evade the innate and adaptive immune responses in the host. In this study, the cDNA for a MIF gene was sequenced from Sarcoptes scabiei, the scabies mite, using RT-PCR and RACE molecular techniques. The resulting nucleotide sequence had a length of 405 base pairs and the putative amino acid sequences for the mite and tick (Dermacentor variabilis) proteins were identical. The initial steps for the project resulted in the production of expressed scabies mite cDNAs. A real time (qPCR) assay was performed with MIF from scabies mites and various tick species. Results show that mRNA encoding MIF homologues was three times more abundant in the mite samples when compared to RNA prepared from D. variabilis salivary glands and 1.3 times more abundant when compared with RNA prepared from D. variabilis midgut.

  18. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  19. Increased serum levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in patients with microscopic polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanemitsu, Hirohito; Matsunawa, Mizuho; Wakabayashi, Kuninobu; Sato, Michihito; Takahashi, Ryo; Odai, Tsuyoshi; Isozaki, Takeo; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Miwa, Yusuke; Kasama, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is involved in the disease activity of systemic vasculitis. Methods Patients with systemic vasculitis were divided into three groups based on the size of the affected vessels. Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) was considered as small vessel vasculitis (SVV), polyarteritis nodosa as medium-sized vessel vasculitis (MVV), and giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis as large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Sera from patients with systemic vasculitis and healthy individuals were collected, and MIF levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Disease activity of vasculitis was assessed using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS). Results Serum MIF levels were significantly higher in the vasculitis patients than in healthy individuals. Among the vasculitis patients, MIF levels were significantly higher in patients in the SVV group (median; 4161.7 pg/ml) than in the other groups (MVV; 1443.2 pg/ml and LVV; 1576.7 pg/ml). In patients with MPA, a positive correlation was observed between serum MIF levels and CRP levels and disease activity (BVAS). Notably, serum MIF levels were significantly diminished after clinical improvement. Conclusions Our findings suggest that MIF may have an important role in small vessel vasculopathy and serve as a useful serologic marker of MPA disease activity.

  20. Two soluble antigens of Plasmodium falciparum induce tumor necrosis factor release from macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Bate, C A; Kwiatkowski, D; Jakobsen, P H; Playfair, J H

    1990-01-01

    The production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may contribute to the pathology of malaria. We showed previously that crude preparations of heat-stable exoantigens from parasite cultures induce the release of TNF in vitro and in vivo. When separated from the culture medium by affinity chromatography, in which immune immunoglobulin G was used as ligand, the mixture of exoantigens of Plasmodium falciparum retained the capacity to induce the secretion of TNF, both by human monocytes from Gambian children and by mouse macrophages. Two individual antigens, Ag1 and Ag7, further purified by affinity chromatography and identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis, also stimulated TNF production by both types of cell but differed in other functional properties. Thus, the activity of Ag7, but not that of Ag1, was inhibited by polymyxin B, and antisera made against boiled exoantigens of the rodent parasite Plasmodium yoelii which blocked the ability of these antigens to induce the production of TNF also inhibited the activity of Ag7 without affecting Ag1. Since the prevalence of antibody against Ag7 in sera from children in endemic areas appears to correlate with the development of immunity against the manifestations of the disease, this antigen may be one cause of pathology, perhaps through its ability to induce the production of TNF. Its serological relationship with rodent exoantigens suggests that it might be a candidate for an anti-disease vaccine which has the advantage that its active moiety is not subject to significant antigen polymorphism. PMID:2201638

  1. Cytokine refacing effect reduces granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor susceptibility to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Carlson, Sharon J; Cox, George N

    2015-10-01

    Crohn's Disease (CD) afflicts over half a million Americans with an annual economic impact exceeding $10 billion. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can increase patient immune responses against intestinal microbes that promote CD and has been effective for some patients in clinical trials. We have made important progress toward developing GM-CSF variants that could be more effective CD therapeutics by virtue of being less prone to neutralization by the endogenous GM-CSF autoantibodies that are highly expressed in CD patients. Yeast display engineering revealed mutations that increase GM-CSF variant binding affinity by up to ∼3-fold toward both GM-CSF receptor alpha and beta subunits in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Increased binding affinity did not reduce GM-CSF half-maximum effective concentration (EC50) values in conventional in vitro human leukocyte proliferation assays. Affinity-enhancing mutations did, however, promote a 'refacing effect' that imparted all five evaluated GM-CSF variants with increased in vitro bioactivity in the presence of GM-CSF-neutralizing polyclonal antisera. The most improved variant, H15L/R23L, was 6-fold more active than wild-type GM-CSF. Incorporation of additional known affinity-increasing mutations could augment the refacing effect and concomitant bioactivity improvements described here. PMID:25855658

  2. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Chen, Lei; Shu, Bin; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular hyperpermeability followed by burn injury is the main cause of shock, and cardiovascular collapse can result if the condition is treated improperly. Our previous studies demonstrated that granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) clearly reduces microvascular permeability and protects microvessels against burn injury. However, the mechanism underlying the protective function of GM-CSF on burn-injured microvessels remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect and mechanism of GM-CSF on endothelial cells after exposure to burn serum. We demonstrated that GM-CSF reduced post-burn endothelial "capillary leak" by inhibiting the activity of RhoA and maintaining the membrane localization of VE-cadherin. Membranous VE-cadherin enhances adherens junctions between endothelial cells and co-localizes with and activates VEGFR2, which protect cells from burn serum-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the protective mechanism of GM-CSF on burn serum-injured endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability is achieved by strengthening cell adherens junctions and improving cell viability.

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Protein Crystallography of Biaryltriazoles as Potent Tautomerase Inhibitors of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Pawel; Cisneros, José A.; Robertson, Michael J.; Hare, Alissa A.; Danford, Nadia E.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Jorgensen, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Optimization is reported for biaryltriazoles as inhibitors of the tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine associated with numerous inflammatory diseases and cancer. A combined approach was taken featuring organic synthesis, enzymatic assaying, crystallography, and modeling including free-energy perturbation (FEP) calculations. X-ray crystal structures for 3a and 3b bound to MIF are reported and provided a basis for the modeling efforts. The accommodation of the inhibitors in the binding site is striking with multiple hydrogen bonds and aryl–aryl interactions. Additional modeling encouraged pursuit of 5-phenoxyquinolinyl analogues, which led to the very potent compound 3s. Activity was further enhanced by addition of a fluorine atom adjacent to the phenolic hydroxyl group as in 3w, 3z, 3aa, and 3bb to strengthen a key hydrogen bond. It is also shown that physical properties of the compounds can be modulated by variation of solvent-exposed substituents. Several of the compounds are likely the most potent known MIF tautomerase inhibitors; the most active ones are more than 1000-fold more active than the well-studied (R)-ISO-1 and more than 200-fold more active than the chromen-4-one Orita-13. PMID:25697265

  4. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor-A potential diagnostic tool in severe burn injuries?

    PubMed

    Grieb, Gerrit; Simons, David; Piatkowski, Andrzej; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Steffens, Guy; Pallua, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    Serum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations as well as leucocyte numbers were evaluated in a retrospective study with 23 patients with severe burn injuries. The MIF and PCT concentrations as well as the number of leucocytes (LEU) were monitored over a period of 5 days. The total body surface area (TBSA) and sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were also evaluated. The MIF, PCT concentrations and leucocyte counts were profoundly increased in all patients with severe burn wounds. At the time of admission into the intensive care unit, no significant differences were observed for the MIF and PCT levels between patients with a TBSA<60% (Group 1) and patients with a TBSA>60% (Group 2). After 48 h, however, the MIF and PCT levels reached very high levels in a subgroup of the patients, whereas these levels became normal again in other subgroups. The group of patients with a TBSA>60% was, therefore, subdivided in three groups (subgroups 2a-c). The MIF and PCT data pairs in these subgroups appeared to correlate in an inhomogeneous manner. These levels in the subgroup 2a (i.e., lethal within 5 days) were strongly elevated over those observed in Group 1 (TBSA<60%) and highly increased concentrations of both MIF and PCT correlated with lethal outcome. The combined determination of MIF and PCT might, therefore, be useful to discriminate between post-burn inflammation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis with lethal outcome.

  5. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation-exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGm-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated.

  6. Novel inhibitors of macrophage migration inhibitory factor prevent cytokine-induced beta cell death.

    PubMed

    Vujicic, Milica; Nikolic, Ivana; Krajnovic, Tamara; Cheng, Kai-Fan; VanPatten, Sonya; He, Mingzhu; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Stojanovic, Ivana; Al-Abed, Yousef; Saksida, Tamara

    2014-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of immune processes and also in apoptosis induction. Elevated MIF expression is detrimental for insulin-producing beta cells and MIF inhibition protected beta cells from several cytotoxic insults such as inflammatory cytokines, high fatty acids or high glucose concentrations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate two newly synthesized small molecule MIF inhibitors (K664-1 and K647-1) and to compare them with previously established effects of the prototypical MIF inhibitor, ISO-1. Our results indicate that K664-1 and K647-1 are 160- and 40-fold more effective in inhibition of MIF׳s tautomerase activity than ISO-1. Also, new inhibitors confer beta cell protection from cytokine-triggered apoptosis at significantly lower concentrations than ISO-1. Although all three MIF inhibitors inhibit caspase 3 activity, K664-1 and K647-1 suppress pro-apoptotic BAX protein expression and up-regulate anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA. Finally, all three MIF inhibitors operate through blockade of nitric oxide production stimulated by cytokines. In conclusion, two novel MIF inhibitors are more potent than ISO-1 and operate through inhibition of the mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway. We propose that these compounds represent a unique class of anti-MIF antagonists that should be further tested for therapeutic use.

  7. An alternative strategy to generate coding sequence of macrophage migration inhibitory factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Different developmental stages of Wuchereria bancrofti, the major causal organism of lymphatic filariasis (LF), are difficult to obtain. Beside this limitation, to obtain complete coding sequence (CDS) of a gene one has to isolate mRNA and perform subsequent cDNA synthesis which is laborious and not successful at times. In this study, an alternative strategy employing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized and validated, to generate CDS of Macrophage migration Inhibitory Factor-2 (wbMIF-2), a gene expressed in the transition stage between L3 to L4. Methods: The genomic DNA of W. bancrofti microfilariae was extracted and used to amplify the full length wbMIF-2 gene (4.275 kb). This amplified product was used as a template for amplifying the exons separately, using the overlapping primers, which were then assembled through another round of PCR. Results: A simple strategy was developed based on PCR, which is used routinely in molecular biology laboratories. The amplified CDS of 363 bp of wbMIF-2 generated using genomic DNA splicing technique was devoid of any intronic sequence. Interpretation & conclusions: The cDNA of wbMIF-2 gene was successfully amplified from genomic DNA of microfilarial stage of W. bancrofti thus circumventing the use of inaccessible L3-L4 transitional stage of this parasite. This strategy is useful for generating CDS of genes from parasites that have restricted availability. PMID:27121522

  8. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) deficiency enhances immune response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Janet V.; Conrad, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with helminth parasites are endemic in the developing world and are a target for intervention with new therapies. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a cytokine with pleiotropic effects in inflammation and immune responses. We investigated the role of MIF in a naturally cleared model of helminth infection in rodents, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. At day 7 post infection MIF-deficient (MIF−/−) mice had reduced parasite burden and mounted an enhanced type 2 immune response (Th2), including increased Gata3 expression and IL-13 production in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Bone marrow reconstitution demonstrated that MIF produced from hematopoietic cells was crucial and Rag1−/− reconstitution provided direct evidence that MIF−/− CD4+ T cells were responsible for the augmented parasite clearance. MIF−/− CD4+ T cells produced less IL-6 post infection, which correlated with enhanced Th2 responses. MIF−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited lower NF-kB activation, potentially explaining the reduction in IL-6. Finally, we demonstrated enhanced clearance of the parasite and Th2 response in WT mice treated with the MIF tautomerase inhibitor, sulforaphane, a compound found naturally found in cruciferous vegetables, These results are the first to describe the importance of the tautomerase enzyme activity in MIF function in N. brasiliensis infection. PMID:27049059

  9. Targeted intracellular accumulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the reperfused heart mediates cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Julia; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Rammos, Christos; Luedike, Peter; Mull, Elena; Stoppe, Christian; Jülicher, Karen; Lue, Hongqi; Merx, Marc W; Kelm, Malte; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been shown to be cytoprotective in myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Since the exact mechanism of action is unknown, we here characterise the cardioprotective effects of targeted intracellular accumulation of MIF in myocardial I/R injury. We used different in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro models of myocardial I/R and hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury to determine MIF levels by immunoblots and ELISA in different phases of reperfusion and reoxygenation, respectively. We discovered a rapid decrease of cardiac MIF that was specific to the early phase of reperfusion. Posttranslational modification of MIF via S-nitrosation--proofed by a modified version of the Biotin Switch Assay--prevented this rapid decrease, leading to a targeted intracellular accumulation of MIF in the early phase of reperfusion. Intracellular MIF accumulation preserved the intracellular ability of MIF to reduce oxidative stress as shown by hydrogen peroxide and aconitase activity measurements. Infarct size measurements by TTC staining showed an overall enhanced cardioprotective effect of this protein by reduction of reperfusion injury. In summary, we have unravelled a novel mechanism of MIF-mediated cardioprotection. Targeted intracellular accumulation of MIF by S-nitrosation may offer a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of myocardial I/R-injury.

  10. Tumour-associated macrophages are associated with vascular endothelial growth factor expression in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Raposo, T P; Pires, I; Carvalho, M I; Prada, J; Argyle, D J; Queiroga, F L

    2015-12-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in carcinogenesis including an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we describe the relationship between TAMs and angiogenesis in canine mammary tumours (CMT). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded CMT samples [(n = 128: malignant (n = 97) and benign (n = 31)] were submitted to immunohistochemical staining to detect MAC387, vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF and CD31 expression. A statistical analysis was carried out to assess possible associations with clinicopathological variables and biological markers of tumour angiogenesis. TAMs, detected by MAC387 expression, were significantly associated with malignant CMT (P < 0.001) and VEGF positive tumours (P = 0.002) and also associated with VEGF expression within malignant CMT (P = 0.043). Associations with clinicopathological variables were found between TAMs and the presence of infiltrative growth (P = 0.031), low tubule formation (P = 0.040) and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.016). The results support the hypothesis that TAMs influence angiogenesis in CMT suggesting TAMs may represent a therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:24119241

  11. The Pathogenic Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Immunologically Induced Kidney Disease in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hui Y.; Bacher, Michael; Yang, Niansheng; Mu, Wei; Nikolic-Paterson, David J.; Metz, Christine; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bucala, Richard; Atkins, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a pivotal role in the inflammatory response in endotoxemia and in the delayed-type hypersensitivity response, but its potential as a regulator of immunologically induced disease is unknown. We have addressed this issue by administering a neutralizing anti-MIF antibody in a rat model of immunologically induced crescentic anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis. Six individual experiments using paired inbred littermates were performed. Rats were primed with rabbit immunoglobulin on day −5 and then injection with rabbit anti–rat GBM serum on day 0. Pairs of animals were treated with anti-MIF or a control monoclonal antibody from the time of anti-GBM serum administration until being killed 14 d later. Control antibody-treated animals developed severe proteinuria and renal function impairment with severe histological damage due to marked leukocytic infiltration and activation within the kidney. In contrast, anti-MIF treatment substantially reduced proteinuria, prevented the loss of renal function, significantly reduced histological damage including glomerular crescent formation, and substantially inhibited renal leukocytic infiltration and activation (all P <0.001 compared with control treatment). Inhibition of renal disease by anti-MIF treatment was attributed to preventing the marked upregulation of interleukin-1β, leukocyte adhesion molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression seen in the control antibody-treated animals. This inhibition of progressive renal injury was mirrored by the complete suppression of the skin delayed-type hypersensitivity response to the challenge antigen (rabbit IgG). Interestingly, anti-MIF treatment did not effect the secondary antibody response or immune deposition within the kidney, indicating that MIF participates in cellular-based immunity in this primed macrophage

  12. Nanocarrier-mediated inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor attenuates secondary injury after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Tarun; Loomis, Kristin H; Pai, S Balakrishna; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Gaupp, Eric; Patil, Ketki; Patkar, Radhika; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2015-02-24

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can lead to permanent motor and sensory deficits. Following the initial traumatic insult, secondary injury mechanisms characterized by persistent heightened inflammation are initiated and lead to continued and pervasive cell death and tissue damage. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as methylprednisolone (MP) used clinically have ambiguous benefits with debilitating side effects. Typically, these drugs are administered systemically at high doses, resulting in toxicity and paradoxically increased inflammation. Furthermore, these drugs have a small time window postinjury (few hours) during which they need to be infused to be effective. As an alternative to MP, we investigated the effect of a small molecule inhibitor (Chicago sky blue, CSB) of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) for treating SCI. The pleiotropic cytokine MIF is known to contribute to upregulation of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in various disease and injury states. In vitro, CSB administration alleviated endotoxin-mediated inflammation in primary microglia and macrophages. Nanocarriers such as liposomes can potentially alleviate systemic side effects of high-dose therapy by enabling site-specific drug delivery to the spinal cord. However, the therapeutic window of 100 nm scale nanoparticle localization to the spinal cord after contusion injury is not fully known. Thus, we first investigated the ability of nanocarriers of different sizes to localize to the injured spinal cord up to 2 weeks postinjury. Results from the study showed that nanocarriers as large as 200 nm in diameter could extravasate into the injured spinal cord up to 96 h postinjury. We then formulated nanocarriers (liposomes) encapsulating CSB and administered them intravenously 48 h postinjury, within the previously determined 96 h therapeutic window. In vivo, in this clinically relevant contusion injury model in rats, CSB administration led to preservation of vascular and white matter integrity

  13. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion. PMID:25366263

  14. Externalization and recognition by macrophages of large subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 in apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Yuji; Shiratsuchi, Akiko; Manaka, Junko; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Takio, Koji; Zhang Jianting; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu . E-mail: nakanaka@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-09-10

    We previously isolated a monoclonal antibody named PH2 that inhibits phosphatidylserine-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages [C. Fujii, A. Shiratsuchi, J. Manaka, S. Yonehara, Y. Nakanishi. Cell Death Differ. 8 (2001) 1113-1122]. We report here the identification of the cognate antigen. A protein bound by PH2 in Western blotting was identified as the 170-kDa subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3 p170/eIF3a). When eIF3a was expressed in a culture cell line as a protein fused to green fluorescence protein, the fusion protein was detected at the cell surface only after the induction of apoptosis. The same phenomenon was seen when the localization of endogenous eIF3a was determined using anti-eIF3a antibody, and eIF3a seemed to be partially degraded during apoptosis. Furthermore, bacterially expressed N-terminal half of eIF3a fused to glutathione S-transferase bound to the surface of macrophages and inhibited phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages when it was added to phagocytosis reactions. These results collectively suggest that eIF3a translocates to the cell surface upon apoptosis, probably after partial degradation, and bridges apoptotic cells and macrophages to enhance phagocytosis.

  15. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion.

  16. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages is not affected by host infection status but depends on the infecting bacterial genotype.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Nicole S; Mitchell, Rebecca M; Baumgart, Martin; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Schukken, Ynte H

    2007-12-15

    In this study we investigated the ability of different Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) strains to survive in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) of cows naturally infected with M. paratuberculosis and control cows. We tested the hypotheses that infection status of cows affects macrophage killing ability and that survival of M. paratuberculosis in macrophages is dependent on the strain. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from Johne's disease-positive (n=3) and age and stage of lactation matched Johne's disease-negative (n=3) multiparious cows. Following differentiation, MDMs were challenged in vitro with four M. paratuberculosis strains of different host specificity (cattle and sheep). Two hours and 2, 4, and 7 days after infection, ingestion, and intracellular survival of M. paratuberculosis strains were determined by fluorescence microscopy. There was no effect of the origin of MDMs (Johne's disease-positive or control animals) on phagocytosis, survival of bacteria, or macrophage survival. In contrast, important strain differences were observed. These findings suggest that some M. paratuberculosis strains interfere more successfully than others with the ability of macrophages to kill intracellular pathogens which may make it important to include strain typing when designing control programs.

  17. The functional behavior of a macrophage/fibroblast co-culture model derived from normal and diabetic mice with a marine gelatin-oxidized alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiong; Chen, Weiliam

    2010-08-01

    Tissues/cells-mediated biodegradable material degradation is epitomized by the constantly changing tissues/cell-implant interface, implicating the constant adaptation of the tissues/cells. Macrophages and fibroblasts are multi-functional cells highly involved in the interactions; the two cell types modulates the behaviors of each other, but their combinatorial functional behavior in the presence of interactive bioactive wound dressings has not been adequately examined. The activity is further complicated by the implantation of biodegradable materials, such as hydrogels commonly utilized as wound dressings, in a pathological environment and this is exemplified by the macrophages with a diabetic pathology producing an alternative cytokine profile which is implicated in wound healing delay. In this study, an in situ gelable formable/conformable hydrogel formulated from modified alginate and marine gelatin was used as a model biodegradable interactive wound dressing to elucidate the combinatorial behavior of macrophages/fibroblasts derived from both normal and diabetic hosts. Cell proliferation, migration and distribution were first characterized; this was followed by simultaneous quantitative detection of 40 inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by a protein microarray. The results showed that the macrophages/fibroblasts co-culture promoted fibroblasts proliferation and migration in the presence of the hydrogel; moreover, the expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were altered when compared with the corresponding fibroblasts or macrophages monocultures. The inflammatory cytokines patterns between the normal and diabetic hosts were considerably different.

  18. The functional behavior of a macrophage/fibroblast co-culture model derived from normal and diabetic mice with a marine gelatin-oxidized alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiong; Chen, Weiliam

    2010-08-01

    Tissues/cells-mediated biodegradable material degradation is epitomized by the constantly changing tissues/cell-implant interface, implicating the constant adaptation of the tissues/cells. Macrophages and fibroblasts are multi-functional cells highly involved in the interactions; the two cell types modulates the behaviors of each other, but their combinatorial functional behavior in the presence of interactive bioactive wound dressings has not been adequately examined. The activity is further complicated by the implantation of biodegradable materials, such as hydrogels commonly utilized as wound dressings, in a pathological environment and this is exemplified by the macrophages with a diabetic pathology producing an alternative cytokine profile which is implicated in wound healing delay. In this study, an in situ gelable formable/conformable hydrogel formulated from modified alginate and marine gelatin was used as a model biodegradable interactive wound dressing to elucidate the combinatorial behavior of macrophages/fibroblasts derived from both normal and diabetic hosts. Cell proliferation, migration and distribution were first characterized; this was followed by simultaneous quantitative detection of 40 inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by a protein microarray. The results showed that the macrophages/fibroblasts co-culture promoted fibroblasts proliferation and migration in the presence of the hydrogel; moreover, the expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were altered when compared with the corresponding fibroblasts or macrophages monocultures. The inflammatory cytokines patterns between the normal and diabetic hosts were considerably different. PMID:20452666

  19. The Functional Behavior of a Macrophage/Fibroblast Co-culture Model Derived from Normal and Diabetic Mice with a Marine Gelatin - Oxidized Alginate Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiong; Chen, Weiliam

    2010-01-01

    Tissues/cells-mediated biodegradable material degradation is epitomized by the constantly changing tissues/cell-implant interface, implicating the constant adaptation of the tissues/cells. Macrophages and fibroblasts are multi-functional cells highly involved in the interactions; the two cell types modulates the behaviors of each other, but their combinatorial functional behavior in the presence of interactive bioactive wound dressings has not been adequately examined. The activity is further complicated by the implantation of biodegradable materials, such as hydrogels commonly utilized as wound dressings, in a pathological environment and this is exemplified by the macrophages with a diabetic pathology producing an alternative cytokine profile which is implicated in wound healing delay. In this study, an in situ gelable formable/conformable hydrogel formulated from modified alginate and marine gelatin was used as a model biodegradable interactive wound dressing to elucidate the combinatorial behavior of macrophages/fibroblasts derived from both normal and diabetic hosts. Cell proliferation, migration and distribution were first characterized; this was followed by simultaneous quantitative detection of 40 inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by a protein microarray. The results showed that the macrophages/fibroblasts co-culture promoted fibroblasts proliferation and migration in the presence of the hydrogel; moreover, the expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were altered when compared with the corresponding fibroblasts or macrophages monocultures. The inflammatory cytokines patterns between the normal and diabetic hosts were considerably different. PMID:20452666

  20. Ontogeny of Tissue-Resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-01-01

    The origin of tissue-resident macrophages, crucial for homeostasis and immunity, has remained controversial until recently. Originally described as part of the mononuclear phagocyte system, macrophages were long thought to derive solely from adult blood circulating monocytes. However, accumulating evidence now shows that certain macrophage populations are in fact independent from monocyte and even from adult bone marrow hematopoiesis. These tissue-resident macrophages derive from sequential seeding of tissues by two precursors during embryonic development. Primitive macrophages generated in the yolk sac (YS) from early erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs), independently of the transcription factor c-Myb and bypassing monocytic intermediates, first give rise to microglia. Later, fetal monocytes, generated from c-Myb+ EMPs that initially seed the fetal liver (FL), then give rise to the majority of other adult macrophages. Thus, hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors transiently present in the YS and the FL give rise to long-lasting self-renewing macrophage populations. PMID:26441990

  1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor promotes prolonged survival and the support of virulent infection by African swine fever virus of macrophages generated from porcine bone marrow and blood.

    PubMed

    Denham, S; Brookes, S M; Hutchings, G H; Parkhouse, R M

    1996-10-01

    Long-surviving cultures of non-adherent cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage were established from the bone marrow and blood of weanling pigs by culturing cells from these tissues in the presence of recombinant porcine granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The cells increased in number, principally during the first 4 weeks of culture, bound monoclonal antibodies recognizing porcine macrophage antigens and avidly phagocytosed latex particles. The GM-CSF generated mononuclear phagocytes were highly infectible [correction of infectable] with a virulent Malawi isolate of African swine fever virus (ASFV) and able to generate levels of virus progeny similar to those produced by freshly isolated pig macrophages. The cultured cells retained their susceptibility to ASFV infection for as long as the cultures survived i.e. for up to 3 months.

  2. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ruairi C; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%-42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%-7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  3. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ruairi C.; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%–42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%–7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein inhibits THP-1-derived macrophage autophagy via TET2 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Peng, Juan; Liu, Yanhui; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Qin; Li, Yongqing; Tang, Zhihan; Wang, Zuo; Jiang, Zhisheng; Wei, Dangheng

    2015-02-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying its pro-atherosclerosis roles has not yet been well explored. DNA demethylation modification, via DNA methyltransferases or ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family, is a crisis epigenetic regulation for various biological and pathological processes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on macrophage autophagy and its potential epigenetic mechanism. Results showed that after treatment with 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg/L ox-LDL for 24 h, the autophagy markers Beclin 1 and LC3 expression were obviously decreased at protein levels (P < 0.05). The mRNA and protein expression of TET2 was evidently decreased (P < 0.05). After pre-treatment with TET2 siRNA, the mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 decreased compared with the 80 mg/L treatment group (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 and LC3-II were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) of pretreatment group. Consistent with the Western blot results, cell immunofluorescence showed that the protein concentration of LC3-II decreased in the TET2 siRNA group and increased in the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine group. Taken together, these results showed that DNA demethylation modifications regulate ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages autophagy and TET2 might be a novel regulator.

  5. Protective role of spleen-derived macrophages in lung inflammation, injury, and fibrosis induced by nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Gow, Andrew J; Hall, Leroy; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a vesicant that causes lung injury and fibrosis, accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies we analyzed the spleen as a source of these cells. Splenectomized (SPX) and sham control rats were treated intratracheally with NM (0.125 mg/kg) or PBS control. Macrophage responses were analyzed 1-7 days later. Splenectomy resulted in an increase in lung macrophages expressing CCR2, but a decrease in ATR-1α(+) cells, receptors important in bone marrow and spleen monocyte trafficking, respectively. Splenectomy was also associated with an increase in proinflammatory M1 (iNOS(+), CD11b(+)CD43(+)) macrophages in lungs of NM-treated rats, as well as greater upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression. Conversely, a decrease in CD11b(+)CD43(-) M2 macrophages was observed in SPX rats, with no changes in CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), or YM-1(+) M2 macrophages, suggesting distinct origins of M2 subpopulations responding to NM. Macrophage expression of M2 genes including IL-10, ApoE, PTX-2, PTX-3, 5-HT2α, and 5-HT7 was also reduced in NM-treated SPX rats compared with shams, indicating impaired M2 activity. Changes in lung macrophages responding to NM as a consequence of splenectomy were correlated with exacerbated tissue injury and more rapid fibrogenesis. These data demonstrate that the spleen is a source of a subset of M2 macrophages with anti-inflammatory activity; moreover, in their absence, proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages predominate in the lung, resulting in heightened pathology. Understanding the origin of macrophages and characterizing their phenotype after vesicant exposure may lead to more targeted therapeutics aimed at reducing toxicity and disease pathogenesis.

  6. Expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor by osteoblastic cells: protection against cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, Jérôme; Abed, Elie; Signor, Céline; Malu, Diane Tshikudi; Cuevas, Jorge; Kevorkova, Olha; Sanchez-Dardon, Jaime; Satoskar, Abhay; Scorza, Tatiana; Jumarie, Catherine; Moreau, Robert

    2012-12-17

    Exposition to cadmium (Cd) has been linked to bone metabolism alterations and occurrence of osteoporosis. Despite its known renal toxicity which indirectly disrupts bone metabolism through impairment of vitamin D synthesis, increasing evidence argues for the direct action of Cd on bone-forming osteoblasts. Indeed, accumulation of Cd in osteoblasts and metal-induced cell death has been documented but little is known about the intracellular mechanisms of protection against this stress. In this work, we investigated the protection afforded by thiol-containing proteins against Cd cytotoxicity in MC3T3 osteoblastic cells. Viability of MC3T3 cells was reduced by Cd in a concentration-dependent manner with a LC(50) of 7.6±1.1μM. Depletion of glutathione by l-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) increased cell sensitivity to Cd cytotoxicity, suggesting the involvement of thiol-containing peptides as a mechanism of protection. Accordingly, Cd was shown to promote progressive depletion of reduced thiol content and to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, low non cytotoxic concentrations of Cd increased the gene expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), also a thiol-containing protein. Inhibition of the transcription factor NFκB prevented Cd-dependent upregulation of MIF expression and consequently, increased Cd cytotoxicity in osteoblasts. Moreover, MIF deficient mouse osteoblasts were more sensitive to Cd cytotoxicity than the corresponding control cells. By gel-filtration chromatography, we demonstrated that MIF acts as a thiol-containing protein and thereby promotes Cd complexation. In accordance with its binding ability, addition of recombinant MIF to the culture medium reduced Cd cytotoxicity. Overall, upregulation of MIF expression by Cd may protect against the cytotoxicity of this metal in the osteoblasts.

  7. Liver regeneration is impaired in macrophage colony stimulating factor deficient mice after partial hepatectomy: the role of M-CSF-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Hidetake; Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), which induces maturation of macrophages, is notably expressed in the liver. Thus, the specific purpose of this study was to investigate the role of M-CSF in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH). Osteopetrotic (op/op) mice, genetically lacking functional M-CSF, or their littermate mice underwent 70% PH. Animals were sacrificed at the designated time points after PH, and remnant liver tissues were harvested for further investigations. Proliferation of hepatocytes was evaluated by the expression of BrdU and the liver-body weight ratio. The mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p) STAT3 were measured. The number of Kupffer cells (KCs) was determined by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, KCs were isolated from op/op mice or littermate mice, and mRNA expression levels of TNF- α and IL-6 were assessed after stimulation with LPS. In littermate mice, steady liver regeneration was observed. The number of KCs reduced markedly by about 60% in the op/op mice compared with littermates as reported previously. Furthermore, these cells were morphologically small and immature. In littermate mice, the peak expression levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the liver was observed 1h after PH, which was consistent with data in previous reports. In contrast, in op/op mice, the peak expression levels were observed 3 h after PH and were significantly lower compared with littermate mice. As a result, the proliferation of hepatocytes was significantly impaired in op/op mice. The mRNA expression level of IL-6, but not TNF-α,was significantly reduced in isolated KCs from op/op mice compared with the littermates after stimulation with LPS, suggesting that the function of KCs is different between op/op mice and littermate mice. To clarify the role of M-CSF in liver regeneration, op/op mice received intraperitoneally, mouse recombinant M-CSF 2 d before PH, and liver regeneration was also

  8. Lon Mutant of Brucella abortus Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Murine J774.A1 Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungdo; Choi, Young-Sill; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Young-Rok; Chu, Hyuk; Hwang, Kyu-Jam; Park, Mi-Yeoun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to isolate a Brucella lon mutant and to analyze the cytokine response of B. lon mutant during macrophage infection. Methods A wild-type Brucella abortus strain was mutagenized by Tn5 transposition. From the mouse macrophage J774.A1 cells, total RNA was isolated at 0 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after infection with Brucella. Using mouse cytokine microarrays, we measured transcriptional levels of the cytokine response, and validated our results with a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to confirm the induction of cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA). Results In host J774.A1 macrophages, mRNA levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and IL-3, were significantly higher in the lon mutant compared to wild-type Brucella and the negative control. TNF-α levels in cell culture media were induced as high as 2 μg/mL after infection with the lon mutant, a greater than sixfold change. Conclusion In order to understand the role of the lon protein in virulence, we identified and characterized a novel B. lon mutant. We compared the immune response it generates to the wild-type Brucella response in a mouse macrophage cell line. We demonstrated that the B. lon mutants induce TNF-α expression from the host J774.A1 macrophage. PMID:24524018

  9. The role of adenosine receptors in regulating production of tumour necrosis factor-α and chemokines by human lung macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Buenestado, A; Delyle, S Grassin; Arnould, I; Besnard, F; Naline, E; Blouquit-Laye, S; Chapelier, A; Bellamy, JF; Devillier, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adenosine is a major endogenous regulator of macrophage function, and activates four specific adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3). Here, we have assessed in human lung macrophages the modulation of the expression of adenosine receptor mRNA by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the relative contributions of the different adenosine receptors to LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and chemokines. Experimental approach: Lung macrophages isolated from resected lungs were stimulated with LPS and treated with adenosine receptor agonists or/and antagonists. Adenosine receptor expression was assessed with qRT-PCR. Cytokines were measured in lung macrophage supernatants with elisa. Key results: LPS increased (about 400-fold) mRNA for A2A adenosine receptors, decreased mRNA for A1 and A2B, but had no effect on A3 adenosine receptor mRNA. The adenosine receptor agonist NECA inhibited TNF-α production concentration dependently, whereas the A1 receptor agonist, CCPA, and the A3 receptor agonist, AB-MECA, inhibited TNF-α production only at concentrations affecting A2A receptors. NECA also inhibited the production of CCL chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5) and CXCL chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10), but not that of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL5. Reversal of NECA-induced inhibition of TNF-α and chemokine production by the selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385, but not the A2B receptor antagonist, MRS 1754, or the A3 receptor antagonist, MRS 1220, indicated involvement of A2A receptors. Conclusions and implications: LPS up-regulated A2A adenosine receptor gene transcription, and this receptor subtype mediated inhibition of the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and of a subset of chemokines in human lung macrophages. PMID:20136829

  10. Purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells express a high-affinity receptor for recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.E.; Bicknell, D.C.; Park, L.S.; Straneva, J.E.; Cooper, S.; Broxmeyer, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Purified recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was labeled with /sup 125/I and used to examine the GM-CSF receptor on unfractionated normal murine bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and highly purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM). CFU-GM were isolated from cyclophosphamide-treated mice by Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation followed by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The resulting population had a cloning efficiency of 62-99% in cultures containing conditioned medium from pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cells and 55-86% in the presence of a plateau concentration of purified recombinant murine GM-CSF. Equilibrium binding studies with /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF showed that normal bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and purified CFU-GM had a single class of high-affinity receptor. Affinity crosslinking studies demonstrated that /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF bound specifically to two species of M/sub r/ 180,000 and 70,000 on CFU-GM, normal bone marrow cells, and peritoneal exudate cells. The M/sub r/ 70,000 species is thought to be a proteolytic fragment of the intact M/sub r/ 180,000 receptor. The present studies indicate that the GM-CSF receptor expressed on CFU-GM and mature myeloid cells are structurally similar. In addition, the number of GM-CSF receptors on CFU-GM is twice the average number of receptors on casein-induced mature myeloid cells, suggesting that receptor number may decrease as CFU-GM mature.

  11. Epithelial cell proliferation in nasal polyps could be up-regulated by platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Coste, A; Wang, Q P; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Chapelin, C; Bedbeder, P; Poron, F; Peynègre, R; Escudier, E

    1996-05-01

    The modifications of epithelial differentiation and proliferation observed in nasal polyps (NP) could be related to local secretion of growth factors, among which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) could play a key role. We therefore prospectively studied, by immunohistochemistry, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, an S-phase cell marker), PDGF, and CD-68 (activated macrophages marker) expression in NP and inferior turbinate mucosa (NM) in 11 patients. Our data show that PCNA and PDGF expression are increased in NP epithelium, while CD-68 expression is increased in NP epithelium and lamina propria when compared to NM. Increased local PDGF secretion by numerous activated macrophages could therefore be involved in epithelial cell proliferation up-regulation in NP. PDGF could also be involved in the pathogenesis of NP via its connective tissue remodeling actions.

  12. Malvidin-3-O-β glucoside, major grape anthocyanin, inhibits human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and decreases clinical scores in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Decendit, Alain; Mamani-Matsuda, Maria; Aumont, Virginie; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Moynet, Daniel; Boniface, Katia; Richard, Emmanuel; Krisa, Stéphanie; Rambert, Jérôme; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Mossalayi, M D

    2013-11-15

    Polyphenolic anthocyanins are major colorful compounds in red fruits, known to prevent cardiovascular and other diseases. Grape polyphenols are a mixture of various molecules and their exact contribution to above bioactivities remains to be clarified. In the present study, we first analyzed the effect of purified grape-derived compounds on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival, proliferation, as well as for their ability to inhibit the activation of human normal macrophages. Data indicated that malvidin-3-O-β glucoside (Malβg), the major grape anthocyanin, is bioactive with no toxicity on human PBMC. Malβg decreased the transcription of genes encoding inflammatory mediators, confirmed by the inhibition of TNFα, IL1, IL-6 and iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) secretion from activated macrophages. As Malβg also inhibited inflammatory response of rat macrophages, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of Malβg in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Malβg significantly diminished inflammatory cachexia and arthritic paw scores in AIA rats at both therapeutic and preventive levels. In vivo effects of Malβg correlated with down-regulation of NO generation from AIA rats' peritoneal macrophages ex vivo. These data indicate that Malβg, major grape anthocyanin, is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in vitro and in vivo, without detectable toxic effect.

  13. Protein kinase A inhibition of macrophage maturation is accompanied by an increase in DNA methylation of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Zasłona, Zbigniew; Scruggs, Anne M; Peters-Golden, Marc; Huang, Steven K

    2016-10-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) plays a critical role in the differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes from bone marrow precursors, and maturing monocytes and macrophages exhibit increased expression of the CSF-1 receptor, CSF1R. The expression of CSF1R is tightly regulated by transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited CSF1R expression and macrophage maturation. Here, we examine the DNA methylation changes that occur at the Csf1r locus during macrophage maturation in the presence or absence of activated PKA. Murine bone marrow cells were matured to macrophages by incubating cells with CSF-1-containing conditioned medium for up to 6 days in the presence or absence of the PKA agonist 6-bnz-cAMP. DNA methylation of Csf1r promoter and enhancer regions was assayed by bisulphite pyrosequencing. DNA methylation of Csf1r decreased during normal macrophage maturation in concert with an increase in Csf1r mRNA expression. Treatment with the PKA agonist inhibited Csf1r mRNA and protein expression, and increased DNA methylation at the Csf1r promoter. This was associated with decreased binding of the transcription factor PU.1 to the Csf1r promoter. Treatment with the PKA agonist inhibited the responsiveness of macrophages to CSF-1. Levels of endogenous PKA activity decreased during normal macrophage maturation, suggesting that attenuation of this signalling pathway contributes to the increase in CSF1R expression during macrophage maturation. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophage maturation is accompanied by Csf1r hypomethylation, and illustrates for the first time the ability of PKA to increase Csf1r DNA methylation.

  14. Protein kinase A inhibition of macrophage maturation is accompanied by an increase in DNA methylation of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Zasłona, Zbigniew; Scruggs, Anne M; Peters-Golden, Marc; Huang, Steven K

    2016-10-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) plays a critical role in the differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes from bone marrow precursors, and maturing monocytes and macrophages exhibit increased expression of the CSF-1 receptor, CSF1R. The expression of CSF1R is tightly regulated by transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited CSF1R expression and macrophage maturation. Here, we examine the DNA methylation changes that occur at the Csf1r locus during macrophage maturation in the presence or absence of activated PKA. Murine bone marrow cells were matured to macrophages by incubating cells with CSF-1-containing conditioned medium for up to 6 days in the presence or absence of the PKA agonist 6-bnz-cAMP. DNA methylation of Csf1r promoter and enhancer regions was assayed by bisulphite pyrosequencing. DNA methylation of Csf1r decreased during normal macrophage maturation in concert with an increase in Csf1r mRNA expression. Treatment with the PKA agonist inhibited Csf1r mRNA and protein expression, and increased DNA methylation at the Csf1r promoter. This was associated with decreased binding of the transcription factor PU.1 to the Csf1r promoter. Treatment with the PKA agonist inhibited the responsiveness of macrophages to CSF-1. Levels of endogenous PKA activity decreased during normal macrophage maturation, suggesting that attenuation of this signalling pathway contributes to the increase in CSF1R expression during macrophage maturation. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophage maturation is accompanied by Csf1r hypomethylation, and illustrates for the first time the ability of PKA to increase Csf1r DNA methylation. PMID:27353657

  15. Influence of conversion of penicillin G into a basic derivative on its accumulation and subcellular localization in cultured macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, C.; Vanderhaeghe, H.J.; Claes, P.J.; Zenebergh, A.; Tulkens, P.M.

    1987-03-01

    beta-Lactam antibiotics do not accumulate in phagocytes, probably because of their acidic character. We therefore synthesized a basic derivative of penicillin G, namely, /sup 14/C-labeled N-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)benzylpenicillinamide (ABP), and studied its uptake and subcellular localization in J774 macrophages compared with that of /sup 14/C-labeled penicillin G. Whereas the intracellular concentration (Ci) of penicillin G remained lower than its extracellular concentration (Ce), ABP reached a Ci/Ce ratio of 4 to 5. Moreover, approximately 50% of intracellular ABP was found associated with lysosomes after isopycnic centrifugation of cell homogenates in isoosmotic Percoll or hyperosmotic sucrose gradients. The behavior of ABP was thus partly consistent with the model of de Duve et al., in which they described the intralysosomal accumulation of weak organic bases in lysosomes. Although ABP is microbiologically inactive, our results show that beta-lactam antibiotics can be driven into cells by appropriate modification. Further efforts therefore may be warranted in the design of active compounds or prodrugs that may prove useful in the chemotherapy of intracellular infections.

  16. Activities of tigecycline and comparators against Legionella pneumophila and Legionella micdadei extracellularly and in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Lawrence H; Baltch, Aldona L; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B; Smith, Raymond P

    2011-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline against Legionellae, which are intracellular pathogens, was evaluated intracellularly in human phagocytes and extracellularly, and compared to the activities of erythromycin and levofloxacin. Clinical isolates of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 6 and L. micdadei were tested in time-kill experiments. Extracellular experiments were done using buffered yeast extract broth. For intracellular assays, monolayers of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected with L. pneumophila or L. micdadei. Antibiotics (0.05-2.5 × MIC) were then added. MDM were lysed at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h and viable bacteria in the lysates were enumerated. Based on multiples of the MICs, tigecycline was less active extracellularly than levofloxacin or erythromycin. However, intracellular killing of both L. pneumophila and L. micdadei by tigecycline at 72 h was greater than for erythromycin or levofloxacin. Currently, evidence does not support the use of tigecycline as a first-line drug for treatment of Legionella infections. However, since Legionellae are intracellular pathogens, these results suggest that tigecycline should be effective for treatment of infections caused by these bacteria.

  17. C-Myb(+) erythro-myeloid progenitor-derived fetal monocytes give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Chen, Jinmiao; Lavin, Yonit; Low, Donovan; Almeida, Francisca F; See, Peter; Beaudin, Anna E; Lum, Josephine; Low, Ivy; Forsberg, E Camilla; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan; Chan, Jerry K Y; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Samokhvalov, Igor M; Merad, Miriam; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-04-21

    Although classified as hematopoietic cells, tissue-resident macrophages (MFs) arise from embryonic precursors that seed the tissues prior to birth to generate a self-renewing population, which is maintained independently of adult hematopoiesis. Here we reveal the identity of these embryonic precursors using an in utero MF-depletion strategy and fate-mapping of yolk sac (YS) and fetal liver (FL) hematopoiesis. We show that YS MFs are the main precursors of microglia, while most other MFs derive from fetal monocytes (MOs). Both YS MFs and fetal MOs arise from erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) generated in the YS. In the YS, EMPs gave rise to MFs without monocytic intermediates, while EMP seeding the FL upon the establishment of blood circulation acquired c-Myb expression and gave rise to fetal MOs that then seeded embryonic tissues and differentiated into MFs. Thus, adult tissue-resident MFs established from hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors arise from two distinct developmental programs.

  18. Inhibition of proinflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages by polyphenols derived from chamomile, meadowsweet and willow bark.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Harbourne, Niamh; Marete, Eunice; Martyn, Danika; Jacquier, Jc; O'Riordan, Dolores; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-04-01

    Antiinflammatory compounds in the diet can alleviate excessive inflammation, a factor in the pathogenesis of common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This study examined three European herbs, chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria L.) and willow bark (Salix alba L.), which have been traditionally used to treat inflammation and their potential for use as antiinflammatory agents. Aqueous herbal extracts and isolated polyphenolic compounds (apigenin, quercetin and salicylic acid, 0-100 μM) were incubated with THP1 macrophages, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured. At concentrations of 10 μM, both apigenin and quercetin reduced IL-6 significantly ( p < 0.05). Apigenin at 10 μM and quercetin at 25 μM reduced TNF-α significantly ( p < 0.05). Amongst the herbal extracts, willow bark had the greatest antiinflammatory activity at reducing IL-6 and TNF-α production. This was followed by meadowsweet and then chamomile. The lowest effective antiinflammatory concentrations were noncytotoxic (MTT mitochondrial activity assay). The Comet assay, which was used to study the protective effect of the isolated phenols against oxidative damage, showed positive results for all three polyphenols. These are the first findings that demonstrate the antiinflammatory capacity of these herbal extracts.

  19. Inhibition of proinflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages by polyphenols derived from chamomile, meadowsweet and willow bark.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Harbourne, Niamh; Marete, Eunice; Martyn, Danika; Jacquier, Jc; O'Riordan, Dolores; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-04-01

    Antiinflammatory compounds in the diet can alleviate excessive inflammation, a factor in the pathogenesis of common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This study examined three European herbs, chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria L.) and willow bark (Salix alba L.), which have been traditionally used to treat inflammation and their potential for use as antiinflammatory agents. Aqueous herbal extracts and isolated polyphenolic compounds (apigenin, quercetin and salicylic acid, 0-100 μM) were incubated with THP1 macrophages, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured. At concentrations of 10 μM, both apigenin and quercetin reduced IL-6 significantly ( p < 0.05). Apigenin at 10 μM and quercetin at 25 μM reduced TNF-α significantly ( p < 0.05). Amongst the herbal extracts, willow bark had the greatest antiinflammatory activity at reducing IL-6 and TNF-α production. This was followed by meadowsweet and then chamomile. The lowest effective antiinflammatory concentrations were noncytotoxic (MTT mitochondrial activity assay). The Comet assay, which was used to study the protective effect of the isolated phenols against oxidative damage, showed positive results for all three polyphenols. These are the first findings that demonstrate the antiinflammatory capacity of these herbal extracts. PMID:22711544

  20. Functional granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor is constitutively expressed on neoplastic plasma cells and mediates tumour cell longevity.

    PubMed

    Villunger, A; Egle, A; Kos, M; Egle, D; Tinhofer, I; Henn, T; Uberall, F; Maly, K; Greil, R

    1998-09-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is able to support myeloma cell propagation in cooperation with interleukin (IL)-6, the major growth factor for malignant plasma cells, although the biological mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therefore we investigated (i) the expression levels of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) constituents in three malignant plasma cell lines and in native malignant plasma cells, (ii) the ability of the receptor to mediate common signalling pathways regulating proliferation and cell survival in malignant plasma cell lines, and (iii) the effects of GM-CSF on tumour cell biology. The GM-CSFRalpha subunit was detected in the malignant plasma cell lines RPMI-8226, MC/CAR, IM-9 as well as 6/6 native myeloma cell samples derived from the bone marrow of patients with overt disease. Furthermore, GM-CSFR expression was also detected in the CD19+ fraction from 2/3 bone marrow samples and 5/8 peripheral blood samples derived from patients with malignant plasma cell disorders, but not in the CD19+ fraction of peripheral blood from healthy donors. The expressed cytokine receptor alpha-subunit was able to constitute a functional signalling complex with the ubiquitously expressed GM-CSFRbeta subunit, as demonstrated by the fact that GM-CSF induced the p21-ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in malignant plasma cell lines. Since this signalling cascade plays an essential role in the mediation of both proliferation and cell survival, we investigated the impact of GM-CSF on these two events. Application of GM-CSF led to an increase of DNA-synthesis in MC/CAR, IM-9 and RPMI-8226 cells. Furthermore, it increased longevity of these malignant plasma cell lines by reducing the rates of spontaneous apoptosis. We conclude that (i) the functional GM-CSFR is commonly expressed on malignant plasma cells and that (ii) GM-CSF promotes the clonal expansion of myeloma cells by inhibiting spontaneous

  1. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Induces Vascular Leakage through Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Ru; Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Perng, Guey-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus; it can either cause mild dengue fever or the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). One of the characteristic features of DHF/DSS is vascular leakage; although DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has been proved to induce vascular leakage after binding to Toll-like receptor 4, the down-stream mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In the sera of DENV-infected patients, the concentrations of DENV NS1 and inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are positively correlated with disease severity, but whether DENV NS1 induces vascular leakage through MIF secretion remains unknown. We demonstrated that recombinant NS1 induced vascular leakage and MIF secretion both in human endothelial cell line HMEC-1 and in mice. Furthermore, these phenomena were inhibited in the presence of anti-NS1 antibodies both in vitro and in vivo. DENV NS1 also induced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion and p62 degradation in endothelial cell line, which indicated the formation of autophagy. To clarify whether MIF or autophagy mediated DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage, various inhibitors were applied. The results showed that DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage and VE-cadherin disarray were blocked in the presence of MIF inhibitors, anti-MIF-antibodies or autophagy inhibitors. An Atg5 knockdown clone further confirmed that autophagy formation of endothelial cells was required in NS1-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, DENV NS1-induced LC3 puncta were also decreased in the presence of MIF inhibitors, indicating that MIF mediated DENV NS1-induced autophagy. Taken together, the results suggest a potential mechanism of DENV-induced vascular leakage and provide possible therapeutic targets against DHF/DSS. PMID:27409803

  2. Crystal structure of a macrophage migration inhibitory factor from Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Abendroth, Jan; Robinson, Howard; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Edwards, Tom E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2013-06-15

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a eukaryotic cytokine that affects a broad spectrum of immune responses and its activation/inactivation is associated with numerous diseases. During protozoan infections MIF is not only expressed by the host, but, has also been observed to be expressed by some parasites and released into the host. To better understand the biological role of parasitic MIF proteins, the crystal structure of the MIF protein from Giardia lamblia (Gl-MIF), the etiological agent responsible for giardiasis, has been determined at 2.30 Å resolution. The 114-residue protein adopts an α/β fold consisting of a four-stranded β-sheet with two anti-parallel α-helices packed against a face of the β-sheet. An additional short β-strand aligns anti-parallel to β4 of the β-sheet in the adjacent protein unit to help stabilize a trimer, the biologically relevant unit observed in all solved MIF crystal structures to date, and form a discontinuous β-barrel. The structure of Gl-MIF is compared to the MIF structures from humans (Hs-MIF) and three Plasmodium species (falciparum, berghei, and yoelii). The structure of all five MIF proteins are generally similar with the exception of a channel that runs through the center of each trimer complex. Relative to Hs-MIF, there are differences in solvent accessibility and electrostatic potential distribution in the channel of Gl-MIF and the Plasmodium-MIFs due primarily to two “gate-keeper” residues in the parasitic MIFs. For the Plasmodium MIFs the gate-keeper residues are at positions 44 (Y==>R) and 100 (V==>D) and for Gl-MIF it is at position 100 (V==>R). If these gate-keeper residues have a biological function and contribute to the progression of parasitemia they may also form the basis for structure-based drug design targeting parasitic MIF proteins.

  3. Filtration of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Julia; Heisler, Martin; Totzeck, Matthias; Kleophas, Werner; Hetzel, Gerd R.; Kelm, Malte; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Rassaf, Tienush

    2015-01-01

    Background End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are characterized by increased morbidity and mortality due to highest prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine that controls cellular signaling in human physiology, pathophysiology, and diseases. Increased MIF plasma levels promote vascular inflammation and development of atherosclerosis. We have shown that MIF is associated with vascular dysfunction in ESRD patients. Whether hemodialysis (HD) affects circulating MIF plasma levels is unknown. We here aimed to investigate whether HD influences the circulating MIF pool in ESRD patients. Methods and Results An observational single-center study was conducted. MIF plasma levels in ESRD patients were assessed before, during, and after a HD session (n = 29). Healthy age-matched volunteers served as controls to compare correlations of MIF plasma levels with inflammatory plasma components (n = 20). MIF removed from the circulating blood pool could be detected in the dialysate and allowed for calculation of totally removed MIF (MIF content in dialysate 219±4 μg/HD-session). MIF plasma levels were markedly decreased 2 hour after initiation of HD (MIF plasma level pre-HD 84.8±6 ng/ml to intra-HD 61.2±5 ng/ml p<0.001) and were replenished already 20 min after termination of HD to basal levels (intra-HD 61.2±5 ng/ml to post-HD 79.8±5 ng/ml, p<0.001). Conclusion MIF is a dialyzable plasma component that is effectively filtrated during HD from the patient blood pool in large amounts. After removal of remarkable amounts of MIF during a single HD session, MIF plasma pool is early reconstituted after termination of HD from unknown sources. PMID:26485680

  4. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Roger, Thierry; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-03-29

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (-794 CATT5-8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (-173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and -173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P= 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P= 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P= 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12,P= 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P= 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy.

  5. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Induces Vascular Leakage through Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ru; Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus; it can either cause mild dengue fever or the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). One of the characteristic features of DHF/DSS is vascular leakage; although DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has been proved to induce vascular leakage after binding to Toll-like receptor 4, the down-stream mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In the sera of DENV-infected patients, the concentrations of DENV NS1 and inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are positively correlated with disease severity, but whether DENV NS1 induces vascular leakage through MIF secretion remains unknown. We demonstrated that recombinant NS1 induced vascular leakage and MIF secretion both in human endothelial cell line HMEC-1 and in mice. Furthermore, these phenomena were inhibited in the presence of anti-NS1 antibodies both in vitro and in vivo. DENV NS1 also induced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion and p62 degradation in endothelial cell line, which indicated the formation of autophagy. To clarify whether MIF or autophagy mediated DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage, various inhibitors were applied. The results showed that DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage and VE-cadherin disarray were blocked in the presence of MIF inhibitors, anti-MIF-antibodies or autophagy inhibitors. An Atg5 knockdown clone further confirmed that autophagy formation of endothelial cells was required in NS1-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, DENV NS1-induced LC3 puncta were also decreased in the presence of MIF inhibitors, indicating that MIF mediated DENV NS1-induced autophagy. Taken together, the results suggest a potential mechanism of DENV-induced vascular leakage and provide possible therapeutic targets against DHF/DSS.

  6. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (−794 CATT5–8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (−173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and −173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P = 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P = 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P = 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12, P = 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P = 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy. PMID:26976591

  7. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Induces Vascular Leakage through Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ru; Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus; it can either cause mild dengue fever or the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). One of the characteristic features of DHF/DSS is vascular leakage; although DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has been proved to induce vascular leakage after binding to Toll-like receptor 4, the down-stream mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In the sera of DENV-infected patients, the concentrations of DENV NS1 and inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are positively correlated with disease severity, but whether DENV NS1 induces vascular leakage through MIF secretion remains unknown. We demonstrated that recombinant NS1 induced vascular leakage and MIF secretion both in human endothelial cell line HMEC-1 and in mice. Furthermore, these phenomena were inhibited in the presence of anti-NS1 antibodies both in vitro and in vivo. DENV NS1 also induced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion and p62 degradation in endothelial cell line, which indicated the formation of autophagy. To clarify whether MIF or autophagy mediated DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage, various inhibitors were applied. The results showed that DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage and VE-cadherin disarray were blocked in the presence of MIF inhibitors, anti-MIF-antibodies or autophagy inhibitors. An Atg5 knockdown clone further confirmed that autophagy formation of endothelial cells was required in NS1-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, DENV NS1-induced LC3 puncta were also decreased in the presence of MIF inhibitors, indicating that MIF mediated DENV NS1-induced autophagy. Taken together, the results suggest a potential mechanism of DENV-induced vascular leakage and provide possible therapeutic targets against DHF/DSS. PMID:27409803

  8. High expression levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor sustain the innate immune responses of neonates.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thierry; Schneider, Anina; Weier, Manuela; Sweep, Fred C G J; Le Roy, Didier; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Calandra, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2016-02-23

    The vulnerability to infection of newborns is associated with a limited ability to mount efficient immune responses. High concentrations of adenosine and prostaglandins in the fetal and neonatal circulation hamper the antimicrobial responses of newborn immune cells. However, the existence of mechanisms counterbalancing neonatal immunosuppression has not been investigated. Remarkably, circulating levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory immunoregulatory cytokine expressed constitutively, were 10-fold higher in newborns than in children and adults. Newborn monocytes expressed high levels of MIF and released MIF upon stimulation with Escherichia coli and group B Streptococcus, the leading pathogens of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Inhibition of MIF activity or MIF expression reduced microbial product-induced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases and secretion of cytokines. Recombinant MIF used at newborn, but not adult, concentrations counterregulated adenosine and prostaglandin E2-mediated inhibition of ERK1/2 activation and TNF production in newborn monocytes exposed to E. coli. In agreement with the concept that once infection is established high levels of MIF are detrimental to the host, treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of MIF reduced systemic inflammatory response, bacterial proliferation, and mortality of septic newborn mice. Altogether, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for how newborns may cope with an immunosuppressive environment to maintain a certain threshold of innate defenses. However, the same defense mechanisms may be at the expense of the host in conditions of severe infection, suggesting that MIF could represent a potential attractive target for immune-modulating adjunctive therapies for neonatal sepsis.

  9. High expression levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor sustain the innate immune responses of neonates

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anina; Weier, Manuela; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Le Roy, Didier; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Calandra, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability to infection of newborns is associated with a limited ability to mount efficient immune responses. High concentrations of adenosine and prostaglandins in the fetal and neonatal circulation hamper the antimicrobial responses of newborn immune cells. However, the existence of mechanisms counterbalancing neonatal immunosuppression has not been investigated. Remarkably, circulating levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory immunoregulatory cytokine expressed constitutively, were 10-fold higher in newborns than in children and adults. Newborn monocytes expressed high levels of MIF and released MIF upon stimulation with Escherichia coli and group B Streptococcus, the leading pathogens of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Inhibition of MIF activity or MIF expression reduced microbial product-induced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases and secretion of cytokines. Recombinant MIF used at newborn, but not adult, concentrations counterregulated adenosine and prostaglandin E2-mediated inhibition of ERK1/2 activation and TNF production in newborn monocytes exposed to E. coli. In agreement with the concept that once infection is established high levels of MIF are detrimental to the host, treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of MIF reduced systemic inflammatory response, bacterial proliferation, and mortality of septic newborn mice. Altogether, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for how newborns may cope with an immunosuppressive environment to maintain a certain threshold of innate defenses. However, the same defense mechanisms may be at the expense of the host in conditions of severe infection, suggesting that MIF could represent a potential attractive target for immune-modulating adjunctive therapies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26858459

  10. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the development of neointimal thickening following arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vivek; Sinha, Satyesh K; Rajavashisth, Tripathi B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) participates critically in atherosclerosis; little is known about the role of M-CSF in the development of neointimal hyperplasia following mechanical vascular injury. We examined the expression of M-CSF and its receptor, c-fms, in rodent and rabbit models of arterial injury. Injured rat carotid arteries expressed 3- to 10-fold higher levels of M-CSF and c-fms mRNA and protein following balloon injury as compared to uninjured arteries. In the rabbit, M-CSF protein expression was greatest in neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) postinjury, with some expression in medial SMCs. M-CSF-positive SMCs exhibited markers of proliferation. At 30days postinjury, neointimal SMCs in the adjacent healed area near the border between injured and uninjured zone lost both proliferative activity and overexpression of M-CSF. The presence of induced M-CSF and c-fms expression correlated with the initiation of SMCs proliferation. M-CSF stimulated incorporation of [(3)H] thymidine in human aortic smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Serum-free conditioned medium from aortic SMCs also promoted DNA synthesis, and this effect was blocked by M-CSF specific antibody. To test further the role of M-CSF in vivo, we induced arterial injury by placing a periadventitial collar around the carotid arteries in compound mutant mice lacking apolipoprotein apoE (apoE(-/-)) and M-CSF. Loss of M-CSF abolished the neointimal hyperplastic response to arterial injury in apoE(-/-) mice. Local delivery of M-CSF to the injured artery restored neointimal proliferation, suggesting a critical role of M-CSF for the development of neointimal thickening following arterial injury. PMID:27135205

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shotaro; Uchida, Kentaro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Fujimaki, Hisako; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were char