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Sample records for macrophage-mediated vascular inflammation

  1. Neurological heterotopic ossification following spinal cord injury is triggered by macrophage-mediated inflammation in muscle.

    PubMed

    Genêt, François; Kulina, Irina; Vaquette, Cedryck; Torossian, Frédéric; Millard, Susan; Pettit, Allison R; Sims, Natalie A; Anginot, Adrienne; Guerton, Bernadette; Winkler, Ingrid G; Barbier, Valérie; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Neurological heterotopic ossification (NHO) is the abnormal formation of bone in soft tissues as a consequence of spinal cord or traumatic brain injury. NHO causes pain, ankyloses, vascular and nerve compression and delays rehabilitation in this high-morbidity patient group. The pathological mechanisms leading to NHO remain unknown and consequently there are no therapeutic options to prevent or reduce NHO. Genetically modified mouse models of rare genetic forms of heterotopic ossification (HO) exist, but their relevance to NHO is questionable. Consequently, we developed the first model of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced NHO in genetically unmodified mice. Formation of NHO, measured by micro-computed tomography, required the combination of both SCI and localized muscular inflammation. Our NHO model faithfully reproduced many clinical features of NHO in SCI patients and both human and mouse NHO tissues contained macrophages. Muscle-derived mesenchymal progenitors underwent osteoblast differentiation in vitro in response to serum from NHO mice without additional exogenous osteogenic stimuli. Substance P was identified as a candidate NHO systemic neuropeptide, as it was significantly elevated in the serum of NHO patients. However, antagonism of substance P receptor in our NHO model only modestly reduced the volume of NHO. In contrast, ablation of phagocytic macrophages with clodronate-loaded liposomes reduced the size of NHO by 90%, supporting the conclusion that NHO is highly dependent on inflammation and phagocytic macrophages in soft tissues. Overall, we have developed the first clinically relevant model of NHO and demonstrated that a combined insult of neurological injury and soft tissue inflammation drives NHO pathophysiology. PMID:25712044

  2. The role of macrophage mediators in respirable quartz-elicited inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, D.; Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; van Schooten, F. J.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    The instigation and persistence of an inflammatory response is widely considered to be critically important in quartz-induced lung cancer and fibrosis. Macrophages have been long recognised as a crucial player in pulmonary inflammation, but evidence for the role of type II epithelial cells is accumulating. Investigations were performed in the rat lung type II cell line RLE and the rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 using Western blotting, NF-κB immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR of the pro-inflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2, as well as the cellular stress gene HO-1. The direct effect of quartz on pro-inflammatory signalling cascades and gene expression in RLE cells was compared to the effect of conditioned media derived from quartz-treated NR8383 cells. Conditioned media activated the NF-κB signalling pathway and induced a far stronger upregulation of iNOS mRNA than quartz itself. Quartz elicited a stronger, progressive induction of COX-2 and HO-1 mRNA. Our results suggest a differentially mediated inflammatory response, in which reactive particles themselves induce oxidative stress and activation of COX-2, while mediators released from particle-activated macrophages trigger NF-κB activation and iNOS expression in type II cells.

  3. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation: Origins and Functions.

    PubMed

    Decano, Julius L; Mattson, Peter C; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages influence various processes of cardiovascular inflammation. Whether they are of embryonic or post-natal hematopoietic origin, their balance in differential activation may direct the course of inflammation. Accelerated macrophage activation and accumulation through a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway may result in extensive tissue damage, adverse repair, and worsened clinical outcomes. Attenuation of such a mechanism and/or promotion of the anti-inflammatory macrophage activation may lead to early resolution of inflammation. Elucidating multiple novel mechanisms of monocyte and macrophage activation leads to a better understanding of their roles in vascular inflammation. In turn, this begets better therapeutic target identification and biomarker discovery. Combined with increasingly sensitive and specific imaging techniques, we continue to push back early detection and monitoring to provide us with a greater window for disease modification. The potential success of cytokine-targeted therapy will be solid proof of the inflammatory hypothesis of atherothrombosis. PMID:27125207

  4. The endothelium and vascular inflammation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hartge, Martin M; Unger, Thomas; Kintscher, Ulrich

    2007-06-01

    The endothelium releases multiple mediators, not only regulators of vasomotor function but also important physiological and pathophysiological inflammatory mediators. Endothelial dysfunction is caused by chronic exposure to various stressors such as oxidative stress and modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, resulting in impaired nitric oxide (NO) production and chronic inflammation. Biomechanical forces on the endothelium, including low shear stress from disturbed blood flow and hypertension, are also important causes of endothelial dysfunction. These processes seem to be augmented in patients with diabetes. In states of insulin resistance and in type 2 diabetes insulin signalling is impaired. Increased vascular inflammation, including enhanced expression of interleukin- 6 (IL-6), vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP- 1) are observed, as is a marked decrease in NO bioavailability. Furthermore, hyperglycaemia leads to increased formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), which quench NO and impair endothelial function. In summary, during the development of diabetes a number of biochemical and mechanical factors converge on the endothelium, resulting in endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation. In the presence of insulin resistance, these processes are potentiated and they provide a basis for the macrovascular disease seen in diabetes.

  5. Macrophage-mediated inflammation and glial response in the skeletal muscle of a rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Jonathan M; Smit-Oistad, Ivy M; Macrander, Corey; Krakora, Dan; Meyer, Michael G; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor dysfunction and loss of large motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain stem. While much research has focused on mechanisms of motor neuron cell death in the spinal cord, degenerative processes in skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are also observed early in disease development. Although recent studies support the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the skeletal muscle in ALS, relatively little is known about inflammation and glial responses in skeletal muscle and near NMJs, or how these responses contribute to motor neuron survival, neuromuscular innervation, or motor dysfunction in ALS. We recently showed that human mesenchymal stem cells modified to release glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hMSC-GDNF) extend survival and protect NMJs and motor neurons in SOD1(G93A) rats when delivered to limb muscles. In this study, we evaluate inflammatory and glial responses near NMJs in the limb muscle collected from a rat model of familial ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats) during disease progression and following hMSC-GDNF transplantation. Muscle samples were collected from pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and end-stage animals. A significant increase in the expression of microglial inflammatory markers (CD11b and CD68) occurred in the skeletal muscle of symptomatic and end-stage SOD1(G93A) rats. Inflammation was confirmed by ELISA for inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in muscle homogenates of SOD1(G93A) rats. Next, we observed active glial responses in the muscle of SOD1(G93A) rats, specifically near intramuscular axons and NMJs. Interestingly, strong expression of activated glial markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin, was observed in the areas adjacent to NMJs. Finally, we determined whether ex vivo trophic factor delivery influences inflammation and terminal

  6. Vascular oxidant stress and inflammation in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Louisa; Weiss, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are a metabolic risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease, as shown in numerous clinical studies that linked elevated homocysteine levels to de novo and recurrent cardiovascular events. High levels of homocysteine promote oxidant stress in vascular cells and tissue because of the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have been strongly implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, ROS have been shown to cause endothelial injury, dysfunction, and activation. Elevated homocysteine stimulates proinflammatory pathways in vascular cells, resulting in leukocyte recruitment to the vessel wall, mediated by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and circulating monocytes and neutrophils, in the infiltration of leukocytes into the arterial wall mediated by increased secretion of chemokines, and in the differentiation of monocytes into cholesterol-scavenging macrophages. Furthermore, it stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells followed by the production of extracellular matrix. Many of these events involve redox-sensitive signaling events, which are promoted by elevated homocysteine, and result in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. In this article, we review current knowledge about the role of homocysteine on oxidant stress-mediated vascular inflammation during the development of atherosclerosis.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) inhibits macrophage-mediated inflammation by activating Nrf2 and suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; He, Jinjiao; Li, Siming; Song, Liying; Guo, Xiaochen; Yao, Wenbing; Zou, Dehua; Gao, Xinyu; Liu, Yunye; Bai, Fuliang; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2016-09-01

    Our previous report has shown that FGF21 has anti-inflammatory properties in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. In this study, the underlying molecular mechanisms of action were also investigated using RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocyte-macrophage. RAW 264.7 cells were pre-incubated with various concentrations (2000, 500, 100ng/ml) of FGF21 and stimulated with LPS to induce oxidative stress and inflammation. The result of flow cytometry showed that β-Klotho, FGF21 specific receptor, was expressed in murine splenic macrophages and RAW 264.7. In vitro, FGF21 reduced the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the level of IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. FGF21 also suppressed profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by an increase of the MDA level and depletion of the intracellular GSH level, and restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Moreover, FGF21 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, including degradation of I-κB and nuclear translocation of p65. In addition, the result of Western blot and real-time PCR showed that FGF21 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and increased the nuclear transcription factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) levels in a dose-dependent manner in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In conclusion, the results suggest that macrophages are the targets for the anti-inflammatory effects of FGF21, and FGF21 exerted an anti-inflammatory effect mainly via enhancing Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidant capacity and suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) inhibits macrophage-mediated inflammation by activating Nrf2 and suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; He, Jinjiao; Li, Siming; Song, Liying; Guo, Xiaochen; Yao, Wenbing; Zou, Dehua; Gao, Xinyu; Liu, Yunye; Bai, Fuliang; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2016-09-01

    Our previous report has shown that FGF21 has anti-inflammatory properties in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. In this study, the underlying molecular mechanisms of action were also investigated using RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocyte-macrophage. RAW 264.7 cells were pre-incubated with various concentrations (2000, 500, 100ng/ml) of FGF21 and stimulated with LPS to induce oxidative stress and inflammation. The result of flow cytometry showed that β-Klotho, FGF21 specific receptor, was expressed in murine splenic macrophages and RAW 264.7. In vitro, FGF21 reduced the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the level of IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. FGF21 also suppressed profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by an increase of the MDA level and depletion of the intracellular GSH level, and restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Moreover, FGF21 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, including degradation of I-κB and nuclear translocation of p65. In addition, the result of Western blot and real-time PCR showed that FGF21 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and increased the nuclear transcription factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) levels in a dose-dependent manner in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In conclusion, the results suggest that macrophages are the targets for the anti-inflammatory effects of FGF21, and FGF21 exerted an anti-inflammatory effect mainly via enhancing Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidant capacity and suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27276443

  9. [Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?].

    PubMed

    Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Andreozzi, Paola; Chiriac, Iulia Maria; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vulcano, Achiropita; Servello, Adriana; Marigliano, Benedetta; Marigliano, Vincenzo

    2011-06-01

    Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?Depression is the most common comorbidity in the elderly, and it is a major determinant of disability. The late-onset depression in highly associated to cardiovascular disease. Depressive symptoms may follow vascular brain damage, especially when mood regulating areas are affected. However depression is strongly associated to vascular disease even when there is no manifest brain damage. Recently great attention has been given to chronic inflammation, both related to depression and vascular disease. Both experimental and clinical evidence shows that a rise in the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids in depressed patients is associated with defect in serotonergic function. Chronic inflammation may underlie many forms of depression associated with vascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The importance of the inflammation hypothesis of depression lies is that psychotropic drugs may have central anti-inflammatory action, and that new generation of central anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful in depression treatment. PMID:21779108

  10. Mutually Supportive Mechanisms of Inflammation and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Whiteford, J R; De Rossi, G; Woodfin, A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is often accompanied by angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from existing ones. This vascular response is a response to chronic hypoxia and/or ischemia, but is also contributory to the progression of disorders including atherosclerosis, arthritis, and tumor growth. Proinflammatory and proangiogenic mediators and signaling pathways form a complex and interrelated network in these conditions, and many factors exert multiple effects. Inflammation drives angiogenesis by direct and indirect mechanisms, promoting endothelial proliferation, migration, and vessel sprouting, but also by mediating extracellular matrix remodeling and release of sequestered growth factors, and recruitment of proangiogenic leukocyte subsets. The role of inflammation in promoting angiogenesis is well documented, but by facilitating greater infiltration of leukocytes and plasma proteins into inflamed tissues, angiogenesis can also propagate chronic inflammation. This review examines the mutually supportive relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation, and considers how these interactions might be exploited to promote resolution of chronic inflammatory or angiogenic disorders. PMID:27572130

  11. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  12. Interleukin-32 Positively Regulates Radiation-Induced Vascular Inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Lin, P. Charles

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To study the role of interleukin-32 (IL-32), a novel protein only detected in human tissues, in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced vascular inflammation. Methods and Materials: Irradiated (0-6 Gy) human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with or without various agents-a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor, or lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs)-were used to assess IL-32 expression by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) cells was also analyzed. Results: Ionizing radiation dramatically increased IL-32 expression in vascular endothelial cells through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation induced IL-32 expression through nuclear factor {kappa}B activation, through induction of cPLA2 and LPC, as well as induction of Cox-2 and subsequent conversion of arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. Conversely, blocking nuclear factor {kappa}B, cPLA2, and Cox-2 activity impaired IR-induced IL-32 expression. Importantly, IL-32 significantly enhanced IR-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion on endothelial cells. Conclusion: This study identifies IL-32 as a positive regulator in IR-induced vascular inflammation, and neutralization of IL-32 may be beneficial in protecting from IR-induced inflammation.

  13. Targeting vascular and leukocyte communication in angiogenesis, inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kreuger, Johan; Phillipson, Mia

    2016-02-01

    Regulation of vascular permeability, recruitment of leukocytes from blood to tissue and angiogenesis are all processes that occur at the level of the microvasculature during both physiological and pathological conditions. The interplay between microvascular cells and leukocytes during inflammation, together with the emerging roles of leukocytes in the modulation of the angiogenic process, make leukocyte-vascular interactions prime targets for therapeutics to potentially treat a wide range of diseases, including pathological and dysfunctional vessel growth, chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In this Review, we discuss how the different cell types that are present in and around microvessels interact, cooperate and instruct each other, and in this context we highlight drug targets as well as emerging druggable processes that can be exploited to restore tissue homeostasis.

  14. Obesity and cognitive decline: role of inflammation and vascular changes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Killcross, A. Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity in middle age is increasing markedly, and in parallel the prevalence of metabolic disorders including cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes is also rising. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both obesity and metabolic disorders are associated with poorer cognitive performance, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this review we discuss the effects of obesity on cognitive performance, including both clinical and preclinical observations, and discuss some of the potential mechanisms involved, namely inflammation and vascular and metabolic alterations. PMID:25477778

  15. Influence of nutrition in PCB-induced vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Petriello, Michael C; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The nutritional profile of an individual can influence the toxicity of persistent environmental toxicants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), prevalent environmental pollutants, are highly lipid-soluble toxic compounds that biomagnify through trophic levels and pose cancer, neurocognitive, and atherosclerotic risk to human populations. There is a growing body of knowledge that PCBs can initiate inflammatory responses in vivo, and this inflammation can be either exacerbated or ameliorated by nutrition. Data indicate that diets high in certain dietary lipids such as omega-6 fatty acids can worsen PCB-induced vascular toxicity while diets enriched with bioactive food components such as polyphenols and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids can improve the toxicant-induced inflammation. There is evidence that bioactive nutrients protect through multiple cell signaling pathways, but we have shown that lipid raft caveolae and the antioxidant defense controller nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) both play a predominant role in nutritional modulation of PCB-induced vascular toxicity. Interestingly, there appears to be an intimate cross-talk between caveolae-related proteins and cellular Nrf2, and focusing on the use of specific bioactive food components that simultaneously alter both pathways may produce a more effective and efficient cytoprotective response to toxicant exposure. The use of nutrition as a protective tool is an economically beneficial means to address the toxicity of persistent environmental toxicants and may become a sensible means to protect human populations from PCB-induced vascular inflammation and associated chronic diseases.

  16. Kruppel-like factor 15 is critical for vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Zhang, Lisheng; Liao, Xudong; Sangwung, Panjamaporn; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Zhou, Guangjin; Votruba, Alexander R.; Brian, Leigh; Han, Yuh Jung; Gao, Huiyun; Wang, Yunmei; Shimizu, Koichi; Weinert-Stein, Kaitlyn; Khrestian, Maria; Simon, Daniel I.; Freedman, Neil J.; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of cells intrinsic to the vessel wall is central to the initiation and progression of vascular inflammation. As the dominant cellular constituent of the vessel wall, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their functions are critical determinants of vascular disease. While factors that regulate VSMC proliferation and migration have been identified, the endogenous regulators of VSMC proinflammatory activation remain incompletely defined. The Kruppel-like family of transcription factors (KLFs) are important regulators of inflammation. In this study, we identified Kruppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) as an essential regulator of VSMC proinflammatory activation. KLF15 levels were markedly reduced in human atherosclerotic tissues. Mice with systemic and smooth muscle–specific deficiency of KLF15 exhibited an aggressive inflammatory vasculopathy in two distinct models of vascular disease: orthotopic carotid artery transplantation and diet-induced atherosclerosis. We demonstrated that KLF15 alters the acetylation status and activity of the proinflammatory factor NF-κB through direct interaction with the histone acetyltransferase p300. These studies identify a previously unrecognized KLF15-dependent pathway that regulates VSMC proinflammatory activation. PMID:23999430

  17. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  18. Risk Factors for Uteroplacental Vascular Compromise and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    BAKER, Arthur M.; BRAUN, Joe M.; SALAFIA, Carolyn M.; HERRING, Amy H.; DANIELS, Julie; RANKINS, Nicole; THORP, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify potentially modifiable risk factors of placental injury reflecting maternal uteroplacental vascular compromise (UPVC) and acute and chronic placental inflammation. Study design A prospective epidemiologic study was conducted. A total of 1270 placentas were characterized by gross and microscopic examination. Placental pathology was coded for features of amniotic fluid infection syndrome (AFIS), chronic villitis, UPVC, and fetal vascular obstructive lesions. Odds ratios between UPVC, the acute and the chronic inflammatory lesions, and risk factors of interest were calculated. Results After adjusting for confounders, women with a history of preterm birth had 1.60 times the odds of chronic inflammation (95% CI: 1.10, 2.55). Women with a previous elective termination had 3.28 times the odds of acute inflammation (95% CI: 1.89, 5.70). The odds of chronic villitis increased with parity, while the odds of AFIS decreased with parity. Conclusion We have identified several predictors of UPVC, AFIS and chronic villitis. Further studies are needed to examine whether interventions to alter UPVC, AFIS and chronic villitis will lead to improved pregnancy outcomes. PMID:18771974

  19. Thymoquinone inhibits inflammation, neoangiogenesis and vascular remodeling in asthma mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinming; Ren, Yuan; Yu, Na; Kong, Lingfei; Kang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic obstructive disease which is characterized by recurring airway inflammation, reversible airway obstruction, airway hyper responsiveness and vascular remodeling. Thymoquinone (TQ), an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa, was reported to exhibit anti-inflammation and anti-proliferation of in various cancer cells as well as epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of TQ on the inflammation, neoangiogenesis and vascular remodeling induced by Ovalbumin (OVA) in asthma mice in vivo and the anti-angiogenesis effects of TQ in VEGF-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Our results revealed that TQ inhibited the production of inflammatory factors interleukin-4/-5 (IL-4/-5) by enzyme-linked immunesorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the increase of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, which is also known as CD31 and α-smooth muscle actinalpha (α-SMA) expression in asthma mice challenged by OVA was suppressed by TQ. Moreover, TQ suppressed the activation of VEGFR2-PI3K-Akt pathway and up-regulated the expression of Slit glycoprotein-2 (Slit-2) both in vivo and in vitro with the inhibition of tube information in HUVEC cells. Meanwhile immunofluorescence analysis showed that Slit-2 and Roundabout-4 (Robo-4) were co-expressing after TQ treatment in OVA-challenged asthma mice. Our study demonstrates that TQ attenuated the inflammatory reaction by antagonizing IL-4/-5 while the anti-neoangiogenesis effect of TQ is mediated by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression through VEGFR2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which supports a potential role for TQ in ameliorating asthma. PMID:27240137

  20. Tie1 controls angiopoietin function in vascular remodeling and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Emilia A; Lampinen, Anita; Giri, Hemant; Anisimov, Andrey; Kim, Minah; Allen, Breanna; Fang, Shentong; D'Amico, Gabriela; Sipilä, Tuomas J; Lohela, Marja; Strandin, Tomas; Vaheri, Antti; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Koh, Gou Young; McDonald, Donald M; Alitalo, Kari; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-09-01

    The angiopoietin/Tie (ANG/Tie) receptor system controls developmental and tumor angiogenesis, inflammatory vascular remodeling, and vessel leakage. ANG1 is a Tie2 agonist that promotes vascular stabilization in inflammation and sepsis, whereas ANG2 is a context-dependent Tie2 agonist or antagonist. A limited understanding of ANG signaling mechanisms and the orphan receptor Tie1 has hindered development of ANG/Tie-targeted therapeutics. Here, we determined that both ANG1 and ANG2 binding to Tie2 increases Tie1-Tie2 interactions in a β1 integrin-dependent manner and that Tie1 regulates ANG-induced Tie2 trafficking in endothelial cells. Endothelial Tie1 was essential for the agonist activity of ANG1 and autocrine ANG2. Deletion of endothelial Tie1 in mice reduced Tie2 phosphorylation and downstream Akt activation, increased FOXO1 nuclear localization and transcriptional activation, and prevented ANG1- and ANG2-induced capillary-to-venous remodeling. However, in acute endotoxemia, the Tie1 ectodomain that is responsible for interaction with Tie2 was rapidly cleaved, ANG1 agonist activity was decreased, and autocrine ANG2 agonist activity was lost, which led to suppression of Tie2 signaling. Tie1 cleavage also occurred in patients with hantavirus infection. These results support a model in which Tie1 directly interacts with Tie2 to promote ANG-induced vascular responses under noninflammatory conditions, whereas in inflammation, Tie1 cleavage contributes to loss of ANG2 agonist activity and vascular stability. PMID:27548530

  1. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Vascular Inflammation and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Kafoury, Ramzi; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The RAAS through its physiological effectors plays a key role in promoting and maintaining inflammation. Inflammation is an important mechanism in the development and progression of CVD such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. In addition to its main role in regulating blood pressure and its role in hypertension, RAAS has proinflammatory and profibrotic effects at cellular and molecular levels. Blocking RAAS provides beneficial effects for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Evidence shows that inhibition of RAAS positively influences vascular remodeling thus improving CVD outcomes. The beneficial vascular effects of RAAS inhibition are likely due to decreasing vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and positive effects on regeneration of endothelial progenitor cells. Inflammatory factors such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and CRP have key roles in mediating vascular inflammation and blocking RAAS negatively modulates the levels of these inflammatory molecules. Some of these inflammatory markers are clinically associated with CVD events. More studies are required to establish long-term effects of RAAS inhibition on vascular inflammation, vascular cells regeneration, and CVD clinical outcomes. This review presents important information on RAAS's role on vascular inflammation, vascular cells responses to RAAS, and inhibition of RAAS signaling in the context of vascular inflammation, vascular remodeling, and vascular inflammation-associated CVD. Nevertheless, the review also equates the need to rethink and rediscover new RAAS inhibitors. PMID:24804145

  2. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  3. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks 'outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  4. Age-associated vascular inflammation promotes monocytosis during atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Wong, Christine; Song, Yang; Shen, Hua; Mori, Daniel; Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Dobrian, Anca D; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    Aging leads to a proinflammatory state within the vasculature without disease, yet whether this inflammatory state occurs during atherogenesis remains unclear. Here, we examined how aging impacts atherosclerosis using Ldlr(-/-) mice, an established murine model of atherosclerosis. We found that aged atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced atherogenesis within the aorta. Aging also led to increased LDL levels, elevated blood pressure on a low-fat diet, and insulin resistance after a high-fat diet (HFD). On a HFD, aging increased a monocytosis in the peripheral blood and enhanced macrophage accumulation within the aorta. When we conducted bone marrow transplant experiments, we found that stromal factors contributed to age-enhanced atherosclerosis. To delineate these stromal factors, we determined that the vasculature exhibited an age-enhanced inflammatory response consisting of elevated production of CCL-2, osteopontin, and IL-6 during atherogenesis. In addition, in vitro cultures showed that aging enhanced the production of osteopontin by vascular smooth muscle cells. Functionally, aged atherosclerotic aortas displayed higher monocyte chemotaxis than young aortas. Hence, our study has revealed that aging induces metabolic dysfunction and enhances vascular inflammation to promote a peripheral monocytosis and macrophage accumulation within the atherosclerotic aorta. PMID:27135421

  5. Amorphous silica nanoparticles impair vascular homeostasis and induce systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Albarwani, Sulayma; Beegam, Sumaya; Yuvaraju, Priya; Yasin, Javed; Attoub, Samir; Ali, Badreldin H

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) are being used in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and many other industrial applications entailing human exposure. However, their potential vascular and systemic pathophysiologic effects are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the acute (24 hours) systemic toxicity of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm and 500 nm SiNPs in mice (0.5 mg/kg). Both sizes of SiNPs induced a platelet proaggregatory effect in pial venules and increased plasma concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen and a decrease in the number of circulating platelets were only seen following the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. The direct addition of SiNPs to untreated mouse blood significantly induced in vitro platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent fashion, and these effects were more pronounced with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and interleukin 1β concentration. However, tumor necrosis factor α concentration was only increased after the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. Nevertheless, plasma markers of oxidative stress, including 8-isoprostane, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase, were not affected by SiNPs. The in vitro exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to SiNPs showed a reduced cellular viability, and more potency was seen with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs caused a decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated small mesenteric arteries. We conclude that amorphous SiNPs cause systemic inflammation and coagulation events, and alter vascular reactivity. Overall, the effects observed with 50 nm SiNPs were more pronounced than those with 500 nm SiNPs. These findings provide new insight into the deleterious effect of amorphous SiNPs on vascular homeostasis. PMID:24936130

  6. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-12-29

    BACKGROUND Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE-/- mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-kB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. RESULTS Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE-/- mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. CONCLUSIONS Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE-/- mice against atherosclerosis.

  7. Vaccine-induced inflammation attenuates the vascular responses to mental stress.

    PubMed

    Paine, Nicola J; Ring, Christopher; Bosch, Jos A; Drayson, Mark T; Aldred, Sarah; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J C S

    2014-09-01

    Inflammation is associated with poorer vascular function, with evidence to suggest that inflammation can also impair the vascular responses to mental stress. This study examined the effects of vaccine-induced inflammation on vascular responses to mental stress in healthy participants. Eighteen male participants completed two stress sessions: an inflammation condition having received a typhoid vaccination and a control (non-inflamed) condition. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 (p's<.001) increased following vaccination, confirming modest increases in inflammation. Mental stress increased blood flow, blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output in both conditions (all p's<.001), but the blood flow response to stress was attenuated having received the vaccination compared to the control condition (p's<.05). These results further implicate the interaction between inflammation and the vasculature as a mechanism through which stress may trigger myocardial infarction.

  8. Orientin inhibits high glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kwak, Soyoung; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-12-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Orientin, a C-glycosyl flavonoid, is known to have anxiolytic and antioxidative activity. In this study, we assessed whether orientin can suppress vascular inflammation induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. Our data indicate that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Remarkably, the vascular inflammatory effects of HG were attenuated by pretreatment with orientin. Since vascular inflammation induced by HG is critical in the development of diabetic complications, our results suggest that orientin may have significant benefits in the treatment of diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  9. Arginase: The Emerging Therapeutic Target for Vascular Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihong; Ming, Xiu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation in the vascular wall are essential mechanisms of atherosclerosis and vascular dysfunctions associated with risk factors such as metabolic diseases, aging, hypertension, etc. Evidence has been provided that activation of the vascular endothelial cells in the presence of the risk factors promotes oxidative stress and vascular inflammatory responses, leading to acceleration of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Increasing number of studies from recent years demonstrates that uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), whereby the enzyme eNOS produces detrimental amount of superoxide anion O2− instead the vasoprotective nitric oxide (NO⋅), plays a critical role in vascular dysfunction under various pathophysiological conditions and in aging. The mechanisms of eNOS-uncoupling seem multiple and complex. Recent research provides emerging evidence supporting an essential role of increased activity of arginases including arginase-I and arginase-II in causing eNOS-uncoupling, which results in vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, and ultimately leading to vascular diseases. This review article will summarize the most recent findings on the functional roles of arginases in vascular diseases and/or dysfunctions and the underlying mechanisms in relation to oxidative stress and inflammations. Moreover, regulatory mechanisms of arginases in the vasculature are reviewed and the future perspectives of targeting arginases as therapeutic options in vascular diseases are discussed. PMID:23781221

  10. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells. PMID:26493158

  11. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the vascular responses to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kvietys, Peter R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and potentially life-threatening condition that involves the participation of a variety of chemical mediators, signaling pathways, and cell types. The microcirculation, which is critical for the initiation and perpetuation of an inflammatory response, exhibits several characteristic functional and structural changes in response to inflammation. These include vasomotor dysfunction (impaired vessel dilation and constriction), the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, endothelial barrier dysfunction (increased vascular permeability), blood vessel proliferation (angiogenesis), and enhanced thrombus formation. These diverse responses of the microvasculature largely reflect the endothelial cell dysfunction that accompanies inflammation and the central role of these cells in modulating processes as varied as blood flow regulation, angiogenesis, and thrombogenesis. The importance of endothelial cells in inflammation-induced vascular dysfunction is also predicated on the ability of these cells to produce and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inflammation seems to upset the balance between nitric oxide and superoxide within (and surrounding) endothelial cells, which is necessary for normal vessel function. This review is focused on defining the molecular targets in the vessel wall that interact with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide to produce the characteristic functional and structural changes that occur in response to inflammation. This analysis of the literature is consistent with the view that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contribute significantly to the diverse vascular responses in inflammation and supports efforts that are directed at targeting these highly reactive species to maintain normal vascular health in pathological conditions that are associated with acute or chronic inflammation. PMID:22154653

  12. Vascular C-reactive protein in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: role of vascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2006-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered to be a chronic inflammatory disease. Vascular inflammation occurs in response to injury induced by various stimuli, such as oxidative stress, shear stress, infection, and so on. This concept is supported by the recent clinical findings that C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. CRP, which was originally identified as a protein that could precipitate the C-polysaccharide of pneumococcal cell walls, has been widely used as a clinical marker of the state of inflammation, since its production by hepatocytes increases during the acute phase of the inflammatory response. Recent investigations have provided two new concepts for the research field of CRP, namely, its extra-hepatic production and its potent biological activities such as the induction of adhesion molecules and chemokines. Recently, we demonstrated that smooth muscle cells and macrophages in coronary arteries expressed CRP protein and mRNA, as evaluated using coronary specimens of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients obtained by atherectomy. The expression of vascular CRP was closely associated with NAD(P)H oxidase, an important enzymatic origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vessel walls. Furthermore, CRP directly up-regulated NAD(P)H oxidase p22(phox) and enhanced ROS generation in cultured coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Thus, vascular CRP is likely to be a direct participant in vascular inflammation and lesion formation via its potent biological effects. Since lysophosphatidylcholine, a major atherogenic lipid of oxidized LDL, was reported to activate vascular NAD(P)H oxidase, we speculate that there is a vicious circle consisting of vascular NAD(P)H oxidase, ROS and oxidized LDL. Since phagocytic NAD(P)H oxidase is at the first line of the host defense system, it is important to selectively suppress vascular NAD(P)H oxidase in the localized inflammatory lesions in therapeutic strategies for CAD. In this review, we

  13. Vicenin-2 and scolymoside inhibit high-glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-03-01

    The vascular inflammatory process has been suggested to play a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in this study, we attempted to determine whether 2 structurally related flavonoids found in Cyclopia subternata, vicenin-2 and scolymoside, can suppress high-glucose (HG)-induced vascular inflammatory processes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The effects of vicenin-2 and scolymoside on HG-induced vascular inflammation were determined by measuring vascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion and migration, cell adhesion molecule (CAM) expression levels, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. In addition, the anti-inflammation mechanism was investigated using immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. The data showed that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expression of CAMs, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Remarkably, pretreatment with vicenin-2 and scolymoside attenuated all of the above-mentioned vascular inflammatory effects of HG. HG-induced vascular inflammatory responses are critical events underlying the development of various diabetic complications; therefore, our results suggest that vicenin-2 and scolymoside have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  14. The role of oxidative stress, antioxidants and vascular inflammation in cardiovascular disease (a review).

    PubMed

    Siti, Hawa N; Kamisah, Y; Kamsiah, J

    2015-08-01

    The concept of mild chronic vascular inflammation as part of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, most importantly hypertension and atherosclerosis, has been well accepted. Indeed there are links between vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. However, there are still gaps in our understanding regarding this matter that might be the cause behind disappointing results of antioxidant therapy for cardiovascular risk factors in large-scale long-term randomised controlled trials. Apart from the limitations of our knowledge, limitations in methodology and assessment of the body's endogenous and exogenous oxidant-antioxidant status are a serious handicap. The pleiotropic effects of antioxidant and anti-inflammation that are shown by some well-established antihypertensive agents and statins partly support the idea of using antioxidants in vascular diseases as still relevant. This review aims to provide an overview of the links between oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors, importantly focusing on blood pressure regulation and atherosclerosis. In view of the potential benefits of antioxidants, this review will also examine the proposed role of vitamin C, vitamin E and polyphenols in cardiovascular diseases as well as the success or failure of antioxidant therapy for cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials.

  15. Human coronary artery perivascular adipocytes overexpress genes responsible for regulating vascular morphology, inflammation, and hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Bruce J.; Tong, Wilson S.; Manka, David; Tang, Yaoliang; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.; Unruh, Dusten; Blomkalns, Andra L.; Piegore, Mark G.; Weintraub, Daniel S.; Rudich, Steven M.; Kuhel, David G.; Hui, David Y.; Weintraub, Neal L.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory cross talk between perivascular adipose tissue and the blood vessel wall has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We previously reported that human perivascular (PV) adipocytes exhibit a proinflammatory phenotype and less adipogenic differentiation than do subcutaneous (SQ) adipocytes. To gain a global view of the genomic basis of biologic differences between PV and SQ adipocytes, we performed genome-wide expression analyses to identify differentially expressed genes between adipocytes derived from human SQ vs. PV adipose tissues. Although >90% of well-expressed genes were similarly regulated, we identified a signature of 307 differentially expressed genes that were highly enriched for functions associated with the regulation of angiogenesis, vascular morphology, inflammation, and blood clotting. Of the 156 PV upregulated genes, 59 associate with angiogenesis, vascular biology, or inflammation, noteworthy of which include TNFRSF11B (osteoprotegerin), PLAT, TGFB1, THBS2, HIF1A, GATA6, and SERPINE1. Of 166 PV downregulated genes, 21 associated with vascular biology and inflammation, including ANGPT1, ANGPTL1, and VEGFC. Consistent with the emergent hypothesis that PV adipocytes differentially regulate angiogenesis and inflammation, cell culture-derived adipocyte-conditioned media from PV adipocytes strongly enhanced endothelial cell tubulogenesis and monocyte migration compared with media from SQ adipocytes. These findings demonstrate that PV adipocytes have the potential to significantly modulate vascular inflammatory crosstalk in the setting of atherosclerosis by their ability to signal to both endothelial and inflammatory cells. PMID:23737535

  16. The bone morphogenic protein inhibitor, noggin, reduces glycemia and vascular inflammation in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Koga, Mitsuhisa; Engberding, Niels; Dikalova, Anna E; Chang, Kyung Hwa; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Long, James S; Lassègue, Bernard; Jo, Hanjoong; Griendling, Kathy K

    2013-09-01

    Vascular diseases frequently accompany diabetes mellitus. Based on the current understanding of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disorder of the vascular wall, it has been speculated that diabetes may accelerate atherosclerosis by inducing a proinflammatory milieu in the vasculature. ANG II and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in vascular inflammation. We evaluated the effect of angiotensin receptor blockade by valsartan and BMP inhibition by noggin on markers of vascular inflammation in a mouse model of diabetes. Noggin had no effect on blood pressure but decreased serum glucose levels, whereas valsartan significantly decreased blood pressure, but not serum glucose. Both inhibitors reduced reactive oxygen species production in the aorta. Additionally, noggin and valsartan diminish gene transcription and protein expression of various inflammatory molecules in the vascular wall. These observations indicate that although both inhibitors block superoxide production and have similar effects on inflammatory gene expression, glycemia and blood pressure may represent a secondary target differentially affected by noggin and valsartan. Our data clearly identify the BMP pathway as a potentially potent therapeutic target in diabetic inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23812391

  17. In Vivo Detection of Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 in Experimental Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Kimmo; Nikula, Tuomo; Holopainen, Riikka; Vähäsilta, Tommi; Matikainen, Marja-Terttu; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Huupponen, Risto; Halkola, Lauri; Nieminen, Lauri; Hiltunen, Jukka; Parviainen, Sakari; Clark, Michael R.; Knuuti, Juhani; Savunen, Timo; Kääpä, Pekka; Voipio-Pulkki, Liisa Maria; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein which mediates leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. To study the pathogenetic significance of VAP-1 in inflammatory disorders, an in vivo immunodetection method was used to detect the regulation of luminally expressed VAP-1 in experimental skin and joint inflammation in the pig and dog. Moreover, VAP-1 was studied as a potential target to localize inflammation by radioimmunoscintigraphy. Up-regulation of VAP-1 in experimental dermatitis and arthritis could be visualized by specifically targeted immunoscintigraphy. Moreover, the translocation of VAP-1 to the functional position on the endothelial surface was only seen in inflamed tissues. These results suggest that VAP-1 is both an optimal candidate for anti-adhesive therapy and a potential target molecule for imaging inflammation. PMID:10934150

  18. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  19. Endothelial microparticles mediate inflammation-induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Paula; Montes de Oca, Addy; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Merino, Ana; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Mariano; Carracedo, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells (ECs) with TNF-α causes an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and the production of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). BMP-2 is known to produce osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It was found that EMPs from TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells (HUVECs) contained a significant amount of BMP-2 and were able to enhance VSMC osteogenesis and calcification. Calcium content was greater in VSMCs exposed to EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs than EMPs from nontreated HUVECs (3.56 ± 0.57 vs. 1.48 ± 0.56 µg/mg protein; P < 0.05). The increase in calcification was accompanied by up-regulation of Cbfa1 (osteogenic transcription factor) and down-regulation of SM22α (VSMC lineage marker). Inhibition of BMP-2 by small interfering RNA reduced the VSMC calcification induced by EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Similar osteogenic capability was observed in EMPs from both patients with chronic kidney disease and senescent cells, which also presented a high level of BMP-2 expression. Labeling of EMPs with CellTracker shows that EMPs are phagocytized by VSMCs under all conditions (with or without high phosphate, control, and EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs). Our data suggest that EC damage results in the release of EMPs with a high content of calcium and BMP-2 that are able to induce calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs.

  20. Enzymatic antioxidant system in vascular inflammation and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems there is a balance between the production and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This balance is maintained by the presence of natural antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The enhancement of lipid peroxidation or the decrease of antioxidant protection present in metabolic diseases or bad lifestyle can induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have shown that oxidative stress can increase ROS reducing the formation of antioxidant defences, especially in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Some observation indicated that in the early stages of the disease there is a homeostatic up-regulation of the antioxidant enzyme system in response to increased free radicals to prevent vascular damage. As soon as free radicals get to chronically elevated levels, this compensation ceases. Therefore, SOD and the other enzymes may represent a good therapeutic target against ROS, but they are not useful markers for the diagnosis of CAD. In conclusion antioxidant enzymes are reduced in presence of metabolic disease and CAD. However the existence of genes that promote their enzymatic activity could contribute to create new drugs for the treatment of damage caused by metabolic diseases or lifestyle that increases the plasma ROS levels. PMID:26618108

  1. Endothelial microparticles mediate inflammation-induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Paula; Montes de Oca, Addy; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Merino, Ana; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Mariano; Carracedo, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells (ECs) with TNF-α causes an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and the production of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). BMP-2 is known to produce osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It was found that EMPs from TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells (HUVECs) contained a significant amount of BMP-2 and were able to enhance VSMC osteogenesis and calcification. Calcium content was greater in VSMCs exposed to EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs than EMPs from nontreated HUVECs (3.56 ± 0.57 vs. 1.48 ± 0.56 µg/mg protein; P < 0.05). The increase in calcification was accompanied by up-regulation of Cbfa1 (osteogenic transcription factor) and down-regulation of SM22α (VSMC lineage marker). Inhibition of BMP-2 by small interfering RNA reduced the VSMC calcification induced by EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Similar osteogenic capability was observed in EMPs from both patients with chronic kidney disease and senescent cells, which also presented a high level of BMP-2 expression. Labeling of EMPs with CellTracker shows that EMPs are phagocytized by VSMCs under all conditions (with or without high phosphate, control, and EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs). Our data suggest that EC damage results in the release of EMPs with a high content of calcium and BMP-2 that are able to induce calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. PMID:25342130

  2. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  3. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. PMID:26859834

  4. Selective induction of endothelial P2Y6 nucleotide receptor promotes vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Ann-Kathrin; Faigle, Marion; Zug, Stephanie; Rosenberger, Peter; Robaye, Bernard; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    During a systemic inflammatory response endothelial-expressed surface molecules have been strongly implicated in orchestrating immune responses. Previous studies have shown enhanced extracellular nucleotide release during acute inflammatory conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that endothelial nucleotide receptors could play a role in vascular inflammation. To address this hypothesis, we performed screening experiments and exposed human microvascular endothelia to inflammatory stimuli, followed by measurements of P2Y or P2X transcriptional responses. These studies showed a selective induction of the P2Y6 receptor (> 4-fold at 24 hours). Moreover, studies that used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, or immunofluorescence confirmed time- and dose-dependent induction of P2Y6 with tumor necrosis factor α or Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Studies that used MRS 2578 as P2Y6 receptor antagonist showed attenuated nuclear factor κB reporter activity and proinflammatory gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, pharmacologic or genetic in vivo studies showed attenuated inflammatory responses in P2Y6−/− mice or after P2Y6 antagonist treatment during LPS-induced vascular inflammation. These studies show an important contribution of P2Y6 signaling in enhancing vascular inflammation during systemic LPS challenge and implicate the P2Y6 receptor as a therapeutic target during systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:21173118

  5. Antioxidant and signal modulation properties of plant polyphenols in controlling vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kostyuk, Vladimir A; Potapovich, Alla I; Suhan, Tatyana O; de Luca, Chiara; Korkina, Liudmila G

    2011-05-11

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) play a critical role in the initiation of atherosclerosis through activation of inflammatory signaling. In the present work we investigated the role of antioxidant and signal modulation properties of plant polyphenols in controlling vascular inflammation. Significant decrease in intracellular NO level and superoxide overproduction was found in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with oxLDL, but not with LDL. The redox imbalance was prevented by the addition of quercetin or resveratrol. Expression analysis of 14 genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation revealed oxLDL-mediated up-regulation of genes specifically involved in leukocyte recruitment and adhesion. This up-regulation could be partially avoided by the addition of verbascoside or resveratrol, while treatment with quercetin resulted in a further increase in the expression of these genes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated HUVEC were also used for the evaluation of anti-inflammatory potency of plant polyphenols. Significant differences between HUVEC treaded with oxLDL and LPS were found in both the expression pattern of inflammation-related genes and the effects of plant polyphenols on cellular responses. The present data indicate that plant polyphenols may affect vascular inflammation not only as antioxidants but also as modulators of inflammatory redox signaling pathways.

  6. Phosphate overload directly induces systemic inflammation and malnutrition as well as vascular calcification in uremia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Tokumoto, Masanori; Tatsumoto, Narihito; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Noguchi, Hideko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Masutani, Kosuke; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-06-15

    Hyperphosphatemia contributes to increased cardiovascular mortality through vascular calcification (VC) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Malnutrition and inflammation are also closely linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular death in CKD. However, the effects of Pi overload on inflammation and malnutrition remain to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dietary Pi loading on the interactions among inflammation, malnutrition, and VC in CKD. We used control rats fed normal diets and adenine-induced CKD rats fed diets with different Pi concentrations ranging from 0.3% to 1.2% for 8 wk. CKD rats showed dietary Pi concentration-dependent increases in serum and tissue levels of TNF-α and urinary and tissue levels of oxidative stress markers and developed malnutrition (decrease in body weight, serum albumin, and urinary creatinine excretion), VC, and premature death without affecting kidney function. Treatment with 6% lanthanum carbonate blunted almost all changes induced by Pi overload. Regression analysis showed that serum Pi levels closely correlated with the extent of inflammation, malnutrition, and VC. Also, in cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, high-Pi medium directly increased the expression of TNF-α in advance of the increase in osteochondrogenic markers. Our data suggest that dietary Pi overload induces systemic inflammation and malnutrition, accompanied by VC and premature death in CKD, and that inhibition of Pi loading through dietary or pharmacological interventions or anti-inflammatory therapy may be a promising treatment for the prevention of malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis syndrome.

  7. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat as a novel agent postulated to act against vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sabán-Ruiz, José; Alonso-Pacho, Ana; Fabregate-Fuente, Martín; de la Puerta González-Quevedo, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the final two reactions that lead to uric acid formation. XOR is a complex molibdoflavoenzyme present in two different functional forms: dehydrogenase and xantine oxidase (XO). XO is a critical source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to vascular inflammation. Under normal physiological conditions, it is mainly found in the dehydrogenase form, while in inflammatory situations, posttranslational modification converts the dehydrogenase form into XO. These inflammatory conditions lead to an increase in XO levels and thus an increased ROS generation by the enzymatic process, finally resulting in alterations in vascular function. It has also been shown that XO secondarily leads to peroxynitrite formation. Peroxynitrite is one of the most powerful ROS that is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide and superoxide radicals, and is considered to be a marker for reactive nitrogen species, accompanied by oxidative stress. Febuxostat is a novel nonpurine XO-specific inhibitor for treating hyperuricemia. As febuxostat inhibits both oxidized and reduced forms of the enzyme, it inhibits the ROS formation and the inflammation promoted by oxidative stress. The administration of febuxostat has also reduced nitro-oxidative stress. XO serum levels are significantly increased in various pathological states such as inflammation, ischemia-reperfusion or aging and that XO-derived ROS formation is involved in oxidative damage. Thus, it may be possible that the inhibition of this enzymatic pathway by febuxostat would be beneficial for the vascular inflammation. In animal models, febuxostat treatment has already demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects, together with the reduction in XO activity. However, the role of febuxostat in humans requires further investigation.

  8. Vascular Function, Inflammation, and Variations in Cardiac Autonomic Responses to Particulate Matter Among Welders

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Mittleman, Murray A.; Christiani, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with health conditions associated with impaired vascular function and inflammation may be more susceptible to the adverse health effects of fine particulate (particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5)) exposure. In 2006, the authors conducted a panel study to investigate directly whether vascular function and inflammation (assessed by C-reactive protein) modify PM2.5-associated reductions in heart rate variability among 23 young male workers (mean age, 40 years) from Massachusetts. Concurrent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram and personal PM2.5 exposure information was collected over a total of 36 person-days, including either or both welding and nonwelding days. Linear mixed models were used to examine the 5-minute standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) in relation to the moving PM2.5 averages in the preceding 1–4 hours. C-reactive protein levels and 3 measures of vascular function (augmentation index, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure) were determined at baseline. The authors observed an inverse association between the 1-hour PM2.5 and 5-minute SDNN. Greater SDNN declines were observed among those with C-reactive protein (Pinteraction < 0.001) and augmentation index (P = 0.06) values at or above the 75th percentile and pulse pressure values below the 75th percentile (P < 0.001). Systemic inflammation and poorer vascular function appear to aggravate particle-related declines in heart rate variability among workers. PMID:19153215

  9. P-Selectin Targeted Dexamethasone-Loaded Lipid Nanoemulsions: A Novel Therapy to Reduce Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Simion, Viorel; Constantinescu, Cristina Ana; Stan, Daniela; Deleanu, Mariana; Tucureanu, Monica Madalina; Butoi, Elena; Manduteanu, Ileana; Simionescu, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a common process associated with numerous vascular pathologies. We hypothesized that targeting the inflamed endothelium by coupling a peptide with high affinity for P-selectin to the surface of dexamethasone-loaded lipid nanoemulsions will highly increase their specific binding to activated endothelial cells (EC) and reduce the cell activation. We developed and characterized dexamethasone-loaded lipid nanoemulsions directed towards P-selectin (PLN-Dex) and monitored their anti-inflammatory effects in vitro using cultured EC (EA.hy926 cells) and in vivo using a mouse model of acute inflammation [lipopolysaccharides (LPS) intravenously administered in C57BL/6 mice]. We found that PLN-Dex bound specifically to the surface of activated EC are efficiently internalized by EC and reduced the expression of proinflammatory genes, thus preventing the monocyte adhesion and transmigration to/through activated EC. Given intravenously in mice with acute inflammation, PLN-Dex accumulated at a significant high level in the lungs (compared to nontargeted nanoemulsions) and significantly reduced mRNA expression level of key proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1. In conclusion, the newly developed nanoformulation, PLN-Dex, is functional in vitro and in vivo, reducing selectively the endothelium activation and the consequent monocyte infiltration and diminishing significantly the lungs' inflammation, in a mouse model of acute inflammation. PMID:27703301

  10. MicroRNA-181b regulates NF-κB–mediated vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghui; Icli, Basak; Wara, Akm Khyrul; Belkin, Nathan; He, Shaolin; Kobzik, Lester; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Vera, Miguel Pinilla; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    EC activation and dysfunction have been linked to a variety of vascular inflammatory disease states. The function of microRNAs (miRNAs) in vascular EC activation and inflammation remains poorly understood. Herein, we report that microRNA-181b (miR-181b) serves as a potent regulator of downstream NF-κB signaling in the vascular endothelium by targeting importin-α3, a protein that is required for nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Overexpression of miR-181b inhibited importin-α3 expression and an enriched set of NF-κB–responsive genes such as adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and E-selectin in ECs in vitro and in vivo. In addition, treatment of mice with proinflammatory stimuli reduced miR-181b expression. Rescue of miR-181b levels by systemic administration of miR-181b “mimics” reduced downstream NF-κB signaling and leukocyte influx in the vascular endothelium and decreased lung injury and mortality in endotoxemic mice. In contrast, miR-181b inhibition exacerbated endotoxin-induced NF-κB activity, leukocyte influx, and lung injury. Finally, we observed that critically ill patients with sepsis had reduced levels of miR-181b compared with control intensive care unit (ICU) subjects. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that miR-181b regulates NF-κB–mediated EC activation and vascular inflammation in response to proinflammatory stimuli and that rescue of miR-181b expression could provide a new target for antiinflammatory therapy and critical illness. PMID:22622040

  11. Oxidative airway inflammation leads to systemic and vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, A; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Imam, F; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Bahashwan, Saleh A

    2015-05-01

    Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance plays an important role in repeated cycles of airway inflammation observed in asthma. It is when reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelm antioxidant defenses that a severe inflammatory state becomes apparent and may impact vasculature. Several studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and cardiovascular complications; however so far none has investigated the link between airway oxidative stress and systemic/vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of vascular/systemic oxidant-antioxidant balance. Rats were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with OVA. Rats were then assessed for airway and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxides) and antioxidants measured as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and thiol content. Challenge with OVA led to increased airway inflammation and oxidative stress with a concomitant increase in vascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in the vasculature was significantly inhibited by antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine; whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation worsened it. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative airway inflammation is associated with vascular/systemic oxidative stress which might predispose these patients to increased cardiovascular risk.

  12. Effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on inflammation in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gojova, Andrea; Lee, Jun-Tae; Jung, Heejung S.; Guo, Bing; Barakat, Abdul I.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    Because vascular endothelial cell inflammation is critical in the development of cardiovascular pathology, we hypothesized that direct exposure of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to ultrafine particles induces an inflammatory response. To test the hypothesis, we incubated HAECs for 4 h with different concentrations (0.001–50 μg/ml) of CeO2 nanoparticles and subsequently measured mRNA levels of the three inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Ceria nanoparticles caused very little inflammatory response in HAECs, even at the highest dose. This material is apparently rather benign in comparison with Y2O3 and ZnO nanoparticles that we have studied previously. These results suggest that inflammation in HAECs following acute exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles depends strongly on particle composition. PMID:19558244

  13. Macrophage-Mediated Injury and Repair After Ischemic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Sarah C.; Cantley, Lloyd G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic kidney injury is a common complication in hospitalized patients. Currently no treatment is available for augmenting kidney repair or preventing progressive kidney fibrosis. Animal models of acute kidney injury demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system plays a major role in the systemic response to ischemia/reperfusion injury. Macrophage depletion studies suggest that macrophages, key participants in the innate immune response, augment the initial injury after reperfusion, but also promote tubular repair and contribute to long-term kidney fibrosis after ischemic injury. The distinct functional outcomes seen following macrophage depletion at different time points after ischemia/reperfusion injury suggest heterogeneity in macrophage activation states. Identifying the pathways that regulate the transitions of macrophage activation is thus critical for understanding the mechanisms that govern both macrophage-mediated injury and repair in the post-ischemic kidney. This review examines our current understanding of the complex and intricately controlled pathways that determine monocyte recruitment, macrophage activation, and macrophage effector functions after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Careful delineation of repair and resolution pathways could provide therapeutic targets for the development of effective treatments to offer patients with acute kidney injury. PMID:24442822

  14. Aging Exacerbates Obesity-Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Perivascular Adipose Tissue in Mice: A Paracrine Mechanism Contributing to Vascular Redox Dysregulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey-Downs, Lora C.; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in the elderly individuals is increasing at alarming rates and there is evidence suggesting that elderly individuals are more vulnerable to the deleterious cardiovascular effects of obesity than younger individuals. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote the development of cardiovascular disease remain unclear. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced inflammation in perivascular adipose tissue, which contributes to increased vascular oxidative stress and inflammation in a paracrine manner. To test this hypothesis, we assessed changes in the secretome, reactive oxygen species production, and macrophage infiltration in periaortic adipose tissue of young (7 month old) and aged (24 month old) high-fat diet–fed obese C57BL/6 mice. High-fat diet–induced vascular reactive oxygen species generation significantly increased in aged mice, which was associated with exacerbation of endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation. In young animals, high-fat diet–induced obesity promoted oxidative stress in the perivascular adipose tissue, which was associated with a marked proinflammatory shift in the profile of secreted cytokines and chemokines. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and significantly increased macrophage infiltration in periaortic adipose tissue. Using cultured arteries isolated from young control mice, we found that inflammatory factors secreted from the perivascular fat tissue of obese aged mice promote significant prooxidative and proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in the vascular wall, mimicking the aging phenotype. Overall, our findings support an important role for localized perivascular adipose tissue inflammation in exacerbation of vascular oxidative stress and inflammation in aging, an effect that likely enhances the risk for development of cardiovascular diseases from obesity in the elderly individuals

  15. The Role of Src Kinase in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Se Eun; Yi, Young-Su; Oh, Jueun; Yoo, Byong Chul; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2012-01-01

    Src kinase (Src) is a tyrosine protein kinase that regulates cellular metabolism, survival, and proliferation. Many studies have shown that Src plays multiple roles in macrophage-mediated innate immunity, such as phagocytosis, the production of inflammatory cytokines/mediators, and the induction of cellular migration, which strongly implies that Src plays a pivotal role in the functional activation of macrophages. Macrophages are involved in a variety of immune responses and in inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis. Previous studies have suggested roles for Src in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses; however, recently, new functions for Src have been reported, implying that Src functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses that have not been described. In this paper, we discuss recent studies regarding a number of these newly defined functions of Src in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Moreover, we discuss the feasibility of Src as a target for the development of new pharmaceutical drugs to treat macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. We provide insights into recent reports regarding new functions for Src that are related to macrophage-related inflammatory responses and the development of novel Src inhibitors with strong immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties, which could be applied to various macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23209344

  16. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Sheykhzade, Majid; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered the main drivers of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis after inhalation of particulate matter. In addition, new studies have shown that particle exposure can induce the level of bioactive mediators in serum, driving vascular- and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE -/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 μg nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 μg/mouse/exposure; once a week for 10 weeks). Inflammation was determined by counting cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Serum Amyloid A3 (Saa3) expression and glutathione status were determined in lung tissue. Plaque progression was assessed in the aorta and the brachiocephalic artery. The effect of vasoactive mediators in plasma of exposed ApoE-/- mice was assessed in aorta rings isolated from naïve C57BL/6 mice. Pulmonary exposure to CB and/or LPS resulted in pulmonary inflammation with a robust influx of neutrophils. The CB exposure did not promote plaque progression in aorta or BCA. Incubation with 0.5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naïve mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. Nevertheless, plasma extracted from mice exposed to nanosized CB induced vasoconstriction in aortas of naïve wild-type mice, an effect possibly related to increased plasma serotonin. PMID:27571356

  17. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Sheykhzade, Majid; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Møller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered the main drivers of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis after inhalation of particulate matter. In addition, new studies have shown that particle exposure can induce the level of bioactive mediators in serum, driving vascular- and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE -/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 μg nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 μg/mouse/exposure; once a week for 10 weeks). Inflammation was determined by counting cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Serum Amyloid A3 (Saa3) expression and glutathione status were determined in lung tissue. Plaque progression was assessed in the aorta and the brachiocephalic artery. The effect of vasoactive mediators in plasma of exposed ApoE-/- mice was assessed in aorta rings isolated from naïve C57BL/6 mice. Pulmonary exposure to CB and/or LPS resulted in pulmonary inflammation with a robust influx of neutrophils. The CB exposure did not promote plaque progression in aorta or BCA. Incubation with 0.5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naïve mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. Nevertheless, plasma extracted from mice exposed to nanosized CB induced vasoconstriction in aortas of naïve wild-type mice, an effect possibly related to increased plasma serotonin. PMID:27571356

  18. PINK1 and its familial Parkinson's disease-associated mutation regulate brain vascular endothelial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yunfu, Wang; Guangjian, Liu; Ping, Zhong; Yanpeng, Sun; Xiaoxia, Fang; Wei, Hu; Jiang, Yuan; Jingquan, Hu; Songlin, Wang; Hongyan, Zhang; Yong, Liu; Shi, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating disorder that affects movement. Inflammation-mediated endothelial dysfunction has been found to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. More than 40 PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) mutations have been found in PD patients. The effects of PINK1 in vascular inflammation are as yet unknown. In this study, our findings revealed that PINK1 can be increased by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). We found that wild-type PINK1 prevents expression of the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), thus inhibiting the attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. However, PINK1G309D, the loss-of-function mutation associated with early-onset familial PD, promotes expression of VCAM-1 and exacerbates attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. Mechanism studies revealed that overexpression of wild-type PINK1 inhibits the VCAM-1 promoter by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1). However, PINK1G309D promotes the VCAM-1 promoter by increasing the transcriptional activity of IRF-1. PMID:24385196

  19. Is exercise training an effective therapy targeting endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall inflammation?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fernando; Alves, Alberto Jorge; Duarte, José Alberto; Oliveira, José

    2010-06-11

    There is an increasing evidence that endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall inflammation are present in all stages of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis does not have to necessarily progress to an acute clinical event. Several therapeutic strategies exist, such as exercise training, which mitigates endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Exercise training consistently improves the nitric oxide bioavailability, and the number of endothelial progenitor cells, and also diminishes the level of inflammatory markers, namely pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein. However, the mechanisms by which exercise improves endothelial function in coronary artery disease patients are not fully clarified. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the positive effect of exercise on the disease progression. They include the decrease in cytokine production by the adipose tissue, skeletal muscles, endothelial cells, and blood mononuclear cells, and also, the increase in the bioavailability of nitric oxide, antioxidant defences, and regenerative capacity of endothelium. This study aims to provide a critical review of the literature linking exercise, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery patients, and to discuss the potential mechanisms behind the exercise-training improvement of endothelial function and inflammatory status.

  20. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  1. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  2. Nanostructures to modulate vascular inflammation: Multifunctional nanoparticles for quantifiable siRNA delivery and molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Megan Marie

    Early steps in the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis involve the recruitment of leukocytes to the vascular endothelium through the expression or up-regulation of adhesion molecules. These adhesion molecules are critical mediators of leukocyte attachment and subsequent extravasation through transendothelial migration. One of these adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is particularly attractive as a marker of early atherosclerotic activity due to its low expression level on normal endothelium and up-regulation prior to and during the development of early lesions. With this in mind, the purpose of this thesis was to develop nanostructures for the detection and down-regulation of adhesion molecules by the vascular endothelium. To detect early inflammation we designed a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle (PFC-NP) probe, which was used for in vivo targeting of VCAM-1. Nanoparticles were detected ex vivo by the magnetic resonance (MR) signature from the fluorine core of the particle. Nanoparticles accumulated in tissues characterized by early inflammatory processes. To down-regulate VCAM-1 expression by vascular endothelial cells, cationic PFC-NP were produced through the addition of the cationic lipid 1,2-Dioleoyl-3-Trimethylammonium-Propane. Cationic PFC-NP were able to deliver anti-VCAM-1 siRNA to endothelial cells through a non-standard lipid raft mediated endocytic pathway. VCAM-1 levels were significantly reduced in treated cells indicating that this delivery mechanism may be advantageous for delivery of cargo into the cytoplasm. Using the fluorine signature from the core of the cationic PFC-NP, we were able to quantify and localize this siRNA delivery agent both in vitro and in vivo. The ability to quantify the local concentrations of these particles could be of great benefit for estimating local drug concentrations and developing new pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic paradigms to describe this new class of

  3. Growth signals, inflammation, and vascular perturbations: mechanistic links between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hursting, Stephen D; Hursting, Marcie J

    2012-08-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2). Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifesting in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with particular emphasis on obesity-associated enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent possible mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link.

  4. Endothelial targeting of nanocarriers loaded with antioxidant enzymes for protection against vascular oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Elizabeth D.; Chorny, Michael; Greineder, Colin F.; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial-targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), is promising strategy for protecting organs and tissues from inflammation and oxidative stress. Here we describe Protective Antioxidant Carriers for Endothelial Targeting (PACkET), the first carriers capable of targeted endothelial delivery of both catalase and SOD. PACkET formed through controlled precipitation loaded ~30% enzyme and protected it from proteolytic degradation, whereas attachment of PECAM monoclonal antibodies to surface of the enzyme-loaded carriers, achieved without adversely affecting their stability and functionality, provided targeting. Isotope tracing and microscopy showed that PACkET exhibited specific endothelial binding and internalization in vitro. Endothelial targeting of PACkET was validated in vivo by specific (vs IgG-control) accumulation in the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous injection achieving 33% of injected dose at 30 min. Catalase loaded PACkET protects endothelial cells from killing by H2O2 and alleviated the pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in mouse model of endotoxin-induced lung injury, whereas SOD-loaded PACkET mitigated cytokine-induced endothelial pro-inflammatory activation and endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. These studies indicate that PACkET offers a modular approach for vascular targeting of therapeutic enzymes. PMID:24480537

  5. Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation via downregulating nuclear transcription factor-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Si, Yanhong; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Jilong; Guo, Shoudong; Zhai, Lei; Yao, Shutong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Gu, Jue; Qin, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of niacin on vascular inflammatory lesions in vivo and in vitro as well as its lipid-regulating mechanism. In vivo study revealed that niacin downregulated the levels of inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) in plasma, suppressed protein expression of CD68 and NF-κB p65 in arterial wall, and attenuated oxidative stress in guinea pigs that have been fed high fat diet. In vitro study further confirmed that niacin decreased the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and inhibited NF-κB p65 and notch1 protein expression in oxLDL-stimulated HUVECs and THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, niacin attenuated oxLDL-induced apoptosis of HUVECs as well. In addition, niacin significantly lessened lipid deposition in arterial wall, increased HDL-C and apoA levels and decreased TG and non-HDL-C levels in plasma, and upregulated the mRNA amount of cholesterol 7 α-hydroxylase A1 in liver of guinea pigs. These data suggest for the first time that niacin inhibits vascular inflammation in vivo and in vitro via downregulating NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, niacin also modulates plasma lipid by upregulating the expression of factors involved in the process of reverse cholesterol transport.

  6. Niacin Inhibits Vascular Inflammation via Downregulating Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanhong; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Jilong; Guo, Shoudong; Zhai, Lei; Yao, Shutong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Gu, Jue; Qin, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of niacin on vascular inflammatory lesions in vivo and in vitro as well as its lipid-regulating mechanism. In vivo study revealed that niacin downregulated the levels of inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) in plasma, suppressed protein expression of CD68 and NF-κB p65 in arterial wall, and attenuated oxidative stress in guinea pigs that have been fed high fat diet. In vitro study further confirmed that niacin decreased the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and inhibited NF-κB p65 and notch1 protein expression in oxLDL-stimulated HUVECs and THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, niacin attenuated oxLDL-induced apoptosis of HUVECs as well. In addition, niacin significantly lessened lipid deposition in arterial wall, increased HDL-C and apoA levels and decreased TG and non-HDL-C levels in plasma, and upregulated the mRNA amount of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase A1 in liver of guinea pigs. These data suggest for the first time that niacin inhibits vascular inflammation in vivo and in vitro via downregulating NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, niacin also modulates plasma lipid by upregulating the expression of factors involved in the process of reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:24991087

  7. Probiotic mixture VSL#3 reduce high fat diet induced vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee Kwan; El-Nezami, Hani; Chen, Yan; Kinnunen, Kristiina; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis results from chronic inflammation potentially caused by translocation of bacterial components from the oro-gastrointestinal tract to circulation. Specific probiotics have anti-inflammatory effects and may reduce bacterial translocation. We thereby tested whether a probiotic mixture with documented anti-inflammatory potential could reduce atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice were fed high fat diet alone or with VSL#3 or a positive control treatment, telmisartan or both for 12 weeks. All treatments reduced atherosclerotic plaques significantly compared to high fat diet alone. VSL#3 significantly reduced proinflammatory adhesion molecules and risk factors of plaque rupture, reduced vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis to a comparable extent to telmisartan; and VSL#3 treated mice had the most distinctly different intestinal microbiota composition from the control groups. Combining the VSL#3 and telmisartan brought no further benefits. Our findings showed the therapeutic potential of VSL#3 in reducing atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation. PMID:27576894

  8. The influence of hypoxic physical activity on cfDNA as a new marker of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna; Orysiak, Joanna; Sitkowski, Dariusz; Banach, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is important for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise biochemistry and physiology. It is likely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by apoptosis of endothelial cells and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and/or by NETosis of immune cells induced by strenuous exercise. Increases of cfDNA are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome, and might be related to aseptic vascular inflammation in athletes. Yet, the relevance of systemic inflammation and cfDNA with endothelial dysfunction in athletes still remains unclear. In this review article, we provide a current overview of exercise-induced cfDNA release to the circulation with special emphasis on its relationship with apoptosis and NETosis and the effect of hypoxic physical activity on vascular inflammation in athletes. PMID:26788076

  9. The influence of hypoxic physical activity on cfDNA as a new marker of vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Andrzej; Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna; Orysiak, Joanna; Sitkowski, Dariusz; Banach, Maciej

    2015-12-10

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is important for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise biochemistry and physiology. It is likely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by apoptosis of endothelial cells and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and/or by NETosis of immune cells induced by strenuous exercise. Increases of cfDNA are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome, and might be related to aseptic vascular inflammation in athletes. Yet, the relevance of systemic inflammation and cfDNA with endothelial dysfunction in athletes still remains unclear. In this review article, we provide a current overview of exercise-induced cfDNA release to the circulation with special emphasis on its relationship with apoptosis and NETosis and the effect of hypoxic physical activity on vascular inflammation in athletes. PMID:26788076

  10. Chronic allergic inflammation causes vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 hypomorph and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) gene have been identified in patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however, disease penetrance is low, suggesting additional factors play a role. Inflammation is associated with PAH and vascular remodeling, but whether allergic inflammation triggers vascular remodeling in individuals with BMPR2 mutations is unknown. Our goal was to determine if chronic allergic inflammation would induce more severe vascular remodeling and PAH in mice with reduced BMPR-II signaling. Groups of Bmpr2 hypomorph and wild-type (WT) Balb/c/Byj mice were exposed to house dust mite (HDM) allergen, intranasally for 7 or 20 weeks to generate a model of chronic inflammation. HDM exposure induced similar inflammatory cell counts in all groups compared to controls. Muscularization of pulmonary arterioles and arterial wall thickness were increased after 7 weeks HDM, more severe at 20 weeks, but similar in both groups. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was measured by direct cardiac catheterization to assess PAH. RVSP was similarly increased in both HDM exposed groups after 20 weeks compared to controls, but not after 7 weeks. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine was also assessed and interestingly, at 20 weeks, was more severe in HDM exposed Bmpr2 hypomorph mice versus WT. We conclude that chronic allergic inflammation caused PAH and while the severity was mild and similar between WT and Bmpr2 hypomorph mice, AHR was enhanced with reduced BMPR-II signaling. These data suggest that vascular remodeling and PAH resulting from chronic allergic inflammation occurs independently of BMPR-II pathway alterations.

  11. Overexpression of circadian clock protein cryptochrome (CRY) 1 alleviates sleep deprivation-induced vascular inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bing; Deng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance of the circadian clock by sleep deprivation has been proposed to be involved in the regulation of inflammation. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian oscillator components in regulating the pro-inflammatory process during sleep deprivation remains poorly understood. Using a sleep deprivation mouse model, we showed here that sleep deprivation increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines expression and decreased the expression of cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) in vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, the adhesion molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin were elevated in vascular endothelial cells and the monocytes binding to vascular endothelial cells were also increased by sleep deprivation. Interestingly, overexpression of CRY1 in a mouse model by adenovirus vector significantly inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, and NF-κB signal pathway activation, as well as the binding of monocytes to vascular endothelial cells. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that CRY1 could repress the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that overexpression of CRY1 inhibited the basal concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), leading to decreased protein kinase A activity, which resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p65. Taken together, these results suggested that the overexpression of CRY1 inhibited sleep deprivation-induced vascular inflammation that might be associated with NF-κB and cAMP/PKA pathways.

  12. [Lp-PLA2, a biomarker of vascular inflammation and vulnerability of atherosclerosis plaques].

    PubMed

    Bonnefont-Rousselot, D

    2016-05-01

    A chronic inflammation is involved in various stages of development of the atherosclerotic plaques. Among the emerging biomarkers of atherogenesis, the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), formerly known as PAF-acetylhydrolase (McIntyre et al., 2009), hydrolyses the oxidized short chain phospholipids of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), thereby releasing pro-inflammatory mediators (lysophospholipids and oxidized fatty acids). Lp-PLA2, produced by monocytes/macrophages and T-lymphocytes, and mainly associated with LDL (Gazi et al., 2005), is predominantly expressed in the necrotic center of the atherosclerotic plaques and in the macrophage-rich areas (Kolodgie et al., 2006). It would have a predictive role of cardiovascular (CV) events in relation to the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. Determination of Lp-PLA2 has been proposed in the assessment of the CV risk, to ensure a better stratification of populations at intermediate risk for targeted therapy (Davidson et al., 2008). Its proatherogenic role suggested that inhibition of its activity could ensure a better vascular protection in combination with cholesterol-lowering agents. Nevertheless, Lp-PLA2 is not yet a fully validated marker for use in daily clinical practice, especially since the studies using an inhibitor of Lp-PLA2 (darapladib) (STABILITY Investigators et al., 2014; O'Donoghue et al., 2014) did not show any reduction in coronary events. Lp-PLA2 could have a site-specific role in plaque inflammation and development (Fenning et al., 2015). High Lp-PLA2 activity could reflect a response to pro-inflammatory stress characteristic of atherosclerosis (Marathe et al., 2014). This presentation aims at clarifying the involvement of Lp-PLA2 in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and at assessing its interest both as a biomarker for the onset of CV events and as a therapeutic target. PMID:26499399

  13. Hepatic Overexpression of Hemopexin Inhibits Inflammation and Vascular Stasis in Murine Models of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vercellotti, Gregory M; Zhang, Ping; Nguyen, Julia; Abdulla, Fuad; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Phong; Nowotny, Carlos; Steer, Clifford J; Smith, Ann; Belcher, John D

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have low serum hemopexin (Hpx) levels due to chronic hemolysis. We hypothesized that in SCD mice, hepatic overexpression of hemopexin would scavenge the proximal mediator of vascular activation, heme, and inhibit inflammation and microvascular stasis. To examine the protective role of Hpx in SCD, we transplanted bone marrow from NY1DD SCD mice into Hpx-/- or Hpx+/+ C57BL/6 mice. Dorsal skin fold chambers were implanted 13 wks post-transplant, and microvascular stasis (% nonflowing venules) was evaluated in response to heme infusion. Hpx-/- sickle mice had significantly greater microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion than Hpx+/+ sickle mice (p < 0.05), demonstrating the protective effect of Hpx in SCD. We utilized Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated gene transfer to overexpress wild-type rat Hpx (wt-Hpx) in NY1DD and Townes-SS SCD mice. Control SCD mice were treated with lactated Ringer’s solution (LRS) or a luciferase (Luc) plasmid. Plasma and hepatic Hpx were significantly increased compared with LRS and Luc controls. Microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion in NY1DD and Townes-SS mice overexpressing wt-Hpx had significantly less stasis than controls (p < 0.05). Wt-Hpx overexpression markedly increased hepatic nuclear Nrf2 expression, HO-1 activity and protein, and the heme-Hpx binding protein and scavenger receptor CD91/LRP1, and decreased NF-κB activation. Two missense (ms)-Hpx SB constructs that bound neither heme nor the Hpx receptor CD91/LRP1 did not prevent heme-induced stasis. In conclusion, increasing Hpx levels in transgenic sickle mice via gene transfer activates the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant axis and ameliorates inflammation and vasoocclusion. PMID:27451971

  14. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  15. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection.

  16. Vascular adhesion protein-1 promotes liver inflammation and drives hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Chris J.; Shepherd, Emma L.; Claridge, Lee C.; Rantakari, Pia; Curbishley, Stuart M.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.; Hubscher, Stefan G.; Reynolds, Gary M.; Aalto, Kristiina; Anstee, Quentin M.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Smith, David J.; Day, Christopher P.; Adams, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of manifestations, including steatosis and cirrhosis. Progressive disease is characterized by hepatic leukocyte accumulation in the form of steatohepatitis. The adhesion molecule vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a membrane-bound amine oxidase that promotes leukocyte recruitment to the liver, and the soluble form (sVAP-1) accounts for most circulating monoamine oxidase activity, has insulin-like effects, and can initiate oxidative stress. Here, we determined that hepatic VAP-1 expression is increased in patients with chronic liver disease and that serum sVAP-1 levels are elevated in patients with NAFLD compared with those in control individuals. In 4 murine hepatic injury models, an absence or blockade of functional VAP-1 reduced inflammatory cell recruitment to the liver and attenuated fibrosis. Moreover, disease was reduced in animals expressing a catalytically inactive form of VAP-1, implicating enzyme activity in the disease pathogenesis. Within the liver, hepatic stromal cells expressed functional VAP-1, and evaluation of cultured cells revealed that sVAP-1 promotes leukocyte migration through catalytic generation of ROS, which depended on VAP-1 enzyme activity. VAP-1 enhanced stromal cell spreading and wound closure and modulated expression of profibrotic genes. Together, these results link the amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 with hepatic inflammation and fibrosis and suggest that targeting VAP-1 has therapeutic potential for NAFLD and other chronic fibrotic liver diseases. PMID:25562318

  17. Magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles induce vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and inflammation by disturbing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, XueQin; Miao, YiMing; Chen, ZhiQiang; Qiang, PengFei; Cui, LiuQing; Jing, Hongjuan; Guo, YuQi

    2016-03-01

    Despite the considerable use of magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) worldwide, their safety is still an important topic of debate. In the present study, we detected the toxicity and biological behavior of bare-Fe3O4NPs (B-Fe3O4NPs) on human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our results showed that B-Fe3O4NPs did not induce cell death within 24h even at concentrations up to 400 μg/ml. The level of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were decreased after exposure to B-Fe3O4NPs, whereas the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were elevated. Importantly, B-Fe3O4NPs increased the accumulation of autophagosomes and LC3-II in HUVECs through both autophagy induction and the blockade of autophagy flux. The levels of Beclin 1 and VPS34, but not phosphorylated mTOR, were increased in the B-Fe3O4NP-treated HUVECs. Suppression of autophagy induction or stimulation of autophagy flux, at least partially, attenuated the B-Fe3O4NP-induced HUVEC dysfunction. Additionally, enhanced autophagic activity might be linked to the B-Fe3O4NP-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results demonstrated that B-Fe3O4NPs disturb the process of autophagy in HUVECs, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction and inflammation.

  18. Implications of Pericardial, Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue on Vascular Inflammation Measured Using 18FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ho Cheol; Hwang, Soon Young; Park, Soyeon; Ryu, Ja Young; Choi, Hae Yoon; Yoo, Hye Jin; Seo, Ji-A; Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nan Hee; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) is associated with adverse cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the relative implications of PAT, abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue on vascular inflammation have not been explored. Method and Results We compared the association of PAT, abdominal visceral fat area (VFA), and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) with vascular inflammation, represented as the target-to-background ratio (TBR), the blood-normalized standardized uptake value measured using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG-PET) in 93 men and women without diabetes or CVD. Age- and sex-adjusted correlation analysis showed that PAT, VFA, and SFA were positively associated with most cardiometabolic risk factors, including systolic blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin resistance and high sensitive C-reactive proteins (hsCRP), whereas they were negatively associated with HDL-cholesterol. In particular, the maximum TBR (maxTBR) values were positively correlated with PAT and VFA (r = 0.48 and r = 0.45, respectively; both P <0.001), whereas SFA showed a relatively weak positive relationship with maxTBR level (r = 0.31, P = 0.003). Conclusion This study demonstrated that both PAT and VFA are significantly and similarly associated with vascular inflammation and various cardiometabolic risk profiles. PMID:26270050

  19. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into normal rabbit arteries results in prolonged vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, K D; Dunn, P F; Owens, J W; Schulick, A H; Virmani, R; Sukhova, G; Libby, P; Dichek, D A

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are capable of high efficiency in vivo arterial gene transfer, and are currently in use as therapeutic agents in animal models of vascular disease. However, despite substantial data on the ability of viruses to cause vascular inflammation and proliferation, and the presence in current adenovirus vectors of viral open reading frames that are translated in vivo, no study has examined the effect of adenovirus vectors alone on the arterial phenotype. In a rabbit model of gene transfer into a normal artery, we examined potential vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal proliferation resulting from exposure to replication-defective adenovirus. Exposure of normal arteries to adenovirus vectors resulted in: (a) pronounced infiltration of T cells throughout the artery wall; (b) upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in arterial smooth muscle cells; (c) neointimal hyperplasia. These findings were present both 10 and 30 d after gene transfer, with no evidence of a decline in severity over time. Adenovirus vectors have pleiotropic effects on the arterial wall and cause significant pathology. Interpretation of experimental protocols that use adenovirus vectors to address either biological or therapeutic issues should take these observations into account. These observations should also prompt the design of more inert gene transfer vectors. Images PMID:8675667

  20. Dual targeting of CCR2 and CX3CR1 in an arterial injury model of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are important in the development of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of a novel CCR2 inhibitor in conjunction with CX3CR1 deletion on vascular inflammation. Methods The novel CCR2 antagonist MRL-677 was characterized using an in vivo model of monocyte migration. To determine the relative roles of CCR2 and CX3CR1 in vascular remodeling, normal or CX3CR1 deficient mice were treated with MRL-677. After 14 days, the level of intimal hyperplasia in the artery was visualized by paraffin sectioning and histology of the hind limbs. Results MRL-677 is a CCR2 antagonist that is effective in blocking macrophage trafficking in a peritoneal thioglycollate model. Intimal hyperplasia resulting from vascular injury was also assessed in mice. Based on the whole-blood potency of MRL-677, sufficient drug levels were maintained for the entire 14 day experimental period to afford good coverage of mCCR2 with MRL-677. Blocking CCR2 with MRL-677 resulted in a 56% decrease in the vascular injury response (n = 9, p < 0.05) in normal animals. Mice in which both CCR2 and CX3CR1 pathways were targeted (CX3CR1 KO mice given MRL-677) had an 88% decrease in the injury response (n = 6, p = 0.009). Conclusion In this study we have shown that blocking CCR2 with a low molecular weight antagonist ameliorates the inflammatory response to vascular injury. The protective effect of CCR2 blockade is increased in the presence of CX3CR1 deficiency suggesting that CX3CR1 and CCR2 have non-redundant functions in the progression of vascular inflammation. PMID:20836883

  1. Systems-level analysis of proteolytic events in increased vascular permeability and complement activation in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Prudova, Anna; Eckhard, Ulrich; Fingleton, Barbara; Overall, Christopher M

    2013-01-15

    During inflammation, vascular permeability is increased by various proteolytic events, such as the generation of bradykinin, that augment local tissue responses by enabling tissue penetration of serum proteins, including complement and acute-phase proteins. Proteases also govern inflammatory responses by processing extracellular matrix proteins and soluble bioactive mediators. We quantified changes in the proteome and the nature of protein amino termini (the N-terminome) and the altered abundance of murine proteases and inhibitors during skin inflammation. Through analysis of the N-terminome by iTRAQ-TAILS, we identified cotranslational and posttranslational αN-acetylation motifs, quantitative increases in protein abundance, and qualitative changes in the proteolytic signature during inflammation. Of the proteins identified in normal skin, about half were cleaved, and phorbol ester-induced inflammation increased the proportion of cleaved proteins, including chemokines and complement proteins, that were processed at previously uncharacterized sites. In response to phorbol ester-induced inflammation, mice deficient in matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) showed reduced accumulation of serum proteins in the skin and exhibited different proteolytic networks from those of wild-type mice. We found that the complement 1 (C1) inhibitor attenuated the increase in serum protein accumulation in inflamed skin. Cleavage and inactivation of the C1 inhibitor by MMP2 increased complement activation and bradykinin generation in wild-type mice, leading to increased vessel permeability during inflammation, which was diminished in Mmp2(-/-) mice. Thus, our systems-level analysis of proteolysis dissected cleavage events associated with skin inflammation and demonstrated that loss of a single protease could perturb the proteolytic signaling network and enhance inflammation.

  2. Role of chemokine RANTES in the regulation of perivascular inflammation, T-cell accumulation, and vascular dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Nosalski, Ryszard; Szczepaniak, Piotr; Budzyn, Klaudia; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Skiba, Dominik; Sagan, Agnieszka; Wu, Jing; Vinh, Antony; Marvar, Paul J; Guzik, Bartlomiej; Podolec, Jakub; Drummond, Grant; Lob, Heinrich E; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the role of perivascular inflammation in cardiovascular disease. We studied mechanisms of perivascular leukocyte infiltration in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and their links to vascular dysfunction. Chronic Ang II infusion in mice increased immune cell content of T cells (255 ± 130 to 1664 ± 349 cells/mg; P < 0.01), M1 and M2 macrophages, and dendritic cells in perivascular adipose tissue. In particular, the content of T lymphocytes bearing CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 1, CCR3, and CCR5 receptors for RANTES chemokine was increased by Ang II (CCR1, 15.6 ± 1.5% vs. 31 ± 5%; P < 0.01). Hypertension was associated with an increase in perivascular adipose tissue expression of the chemokine RANTES (relative quantification, 1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 3.5 ± 1.1; P < 0.05), which induced T-cell chemotaxis and vascular accumulation of T cells expressing the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5. Mechanistically, RANTES(-/-) knockout protected against vascular leukocyte, and in particular T lymphocyte infiltration (26 ± 5% in wild type Ang II vs. 15 ± 4% in RANTES(-/-)), which was associated with protection from endothelial dysfunction induced by Ang II. This effect was linked with diminished infiltration of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) and double-negative CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells in perivascular space and reduced vascular oxidative stress while FoxP3(+) T-regulatory cells were unaltered. IFN-γ ex vivo caused significant endothelial dysfunction, which was reduced by superoxide anion scavenging. In a human cohort, a significant inverse correlation was observed between circulating RANTES levels as a biomarker and vascular function measured as flow-mediated dilatation (R = -0.3, P < 0.01) or endothelial injury marker von Willebrand factor (R = +0.3; P < 0.01). Thus, chemokine RANTES is important in the regulation of vascular dysfunction through modulation of perivascular inflammation.-Mikolajczyk, T. P., Nosalski, R., Szczepaniak, P

  3. Role of chemokine RANTES in the regulation of perivascular inflammation, T-cell accumulation, and vascular dysfunction in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P.; Nosalski, Ryszard; Szczepaniak, Piotr; Budzyn, Klaudia; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Skiba, Dominik; Sagan, Agnieszka; Wu, Jing; Vinh, Antony; Marvar, Paul J.; Guzik, Bartlomiej; Podolec, Jakub; Drummond, Grant; Lob, Heinrich E.; Harrison, David G.; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the role of perivascular inflammation in cardiovascular disease. We studied mechanisms of perivascular leukocyte infiltration in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and their links to vascular dysfunction. Chronic Ang II infusion in mice increased immune cell content of T cells (255 ± 130 to 1664 ± 349 cells/mg; P < 0.01), M1 and M2 macrophages, and dendritic cells in perivascular adipose tissue. In particular, the content of T lymphocytes bearing CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 1, CCR3, and CCR5 receptors for RANTES chemokine was increased by Ang II (CCR1, 15.6 ± 1.5% vs. 31 ± 5%; P < 0.01). Hypertension was associated with an increase in perivascular adipose tissue expression of the chemokine RANTES (relative quantification, 1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 3.5 ± 1.1; P < 0.05), which induced T-cell chemotaxis and vascular accumulation of T cells expressing the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5. Mechanistically, RANTES−/− knockout protected against vascular leukocyte, and in particular T lymphocyte infiltration (26 ± 5% in wild type Ang II vs. 15 ± 4% in RANTES−/−), which was associated with protection from endothelial dysfunction induced by Ang II. This effect was linked with diminished infiltration of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ and double-negative CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells in perivascular space and reduced vascular oxidative stress while FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells were unaltered. IFN-γ ex vivo caused significant endothelial dysfunction, which was reduced by superoxide anion scavenging. In a human cohort, a significant inverse correlation was observed between circulating RANTES levels as a biomarker and vascular function measured as flow-mediated dilatation (R = −0.3, P < 0.01) or endothelial injury marker von Willebrand factor (R = +0.3; P < 0.01). Thus, chemokine RANTES is important in the regulation of vascular dysfunction through modulation of perivascular inflammation.—Mikolajczyk, T. P., Nosalski, R., Szczepaniak, P

  4. Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Essential Oil Exerts Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Macrophage Mediated Immune Response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, D; Gismondi, A; Basso, A; Canuti, L; Braglia, R; Canini, A; Mariani, F; Cappelli, G

    2016-01-01

    Different studies described the antibacterial properties of Lavandula angustifolia (Mill.) essential oil and its anti-inflammatory effects. Besides, no data exist on its ability to activate human macrophages during the innate response against Staphylococcus aureus. The discovery of promising regulators of macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, without side effects, could be useful for the prevention of, or as therapeutic remedy for, various inflammation-mediated diseases. This study investigated, by transcriptional analysis, how a L. angustifolia essential oil treatment influences the macrophage response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The results showed that the treatment increases the phagocytic rate and stimulates the containment of intracellular bacterial replication by macrophages. Our data showed that this stimulation is coupled with expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species production (i.e., CYBB and NCF4). Moreover, the essential oil treatment balanced the inflammatory signaling induced by S. aureus by repressing the principal pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors and inducing the heme oxygenase-1 gene transcription. These data showed that the L. angustifolia essential oil can stimulate the human innate macrophage response to a bacterium which is responsible for one of the most important nosocomial infection and might suggest the potential development of this plant extract as an anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory coadjutant drug. PMID:26730790

  5. Critical role of the C5a-activated neutrophils in high-fat diet-induced vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Mizuko; Ito, Shunsuke; Honda, Masaki; Inomata, Yukihiro; Egashira, Kensuke; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Exceed and chronic high-fat diet (HFD) contributes to the diagnosis and development of atherosclerosis, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. However, the key molecular component(s) triggered by HFD responsible for initiating vascular inflammation remain unknown. We observed that feeding HFD for 4 weeks is sufficient to induce leukocyte recruitment in the femoral artery of wild-type mice. Neutrophil- and monocyte-depletion analyses confirmed the preferential recruitment of neutrophils in these mice. Protein analysis of sera from HFD-fed mice revealed a marked elevation of complement component C5a levels. Exogenous C5a alone induced leukocyte recruitment, which was abolished by a C5a-receptor antagonist. We also examined the role of neutrophil-derived MCP-1 in accumulation of leukocytes in the artery. These results demonstrated a previously unrecognized role for C5a and neutrophils in the early onset of HFD-induced vascular inflammation. Further study may help in elucidating a novel regulatory pathway to control diet-induced inflammation such as that in case of atherosclerosis. PMID:26893238

  6. Tissue-engineered vascular grafts transform into mature blood vessels via an inflammation-mediated process of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jason D; Sawh-Martinez, Rajendra; Brennan, Matthew P; Jay, Steven M; Devine, Lesley; Rao, Deepak A; Yi, Tai; Mirensky, Tamar L; Nalbandian, Ani; Udelsman, Brooks; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Saltzman, W Mark; Snyder, Edward; Kyriakides, Themis R; Pober, Jordan S; Breuer, Christopher K

    2010-03-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are the earliest tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) to be used clinically. These TEVGs transform into living blood vessels in vivo, with an endothelial cell (EC) lining invested by smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, the process by which this occurs is unclear. To test if the seeded BMCs differentiate into the mature vascular cells of the neovessel, we implanted an immunodeficient mouse recipient with human BMC (hBMC)-seeded scaffolds. As in humans, TEVGs implanted in a mouse host as venous interposition grafts gradually transformed into living blood vessels over a 6-month time course. Seeded hBMCs, however, were no longer detectable within a few days of implantation. Instead, scaffolds were initially repopulated by mouse monocytes and subsequently repopulated by mouse SMCs and ECs. Seeded BMCs secreted significant amounts of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and increased early monocyte recruitment. These findings suggest TEVGs transform into functional neovessels via an inflammatory process of vascular remodeling.

  7. Contribution of inflammation to vascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Mohamed E; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an exceptionally high mortality rate, much of which results from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic low-grade inflammation, as evidenced by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), is a common feature of CKD and may cause atherosclerotic CVD through various pathogenetic mechanisms. Evidence suggests that persistent inflammation may also be a risk factor for progression of CKD, which may result in a vicious inflammation-driven circle. The causes of inflammation in CKD are multifactorial. The influence of various comorbidities may contribute to inflammation in the setting of progressive loss of renal function. Available data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines also play a central role in the genesis of the metabolic syndrome. There is a lack of epidemiological data on the prevalence and consequences of inflammation in relation to protein-energy wasting (PEW) and CVD in CKD patients from developing countries. The 'westernization' of nutritional intakes and changes of life style besides the high prevalence of chronic infections in developing countries are possible additive contributors to a high prevalence of inflammation, PEW and CVD among CKD patients. Also, genetic differences may affect inflammatory responses and nutritional status and, thus, the susceptibility to CVD in different regions.

  8. Class A scavenger receptor deficiency augments angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lingling; Li, Xiaoyu; Fang, Ru; Wang, Zhuoyun; Xu, Yiming; Zhang, Hanwen; Bai, Hui; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xudong; Ben, Jingjing; Xu, Yong; Chen, Qi

    2014-08-01

    Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a multifunctional molecule that participates in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Here we evaluated the role of SR-A in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive vascular remodeling. Chronic infusion of Ang II leads to an increased systolic blood pressure both in SR-A knockout (SR-A(-/-)) and wild type (SR-A(+/+)) mice with no significant difference between these two groups. SR-A(-/-) hypertensive mice, however, exhibited a marked augmentation of arterial wall thickening and vascular cell proliferation compared with SR-A(+/+) hypertensive mice. M1 macrophage markers were increased whereas M2 macrophage markers were decreased in vascular tissues of SR-A(-/-) mice. Co-culture experiments revealed that more pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α were produced by SR-A(-/-) peritoneal macrophages leading to a stronger proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. In addition, SR-A(-/-) macrophages were more prone to lipopolysaccharide-induced M1 differentiation while resisting interleukin-4-induced M2 differentiation. Importantly, transplantation of SR-A(-/-) bone marrow into SR-A(+/+) mice significantly augmented Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. These results show that SR-A is critical for Ang II-induced vascular remodeling by regulating macrophage polarization. Therefore, SR-A may be a useful therapeutic target for the intervention of hypertensive vascular remodeling. PMID:24875449

  9. Reduced vascular nitric oxide-cGMP signaling contributes to adipose tissue inflammation during high-fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Priya; Tateya, Sanshiro; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Morgan-Stevenson, Vicki; Han, Chang-Yeop; Clowes, Alexander W.; Daum, Guenter; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Chait, Alan; Kim, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Obesity is characterized by chronic inflammation of adipose tissue, which contributes to insulin resistance and diabetes. Although nitric oxide (NO) signaling has anti-inflammatory effects in the vasculature, whether reduced NO contributes to adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. We sought to determine whether 1) obesity induced by high-fat (HF) diet reduces endothelial nitric oxide signaling in adipose tissue, 2) reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling is sufficient to induce adipose tissue inflammation independent of diet, and 3) increased cGMP signaling can block adipose tissue inflammation induced by HF feeding. Methods and results Relative to mice fed a low-fat diet, HF diet markedly reduced phospho-eNOS and phospho-VASP, markers of vascular NO signaling. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was increased in adipose tissue of eNOS−/− mice. Conversely, enhancement of signaling downstream of NO by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibition using sildenafil attenuated HF-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and the recruitment of macrophages into adipose tissue. Finally, we implicate a role for Vasodilator- stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a downstream mediator of NO-cGMP signaling in mediating eNOS-induced anti-inflammatory effects since VASP−/− mice recapitulated the pro-inflammatory phenotype displayed by eNOS−/− mice. Conclusions These results imply a physiological role for endothelial NO to limit obesity-associated inflammation in adipose tissue and hence identifies the NO-cGMP-VASP pathway as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:21903940

  10. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  11. Senescent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Drive Inflammation Through an Interleukin-1α–Dependent Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sarah E.; Humphry, Melanie; Bennett, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective— Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) that become senescent are both present within atherosclerotic plaques and thought to be important to the disease process. However, senescent VSMCs are generally considered to only contribute through inaction, with failure to proliferate resulting in VSMC- and collagen-poor unstable fibrous caps. Whether senescent VSMCs can actively contribute to atherogenic processes, such as inflammation, is unknown. Approach and Results— We find that senescent human VSMCs develop a proinflammatory state known as a senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Senescent human VSMCs release high levels of multiple cytokines and chemokines driven by secreted interleukin-1α acting in an autocrine manner. Consequently, the VSMC senescence-associated secretory phenotype promotes chemotaxis of mononuclear cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, senescent VSMCs release active matrix metalloproteinase-9, secrete less collagen, upregulate multiple inflammasome components, and prime adjacent endothelial cells and VSMCs to a proadhesive and proinflammatory state. Importantly, maintaining the senescence-associated secretory phenotype places a large metabolic burden on senescent VSMCs, such that they can be selectively killed by inhibiting glucose utilization. Conclusions— Senescent VSMCs may actively contribute toward the chronic inflammation associated with atherosclerosis through the interleukin-1α–driven senescence-associated secretory phenotype and the priming of adjacent cells to a proatherosclerotic state. These data also suggest that inhibition of this potentially important source of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis requires blockade of interleukin-1α and not interleukin-1β. PMID:26139463

  12. Combined concurrent nanoshell loaded macrophage-mediated photothermal and photodynamic therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Trinidad, Anthony; Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Kwon, Young J.; Madsen, Steen

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages loaded with gold nanoshells (AuNS), that convert near infrared light to heat, can be used as transport vectors for photothermal hyperthermia of tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of combined macrophage mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) and PDT on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The results provide proof of concept for the use of macrophages as a delivery vector of AuNS for photothermal enhancement of the effects of PDT on squamous cell carcinoma. A significant synergy was demonstrated with combined PDT and PTT compared to each modality applied separately.

  13. Vascular damage, fibrosis, and chronic inflammation in mechanical back pain problems.

    PubMed

    Jayson, M I

    1989-05-01

    Our current hypothesis is that mechanical damage in the spine such as a disc prolapse can lead directly to pain. However, pain arising for this reason is usually of short duration. In many subjects, however, the mechanical problems lead to vascular damage and, in particular, venous obstruction and dilatation with endothelial damage, fibrin deposition, and intravascular thromboses. In turn, this is associated with perineural and intraneural fibrosis. There is a defect in the fibrinolytic system in the peripheral blood that may be the result of vascular damage but in turn may contribute to the persistence of this problem. Therefore, it seems likely that in many patients with chronic mechanical back pain there are important vascular, fibrotic, and inflammatory components to the problem. Treatment in the future should be directed specifically at these aspects of the disorder and hopefully can lead to better control of symptoms.

  14. Liposomal prednisolone inhibits vascular inflammation and enhances venous outward remodeling in a murine arteriovenous fistula model

    PubMed Central

    Wong, ChunYu; Bezhaeva, Taisiya; Rothuizen, Tonia C.; Metselaar, Josbert M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Verbeek, Floris P. R.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Wezel, Anouk; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Rabelink, Ton J.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) for hemodialysis access have a 1-year primary patency rate of only 60%, mainly as a result of maturation failure that is caused by insufficient outward remodeling and intimal hyperplasia. The exact pathophysiology remains unknown, but the inflammatory vascular response is thought to play an important role. In the present study we demonstrate that targeted liposomal delivery of prednisolone increases outward remodeling of the AVF in a murine model. Liposomes accumulate in the post-anastomotic area of the venous outflow tract in which the vascular pathology is most prominent in failed AVFs. On a histological level, we observed a reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes in the vascular wall. In addition, a strong anti-inflammatory effect of liposomal prednisolone on macrophages was demonstrated in vitro. Therefore, treatment with liposomal prednisolone might be a valuable strategy to improve AVF maturation. PMID:27460883

  15. NF-κB/AP-1-targeted inhibition of macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses by depigmenting compound AP736 derived from natural 1,3-diphenylpropane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ha, Van Thai; Beak, Heung Soo; Kim, Eunji; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Kim, Jun Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Joo, Yung Hyup; Lee, Chang Seok; Choi, Joonho; Shin, Hong-Ju; Hong, Sungyoul; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    AP736 was identified as an antimelanogenic drug that can be used for the prevention of melasma, freckles, and dark spots in skin by acting as a suppressor of melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression. Since macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses are critical for skin health, here we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory activity of AP736. The effects of AP736 on various inflammatory events such as nitric oxide (NO)/prostaglandin (PG) E2 production, inflammatory gene expression, phagocytic uptake, and morphological changes were examined in RAW264.7 cells. AP736 was found to strongly inhibit the production of both NO and PGE2 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, AP736 strongly inhibited both LPS-induced morphological changes and FITC-dextran-induced phagocytic uptake. Furthermore, AP736 also downregulated the expression of multiple inflammatory genes, such as inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, and interleukin- (IL-) 1β in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Transcription factor analysis, including upstream signalling events, revealed that both NF-κB and AP-1 were targeted by AP736 via inhibition of the IKK/IκBα and IRAK1/TAK1 pathways. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that AP736 is a potential anti-inflammatory drug due to its suppression of NF-κB-IKK/IκBα and AP-1-IRAK1/TAK1 signalling, which may make AP736 useful for the treatment of macrophage-mediated skin inflammation. PMID:25386046

  16. Toll Like Receptor-4 Mediates Vascular Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular dysfunction is a major complication of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. The current studies were undertaken to determine if inflammatory responses are activated in the vasculature of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), and if so, whether Toll Like Receptor-4 (TLR4), a ke...

  17. Central role of endogenous Toll-like receptor-2 activation in regulating inflammation, reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent neointimal formation after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Tetsuro . E-mail: Tetsuro_Shishido@URMC.Rochester.edu; Nozaki, Naoki; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Niizeki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yo; Abe, Jun-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2006-07-14

    Background: It is now evident that inflammation after vascular injury has significant impact on the restenosis after revascularization procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, and bypass grafting. However, the mechanisms that regulate inflammation and repair after vascular injury are incompletely understood. Here, we report that vascular injury-mediated cytokine expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as subsequent neointimal formation requires Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway in vivo. Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by cuff-placement around the femoral artery in non-transgenic littermates (NLC) and TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2KO) mice. After cuff-placement in NLC mice, expression of TLR-2 was significantly increased in both smooth muscle medial layer and adventitia. Interestingly, we found that inflammatory genes expression such as tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were markedly decreased in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. In addition, ROS production after vascular injury was attenuated in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. Since we observed the significant role of endogenous TLR-2 activation in regulating inflammatory responses and ROS production after vascular injury, we determined whether inhibition of endogenous TLR-2 activation can inhibit neointimal proliferation after vascular injury. Neointimal hyperplasia was markedly suppressed in TLR-2KO mice compared with WT mice at both 2 and 4 weeks after vascular injury. Conclusions: These findings suggested that endogenous TLR-2 activation might play a central role in the regulation of vascular inflammation as well as subsequent neointimal formation in injured vessels.

  18. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  19. Light-triggered in vivo Activation of Adhesive Peptides Regulates Cell Adhesion, Inflammation and Vascularization of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have been recently realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  20. Acute effects of different types of oil consumption on endothelial function, oxidative stress status and vascular inflammation in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Antoniades, Charalambos; Giolis, Anastasios; Bouras, George; Gounari, Panagiota; Stefanadi, Elli; Miliou, Antigoni; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of different types of oil may have different effects on cardiovascular risk. The exact role of maize oil, cod liver oil, soya oil and extra virgin olive oil on endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation is unknown. We evaluated the effect of acute consumption of these types of oil on endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in healthy adults. Thirty-seven healthy volunteers were randomised to receive an oral amount of each type of oil or water. Endothelial function was evaluated by gauge-strain plethysmography at baseline and 1, 2 and 3 h after consumption. Oxidative stress status was determined by total lipid peroxides (PEROX), while inflammatory process was estimated by measuring the soluble form of vascular adhesion molecule 1. Serum levels of the two previous markers were measured at baseline and 3 h after oil consumption. Reactive hyperaemia (RH) was significantly decreased after maize oil consumption compared with controls (P < 0.05). However, the consumption of cod liver oil and soya oil induced a significant improvement of RH after 1 h, compared with controls (P < 0.05). There was no significant effect of any type of oil consumption on endothelium-independent dilatation, total lipid PEROX and vascular adhesion molecule 1 serum levels. Consumption of maize oil leads to impaired endothelial function, while soya oil and cod liver oil slightly improve endothelial function. However, all types of oils did not affect inflammatory process and systemic oxidative stress, suggesting that their effect on endothelial function may not be mediated by free radicals bioavailability.

  1. Thalidomide Ameliorates Inflammation and Vascular Injury but Aggravates Tubular Damage in the Irradiated Mouse Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Russell, Nicola S.; Coppes, Rob P.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: The late side effects of kidney irradiation include vascular damage and fibrosis, which are promoted by an irradiation-induced inflammatory response. We therefore treated kidney-irradiated mice with the anti-inflammatory and angiogenesis-modulating drug thalidomide in an attempt to prevent the development of late normal tissue damage and radiation nephropathy in the mouse kidney. Methods and Materials: Kidneys of C57Bl/6 mice were irradiated with a single dose of 14 Gy. Starting from week 16 after irradiation, the mice were fed with thalidomide-containing chow (100 mg/kg body weight/day). Gene expression and kidney histology were analyzed at 40 weeks and blood samples at 10, 20, 30, and 40 weeks after irradiation. Results: Thalidomide improved the vascular structure and vessel perfusion after irradiation, associated with a normalization of pericyte coverage. The drug also reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells but could not suppress the development of fibrosis. Irradiation-induced changes in hematocrit and blood urea nitrogen levels were not rescued by thalidomide. Moreover, thalidomide worsened tubular damage after irradiation and also negatively affected basal tubular function. Conclusions: Thalidomide improved the inflammatory and vascular side effects of kidney irradiation but could not reverse tubular toxicity, which probably prevented preservation of kidney function.

  2. Endothelial protein kinase MAP4K4 promotes vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Skoura, Athanasia; Matevossian, Anouch; Danai, Laura V.; Zheng, Wei; Cortes, Christian; Bhattacharya, Samit K.; Aouadi, Myriam; Hagan, Nana; Yawe, Joseph C.; Vangala, Pranitha; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Cooper, Marcus P.; Fitzgibbons, Timothy P.; Buckbinder, Leonard; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Signalling pathways that control endothelial cell (EC) permeability, leukocyte adhesion and inflammation are pivotal for atherosclerosis initiation and progression. Here we demonstrate that the Sterile-20-like mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4), which has been implicated in inflammation, is abundantly expressed in ECs and in atherosclerotic plaques from mice and humans. On the basis of endothelial-specific MAP4K4 gene silencing and gene ablation experiments in Apoe−/− mice, we show that MAP4K4 in ECs markedly promotes Western diet-induced aortic macrophage accumulation and atherosclerotic plaque development. Treatment of Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice with a selective small-molecule MAP4K4 inhibitor also markedly reduces atherosclerotic lesion area. MAP4K4 silencing in cultured ECs attenuates cell surface adhesion molecule expression while reducing nuclear localization and activity of NFκB, which is critical for promoting EC activation and atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results reveal that MAP4K4 is a key signalling node that promotes immune cell recruitment in atherosclerosis. PMID:26688060

  3. A matrix metalloprotease-PAR1 system regulates vascular integrity, systemic inflammation and death in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tressel, Sarah L; Kaneider, Nicole C; Kasuda, Shogo; Foley, Caitlin; Koukos, Georgios; Austin, Karyn; Agarwal, Anika; Covic, Lidija; Opal, Steven M; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a deadly disease characterized by the inability to regulate the inflammatory–coagulation response in which the endothelium plays a key role. The cause of this perturbation remains poorly understood and has hampered the development of effective therapeutics. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are involved in the host response to pathogens, but can also cause uncontrolled tissue damage and contribute to mortality. We found that human sepsis patients had markedly elevated plasma proMMP-1 and active MMP-1 levels, which correlated with death at 7 and 28 days after diagnosis. Likewise, septic mice had increased plasma levels of the MMP-1 ortholog, MMP-1a. We identified mouse MMP-1a as an agonist of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) on endothelial cells. MMP-1a was released from endothelial cells in septic mice. Blockade of MMP-1 activity suppressed endothelial barrier disruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), lung vascular permeability as well as the cytokine storm and improved survival, which was lost in PAR1-deficient mice. Infusion of human MMP-1 increased lung vascular permeability in normal wild-type mice but not in PAR1-deficient mice. These findings implicate MMP-1 as an important activator of PAR1 in sepsis and suggest that therapeutics that target MMP1-PAR1 may prove beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. PMID:21591259

  4. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) reduces vascular endothelial growth factor expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Seoung Ju; Lee, Ho Kyung; Park, Hee Sun; Min, Kyung Hoon; Jin, Sun Mi; Lee, Yong Chul

    2006-06-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been implicated in regulating cell survival signaling through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. The key role of PI3K in VEGF-mediated signal transduction is established. However, the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling in asthma are unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of PI3K inhibitors and PTEN on VEGF expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation. We have used a female C57BL/6 mouse model for asthma to determine the role of PTEN in allergen-induced airway inflammation, specifically in the expression of VEGF. Allergen-induced airway inflammation leads to increased activity of PI3K in lung tissue. These mice develop the following typical pathophysiological features of asthma in the lungs: increased numbers of inflammatory cells of the airways; airway hyper-responsiveness; increased expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and eotaxin; increased vascular permeability; and increased levels of VEGF. Administration of PI3K inhibitors or adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA reduced the symptoms of asthma and decreased the increased levels of plasma extravasation and VEGF in allergen-induced asthmatic lungs. These results indicate that PTEN reduces VEGF expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation.

  5. FT011, a Novel Cardiorenal Protective Drug, Reduces Inflammation, Gliosis and Vascular Injury in Rats with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Deliyanti, Devy; Zhang, Yuan; Khong, Fay; Berka, David R.; Stapleton, David I.; Kelly, Darren J.; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy features inflammation as well as injury to glial cells and the microvasculature, which are influenced by hypertension and overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system. FT011 is an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic agent that has been reported to attenuate organ damage in diabetic rats with cardiomyopathy and nephropathy. However, the potential therapeutic utility of FT011 for diabetic retinopathy has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that FT011 would attenuate retinopathy in diabetic Ren-2 rats, which exhibit hypertension due to an overactive extra-renal renin-angiotensin system. Diabetic rats were studied for 8 and 32 weeks and received intravitreal injections of FT011 (50 μM) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Comparisons were to age-matched controls. In the 8-week study, retinal inflammation was examined by quantitating vascular leukocyte adherence, microglial/macrophage density and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Macroglial Müller cells, which exhibit a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype in diabetes, were evaluated in the 8-week study as well as in culture following exposure to hyperglycaemia and FT011 (10, 30, 100 μM) for 72 hours. In the 32-week study, severe retinal vasculopathy was examined by quantitating acellular capillaries and extracellular matrix proteins. In diabetic rats, FT011 reduced retinal leukostasis, microglial density and mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In Müller cells, FT011 reduced diabetes-induced gliosis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling and the hyperglycaemic-induced increase in ICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, CCL20, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, VEGF and IL-6. Late intervention with FT011 reduced acellular capillaries and the elevated mRNA levels of collagen IV and fibronectin in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the protective effects of FT011 in cardiorenal disease extend to key elements of diabetic retinopathy and

  6. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  7. Frequency of Vascular Inflammation and Impact on Neointimal Proliferation of Drug Eluting Stents in Porcine Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jong Shiuan; Oh, Seung Jin; Hsueh, Chun Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to describe the frequency of vascular inflammatory reactions with second generation drug eluting stents (DES) compared to first generation DES, and analyze the impact on inflammation and neointimal proliferation in a porcine coronary model. Methods A total of 26 stents (7 multi-link VISION, 6 CYPHER, 6 TAXUS and 7 XIENCE V) were deployed in the coronary arteries of 10 domestic swine for 28 days, after which each stent was harvested and processed (divided into 8 or 9 segments) for histomorphometric analysis. Results A total of 202 histological segments [146 DES and 56 bare metal stents (BMS)] were included in this study. The mean neointimal thickness was significantly reduced in the DES group compared to the BMS group. The DES group had higher injury scores (DES = 0.99 ± 0.79 versus BMS = 0.67 ± 0.44, p < 0.004), inflammatory scores (DES = 2.09 ± 1.54 versus BMS = 0.64 ± 0.98, p < 0.001) and presence of para-strut granulomas (DES = 35% versus BMS = 2%, p < 0.001). In logistic regression analysis, the presence of para-strut granulomas correlated with an area of stenosis > 50% (RR: 6.11, 95% CI: 2.97 to 12.59, p = 0.001). In the DES group, the second generation stents had a lower neointimal area (XIENCE V: 1.64 ± 0.90 mm2) compared to the first generation stents (TAXUS: 2.36 ± 1.56 mm2, p = 0.005; CYPHER 2.78 ± 1.82 mm2, p = 0.001). The XIENCE V stents had lower inflammatory scores and lower frequency of para-strut granulomas compared to the first generation stents. Conclusions Second generation DES had a lower incidence of vascular inflammatory reactions compared to first generation DES. This biological phenomenon appears to influence the patterns of neointimal formation. PMID:27713606

  8. Copper chelation by tetrathiomolybdate inhibits vascular inflammation and atherosclerotic lesion development in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hao; Zhang, Wei-Jian; McMillen, Timothy S; Leboeuf, Renee C; Frei, Balz

    2012-08-01

    Endothelial activation, which is characterized by upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules and pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and consequent monocyte recruitment to the arterial intima are etiologic factors in atherosclerosis. Redox-active transition metal ions, such as copper and iron, may play an important role in endothelial activation by stimulating redox-sensitive cell signaling pathways. We have shown previously that copper chelation by tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in vivo. Here, we investigated whether TTM can inhibit atherosclerotic lesion development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. We found that 10-week treatment of apoE-/- mice with TTM (33-66 ppm in the diet) reduced serum levels of the copper-containing protein, ceruloplasmin, by 47%, and serum iron by 26%. Tissue levels of "bioavailable" copper, assessed by the copper-to-molybdenum ratio, decreased by 80% in aorta and heart, whereas iron levels of these tissues were not affected by TTM treatment. Furthermore, TTM significantly attenuated atherosclerotic lesion development in whole aorta by 25% and descending aorta by 45% compared to non-TTM treated apoE-/- mice. This anti-atherogenic effect of TTM was accompanied by several anti-inflammatory effects, i.e., significantly decreased serum levels of soluble vascular cell and intercellular adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1); reduced aortic gene expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and pro-inflammatory cytokines; and significantly less aortic accumulation of M1 type macrophages. In contrast, serum levels of oxidized LDL were not reduced by TTM. These data indicate that TTM inhibits atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice by reducing bioavailable copper and vascular inflammation, not by altering iron homeostasis or reducing oxidative stress.

  9. Vascular repair utilising immobilised heparin conjugate for protection against early activation of inflammation and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Nordling, Sofia; Hong, Jaan; Fromell, Karin; Edin, Fredrik; Brännström, Johan; Larsson, Rolf; Nilsson, Bo; Magnusson, Peetra U

    2015-06-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) poses a major challenge in many thrombotic conditions and in whole organ transplantation. Activation of the endothelial cells and shedding of the protective vascular glycocalyx during IRI increase the risk of innate immune activation, cell infiltration and severe thrombus formation, promoting damage to the tissue. Here, we present a novel one-step strategy to protect the vasculature by immobilisation of a unique multi-arm heparin conjugate to the endothelium. Applying a new in vitro blood endothelial cell chamber model, the heparin conjugate was found to bind not only to primary human endothelial cells but also directly to the collagen to which the cells adhered. Incubation of hypoxic endothelial cells with freshly drawn human blood in the blood chambers elicited coagulation activation reflected by thrombin anti-thrombin formation and binding of platelets and neutrophils. Immobilisation of the heparin conjugate to the hypoxic endothelial cells created a protective coating, leading to a significant reduction of the recruitment of blood cells and coagulation activation compared to untreated hypoxic endothelial cells. This novel approach of immobilising multi-arm heparin conjugates on the endothelial cells and collagen of the basement membrane ensures to protect the endothelium against IRI in thrombotic disorders and in transplantation.

  10. The saponin DT-13 Attenuates Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Vascular Inflammation Associated with Src/NF-кB/MAPK Pathway Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Minhui; Han, Yuwei; Zhai, Kefeng; Tang, Youmei; Qin, Xiaoying; Cao, Zhengyu; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect of DT-13 (25(R,S)-ruscogenin- 1-O- [β-d-glucopyranosyl- (1→2)][β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β -d- fucopyranoside) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced vascular inflammation and the potential molecular mechanisms. In vitro, DT-13 suppressed TNF-α-induced adhesion and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by inhibiting the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). DT-13 markedly suppressed NF-кB p65 phosphorylation, and when NF-кB p65 was over-expressed, the inhibitory effect of DT-13 on adhesion molecular decreased. DT-13 also suppressed TNF-α induced luciferase activities of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 promoter containing NF-κB binding sites. Furthermore, DT-13 markedly suppressed p38 phosphorylation and Src degradation induced by TNF-α, whereas had no significant effect on ERK and JNK activation. In vivo, DT-13 at 4 mg/kg prevented vascular inflammation and the expression of adhesion molecules induced by TNF-α in mice. These findings suggest that DT-13 abrogates vascular inflammation by down-regulating adhesion molecules associated with modulating the NF-кB, p38MAPK, Src signaling pathways, and NF-κB binding site is at least one of the targets of DT-13. This study provides novel information regarding the mechanism by which DT-13 exerts its effects on vascular inflammation, which is important for the onset and progression of various diseases. PMID:26157351

  11. Increased levels of markers of vascular inflammation in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, A; Seljeflot, I; Sommervoll, L; Christensen, B; Otterstad, J E; Arnesen, H

    2002-01-01

    Elevated levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules (sCAMs), inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with atherosclerotic disease states. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether circulating levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), E- and P-selectin were significantly elevated in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) compared with healthy controls, and to study possible associations between these sCAMs, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). interleukin-6 (IL-6), CRP and major CHD risk factors. The study included 193 patients in various stages of CHD and 193 matched controls. To evaluate any possible influence of acute phase reaction, reinvestigation was performed after 6 months. After adjustment for major CHD risk factors, sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, P-selectin, IL-6 and CRP remained significantly elevated in the CHD patients (p for all <0.001). In multivariate analysis sVCAM-1 was predicted by age (p=0.015), sICAM-1 by smoking (p<0.001) and total cholesterol (p=0.026), E-selectin by body mass index (BMI) (p=0.004) and P-selectin by male gender (p=0.015). TNFalpha significantly predicted sICAM-1 and E-selectin levels, while IL-6 predicted CRP but none of the sCAMs measured. This might indicate that TNFalpha, but not IL-6, plays a major role in the regulation of sCAM levels in vivo.

  12. Neuromuscular and Vascular Hamartoma of the Small Intestine: An Exuberant Reparative Process Secondary to Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Crothers, Jessica W; Zenali, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    The term Neuromuscular and Vascular Hamartoma (NMVH) was initially coined by Fernando and McGovern in 1982 in their report of 2 cases. Whether this lesion is truly hamartomatous or represents a "burnt-out" phase of varying chronic pathologies has been debated since that time. Examples of NMVH-like proliferations have been reported in the setting of diaphragm disease, Crohn's disease, radiation, and ischemia. Herein we present the case of a 73-year-old female with partial small bowel obstruction and a past surgical history significant for cholecystectomy and abdominal hysterectomy. A computed tomography scan revealed an ill-defined mass with the same density as muscle extending into the mesentery, worrisome for malignancy and generating the differential of lymphoma versus metastatic disease. Upon laparotomy, a 2.5 cm, constrictive, predominantly mural-based mass was identified. The more proximal bowel was dilated, and there were dense serosal adhesions. Grossly, the transmural lesion had a tan-yellow cobweb-like cut surface and the overlying mucosa was flattened. Histologically, the lesion contained fascicles of smooth muscle, irregularly spaced large nerve bundles, and thick-walled vasculature in a haphazard arrangement within a hypocellular fibroadipose stroma. No stigmata of Crohn's disease were observed, and the uninvolved enteric tissue was unremarkable. The patient's medical history was negative for chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use and was otherwise unremarkable. This case of an NMVH-like lesion is presented as a reminder of benign mass-forming lesions causing bowel obstruction and suggests that such lesions may develop secondary to a chronic inflammatory process.

  13. CD47-blocking immunotherapies stimulate macrophage-mediated destruction of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine S; Schnorr, Peter J; Cristea, Sandra; Ring, Aaron M; Maute, Roy L; Volkmer, Anne K; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Liu, Jie; Lim, Jing Shan; Yang, Dian; Seitz, Garrett; Nguyen, Thuyen; Wu, Di; Jude, Kevin; Guerston, Heather; Barkal, Amira; Trapani, Francesca; George, Julie; Poirier, John T; Gardner, Eric E; Miles, Linde A; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lofgren, Shane M; Vogel, Hannes; Winslow, Monte M; Dive, Caroline; Thomas, Roman K; Rudin, Charles M; van de Rijn, Matt; Majeti, Ravindra; Garcia, K Christopher; Weissman, Irving L; Sage, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with limited treatment options. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that promotes immune evasion by engaging signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), which serves as an inhibitory receptor on macrophages. Here, we found that CD47 is highly expressed on the surface of human SCLC cells; therefore, we investigated CD47-blocking immunotherapies as a potential approach for SCLC treatment. Disruption of the interaction of CD47 with SIRPα using anti-CD47 antibodies induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human SCLC patient cells in culture. In a murine model, administration of CD47-blocking antibodies or targeted inactivation of the Cd47 gene markedly inhibited SCLC tumor growth. Furthermore, using comprehensive antibody arrays, we identified several possible therapeutic targets on the surface of SCLC cells. Antibodies to these targets, including CD56/neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promoted phagocytosis in human SCLC cell lines that was enhanced when combined with CD47-blocking therapies. In light of recent clinical trials for CD47-blocking therapies in cancer treatment, these findings identify disruption of the CD47/SIRPα axis as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy for SCLC. This approach could enable personalized immunotherapeutic regimens in patients with SCLC and other cancers.

  14. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  15. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  16. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-05-19

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence.

  17. CD47-blocking immunotherapies stimulate macrophage-mediated destruction of small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Schnorr, Peter J.; Ring, Aaron M.; Maute, Roy L.; Volkmer, Anne K.; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Liu, Jie; Lim, Jing Shan; Yang, Dian; Seitz, Garrett; Nguyen, Thuyen; Wu, Di; Guerston, Heather; Trapani, Francesca; George, Julie; Poirier, John T.; Gardner, Eric E.; Miles, Linde A.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lofgren, Shane M.; Vogel, Hannes; Winslow, Monte M.; Dive, Caroline; Thomas, Roman K.; Rudin, Charles M.; van de Rijn, Matt; Majeti, Ravindra; Garcia, K. Christopher; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with limited treatment options. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that promotes immune evasion by engaging signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), which serves as an inhibitory receptor on macrophages. Here, we found that CD47 is highly expressed on the surface of human SCLC cells; therefore, we investigated CD47-blocking immunotherapies as a potential approach for SCLC treatment. Disruption of the interaction of CD47 with SIRPα using anti-CD47 antibodies induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human SCLC patient cells in culture. In a murine model, administration of CD47-blocking antibodies or targeted inactivation of the Cd47 gene markedly inhibited SCLC tumor growth. Furthermore, using comprehensive antibody arrays, we identified several possible therapeutic targets on the surface of SCLC cells. Antibodies to these targets, including CD56/neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promoted phagocytosis in human SCLC cell lines that was enhanced when combined with CD47-blocking therapies. In light of recent clinical trials for CD47-blocking therapies in cancer treatment, these findings identify disruption of the CD47/SIRPα axis as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy for SCLC. This approach could enable personalized immunotherapeutic regimens in patients with SCLC and other cancers. PMID:27294525

  18. Air pollution and autonomic and vascular dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease: interactions of systemic inflammation, overweight, and gender.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Pan, Xiaochuan; Hu, Min; Lu, Shou-En; Lin, Yong; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Yuanhang; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2012-07-15

    The authors conducted a 2-year follow-up of 40 cardiovascular disease patients (mean age = 65.6 years (standard deviation, 5.8)) who underwent repeated measurements of cardiovascular response before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympics (Beijing, China), when air pollution was strictly controlled. Ambient levels of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm (PM(2.5)), black carbon, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone, and carbon monoxide were measured continuously, with validation of concurrent real-time measurements of personal exposure to PM(2.5) and carbon monoxide. Linear mixed-effects models were used with adjustment for individual risk factors, time-varying factors, and meteorologic effects. Significant heart rate variability reduction and blood pressure elevation were observed in association with exposure to air pollution. Specifically, interquartile-range increases of 51.8 µg/m(3), 2.02 µg/m(3), and 13.7 ppb in prior 4-hour exposure to PM(2.5), black carbon, and nitrogen dioxide were associated with significant reductions in the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals of 4.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9, 6.4), 4.2% (95% CI: 1.8, 6.6), and 3.9% (95% CI: 2.2, 5.7), respectively. Greater heart rate variability declines were observed among subjects with C-reactive protein values above the 90th percentile, subjects with a body mass index greater than 25, and females. The authors conclude that autonomic and vascular dysfunction may be one of the mechanisms through which air pollution exposure can increase cardiovascular disease risk, especially among persons with systemic inflammation and overweight. PMID:22763390

  19. LUTEOLIN PROTECTS AGAINST VASCULAR INFLAMMATION IN MICE AND TNF-ALPHA-INDUCED MONOCYTE ADHESION TO ENDOTHELIAL CELLS VIA SUPPRESSING IΚBα/NF-κB SIGNALING PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenquan; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Liu, Dongmin; Shah, Halley; Li, Jason Z.; Chitrakar, Rojin; Si, Hongwei; McCormick, John; Zhu, Hong; Zhen, Wei; Li, Yunbo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavanoid, present in many medicinal plants as well as in some commonly consumed fruits and vegetables has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of luteolin at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that luteolin as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells, a key event in triggering vascular inflammation. Luteolin potently suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, key mediators involved in enhancing endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, luteolin inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation, expression of IκB kinase ß (IKKß), and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that luteolin can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 0% or 0.6% luteolin for three weeks and luteolin supplementation greatly suppressed TNF-α-induced increases in circulating levels of MCP-1/JE, CXCL1/KC, and sICAM-1 in C57BL/6 mice. Consistently, dietary intake of luteolin significantly reduced TNF-α-stimulated adhesion of monocytes to aortic endothelial cells ex vivo. Histology shows that luteolin treatment prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies further show that luteolin treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, luteolin protects against TNF-α-induced vascular inflammation, in both in

  20. HLA-G1, but Not HLA-G3, Suppresses Human Monocyte/Macrophage-mediated Swine Endothelial Cell Lysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Maeda, A; Lo, P C; Matsuura, R; Esquivel, E L; Asada, M; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Deguchi, K; Ueno, T; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The inhibitory function of HLA-G1, a class Ib molecule, on monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was examined. The expression of inhibitory receptors that interact with HLA-G, immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2), ILT4, and KIR2DL4 (CD158d) on in vitro-generated macrophages obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated THP-1 cells were examined by flow cytometry. cDNAs of HLA-G1, HLA-G3, HLA-E, and human β2-microglobulin were prepared, transfected into pig endothelial cells (PECs), and macrophage- and the THP-1 cell-mediated PEC cytolysis was then assessed. In vitro-generated macrophages expressed not only ILT2 and ILT4 but CD158d as well. The transgenic HLA-G1 on PEC indicated a significant suppression in macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, which was equivalent to that of transgenic HLA-E. HLA-G1 was clearly expressed on the cell surface of PEC, whereas the levels of HLA-G3 were much lower and remained in the intracellular space. On the other hand, the PMA-activated THP-1 cell was less expressed these inhibitory molecules than in vitro-generated macrophages. Therefore, the HLA-G1 on PECs showed a significant but relatively smaller suppression to THP-1 cell-mediated cytotoxicity compared to in vitro-generated macrophages. These results indicate that by generating HLA-G1, but not HLA-G3, transgenic pigs can protect porcine grafts from monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:27320605

  1. Detailed protocol to assess in vivo and ex vivo myeloperoxidase activity in mouse models of vascular inflammation and disease using hydroethidine.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Cheng, David; Stocker, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity contributes to arterial inflammation, vascular dysfunction and disease, including atherosclerosis. Current assessment of MPO activity in biological systems in vivo utilizes 3-chlorotyrosine (3-Cl-Tyr) as a biomarker of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and other chlorinating species. However, 3-Cl-Tyr is formed in low yield and is subject to further metabolism. Recently, we reported a method to selectively assess MPO-activity in vivo by measuring the conversion of hydroethidine to 2-chloroethidium (2-Cl-E(+)) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (J. Biol. Chem., 289, 2014, pp. 5580-5595). The hydroethidine-based method has greater sensitivity for MPO activity than measurement of 3-Cl-Tyr. The current methods paper provides a detailed protocol to determine in vivo and ex vivo MPO activity in arteries from mouse models of vascular inflammation and disease by utilizing the conversion of hydroethidine to 2-Cl-E(+). Procedures for the synthesis of standards, preparation of tissue homogenates and the generation of 2-Cl-E(+) are also provided in detail, as are the conditions for LC-MS/MS detection of 2-Cl-E(+). PMID:27184954

  2. HDL-bound sphingosine 1-phosphate acts as a biased agonist for the endothelial cell receptor S1P1 to limit vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Sylvain; Sanson, Marie; Blaho, Victoria A.; Swendeman, Steven L.; Obinata, Hideru; Conger, Heather; Dahlbäck, Björn; Kono, Mari; Proia, Richard L.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hla, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is abundant in endothelial cells, where it regulates vascular development and microvascular barrier function. In investigating the role of endothelial cell S1P1 in adult mice, we found that the endothelial S1P1 signal was enhanced in regions of the arterial vasculature experiencing inflammation. The abundance of proinflammatory adhesion proteins, such as ICAM-1, was enhanced in mice with endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 and suppressed in mice with endothelial cell–specific overexpression of S1pr1, suggesting a protective function of S1P1 in vascular disease. The chaperones ApoM+HDL (HDL) or albumin bind to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in the circulation; therefore, we tested the effects of S1P bound to each chaperone on S1P1 signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to ApoM+HDL-S1P, but not to albumin-S1P, promoted the formation of a cell surface S1P1–β-arrestin 2 complex and attenuated the ability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα to activate NF-κB and increase ICAM-1 abundance. Although S1P bound to either chaperone induced MAPK activation, albumin-S1P triggered greater Gi activation and receptor endocytosis. Endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 in the hypercholesterolemic Apoe−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in the descending aorta. We propose that the ability of ApoM+HDL to act as a biased agonist on S1P1 inhibits vascular inflammation, which may partially explain the cardiovascular protective functions of HDL. PMID:26268607

  3. Tormentic acid inhibits H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Lun; Sun, Gen-Yi; Zhang, Ying; He, Jia-Jun; Zheng, Shen; Lin, Jing-Na

    2016-10-01

    Tormentic acid (TA) is a triterpene isolated from the stem bark of the plant Vochysia divergens and has been reported to exhibit anticancer, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑atherogenic properties. However, the functions of TA in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs) remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether TA suppressed H2O2‑induced oxidative stress and inflammation in RVSMCs, and to determine its molecular mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that TA inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, induced H2O2 in RVSMCs, and inhibited H2O2-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) in RVSMCs. In addition, TA significantly decreased the production of tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin 6 (IL‑6) and IL‑1β. Furthermore, TA pretreatment prevented nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) subunit p65 phosphorylation and NF‑κB inhibitor α (IκBα) degradation induced by H2O2 in RVSMCs. TA is, therefore, suggested to inhibit H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in RVSMCs via inhibition of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. TA may have potential as a pharmacological agent in the prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27572426

  4. Tormentic acid inhibits H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Lun; Sun, Gen-Yi; Zhang, Ying; He, Jia-Jun; Zheng, Shen; Lin, Jing-Na

    2016-01-01

    Tormentic acid (TA) is a triterpene isolated from the stem bark of the plant Vochysia divergens and has been reported to exhibit anticancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties. However, the functions of TA in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs) remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether TA suppressed H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in RVSMCs, and to determine its molecular mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that TA inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, induced H2O2 in RVSMCs, and inhibited H2O2-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) in RVSMCs. In addition, TA significantly decreased the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-1β. Furthermore, TA pretreatment prevented nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) subunit p65 phosphorylation and NF-κB inhibitor α (IκBα) degradation induced by H2O2 in RVSMCs. TA is, therefore, suggested to inhibit H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in RVSMCs via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. TA may have potential as a pharmacological agent in the prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27572426

  5. Tormentic acid inhibits H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Lun; Sun, Gen-Yi; Zhang, Ying; He, Jia-Jun; Zheng, Shen; Lin, Jing-Na

    2016-10-01

    Tormentic acid (TA) is a triterpene isolated from the stem bark of the plant Vochysia divergens and has been reported to exhibit anticancer, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑atherogenic properties. However, the functions of TA in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs) remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether TA suppressed H2O2‑induced oxidative stress and inflammation in RVSMCs, and to determine its molecular mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that TA inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, induced H2O2 in RVSMCs, and inhibited H2O2-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) in RVSMCs. In addition, TA significantly decreased the production of tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin 6 (IL‑6) and IL‑1β. Furthermore, TA pretreatment prevented nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) subunit p65 phosphorylation and NF‑κB inhibitor α (IκBα) degradation induced by H2O2 in RVSMCs. TA is, therefore, suggested to inhibit H2O2-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in RVSMCs via inhibition of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. TA may have potential as a pharmacological agent in the prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis.

  6. The effect of short-term withdrawal from continuous positive airway pressure therapy on sympathetic activity and markers of vascular inflammation in subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Craig L; Yang, Qiao; Williams, Andrew; Roth, Michael; Yee, Brendon J; Hedner, Jan A; Berend, Norbert; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2007-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is commonly associated with cardiovascular disease and sympathetic activation. However, it is unclear whether this association is independent of obesity and to what extent treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) alleviates the vascular inflammation that underpins cardiovascular disease. We therefore evaluated whether short-term withdrawal from CPAP therapy in subjects with moderate-severe OSA would result in increased levels of sympathetic activity and circulating inflammatory cytokines independent of weight. Vascular inflammatory markers (hsCRP, hsIL-6 and hsTNF-alpha) were assessed in 20 subjects after one and seven nights of withdrawal from CPAP together with the hypoxia-responsive angiogenic marker VEGF and urinary catecholamines. Compared with baseline on CPAP, withdrawal from therapy resulted in an immediate return of OSA with an increase in RDI to 26.7 +/- 5.2 and 39.0 +/- 5.9 events per hour after one and seven nights without CPAP, respectively (both P < 0.0001). This was accompanied by a concomitant rise in daytime urinary noradrenaline (P < 0.0001) after seven nights CPAP withdrawal that was positively associated with the severity of hypoxaemia. In contrast, withdrawal from CPAP therapy was not accompanied by any change in measured cytokines or VEGF (all P > 0.1). In conclusion, 1 week of CPAP withdrawal was associated with a return of OSA and a marked increase in sympathetic activity without a concomitant elevation of vascular inflammatory markers.

  7. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) Contributes to the Development of Vascular Inflammation by Regulating Monocytic Cell Motility in Mouse Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenjie; Morgan, Stephanie; Ren, Jun; Wang, Qiwei; Annis, Douglas S.; Mosher, Deane F.; Zhang, Jing; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Histological examination of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissues demonstrates extracellular matrix (ECM) destruction and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Previous work with mouse models of AAA has shown that anti-inflammatory strategies can effectively attenuate aneurysm formation. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is a matricellular protein involved in the maintenance of vascular structure and homeostasis through the regulation of biological functions such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, and adhesion. Expression levels of TSP1 correlate with vascular disease conditions. Objective To use TSP1 deficient (Thbs1−/−) mice to test the hypothesis that TSP1 contributes to pathogenesis of AAAs. Methods and Results Mouse experimental AAA was induced either through perivascular treatment with calcium phosphate, intraluminal perfusion with porcine elastase, or systemic administration of Angiotensin II. Induction of AAA increased TSP1 expression in aortas of C57BL/6 or apoE−/− mice. Compared to Thbs1+/+ mice, Thbs1−/− mice developed significantly smaller aortic expansion when subjected to AAA inductions, which was associated with diminished infiltration of macrophages. Thbs1−/− monocytic cells had reduced adhesion and migratory capacity in vitro compared to wildtype counterparts. Adoptive transfer of Thbs1+/+ monocytic cells or bone marrow reconstitution rescued aneurysm development in Thbs1−/− mice. Conclusions TSP1 expression plays a significant role in regulation of migration and adhesion of mononuclear cells, contributing to vascular inflammation during AAA development. PMID:25940549

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates cigarette smoke-induced restenosis after vascular angioplasty by attenuating inflammation in rat model.

    PubMed

    Ni, Leng; Wang, Zhanqi; Yang, Genhuan; Li, Tianjia; Liu, Xinnong; Liu, Changwei

    2016-03-14

    Cigarette smoke is not only a profound independent risk factor of atherosclerosis, but also aggravates restenosis after vascular angioplasty. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an endogenous antioxidant and cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we investigated whether HO-1 upregulating by hemin, a potent HO-1 inducer, can protect against cigarette smoke-induced restenosis in rat's carotid arteries after balloon injury. Results showed that cigarette smoke exposure aggravated stenosis of the lumen, promoted infiltration of inflammatory cells, and induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules after balloon-induced carotid artery injury. HO-1 upregulating by hemin treatment reduced these effects of cigarette smoke, whereas the beneficial effects were abolished in the presence of Zincprotoporphyrin IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. To conclude, hemin has potential therapeutic applications in the restenosis prevention after the smokers' vascular angioplasty.

  9. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A.S.; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally-occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), adhesion molecule sVCAM-1 and sE-Selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane may be, at least in part, associated with interfering with the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24880493

  10. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-01

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  11. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak.

  12. Microcystins Induces Vascular Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via Activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) produced by toxic cyanobacteria cause serious water pollution and public health hazard to humans and animals. However, direct molecular mechanisms of MC-LR in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) have not been understood yet. In this study, we investigated whether MC-LR induces vascular inflammatory process in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data demonstrated that MC-LR decreased HUVECs proliferation and tube formation and enhanced apoptosis. MC-LR also induced intracellular reactive oxygen species formation (ROS) in HUVECs. The MC-LR directly stimulated phosphorylation of NF-κB. Furthermore, MC-LR also increased cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) expression in HUVECs. Taken together, the present data suggested that MC-LR induced vascular inflammatory process, which may be closely related to the oxidative stress, NF-κB activation, and cell adhesion molecules expression in HUVECs. Our findings may highlight that MC-LR causes potential damage to blood vessels. PMID:26063980

  13. Red Grape Skin Polyphenols Blunt Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activity and Expression in Cell Models of Vascular Inflammation: Protective Role in Degenerative and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-08-29

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases responsible for the hydrolysis of various components of extracellular matrix. MMPs, namely gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contribute to the progression of chronic and degenerative diseases. Since gelatinases' activity and expression are regulated by oxidative stress, we sought to evaluate whether supplementation with polyphenol-rich red grape skin extracts modulated the matrix-degrading capacity in cell models of vascular inflammation. Human endothelial and monocytic cells were incubated with increasing concentrations (0.5-25 μg/mL) of Negroamaro and Primitivo red grape skin polyphenolic extracts (NSPE and PSPE, respectively) or their specific components (0.5-25 μmol/L), before stimulation with inflammatory challenge. NSPE and PSPE inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, endothelial invasion as well as the MMP-9 and MMP-2 release in stimulated endothelial cells, and MMP-9 production in inflamed monocytes, without affecting tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. The matrix degrading inhibitory capacity was the same for both NSPE and PSPE, despite their different polyphenolic profiles. Among the main polyphenols of grape skin extracts, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, kaempferol and quercetin exhibited the most significant inhibitory effects on matrix-degrading enzyme activities. Our findings appreciate the grape skins as rich source of polyphenols able to prevent the dysregulation of vascular remodelling affecting degenerative and inflammatory diseases.

  14. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH. PMID:25656991

  15. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  16. Red Grape Skin Polyphenols Blunt Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activity and Expression in Cell Models of Vascular Inflammation: Protective Role in Degenerative and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases responsible for the hydrolysis of various components of extracellular matrix. MMPs, namely gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contribute to the progression of chronic and degenerative diseases. Since gelatinases' activity and expression are regulated by oxidative stress, we sought to evaluate whether supplementation with polyphenol-rich red grape skin extracts modulated the matrix-degrading capacity in cell models of vascular inflammation. Human endothelial and monocytic cells were incubated with increasing concentrations (0.5-25 μg/mL) of Negroamaro and Primitivo red grape skin polyphenolic extracts (NSPE and PSPE, respectively) or their specific components (0.5-25 μmol/L), before stimulation with inflammatory challenge. NSPE and PSPE inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, endothelial invasion as well as the MMP-9 and MMP-2 release in stimulated endothelial cells, and MMP-9 production in inflamed monocytes, without affecting tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. The matrix degrading inhibitory capacity was the same for both NSPE and PSPE, despite their different polyphenolic profiles. Among the main polyphenols of grape skin extracts, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, kaempferol and quercetin exhibited the most significant inhibitory effects on matrix-degrading enzyme activities. Our findings appreciate the grape skins as rich source of polyphenols able to prevent the dysregulation of vascular remodelling affecting degenerative and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27589705

  17. Melatonin ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by suppressing the TLR4/NF-κB system in high-fat-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ze-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Ling; Fang, Nan; Wang, Xiao-Bian; Qian, Hai-Yan; Cao, Zhong; Cheng, Yuan; Wang, Bang-Ning; Wang, Yuan

    2013-11-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and inflammation contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Melatonin (MLT) normalizes lipid profile, improves endothelial function, and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. However, the precise mechanisms are still unclear. This study investigated whether MLT could ameliorate VED, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by suppressing the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) system in high-fat-fed rabbits. Rabbits were randomly divided into three groups that received a standard diet (control group), high-cholesterol diet (atherosclerosis group), or high-cholesterol diet plus 10 mg/kg/day MLT (MLT group) for 12 wk. After treatment, high-fat diet significantly increased serum lipid and inflammatory markers in rabbits in atherosclerosis group compared with that in control group. In addition, high-fat diet also induced VED and typical atherosclerotic plaque formation and increased intima/media thickness ratio, which were significantly improved by MLT therapy as demonstrated in MLT group. Histological and immunoblot analysis further showed that high-fat diet enhanced the expressions of TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MyD88), and NF-κB p65, but decreased inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) expression. By contrast, MLT therapy decreased the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB p65 and increased IκB expression. This study has demonstrated that MLT ameliorates lipid metabolism, VED, and inflammation and inhibits the progression of atherosclerosis in high-fat-fed rabbits. Moreover, our study indicates for the first time that suppression of the TLR4/NF-κB system in local vasculature with atherosclerotic damage is important for the protective effects of MLT. PMID:24006943

  18. Promoting inflammatory lymphangiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) aggravated intestinal inflammation in mice with experimental acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.L.; Zhao, J.; Qin, L.; Qiao, M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, it is not understood if inflammatory lymphangiogenesis is a pathological consequence or a productive attempt to resolve the inflammation. This study investigated the effect of lymphangiogenesis on intestinal inflammation by overexpressing a lymphangiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), in a mouse model of acute colitis. Forty eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were treated with recombinant adenovirus overexpressing VEGF-C or with recombinant VEGF-C156S protein. Acute colitis was then established by exposing the mice to 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days. Mice were evaluated for disease activity index (DAI), colonic inflammatory changes, colon edema, microvessel density, lymphatic vessel density (LVD), and VEGFR-3mRNA expression in colon tissue. When acute colitis was induced in mice overexpressing VEGF-C, there was a significant increase in colonic epithelial damage, inflammatory edema, microvessel density, and neutrophil infiltration compared to control mice. These mice also exhibited increased lymphatic vessel density (73.0±3.9 vs 38.2±1.9, P<0.001) and lymphatic vessel size (1974.6±104.3 vs 1639.0±91.5, P<0.001) compared to control mice. Additionally, the expression of VEGFR-3 mRNA was significantly upregulated in VEGF-C156S mice compared to DSS-treated mice after induction of colitis (42.0±1.4 vs 3.5±0.4, P<0.001). Stimulation of lymphangiogenesis by VEGF-C during acute colitis promoted inflammatory lymphangiogenesis in the colon and aggravated intestinal inflammation. Inflammatory lymphangiogenesis may have pleiotropic effects at different stages of IBD. PMID:27074165

  19. Inhibition of Hydrogen Sulfide-induced Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Vascular Endothelial Cells: Potential Mechanisms of Gastric Cancer Prevention by Korean Red Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki-Seok; Song, Heup; Kim, Eun-Hee; Choi, Jae Hyung; Hong, Hua; Han, Young-Min; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2012-04-01

    Previously, we reported that Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and gastric cancer are closely associated with increased levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and that Korean red ginseng significantly reduced the severity of H. pylori-associated gastric diseases by attenuating H2S generation. Because the incubation of endothelial cells with H2S has been known to enhance their angiogenic activities, we hypothesized that the amelioration of H2S-induced gastric inflammation or angiogenesis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) might explain the preventive effect of Korean red ginseng on H. pylori-associated carcinogenesis. The expression of inflammatory mediators, angiogenic growth factors, and angiogenic activities in the absence or presence of Korean red ginseng extracts (KRGE) were evaluated in HUVECs stimulated with the H2S generator sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS). KRGE efficiently decreased the expression of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, enzymes that are essential for H2S synthesis. Concomitantly, a significant decrease in the expression of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and several angiogenic factors, including interleukin (IL)-8, hypoxia inducible factor-1a, vascular endothelial growth factor, IL-6, and matrix metalloproteinases, was observed; all of these factors are normally induced after NaHS. An in vitro angiogenesis assay demonstrated that NaHS significantly increased tube formation in endothelial cells, whereas KRGE pretreatment significantly attenuated tube formation. NaHS activated p38 and Akt, increasing the expression of angiogenic factors and the proliferation of HUVECs, whereas KRGE effectively abrogated this H2S-activated angiogenesis and the increase in inflammatory mediators in vascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, KRGE was able to mitigate H2S-induced angiogenesis, implying that antagonistic action against H2S-induced angiogenesis may be the

  20. [Markers of endocrine system and inflammation as prognostic risk factors of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Verbovoĭ, A F; Morkovskikh, N V

    2011-01-01

    The high risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is a key problem in modern medicine. In this review, the basic risk factors of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus are described and their prognostic value analysed. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the role of adipose tissue hormone adiponectin. The anti-inflammatory properties of adiponectin suggest its protective action against atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. In this article, we review a number of studies on the relationship between adiponectin and the main cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Protective Effect of Irisin on Atherosclerosis via Suppressing Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induced Vascular Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuzhu; Mu, Qian; Zhou, Zheng; Song, Haibo; Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Fei; Jiang, Miao; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Liang; Shao, Lei; Wang, Xingli; Li, Shiwu; Yang, Lijun; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Mingxiang; Tang, Dongqi

    2016-01-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, is considered as a promising candidate for the treatment of metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we used two animal models, apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed on a high-cholesterol diet and a mouse carotid partial ligation model to test the anti-atherosclerotic effect of irisin. Irisin treatment (0.5 μg/g body weight/day) significantly reduced the severity of aortic atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed on a high-cholesterol diet and suppressed carotid neointima formation in a carotid partial ligation model. It was associated with decreased inflammation and cell apoptosis in aortic tissues. In addition, in a cell culture model, irisin restored ox-LDL-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell dysfunction by reducing the levels of inflammatory genes via inhibiting the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/ p38 MAPK/ NF-κB signaling pathway activation and inhibiting cell apoptosis via up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating Bax and caspase-3 expression. Our study demonstrated that irisin significantly reduced atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice via suppressing ox-LDL-induced cell inflammation and apoptosis, which might have a direct therapeutic effect on atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:27355581

  2. The role of repeatedly heated soybean oil in the development of hypertension in rats: association with vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Kamisah, Yusof; Faizah, Othman; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2012-01-01

    Thermally oxidized oil generates reactive oxygen species that have been implicated in several pathological processes including hypertension. This study was to ascertain the role of inflammation in the blood pressure raising effect of heated soybean oil in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and were fed with the following diets, respectively, for 6 months: basal diet (control); fresh soybean oil (FSO); five-time-heated soybean oil (5HSO); or 10-time-heated soybean oil (10HSO). Blood pressure was measured at baseline and monthly using tail-cuff method. Plasma prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) were measured prior to treatment and at the end of the study. After six months, the rats were sacrificed, and the aortic arches were dissected for morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. Blood pressure was increased significantly in the 5HSO and 10HSO groups. The blood pressure was maintained throughout the study in rats fed FSO. The aortae in the 5HSO and 10HSO groups showed significantly increased aortic wall thickness, area and circumferential wall tension. 5HSO and 10HSO diets significantly increased plasma TXA2/PGI2 ratio. Endothelial VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 were significantly increased in 5HSO, as well as LOX-1 in 10HSO groups. In conclusion, prolonged consumption of repeatedly heated soybean oil causes blood pressure elevation, which may be attributed to inflammation. PMID:22974219

  3. DAP12 expression in lung macrophages mediates ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil extravasation.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Jessica H; Li, Wenjun; Bribriesco, Alejandro C; Liu, Jie; Shen, Hua; Ibricevic, Aida; Pan, Jie-Hong; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Brody, Steven L; Goldstein, Daniel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Gelman, Andrew E; Miller, Mark J; Kreisel, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Neutrophils are critical mediators of innate immune responses and contribute to tissue injury. However, immune pathways that regulate neutrophil recruitment to injured tissues during noninfectious inflammation remain poorly understood. DAP12 is a cell membrane-associated protein that is expressed in myeloid cells and can either augment or dampen innate inflammatory responses during infections. To elucidate the role of DAP12 in pulmonary ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), we took advantage of a clinically relevant mouse model of transplant-mediated lung IRI. This technique allowed us to dissect the importance of DAP12 in tissue-resident cells and those that infiltrate injured tissue from the periphery during noninfectious inflammation. Macrophages in both mouse and human lungs that have been subjected to cold ischemic storage express DAP12. We found that donor, but not recipient, deficiency in DAP12 protected against pulmonary IRI. Analysis of the immune response showed that DAP12 promotes the survival of tissue-resident alveolar macrophages and contributes to local production of neutrophil chemoattractants. Intravital imaging demonstrated a transendothelial migration defect into DAP12-deficient lungs, which can be rescued by local administration of the neutrophil chemokine CXCL2. We have uncovered a previously unrecognized role for DAP12 expression in tissue-resident alveolar macrophages in mediating acute noninfectious tissue injury through regulation of neutrophil trafficking.

  4. Role of vascular inflammation in coronary artery disease: potential of anti-inflammatory drugs in the prevention of atherothrombosis. Inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel Medeiros; da Silva, Roberto Leo; Vieira, Jefferson Luís; Fattah, Tammuz; Lueneberg, Maria Emilia; Gottschall, Carlos Antonio Mascia

    2015-02-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are inflammatory pathologies, involving interleukins (ILs), such as IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and acute phase proteins production, such as for C reactive protein (CRP). The process begins with retention of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its oxidation inside the intima, with the formation of the "foam cells." Toll-like receptors and inflamassomes participate in atherosclerosis formation, as well as in the activation of the complement system. In addition to innate immunity, adaptive immunity is also associated with atherosclerosis through antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes. AMI also increases the expression of some ILs and promotes macrophage and lymphocyte accumulation. Reperfusion increases the expression of anti-inflammatory ILs (such as IL-10) and generates oxygen free radicals. Although CAD and AMI are inflammatory disorders, the only drugs with anti-inflammatory effect so far widely used in ischemic heart disease are aspirin and statins. Some immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive promising therapies, such as cyclosporine and colchicine, may have benefits in CAD. Methotrexate also has potential cardioprotective anti-inflammatory effects, through increased adenosine levels. The TETHYS trial (The Effects of mETHotrexate Therapy on ST Segment Elevation MYocardial InfarctionS trial) will evaluate low-dose methotrexate in ST elevation AMI. The CIRT (Cardiovascular Inflammation Reduction Trial), in turn, will evaluate low-dose methotrexate in patients with a high prevalence of subclinical vascular inflammation. The CANTOS (The Canakinumab Antiinflammatory Thrombosis Outcomes Study) will evaluate canakinumab in patients with CAD and persistently elevated CRP. The blockage of other potential targets, such as the IL-6 receptor, CC2 chemokine receptor and CD20, could bring benefits in CAD.

  5. Early life stress sensitizes rats to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vascular inflammation in adult life.

    PubMed

    Loria, Analia S; Pollock, David M; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2010-02-01

    Maternal separation during early life is an established chronic behavioral model of early life stress in rats. It is known that perinatal adverse environments increase activity of the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system, specifically Ang II, in adulthood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the effects of early life stress augment the sensitivity of the Ang II pathway. Using Wistar Kyoto rats, the maternal separation (MS) protocol was performed by separating approximately half of the male pups from their mother 3 h/d from days 2 to 14 of life. Pups remaining with the mother at all times were used as controls. Maternal separation did not influence the plasma basal parameters, such as blood glucose, insulin, Ang II, Ang 1-7 and plasma renin activity. Furthermore, body weight, blood pressure, and heart rate were similar in MS and control rats. The acute pressor response to Ang II was not different in anesthetized MS and control rats. However, the chronic infusion of Ang II (65 ng/min SC) elicited an exaggerated hypertensive response in MS compared with control rats (P<0.05). Surprisingly, HR was dramatically increased during the second week of Ang II infusion in MS compared with control rats (P<0.05). This enhanced Ang II sensitivity was accompanied by a greater vascular inflammatory response in MS versus control rats. Chronic Ang II infusion increased vascular wall structure in both groups similarly. These data indicate that early life stress sensitizes rats to an increased hemodynamic and inflammatory response during Ang II-induced hypertension.

  6. Impact of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ on angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated insulin sensitivity, vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Becher, Ulrich M.; Camara, Bakary; Yildirimtürk, Cihan; Aksoy, Adem; Kebschull, Moritz; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Müller, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. A number of studies have reported that AT1R inhibition or genetic AT1R disruption and PPARγ activation inhibit vascular inflammation and improve glucose and lipid metabolism, underscoring a molecular interaction of AT1R and PPARγ. We here analyzed the hypothesis that vasculoprotective anti-inflammatory and metabolic effects of AT1R inhibition are mediated by PPARγ. Material and methods Female ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice were fedwith a high-fat and cholesterol-rich diet and received continuous treatment with the selective PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or vehicle at a rate of 700 ng/kg/min for 4 weeks using subcutaneously implanted osmotic mini-pumps. Additionally, one group of female ApoE–/– mice served as a control group. After treatment for 4 weeks mice were sacrificed and read-outs (plaque development, vascular inflammation and insulinsensitivity) were performed. Results Using AT1R deficient ApoE–/– mice (ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice) we found decreased cholesterol-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis compared to ApoE–/– mice. Inhibition of PPARγ by application of the specific PPARγ antagonist GW9662 significantly abolished the anti-atherogenic effects of AT1R deficiency in ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice (plaque area as % of control: ApoE–/–: 39 ±5%; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–: 17 ±7%, p = 0.044 vs. ApoE–/–; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– + GW9662: 31 ±8%, p = 0.047 vs. ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–). Focusing on IL6 as a pro-inflammatory humoral marker we detected significantly increased IL-6 levels in GW9662-treated animals (IL-6 in pg/ml: ApoE–/–: 230 ±16; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–: 117 ±20, p = 0.01 vs. ApoE–/–; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– + GW9662: 199 ±20, p = 0.01 vs. ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–), while the anti-inflammatory marker IL-10 was significantly

  7. Endothelial Dicer promotes atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation by miRNA-103-mediated suppression of KLF4

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Petra; Zhou, Zhe; Natarelli, Lucia; Wei, Yuanyuan; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Zhu, Mengyu; Grommes, Jochen; Steffens, Sabine; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate the maladaptation of endothelial cells (ECs) to naturally occurring disturbed blood flow at arterial bifurcations resulting in arterial inflammation and atherosclerosis in response to hyperlipidemic stress. Here, we show that reduced endothelial expression of the RNAse Dicer, which generates almost all mature miRNAs, decreases monocyte adhesion, endothelial C–X–C motif chemokine 1 (CXCL1) expression, atherosclerosis and the lesional macrophage content in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (Apoe−/−) after exposure to a high-fat diet. Endothelial Dicer deficiency reduces the expression of unstable miRNAs, such as miR-103, and promotes Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4)-dependent gene expression in murine atherosclerotic arteries. MiR-103 mediated suppression of KLF4 increases monocyte adhesion to ECs by enhancing nuclear factor-κB-dependent CXCL1 expression. Inhibiting the interaction between miR-103 and KLF4 reduces atherosclerosis, lesional macrophage accumulation and endothelial CXCL1 expression. Overall, our study suggests that Dicer promotes endothelial maladaptation and atherosclerosis in part by miR-103-mediated suppression of KLF4. PMID:26837267

  8. Endothelial Dicer promotes atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation by miRNA-103-mediated suppression of KLF4.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Petra; Zhou, Zhe; Natarelli, Lucia; Wei, Yuanyuan; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Zhu, Mengyu; Grommes, Jochen; Steffens, Sabine; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate the maladaptation of endothelial cells (ECs) to naturally occurring disturbed blood flow at arterial bifurcations resulting in arterial inflammation and atherosclerosis in response to hyperlipidemic stress. Here, we show that reduced endothelial expression of the RNAse Dicer, which generates almost all mature miRNAs, decreases monocyte adhesion, endothelial C-X-C motif chemokine 1 (CXCL1) expression, atherosclerosis and the lesional macrophage content in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (Apoe(-/-)) after exposure to a high-fat diet. Endothelial Dicer deficiency reduces the expression of unstable miRNAs, such as miR-103, and promotes Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4)-dependent gene expression in murine atherosclerotic arteries. MiR-103 mediated suppression of KLF4 increases monocyte adhesion to ECs by enhancing nuclear factor-κB-dependent CXCL1 expression. Inhibiting the interaction between miR-103 and KLF4 reduces atherosclerosis, lesional macrophage accumulation and endothelial CXCL1 expression. Overall, our study suggests that Dicer promotes endothelial maladaptation and atherosclerosis in part by miR-103-mediated suppression of KLF4. PMID:26837267

  9. Metabolomic and Genomic Markers of Atherosclerosis as Related to Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Vascular Function in Twin Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Rana, Brinda K.; Stenger, Michael B.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Smith, Scott M.; Macias, Brandon R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Sharma, Kumar; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2016-01-01

    Background: Future human space travel will consist primarily of long-duration missions onboard the International Space Station (ISS) or exploration-class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Astronauts participating in long-duration missions may be at an increased risk of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage due to radiation, psychological stress, altered physical activity, nutritional insufficiency, and hyperoxia during extravehicular activity. By studying one identical twin during his 1-year ISS mission and one ground-based twin, this work extends a current NASA-funded investigation to determine whether these spaceflight factors contribute to an accelerated progression of atherosclerosis. This study of twins affords a unique opportunity to examine the spaceflight-related atherosclerosis risk independent of the confounding factors associated with different genotypes. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to determine whether biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after long-duration spaceflight and determine if a relation exists between levels of these biomarkers and structural and functional indices of atherosclerotic risk measured in the carotid and brachial arteries. These physiological and biochemical data will be extended by using an exploratory approach to investigate the relationship between intermediate phenotypes and risk factors for atherosclerosis and the metabolomic signature from plasma and urine samples. Since metabolites are often the indirect products of gene expression, we will simultaneously assess gene expression and DNA methylation in leukocytes. Hypothesis: We predict that the space-flown twin will experience elevated biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage, altered arterial structure and function, accelerated telomere shortening, dysregulation of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, and a metabolic profile shift that is associated with elevated

  10. Systemic Delivery of MicroRNA-181b Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation, Vascular Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wara, A.K.M.; Icli, Basak; Shvartz, Eugenia; Tesmenitsky, Yevgenia; Belkin, Nathan; Li, Dazhu; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Croce, Kevin; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling in the vascular endothelium promotes the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Targeting endothelial NF-κB may provide a novel strategy to limit chronic inflammation. Objective To examine the role of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) in endothelial NF-κB signaling and effects on atherosclerosis. Methods and Results MiR-181b expression was reduced in the aortic intima and plasma in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice fed a high-fat diet. Correspondingly, circulating miR-181b in the plasma was markedly reduced in human subjects with coronary artery disease. Systemic delivery of miR-181b resulted in a 2.3-fold overexpression of miR-181b in the aortic intima of apolipoprotein E–deficient mice and suppressed NF-κB signaling revealed by bioluminescence imaging and reduced target gene expression in the aortic arch in apolipoprotein E–deficient/NF-κB-luciferase transgenic mice. MiR-181b significantly inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation, proinflammatory gene expression and the influx of lesional macrophages and CD4+ T cells in the vessel wall. Mechanistically, miR-181b inhibited the expression of the target gene importin-α3, an effect that reduced NF-κB nuclear translocation specifically in the vascular endothelium of lesions, whereas surprisingly leukocyte NF-κB signaling was unaffected despite a 7-fold overexpression of miR-181b. Our findings uncover that NF-κB nuclear translocation in leukocytes does not involve importin-α3, but rather importin-α5, which miR-181b does not target, highlighting that inhibition of NF-κB signaling in the endothelium is sufficient to mediate miR-181b's protective effects. Conclusions Systemic delivery of miR-181b inhibits the activation of NF-κB and atherosclerosis through cell-specific mechanisms in the vascular endothelium. These findings support the rationale that delivery of miR-181b may provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat chronic inflammatory diseases

  11. Relationship between serum levels of triglycerides and vascular inflammation, measured as COX-2, in arteries from diabetic patients: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a common feature in the majority of cardiovascular disease, including Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Levels of pro-inflammatory markers have been found in increasing levels in serum from diabetic patients (DP). Moreover, levels of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are increased in coronary arteries from DP. Methods Through a cross-sectional design, patients who underwent CABG were recruited. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were cultured and COX-2 was measured by western blot. Biochemical and clinical data were collected from the medical record and by blood testing. COX-2 expression was analyzed in internal mammary artery cross-sections by confocal microscopy. Eventually, PGI2 and PGE2 were assessed from VSMC conditioned media by ELISA. Results Only a high glucose concentration, but a physiological concentration of triglycerides exposure of cultured human VSMC derived from non-diabetic patients increased COX-2 expression .Diabetic patients showed increasing serum levels of glucose, Hb1ac and triglycerides. The bivariate analysis of the variables showed that triglycerides was positively correlated with the expression of COX-2 in internal mammary arteries from patients (r2 = 0.214, P < 0.04). Conclusions We conclude that is not the glucose blood levels but the triglicerydes leves what increases the expression of COX-2 in arteries from DP. PMID:23642086

  12. Regulation of macrophage-mediated larvicidal activity in Echinococcus granulosus and Mesocestoides corti (Cestoda) infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P; Dixon, J B; Rakha, N K; Carter, S D

    1990-04-01

    Killing of metacestodes by normal or post-infection macrophages and the regulation of this activity by cytokines were studied in vitro. The protoscolecidal activity of normal macrophages against Echinococcus granulosus was inhibited by a product of naive T-enriched lymphocytes co-cultured with protoscoleces (PSC). By contrast, supernates from co-cultures of Mesocestoides corti tetrathyridia (MCT) and T-enriched or B-enriched normal lymphocytes increased killing of MCT by normal macrophages. Larvicidal activity (against both PSC and MCT) was enhanced by high concentrations of macrophage-activating factors produced by Con A-stimulated rat lymphocytes (Con A-LK), but was reduced by low concentrations of these factors. Activation by synergism between Con A-LK and recombinant interferon-gamma(r. IFN-gamma) was demonstrated in macrophage-mediated killing of MCT at high effector to target ratio. Cytokine-activation of normal or post-MCT infection macrophages was compared. Macrophages from both 8 and 20 week post-infection mice were refractory to lymphokines from lymphocyte-MCT cultures and displayed greatly reduced killing of MCT. Macrophage activation by Con A-LK and r.IFN-gamma was also impaired, implying a general defect in the ability of these post-infection macrophages to respond to macrophage activating signals. The data indicate that two different mechanisms may exist by which metacestodes regulate potentially larvicidal effector mechanisms. E. granulosus can elicit the production of lymphokines suppressive for PSC killing, whereas M. corti appears directly to induce a refractory state in effector macrophages.

  13. Targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 and Protein Kinase D1 Related Pathways by a Multiple Kinase Inhibitor in Angiogenesis and Inflammation Related Processes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Attila; Gyulavári, Pál; Greff, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Németh, Tamás; Simon-Szabó, Laura; Kerekes, Krisztina; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Brauswetter, Diána; Kokas, Márton; Borbély, Gábor; Erdei, Anna; Mócsai, Attila; Kéri, György; Vántus, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and protein kinase D1 (PKD1) signaling axis plays a critical role in normal and pathological angiogenesis and inflammation related processes. Despite all efforts, the currently available therapeutic interventions are limited. Prior studies have also proved that a multiple target inhibitor can be more efficient compared to a single target one. Therefore, development of novel inflammatory pathway-specific inhibitors would be of great value. To test this possibility, we screened our molecular library using recombinant kinase assays and identified the previously described compound VCC251801 with strong inhibitory effect on both VEGFR2 and PKD1. We further analyzed the effect of VCC251801 in the endothelium-derived EA.hy926 cell line and in different inflammatory cell types. In EA.hy926 cells, VCC251801 potently inhibited the intracellular activation and signaling of VEGFR2 and PKD1 which inhibition eventually resulted in diminished cell proliferation. In this model, our compound was also an efficient inhibitor of in vitro angiogenesis by interfering with endothelial cell migration and tube formation processes. Our results from functional assays in inflammatory cellular models such as neutrophils and mast cells suggested an anti-inflammatory effect of VCC251801. The neutrophil study showed that VCC251801 specifically blocked the immobilized immune-complex and the adhesion dependent TNF-α -fibrinogen stimulated neutrophil activation. Furthermore, similar results were found in mast cell degranulation assay where VCC251801 caused significant reduction of mast cell response. In summary, we described a novel function of a multiple kinase inhibitor which strongly inhibits the VEGFR2-PKD1 signaling and might be a novel inhibitor of pathological inflammatory pathways. PMID:25874616

  14. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  15. Obesity, Inflammation, and Exercise Training: Relative Contribution of iNOS and eNOS in the Modulation of Vascular Function in the Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Josiane F.; Correa, Izabella C.; Diniz, Thiago F.; Lima, Paulo M.; Santos, Roger L.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The understanding of obsesity-related vascular dysfunction remains controversial mainly because of the diseases associated with vascular injury. Exercise training is known to prevent vascular dysfunction. Using an obesity model without comorbidities, we aimed at investigating the underlying mechanism of vascular dysfunction and how exercise interferes with this process. Methods: High-sugar diet was used to induce obesity in mice. Exercise training was performed 5 days/week. Body weight, energy intake, and adipose tissues were assessed; blood metabolic and hormonal parameters were determined; and serum TNFα was measured. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed by plethysmography. Changes in aortic isometric tension were recorded on myograph. Western blot was used to analyze protein expression. Nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were used for inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) knockdown. Results: Body weight, fat mass, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, insulin, and leptin were higher in the sedentary obese group (SD) than in the sedentary control animals (SS). Exercise training prevented these changes. No difference in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and heart rate was found. Decreased vascular relaxation and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) functioning in the SD group were prevented by exercise. Contractile response to phenylephrine was decreased in the aortas of the wild SD mice, compared with that of the SS group; however, no alteration was noted in the SD iNOS−/− animals. The decreased contractility was endothelium-dependent, and was reverted by iNOS inhibition or iNOS silencing. The aortas from the SD group showed increased basal NO production, serum TNFα, TNF receptor-1, and phospho-IκB. Exercise training attenuated iNOS-dependent reduction in contractile response in high-sugar diet–fed animals

  16. Obesity, Inflammation, and Exercise Training: Relative Contribution of iNOS and eNOS in the Modulation of Vascular Function in the Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Josiane F.; Correa, Izabella C.; Diniz, Thiago F.; Lima, Paulo M.; Santos, Roger L.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The understanding of obsesity-related vascular dysfunction remains controversial mainly because of the diseases associated with vascular injury. Exercise training is known to prevent vascular dysfunction. Using an obesity model without comorbidities, we aimed at investigating the underlying mechanism of vascular dysfunction and how exercise interferes with this process. Methods: High-sugar diet was used to induce obesity in mice. Exercise training was performed 5 days/week. Body weight, energy intake, and adipose tissues were assessed; blood metabolic and hormonal parameters were determined; and serum TNFα was measured. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed by plethysmography. Changes in aortic isometric tension were recorded on myograph. Western blot was used to analyze protein expression. Nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were used for inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) knockdown. Results: Body weight, fat mass, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, insulin, and leptin were higher in the sedentary obese group (SD) than in the sedentary control animals (SS). Exercise training prevented these changes. No difference in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and heart rate was found. Decreased vascular relaxation and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) functioning in the SD group were prevented by exercise. Contractile response to phenylephrine was decreased in the aortas of the wild SD mice, compared with that of the SS group; however, no alteration was noted in the SD iNOS−/− animals. The decreased contractility was endothelium-dependent, and was reverted by iNOS inhibition or iNOS silencing. The aortas from the SD group showed increased basal NO production, serum TNFα, TNF receptor-1, and phospho-IκB. Exercise training attenuated iNOS-dependent reduction in contractile response in high-sugar diet–fed animals

  17. Advances in inflammation research, Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Russo-Marie, F. ); Mencia-Huerta, J.M.; Chignard, M. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 29 sections, each containing several papers. Some of the section titles are: Membrane Activation, Cell Injury, Prostanoids, Free Radicals, Mast Cells and Inflammation, Vascular Injury, Immediate and Delayed Type Hypersensitivity, Chronic Tissue Injury, Updating Experimental Models of Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis and Inflammation.

  18. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, J. R.; Hibbs, M. J.; Laver, A. J.; Smith, R. A.; Sacks, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8952538

  19. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena; Marusich, Elena; Agrawal, Lokesh; Strayer, David S

    2011-02-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in seizures. We used a rat model based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Four months before KA injection, adult rats were given femoral intramarrow inoculations of SV (RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) against CCR5, plus a marker epitope (AU1), or its monofunctional RNAi-carrying homologue, SV(RNAiR5). This treatment lowered expression of CCR5 in circulating cells. In control rats, seizures induced elevated expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, increased BBB leakage and CCR5(+) cells, as well as neuronal loss, inflammation, and gliosis in the hippocampi. Animals given either the bifunctional or the monofunctional vector were largely protected from KA-induced seizures, neuroinflammation, BBB damage, and neuron loss. Brain CCR5 mRNA was reduced. Rats receiving RNAiR5-bearing vectors showed far greater repair responses: increased neuronal proliferation, and decreased production of MIP-1α and RANTES. Controls received unrelated SV(BUGT) vectors. Decrease in CCR5 in circulating cells strongly protected from excitotoxin-induced seizures, BBB leakage, CNS injury, and inflammation, and facilitated neurogenic repair. PMID:20940264

  20. Emerging applications for zebrafish as a model organism to study oxidative mechanisms and their roles in inflammation and vascular accumulation of oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Longhou; Miller, Yury I

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were recognized as an attractive model organism to study many biological processes. Remarkably, the small size and optical transparency of zebrafish larvae enable high-resolution imaging of live animals. Zebrafish respond to various environmental and pathological factors with robust oxidative stress. In this article, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in oxidative stress and antioxidant response in zebrafish. Existing applications of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors allow imaging, in real time, of the production of H(2)O(2) and studying its involvement in inflammatory responses, as well as activation of the oxidation-sensitive transcription factors HIF and NRF2. Oxidative stress, combined with hyperlipidemia, leads to oxidation of lipoproteins, the process that contributes significantly to the development of atherosclerosis in humans. Recent work found that feeding zebrafish a high-cholesterol diet results in hypercholesterolemia, vascular lipid accumulation, and extreme lipoprotein oxidation. Generation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged human antibody to malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL makes possible the in vivo visualization of MDA epitopes in the vascular wall and testing of the efficacy of antioxidants and dietary interventions. Thus, using zebrafish as a model organism provides important advantages in studying the roles of reactive oxygen species and lipid oxidation in basic biologic and pathologic processes.

  1. From the Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens and Supplementation Prevents High-Fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Pathological Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dai, Xiaozhen; Kong, Maiying; Cai, Lu; Wang, Yuehui; Shi, Bingyin; Tan, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become a common public health problem in the world and raises the risk of various cardiovascular diseases. Zinc is essential for multiple organs in terms of normal structure and function. The present study investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity on the aorta in mice, and evaluated whether it can be affected by zinc deficiency or supplementation. Four-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD with varied amounts of zinc (deficiency, adequate and supplementation) for 3 and 6 months. Results showed that HFD feeding induced a time-dependent aortic remodeling, demonstrated by increased vessel wall thickness, tunica cell proliferation and fibrotic responses, and inflammatory response, reflected by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). HFD feeding also caused aortic oxidative damage, reflected by 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal accumulation, and down-regulated nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression and function, shown by down-regulation of its downstream antioxidants, catalase, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1), and metallothionein expression. The vascular effects of obesity-induced by HFD was exacerbated by zinc deficiency but significantly improved by zinc supplementation. In addition, down-regulation of Nrf2 function and associated antioxidants expression were also worsened by zinc deficiency but improved by zinc supplementation. These results suggest that HFD induces aortic remodeling, which can be exacerbated by zinc deficiency and improved by zinc supplementation. PMID:27370414

  2. Emerging applications of zebrafish as a model organism to study oxidative mechanisms and their role in inflammation and vascular accumulation of oxidized lipids

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were recognized as an attractive model organism to study many biological processes. Remarkably, the small size and optical transparency of zebrafish larvae enable high-resolution imaging of live animals. Zebrafish respond to various environmental and pathological factors with robust oxidative stress. In this article, we provide an overview of molecular mechanisms involved in oxidative stress and antioxidant response in zebrafish. Existing applications of generically-encoded fluorescent sensors allow imaging, in real time, production of H2O2 and studying its involvement in inflammatory responses, as well as activation of oxidation-sensitive transcription factors HIF and NRF2. Oxidative stress, combined with hypelipidemia, leads to oxidation of lipoproteins, the process that contributes significantly to development of human atherosclerosis. Recent work found that feeding zebrafish a high-cholesterol diet results in hypercholesterolemia, vascular lipid accumulation and extreme lipoprotein oxidation. Generation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing a GFP-tagged human antibody to malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL makes possible in vivo visualization of MDA epitopes in the vascular wall and testing the efficacy of antioxidants and dietary interventions. Thus, using zebrafish as a model organism provides important advantages in studying the role of ROS and lipid oxidation in basic biologic and pathologic processes. PMID:22906686

  3. CD36-Dependent 7-Ketocholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages Mediates Progression of Atherosclerosis in Response to Chronic Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Maiseyeu, Andrei; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Villamena, Frederick A.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Harkema, Jack R; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Air pollution exposure has been shown to potentiate plaque progression in humans and animals. Our previous studies have suggested a role for oxidized lipids in mediating adverse vascular effect of air pollution. However, the types of oxidized lipids formed in response to air pollutants and how this occurs and their relevance to atherosclerosis is not fully understood. Objective To investigate the mechanisms by which particulate matter< 2.5μm (PM2.5) induces progression of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Atherosclerosis-prone ApoE−/− or LDLR−/− mice were exposed to filtered air or concentrated ambient PM2.5 using a versatile aerosol concentrator enrichment system for 6 months. PM2.5 increased 7-ketocholesterol (7-KCh), an oxidatively modified form of cholesterol, in plasma IDL/LDL fraction and in aortic plaque concomitant with progression of atherosclerosis and increased CD36 expression in plaque-macrophages from PM2.5-exposed mice. Macrophages isolated from PM2.5-exposed mice displayed increased uptake of oxidized lipids without alterations in their efflux capacity. Consistent with these finding, CD36-positive macrophages displayed a heightened capacity for oxidized lipid uptake. Deficiency of CD36 on hematopoietic cells diminished the effect of air pollution on 7-KCh accumulation, foam cell formation, and atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest a potential role for CD36-mediated abnormal accumulations of oxidized lipids such as 7-KCh in air pollution induced atherosclerosis progression. PMID:25186795

  4. Inflammation and haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and haemostasis are interrelated pathophysiologic processes that considerably affect each other. In this bidirectional relationship, inflammation leads to activation of the haemostatic system that in turn also considerably influences inflammatory activity. Such, the haemostatic system acts in concert with the inflammatory cascade creating an inflammation-haemostasis cycle in which each activated process promotes the other and the two systems function in a positive feedback loop. The extensive crosstalk between immune and haemostatic systems occurs at level of all components of the haemostatic system including vascular endothelial cells, platelets, plasma coagulation cascade, physiologic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic activity. During inflammatory response, inflammatory mediators, in particular proinflammatory cytokines, play a central role in the effects on haemostatic system by triggering its disturbance in a number of mechanisms including endothelial cell dysfunction, increased platelet reactivity, activation of the plasma coagulation cascade, impaired function of physiologic anticoagulants and suppressed fibrinolytic activity. The two examples of pathophysiologic processes in which the tight interdependent relationship between inflammation and haemostasis considerably contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of disease are systemic inflammatory response to infection or sepsis and acute arterial thrombosis as a consequence of ruptured atherosclerotic plaque. Close links between inflammation and haemostasis help explain the prothrombotic tendency in these two clinical conditions in which inflammation shifts the haemostatic activity towards procoagulant state by the ability of proinflammatory mediators to activate coagulation system and to inhibit anticoagulant and fibrinolytic activities. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the complex interactions in the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and haemostasis.

  5. Melanoma exosome induction of endothelial cell GM-CSF in pre-metastatic lymph nodes may result in different M1 and M2 macrophage mediated angiogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Hood, Joshua L

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in the preparation of lymph nodes for melanoma metastasis. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) in M1 or HIF-2α in M2 polarized macrophages. HIF-1α promotes neoangiogenesis while HIF-2α facilitates morphogenic normalization of neovasculature. Melanoma exosomes induce GM-CSF expression by endothelial cells in vitro and HIF-1α expression in pre-metastatic lymph nodes in vivo. This suggest a relationship between melanoma exosome induced endothelial GM-CSF and macrophage mediated angiogenesis in lymph nodes. Theoretically, induction of endothelial cell derived GM-CSF by melanoma exosomes mediates different angiogenic functions in pre-metastatic lymph nodes depending on subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophage polarity. To explore this hypothesis, experiments utilizing melanoma exosomes in a lymph node model are outlined. Despite their opposing immune functions, indirect melanoma exosome stimulation of M1 or M2 SCS macrophages via endothelial derived GM-CSF in lymph nodes may induce different although complementary pro-tumor angiogenic processes. PMID:27515216

  6. SY 17-1 DYNAMIC REGULATION OF REDOX REGULATING FACTOR APE1/REF-1 ON THE OXIDATIVE STRESS AND VASCULAR INFLAMMATION.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA damage and redox regulation against oxidative stress. APE1/Ref-1 is essential for cellular survival and embryonic lethal in knockout mouse models. Heterozygous APE1/Ref-1 mice showed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, reduced vascular NO levels, and are hypertensive. APE1/Ref-1 reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species production by negatively regulating the activity of the NADPH oxidase. APE1/Ref-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus; however, its subcellular localization is dynamically regulated. Recently, it was shown that APE1/Ref-1 is secreted in response to hyperacetylation at specific lysine residues. We investigated the functions of extracellular APE1/Ref-1 with respect to leading anti-inflammatory signaling in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells in response to acetylation. Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, considerably suppressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells. During TSA-mediated acetylation in culture, a time-dependent increase in secreted APE1/Ref-1 was confirmed. Recombinant human APE1/Ref-1 with reducing activity induced a conformational change in TNFR1 by thiol-disulfide exchange. Following treatment with the neutralizing anti-APE1/Ref-1 antibody, inflammatory signals via the binding of TNF-α to TNFR1 were remarkably recovered. Furthermore, rhAPE1/Ref-1 inhibited IL-1β-induced VCAM-1 expression in endothelial cells, and it inhibited iNOS or COX-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. These results strongly indicate that anti-inflammatory effects of secreted APE1/Ref-1 and its property of secreted APE1/Ref-1 may be useful as a therapeutic biomolecule in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27643268

  7. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-12-10

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release 'messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial 'apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50-120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  8. Palmitoylethanolamide Modulates Inflammation-Associated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling via the Akt/mTOR Pathway in a Selective Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha (PPAR-α)-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sarnelli, Giovanni; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Iuvone, Teresa; Capoccia, Elena; Gigli, Stefano; Pesce, Marcella; Seguella, Luisa; Nobile, Nicola; Aprea, Giovanni; Maione, Francesco; de Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Cuomo, Rosario; Steardo, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Angiogenesis is emerging as a pivotal process in chronic inflammatory pathologies, promoting immune infiltration and prompting carcinogenesis. Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s Disease (CD) represent paradigmatic examples of intestinal chronic inflammatory conditions in which the process of neovascularization correlates with the severity and progression of the diseases. Molecules able to target the angiogenesis have thus the potential to synergistically affect the disease course. Beyond its anti-inflammatory effect, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is able to reduce angiogenesis in several chronic inflammatory conditions, but no data about its anti-angiogenic activity in colitis have been produced, yet. Methods The effects of PEA on inflammation-associated angiogenesis in mice with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and in patients with UC were assessed. The release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), the hemoglobin tissue content, the expression of CD31 and of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian-target-of-rapamycin (mTOR) signaling axis were all evaluated in the presence of different concentrations of PEA and concomitant administration of PPAR-α and -γ antagonists. Results Our results demonstrated that PEA, in a selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α dependent mechanism, inhibits colitis-associated angiogenesis, decreasing VEGF release and new vessels formation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mTOR/Akt axis regulates, at least partly, the angiogenic process in IBD and that PEA directly affects this pathway. Conclusions Our results suggest that PEA may improve inflammation-driven angiogenesis in colonic mucosa, thus reducing the mucosal damage and potentially affecting disease progression and the shift towards the carcinogenesis. PMID:27219328

  9. Acyl-CoA:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Expression Level in the Hematopoietic Compartment Impacts Inflammation in the Vascular Plaques of Atherosclerotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, Nemanja; Porter Abate, Jess; Schlager, Stefanie; David, Tovo; Koliwad, Suneil K.

    2016-01-01

    The final step of triacylglycerol synthesis is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs). We have previously shown that ApoE-/-Dgat1-/- mice are protected from developing atherosclerosis in association with reduced foam cell formation. However, the role of DGAT1, specifically in myeloid and other hematopoietic cell types, in determining this protective phenotype is unknown. To address this question, we reconstituted the bone marrow of irradiated Ldlr–/–mice with that from wild-type (WT→ Ldlr–/–) and Dgat1–/–(Dgat1–/–→ Ldlr–/–) donor mice. We noted that DGAT1 in the hematopoietic compartment exerts a sex-specific effect on systemic cholesterol homeostasis. However, both male and female Dgat1–/–→ Ldlr–/–mice had higher circulating neutrophil and lower lymphocyte counts than control mice, suggestive of a classical inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, specifically examining the aortae of these mice revealed that Dgat1–/–→ Ldlr–/–mice have atherosclerotic plaques with increased macrophage content. This increase was coupled to a reduced plaque collagen content, leading to a reduced collagen-to-macrophage ratio. Together, these findings point to a difference in the inflammatory contribution to plaque composition between Dgat1–/–→ Ldlr–/–and control mice. By contrast, DGAT1 deficiency did not affect the transcriptional responses of cultured macrophages to lipoprotein treatment in vitro, suggesting that the alterations seen in the plaques of Dgat1–/–→ Ldlr–/–mice in vivo do not reflect a cell intrinsic effect of DGAT1 in macrophages. We conclude that although DGAT1 in the hematopoietic compartment does not impact the overall lipid content of atherosclerotic plaques, it exerts reciprocal effects on inflammation and fibrosis, two processes that control plaque vulnerability. PMID:27223895

  10. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  11. Combined Concurrent Photodynamic and Gold Nanoshell Loaded Macrophage-Mediated Photothermal Therapies: An In Vitro Study on Squamous Cell Head and Neck Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Anthony J.; Hong, Seok Jin; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Treatment modalities, such as hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been used in the treatment of a variety of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), either alone or as an adjuvant therapy. Macrophages loaded with gold nanoshells, which convert near-infrared light to heat, can be used as transport vectors for photothermal hyperthermia of tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of combined macrophage mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) and PDT on HNSCC cells. Study Design/Materials and Methods Gold nanoshell loaded rat macrophages either alone or combined with human FaDu squamous cells in hybrid monolayers were subjected to PTT, PDT, or a simultaneous combination of the two light treatments. Therapies were given concurrently employing two laser light sources of λ = 670 nm (PDT) and λ = 810 nm (PTT), respectively. Results Significant uptake of gold nanospheres (AuNS) by rat alveolar macrophages was observed thus providing the rationale for their use as delivery vectors. Viability of the AuNS-loaded Ma was reduced to 35 and 12% of control values at an irradiance of 14 or 28 W/cm2 administered over a 5 minute period respectively. No significant cytotoxicity was observed for empty Ma for similar PTT exposure. AlPcS2a mediated PDT at a fluence level of 0.25 J/cm2 and PTT at 14 W/cm2 irradiance had little effect on cell viability for the FaDu/Ma (ratio 2:1) hybrid monolayers. In contrast, combined treatment reduced the cell viability to less than 40% at these same laser power settings. Conclusions The results of this study provide proof of concept for the use of macrophages as a delivery vector of AuNS for photothermal enhancement of the effects of PDT on squamous cell carcinoma. A significant synergy was demonstrated with combined PDT and PTT compared to each modality applied separately. PMID:24648368

  12. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular Disease Fibromuscular Dysplasia High ...

  13. Cannabinoids for the treatment of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John C

    2007-05-01

    Cannabinoids are effective at suppressing immune and inflammation functions in leukocytes in vitro, and in animal models of acute inflammation, such as the mouse hind paw, ear and air pouch models, as well as gastrointestinal, pulmonary, myocardial, vascular, periodontal, neural, hepatic, pancreatic and arthritic inflammation models. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid receptor CB2 is emerging as a critical target for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation, and thus CB2-selective agonists are undergoing intense investigation and research. This review discusses the evidence for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation across a range of models and highlights the most promising drug candidates.

  14. Post lung-stage schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni exhibit transient susceptibility to macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro that may relate to late phase killing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pearce, E J; James, S L

    1986-09-01

    Studies of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni in immunized mice suggest that a proportion of challenge parasites may be eliminated after they have passed through the lungs of the host several days after infection; however, no potential immune effector mechanism of resistance against this stage of the parasite has yet been identified, since schistosomes have been shown to rapidly become resistant to antibody-dependent killing mechanisms. In this study, different development stages of S. mansoni were examined for their susceptibility to in vitro cytotoxicity by lymphokine-activated macrophages. As previously shown, newly transformed larvae were readily killed by lymphokine-treated peritoneal macrophages or the macrophage cell line IC-21 (80% mortality over 48 h in vitro), whereas 7 and 10 day old lung-stage parasites had become refractory to macrophage effects. However, after 2 to 2 1/2 weeks of development in vivo, juvenile parasites recovered from the liver were again susceptible to activated macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity (25-65% mortality). Ultrastructural studies of 2 1/2 week old parasites co-cultured with activated IC-21 cells revealed that damage was largely restricted to the areas beneath the parasite surface and gut syncitia; surface membrane disruption was not evident. This late stage of susceptibility was transient and by 4 to 6 weeks liver-stage worms had again become refractory to macrophage killing. The interaction of post lung-stage parasites with activated macrophages was antibody independent. Furthermore, schistosomes isolated from the portal circulation 2 1/2 weeks after infection showed no evidence of surface-bound immunoglobulin in a quantitative immunofluorescence assay, nor did antisera from chronically infected mice (CIS) or mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae (VS) react with the surface of these parasites in vitro, making the possibility of direct antibody-dependent killing mechanisms unlikely. However, both CIS and VS

  15. Tumoricidal effector mechanisms of murine Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-activated macrophages: mediation of cytolysis, mitochondrial respiration inhibition, and release of intracellular iron by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klostergaard, J; Leroux, M E; Ezell, S M; Kull, F C

    1987-04-15

    Murine Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-activated macrophages mediate discrete cytotoxic effects in cocultured tumor target cells in vitro. These effects include: the loss of intracellular iron, in part associated with reversible inhibition of the Kreb's cycle enzyme, aconitase; cytostasis, associated with reversible lesions inflicted in the electron transport chain (ETC) of the mitochondria resulting in reversible loss of proliferative capacity; and cytolysis, manifested by eventual gross perturbation of the integrity of the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that these manifestations of cytotoxicity are the result of three independent mechanisms employing apparently distinct macromolecules for their commission. Analysis of target cells that are highly susceptible (L-929), highly resistant (L-1210), or have incomplete resistance (EMT-6) to the cytolytic effects of cocultured activated macrophages indicates that there is no consistent relationship between the release of intracellular 59Fe and 51Cr. Thus, perturbation of intracellular iron pools did not appear to be an obligatory step on the pathway to cytolysis. Further evidence for this dissociation was obtained by employing a specific heteroantiserum reactive with cytolytic molecule(s). This antiserum could block the cytolytic response (51Cr release of cocultured L-929 and EMT-6 targets) but had no effect on the extent of iron release from viable EMT-6 or L-1210 targets. Furthermore, the cytolytic factor itself was incapable of mediating effects on the ETC or in causing release of intracellular iron. Two lines of evidence suggested that effects on the ETC are not linked with loss of intracellular iron. First, the monokine respiration inhibitory factor was incapable of causing release of intracellular iron from target cells in which the mitochondria were strongly suppressed. Second, the kinetics of release of respiration inhibitory factor from endotoxin-triggered Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-activated macrophages indicate a

  16. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Marxreiter, F; Winkler, J

    2016-07-01

    Parkinsonism may result from cerebral vascular disorders that feature white matter lesions and small vessel pathology. Vascular Parkinsonism typically presents as lower body Parkinsonism with predominant gait impairment. Urinary incontinence and cognitive decline are additional features of the disease. There is a considerable overlap between vascular Parkinsonism and vascular dementia. We review the clinical characteristics of vascular Parkinsonism and discuss the current treatment approaches, as well as the role of brain imaging for the diagnostic workup. . PMID:27299942

  17. Vascular Hyperpermeability and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Ryan; Tharakan, Binu

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability, the excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from blood vessels to the interstitial space, commonly occurs in traumatic and ischemic injuries. This hyperpermeability causes tissue vasogenic edema, which often leads to multiple organ failure resulting in patient death. Vascular hyperpermeability occurs most readily in small blood vessels as their more delicate physical constitution makes them an easy target for barrier dysfunction. A single layer of endothelial cells, linked to one another by cell adhesion molecules, covers the interior surface of each blood vessel. The cell adhesion molecules play a key role in maintaining barrier functions like the regulation of permeability. Aging is a major risk factor for microvascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability. Apart from age-related remodeling of the vascular wall, endothelial barrier integrity and function declines with the advancement of age. Studies that address the physiological and molecular basis of vascular permeability regulation in aging are currently very limited. There have been many cellular and molecular mechanisms proposed to explain aging-related endothelial dysfunction but their true relationship to barrier dysfunction and hyperpermeability is not clearly known. Among the several mechanisms that promote vascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability, the following are considered major contributors: oxidative stress, inflammation, and the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways. In this review we highlighted (a) the physiological, cellular and molecular changes that occur in the vascular system as a product of aging; (b) the potential mechanisms by which aging leads to barrier dysfunction and vascular hyperpermeability in the peripheral and the blood-brain barrier; (c) the mechanisms by which the age-related increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory markers and apoptotic signaling etc. cause endothelial dysfunction and their relationship to hyperpermeability; and (d) the

  18. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  19. Evolving functions of endothelial cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pober, Jordan S; Sessa, William C

    2007-10-01

    Inflammation is usually analysed from the perspective of tissue-infiltrating leukocytes. Microvascular endothelial cells at a site of inflammation are both active participants in and regulators of inflammatory processes. The properties of endothelial cells change during the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and during the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Mediators that act on endothelial cells also act on leukocytes and vice versa. Consequently, many anti-inflammatory therapies influence the behaviour of endothelial cells and vascular therapeutics influence inflammation. This Review describes the functions performed by endothelial cells at each stage of the inflammatory process, emphasizing the principal mediators and signalling pathways involved and the therapeutic implications. PMID:17893694

  20. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  1. Angiogenesis and inflammation in invasive carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A H; Happerfield, L C; Bobrow, L G; Millis, R R

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relation between angiogenesis and inflammation in invasive carcinoma of the breast. METHODS: Sections from 75 invasive carcinomas of the breast were stained using immunohistochemistry for von Willebrand factor, CD3, CD8, CD45RO, CD45RA, CD20, CD68, and c-erbB-2. Tumour vascularity was assessed by counting vessels in the three most vascular areas, and calculating the average (x 400 magnification, field 0.168 mm2). Each pattern of inflammation was scored semiquantitatively. RESULTS: The main pattern of inflammation was a diffuse infiltrate of macrophages, and to a lesser extent T cells. Perivascular and perilobular clusters of B and T cells were noted at the edge of the carcinomas, but were less prominent than the diffuse inflammation. Diffuse inflammation, particularly macrophages, was associated with high tumour grade, tumour necrosis, large tumour size, and c-erbB-2 expression. Perivascular and perilobular inflammation also increased with tumour grade. Tumour vascularity increased slightly with intensity of diffuse inflammation (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rs = 0.17, p = 0.08), and was inversely related to perilobular inflammation (rs = -0.23, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The correlations between inflammation and vascularity were weak in this study (r2 about 0.04) and thus there was no evidence of an important relation. Discrepancies between this and other studies may be resolved by studying expression of angiogenic cytokines and proteolytic enzymes by tumour infiltrating inflammatory cells, and their relation to tumour vascularity. PMID:9301551

  2. Adhesion in vascular biology

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature delivers vital support for all other tissues by supplying oxygen and nutrients for growth and by transporting the immune cells that protect and cure them. Therefore, the microvasculature developed a special barrier that is permissive for gasses like oxygen and carbon dioxide, while fluids are kept inside and pathogens are kept out. While maintaining this tight barrier, the vascular wall also allows immune cells to exit at sites of inflammation or damage, a process that is called transmigration. The endothelial cell layer that forms the inner lining of the vasculature is crucial for the vascular barrier function as well as the regulation of transmigration. Therefore, adhesions between vascular endothelial cells are both tight and dynamic and the mechanisms by which they are established, and the mechanisms by which they are controlled have been extensively studied over the past decades. Because of our fundamental strive to understand biology, but also because defects in vascular barrier control cause a variety of clinical problems and treatment strategies may evolve from our detailed understanding of its mechanisms. This special focus issue features a collection of articles that review key components of the development and control of the endothelial cell-cell junction that is central to endothelial barrier function. PMID:25422845

  3. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs. PMID:27429513

  4. Myeloid-specific SIRT1 Deletion Aggravates Hepatic Inflammation and Steatosis in High-fat Diet-fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Kim, Hwajin; Heo, Rok Won; Shin, Hyun Joo; Yi, Chin-ok; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that regulates cellular metabolism and inflammatory response. The organ-specific deletion of SIRT1 induces local inflammation and insulin resistance in dietary and genetic obesity. Macrophage-mediated inflammation contributes to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, however, the macrophage-specific SIRT1 function in the context of obesity is largely unknown. C57/BL6 wild type (WT) or myeloid-specific SIRT1 knockout (KO) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks. Metabolic parameters and markers of hepatic steatosis and inflammation in liver were compared in WT and KO mice. SIRT1 deletion enhanced HFD-induced changes on body and liver weight gain, and increased glucose and insulin resistance. In liver, SIRT1 deletion increased the acetylation, and enhanced HFD-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), hepatic inflammation and macrophage infiltration. HFD-fed KO mice showed severe hepatic steatosis by activating lipogenic pathway through sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), and hepatic fibrogenesis, as indicated by induction of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen secretion. Myeloid-specific deletion of SIRT1 stimulates obesity-induced inflammation and increases the risk of hepatic fibrosis. Targeted induction of macrophage SIRT1 may be a good therapy for alleviating inflammation-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:26330758

  5. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  6. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  7. [Vascular dementia].

    PubMed

    Peters, N; Dichgans, M

    2010-10-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) constitutes the second most frequent cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast to AD, VaD encompasses a variety of conditions and dementia mechanisms including multiple and strategic infarcts, widespread white matter lesions and hemorrhages. The diagnosis of VaD is based on the patient history, the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging. Treatment of VaD should account for the underlying vascular condition and is directed towards the control of vascular risk factors and stroke prevention. The need for early diagnosis and preventive treatment has promoted the concept of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Harmonization standards for the description and study of VCI have recently been published. A common and distinct subtype of VaD is subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) which is related to cerebral small vessel disease. SIVD is clinically characterized by impairment of executive functions and processing speed with relatively preserved memory. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of SIVD, represents an important differential diagnosis and may serve as a model of SIVD.

  8. Vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Semashko, D C

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the initial assessment and emergent management of several common as well as uncommon vascular emergencies. Aortic dissection, aneurysms, and arterial occlusive disease are familiar but challenging clinical entities. Less frequently encountered conditions are also discussed including an aortic enteric fistula, mesenteric venous thrombosis, phlegmasia alba dolens, and subclavian vein thrombosis.

  9. [Adipose tissue inflammation and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Shwarts, V

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ secreting more than 30 various adipokines which regulate wide spectrum of metabolic and immune processes. Obesity is associated with development of adipose tissue inflammation. This inflammation is characterized by infiltration with macrophages, alterations of adipokine secretion, development of insulin resistance. All these factors promote atherosclerosis. Inflammation of perivascular adipose tissue is especially important. Adipokines damage vascular endothelium via paracrine pathway. Cytokines released by macrophages as well as changes of adipokine secretion lead to endothelial dysfunction - the first stage of atherogenesis. Besides specific action curative factors used in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus also produce anti-inflammatory effect and thus diminish risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, rate of their development, and alleviate manifestations of atherosclerosis. Inflammation of adipose tissue is a connecting link between obesity and atherosclerosis. This review contains an outline of roles of various major adipokines in development of atherosclerosis as well as synopsis of anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects of glytazones , metformin, rimonabant, statins, and of lowering of body weight.

  10. Helminth-induced arginase-1 exacerbates lung inflammation and disease severity in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Monin, Leticia; Griffiths, Kristin L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Gopal, Radha; Kang, Dongwan D.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Babu, Subash; Kolls, Jay K.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Rosa, Bruce A.; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Morrison, Thomas E.; Murray, Peter J.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Pearce, Edward J.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth worms, such as Schistosoma mansoni, are endemic in regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among the population. Human studies suggest that helminth coinfections contribute to increased TB susceptibility and increased rates of TB reactivation. Prevailing models suggest that T helper type 2 (Th2) responses induced by helminth infection impair Th1 immune responses and thereby limit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) control. Using a pulmonary mouse model of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that S. mansoni coinfection or immunization with S. mansoni egg antigens can reversibly impair Mtb-specific T cell responses without affecting macrophage-mediated Mtb control. Instead, S. mansoni infection resulted in accumulation of high arginase-1–expressing macrophages in the lung, which formed type 2 granulomas and exacerbated inflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Treatment of coinfected animals with an antihelminthic improved Mtb-specific Th1 responses and reduced disease severity. In a genetically diverse mouse population infected with Mtb, enhanced arginase-1 activity was associated with increased lung inflammation. Moreover, in patients with pulmonary TB, lung damage correlated with increased serum activity of arginase-1, which was elevated in TB patients coinfected with helminths. Together, our data indicate that helminth coinfection induces arginase-1–expressing type 2 granulomas, thereby increasing inflammation and TB disease severity. These results also provide insight into the mechanisms by which helminth coinfections drive increased susceptibility, disease progression, and severity in TB. PMID:26571397

  11. miR-181a Induces Macrophage Polarized to M2 Phenotype and Promotes M2 Macrophage-mediated Tumor Cell Metastasis by Targeting KLF6 and C/EBPα.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jia; Zeng, Xianxin; Zhao, Lin; Wei, Qian; Yu, Lifeng; Wang, Xinnan; Yu, Zhaojin; Cao, Yaming; Shan, Fengping; Wei, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages can acquire a variety of polarization status and functions: classically activated macrophages (M1 macrophages); alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages). However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. Here, this study addresses that microRNA-181a (miR-181a) is a key molecule controlling macrophage polarization. We found that miR-181a is overexpressed in M2 macrophages than in M1 macrophages. miR-181a expression was decreased when M2 phenotype converted to M1, whereas it increased when M1 phenotype converted to M2. Overexpression of miR-181a in M1 macrophages diminished M1 phenotype expression while promoting polarization to the M2 phenotype. In contrast, knockdown of miR-181a in M2 macrophages promoted M1 polarization and diminished M2 phenotype expression. Mechanistically, Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) is a potential target of miR-181a and luciferase assay confirmed that KLF6 and C/EBPα translation is suppressed by miR-181a through interaction with the 3'UTR of KLF6 and C/EBPα mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-181a suppressed KLF6 and C/EBPα protein expression. Importantly, miR-181a also diminishes M2 macrophages-mediated migration and invasion capacity of tumor cells. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-181a plays a significant role in regulating macrophage polarization through directly target KLF6 and C/EBPα. PMID:27673564

  12. miR-181a Induces Macrophage Polarized to M2 Phenotype and Promotes M2 Macrophage-mediated Tumor Cell Metastasis by Targeting KLF6 and C/EBPα

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jia; Zeng, Xianxin; Zhao, Lin; Wei, Qian; Yu, Lifeng; Wang, Xinnan; Yu, Zhaojin; Cao, Yaming; Shan, Fengping; Wei, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages can acquire a variety of polarization status and functions: classically activated macrophages (M1 macrophages); alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages). However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. Here, this study addresses that microRNA-181a (miR-181a) is a key molecule controlling macrophage polarization. We found that miR-181a is overexpressed in M2 macrophages than in M1 macrophages. miR-181a expression was decreased when M2 phenotype converted to M1, whereas it increased when M1 phenotype converted to M2. Overexpression of miR-181a in M1 macrophages diminished M1 phenotype expression while promoting polarization to the M2 phenotype. In contrast, knockdown of miR-181a in M2 macrophages promoted M1 polarization and diminished M2 phenotype expression. Mechanistically, Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) is a potential target of miR-181a and luciferase assay confirmed that KLF6 and C/EBPα translation is suppressed by miR-181a through interaction with the 3′UTR of KLF6 and C/EBPα mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-181a suppressed KLF6 and C/EBPα protein expression. Importantly, miR-181a also diminishes M2 macrophages-mediated migration and invasion capacity of tumor cells. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-181a plays a significant role in regulating macrophage polarization through directly target KLF6 and C/EBPα. PMID:27673564

  13. Mechanosensing at the Vascular Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Simon, Scott I.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are endowed with a complex set of mechanisms that sense mechanical forces imparted by blood flow to endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells, and circulating blood cells to elicit biochemical responses through a process referred to as mechanotransduction. These biochemical responses are critical for a host of other responses, including regulation of blood pressure, control of vascular permeability for maintaining adequate perfusion of tissues, and control of leukocyte recruitment during immunosurveillance and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of the endothelial surface proteoglycan/glycoprotein layer—the glycocalyx (GCX)—that lines all blood vessel walls and is an agent in mechanotransduction and the modulation of blood cell interactions with the EC surface. We first discuss the biochemical composition and ultrastructure of the GCX, highlighting recent developments that reveal gaps in our understanding of the relationship between composition and spatial organization. We then consider the roles of the GCX in mechanotransduction and in vascular permeability control and review the prominent interaction of plasma borne sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), which has been shown to regulate both the composition of the GCX and the endothelial junctions. Finally, we consider the association of GCX degradation with inflammation and vascular disease and end with a final section on future research directions. PMID:24905872

  14. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  15. CD43 Functions as an E-Selectin Ligand for Th17 Cells In Vitro and Is Required for Rolling on the Vascular Endothelium and Th17 Cell Recruitment during Inflammation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Francisco; Grodecki-Pena, Anna; Knapp, Andrew; Salvador, Ane M; Nevers, Tania; Croce, Kevin J; Alcaide, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Endothelial E- and P-selectins mediate lymphocyte trafficking in inflammatory processes by interacting with lymphocyte selectin ligands. These are differentially expressed among different T cell subsets and function alone or in cooperation to mediate T cell adhesion. In this study, we characterize the expression and functionality of E-selectin ligands in Th type 17 lymphocytes (Th17 cells) and report that CD43 functions as a Th17 cell E-selectin ligand in vitro that mediates Th17 cell rolling on the vascular endothelium and recruitment in vivo. We demonstrate Th17 cells express CD44, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1, and CD43. Few PSGL-1(-/-)CD43(-/-) Th17 cells accumulated on E-selectin under shear flow conditions compared with wild-type cells. CD43(-/-) Th17 cell accumulation on E-selectin was impaired as compared with wild-type and PSGL-1(-/-), and similar to that observed for PSGL-1(-/-)CD43(-/-) Th17 cells, indicating that CD43 alone is a dominant ligand for E-selectin. Notably, this finding is Th17 cell subset specific because CD43 requires cooperation with PSGL-1 in Th1 cells for binding to E-selectin. In vivo, Th17 cell recruitment into the air pouch was reduced in CD43(-/-) mice in response to CCL20 or TNF-α, and intravital microscopy studies demonstrated that CD43(-/-) Th17 cells had impaired rolling on TNF-α-treated microvessels. Furthermore, CD43(-/-) mice were protected from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and had impaired recruitment of Th17 cells in the spinal cord. Our findings demonstrate that CD43 is a major E-selectin ligand in Th17 cells that functions independent of PSGL-1, and they suggest that CD43 may hold promise as a therapeutic target to modulate Th17 cell recruitment.

  16. Lipidomics in vascular health: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms that convert a healthy vascular wall to an atherosclerotic wall is of major importance since the consequences may lead to a shortened lifespan. Classical risk factors (age, smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) may result in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions by processes including inflammation and lipid accumulation. Thus, the evaluation of blood lipids and the full lipid complement produced by cells, organisms, or tissues (lipidomics) is an issue of importance. In this review, we shall describe the recent progress in vascular health research using lipidomic advances. We will begin with an overview of vascular wall biology and lipids, followed by a short analysis of lipidomics. Finally, we shall focus on the clinical implications of lipidomics and studies that have examined lipidomic approaches and vascular health. PMID:26109865

  17. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  18. Factor V Leiden and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Pujol, Silvia; Aras, Omer; Escolar, Gines

    2012-01-01

    Factor V Leiden, is a variant of human factor V (FV), also known as proaccelerin, which leads to a hypercoagulable state. Along these years, factor V Leiden (FVL) has been studied from the pathophysiologic point of view, and research has been focused on finding clinical approaches for the management of the FVL associated to a trombophilic state. Less attention has been paid about the possible role of FVL in inflammatory conditions known to be present in different disorders such as uremia, cirrhosis, liver transplantation, depression as well as sepsis, infection or, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Whether platelet FVL will increase the activation of coagulation and/or in which proportion is able to determine the final outcome in the previously mentioned inflammatory conditions is a subject that remains uncertain. This paper will review the association of FVL with inflammation. Specifically, it will analyze the important role of the endothelium and the contribution of other inflammatory components involved at both the immune and vascular levels. This paper will also try to emphasize the importance of being a FVL carrier in associations to diseases where a chronic inflammation occurs, and how this condition may be determinant in the progression and outcome of a specific clinic situation. PMID:22666576

  19. Inflammation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Price, Laura C; Wort, S John; Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Montani, David; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling of the precapillary pulmonary arteries, with excessive proliferation of vascular cells. Although the exact pathophysiology remains unknown, there is increasing evidence to suggest an important role for inflammation. Firstly, pathologic specimens from patients with PAH reveal an accumulation of perivascular inflammatory cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes, and mast cells. Secondly, circulating levels of certain cytokines and chemokines are elevated, and these may correlate with a worse clinical outcome. Thirdly, certain inflammatory conditions such as connective tissue diseases are associated with an increased incidence of PAH. Finally, treatment of the underlying inflammatory condition may alleviate the associated PAH. Underlying pathologic mechanisms are likely to be "multihit" and complex. For instance, the inflammatory response may be regulated by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR II) status, and, in turn, BMPR II expression can be altered by certain cytokines. Although antiinflammatory therapies have been effective in certain connective-tissue-disease-associated PAH, this approach is untested in idiopathic PAH (iPAH). The potential benefit of antiinflammatory therapies in iPAH is of importance and requires further study. PMID:22215829

  20. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  1. Green tea polyphenols avert chronic inflammation-induced myocardial fibrosis of female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Green tea proposes anti-inflammatory properties which may attenuate chronic inflammation-induced fibrosis of vessels. This study evaluated whether green tea polyphenols (GTP) can avert fibrosis or vascular disruption along with mechanisms in rats with chronic inflammation. Treatments: Fo...

  2. Diet, inflammation and prediabetes-impact of quality of diet.

    PubMed

    Uusitupa, Matti; Schwab, Ursula

    2013-10-01

    Low grade inflammation has been linked to risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Obesity and, in particular, abdominal obesity increase the risk of diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular diseases. One of the mechanisms could be low grade inflammation and vascular endothelial dysfunction. Permanent weight reduction is the first line of treatment both for obese individuals at increased risk of diabetes and for newly onset type 2 diabetes. Weight reduction lowers the level of several inflammatory factors in the body while increasing the level of adiponectin. Besides weight reduction the quality of diet and physical activity also modifies low grade inflammation. Based on the literature survey and our own studies in humans, it is possible to have dietary patterns that reduce inflammatory stress in the body and improves vascular endothelial dysfunction. There is strong evidence to suggest that IL-1 Ra is a very sensitive marker of low grade inflammation in obesity and related phenotypes; however, its level is markedly lowered by weight reduction and by choosing foods that have been shown to reduce inflammatory stress in the body.

  3. Immune activation caused by vascular oxidation promotes fibrosis and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Saleh, Mohamed A; Kirabo, Annet; Itani, Hana A; Montaniel, Kim Ramil C; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Wei; Mernaugh, Raymond L; Cai, Hua; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Goronzy, Jörg J; Weyand, Cornelia M; Curci, John A; Barbaro, Natalia R; Moreno, Heitor; Davies, Sean S; Roberts, L Jackson; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular oxidative injury accompanies many common conditions associated with hypertension. In the present study, we employed mouse models with excessive vascular production of ROS (tg(sm/p22phox) mice, which overexpress the NADPH oxidase subunit p22(phox) in smooth muscle, and mice with vascular-specific deletion of extracellular SOD) and have shown that these animals develop vascular collagen deposition, aortic stiffening, renal dysfunction, and hypertension with age. T cells from tg(sm/p22phox) mice produced high levels of IL-17A and IFN-γ. Crossing tg(sm/p22phox) mice with lymphocyte-deficient Rag1(-/-) mice eliminated vascular inflammation, aortic stiffening, renal dysfunction, and hypertension; however, adoptive transfer of T cells restored these processes. Isoketal-protein adducts, which are immunogenic, were increased in aortas, DCs, and macrophages of tg(sm/p22phox) mice. Autologous pulsing with tg(sm/p22phox) aortic homogenates promoted DCs of tg(sm/p22phox) mice to stimulate T cell proliferation and production of IFN-γ, IL-17A, and TNF-α. Treatment with the superoxide scavenger tempol or the isoketal scavenger 2-hydroxybenzylamine (2-HOBA) normalized blood pressure; prevented vascular inflammation, aortic stiffening, and hypertension; and prevented DC and T cell activation. Moreover, in human aortas, the aortic content of isoketal adducts correlated with fibrosis and inflammation severity. Together, these results define a pathway linking vascular oxidant stress to immune activation and aortic stiffening and provide insight into the systemic inflammation encountered in common vascular diseases. PMID:26595812

  4. Inflammation in Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Speed, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The role of inflammation in tendon disorders has long been a subject of considerable debate. Developments in our understanding of the basic science of inflammation have provided further insight into its potential role in specific forms of tendon disease, and the circumstances that may potentiate this. Such circumstances include excessive mechanical stresses on tendon and the presence of systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases. In this chapter a brief review of the basic science of inflammation is provided and the influence that it may play on tendons is discussed. PMID:27535263

  5. Biology of intracranial aneurysms: role of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Ali, Muhammad S; Jabbour, Pascal M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Koch, Walter J; Dumont, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) linger as a potentially devastating clinical problem. Despite intense investigation, our understanding of the mechanisms leading to aneurysm development, progression and rupture remain incompletely defined. An accumulating body of evidence implicates inflammation as a critical contributor to aneurysm pathogenesis. Intracranial aneurysm formation and progression appear to result from endothelial dysfunction, a mounting inflammatory response, and vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation producing a pro-inflammatory phenotype. A later final common pathway appears to involve apoptosis of cellular constituents of the vessel wall. These changes result in degradation of the integrity of the vascular wall leading to aneurysmal dilation, progression and eventual rupture in certain aneurysms. Various aspects of the inflammatory response have been investigated as contributors to IA pathogenesis including leukocytes, complement, immunoglobulins, cytokines, and other humoral mediators. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of IA compared with control arteries has prominently featured differential expression of genes involved with immune response/inflammation. Preliminary data suggest that therapies targeting the inflammatory response may have efficacy in the future treatment of IA. Further investigation, however, is necessary to elucidate the precise role of inflammation in IA pathogenesis, which can be exploited to improve the prognosis of patients harboring IA. PMID:22781330

  6. Branding of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Perler, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) to understand how PCPs make referral decisions for their patients with peripheral vascular disease. Responses were received from 250 PCPs in 44 states. More than 80% of the respondents characterized their experiences with vascular surgeons as positive or very positive. PCPs perceive that vascular surgeons perform "invasive" procedures and refer patients with the most severe vascular disease to vascular surgeons but were more than twice as likely to refer patients to cardiologists, believing they are better able to perform minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, PCPs are receptive to the notion of increasing referrals to vascular surgeons. A successful branding campaign will require considerable education of referring physicians about the totality of traditional vascular and endovascular care increasingly provided by the contemporary vascular surgical practice and will be most effective at the local grassroots level.

  7. Nanoengineering of therapeutics for retinal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gahlaut, Nivriti; Suarez, Sandra; Uddin, Md Imam; Gordon, Andrew Y; Evans, Stephanie M; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age related macular degeneration, and retinal vein occlusion, are leading causes of blindness in the Western world. These diseases share several common disease mechanisms, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, hypoxia, and inflammation, which provide opportunities for common therapeutic strategies. Treatment of these diseases using laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, and/or steroids has significantly improved clinical outcomes. However, these strategies do not address the underlying root causes of pathology, and may have deleterious side effects. Furthermore, many patients continue to progress toward legal blindness despite receiving regular therapy. Nanomedicine, the engineering of therapeutics at the 1-100 nm scale, is a promising approach for improving clinical management of retinal vascular diseases. Nanomedicine-based technologies have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of ophthalmology, through enabling sustained release of drugs over several months, reducing side effects due to specific targeting of dysfunctional cells, and interfacing with currently "undruggable" targets. We will discuss emerging nanomedicine-based applications for the treatment of complications associated with retinal vascular diseases, including angiogenesis and inflammation.

  8. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease: Atherosclerosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET and MR imaging have been used separately with success for plaque characterization. Where MR imaging has the ability to reveal plaque composition, PET has the ability to visualize plaque activity. Together this leads to a comprehensive evaluation of plaque vulnerability. In this review, the authors go through data and arguments that support increased use of PET/MR imaging in atherosclerotic imaging. PMID:27593251

  9. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  10. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A.; Deans, Robert J.; Mays, Robert W.; Busch, Sarah A.; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  11. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite production in ocular inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J B; Keng, T; Privalle, C

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated nitric oxide and peroxynitrite in the pathogenesis of many diseases, such as septic shock, arthritis, lung disease, and atherosclerosis. Nitric oxide (.NO) exerts many diverse effects on vascular tone, affecting neurotransmission and cellular cytotoxicity/communication. Our laboratory and others have documented a proinflammatory role for .NO in ocular inflammation. Uveitis, which is an inflammation of the highly vascular uveal tract in the eye, is a debilitating condition that can lead to visual impairment and blindness. It is characterized by acute, recurrent, or persistent inflammation with disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier and is accompanied by protein leakage and leukocyte infiltration into the aqueous humor and anterior chamber. Systemic injection of endotoxin into mice and rats, or intraocular injection of endotoxin into mice, rats, and rabbits induces acute uveitis, which clinically and histologically resembles acute anterior uveitis in humans. These models facilitate the study of pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to ocular inflammation. In addition to .NO, superoxide anion radicals (O2.-), and peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the products of the reaction between .NO and O2.-, are also implicated in uveitis. The role of peroxynitrite in ocular inflammation is still largely unknown. Characterization of the roles of these important uveitic mediators in the ocular inflammatory response will provide information critical to the understanding of the pathogenesis of intraocular inflammation so that more effective therapeutic intervention(s) can be developed. PMID:9788889

  12. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  13. Topical Application of Fingolimod Perturbs Cutaneous Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wai Y; Dimasi, David P; Pitman, Melissa R; Zhuang, YiZhong; Heddle, Robert; Pitson, Stuart M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Bonder, Claudine S

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of allergies, including rhinitis, eczema, and anaphylaxis, is rising dramatically worldwide. This increase is especially problematic in children who bear the greatest burden of this rising trend. Increasing evidence identifies neutrophils as primary perpetrators of the more severe and difficult to manage forms of inflammation. A newly recognized mechanism by which neutrophils are recruited during the early phase of histamine-induced inflammation involves the sphingosine kinase (SK)/sphingosine-1-phosphate axis. This study examines whether topical application of fingolimod, an established SK/sphingosine-1-phosphate antagonist already in clinical use to treat multiple sclerosis, may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. Using two mouse models of ear skin inflammation (histamine- and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis) we topically applied fingolimod prophylactically, as well as after establishment of the inflammatory response, and examined ear swelling, SK activity, vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and production of proinflammatory mediators. The present study reveals that when applied topically, fingolimod attenuates both immediate and late-phase responses to histamine with reduced extravasation of fluid, SK-1 activity, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and neutrophil influx and prevents ear swelling. Intravital microscopy demonstrates that histamine-induced neutrophil rolling and adhesion to the postcapillary venules in the mouse ears is significantly attenuated even after 24 h. More importantly, these effects are achievable even once inflammation is established. Translation into humans was also accomplished with epicutaneous application of fingolimod resolving histamine-induced and allergen-induced inflammatory reactions in forearm skin. Overall, this study demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, that fingolimod may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. PMID:27001955

  14. [Prefabrication of vascularized facial bones].

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, R; Jehn, P; Spalthoff, S; Kokemüller, H; Gellrich, N-C

    2015-03-01

    Critical size defects in the craniomaxillofacial region often result from ablative tumor surgery, inflammation and posttraumatic deformities. To date, autologous bone grafts are still the gold standard for the reconstruction of these defects; however, they are frequently associated with severe donor site morbidity as well as functional and aesthetic compromises. In this context various resorbable and non-resorbable bone replacement materials have been developed and intensively investigated. Particularly in critical size defects these materials fail due to their lack of osteogenic potential and endogenous vascularization. The combination of alloplastic osteoconductive scaffolds, osteogenic cells, and axial prevascularization in bioartificial bone grafts might present an innovative approach for the microsurgical reconstruction of critical size defects.

  15. A possible new role for Aβ in vascular and inflammatory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is often characterized by vascular pathology, a procoagulant state, and chronic inflammation. The mechanisms behind these abnormalities in AD are not clear. Here, we review evidence for the role of the AD-associated peptide Aβ in promoting inflammation and thrombosis in AD via its interaction with the circulating proteins factor XII and fibrinogen. PMID:27207427

  16. Myeloid-Specific Blockade of Notch Signaling by RBP-J Knockout Attenuates Spinal Cord Injury Accompanied by Compromised Inflammation Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Yu; Zheng, Min-Hua; Chen, Yan; Du, Yan-Ling; Sun, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Xing; Duan, Li; Gao, Fang; Liang, Liang; Qin, Hong-Yan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Han, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The outcome of spinal cord injury (SCI) is determined by both neural cell-intrinsic survival pathways and tissue microenvironment-derived signals. Macrophages dominating the inflammatory responses in SCI possess both destructive and reparative potentials, according to their activation status. Notch signaling is involved in both cell survival and macrophage-mediated inflammation, but a comprehensive role of Notch signaling in SCI has been elusive. In this study, we compared the effects of general Notch blockade by a pharmaceutical γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) and myeloid-specific Notch signal disruption by recombination signal binding protein Jκ (RBP-J) knockout on SCI. The administration of Notch signal inhibitor GSI resulted in worsened hind limb locomotion and exacerbated inflammation. However, mice lacking RBP-J, the critical transcription factor mediating signals from all four mammalian Notch receptors, in myeloid lineage displayed promoted functional recovery, attenuated glial scar formation, improved neuronal survival and axon regrowth, and mitigated inflammatory response after SCI. These benefits were accompanied by enhanced AKT activation in the lesion area after SCI. These findings demonstrate that abrogating Notch signal in myeloid cells ameliorates inflammation response post-SCI and promotes functional recovery, but general pharmaceutical Notch interception has opposite effects. Therefore, clinical intervention of Notch signaling in SCI needs to pinpoint myeloid lineage to avoid the counteractive effects of global inhibition.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate airway inflammation and emphysema in COPD through down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 via p38 and ERK MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wen; Song, Lin; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Di; Guo, Xue-Jun; Xu, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as one possible strategy for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our previous studies have demonstrated that MSC administration has therapeutic potential in airway inflammation and emphysema via a paracrine mechanism. We proposed that MSCs reverse the inflammatory process and restore impaired lung function through their interaction with macrophages. In our study, the rats were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), followed by the administration of MSCs into the lungs for 5 weeks. Here we show that MSC administration alleviated airway inflammation and emphysema through the down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and COX-2-mediated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, possibly through the effect on alveolar macrophages. In vitro co-culture experiments provided evidence that MSCs down-regulated COX-2/PGE2 in macrophages through inhibition of the activation-associated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK. Our data suggest that MSCs may relieve airway inflammation and emphysema in CS-exposed rat models, through the inhibition of COX-2/PGE2 in alveolar macrophages, mediated in part by the p38 MAPK and ERK pathways. This study provides a compelling mechanism for MSC treatment in COPD, in addition to its paracrine mechanism. PMID:25736434

  18. [Inflammation and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Löbner, K; Füchtenbusch, M

    2004-09-01

    The focus of current diabetes research is the clarification of the pathogenetic relationships between subclinical inflammation, diabetes and arteriosclerosis. Even minimal disturbances in glucose tolerance are associated with a chronic, generalized inflammatory reaction that links components of the metabolic syndrome and contributes to the development of diabetic complications as well as to the development and progression of arteriosclerosis. The most important mediators and markers of this inflammation cascade are NF-kappaB, TNF-alpha, IL-6, CRP and PAI-1. For the treatment of subclinical inflammation, substances with anti-inflammatory properties such as statins or ACE inhibitors are of increasing importance.

  19. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  20. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-03-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations. PMID:27607324

  1. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  2. Absence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunit amplifies inflammation and accelerates onset of fibrosis: an inflammatory kidney model

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Luan D.; Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is regulated by endogenous mechanisms, including anti-inflammatory cytokines, adenosine, and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunit (α7nAChR). We investigated the role of α7nAChR in protection against the progression of tissue injury in a model of severe, macrophage-mediated, cytokine-dependent anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis (GN), in α7nAChR-deficient (α7−/−) mice . At d 7 after the injection of anti-GBM antibody, kidneys from α7−/− mice displayed severe glomeruli (P < 0.0001) and tubulointerstitial lesions (P < 0.001) compared to kidneys from WT mice. An important finding was the presence of severe glomerulosclerosis in α7−/− mice in this early phase of the disease. Kidneys of α7−/− mice showed greater accumulation of inflammatory cells and higher expression of chemokines and cytokines than did those of WT mice. In addition, in α7−/− fibrotic kidneys, the expression of fibrin, collagen, TGF-β, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 increased, and the expression of TIMP3 declined. The increase in counterregulatory responses to inflammation in α7−/− nephritic kidneys did not compensate for the lack of α7nAChR. These findings indicate that α7nAChR plays a key role in regulating the inflammatory response in anti-GBM GN and that disruption of the endogenous protective α7nAChR amplifies inflammation to accelerate kidney damage and fibrosis.—Truong, L. D., Trostel. J., Garcia, G. E. Absence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunit amplifies inflammation and accelerates onset of fibrosis: an inflammatory kidney model. PMID:25985801

  3. Low Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Levels Are Associated With Inflammation and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Di Pino, Antonino; Urbano, Francesca; Zagami, Rose Maria; Filippello, Agnese; Di Mauro, Stefania; Piro, Salvatore; Purrello, Francesco; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria

    2016-04-01

    Pre-diabetes is associated with advanced vascular damage. Our data shows that subjects with pre-diabetes exhibited low esRAGE plasma levels and gene expression, which are inversely related with markers of inflammation and atherosclerotic risk.

  4. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingjun; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE -/- mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come.

  5. Persistent inflammation as a catalyst for other risk factors in chronic kidney disease: a hypothesis proposal.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Because inflammation by now is a "traditional" finding that predicts poor outcome and cardiovascular events in the vast majority of patients with ESRD, it could be argued that inflammatory biomarkers should not longer be considered "novel" risk factors. In this review, we forward the hypothesis that, in addition to putative direct proatherogenic effects, persistent inflammation may serve as a catalyst and, in the toxic uremic milieu, modulate the effects of other concurrent vascular and nutritional risk factors. We discuss some recent observational studies, suggesting that the presence of persistent inflammation magnifies the risk for poor outcome via mechanisms related to self-enhancement of the inflammatory cascade and exacerbation of both the wasting and the vascular calcification processes. Because persistent inflammation may be the silent culprit of other commonly observed pathophysiologic alterations in chronic kidney disease, it is imperative that inflammatory markers be regularly monitored and therapeutic attempts be made to target persistent low-grade inflammation in this patient group.

  6. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  7. Vitamin D and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cannell, John J; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Several studies found an inverse relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and markers of inflammation. A controversy exists as to whether vitamin D lowers inflammation or whether inflammation lowers 25(OH)D concentrations. Certainly 25(OH)D concentrations fall after major surgery. However, is this due to inflammation lowering 25(OH)D or is 25(OH)D being metabolically cleared by the body to quell inflammation. We searched the literature and found 39 randomized controlled trials (RCT) of vitamin D and markers of inflammation. Seventeen found significantly reduced inflammatory markers, 19 did not, one was mixed and one showed adverse results. With few exceptions, studies in normal subjects, obesity, type 2 diabetics, and stable cardiovascular disease did not find significant beneficial effects. However, we found that 6 out of 7 RCTS of vitamin D3 in highly inflammatory conditions (acute infantile congestive heart failure, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, SLE, active TB and evolving myocardial infarction) found significant reductions. We found baseline and final 25(OH)D predicted RCTs with significant reduction in inflammatory markers. Vitamin D tends to modestly lower markers of inflammation in highly inflammatory conditions, when baseline 25(OH)D levels were low and when achieved 25(OH)D levels were higher. Future inquiries should: recruit subjects with low baseline 25(OH)D levels, subjects with elevated markers of inflammation, subjects with inflammatory conditions, achieve adequate final 25(OH)D levels, and use physiological doses of vitamin D. We attempted to identify all extant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin D that used inflammatory markers as primary or secondary endpoints. PMID:26413186

  8. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    PubMed

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  9. Epidemic inflammation: pondering obesity.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades, inflammation has been recognized as a major driver in the pathogenesis of several common diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and asthma. Over the same period, there has been a steep rise in the incidence of obesity, a major risk factor for these disorders. Inflammation of adipose tissue is now recognized to accompany obesity and contribute to its sequelae. Thus, whereas obesity is primarily a disorder of energy balance, it may be helpful to consider it also as a form of epidemic inflammation that predisposes to other forms of epidemic inflammation. It is a fundamental biologic challenge to understand how a positive energy balance and inflammation are linked. This work reviews evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates (ROI and RNI) help drive chronic inflammation in the obese. This is proposed to be a maladaptive instance of our evolved dependence on ROI and RNI for both homeostatic signaling and host defense. ROI and RNI are well suited for these seemingly contradictory dual functions by their metabolic origin, high diffusibility in water and lipid, atomic specificity, and large number of molecular targets. When we eat so much and work so little that we repeatedly generate reactive compounds at levels normally reserved for emergencies, we treat our own cells like invading microbes.

  10. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  11. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  12. Vascular Remodelling and Mesenchymal Transition in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Tombetti, Enrico; Maugeri, Norma; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis of the skin and of internal organs, autoimmunity, and vascular inflammation are hallmarks of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). The injury and activation of endothelial cells, with hyperplasia of the intima and eventual obliteration of the vascular lumen, are early features of SSc. Reduced capillary blood flow coupled with deficient angiogenesis leads to chronic hypoxia and tissue ischemia, enforcing a positive feed-forward loop sustaining vascular remodelling, further exacerbated by extracellular matrix accumulation due to fibrosis. Despite numerous developments and a growing number of controlled clinical trials no treatment has been shown so far to alter SSc natural history, outlining the need of further investigation in the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We review some processes potentially involved in SSc vasculopathy, with attention to the possible effect of sustained vascular inflammation on the plasticity of vascular cells. Specifically we focus on mesenchymal transition, a key phenomenon in the cardiac and vascular development as well as in the remodelling of injured vessels. Recent work supports the role of transforming growth factor-beta, Wnt, and Notch signaling in these processes. Importantly, endothelial-mesenchymal transition may be reversible, possibly offering novel cues for treatment. PMID:27069480

  13. The emerging link between nutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Rodolfo; Poli, Andrea; Cignarella, Andrea

    2006-05-01

    A number of dietary components modulate the inflammatory response in humans, thereby affecting cardiovascular risk. As basic research provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of vascular function regulation by nutrients, clinical investigation and outcome studies demonstrate the relevance of dietary factors to the prevention and treatment of vascular disease. Benefits of dietary interventions may be attributable to weight loss or to more specialized mechanisms in which inflammation is targeted directly. Available evidence indicates that dietary intervention should be an integral part of therapeutic approaches for treating conditions such as the metabolic syndrome and, ultimately, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:16716099

  14. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  15. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  16. Visfatin and cardio-cerebro-vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide from nicotinamide. This protein was originally cloned as a putative pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor and also found to be a visceral fat-derived adipokine (visfatin). As a multifunctional protein, visfatin plays an important role in immunity, metabolism, aging, inflammation, and responses to stress. Visfatin also participates in several pathophysiological processes contributing to cardio-cerebro-vascular diseases, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke. However, whether visfatin is a friend or a foe in these diseases remains uncertain. This brief review focuses on the current understanding of the complex role of visfatin in the cardio-cerebro-vascular system under normal and pathophysiological conditions.

  17. Pulmonary manifestations of the collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, H P; Matthay, R A

    1989-12-01

    The collagen vascular diseases are a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders. The organs and tissues that compose the respiratory system are frequently affected by these diseases. Potential targets of the inflammation and injury include the lung parenchyma, tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary vasculature, pleura, larynx, and respiratory muscles. In this article, the spectrum of respiratory disease caused by systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, and Sjögren's syndrome is reviewed. Where appropriate, therapeutic options are discussed.

  18. Inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Lisa M.; Werb, Zena

    2009-01-01

    Recent data have expanded the concept that inflammation is a critical component of tumour progression. Many cancers arise from sites of infection, chronic irritation and inflammation. It is now becoming clear that the tumour microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, fostering proliferation, survival and migration. In addition, tumour cells have co-opted some of the signalling molecules of the innate immune system, such as selectins, chemokines and their receptors for invasion, migration and metastasis. These insights are fostering new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer development. PMID:12490959

  19. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  20. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junzhen; Xia, Shijin; Kalionis, Bill; Sun, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Age is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease, even in the absence of other traditional factors. Emerging evidence in experimental animal and human models has emphasized a central role for two main mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease: oxidative stress and inflammation. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide generated by oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation accompanying aging recapitulate age-related cardiovascular dysfunction, that is, left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction in the heart as well as endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity, and increased vascular stiffness. We describe the signaling involved in these two main mechanisms that include the factors NF-κB, JunD, p66Shc, and Nrf2. Potential therapeutic strategies to improve the cardiovascular function with aging are discussed, with a focus on calorie restriction, SIRT1, and resveratrol. PMID:25143940

  2. The role of oxidative stress and inflammation in cardiovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junzhen; Xia, Shijin; Kalionis, Bill; Wan, Wenbin; Sun, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Age is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease, even in the absence of other traditional factors. Emerging evidence in experimental animal and human models has emphasized a central role for two main mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease: oxidative stress and inflammation. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide generated by oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation accompanying aging recapitulate age-related cardiovascular dysfunction, that is, left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction in the heart as well as endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity, and increased vascular stiffness. We describe the signaling involved in these two main mechanisms that include the factors NF-κB, JunD, p66(Shc), and Nrf2. Potential therapeutic strategies to improve the cardiovascular function with aging are discussed, with a focus on calorie restriction, SIRT1, and resveratrol.

  3. Adventitial inflammation and its interaction with intimal atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Wangler, Susanne; Gleissner, Christian A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Katus, Hugo A.; Erbel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adventitial inflammation in correlation with atherosclerotic lesions has been recognized for decades. In the last years, several studies have investigated the relevance and impact of adventitial inflammation on atherogenesis. In the abdominal aorta of elderly Apoe−/− mice, adventitial inflammatory structures were characterized as organized ectopic lymphoid tissue, and therefore termed adventitial tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs). These ATLOs possess similarities in development, structure and function to secondary lymphoid organs. A crosstalk between intimal atherosclerotic lesions and ATLOs has been suggested, and several studies could demonstrate a potential role for medial vascular smooth muscle cells in this process. We here review the development, phenotypic characteristics, and function of ATLOs in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we discuss the possible role of medial vascular smooth muscle cells and their interaction between plaque and ATLOs. PMID:25152736

  4. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sessions June 14-17, 2017 Sheraton New Orleans New Orleans, LA USA Board Review Course June 16-18, 2017 SVM in the Vascular Lab June 17, 2017 Learn more Patient Information Pages from Vascular Medicine October 2016 Smoking Cessation More info for patients. SVM Case ...

  5. [Vascular graft prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakfé, N; Dieval, F; Thaveau, F; Rinckenbach, S; Hassani, O; Camelot, G; Durand, B; Kretz, J-G

    2004-06-01

    Performed since the 1950s, vascular grafting has opened modern era of vascular surgery. Autologous venous grafts are of first choice for revascularisation of small arteries. Synthetic grafts are mainly modelled using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene or terephtalate polyethylene. These prosthesis are mainly used for revascularization of medium and large size arteries. PMID:15220107

  6. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation.

  7. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  8. Dietary modulation of inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation is heightened innate immune response caused by infection or wound. It is a part of essential immune responses for host defense against invading pathogens and wound healing which are the key biological processes necessary for the survival of all multi-cellular organisms. In mammals, it i...

  9. Periostin in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Izuhara, Kenji; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shoichi; Inamitsu, Masako; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi

    2014-06-01

    Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein belonging to the fasciclin family, has been shown to play a critical role in the process of remodeling during tissue/organ development or repair. Periostin functions as a matricellular protein in cell activation by binding to their receptors on cell surface, thereby exerting its biological activities. After we found that periostin is a downstream molecule of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, signature cytokines of type 2 immune responses, we showed that periostin is a component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma, the first formal proof that periostin is involved in allergic inflammation. Subsequently, a great deal of evidence has accumulated demonstrating the significance of periostin in allergic inflammation. It is of note that in skin tissues, periostin is critical for amplification and persistence of allergic inflammation by communicating between fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Furthermore, periostin has been applied to development of novel diagnostics or therapeutic agents for allergic diseases. Serum periostin can reflect local production of periostin in inflamed lesions induced by Th2-type immune responses and also can predict the efficacy of Th2 antagonists against bronchial asthma. Blocking the interaction between periostin and its receptor, αv integrin, or down-regulating the periostin expression shows improvement of periostin-induced inflammation in mouse models or in in vitro systems. It is hoped that diagnostics or therapeutic agents targeting periostin will be of practical use in the near future.

  10. Targeting arginase-II protects mice from high-fat-diet-induced hepatic steatosis through suppression of macrophage inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Rajapakse, Angana G.; Riedo, Erwin; Fellay, Benoit; Bernhard, Marie-Claire; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Yang, Zhihong; Ming, Xiu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associates with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Hypoactive AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), hyperactive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, and macrophage-mediated inflammation are mechanistically linked to NAFLD. Studies investigating roles of arginase particularly the extrahepatic isoform arginase-II (Arg-II) in obesity-associated NAFLD showed contradictory results. Here we demonstrate that Arg-II−/− mice reveal decreased hepatic steatosis, macrophage infiltration, TNF-α and IL-6 as compared to the wild type (WT) littermates fed high fat diet (HFD). A higher AMPK activation (no difference in mTOR signaling), lower levels of lipogenic transcription factor SREBP-1c and activity/expression of lipogenic enzymes were observed in the Arg-II−/− mice liver. Moreover, release of TNF-α and IL-6 from bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) of Arg-II−/− mice is decreased as compared to WT-BMM. Conditioned medium from Arg-II−/−-BMM exhibits weaker activity to facilitate triglyceride synthesis paralleled with lower expression of SREBP-1c and SCD-1 and higher AMPK activation in hepatocytes as compared to that from WT-BMM. These effects of BMM conditioned medium can be neutralized by neutralizing antibodies against TNF-α and IL-6. Thus, Arg-II-expressing macrophages facilitate diet-induced NAFLD through TNF-α and IL-6 in obesity. PMID:26846206

  11. Anaemia and inflammation: what are the implications for the nephrologist?

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter

    2003-11-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by a high mortality rate, which is mainly caused by cardiovascular disease. In patients with ESRD, high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased oxidative stress are common features and may contribute to the development of malnutrition, anaemia, resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin) and atherosclerosis. The onset of inflammation is multi-factorial and is a predictor of poor outcome in ESRD. Although the inflammation may reflect the underlying cardiovascular disease, the acute-phase response may also contribute to both oxidative stress and progressive vascular injury. The acute-phase response in these patients may be influenced by a number of factors, and possibly the dialysis procedure itself. Inflammation and the acute-phase response interact with the haematopoietic system at several levels, resulting in reduced erythropoiesis, accelerated destruction of erythrocytes and blunting of the reactive increase in erythropoietin in response to reduced haemoglobin levels. In patients with ESRD, epoetin resistance has been linked with inflammation, which is often associated with a state of functional iron deficiency. Patients with ESRD are thought to have a reduced capacity in their control of oxidative stress and there is evidence that suggests that a relationship may exist between inflammation, oxidative stress and the treatment of anaemia with epoetin. Controlled trials are needed before evidence-based recommendations for the management of inflammation-induced anaemia and resistance to epoetin can be defined.

  12. Association between inflammation and malnutrition as risk factors of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kaysen, George A

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among dialysis patients. The relative risk of mortality increases as serum albumin concentration and body mass index decline. While these are generally associated with nutritional status, inflammation causes sarcopenia and decreased albumin concentration by reducing synthesis of proteins and increasing their catabolic rate. While inflammation can arise from atherosclerotic blood vessels, systemic inflammation from any source can alter the vascular endothelium and plasma protein composition in ways that promotes vascular injury. High-density lipoprotein synthesis is decreased and the high-density lipoprotein present is less capable of reducing inflammation. Activation of neutrophils favors lipoprotein oxidation. Surprisingly, while obesity is associated with cytokine production in patients without renal failure, as well as among dialysis patients, increased body mass index, whether reflecting muscle mass or adipose tissue, is associated with a decline in mortality rates.

  13. PROGRESSIVE RENAL VASCULAR PROLIFERATION AND INJURY IN OBESE ZUCKER RATS

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Radu; Chade, Alejandro R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Obesity, an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, may induce renal injury by promoting inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines can induce neovascularization in different organs, including the kidneys. However, whether obesity triggers renal neovascularization and, if so, its effect on renal function has never been investigated. Methods Blood pressure, proteinuria and glomerular-filtration-rate (GFR) were measured in-vivo. Renal microvascular (MV) architecture was studied by 3D micro-CT in lean and obese Zucker rats (LZR and OZR, n=7/group) at 12, 22, and 32 weeks of age. Renal inflammation was assessed by quantifying interleukin (IL)-6, tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-alpha, and ED-1 expression, as renal fibrosis in trichrome-stained cross-sections. Results Mild inflammation and lower GFR was only observed in younger OZR, without renal fibrosis or changes in MV density. Interestingly, renal MV density increased in OZR at 32 weeks of age, accompanied by pronounced increase in renal IL-6 and TNF-alpha, ED-1+ cells, proteinuria, decreased GFR, and fibrosis. Conclusion This study shows increased renal cortical vascularization in experimental obesity, suggesting neovascularization as an evolving process as obesity progresses. Increased renal vascularization, possibly triggered by inflammation, may reflect an initially compensatory mechanism in obesity. However, increased inflammation and inflammatory-induced neovascularization may further promote renal injury as obesity advances. PMID:20536738

  14. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  16. Inflammation in end-stage renal disease: the hidden enemy.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter

    2006-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. As traditional risk factors cannot alone explain the unacceptable high prevalence and incidence of CVD in this high-risk population, inflammation (interrelated to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, wasting and endothelial dysfunction) has been suggested to be a significant contributor. Indeed, several different inflammatory biomarkers, such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), have been shown to independently predict mortality in ESRD patients. As CRP is so strongly associated with vascular disease it has been suggested that this hepatic-derived protein is not only a marker, but also a mediator, of vascular disease. Although in vitro data from studies on endothelial cells, monocytes-macrophages and smooth muscle cells support a direct role for CRP in atherogenesis, data from studies performed in vivo have been controversial. The causes of the highly prevalent state of inflammation in ESRD are multiple, including inflammatory signals associated with the dialysis procedure, decreased renal function, volume overload, comorbidity and intercurrent clinical events. As the prevalence of inflammation varies considerably between continents and races, dietary and/or genetic factors may have an impact on inflammation in ESRD. Elevated CRP in dialysis patients could be evaluated at three different levels: (i) national/regional level; (ii) dialysis unit level; and (iii) individual patient level.

  17. VESGEN Mapping of Bioactive Protection against Intestinal Inflammation: Application to Human Spaceflight and ISS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Chen, X.; Kelly, C. P.; Reinecker, H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Challenges to successful space exploration and colonization include adverse physiological reactions to micro gravity and space radiation factors. Constant remodeling of the microvasculature is critical for tissue preservation, wound healing, and recovery after ischemia. Regulation of the vascular system in the intestine is particularly important to enable nutrient absorption while maintaining barrier function and mucosal defense against micro biota. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular circuits regulating neovascularization, our knowledge of the adaptations of the vascular system to environmental challenges in the intestine remains incomplete. This is in part because of the lack of methods to observe and quantify the complex processes associated with vascular responses in vivo. Developed by GRC as a mature beta version, pre-release research software, VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) maps and quantifies the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching for novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and microvascular remodeling. Here we demonstrate that VESGEN can be used to characterize the dynamic vascular responses to acute intestinal inflammation and mucosal recovery from in vivo confocal microscopic 3D image series. We induced transient intestinal inflammation in mice by DSS treatment and investigated whether the ability of the pro biotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) to protect against intestinal inflammation was due to regulation of vascular remodeling. A primary characteristic of inflammation is excessive neovascularization (angiogenesis) resulting in fragile vessels prone to bleeding. Morphological parameters for triplicate specimens revealed that Sb treatment greatly reduced the inflammatory response of vascular networks by an average of 78%. This resulted from Sb inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling, a major

  18. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  19. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  20. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  1. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hakansson, Asa; Molin, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics. PMID:22254115

  2. Osteoprotegerin and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saidenberg Kermanac'h, N; Bessis, Natacha; Cohen-Solal, M; De Vernejoul, M C; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2002-01-01

    RANK, RANKL, and OPG have well established regulatory effects on bone metabolism. RANK is expressed at very high levels on osteoclastic precursors and on mature osteoclasts, and is required for differentiation and activation of the osteoclast. The ligand, RANKL binds to its receptor RANK to induce bone resorption. RANKL is a transmembrane protein expressed in various cells type and particularly on osteoblast and activated T cells. RANKL can be cleaved and the soluble form is active. Osteoprotegerin decoy receptor (OPG), a member of the TNF receptor family expressed by osteoblasts, strongly inhibits bone resorption by binding with high affinity to its ligand RANKL, thereby preventing RANKL from engaging its receptor RANK. This system is regulated by the calciotropic hormones. Conversely, the effects of RANKL, RANK, and OPG on inflammatory processes, most notably on the bone resorption associated with inflammation, remain to be defined. The RANK system seems to play a major role in modulating the immune system. Activated T cells express RANKL messenger RNA, and knock-out mice for RANKL acquire severe immunological abnormalities and osteopetrosis. RANKL secretion by activated T cells can induce osteoclastogenesis. These mechanisms are enhanced by cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-17, which promote both inflammation and bone resorption. Conversely, this system is blocked by OPG, IL-4, and IL-10, which inhibit both inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. These data may explain part of the abnormal phenomena in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis characterized by both inflammation and destruction. Activated T cells within the rheumatoid synovium express RANKL. Synovial cells are capable of differentiating to osteoclast-like cells under some conditions, including culturing with M-CSF and RANKL. This suggests that the bone erosion seen in rheumatoid arthritis may result from RANKL/RANK system activation by activated T cells. This opens up the possibility that OPG

  3. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  4. [Vascular factors in dementia].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrovascular factors are a common cause of dementia or contribute to cognitive decline in other dementias. Studies showing that cerebrovascular factors are the risk factors for neurodegenerative dementias, especially Alzheimer's disease. Practically all neurodegenerative dementias have a vascular component that reduces cerebral perfusion and has great impact on the clinical picture. Recent data support the view that the neurodegenerative process is caused by cerebrovascular mechanisms. The results showed that patients with vascular cognitive impairment have a typical clinical picture. Various important non-cognitive features are caused by cerebrovascular factors and are associated with a more rapid course of illness. On the other hand the term vascular diseases or cerebrovascular factors include a variety of vascular pathologies. PMID:16358596

  5. Vascular ring (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ring is a term used to describe a number of abnormal formations of the aorta, the large artery ... the pulmonary artery. The abnormal vessel(s) forms a ring, which encircles and may press down on the ...

  6. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan of the heart Stress tests (many different types of stress tests exist) Vascular ultrasound, such as carotid ultrasound Venous ultrasound of the arms and legs SURGERIES AND INTERVENTIONS ... these types of procedures, a catheter is inserted through the ...

  7. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  8. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  9. Sinuosities in vascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.-B.; Martin, J.-L.

    2007-12-01

    In most organs, depending on the scale, the nature of the heart pump, the geometry and topology of the organ, some of the blood vessels tend to exhibit sinuous trajectories. We describe a part of this sinuous behavior, including partial biological and strong physical effects in a global physical framework. We will voluntarily focus on physical and topological effects. This study is performed on the vitelline membrane of the chicken embryo. Crossing angles, sinuosity, and the oscillation amplitude of the vascular system are analyzed. Surprisingly, the equation of river meandering dynamics is found to model the sinuosities in the vascular system, and an extension of this equation to non planar case is able to explain the effect of tissue global curvature on the vascular system. Results of this study could lead to a new understanding of the interplay between biological signaling and physical effects in determining the vascular pattern in different tissues.

  10. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  11. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  12. Stress increases periodontal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SUAZO, IVÁN; BECERRA, JAVIERA

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of chronic restraint stress (RS) on the severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats. A total of 32 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: i) Rats receiving two treatment regimens, chronic stress induced by movement restriction in acrylic cylinders for 1–1.5 h daily and induction of experimental periodontal disease, using a nylon ligature which was placed around the first left mandibular molars (n=8); ii) induction of periodontal disease, without RS (n=8); iii) RS (n=8) and iv) control (n=8). After 15 days, blood samples were obtained, and blood glucose levels and the corticosterone concentration were measured as stress markers. The severity of periodontal disease was analyzed according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation, leading to compromise of the teeth involved. Chronic stress was induced with movement restriction (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) and increased the severity (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) of experimental perio dontal disease in rats, according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation around the first left mandibular molars. The results of the present study showed that RS modulates periodontal inflammation and that the rat model described herein is suitable for investigating the association between stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23226743

  13. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  14. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  15. Vascular Inflammatory Cells in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.; Marvar, Paul J.; Titze, Jens M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients, and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease. PMID:22586409

  16. Assessing vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Forette, F; Rigaud, A S; Morin, M; Gisselbrecht, M; Bert, P

    1995-10-01

    Vascular dementia is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly after Alzheimer's disease. Many forms of vascular dementia have been described: multi-infarct dementia, lacunar dementia, Binswanger's subcortical encephalopathy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, white matter lesions associated with dementias, single infarct dementia, dementia linked to hypoperfusion and haemorrhagic dementia. The difficulty of diagnosing vascular dementia must not be underestimated and an international consensus is needed for epidemiological studies. The NINCDS-AIREN group has recently published diagnostic criteria. The State of California Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers also proposed some which differ from the NINCDS-AIREN criteria in considering only ischaemic vascular dementia and not other mechanisms such as haemorrhagic or hypoxic lesions. Most studies stress hypertension as the most powerful risk factor for all forms of vascular dementia. The incidence rate ranges from 7 per 1000 person-years in normal volunteers to 16 per 1000 person-years in hypertensive patients. No therapeutic attempt has influenced the course of the disease once the dementing condition is established. The only effective approach is preventive treatment. The objective of the SYST-EUR Vascular Dementia project is to confirm that the treatment of isolated systolic hypertension is able to reduce its incidence.

  17. [Free radicals and eye inflammations].

    PubMed

    Ianopol, N

    1998-01-01

    Free radicals (FR), mainly those oxygen derived (FRO) are considered to be inflammation's mediators. Produced either by photochemical reactions or by synthesis into active phagocytic cells (in the cellular time of inflammation), FRO can determine an inflammatory reaction or they can augment a pre-existed one. These phenomena are produced by synthesis of inflammation's mediators as: prostaglandines, prostaciclines, thromboxane and leucotrienes starting from arachidonic acid, by the generation of some compounds with chemotactic properties and by the activation of phagocytic cells, by the augmentation of the proteolytic activity due to natural protease inhibitors inactivation and, last but not least, by the directly destructive action against different tissue compounds. In the first part of this lecture I presented general data about FR, inflammation, photosensitive agents and radical reactions. In the second part, I presented the pathogenic relation between FR and ocular inflammations from two different point of view: that of inflammation generation by FR, and that of FR generation during a preexistent inflammation.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor as a key inducer of angiogenesis in the asthmatic airways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Norbert; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by structural airway changes, which are known as airway remodeling, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Vascular remodeling in asthmatic lungs results from increased angiogenesis, which is mainly mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF is a key regulator of blood vessel growth in the airways of asthma patients by promoting proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and inducing vascular leakage and permeability. In addition, VEGF induces allergic inflammation, enhances allergic sensitization, and has a role in Th2 type inflammatory responses. Specific inhibitors of VEGF and blockers of its receptors might be useful to control chronic airway inflammation and vascular remodeling, and might be a new therapeutic approach for chronic inflammatory airway disease like asthma.

  19. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  20. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD.

  1. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Swirski, Filip K.; Zernecke, Alma

    2013-01-01

    Acute rupture of vulnerable plaques frequently leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. Within the last decades, several cellular and molecular players have been identified that promote atherosclerotic lesion formation, maturation and plaque rupture. It is now widely recognized that inflammation of the vessel wall and distinct leukocyte subsets are involved throughout all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. The mechanisms that render a stable plaque unstable and prone to rupture, however, remain unknown and the identification of the vulnerable plaque remains a major challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Imaging technologies used in the clinic offer minimal information about the underlying biology and potential risk for rupture. New imaging technologies are therefore being developed, and in the preclinical setting have enabled new and dynamic insights into the vessel wall for a better understanding of this complex disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to track biological processes, such as the activity of cellular and molecular biomarkers in vivo and over time. Similarly, novel imaging technologies specifically detect effects of therapies that aim to stabilize vulnerable plaques and silence vascular inflammation. Here we will review the potential of established and new molecular imaging technologies in the setting of atherosclerosis, and discuss the cumbersome steps required for translating molecular imaging approaches into the clinic. PMID:24312156

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  4. Neuroprotective effect of selective DPP-4 inhibitor in experimental vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Both forms of dementia are posing greater risk to the world population and are increasing at a faster rate. In the past we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the role of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. Pancreatectomy diabetes rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of vildagliptin has significantly attenuated pancreatectomy induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor may be considered as potential pharmacological agents for the management of pancreatectomy induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. The selective modulators of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 may further be explored for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:26382939

  5. Micromanaging Vascular Biology: Tiny MicroRNAs Play Big Band

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati

    2009-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are estimated to regulate 30% of the human genome primarily through translational repression. In 2005–2008, the first series of observations establishing the key significance of miRNAs in the regulation of vascular biology came from experimental studies involved in arresting miRNA biogenesis to deplete the miRNA pools of vascular tissues and cells. Dicer-dependent biogenesis of miRNA is required for blood vessel development during embryogenesis and wound healing. miRNAs regulate redox signaling in endothelial cells, a key regulator of vascular cell biology. miRNAs that regulate angiogenesis include miRNA 17–5p, cluster 17–92, 21, 27a&b, 126, 130a, 210, 221, 222, 378 and the let7 family. miRNAs also represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of proliferative vascular diseases as well as hypertension. Evidence supporting the regulation of inducible adhesion molecules by miRNA supports a role of miRNAs in regulating vascular inflammation. Productive strategies to safely up-regulate as well as down-regulate miRNAs in vivo are in place and being tested for their value in disease intervention. Prudent targeting of non-coding genes such as miRNAs, which in turn regulates large sets of coding genes, holds promise in gene therapy. Recent developments in miRNA biology offer lucrative opportunities to manage vascular health. PMID:19571573

  6. Angiopoietin-2 is critical for cytokine-induced vascular leakage.

    PubMed

    Benest, Andrew V; Kruse, Karoline; Savant, Soniya; Thomas, Markus; Laib, Anna M; Loos, Elias K; Fiedler, Ulrike; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2013-01-01

    Genetic experiments (loss-of-function and gain-of-function) have established the role of Angiopoietin/Tie ligand/receptor tyrosine kinase system as a regulator of vessel maturation and quiescence. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) acts on Tie2-expressing resting endothelial cells as an antagonistic ligand to negatively interfere with the vessel stabilizing effects of constitutive Ang-1/Tie-2 signaling. Ang-2 thereby controls the vascular response to inflammation-inducing as well as angiogenesis-inducing cytokines. This study was aimed at assessing the role of Ang-2 as an autocrine (i.e. endothelial-derived) regulator of rapid vascular responses (within minutes) caused by permeability-inducing agents. Employing two independent in vivo assays to quantitatively assess vascular leakage (tracheal microsphere assay, 1-5 min and Miles assay, 20 min), the immediate vascular response to histamine, bradykinin and VEGF was analyzed in Ang-2-deficient (Ang-2(-/-)) mice. In comparison to the wild type control mice, the Ang2(-/-) mice demonstrated a significantly attenuated response. The Ang-2(-/-) phenotype was rescued by systemic administration (paracrine) of an adenovirus encoding Ang-2. Furthermore, cytokine-induced intracellular calcium influx was impaired in Ang-2(-/-) endothelioma cells, consistent with reduced phospholipase activation in vivo. Additionally, recombinant human Ang-2 (rhAng-2) alone was unable to induce vascular leakage. In summary, we report here in a definite genetic setting that Ang-2 is critical for multiple vascular permeability-inducing cytokines. PMID:23940579

  7. [Inflammation and obesity (lipoinflammation)].

    PubMed

    Izaola, Olatz; de Luis, Daniel; Sajoux, Ignacio; Domingo, Joan Carles; Vidal, Montse

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with multiple origins. It is a widespread global phenomenon carrying potentially serious complications which requires a multidisciplinary approach due to the significant clinical repercussions and elevated health costs associated with the disease. The most recent evidence indicates that it shares a common characteristic with other prevalent, difficult-to-treat pathologies: chronic, low-grade inflammation which perpetuates the disease and is associated with multiple complications. The current interest in lipoinflammation or chronic inflammation associated with obesity derives from an understanding of the alterations and remodelling that occurs in the adipose tissue, with the participation of multiple factors and elements throughout the process. Recent research highlights the importance of some of these molecules, called pro-resolving mediators, as possible therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity. This article reviews the evidence published on the mechanisms that regulate the adipose tissue remodelling process and lipoinflammation both in obesity and in the mediators that are directly involved in the appearance and resolution of the inflammatory process.

  8. Leptin and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Iikuni, Noriko; Lam, Queenie Lai Kwan; Lu, Liwei; Matarese, Giuseppe; La Cava, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The past few years of research on leptin have provided important information on the link between metabolism and immune homeostasis. Adipocytes influence not only the endocrine system but also the immune response through several cytokine-like mediators known as adipokines, which include leptin. It is widely accepted that leptin can directly link nutritional status and pro-inflammatory T helper 1 immune responses, and that a decrease of leptin plasma concentration during food deprivation can lead to an impaired immune function. Additionally, several studies have implicated leptin in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, and the elevated circulating leptin levels in obesity appear to contribute to the low-grade inflammatory background which makes obese individuals more susceptible to increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, or degenerative disease including autoimmunity and cancer. Conversely, reduced levels of leptin such as those found in malnourished individuals have been linked to increased risk of infection and reduced cell-mediated immune responses. We discuss here the functional influences of leptin in the physiopathology of inflammation, and the effects of leptin in the modulation of such responses. PMID:20198122

  9. [Inflammation and obesity (lipoinflammation)].

    PubMed

    Izaola, Olatz; de Luis, Daniel; Sajoux, Ignacio; Domingo, Joan Carles; Vidal, Montse

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with multiple origins. It is a widespread global phenomenon carrying potentially serious complications which requires a multidisciplinary approach due to the significant clinical repercussions and elevated health costs associated with the disease. The most recent evidence indicates that it shares a common characteristic with other prevalent, difficult-to-treat pathologies: chronic, low-grade inflammation which perpetuates the disease and is associated with multiple complications. The current interest in lipoinflammation or chronic inflammation associated with obesity derives from an understanding of the alterations and remodelling that occurs in the adipose tissue, with the participation of multiple factors and elements throughout the process. Recent research highlights the importance of some of these molecules, called pro-resolving mediators, as possible therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity. This article reviews the evidence published on the mechanisms that regulate the adipose tissue remodelling process and lipoinflammation both in obesity and in the mediators that are directly involved in the appearance and resolution of the inflammatory process. PMID:26040339

  10. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bagavathiappan, S; Saravanan, T; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R; Panicker, T M R; Korath, M Paul; Jagadeesan, K

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1 degrees C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders.

  11. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  12. CD8 T Cell-Initiated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Promotes Central Nervous System Vascular Permeability under Neuroinflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Chen, Yi; McDole, Jeremiah R.; Tripathi, Pulak; Pirko, Istvan; Seroogy, Kim B.; Johnson, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark feature of numerous neurologic disorders as diverse as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, viral hemorrhagic fevers, cerebral malaria, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. CD8 T cells are one immune cell type that have been implicated in promoting vascular permeability in these conditions. Our laboratory has created a murine model of CD8 T cell-mediated CNS vascular permeability using a variation of the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus system traditionally used to study multiple sclerosis. Previously, we demonstrated that CD8 T cells have the capacity to initiate astrocyte activation, cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein alterations and CNS vascular permeability through a perforin-dependent process. To address the downstream mechanism by which CD8 T cells promote BBB dysregulation, in this study, we assess the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in this model. We demonstrate that neuronal expression of VEGF is significantly upregulated prior to, and coinciding with, CNS vascular permeability. Phosphorylation of fetal liver kinase-1 is significantly increased early in this process indicating activation of this receptor. Specific inhibition of neuropilin-1 significantly reduced CNS vascular permeability and fetal liver kinase-1 activation, and preserved levels of the cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein occludin. Our data demonstrate that CD8 T cells initiate neuronal expression of VEGF in the CNS under neuroinflammatory conditions, and that VEGF may be a viable therapeutic target in neurologic disease characterized by inflammation-induced BBB disruption. PMID:20008293

  13. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  14. Role of Hemichannels in CNS Inflammation and the Inflammasome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuri; Davidson, Joanne O; Gunn, Katherine C; Phillips, Anthony R; Green, Colin R; Gunn, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, once triggered, share a number of common features, including sustained inflammatory cell activation and vascular disruption. These shared pathways are induced independently of any genetic predisposition to the disease or the precise external stimulus. Glial cells respond to injury with an innate immune response that includes release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Vascular endothelial cells may also be affected, leading to opening of the blood-brain barrier that facilitates invasion by circulating inflammatory cells. Inflammation can trigger acute neural injury followed by chronic inflammation that plays a key role in neurodegenerative conditions. Gap junction channels normally allow direct cell-to-cell communication. They are formed by the docking of two hemichannels, one contributed by each of the neighboring cells. While the opening probability of these channels is tightly controlled under resting conditions, hemichannels can open in response to injury or inflammatory factors, forming a large, relatively nonselective membrane pore. In this review, we consider the CNS immune system from the perspective that modulating connexin hemichannel opening can prevent tissue damage arising from excessive and uncontrolled inflammation. We discuss connexin channel roles in microglia, astrocytes, and endothelial cells in both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, and in particular describe the role of connexin hemichannels in the inflammasome pathway where they contribute to both its activation and its spread to neighboring cells. Finally, we describe the benefits of hemichannel block in animal models of brain injury. PMID:27038371

  15. Inflammation: a possible mechanism for a causative role of hyperuricemia/gout in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, F; Becker, M A

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia and gout are independent risk factors associated with the development of hypertension, metabolic syndrome, vascular damage, and renal disease. Whether these risk factors are causally related to these important chronic co-morbidities remains uncertain, but inflammation may provide a mechanistic explanation. Hyperuricemia and gout negatively affect vascular function by exerting pro-oxidant effects and by decreasing nitric oxide bioavailability, thus inducing inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, which may promote hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular (CV) disease. This paper presents and discusses current understanding of the diverse influences promoting hyperuricemia and gout and the basis of acute and chronic hyperuricemia/gout-related inflammation. This review is based on a PubMed/Embase database search for articles on hyperuricemia and its impact on cardiovascular and renal function.

  16. Lifestyle and metabolic approaches to maximizing erectile and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, D R; Gambone, J C; Morris, M A; Esposito, K; Giugliano, D; Ignarro, L J

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation, which disrupt nitric oxide (NO) production directly or by causing resistance to insulin, are central determinants of vascular diseases including ED. Decreased vascular NO has been linked to abdominal obesity, smoking and high intakes of fat and sugar, which all cause oxidative stress. Men with ED have decreased vascular NO and circulating and cellular antioxidants. Oxidative stress and inflammatory markers are increased in men with ED, and all increase with age. Exercise increases vascular NO, and more frequent erections are correlated with decreased ED, both in part due to stimulation of endothelial NO production by shear stress. Exercise and weight loss increase insulin sensitivity and endothelial NO production. Potent antioxidants or high doses of weaker antioxidants increase vascular NO and improve vascular and erectile function. Antioxidants may be particularly important in men with ED who smoke, are obese or have diabetes. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammatory markers, decrease cardiac death and increase endothelial NO production, and are therefore critical for men with ED who are under age 60 years, and/or have diabetes, hypertension or coronary artery disease, who are at increased risk of serious or even fatal cardiac events. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors have recently been shown to improve antioxidant status and NO production and allow more frequent and sustained penile exercise. Some angiotensin II receptor blockers decrease oxidative stress and improve vascular and erectile function and are therefore preferred choices for lowering blood pressure in men with ED. Lifestyle modifications, including physical and penile-specific exercise, weight loss, omega-3 and folic acid supplements, reduced intakes of fat and sugar, and improved antioxidant status through diet and/or supplements should be integrated into any comprehensive approach to maximizing erectile function, resulting in greater overall success and patient

  17. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  18. [Evaluation of nasal inflammation].

    PubMed

    De La Torre Morín, F; Sánchez Machín, I

    2006-01-01

    In the reaction of immediate hypersensibility to alergene is joined to its specific type IgE antibody, also united to the high affinity receptors for IgE (FccI) of the effecters cells fundamentally mastocites and basophiles. The interbreeding of these molecules Fcc to RI, after the union ofpolyvalent antigenes to IgE, active these cells, producing three biologic responses: excitosis of the preformed content of its granules, synthesization of lipidic mediators and citoquine secretion. The inflammation mediators are in last term, substances responsible of the clinic symptomatology. They can be divided generally in preformed mediators (biogene amines and macromolecules of the granules) and of new synthese mediators (lipidic and citoquine mediators). PMID:16749721

  19. SOCS, inflammation, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko; Kondo, Taisuke; Ito, Minako; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways elicited by cytokines and hormones have been shown to regulate distinct stages of development. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are negative feedback regulators of cytokine signaling mediated by the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. In particular, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are potent inhibitors of JAKs and can play pivotal roles in inflammation, as well as in the development and progression of cancers. Abnormal expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in cancer cells has been reported in human carcinoma associated with dysregulation of signals from cytokine receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and hormone receptors, resulting in malignancies. In this review, we focus on the role of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in cancer development. In addition, the potential of SOCS as a therapeutic target and diagnostic aid will be discussed. PMID:24069550

  20. Frailty, Inflammation and Immunosenescence.

    PubMed

    Fulop, Tamas; McElhaney, Janet; Pawelec, Graham; Cohen, Alan A; Morais, José A; Dupuis, Gilles; Baehl, Sarra; Camous, Xavier; Witkowski, Jacek M; Larbi, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is a still-evolving concept of a complex phenomenon. There are several algorithms and strategies for assessing frailty syndrome, but currently, no universally accepted definition or measurement protocol has been determined. Consequently, the biological cause(s) of frailty are also poorly defined. Much circumstantial experimental data point to the dysregulation of several key physiological systems, including the neuroendocrine, musculoskeletal, metabolic and immune/inflammatory systems, resulting from alterations in functional reserves. Immune dysregulation and inflammation as causes of frailty have gained some support from the results of longitudinal studies, but a true causal relationship has not been established. This chapter will describe the immune/inflammatory alterations found in frailty and their putative causal relationships with this state. PMID:26301977

  1. Sleep Loss and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Norah S.; Meier-Ewert, Hans K.; Haack, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Controlled, experimental studies on the effects of acute sleep loss in humans have shown that mediators of inflammation are altered by sleep loss. Elevations in these mediators have been found to occur in healthy, rigorously screened individuals undergoing experimental vigils of more than 24 hours, and have also been seen in response to various durations of sleep restricted to between 25 and 50% of a normal 8 hour sleep amount. While these altered profiles represent small changes, such sub-clinical shifts in basal inflammatory cytokines are known to be associated with the future development of metabolic syndrome disease in healthy, asymptomatic individuals. Although the mechanism of this altered inflammatory status in humans undergoing experimental sleep loss is unknown, it is likely that autonomic activation and metabolic changes play key roles. PMID:21112025

  2. Vascular air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Gordy, Stephanie; Rowell, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Vascular air embolism is a rare but potentially fatal event. It may occur in a variety of procedures and surgeries but is most often associated as an iatrogenic complication of central line catheter insertion. This article reviews the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this phenomenon. PMID:23724390

  3. Engineered Vascularized Muscle Flap.

    PubMed

    Egozi, Dana; Shandalov, Yulia; Freiman, Alina; Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the thickness of a tissue construct and its consequential viability and applicability in vivo, is the control of oxygen supply to the cell microenvironment, as passive diffusion is limited to a very thin layer. Although various materials have been described to restore the integrity of full-thickness defects of the abdominal wall, no material has yet proved to be optimal, due to low graft vascularization, tissue rejection, infection, or inadequate mechanical properties. This protocol describes a means of engineering a fully vascularized flap, with a thickness relevant for muscle tissue reconstruction. Cell-embedded poly L-lactic acid/poly lactic-co-glycolic acid constructs are implanted around the mouse femoral artery and vein and maintained in vivo for a period of one or two weeks. The vascularized graft is then transferred as a flap towards a full thickness defect made in the abdomen. This technique replaces the need for autologous tissue sacrifications and may enable the use of in vitro engineered vascularized flaps in many surgical applications. PMID:26779840

  4. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S; White, H Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled "epilepsy." Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered.

  5. Obesity and inflammation in children.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Sinaiko, Alan R

    2006-12-01

    Systemic inflammation is present in children and adults with obesity. Inflammation associated with obesity appears to be central to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis and may be important in the pathogenesis of other comorbid conditions. Although generally considered an inert energy storage tissue, white adipose tissue is a metabolically active organ. It produces a number of inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants. Inflammation associated with obesity declines after weight loss and with exercise. It may also be possible to modify obesity-associated inflammation with medications, reducing comorbidities without weight loss. The study of inflammation in the context of excessive adipose tissue is central to understanding obesity and modifying its impact on patients.

  6. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  7. Atrial fibrillation is associated with hematopoietic tissue activation and arterial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Philip; Ishai, Amorina; MacNabb, Megan; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R; Ruskin, Jeremy; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Activity in hematopoietic tissues, which produce inflammatory leukocytes, is closely related to systemic inflammation, arterial inflammation and cardiovascular events, but its relationship to AF is unknown. Using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we examined the relationships between AF, splenic metabolic activity and vascular inflammation. We conducted a cross sectional study of 70 participants: 35 with AF, who were matched (by age, sex and history of active cancer) to 35 controls without AF. Splenic metabolic activity and vascular aortic inflammation were measured by the mean FDG maximum standard uptake values (SUV Max) by PET. We examined (1) the association between AF and splenic activity, and (2) AF and aortic inflammation. The mean age of the population was 68.13 (standard deviation (SD) 8.98) years and 46 (65 %) participants were male. Splenic activity was higher in AF participants [2.31 (SD 0.45) vs. 2.07 (SD 0.37), p = 0.024], and remained significant after adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. Aortic inflammation was also higher in AF participants [2.22 (SD 0.44) vs. 1.91 (SD 0.44), p = 0.004], and remained significant on multivariable analysis. Aortic inflammation and splenic activity were highly correlated (Pearson R = 0.61, p < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation is associated with higher hematopoietic tissue activation and arterial inflammation. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms by which this cardio-splenic axis is implicated in AF. PMID:26411879

  8. Short-term Physical Inactivity Impairs Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Emily V.; Yen, Priscilla; Chong, Karen C.; Alley, Hugh F.; Stock, Eveline O.; Quinn, Alex; Hellmann, Jason; Conte, Michael S.; Owens, Christopher D.; Spite, Matthew; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedentarism, also termed physical inactivity, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms thought to be involved include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased inflammation. It is unknown whether changes in vascular and endothelial function also contribute to this excess risk. We hypothesized that short-term exposure to inactivity would lead to endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and increased vascular inflammation. Methods Five healthy subjects (4 males and 1 female) underwent 5 days of bed rest (BR) to simulate inactivity. Measurements of vascular function [flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) to evaluate endothelial function; applanation tonometry to assess arterial resistance], inflammation and metabolism were made before BR, daily during BR and after 2 recovery days. Subjects maintained an isocaloric diet throughout. Results Bed rest led to significant decreases in brachial artery and femoral artery FMD [Brachial: 11 ± 3% pre-BR vs. 9 ± 2% end-BR, P=0.04; Femoral: 4 ± 1% vs. 2 ± 1%, P=0.04]. The central augmentation index increased with BR [−4 ± 9% vs. 5 ± 11%, P=0.03]. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased [58 ± 7 mmHg vs. 62 ± 7 mmHg, P=0.02], while neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate changed. 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite, increased but the other inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers were unchanged. Conclusions Our findings show that acute exposure to sedentarism results in decreased endothelial function, arterial stiffening, increased DBP, and an increase in 15-HETE. We speculate that inactivity promotes a vascular “deconditioning” state characterized by impaired endothelial function, leading to arterial stiffness and increased arterial tone. Although physiologically significant, the underlying mechanisms and clinical relevance of these findings need to be further explored. PMID:24630521

  9. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Its Receptors: A Mutual Link between Blood Coagulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan-Thakur, Shailaja; Böhm, Andreas; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a versatile lipid signaling molecule and key regulator in vascular inflammation. S1P is secreted by platelets, monocytes, and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. It binds specifically to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors, S1P receptors 1 to 5, resulting in downstream signaling and numerous cellular effects. S1P modulates cell proliferation and migration, and mediates proinflammatory responses and apoptosis. In the vascular barrier, S1P regulates permeability and endothelial reactions and recruitment of monocytes and may modulate atherosclerosis. Only recently has S1P emerged as a critical mediator which directly links the coagulation factor system to vascular inflammation. The multifunctional proteases thrombin and FXa regulate local S1P availability and interact with S1P signaling at multiple levels in various vascular cell types. Differential expression patterns and intracellular signaling pathways of each receptor enable S1P to exert its widespread functions. Although a vast amount of information is available about the functions of S1P and its receptors in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological conditions, S1P-mediated mechanisms in the vasculature remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of S1P and its receptors in vascular wall and blood cells, which link the coagulation system to inflammatory responses in the vasculature. PMID:26604433

  11. Adipocytokines in Atherothrombosis: Focus on Platelets and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anfossi, Giovanni; Russo, Isabella; Doronzo, Gabriella; Pomero, Alice; Trovati, Mariella

    2010-01-01

    Visceral obesity is a relevant pathological condition closely associated with high risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease including myocardial infarction and stroke. The increased vascular risk is related also to peculiar dysfunction in the endocrine activity of adipose tissue responsible of vascular impairment (including endothelial dysfunction), prothrombotic tendency, and low-grade chronic inflammation. In particular, increased synthesis and release of different cytokines, including interleukins and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and adipokines—such as leptin—have been reported as associated with future cardiovascular events. Since vascular cell dysfunction plays a major role in the atherothrombotic complications in central obesity, this paper aims at focusing, in particular, on the relationship between platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the impaired secretory pattern of adipose tissue. PMID:20652043

  12. Aerobic exercise and other healthy lifestyle factors that influence vascular aging.

    PubMed

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R; LaRocca, Thomas J; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death in the United States and other modern societies. Advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD, primarily due to stiffening of the large elastic arteries and the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, regular aerobic exercise protects against the development of large elastic artery stiffness and vascular endothelial dysfunction with advancing age. Moreover, aerobic exercise interventions reduce arterial stiffness and restore vascular endothelial function in previously sedentary middle-aged/older adults. Aerobic exercise exerts its beneficial effects on arterial function by modulating structural proteins, reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, and restoring nitric oxide bioavailability. Aerobic exercise may also promote "resistance" against factors that reduce vascular function and increase CVD risk with age. Preventing excessive increases in abdominal adiposity, following healthy dietary practices, maintaining a low CVD risk factor profile, and, possibly, selective use of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals also play a major role in preserving vascular function with aging. PMID:25434012

  13. The association between vibration and vascular injury in rheumatic diseases: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Lei; Yan, Jun-Wei; Wan, Ya-Nan; Wang, Bing-Xiang; Tao, Jin-Hui; Chen, Bing; Li, Bao-Zhu; Yang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Vascular manifestations can be seen early in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Animal experiments, laboratory and clinical findings indicated that acute or long-term vibration exposure can induce vascular abnormalities. Recent years, in addition to Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), vibration as a risk factor for other rheumatic diseases has also received corresponding considered. This review is concentrated upon the role of vibration in the disease of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In this review, we are going to discuss the main mechanisms which are thought to be important in pathophysiology of vascular injury under the three broad headings of "vascular", "neural" and "intravascular". Aspects on the vibration and vascular inflammation are briefly discussed. And the epidemiological studies related to vibration studies in SSc and other rheumatic diseases are taken into account.

  14. Vascular calcification in rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence, pathophysiological aspects and potential targets.

    PubMed

    Paccou, J; Brazier, M; Mentaverri, R; Kamel, S; Fardellone, P; Massy, Z A

    2012-10-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. Excess cardiovascular mortality in RA patients cannot be fully explained by conventional cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent progress concerning the prevalence and pathophysiological aspects of vascular calcification in RA. RA patients have early-onset diffuse calcification involving multiple vascular beds compared to age and sex-matched controls. Pathogenesis of vascular calcification in RA patients is not fully understood, but specific mediators such as proinflammatory cytokines and not global inflammation could be involved. The possible link between osteoporosis and vascular calcification in RA will not be discussed. Finally, potential targets to reduce vascular calcification in RA will be discussed.

  15. Psoriasis and intraocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Knox, D L

    1979-01-01

    Presented in this series were seven men and three women. Ages when seen, ranged from 32 to 68 years (average 54). Psoriasis had begun in childhood in the women and in the late 20's and 30's in the men. Arthritis (ankylosing spondylitis) was present in only one. Their ocular inflammations began from ages 26 to 62 (average 41). The onset of the inflammation was acute iritis in four and in indolent iridocylcitis in six. All but one were bilateral and chronic. The vitreous had heavy debris in nine of the ten patients. The retina was normal in only three. Boggy congestion was present in two with cystoid edema. Patches of edema. fluorescein leaking, depigmentation of both maculae, pars plana exudate, and retinal vessel obliteration to grey-white, shaggy cords was present in at least one of the remaining five patients. Systemic corticosteroid therapy has been used in eight of the ten patients described in this report. Doses no higher than 30 mg of prednisone per day were used to initiate reversal of the inflammatory response. In case 10, knowledge of the sensitivity of the process to steroids led to the successful rapid reversal of a recalcitrant iritis with only 20 mg of prednisone as a first dose and 20 mg per day for less than three weeks. Maintenance corticosteroid therapy ranged from 40 mg of prednisone every other day in case 9, prednisone 12.5 mg one day and 5 mg the next in case 8, to 8 mg of Aristocort or methylprednisolone acetate (M-edrol) daily in cases 1 and 2. In summary, these patients are older, have an indolent onset bilateral uveitis with dense vitreous debris, retinal abnormalites, and are extremely sensitive to systemic corticosteroids. Many of these patients had undergone the series of clinical evaluations known as a "uveitis survey." Many different systemic abnormalities were found and merited treatment which rarely made a difference in their ocular disease, though two improved after infected teeth were treated. Assuming that these ocular diseases

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine perpetuates macrophage polarization toward classically activated phenotype in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofei; Qiu, Chunguang; Zhao, Luosha

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory macrophages are involved in vascular inflammation and serve as the major effector cells in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major phospholipid moiety affixed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and thought to play important roles in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study we described that a bioactive lipid derivative, lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), generated from hydrolysis of the PC moiety of oxidized LDL, promoted and stabilized a strong M1 phenotype in macrophage polarization. Another derivative, 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), did not show the similar biological function. Blockade of G protein coupled receptor, G2A, which mediates the signal transduction of lysoPC, diminished the effects of lysoPC on the macrophage polarization toward M1 phenotype. The results provide insights into the new mechanism on how oxidized LDL participates in tissue inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:24841857

  17. Inflammation, Sanitation, and Consternation

    PubMed Central

    Raison, Charles L.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Rook, Graham A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Context Inflammation is increasingly recognized as contributing to the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD), even in individuals who are otherwise medically healthy. Most studies in search of sources for this increased inflammation have focused on factors such as psychosocial stress and obesity that are known to activate inflammatory processes and increase the risk for depression. However, MDD may be so prevalent in the modern world not just because proinflammatory factors are widespread, but also because we have lost contact with previously available sources of anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory signaling. Objective To examine evidence that disruptions in co-evolved relationships with a variety of tolerogenic microorganisms that were previously ubiquitous in soil, food, and the gut, but that are largely missing from industrialized societies, may contribute to increasing rates of MDD in the modern world. Data Sources Relevant studies were identified using PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. Study Selection Included were laboratory animal and human studies relevant to immune functioning, the hygiene hypothesis, and major depressive disorder identified via PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE searches. Data Extraction Studies were reviewed by all authors, and data considered to be potentially relevant to the contribution of hygiene-related immune variables to major depressive disorder were extracted. Data Synthesis Significant data suggest that a variety of microorganisms (frequently referred to as the “old friends”) were tasked by coevolutionary processes with training the human immune system to tolerate a wide array of nonthreatening but potentially proinflammatory stimuli. Lacking such immune training, vulnerable individuals in the modern world are at significantly increased risk of mounting inappropriate inflammatory attacks on harmless environmental antigens (leading to asthma), benign food contents and commensals in the gut (leading to inflammatory bowel disease), or

  18. Is Pulp Inflammation a Prerequisite for Pulp Healing and Regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Michel; Njeh, Akram; Uzunoglu, Emel

    2015-01-01

    The importance of inflammation has been underestimated in pulpal healing, and in the past, it has been considered only as an undesirable effect. Associated with moderate inflammation, necrosis includes pyroptosis, apoptosis, and nemosis. There are now evidences that inflammation is a prerequisite for pulp healing, with series of events ahead of regeneration. Immunocompetent cells are recruited in the apical part. They slide along the root and migrate toward the crown. Due to the high alkalinity of the capping agent, pulp cells display mild inflammation, proliferate, and increase in number and size and initiate mineralization. Pulp fibroblasts become odontoblast-like cells producing type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and SPARC/osteonectin. Molecules of the SIBLING family, matrix metalloproteinases, and vascular and nerve mediators are also implicated in the formation of a reparative dentinal bridge, osteo/orthodentin closing the pulp exposure. Beneath a calciotraumatic line, a thin layer identified as reactionary dentin underlines the periphery of the pulp chamber. Inflammatory and/or noninflammatory processes contribute to produce a reparative dentinal bridge closing the pulp exposure, with minute canaliculi and large tunnel defects. Depending on the form and severity of the inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, and according to the capping agent, pulp reactions are induced specifically. PMID:26538825

  19. Perspectives for Monocyte/Macrophage-Based Diagnostics of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Moganti, Kondaiah; Gratchev, Alexei; Orekhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Summary Low-grade chronic inflammation underlies the development of the most dangerous cardiometabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. In contrast to acute inflammation induced by bacteria and viruses, chronic inflammation can be driven by abnormal reaction to endogenous factors, including Th2 cytokines, metabolic factors like advanced glycation end products (AGEs), modified lipoproteins, or hyperglycemia. The key innate immune cells that recognize these factors in blood circulation are monocytes. Inflammatory programming of monocytes which migrate into tissues can, in turn, result into generation of tissue macrophages with pathological functions. Therefore, determination of the molecular and functional phenotype of circulating monocytes is a very promising diagnostic tool for the identification of hidden inflammation, which can precede the development of the pathology. Here we propose a new test system for the identification of inflammatory programming of monocytes: surface biomarkers and ex vivo functional system. We summarize the current knowledge about surface biomarkers for monocyte subsets, including CD16, CCR2, CX3CR1, CD64, stabilin-1 and CD36, and their association with inflammatory human disorders. Furthermore, we present the design of an ex vivo monocyte-based test system with minimal set of parameters as a potential diagnostic tool for the identification of personalized inflammatory responses. PMID:27226789

  20. Perspectives for Monocyte/Macrophage-Based Diagnostics of Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Moganti, Kondaiah; Gratchev, Alexei; Orekhov, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation underlies the development of the most dangerous cardiometabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. In contrast to acute inflammation induced by bacteria and viruses, chronic inflammation can be driven by abnormal reaction to endogenous factors, including Th2 cytokines, metabolic factors like advanced glycation end products (AGEs), modified lipoproteins, or hyperglycemia. The key innate immune cells that recognize these factors in blood circulation are monocytes. Inflammatory programming of monocytes which migrate into tissues can, in turn, result into generation of tissue macrophages with pathological functions. Therefore, determination of the molecular and functional phenotype of circulating monocytes is a very promising diagnostic tool for the identification of hidden inflammation, which can precede the development of the pathology. Here we propose a new test system for the identification of inflammatory programming of monocytes: surface biomarkers and ex vivo functional system. We summarize the current knowledge about surface biomarkers for monocyte subsets, including CD16, CCR2, CX3CR1, CD64, stabilin-1 and CD36, and their association with inflammatory human disorders. Furthermore, we present the design of an ex vivo monocyte-based test system with minimal set of parameters as a potential diagnostic tool for the identification of personalized inflammatory responses. PMID:27226789

  1. Frailty and Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Mechanisms Behind the Link.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Navarro, Sara Gloria; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto José; Anaya-Escamilla, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between frailty and cognitive impairment has been recognized for decades, but it was not until a few years ago that the interest in this relationship increased and is now being understood. Epidemiological evidence suggests that physical frailty may be linked to cognitive impairment since both conditions share pathophysiological mechanisms at the cellular and systemic levels. Aging itself promotes multiple vascular changes, making the brain susceptible to cognitive decline through mechanisms such as thinning of blood vessels, increased collagen accumulation, rupture of the blood-brain barrier, inflammation, and oxidative damage. The prevalence of frailty and cognitive decline increases as individuals become older, and cognitive impairment attributable to cerebrovascular disease has become a major public health problem since vascular dementia is now the second most common subtype of dementia. However, full understanding of the mechanisms underlying the relationship between frailty and vascular cognitive impairment remains fragmented. This review examines the link between frailty and vascular cognitive decline and also explores the role of vascular changes in the genesis of both conditions. PMID:27028174

  2. VEGF-A, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the pathological vascular phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Janice A. . E-mail: jnagy@bidmc.harvard.edu; Senger, Donald R. . E-mail: dsenger@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-03-10

    Normal angiogenesis is a complex process involving the organization of proliferating and migrating endothelial cells (ECs) into a well-ordered and highly functional vascular network. In contrast, pathological angiogenesis, which is a conspicuous feature of tumor growth, ischemic diseases, and chronic inflammation, is characterized by vessels with aberrant angioarchitecture and compromised barrier function. Herein we review the subject of pathological angiogenesis, particularly that driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), from a new perspective. We propose that the serious structural and functional anomalies associated with VEGF-A-elicited neovessels, reflect, at least in part, imbalances in the internal molecular cues that govern the ordered assembly of ECs into three dimensional vascular networks and preserve vessel barrier function. Adopting such a viewpoint widens the focus from solely on specific pro-angiogenic stimuli such as VEGF-A to include a key set of cytoskeletal regulatory molecules, the Rho GTPases, which are known to direct multiple aspects of vascular morphogenesis including EC motility, alignment, multi-cellular organization, as well as intercellular junction integrity. We offer this perspective to draw attention to the importance of endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics for proper neovascularization and to suggest new therapeutic strategies with the potential to improve the pathological vascular phenotype.

  3. Incretin-Based Therapy for Prevention of Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complications are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with numbers of affected individuals steadily increasing. Diabetic vascular complications can be divided into two categories: macrovascular andmicrovascular complications. Macrovascular complications include coronary artery diseaseand cerebrovascular disease, while microvascular complications include retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. These complications result from metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, elevated levels of free fatty acids, and insulin resistance. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the adverse effects of these metabolic disorders on vascular tissues, including stimulation of protein kinase C signaling and activation of the polyol pathway by oxidative stress and inflammation. Additionally, the loss of tissue-specific insulin signaling induced by hyperglycemia and toxic metabolites can induce cellular dysfunction and both macro- and microvascular complications characteristic of diabetes. Despite these insights, few therapeutic methods are available for the management of diabetic complications. Recently, incretin-based therapeutic agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, have been reported to elicit vasotropic actions, suggesting a potential for effecting an actual reduction in diabetic vascular complications. The present review will summarize the relationship between multiple adverse biological mechanisms in diabetes and putative incretin-based therapeutic interventions intended to prevent diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26881236

  4. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  5. Neurobiology of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Enciu, Ana-Maria; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Popescu, Laurenţiu M.; Mureşanu, Dafin F.; Popescu, Bogdan O.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular dementia is, in its current conceptual form, a distinct type of dementia with a spectrum of specific clinical and pathophysiological features. However, in a very large majority of cases, these alterations occur in an already aged brain, characterized by a milieu of cellular and molecular events common for different neurodegenerative diseases. The cell signaling defects and molecular dyshomeostasis might lead to neuronal malfunction prior to the death of neurons and the alteration of neuronal networks. In the present paper, we explore some of the molecular mechanisms underlying brain malfunction triggered by cerebrovascular disease and risk factors. We suggest that, in the age of genetic investigation and molecular diagnosis, the concept of vascular dementia needs a new approach. PMID:21876809

  6. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  7. [Vascular variability syndromes].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kuniaki; Okajima, Kiyotaka; Yamanaka, Takashi; Cornelissen, Germaine

    2014-08-01

    Analytical global and local methods applied to human blood pressure (BP) records of around-the-clock measurements. The chronobiological interpretation of ambulatory BP monitoring records in the light of time-specified reference values derived from healthy peers matched by sex and age identify vascular variability disorders (VVDs) for an assessment of cardio-, cerebro-, and renovascular disease risk. VVD includes circadian BP over-swinging (CHAT, short for circadian hyper-amplitude tension), deficient heart rate variability, MESOR (midline-estimating statistic of rhythm) hypertension, excessively elevated pulse pressure over 60 mmHg, BP ecphasia (an odd timing of the circadian rhythms in BP but not in that of heart rate) and frequency alteration. The term MESOR-hypertension indicates only one of several VVDs that can combine to for sets of 2, 3 and n-component vascular variability syndromes. PMID:25167758

  8. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  9. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  10. Congenital Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gravereaux, Edwin C.; Nguyen, Louis L.; Cunningham, Leslie D.

    2004-04-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies are rare. The cardiovascular specialist should nevertheless be aware of the more common types of vascular anomalies and understand the implications for patient treatment and the likelihood of associated morbidity. The presentation of congenital arteriovenous malformations can range from asymptomatic or cosmetic lesions, to those causing ischemia, ulceration, hemorrhage, or high-output congestive heart failure. Treatment of large, symptomatic arteriovenous malformations often requires catheter-directed embolization prior to the attempt at complete surgical excision. Later recurrence, due to collateral recruitment, is frequent. Graded compression stockings and leg elevation are the mainstays of treatment for the predominantly venous congenital vascular anomalies. Most congenital central venous disorders are clinically silent. An exception is the retrocaval ureter. Retroaortic left renal vein, circumaortic venous ring, and absent, left-sided or duplicated inferior vena cava are relevant when aortic or inferior vena cava procedures are planned. The treatment of the venous disorders is directed at prevention or management of symptoms. Persistent sciatic artery, popliteal entrapment syndrome, and aberrant right subclavian artery origin are congenital anomalies that are typically symptomatic at presentation. Because they mimic more common diseases, diagnosis is frequently delayed. Delay can result in significant morbidity for the patient. Failure to make the diagnosis of persistent sciatic artery and popliteal entrapment can result in critical limb ischemia and subsequent amputation. Unrecognized aberrant right subclavian artery origin associated with aneurysmal degeneration can rupture and result in death. The treatment options for large-vessel arterial anomalies are surgical, sometimes in combination with endovascular techniques.

  11. Macrophage-derived IL-18 and increased fibrinogen deposition are age-related inflammatory signatures of vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Martinez, Laisel; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Duque, Juan C.; Wei, Yuntao; Mesa, Annia; Pena, Angela; Gupta, Vineet; Pham, Si M.

    2014-01-01

    Aging has been associated with pathological vascular remodeling and increased neointimal hyperplasia. The understanding of how aging exacerbates this process is fundamental to prevent cardiovascular complications in the elderly. This study proposes a mechanism by which aging sustains leukocyte adhesion, vascular inflammation, and increased neointimal thickness after injury. The effect of aging on vascular remodeling was assessed in the rat balloon injury model using microarray analysis, immunohistochemistry, and LINCOplex assays. The injured arteries in aging rats developed thicker neointimas than those in younger animals, and this significantly correlated with a higher number of tissue macrophages and increased vascular IL-18. Indeed, IL-18 was 23-fold more abundant in the injured vasculature of aged animals compared with young rats, while circulating levels were similar in both groups of animals. The depletion of macrophages in aged rats with clodronate liposomes ameliorated vascular accumulation of IL-18 and significantly decreased neointimal formation. IL-18 was found to inhibit apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and macrophages, thus favoring both the formation and inflammation of the neointima. In addition, injured arteries of aged rats accumulated 18-fold more fibrinogen-γ than those of young animals. Incubation of rat peritoneal macrophages with immobilized IL-18 increased leukocyte adhesion to fibrinogen and suggested a proinflammatory positive feedback loop among macrophages, VSMC, and the deposition of fibrinogen during neointimal hyperplasia. In conclusion, our data reveal that concentration changes in vascular cytokine and fibrinogen following injury in aging rats contribute to local inflammation and postinjury neointima formation. PMID:24414074

  12. Mast cells and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Delivanis, Danae-Anastasia; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Zhang, Bodi; Asadi, Shahrzad; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Weng, Zuyi; Miniati, Alexandra; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are well known for their role in allergic and anaphylactic reactions, as well as their involvement in acquired and innate immunity. Increasing evidence now implicates mast cells in inflammatory diseases where they are activated by non-allergic triggers, such as neuropeptides and cytokines, often exerting synergistic effects as in the case of IL-33. Mast cells can also release pro-inflammatory mediators selectively without degranulation. In particular, IL-1 induces selective release of IL-6, while corticotropin-releasing hormone secreted under stress induces the release of vascular endothelial growth factor. Many inflammatory diseases involve mast cells in cross-talk with T cells, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, which all worsen by stress. How mast cell differential responses are regulated is still unresolved. Preliminary evidence suggests that mitochondrial function and dynamics control mast cell degranulation, but not selective release. Recent findings also indicate that mast cells have immunomodulatory properties. Understanding selective release of mediators could explain how mast cells participate in numerous diverse biologic processes, and how they exert both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive actions. Unraveling selective mast cell secretion could also help develop unique mast cell inhibitors with novel therapeutic applications. PMID:21185371

  13. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  14. Mechanisms Underlying Inflammation in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Christopher K.; Saijo, Kaoru; Winner, Beate; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Gage, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. In this Review, we discuss inducers, sensors, transducers, and effectors of neuroinflammation that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death. Although inducers of inflammation may be generated in a disease-specific manner, there is evidence for a remarkable convergence in the mechanisms responsible for the sensing, transduction, and amplification of inflammatory processes that result in the production of neurotoxic mediators. A major unanswered question is whether pharmacological inhibition of inflammation pathways will be able to safely reverse or slow the course of disease. PMID:20303880

  15. The role of granulocytes in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, J

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils secrete of variety of biologically active compounds, especially when they accumulate at sites of inflammation. Secretory products are delivered to the tissues both by exocytosis of cytoplasmic granules and by metabolic events taking place at the plasma membrane. The release of lysosomal constituents, such as lactoferrin, elastase and collagenases, is associated with the regulation of the turnover of neutrophils, their participation and activity in the inflammatory reaction, and breakdown of cartilage and connective tissues, for example. Generation of cytotoxic oxygen radicals and compounds, e.g. the superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and the hydroxyl radical, is initiated by many inflammatory mediators. These two systems, either individually or in collaboration, can cause damage to many types of structures. For instance, when endothelial cells are injured, increased vascular permeability may occur. If such injury involves the pulmonary capillary system a respiratory distress syndrome may supervene. Leukotrienes are potent mediators of inflammation, formed in neutrophils after exposure to various other chemotactic or perturbating compounds. Leukotriene B4 is the most potent of the hitherto described compounds, being a promotor of neutrophil adherence, aggregation and chemotaxis in vitro of similar potency as the formylated synthetic chemotactic peptides, e.g. fMLP, and as the C5a fragment. However, the ability of LTB4 to induce a release of lysosomal enzymes is only half of that of fMLP, and, finally, the capacity to initiate a chemiluminescence response, being a measure of the oxidative metabolism, is only one-tenth of that of fMLP. Thus, leukotrienes of the B series seem to be a signal system whereby activated neutrophils can recruit cellular reinforcements, and, possibly, to act as an intracellular, second messenger system.

  16. Mononuclear cells and vascular repair in HHT

    PubMed Central

    Dingenouts, Calinda K. E.; Goumans, Marie-José; Bakker, Wineke

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu–Osler–Weber disease is a rare genetic vascular disorder known for its endothelial dysplasia causing arteriovenous malformations and severe bleedings. HHT-1 and HHT-2 are the most prevalent variants and are caused by heterozygous mutations in endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1, respectively. An undervalued aspect of the disease is that HHT patients experience persistent inflammation. Although endothelial and mural cells have been the main research focus trying to unravel the mechanism behind the disease, wound healing is a process with a delicate balance between inflammatory and vascular cells. Inflammatory cells are part of the mononuclear cells (MNCs) fraction, and can, next to eliciting an immune response, also have angiogenic potential. This biphasic effect of MNC can hold a promising mechanism to further elucidate treatment strategies for HHT patients. Before MNC are able to contribute to repair, they need to home to and retain in ischemic and damaged tissue. Directed migration (homing) of MNCs following tissue damage is regulated by the stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1). MNCs that express the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) migrate toward the tightly regulated gradient of SDF1. This directed migration of monocytes and lymphocytes can be inhibited by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). Interestingly, MNC of HHT patients express elevated levels of DPP4 and show impaired homing toward damaged tissue. Impaired homing capacity of the MNCs might therefore contribute to the impaired angiogenesis and tissue repair observed in HHT patients. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the role of MNCs in the etiology of HHT and vascular repair, and evaluates the efficacy of DPP4 inhibition in tissue integrity and repair. PMID:25852751

  17. Aspalathin and Nothofagin from Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) inhibits high glucose-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kwak, Soyoung; Kim, Yaesol; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-02-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Aspalathin (Asp) and nothofagin (Not) are two major active dihydrochalcones found in green rooibos, which have been reported for their antioxidant activity. In this study, we assessed whether Asp or Not can suppress vascular inflammation induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. We monitored the effects of Asp or Not on HG-induced vascular hyperpermeability, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expression of CAMs, formation of ROS, and activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, treatment of Asp or Not inhibited HG-mediated vascular hyperpermeability, adhesion of monocytes toward HUVECs, and expression of CAMs. In addition, Asp or Not suppressed the formation of ROS and the activation of NF-κB. Since vascular inflammation induced by HG is critical in the development of diabetic complications, our results suggest that Asp or Not may have significant benefits in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  18. Biofilms and chronic wound inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, R D; Rhoads, D D; Dowd, S E

    2008-08-01

    In contrast to the commonly accepted hypothesis of host-centred pathology, it is possible that surface bacteria, not host dysfunction, cause the chronicity and perpetual inflammation associated with chronic non-healing wounds.

  19. Noncoding RNAs regulate NF-κB signaling to modulate blood vessel inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henry S.; Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Khyzha, Nadiya; Dang, Lan T.; Fish, Jason E.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, which include heart attack and stroke, occur several decades after initiation of the disease and become more severe with age. Inflammation of blood vessels plays a prominent role in atherogenesis. Activation of the endothelium by inflammatory mediators leads to the recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells, which drives atherosclerotic plaque formation and progression. Inflammatory signaling within the endothelium is driven predominantly by the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-κB. Interestingly, activation of NF-κB is enhanced during the normal aging process and this may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, studies utilizing mouse models of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis are uncovering a network of noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs, which impinge on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here we summarize the literature regarding the control of vascular inflammation by microRNAs, and provide insight into how these microRNA-based pathways might be harnessed for therapeutic treatment of disease. We also discuss emerging areas of endothelial cell biology, including the involvement of long noncoding RNAs and circulating microRNAs in the control of vascular inflammation. PMID:25540650

  20. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  1. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  2. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-08-15

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  3. The hexane fraction of Ardisia crispa Thunb. A. DC. roots inhibits inflammation-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ardisia crispa (Myrsinaceae) is used in traditional Malay medicine to treat various ailments associated with inflammation, including rheumatism. The plant’s hexane fraction was previously shown to inhibit several diseases associated with inflammation. As there is a strong correlation between inflammation and angiogenesis, we conducted the present study to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of the plant’s roots in animal models of inflammation-induced angiogenesis. Methods We first performed phytochemical screening and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprinting of the hexane fraction of Ardisia crispa roots ethanolic extract (ACRH) and its quinone-rich fraction (QRF). The anti-inflammatory properties of ACRH and QRF were tested using the Miles vascular permeability assay and the murine air pouch granuloma model following oral administration at various doses. Results Preliminary phytochemical screening of ACRH revealed the presence of flavonoids, triterpenes, and tannins. The QRF was separated from ACRH (38.38% w/w) by column chromatography, and was isolated to yield a benzoquinonoid compound. The ACRH and QRF were quantified by HPLC. The LD50 value of ACRH was 617.02 mg/kg. In the Miles vascular permeability assay, the lowest dose of ACRH (10 mg/kg) and all doses of QRF significantly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced hyperpermeability, when compared with the vehicle control. In the murine air pouch granuloma model, ACRH and QRF both displayed significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects, without granuloma weight. ACRH and QRF significantly reduced the vascular index, but not granuloma tissue weight. Conclusions In conclusion, both ACRH and QRF showed potential anti-inflammatory properties in a model of inflammation-induced angiogenesis model, demonstrating their potential anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:23298265

  4. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  5. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 vs control group). Paeoniflorin could decrease the cell populations at S phases (paeoniflorin 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and increase the cell populations at G0-G1 phases of Lewis lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and reduce the numbers of M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages induced by IL-4 (paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 vs Control group). Paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P < 0.01 vs control group). These results suggest that paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft partly through inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages.

  6. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  7. Mechanisms for macrophage-mediated HIV-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Hardegen, Neil J; Wahl, Larry M; Hewlett, Indira K; Clouse, Kathleen A; Yamada, Kenneth M; Dhawan, Subhash

    2004-12-01

    Viral latency is a long-term pathogenic condition in patients infected with HIV-1. Low but sustained virus replication in chronically infected cells can be activated by stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, or other host factors. However, the precise mechanism by which cellular activation induces latently infected cells to produce virions has remained unclear. In the present report, we present evidence that activation of HIV-1 replication in latently infected U1 or ACH2 cells by human macrophages is mediated by a rapid nuclear localization of NF-kappaB p50/p65 dimer with concomitant increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Multiplexed RT-PCR amplification of mRNA isolated from cocultures of macrophages and U1 and ACH2 cells showed significant induction of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta expression within 3 h of coincubation. Fixation of macrophages, U-1, or ACH2 cells with paraformaldehyde before coculture completely abrogated the induction of NF-kappaB subunits and HIV-1 replication, suggesting that cooperative interaction between the two cell types is an essential process for cellular activation. Pretreatment of macrophage-U1 or macrophage-ACH2 cocultures with neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha Ab down-regulated the replication of HIV-1. In addition, pretreatment of macrophage-U1 or macrophage-ACH2 cocultures with the NF-kappaB inhibitor (E)3-[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7082) prevented the induction of cytokine expression, indicating a pivotal role of NF-kappaB-mediated signaling in the reactivation of HIV-1 in latently infected cells by macrophages. These results provide a mechanism by which macrophages induce HIV-1 replication in latently infected cells.

  8. The macrophage mediates the renoprotective effects of endotoxin preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Winfree, Seth; Kalakeche, Rabih; Dube, Shataakshi; Kumar, Rakesh; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Plotkin, Zoya; Dagher, Pierre C

    2015-06-01

    Preconditioning is a preventative approach, whereby minimized insults generate protection against subsequent larger exposures to the same or even different insults. In immune cells, endotoxin preconditioning downregulates the inflammatory response and yet, preserves the ability to contain infections. However, the protective mechanisms of preconditioning at the tissue level in organs such as the kidney remain poorly understood. Here, we show that endotoxin preconditioning confers renal epithelial protection in various models of sepsis in vivo. We also tested the hypothesis that this protection results from direct interactions between the preconditioning dose of endotoxin and the renal tubules. This hypothesis is on the basis of our previous findings that endotoxin toxicity to nonpreconditioned renal tubules was direct and independent of immune cells. Notably, we found that tubular protection after preconditioning has an absolute requirement for CD14-expressing myeloid cells and particularly, macrophages. Additionally, an intact macrophage CD14-TRIF signaling pathway was essential for tubular protection. The preconditioned state was characterized by increased macrophage number and trafficking within the kidney as well as clustering of macrophages around S1 proximal tubules. These macrophages exhibited increased M2 polarization and upregulation of redox and iron-handling molecules. In renal tubules, preconditioning prevented peroxisomal damage and abolished oxidative stress and injury to S2 and S3 tubules. In summary, these data suggest that macrophages are essential mediators of endotoxin preconditioning and required for renal tissue protection. Preconditioning is, therefore, an attractive model to investigate novel protective pathways for the prevention and treatment of sepsis.

  9. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 vs control group). Paeoniflorin could decrease the cell populations at S phases (paeoniflorin 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and increase the cell populations at G0-G1 phases of Lewis lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and reduce the numbers of M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages induced by IL-4 (paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 vs Control group). Paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P < 0.01 vs control group). These results suggest that paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft partly through inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages. PMID:26721711

  10. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Hickey, Michael J; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in postcapillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we showed that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor α-hemolysin produced by S. aureus lyses perivascular macrophages, which leads to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin and indicate that S. aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  11. Vascular effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Almeida Rezende, Bruno; Pereira, Aline Carvalho; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia Soares

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant-derived polyphenolic compounds with various biological properties particularly in the cardiovascular system, including antiatherogenic, antioxidant, vasodilation, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet activities. These biological properties have been evaluated in several experimental and clinical studies. In addition, extensive reviews have discussed the antiatherogenic effect of these polyphenols. However, limited studies have investigated the potential therapeutic vascular effects of these compounds. This review brings together some recent studies, to establish the different signaling pathways involved in the molecular mechanisms that underlie the vasodilation induced by flavonoids.

  12. Controlling the complement system in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    1997-12-01

    Inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system can lead to harmful, potentially life-threatening consequences due to severe inflammatory tissue destruction. These consequences are clinically manifested in various disorders, including septic shock, multiple organ failure and hyperacute graft rejection. Genetic complement deficiencies or complement depletion have been proven to be beneficial in reducing tissue injury in a number of animal models of severe complement-dependent inflammation. It is therefore believed that therapeutic inhibition of complement is likely to arrest the process of certain diseases. Attempts to efficiently inhibit complement include the application of endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1-inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1- rsCR1), the administration of antibodies, either blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction (e.g. C3, C5), neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium. In addition, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (DAF-CD55, MCP-CD46, CD59) has become possible by transfection of the correspondent cDNA into xenogeneic cells. Thereby, protection against complement-mediated inflammatory tissue damage could be achieved in various animal models of sepsis, myocardial as well as intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, nephritis and graft rejection. Supported by results from first clinical trials, complement inhibition appears to be a suitable therapeutic approach to control inflammation. Current strategies to specifically inhibit complement in inflammation have been discussed at a recent meeting on the 'Immune Consequences of Trauma, Shock and Sepsis', held from March 4-8, 1997, in Munich, Germany. The Congress (chairman: E. Faist, Munich, Germany), which was held in close cooperation with various

  13. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  14. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  15. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products mitigates vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Le; Cao, Qingxin; Song, Ying; Liu, Yuxiu; Gong, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction including vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension often results in poor clinical outcomes and increased risk of vascular accidents. We investigate the effect of treatment with soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Firstly, the aortic AGE/RAGE pathway was investigated in SHR. Secondly, SHR received intraperitoneal injections of sRAGE daily for 4 weeks. Effect of sRAGE against vascular dysfunction in SHR and underlying mechanism was investigated. SHR aortas exhibited enhanced activity of aldose reductase, reduced activity of glyoxalase 1, accumulation of methylglyoxal and AGE, and upregulated expression of RAGE. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE had no significant effect on blood pressure, but alleviated aortic hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. In vitro, treatment with sRAGE reversed the effect of incubation with AGE on proliferation of smooth muscle cells and endothelial function. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE abated oxidative stress, suppressed inflammation and NF-κB activation, improved the balance between Ang II and Ang-(1-7) through reducing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and enhancing ACE2 expression, and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression in aortas. In conclusion, treatment with sRAGE alleviated vascular adverse remodeling in SHR, possibly via suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, improvement in RAS balance, and activation of PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27426491

  16. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  17. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  18. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J.; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  19. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals. PMID:23494259

  20. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals.

  1. Signalling from dead cells drives inflammation and vessel remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin; Yu, Haixiang; Clarke, Murray

    2012-01-01

    Death of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has been demonstrated in vessel development and in disease, most notably in atherosclerosis, but also after injury and remodelling. VSMC death promotes multiple features of vulnerable plaques, but also induces features of normal vessel ageing and cystic medial necrosis, including loss of VSMCs, elastin fragmentation and loss, increased glycosaminoglycans and speckled calcification. VSMC apoptosis in the absence of efficient phagocytosis also produces inflammation due to secondary necrosis; in contrast, VSMC apoptosis in normal vessels can be silent. We have investigated the consequences of VSMC apoptosis in both disease and during vessel remodelling. We find that VSMCs release specific cytokines dependent upon the mode of cell death; IL-1β predominates during apoptosis, whilst IL-1α predominates during necrosis. Both IL-1α and β promote release of further cytokines from adjacent live cells, in particular IL-6 and MCP-1. The balance of cytokines results in pathology with differing compositions, including inflammation or neointima formation/vascular repair, via direct promotion of VSMC proliferation and migration. Thus, VSMC death can promote either pathology or repair, depending upon the context and cytokine signalling.

  2. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns.

  3. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  4. Vascularization of engineered teeth.

    PubMed

    Nait Lechguer, A; Kuchler-Bopp, S; Hu, B; Haïkel, Y; Lesot, H

    2008-12-01

    The implantation of cultured dental cell-cell re-associations allows for the reproduction of fully formed teeth, crown morphogenesis, epithelial histogenesis, mineralized dentin and enamel deposition, and root-periodontium development. Since vascularization is critical for organogenesis and tissue engineering, this work aimed to study: (a) blood vessel formation during tooth development, (b) the fate of blood vessels in cultured teeth and re-associations, and (c) vascularization after in vivo implantation. Ex vivo, blood vessels developed in the dental mesenchyme from the cap to bell stages and in the enamel organ, shortly before ameloblast differentiation. In cultured teeth and re-associations, blood-vessel-like structures remained in the peridental mesenchyme, but never developed into dental tissues. After implantation, both teeth and re-associations became revascularized, although later in the case of the re-associations. In implanted re-associations, newly formed blood vessels originated from the host, allowing for their survival, and affording conditions organ growth, mineralization, and enamel secretion.

  5. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  6. Vascular graft infections.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Barbara; Husmann, Lars; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Weber, Rainer; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Vascular procedures are rarely complicated by infection, but if prosthetic vascular graft infection (PVGI) occurs, morbidity and mortality are high. Several patient-related, surgery-related and postoperative risk factors are reported, but they are not well validated. PVGI is due to bacterial colonisation of the wound and the underlying prosthetic graft, generally as a result of direct contamination during the operative procedure, mainly from the patient's skin or adjacent bowel. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria or on the best management of PVGI. On the basis of reported clinical studies and our own experience, we advocate a surgical approach combining repeated radical local debridement, with graft preservation whenever possible or partial excision of the infected graft, depending on its condition, plus simultaneous negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT). In addition, antimicrobial therapy is recommended, but there is no consensus on which classes of agent are adequate for the treatment of PVGI and whether certain infections may be treated by means of NPWT alone. Since staphylococci and Gram-negative rods are likely to be isolated, empirical treatment might include a penicillinase-resistant beta-lactam or a glycopeptide, plus an aminoglycoside, the latter for Gram-negative coverage and synergistic treatment of Gram-positive cocci. Additionally, empirical treatment might include rifampicin since it penetrates well into biofilms.

  7. Human miR-221/222 in Physiological and Atherosclerotic Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dmitry A.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of miR-221/222 is a key player in vascular biology through exhibiting its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). These miRNAs contribute to vascular remodeling, an adaptive process involving phenotypic and behavioral changes in vascular cells in response to vascular injury. In proliferative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, pathological vascular remodeling plays a prominent role. The miR-221/222 cluster controls development and differentiation of ECs but inhibits their proangiogenic activation, proliferation, and migration. miR-221/222 are primarily implicated in maintaining endothelial integrity and supporting quiescent EC phenotype. Vascular expression of miR-221/222 is upregulated in initial atherogenic stages causing inhibition of angiogenic recruitment of ECs and increasing endothelial dysfunction and EC apoptosis. In contrast, these miRNAs stimulate VSMCs and switching from the VSMC “contractile” phenotype to the “synthetic” phenotype associated with induction of proliferation and motility. In atherosclerotic vessels, miR-221/222 drive neointima formation. Both miRNAs contribute to atherogenic calcification of VSMCs. In advanced plaques, chronic inflammation downregulates miR-221/222 expression in ECs that in turn could activate intralesion neoangiogenesis. In addition, both miRNAs could contribute to cardiovascular pathology through their effects on fat and glucose metabolism in nonvascular tissues such as adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscles. PMID:26221589

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2-16h at concentrations of 0-50 μg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways.

  9. Pleiotropic effects of intravascular haemolysis on vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Gregory J; Taylor, James G

    2010-03-01

    The breakdown of senescent or defective red blood cells releases red cell contents, especially haemoglobin, which scavenges nitric oxide (NO) and decomposes to haem and free iron. These are potent oxidants, all of which have promoted the evolution of inducible and vasculoprotective compensatory pathways to rapidly clear and detoxify haemoglobin, haem and iron. Chronic haemolytic red cell disorders as diverse as sickle cell disease, thalassaemia, unstable haemoglobinopathy, cytoskeletal defects and enzymopathies have been linked to a clinical constellation of pulmonary hypertension, priapism, leg ulceration and possibly cerebrovascular disease and thrombosis. Besides free haemoglobin, haemolysis has been associated with extracellular arginase that limits substrate availability to NO synthase, endogenous inhibitors of NO synthase activity, and inappropriate activation of haemostatic pathways. This article reviews the haemolytic disorders that have been reported to manifest vascular complications, and explores the speculative possibility that haemolysis mediates some of the vascular complications of inflammation and diabetes. PMID:19958359

  10. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  11. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Vidula T; Liu, Tiefu; Wang, Xianfeng; Hoth, Jason J; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT), first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1-7) guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to "defend and mend" against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation) for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to "defend" against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to "mend," leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis. PMID:26904696

  12. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula T.; Liu, Tiefu; Wang, Xianfeng; Hoth, Jason J.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT), first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1–7) guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to “defend and mend” against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation) for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to “defend” against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to “mend,” leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis. PMID:26904696

  13. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk. PMID:26389951

  14. Chronic Inflammation in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Molls, Michael; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory mediators exert pleiotropic effects in the development of cancer. On the one hand, inflammation favors carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spread; on the other hand inflammation can stimulate immune effector mechanisms that might limit tumor growth. The link between cancer and inflammation depends on intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Both pathways result in the activation of transcription factors such as NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 and in accumulation of tumorigenic factors in tumor and microenvironment. STAT-3 and NF-κB interact at multiple levels and thereby boost tumor-associated inflammation which can suppress anti-tumor immune responses. These factors also promote tumor growth, progression, and metastatic spread. IL-1, IL-6, TNF, and PGHS-2 are key mediators of an inflammatory milieu by modulating the expression of tumor-promoting factors. In this review we concentrate on the crucial role of pro-inflammatory mediators in inflammation-driven carcinogenesis and outline molecular mechanisms of IL-1 signaling in tumors. In addition, we elucidate the dual roles of stress proteins as danger signals in the development of anti-cancer immunity and anti-apoptotic functions. PMID:22566887

  15. Lymphatic vascular morphogenesis in development, physiology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Sabine, Amélie; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2011-05-16

    The lymphatic vasculature constitutes a highly specialized part of the vascular system that is essential for the maintenance of interstitial fluid balance, uptake of dietary fat, and immune response. Recently, there has been an increased awareness of the importance of lymphatic vessels in many common pathological conditions, such as tumor cell dissemination and chronic inflammation. Studies of embryonic development and genetically engineered animal models coupled with the discovery of mutations underlying human lymphedema syndromes have contributed to our understanding of mechanisms regulating normal and pathological lymphatic morphogenesis. It is now crucial to use this knowledge for the development of novel therapies for human diseases.

  16. Oral nitrite therapy improves vascular function in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sindler, Amy L; Cox-York, Kimberly; Reese, Lauren; Bryan, Nathan S; Seals, Douglas R; Gentile, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Aim We tested the hypothesis that short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation would improve vascular dysfunction in obese, diabetic mice. Methods and results Vascular function was determined in control mice and in db/db mice receiving drinking water with or without sodium nitrite (50 mg/L) for 5 weeks. Nitrite supplementation increased plasma nitrite concentrations in db/db mice (0.19±0.02 μM vs 0.80±0.26μM; p < 0.05). Db/db mice had lower endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) in response to increasing doses of acetylcholine versus heterozygous control mice (71.2% ± 14.3% vs 93% ± 7.0%; p < 0.05), and sodium nitrite supplementation restored endothelium-dependent dilation to control levels (92.9% ± 2.3% vs 93% ± 7.0%; p < 0.05). The improvement in endothelial function was accompanied by a reduction in intrinsic stiffness, but not by alterations in plasma or vascular markers of inflammation. Conclusion These data suggest that sodium nitrite may be a novel therapy for treating diabetes-related vascular dysfunction; however, the mechanisms of improvement are unknown. PMID:25696116

  17. Myocardin Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Inflammatory Activation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ackers-Johnson, Matthew; Talasila, Amarnath; Sage, Andrew P; Long, Xiaochun; Bot, Ilze; Morrell, Nicholas W; Bennett, Martin R; Miano, Joseph M.; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis, the cause of 50% of deaths in westernised societies, is widely regarded as a chronic vascular inflammatory disease. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) inflammatory activation in response to local pro-inflammatory stimuli contributes to disease progression and is a pervasive feature in developing atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, it is of considerable therapeutic importance to identify mechanisms that regulate the VSMC inflammatory response. Approach and Results We report that myocardin, a powerful myogenic transcriptional coactivator, negatively regulates VSMC inflammatory activation and vascular disease. Myocardin levels are reduced during atherosclerosis, in association with phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells. Myocardin deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic ApoE−/− mice. Conversely, increased myocardin expression potently abrogates the induction of an array of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in VSMCs. Expression of myocardin in VSMCs reduces lipid uptake, macrophage interaction, chemotaxis and macrophage-endothelial tethering in vitro, and attenuates monocyte accumulation within developing lesions in vivo. These results demonstrate that endogenous levels of myocardin are a critical regulator of vessel inflammation. Conclusions We propose myocardin as a guardian of the contractile, non-inflammatory VSMC phenotype, with loss of myocardin representing a critical permissive step in the process of phenotypic transition and inflammatory activation, at the onset of vascular disease. PMID:25614278

  18. Vascular injury in diabetic db/db mice is ameliorated by atorvastatin: role of Rac1/2-sensitive Nox-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Callera, Glaucia E; Montezano, Augusto C; He, Ying; Antunes, Tayze T; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Tostes, Rita C; Touyz, Rhian M

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress [increased bioavailability of reactive oxygen species (ROS)] plays a role in the endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation, which underlie vascular damage in diabetes. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that are vasoprotective in diabetes through unknown mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that atorvastatin decreases NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived ROS generation and associated vascular injury in diabetes. Lepr(db)/Lepr(db) (db/db) mice, a model of Type 2 diabetes and control Lepr(db)/Lepr(+) (db/+) mice were administered atorvastatin (10 mg/kg per day, 2 weeks). Atorvastatin improved glucose tolerance in db/db mice. Systemic and vascular oxidative stress in db/db mice, characterized by increased plasma TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) levels and exaggerated vascular Nox-derived ROS generation respectively, were inhibited by atorvastatin. Cytosol-to-membrane translocation of the Nox regulatory subunit p47(phox) and the small GTPase Rac1/2 was increased in vessels from db/db mice compared with db/+ mice, an effect blunted by atorvastatin. The increase in vascular Nox1/2/4 expression and increased phosphorylation of redox-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was abrogated by atorvastatin in db/db mice. Pro-inflammatory signalling (decreased IκB-α and increased NF-κB p50 expression, increased NF-κB p65 phosphorylation) and associated vascular inflammation [vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression and vascular monocyte adhesion], which were increased in aortas of db/db mice, were blunted by atorvastatin. Impaired acetylcholine (Ach)- and insulin (INS)-induced vasorelaxation in db/db mice was normalized by atorvastatin. Our results demonstrate that, in diabetic mice, atorvastatin decreases vascular oxidative stress and inflammation and ameliorates vascular injury through processes involving decreased activation of Rac1/2 and Nox. These findings elucidate redox-sensitive and Rac1/2-dependent

  19. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  20. Points of control in inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Carl

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a complex set of interactions among soluble factors and cells that can arise in any tissue in response to traumatic, infectious, post-ischaemic, toxic or autoimmune injury. The process normally leads to recovery from infection and to healing, However, if targeted destruction and assisted repair are not properly phased, inflammation can lead to persistent tissue damage by leukocytes, lymphocytes or collagen. Inflammation may be considered in terms of its checkpoints, where binary or higher-order signals drive each commitment to escalate, go signals trigger stop signals, and molecules responsible for mediating the inflammatory response also suppress it, depending on timing and context. The non-inflammatory state does not arise passively from an absence of inflammatory stimuli; rather, maintenance of health requires the positive actions of specific gene products to suppress reactions to potentially inflammatory stimuli that do not warrant a full response.

  1. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  2. Inflammation in tissue engineering: The Janus between engraftment and rejection.

    PubMed

    Crupi, Annunziata; Costa, Alessandra; Tarnok, Attila; Melzer, Susanne; Teodori, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) for tissue and organ regeneration or replacement is generally performed with scaffold implants, which provide structural and molecular support to in vitro seeded or in vivo recruited cells. TE implants elicit the host immune response, often resulting in engraftment impediment or rejection. Besides this negative effect, however, the immune system components also yield a positive influence on stem cell recruitment and differentiation, allowing tissue regeneration and healing. Thus, a balanced cooperation between proinflammatory and proresolution players of the immune response is an essential element of implant success. In this context, macrophage plasticity plays a fundamental role. Therefore modulating the immune response, instead of immune suppressing the host, might be the best way to successfully implant TE tissues or organs. In particular, it is becoming evident that the scaffold, immune, and stem cells are linked by a three-way interaction, and many efforts are being made for scaffold-appropriate design and functionalization in order to drive the inflammation process toward regeneration, vascularization, and implant success. This review discusses current and potential strategies for inflammation modulation to aid engraftment and regeneration, supporting the concept that quality, and not quantity, of inflammation might influence implant success.

  3. Vascular calcification: When should we interfere in chronic kidney disease patients and how?

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are endangered with the highest mortality rate compared to other chronic diseases. Cardiovascular events account for up to 60% of the fatalities. Cardiovascular calcifications affect most of the CKD patients. Most of this calcification is related to disturbed renal phosphate handling. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and klotho deficiency were incriminated in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification through different mechanisms including their effects on endothelium and arterial wall smooth muscle cells. In addition, deficient klotho gene expression, a constant feature of CKD, promotes vascular pathology and shares in progression of the CKD. The role of gut in the etio-pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and vascular calcification is a newly discovered mechanism. This review will cover the medical history, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical relevance, different tools used to diagnose, the ideal timing to prevent or to withhold the progression of vascular calcification and the different medications and medical procedures that can help to prolong the survival of CKD patients.

  4. The quantitative analysis of the vascularization following two basic auditory canal skin incisions.

    PubMed

    Cvjetković, Niko; Velepic, Mitja S; Velepic, Marko M; Komljenović, Dejan; Zauhar, Gordana

    2003-06-01

    Three groups of nine patients each were analyzed. The first two groups consisted of those that underwent tympanoplastic due to chronic inflammation of middle ear. Two different standard auditory canal skin incisions were applied, i.e. tympanomeatal flap (TMF) or vascular strip (VS). The third control group consisted of non-operated patients. All the operated patients were subjected to a quantitative analysis of the auditory canal revascularization by means of the Weibel stereological test method, i.e. the B 100 double network system. The density of capillaries, arterioles, venulolymphatic spaces and a total volume density of all vascular elements of the auditory canal skin were measured. The obtained results of vascularization were compared with those of the target control group. It was found out that there were no significant differences in vascularization of auditory canal skin between TMF and VS patients from one side and the control group on the other side. PMID:12974157

  5. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone inhibits monocytes adhesion to vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Weihua; Meng, Lin; Yu, Haitao; Lu, Na; Fu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and its subsequent endothelial dysfunction have been reported to play a pivotal role in the initiation and progression of chronic vascular diseases. Inhibiting the attachment of monocytes to endothelium is a potential therapeutic strategy for vascular diseases treatment. α-Melanocyte stimulating hormone is generated from a precursor hormone called proopiomelanocortin by post-translational processing. However, whether α-melanocyte stimulating hormone plays a role in regulating endothelial inflammation is still unknown. In this study, the effects of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone on endothelial inflammation in human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines were investigated. And the result indicated that α-melanocyte stimulating hormone inhibits the expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, including vascular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin, thereby attenuating the adhesion of THP-1 cells to the surface of endothelial cells. Mechanistically, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone was found to inhibit NF-κB transcriptional activity. Finally, we found that the effect of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone on endothelial inflammation is dependent on its receptor melanocortin receptor 1. PMID:25898835

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor and dexamethasone release from nonfouling sensor coatings affect the foreign body response

    PubMed Central

    Norton, L.W.; Koschwanez, H.E.; Wisniewski, N.A.; Klitzman, B.; Reichert, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and dexamethasone (DX) release from hydrogel coatings were examined as a means to modify tissue inflammation and induce angiogenesis. Antibiofouling hydrogels for implantable glucose sensor coatings were prepared from 2-hydro-xyethyl methacrylate, N-vinyl pyrrolidinone, and polyethylene glycol. Microdialysis sampling was used to test the effect of the hydrogel coating on glucose recovery. VEGF-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers increased vascularity and inflammation in the surrounding tissue after 2 weeks of implantation compared to hydrogel-coated fibers. DX-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers reduced inflammation compared to hydrogel-coated fibers and had reduced capsule vascularity compared to VEGF-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers. Hydrogels that released both VEGF and DX simultaneously also showed reduced inflammation at 2 weeks implantation; however, no enhanced vessel formation was observed indicating that the DX diminished the VEGF effect. At 6 weeks, there were no detectable differences between drug-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers and control fibers. From this study, hydrogel drug release affected initial events of the foreign body response with DX inhibiting VEGF, but once the drug depot was exhausted these effects disappeared. PMID:17236219

  7. Lymphocyte binding to vascular endothelium in inflamed skin revisited: a central role for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1).

    PubMed

    Arvilommi, A M; Salmi, M; Kalimo, K; Jalkanen, S

    1996-04-01

    The binding of leukocytes to vascular endothelium and their migration into tissues is mediated by adhesion molecules on the endothelial cells and leukocytes. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a 170-180/90-kDa endothelial molecule expressed most prominently in high endothelial venules in peripheral lymph node (PLN) type lymphatic tissues. VAP-1 mediates lymphocyte binding to PLN, tonsil and synovium. The expression of VAP-1 is induced in inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and gut inflammation. We examined the expression, structure and function of VAP-1 in normal and inflamed skin and compared it to those of other adhesion molecules implicated in skin homing. In psoriasis lichen ruber planus, pemphigoid and allergic lesions, VAP-1 was markedly upregulated. The expression of VAP-1 was also increased in biopsies of healthy skin of the patients. The VAP-1 molecule induced in skin is decorated with abundant sialic acids. VAP-1 inflamed skin is functional, since inhibition with anti-VAP-1 monoclonal antibodies caused a 60% reduction in lymphocytes adhesion to vascular endothelium. Antibodies against E-selectin, which has been regarded as the major vascular addressin directing cutaneous lymphocyte traffic, and, surprisingly, against peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd), caused inhibitions of 30% and 60%, respectively, in the frozen section adhesion assay. These findings suggest important roles also for VAP-1 and PNAd in lymphocyte homing into inflamed skin. PMID:8625974

  8. New insight in quantitative analysis of vascular permeability during immune reaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Molodij, Guillaume; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Smolyakov, Yuri; Israeli, David; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging of vascular permeability becomes a golden standard for assessing the inflammation process during experimental immune response in vivo. The use of the optical fluorescence imaging provides a very useful and simple tool to reach this purpose. The motivation comes from the necessity of a robust and simple quantification and data presentation of inflammation based on a vascular permeability. Changes of the fluorescent intensity, as a function of time is a widely accepted method to assess the vascular permeability during inflammation related to the immune response. In the present study we propose to bring a new dimension by applying a more sophisticated approach to the analysis of vascular reaction by using a quantitative analysis based on methods derived from astronomical observations, in particular by using a space-time Fourier filtering analysis followed by a polynomial orthogonal modes decomposition. We demonstrate that temporal evolution of the fluorescent intensity observed at certain pixels correlates quantitatively to the blood flow circulation at normal conditions. The approach allows to determine the regions of permeability and monitor both the fast kinetics related to the contrast material distribution in the circulatory system and slow kinetics associated with extravasation of the contrast material. Thus, we introduce a simple and convenient method for fast quantitative visualization of the leakage related to the inflammatory (immune) reaction in vivo.

  9. Surgical inflammation: a pathophysiological rainbow

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Jose-Ignacio; Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole molecules are distributed in virtually all living organisms on Earth. In mammals, tetrapyrrole end products are closely linked to oxygen metabolism. Since increasingly complex trophic functional systems for using oxygen are considered in the post-traumatic inflammatory response, it can be suggested that tetrapyrrole molecules and, particularly their derived pigments, play a key role in modulating inflammation. In this way, the diverse colorfulness that the inflammatory response triggers during its evolution would reflect the major pathophysiological importance of these pigments in each one of its phases. Therefore, the need of exploiting this color resource could be considered for both the diagnosis and treatment of the inflammation. PMID:19309494

  10. Vascular surgery: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, P

    1999-09-01

    Isaac Newton, among others, observed that 'we see so far because we are standing upon the shoulders of giants'. In vascular surgery most of the giants have been European, and this is a heritage which we as Europeans can take pride in and build upon if we chose to do so. As in other areas of life, commitment is essential in order to influence the future. For vascular surgeons in Europe this means active participation in the European scientific societies for vascular surgery and in the UEMS. The main value of the EBSQ.VASC assessments to date has been to expose the uneven standards of training in vascular surgery within the European Union. Only if action follows to address these inequalities will the tactics of the European Board of Vascular Surgery be vindicated.

  11. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  12. A Critical Role for Monocytes/Macrophages During Intestinal Inflammation-associated Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Felix; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Gavins, Felicity N. E.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Navratil, Aaron R.; Jin, Long; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Orr, A. Wayne; Alexander, Jonathan S.; Ostanin, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation-associated lymphangiogenesis (IAL) is frequently observed in inflammatory bowel diseases. IAL is believed to limit inflammation by enhancing fluid and immune cell clearance. Although monocytes/macrophages (MΦ) are known to contribute to intestinal pathology in inflammatory bowel disease, their role in intestinal IAL has never been studied mechanistically. We investigated contributions of monocytes/MΦ to the development of intestinal inflammation and IAL. Methods Because inflammatory monocytes express CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), we used CCR2 diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic (CCR2.DTR) mice, in which monocytes can be depleted by diphtheria toxin injection, and CCR2−/− mice, which have reduced circulating monocytes. Acute or chronic colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulfate or adoptive transfer of CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells, respectively. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, disease activity, and histopathology, whereas IAL was assessed by lymphatic vessel morphology and density. Results We demonstrated that intestinal MΦ expressed vascular endothelial growth factor-C/D. In acute colitis, monocyte-depleted mice were protected from intestinal injury and showed reduced IAL, which was reversed after transfer of wild-type monocytes into CCR2−/− mice. In chronic colitis, CCR2 deficiency did not attenuate inflammation but reduced IAL. Conclusions We propose a dual role of MΦ in (1) promoting acute inflammation and (2) contributing to IAL. Our data suggest that intestinal inflammation and IAL could occur independently, because IAL was reduced in the absence of monocytes/MΦ, even when inflammation was present. Future inflammatory bowel disease therapies might exploit promotion of IAL and suppression of MΦ independently, to restore lymphatic clearance and reduce inflammation. PMID:26950310

  13. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells are not affected by acute systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tura, Olga; Haeck, Marlieke L. A.; Short, Abigail; Freyer, Elizabeth; Barclay, G. Robin; Newby, David E.; Mills, Nicholas L.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular injury causes acute systemic inflammation and mobilizes endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cell (EC) colony-forming units (EC-CFUs). Whether such mobilization occurs as part of a nonspecific acute phase response or is a phenomenon specific to vascular injury remains unclear. We aimed to determine the effect of acute systemic inflammation on EPCs and EC-CFU mobilization in the absence of vascular injury. Salmonella typhus vaccination was used as a model of acute systemic inflammation. In a double-blind randomized crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers received S. typhus vaccination or placebo. Phenotypic EPC populations enumerated by flow cytometry [CD34+VEGF receptor (VEGF)R-2+CD133+, CD14+VEGFR-2+Tie2+, CD45−CD34+, as a surrogate for late outgrowth EPCs, and CD34+CXCR-4+], EC-CFUs, and serum cytokine concentrations (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6, and stromal-derived factor-1) were quantified during the first 7 days. Vaccination increased circulating leukocyte (9.8 ± 0.6 vs. 5.1 ± 0.2 × 109 cells/l, P < 0.0001), serum IL-6 [0.95 (0–1.7) vs. 0 (0–0) ng/l, P = 0.016], and VEGF-A [60 (45–94) vs. 43 (21–64) pg/l, P = 0.006] concentrations at 6 h and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein at 24 h [2.7 (1.4–3.6) vs. 0.4 (0.2–0.8) mg/l, P = 0.037]. Vaccination caused a 56.7 ± 7.6% increase in CD14+ cells at 6 h (P < 0.001) and a 22.4 ± 6.9% increase in CD34+ cells at 7 days (P = 0.04). EC-CFUs, putative vascular progenitors, and the serum stromal-derived factor-1 concentration were unaffected throughout the study period (P > 0.05 for all). In conclusion, acute systemic inflammation causes nonspecific mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells, although it does not selectively mobilize putative vascular progenitors. We suggest that systemic inflammation is not the primary stimulus for EPC mobilization after acute vascular injury. PMID:20382859

  14. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  15. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  16. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  17. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:27262216

  18. Geriatric syndromes--vascular disorders?

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Timo E; Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Tilvis, Reijo S; O'Neill, Desmond; Erkinjuntti, Timo J

    2013-05-01

    The term geriatric syndrome is used to characterize multifactorial clinical conditions among older people which are not subsumed readily into disease entities, but which nevertheless predispose older people to disability and death. Commonly included are frailty, dementia, delirium, incontinence, falls, and dizziness. Geriatric syndromes are common among older people: in a recent survey, 50% of those aged more than 65 had one or more of these conditions. Better methods for prevention and treatment are needed, but current strategies have lacked a coherent conceptual and diagnostic framework. Prevention and interventions need to be targeted at earlier ages, with geriatrics expertise needed in the definition and operationalization of these complex entities. In this review we consolidate evidence that vascular disorders, including vascular ageing and vascular diseases, are key etiological factors of geriatric syndromes. Identifying this vascular dimension would offer opportunities for more efficient preventive strategies and mandates earlier intervention, especially for women, among whom vascular disease is often expressed more insidiously than among men. This would entail a sensitization of the health care system to the systematic detection of the syndromes, which are currently underdiagnosed. Further disentangling of the mechanisms of vascular ageing may offer therapies for vascular diseases and geriatric syndromes alike.

  19. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  20. [The future of vascular medicine].

    PubMed

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step.

  1. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  2. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations.

  3. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications.

  4. Lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK deficiency exacerbates hypertension and end-organ inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed A.; McMaster, William G.; Wu, Jing; Norlander, Allison E.; Funt, Samuel A.; Thabet, Salim R.; Kirabo, Annet; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Wei; Itani, Hana A.; Michell, Danielle; Huan, Tianxiao; Zhang, Yahua; Takaki, Satoshi; Titze, Jens; Levy, Daniel; Harrison, David G.; Madhur, Meena S.

    2015-01-01

    The lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK (also known as SH2B3) is primarily expressed in hematopoietic and endothelial cells, where it functions as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and cell proliferation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding LNK are associated with autoimmune and cardiovascular disorders; however, it is not known how LNK contributes to hypertension. Here, we determined that loss of LNK exacerbates angiotensin II–induced (Ang II–induced) hypertension and the associated renal and vascular dysfunction. At baseline, kidneys from Lnk–/– mice exhibited greater levels of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glomerular injury compared with WT animals, and these parameters were further exacerbated by Ang II infusion. Aortas from Lnk–/– mice exhibited enhanced inflammation, reduced nitric oxide levels, and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Bone marrow transplantation studies demonstrated that loss of LNK in hematopoietic cells is primarily responsible for the observed renal and vascular inflammation and predisposition to hypertension. Ang II infusion increased IFN-γ–producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen and kidneys of Lnk–/– mice compared with WT mice. Moreover, IFN-γ deficiency resulted in blunted hypertension in response to Ang II infusion. Together, these results suggest that LNK is a potential therapeutic target for hypertension and its associated renal and vascular sequela. PMID:25664851

  5. Targeting inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Welty, Francine K; Alfaddagh, Abdulhamied; Elajami, Tarec K

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is comprised of a cluster of closely related risk factors, including visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, hypertension, high triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; all of which increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A chronic state of inflammation appears to be a central mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and MetS. In this review, we summarize recent research which has provided insight into the mechanisms by which inflammation underlies the pathophysiology of the individual components of MetS including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. On the basis of these mechanisms, we summarize therapeutic modalities to target inflammation in the MetS and its individual components. Current therapeutic modalities can modulate the individual components of MetS and have a direct anti-inflammatory effect. Lifestyle modifications including exercise, weight loss, and diets high in fruits, vegetables, fiber, whole grains, and low-fat dairy and low in saturated fat and glucose are recommended as a first line therapy. The Mediterranean and dietary approaches to stop hypertension diets are especially beneficial and have been shown to prevent development of MetS. Moreover, the Mediterranean diet has been associated with reductions in total and cardiovascular mortality. Omega-3 fatty acids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists lower high levels of triglyceride; their role in targeting inflammation is reviewed. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone blockers comprise pharmacologic therapies for hypertension but also target other aspects of MetS including inflammation. Statin drugs target many of the underlying inflammatory pathways involved in MetS.

  6. Vascular calcification: Mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  7. The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Cronenwett, Jack L; Kraiss, Larry W; Cambria, Richard P

    2012-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) is designed to improve the quality, safety, effectiveness, and cost of vascular health care. It uses the structure of a Patient Safety Organization to permit collection of patient-identified information but protect benchmarked comparisons from legal discovery. The SVS VQI is uniquely organized as a distributed network of regional quality groups to facilitate local translation of registry data into practice change while maintaining the power of a national registry. Detailed data specific to each commonly performed open and endovascular procedure are collected, both in-hospital and at ≥ 1 year of follow-up. Quality measures are reported to physicians and hospitals, which allow anonymous risk-adjusted benchmarking within regions or nationally. All specialties that perform vascular procedures are included, and international participation is encouraged. This review describes the current status of the SVS VQI.

  8. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  9. Defining excellence in vascular neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Spetzler, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Success as a vascular neurosurgeon almost always begins with passion, an inherent love for the work that drives an insatiable desire for personal improvement. A personal definition of excellence in vascular neurosurgery includes several fundamental qualities: mastery of the basics, refinement of technique, advancement of technology, investigative study, advanced decision making, microsurgical innovation, a well-rounded surgical armamentarium, and a lifelong commitment to teaching. Ultimately, the reward for these efforts is the ability to influence generations to come, particularly as one follows the rising careers of former trainees, each redefining the term "excellence" in vascular neurosurgery.

  10. Neutrophils as sources of extracellular nucleotides: Functional consequences at the vascular interface

    PubMed Central

    Eltzschig, Holger K.; MacManus, Christopher F.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling is currently an area of intense investigation. Extracellular ATP liberated during hypoxia or inflammation can either signal directly to purinergic receptors or, following phosphohydrolytic metabolism, can activate surface adenosine (Ado) receptors. Given the association of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with adenine nucleotide / nucleoside signaling in the inflammatory milieu, it was recently demonstrated that PMN actively release ATP via a connexin 43 (Cx43) hemichannel-dependent mechanism. Here we review the mechanisms of ATP release and subsequent functional implications of ATP metabolism at the interface between PMN and vascular endothelial cells during inflammation and in hypoxia. PMID:18436149

  11. GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilin; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Hongliang; Duan, Weixun; Hu, Jing; Zhi, Weiwei; Yang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Minggao; Liu, Jincheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of estrogen receptors on diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction is critical, but ambiguous. Individuals with diabetic vascular disease may require estrogen receptor-specific targeted therapy in the future. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has beneficial effects on vascular function. However, its fundamental mechanisms are unclear. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway contributes to diabetic vascular complications, whereas estrogen can suppress Rho-kinase function. Thus, we assumed that GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular dysfunction. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. Vascular endothelial cells and ex vivo cultured ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mouse aortae were treated with high glucose (HG) alone or in combination with GPER agonist (G1). G1 treatment was also administered to OVX db/db mice for 8 weeks. An ex-vivo isovolumic myograph was used to analyze the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent contraction of mouse aortae. Apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were attenuated in G1-pretreated vascular endothelial cells. G1 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of inhibitory endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase residue threonine 495 (eNOS Thr495), inhibited RhoA expression, and increased NO production. Additionally, G1 rescued the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibited RhoA activation in the thoracic aorta of OVX db/db mice and ex-vivo cultured OVX C57BL/6 mouse aortae treated with HG. Estrogens acting via GPER could protect vascular endothelium, and GPER activation might elicit ERα-independent effect to inhibit RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Additionally, GPER activation might reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting RhoA activation. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a new therapeutic paradigm for end-stage vascular dysfunction by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway via GPER activation. PMID:26785611

  12. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  13. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  14. Nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for vascular and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular imaging have made magnetic resonance imaging a promising modality for noninvasive visualization and assessment of vascular and cardiac disease processes. This review provides a description of the various nanoparticles exploited for imaging cardiovascular targets. Nanoparticle probes detecting inflammation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix, and angiogenesis may provide tools for assessing the risk of progressive vascular dysfunction and heart failure. The utility of nanoparticles as multimodal probes and/or theranostic agents has also been investigated. Although clinical application of these nanoparticles is largely unexplored, the potential for enhancing disease diagnosis and treatment is considerable. PMID:20967875

  15. Immunosuppression Related to Collagen-Vascular Disease or Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Carol Dukes

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-vascular diseases are associated with immune dysregulation and inflammation, leading to tissue destruction or compromise. Immunosuppression is more commonly associated with the drugs used to treat these disorders than with the diseases themselves. The newest agents being used to treat collagen-vascular diseases are the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved TNF-α inhibitors have differing effects on the immune system, reflecting their potency and mechanisms of action. They are particularly effective in breaking down granulomatous inflammation, which makes them effective treatment for sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. This same property makes them likely to break down the host defense mechanism that normally contains pathogens such as mycobacteria and fungi in a dormant state, namely the physical and immunologic barrier formed by granulomas in the lung and elsewhere. The most common infection reported with the TNF-α inhibitors has been tuberculosis, which may manifest as pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary disease, with the latter being more common and severe than usual. Histoplasma capsulatum, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Listeria monocytogenes have also been described in a number of cases, and their frequency is discussed. PMID:16322600

  16. The PPAR-Platelet Connection: Modulators of Inflammation and Potential Cardiovascular Effects.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, S L; O'Brien, J J; Bancos, S; Lehmann, G M; Springer, D L; Blumberg, N; Francis, C W; Taubman, M B; Phipps, R P

    2008-01-01

    Historically, platelets were viewed as simple anucleate cells responsible for initiating thrombosis and maintaining hemostasis, but clearly they are also key mediators of inflammation and immune cell activation. An emerging body of evidence links platelet function and thrombosis to vascular inflammation. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play a major role in modulating inflammation and, interestingly, PPARs (PPARbeta/delta and PPARgamma) were recently identified in platelets. Additionally, PPAR agonists attenuate platelet activation; an important discovery for two reasons. First, activated platelets are formidable antagonists that initiate and prolong a cascade of events that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. Dampening platelet release of proinflammatory mediators, including CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154), is essential to hinder this cascade. Second, understanding the biologic importance of platelet PPARs and the mechanism(s) by which PPARs regulate platelet activation will be imperative in designing therapeutic strategies lacking the deleterious or unwanted side effects of current treatment options.

  17. Extracellular matrix moieties, cytokines, and enzymes: dynamic effects on immune cell behavior and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vaday, G G; Lider, O

    2000-02-01

    Tissue injury caused by infection or physical damage evokes inflammatory reactions and events that are necessary for regaining homeostasis. Central to these events is the translocation of leukocytes, including monocytes, neutrophils, and T lymphocytes, from the vascular system, through endothelium, and into the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding the injured tissue. This transition from the vasculature into the site of inflammation elicits remarkable changes in leukocyte behavior as cells adhere to and migrate across ECM before carrying out their effector functions. Growing evidence suggests that, through its interactions with cytokines and degradative enzymes, the ECM microenvironment has a specialized role in providing intrinsic signals for coordinating leukocyte actions. Recent advances also reveal that enzymatic modifications to ECM moieties and cytokines induce distinctive cellular responses, and are likely part of the mechanism regulating the perpetuation or arrest of inflammation. This article reviews the findings that have elucidated the dynamic relationships among these factors and how they communicate with immune cells during inflammation. PMID:10670574

  18. The PPAR-Platelet Connection: Modulators of Inflammation and Potential Cardiovascular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, S. L.; O'Brien, J. J.; Bancos, S.; Lehmann, G. M.; Springer, D. L.; Blumberg, N.; Francis, C. W.; Taubman, M. B.; Phipps, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    Historically, platelets were viewed as simple anucleate cells responsible for initiating thrombosis and maintaining hemostasis, but clearly they are also key mediators of inflammation and immune cell activation. An emerging body of evidence links platelet function and thrombosis to vascular inflammation. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play a major role in modulating inflammation and, interestingly, PPARs (PPARβ/δ and PPARγ) were recently identified in platelets. Additionally, PPAR agonists attenuate platelet activation; an important discovery for two reasons. First, activated platelets are formidable antagonists that initiate and prolong a cascade of events that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. Dampening platelet release of proinflammatory mediators, including CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154), is essential to hinder this cascade. Second, understanding the biologic importance of platelet PPARs and the mechanism(s) by which PPARs regulate platelet activation will be imperative in designing therapeutic strategies lacking the deleterious or unwanted side effects of current treatment options. PMID:18288284

  19. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  20. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  1. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chan, Christina K; Eriksson, Inger; Johnson, Pamela Y; Cao, Xiaofang; Westöö, Christian; Norvik, Christian; Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Staffan; Hedin, Ulf; Kjellén, Lena; Wight, Thomas N; Tran-Lundmark, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal condition for which there is no effective curative pharmacotherapy. PAH is characterized by vasoconstriction, wall thickening of pulmonary arteries, and increased vascular resistance. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the vascular extracellular matrix that accumulates following vascular injury and promotes smooth-muscle cell proliferation in systemic arteries. Here, we investigated whether versican may play a similar role in PAH. Paraffin-embedded lung sections from patients who underwent lung transplantation to treat PAH were used for immunohistochemistry. The etiologies of PAH in the subjects involved in this study were idiopathic PAH, scleroderma, and congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect) with left-to-right shunt. Independent of the underlying etiology, increased versican immunostaining was observed in areas of medial thickening, in neointima, and in plexiform lesions. Western blot of lung tissue lysates confirmed accumulation of versican in patients with PAH. Double staining for versican and CD45 showed only occasional colocalization in neointima of high-grade lesions and plexiform lesions. In vitro, metabolic labeling with [(35)S]sulfate showed that human pulmonary artery smooth-muscle cells (hPASMCs) produce mainly chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. In addition, hypoxia, but not cyclic stretch, was demonstrated to increase both versican messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis by hPASMCs. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions of PAH, and the amount of versican correlates more with lesion severity than with underlying etiology or inflammation. Hypoxia is a possible regulator of versican accumulation, which may promote proliferation of pulmonary smooth-muscle cells and vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27683612

  2. The Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Heather J.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Barkovich, James A.; Glaser, Carol; Glidden, David; Hills, Nancy K.; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Wintermark, Max; deVeber, Gabrielle A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The most common cause of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in a previously healthy child is a large vessel cerebral arteriopathy. Varicella zoster virus is an established etiology, and recent data implicate a non-specific effect of additional common viral infections on cerebral vessels. The Vascular effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) study is a multicenter cohort study that will test the hypotheses that (1) infection can lead to childhood AIS by causing vascular injury, and (2) the resultant arteriopathy, and inflammatory markers, predict recurrent stroke. Methods We are prospectively enrolling 480 children (aged 1 month through 18 years) with AIS and collecting (1) extensive infectious histories (through parental interview), (2) blood and serum samples (and CSF, when clinically obtained), and (3) clinically obtained but standardized brain and cerebrovascular imaging studies. Imaging studies are being centrally reviewed and adjudicated. Centralized laboratory assays will include serologies (acute and convalescent) and molecular assays for herpes viruses, and levels of inflammatory markers. Subjects are followed prospectively for recurrent ischemic events for the duration of the study (minimum of 1 year). We are banking biological specimens (including DNA) for future studies of specific infectious agents and mediators of inflammation relevant to thrombosis and vascular injury. Analysis Plan In a cross-sectional analysis, we will use logistic regression techniques to measure the association between markers of infection (from the clinical history and laboratory assays) and cerebral arteriopathy. In a prospective cohort analysis, we will use survival analysis techniques to determine whether cerebral arteriopathy and inflammatory markers predict recurrent stroke. Conclusions VIPS will shed light on the vascular effects of infection in childhood stroke. Because arteriopathy is likely the major predictor of recurrent stroke in children, a better

  3. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christina K.; Eriksson, Inger; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Cao, Xiaofang; Westöö, Christian; Norvik, Christian; Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Staffan; Hedin, Ulf; Kjellén, Lena; Wight, Thomas N.; Tran-Lundmark, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal condition for which there is no effective curative pharmacotherapy. PAH is characterized by vasoconstriction, wall thickening of pulmonary arteries, and increased vascular resistance. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the vascular extracellular matrix that accumulates following vascular injury and promotes smooth-muscle cell proliferation in systemic arteries. Here, we investigated whether versican may play a similar role in PAH. Paraffin-embedded lung sections from patients who underwent lung transplantation to treat PAH were used for immunohistochemistry. The etiologies of PAH in the subjects involved in this study were idiopathic PAH, scleroderma, and congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect) with left-to-right shunt. Independent of the underlying etiology, increased versican immunostaining was observed in areas of medial thickening, in neointima, and in plexiform lesions. Western blot of lung tissue lysates confirmed accumulation of versican in patients with PAH. Double staining for versican and CD45 showed only occasional colocalization in neointima of high-grade lesions and plexiform lesions. In vitro, metabolic labeling with [35S]sulfate showed that human pulmonary artery smooth-muscle cells (hPASMCs) produce mainly chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. In addition, hypoxia, but not cyclic stretch, was demonstrated to increase both versican messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis by hPASMCs. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions of PAH, and the amount of versican correlates more with lesion severity than with underlying etiology or inflammation. Hypoxia is a possible regulator of versican accumulation, which may promote proliferation of pulmonary smooth-muscle cells and vascular remodeling in PAH.

  4. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease.

  5. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christina K.; Eriksson, Inger; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Cao, Xiaofang; Westöö, Christian; Norvik, Christian; Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Staffan; Hedin, Ulf; Kjellén, Lena; Wight, Thomas N.; Tran-Lundmark, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal condition for which there is no effective curative pharmacotherapy. PAH is characterized by vasoconstriction, wall thickening of pulmonary arteries, and increased vascular resistance. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the vascular extracellular matrix that accumulates following vascular injury and promotes smooth-muscle cell proliferation in systemic arteries. Here, we investigated whether versican may play a similar role in PAH. Paraffin-embedded lung sections from patients who underwent lung transplantation to treat PAH were used for immunohistochemistry. The etiologies of PAH in the subjects involved in this study were idiopathic PAH, scleroderma, and congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect) with left-to-right shunt. Independent of the underlying etiology, increased versican immunostaining was observed in areas of medial thickening, in neointima, and in plexiform lesions. Western blot of lung tissue lysates confirmed accumulation of versican in patients with PAH. Double staining for versican and CD45 showed only occasional colocalization in neointima of high-grade lesions and plexiform lesions. In vitro, metabolic labeling with [35S]sulfate showed that human pulmonary artery smooth-muscle cells (hPASMCs) produce mainly chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. In addition, hypoxia, but not cyclic stretch, was demonstrated to increase both versican messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis by hPASMCs. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions of PAH, and the amount of versican correlates more with lesion severity than with underlying etiology or inflammation. Hypoxia is a possible regulator of versican accumulation, which may promote proliferation of pulmonary smooth-muscle cells and vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27683612

  6. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  7. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution.

  8. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. PMID:27016579

  9. Systemic Inflammation in Cachexia – Is Tumor Cytokine Expression Profile the Culprit?

    PubMed Central

    de Matos-Neto, Emidio M.; Lima, Joanna D. C. C.; de Pereira, Welbert O.; Figuerêdo, Raquel G.; Riccardi, Daniela M. dos R.; Radloff, Katrin; das Neves, Rodrigo X.; Camargo, Rodolfo G.; Maximiano, Linda F.; Tokeshi, Flávio; Otoch, José P.; Goldszmid, Romina; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; de Alcântara, Paulo S. M.; Seelaender, Marília

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia affects about 80% of gastrointestinal cancer patients. This multifactorial syndrome resulting in involuntary and continuous weight loss is accompanied by systemic inflammation and immune cell infiltration in various tissues. Understanding the interactions among tumor, immune cells, and peripheral tissues could help attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, we investigated inflammation in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the tumor, in weight stable and cachectic cancer patients with same diagnosis, in order to establish correlations between tumor microenvironment and secretory pattern with adipose tissue and systemic inflammation. Infiltrating monocyte phenotypes of subcutaneous and tumor vascular-stromal fraction were identified by flow cytometry. Gene and protein expression of inflammatory and chemotactic factors was measured with qRT-PCR and Multiplex Magpix® system, respectively. Subcutaneous vascular-stromal fraction exhibited no differences in regard to macrophage subtypes, while in the tumor, the percentage of M2 macrophages was decreased in the cachectic patients, in comparison to weight-stable counterparts. CCL3, CCL4, and IL-1β expression was higher in the adipose tissue and tumor tissue in the cachectic group. In both tissues, chemotactic factors were positively correlated with IL-1β. Furthermore, positive correlations were found for the content of chemoattractants and cytokines in the tumor and adipose tissue. The results strongly suggest that the crosstalk between the tumor and peripheral tissues is more pronounced in cachectic patients, compared to weight-stable patients with the same tumor diagnosis. PMID:26732354

  10. Inflammation in pulmonary hypertension: what we know and what we could logically and safely target first.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Hautefort, Aurélie; Price, Laura; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in most of the animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and therapeutic targeting of inflammation in these models blocks PAH development. In humans, pulmonary vascular lesions of PAH are the source of cytokine and chemokine production, related to inflammatory cell recruitment and lymphoid neogenesis. Circulating autoantibodies to endothelial cells and to fibroblasts have been reported in 10-40% of patients with idiopathic PAH, suggesting a possible role for autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular lesions. Current specific PAH treatments have immunomodulatory properties, and some studies have demonstrated a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patient survival. New immunopathological approaches to PAH should enable the development of innovative treatments for this severe condition. PMID:24747559

  11. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Veld, C. de Graaf-in't; Wijk, R. Gerth van; Zijlstra, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells) and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells). This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients. PMID:18475703

  12. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  13. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  14. Tissue engineering: Perfusable vascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-09-01

    A rapid vascular casting approach that uses carbohydrate glass as a sacrificial template allows tissues to be built that can be kept alive for longer in the laboratory until needed for transplantation.

  15. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  16. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  17. Social media in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. PMID:23321344

  18. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  19. Paricalcitol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LEE, AE SIN; JUNG, YU JIN; THANH, TÙNG NGUYỄN; LEE, SIK; KIM, WON; KANG, KYUNG PYO; PARK, SUNG KWANG

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, infectious diseases and allergies. Vascular alterations are an important pathophysiological mechanism of sepsis. Experimental data suggest that paricalcitol, a vitamin D2 analogue, exerts beneficial effects on renal inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of paricalcitol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We used primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells for in vitro experiments, in which stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was used to induce endothelial cell inflammation. For in vivo experiments, myocardial inflammation was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg LPS into C57BL6 mice pre-treated with or without 0.2 µg/kg paricalcitol. Treatment with paricalcitol suppressed the TNF-α-induced increase in the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fractalkine in endothelial cells. Treatment with paricalcitol also decreased the TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding activity. In a mouse model of LPS-induced myocardial inflammation, pre-treatment with paricalcitol prevented the LPS-induced increase in the expression of myocardial ICAM-1, phosphorylated p65 and myocardial TNF-α. Pre-treatment with paricalcitol also alleviated endotoxemia-induced microvascular leakage in the myocardium. The findings of our study suggest that paricalcitol exerts a protective effect against LPS-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the expression of cell adhesion molecules and TNF-α, and by improving myocardial permeability. PMID:26954764

  20. Paricalcitol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Thanh, Tùng Nguyễn; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Park, Sung Kwang

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, infectious diseases and allergies. Vascular alterations are an important pathophysiological mechanism of sepsis. Experimental data suggest that paricalcitol, a vitamin D2 analogue, exerts beneficial effects on renal inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of paricalcitol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We used primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells for in vitro experiments, in which stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was used to induce endothelial cell inflammation. For in vivo experiments, myocardial inflammation was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg LPS into C57BL6 mice pre-treated with or without 0.2 µg/kg paricalcitol. Treatment with paricalcitol suppressed the TNF-α-induced increase in the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fractalkine in endothelial cells. Treatment with paricalcitol also decreased the TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding activity. In a mouse model of LPS-induced myocardial inflammation, pre-treatment with paricalcitol prevented the LPS-induced increase in the expression of myocardial ICAM-1, phosphorylated p65 and myocardial TNF-α. Pre-treatment with paricalcitol also alleviated endotoxemia‑induced microvascular leakage in the myocardium. The findings of our study suggest that paricalcitol exerts a protective effect against LPS-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the expression of cell adhesion molecules and TNF-α, and by improving myocardial permeability. PMID:26954764

  1. Vascular heterogeneity in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Molema, Grietje; Aird, William C

    2012-03-01

    Blood vessels and their endothelial lining are uniquely adapted to the needs of the underlying tissue. The structure and function of the vasculature varies both between and within different organs. In the kidney, the vascular architecture is designed to function both in oxygen/nutrient delivery and filtration of blood according to the homeostatic needs of the body. Here, we review spatial and temporal differences in renal vascular phenotypes in both health and disease.

  2. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis.

  3. Vascular calcification and renal bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  4. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  5. Multimodality imaging of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Vascular malformations and hemangiomas are common in children but remain a source of confusion during diagnosis, in part because of the lack of a uniform terminology. With the existing treatments for hemangiomas and vascular malformations, it is important to make the correct diagnosis initially to prevent adverse physical and emotional sequelae in not only the child but also the family. The diagnosis of vascular malformations is made primarily by the clinician and based on the physical exam. Imaging is carried out using predominantly ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which are complementary modalities. In most cases of vascular anomalies, US is the first line of imaging as it is readily available, less expensive, lacks ionizing radiation and does not require sedation. MRI is also of great help for further characterizing the lesions. Conventional arteriography is reserved for cases that require therapeutic intervention, more commonly for arteriovenous malformations. Radiographs usually play no role in diagnosing vascular anomalies in children. In this article, the author describes the terminology and types of hemangiomas and vascular malformations and their clinical, histological features, as well as the imaging approach and appearance.

  6. [COPD: bronchial and systemic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Macario, Ciro Casanova; de Torres Tajes, Juan Pablo; Córdoba Lanus, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is considered to be an inflammatory disease of the airways, in which there can be low-grade systemic inflammation. The etiology of this disease is multifactorial but is mainly due to an anomalous and amplified inflammatory response to tobacco smoke. This inflammatory response involves innate and acquired immunity. The latter is characterized by a Th1-type (CD8) response and its presence seems to be associated with progression to advanced stages of the disease. Currently, it is unknown whether bronchial and systemic inflammation are related or whether they act as independent compartments. Most of the available data on COPD are drawn from cross-sectional studies and consequently a causal relation between the possible inflammatory mediators and the genetic factors involved in pulmonary and extrapulmonary involvement in this disease cannot be established. Further studies are required that would allow the inflammatory response to be correlated with the distinct COPD phenotypes.

  7. Obesity, inflammation, and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obesity has become a universal and major public health problem with increasing prevalence in both adults and children in the 21st century, even in developing countries. Extensive epidemiological studies reveal a strong link between obesity and development and progression of various types of cancers. The connection between obesity and liver cancer is particularly strong and obesity often results in liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is characterized by fatty liver inflammation and is believed to cause fibrosis and cirrhosis. The latter is a known liver cancer risk factor. In fact due to its much higher prevalence obesity may be a more substantial contributor to overall hepatocellular carcinoma burden than infection with hepatitis viruses. Here we review and discuss recent advances in elucidation of cellular and molecular alterations and signaling pathways associated with obesity and liver inflammation and their contribution to hepatocarcinogenesis.

  8. Age-related changes in monocytes exacerbate neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Laisel; Gomez, Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.

    2015-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is the leading cause of restenosis after endovascular interventions. It is characterized by the accumulation of myofibroblast-like cells and extracellular matrix in the innermost layer of the wall and is exacerbated by inflammation. Monocytes from either young or aged rats were applied perivascularly to injured vascular walls of young recipient animals. Monocytes from aged rats, but not young donors, increased neointima thickness. Accordingly, the gene expression profiles of CD11b+ monocytes from aged rats showed significant up-regulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, lipid degradation, cytotoxicity, differentiation, and inflammation. These included cadherin 13 (Cdh13), colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 (Cxcl1), endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (Esam), and interferon gamma (Ifng). In conclusion, our results suggest that the increased inflammatory and adhesive profile of monocytes contributes to pathological wall remodeling in aged-related vascular diseases. PMID:25965835

  9. Steroid hormones and the stroma-vascular cells of the adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Volat, Fanny; Bouloumié, Anne

    2013-09-01

    The stroma-vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue (AT) is a heterogeneous cell fraction composed of progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and immune cells. SVF plays a key role in AT homeostasis and growth as well as in obesity-associated pathologies. The SVF cell composition and phenotype are distinct according to AT location and adiposity. Such discrepancies influence AT function and are involved in obesity-associated disorders such as chronic inflammation. Investigations performed in recent years in rodents and humans provided evidence that the stroma-vascular cells contribute to the conversion of steroid hormones in AT and are also steroid targets. This review describes the link between steroids and SVF depending on gender, adiposity, and AT location and highlights the potential role of sex and corticosteroid hormones in adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and their contributions in AT inflammation.

  10. Subclinical Inflammation and Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Christian; Lankisch, Mark; Ziegler, Dan; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Thorand, Barbara; Holle, Rolf; Giani, Guido; Martin, Stephan; Meisinger, Christa

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Subclinical inflammation represents a risk factor of type 2 diabetes and several diabetes complications, but data on diabetic neuropathies are scarce. Therefore, we investigated whether circulating concentrations of acute-phase proteins, cytokines, and chemokines differ among diabetic patients with or without diabetic polyneuropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured 10 markers of subclinical inflammation in 227 type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic polyneuropathy who participated in the population-based MONICA/KORA Survey F3 (2004–2005; Augsburg, Germany). Diabetic polyneuropathy was diagnosed using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). RESULTS After adjustment for multiple confounders, high levels of C-reactive protein and interleukin (IL)-6 were most consistently associated with diabetic polyneuropathy, high MNSI score, and specific neuropathic deficits, whereas some inverse associations were seen for IL-18. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that subclinical inflammation is associated with diabetic polyneuropathy and neuropathic impairments. This association appears rather specific because only certain immune mediators and impairments are involved. PMID:19131463

  11. Chronic Inflammation in Skin Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked to the development and progression of multiple cancers, including those of the lung, stomach, liver, colon, breast and skin. Inflammation not only drives the oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells under the stress of chronic infection and autoimmune diseases, but also promotes the growth, progression and metastatic spread of cancers. Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are comprised of a diverse population of myeloid and immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B cells, and others. Different myeloid and lymphoid cells within tumor microenvironment exert diverse, often contradicting, effects during skin cancer development and progression. The nature of tumor-immune interaction determines the rate of cancer progression and the outcome of cancer treatment. Inflammatory environment within skin tumor also inhibits naturally occurring anti-tumor immunity and limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. In this article we aim to give an overview on the mechanism by which inflammation interferes with the development and therapeutic intervention of cancers, especially those of the skin.

  12. Low-grade inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients before the start of renal replacement therapy: sources and consequences.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, M I; Carrero, J J; Axelsson, J; Lindholm, B; Stenvinkel, P

    2007-07-01

    Low-grade inflammation is a common feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD) already before the start of renal replacement therapy, and evidence suggests that persistent inflammation may also be per se a risk factor for progression of CKD and vascular disease. Many factors, including retention of pro-inflammatory cytokines, advanced glycation end products, reactive oxygen species, autonomic dysfunctions and volume overload may contribute to inflammation when renal function declines. The aim of the present review is to summarize the causes and consequences of a chronic inflammatory state in the CKD population before start of renal replacement therapy, with special emphasis in polymorphnuclear leukocyte priming, which may be a key mediator in the induction of a vicious circle of oxidative stress and inflammation in CKD. A more thorough characterization of uremic retention solutes with regard to their specific pro- and anti-inflammatory properties is needed.

  13. The prowess of platelets in immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Rory R

    2016-09-27

    Platelets not only serve as essential haemostatic cells, they also have important roles in immune defence and inflammation. Despite not having a nucleus, platelets contain physiologically relevant amounts of RNA, which can be spliced and translated into functional proteins. In addition, platelets have the ability to bind to numerous other cells, such as leukocytes and vascular cells. During those interactions, platelets can modulate cellular responses, resulting in e. g. inflammatory activation or apoptosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that platelets can influence the outcomes of bacterial and viral infection, as well as the extent of tissue injury after ischaemia. Platelets also carry considerable amounts of cytokines and growth factors in their secretory granules, preformed for rapid secretion. Those properties in combination with the sheer amount of platelets circulating in the blood stream make them an important force in the immune response during health and disease. In this overview, recent findings concerning those interesting properties of platelets beyond haemostasis are discussed.

  14. Inflammatory, metabolic, and genetic mechanisms of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Demer, Linda L; Tintut, Yin

    2014-04-01

    This review centers on updating the active research area of vascular calcification. This pathology underlies substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through adverse mechanical effects on vascular compliance, vasomotion, and, most likely, plaque stability. Biomineralization is a complex, regulated process occurring widely throughout nature. Decades ago, its presence in the vasculature was considered a mere curiosity and an unregulated, dystrophic process that does not involve biological mechanisms. Although it remains controversial whether the process has any adaptive value or past evolutionary advantage, substantial advances have been made in understanding the biological mechanisms driving the process. Different types of calcific vasculopathy, such as inflammatory versus metabolic, have parallel mechanisms in skeletal bone calcification, such as intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Recent work has identified important regulatory roles for inflammation, oxidized lipids, elastin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprogenitor cells, matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein, transglutaminase, osteoclastic regulatory factors, phosphate regulatory hormones and receptors, apoptosis, prelamin A, autophagy, and microvesicles or microparticles similar to the matrix vesicles of skeletal bone. Recent work has uncovered fascinating interactions between matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein, vitamin K, warfarin, and transport proteins. And, lastly, recent breakthroughs in inherited forms of calcific vasculopathy have identified the genes responsible as well as an unexpected overlap of phenotypes. Until recently, vascular calcification was considered a purely degenerative, unregulated process. Since then, investigative groups around the world have identified a wide range of causative mechanisms and regulatory pathways, and some of the recent developments are highlighted in this review.

  15. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  16. Early experience on peripheral vascular application of the vascular plugs

    PubMed Central

    Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Sinha, Alok Kumar; Kamana, Naveen Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter closure of various congenital and acquired vascular malformations with Amplatzer Vascular plugs I and II has been established. Here we present our experience with device closure. Materials and methods Between October 2006 and August 2012, nine (three males and six females) patients aged between 11 months and 62 years (mean age 19 years) underwent percutaneous device closure with AVP I and II vascular plugs for congenital and acquired arteriovenous malformation and cardiac diverticulum are presented here. Results One case of coronary cameral fistula, four cases of pulmonary arteriovenous fistula, one case of large major aortopulmonary collaterals (in tetralogy of Fallot closed before intracardiac repair), one case of congenital cardiac diverticulum, one case of fistula between external carotid artery and internal jugular vein and one case of iatrogenic carotid jugular fistula were successfully closed with AVP I and II plugs. Overall in nine cases, 16 AVP I and II plugs were deployed to occlude feeding vessels and one cardiac diverticulum. The technical success rate was 100%. No major complications were observed. Conclusion Amplatzer vascular plugs can be used successfully for closure of various congenital and acquired vascular malformations with good result. PMID:24206877

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  18. Effect of Vitamin E and Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Protecting Ambient PM2.5-Induced Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Liang; Jiang, Shuo; Xie, Yuquan; Kan, Haidong; Song, Weimin; Zhao, Jinzhuo

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanisms linking cardiopulmonary diseases to ambient fine particles (PM2.5) are still unclear, inflammation and oxidative stress play important roles in PM2.5-induced injury. It is well known that inflammation and oxidative stress could be restricted by vitamin E (Ve) or omega-3 fatty acids (Ω-3 FA) consumption. This study investigated the effects of Ve and Ω-3 FA on PM2.5-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in vascular endothelial cells. The underlying mechanisms linking PM2.5 to vascular endothelial injury were also explored. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with 50 μg/mL PM2.5 in the presence or absence of different concentrations of Ve and Ω-3 FA. The inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers were determined. The results showed that Ve induced a significant decrease in PM2.5-induced inflammation and oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) in supernatant and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytoplasm decreased by Ve, while the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity elevated. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) also reduced by Ve. Moreover, Ω-3 FA played the same role on decreasing the inflammation and oxidative stress. IL-6 and TNF-α expressions were significantly lower in combined Ve with Ω-3 FA than treatment with Ve or Ω-3 FA alone. The Ve and Ω-3 FA intervention might abolish the PM2.5-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. There might be an additive effect of these two nutrients in mediating the PM2.5-induced injury in vascular endothelial cells. The results suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress might be parts of the mechanisms linking PM2.5 to vascular endothelial injury. PMID:27007186

  19. Vascular tissue engineering: towards the next generation vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Duncan, Daniel; Hibino, Narutoshi; Solomon, Daniel; Cleary, Muriel; Rathore, Animesh; Fein, Corey; Church, Spencer; Breuer, Christopher

    2011-04-30

    The application of tissue engineering technology to cardiovascular surgery holds great promise for improving outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Currently used synthetic vascular grafts have several limitations including thrombogenicity, increased risk of infection, and lack of growth potential. We have completed the first clinical trial evaluating the feasibility of using tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVG) created by seeding autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) onto biodegradable tubular scaffolds. Despite an excellent safety profile, data from the clinical trial suggest that the primary graft related complication of the TEVG is stenosis, affecting approximately 16% of grafts within the first seven years after implantation. Continued investigation into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying vascular neotissue formation will improve our basic understanding and provide insights that will enable the rationale design of second generation TEVG. PMID:21421015

  20. Vascular changes in hard palate sialolipoma: Sialoangiolipoma or vascular malformation?

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Palate sialolipomas are rare. Less than 10 cases located in the hard palate are reported to our knowledge. We report a case of hard palate sialolipoma, peculiar by the intratumor vascular patterns. A 67-year-old man presented with a 1.5 cm lesion of the oral hard palate. The lesion was surgically resected. On microscopy, the lesion, partly encapsulated, consisted of a proliferation of mature adipocytes containing normal minor salivary gland tissue and branching intratumoral vessels of varied size with irregularly thickened wall and papillary projections or tufts. The microscopic features of the tumor we report suggest that vascular malformation-like patterns may occur in sialolipomas of the hard palate. This morphological vascular peculiarity should be acknowledged since it may represent source of hemorrhage. PMID:26604516

  1. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  2. Pulmonary vascular and alveolar development in preterm lambs chronically colonized with Ureaplasma parvum

    PubMed Central

    Polglase, Graeme R.; Dalton, Richard G. B.; Nitsos, Ilias; Knox, Christine L.; Pillow, J. Jane; Jobe, Alan H.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Newnham, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Ureaplasma species, the most commonly isolated microorganisms in women with chorioamnionitis, are associated with preterm delivery. Chorioamnionitis increases the risk and severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is not known whether the timing of exposure to inflammation in utero is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We hypothesized that chronic inflammation would alter the pulmonary air space and vascular development after 70 days of exposure to infection. Pregnant ewes were given intra-amniotic injection of Ureaplasma parvum serovars 3 or 6 at low (2 × 104 cfu) or high doses (2 × 107 cfu) or media (controls) at 55 days gestational age. Fetuses were delivered at 125 days (term = 150 days). U. parvum was grown from the lungs of all exposed fetuses, and neutrophils and monocytes were increased in the air spaces. Lung mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-8, but not IL-6, was modestly increased in U. parvum-exposed fetuses. U. parvum exposure increased surfactant and improved lung gas volumes. The changes in lung inflammation and maturation were independent of serovar or dose. Exposure to U. parvum did not change multiple indices of air space or vascular development. Parenchymal elastin and collagen content were similar between groups. Expression of several endothelial proteins and pulmonary resistance arteriolar media thickness were also not different between groups. We conclude that chronic exposure to U. parvum does not cause sustained effects on air space or vascular development in premature lambs. PMID:20495079

  3. Vascular effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Svyatoslav N.; Kopayeva, V. G.; Andreev, J. B.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Suchin, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular effect of PDT has been studied in patients with corneal vascularized leucomas (10 patients) and in patients with corneal neovascularized transplant (3 patients). For vascularized leucomas the method of photodynamic therapy consisted of the local injection of dimegin (deiteroporphyrin derivative) into the space of the newly-formed vessels under operating microscope (opton) with the microneedle (diameter 200 microns) and corneal irradiation by the operating microscope light. For corneal neovascularized transplant the injection of photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) intravenously were made with subsequent irradiation by light of dye laser (5 hours after the injection) with light density of 150 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes. In all the cases at the time of irradiation the aggregated blood flow was appeared, followed by blood flow stasis. In postoperative period the vessels disintegrated into separate fragments which disappeared completely after 10 - 15 days. Taking into account the data of light microscopy, the disappearance of the vessels took place as a result of the vascular endothelium lisis along the vascular walls. Neovascularized cornea and newly-formed vessels in tumor stroms have much in common. The vessel alterations study presented in this paper, may serve to specify the mechanism of photodynamic destruction of neovascularized stroma of tumor.

  4. Vascular potassium channels in NVC.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K

    2016-01-01

    It has long been proposed that the external potassium ion ([K(+)]0) works as a potent vasodilator in the dynamic regulation of local cerebral blood flow. Astrocytes may play a central role for producing K(+) outflow possibly through calcium-activated potassium channels on the end feet, responding to a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which might well reflect local neuronal activity. A mild elevation of [K(+)]0 in the end feet/vascular smooth muscle space could activate Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase concomitant with inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to a hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle and relaxation of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels. Also proposed notion is endothelial calcium-activated potassium channels and/or inwardly rectifying potassium channel-mediated hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle. A larger elevation of [K(+)]0, which may occur pathophysiologically in such as spreading depression or stroke, can trigger a depolarization of vascular smooth muscle cells and vasoconstriction instead. PMID:27130411

  5. Human mesenchymal stem cells attenuate experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia induced by perinatal inflammation and hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Li, Yuan-Tsung; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic maternal inflammation and neonatal hyperoxia arrest alveolarization in neonates. The aims were to test whether human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduce lung inflammation and improve lung development in perinatal inflammation- and hyperoxia-induced experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Methods: Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.5 mg/kg/day) on Gestational Days 20 and 21. Human MSCs (3×105 and 1×106 cells) in 0.03 ml normal saline (NS) were administered intratracheally on Postnatal Day 5. Pups were reared in room air (RA) or an oxygen-enriched atmosphere (O2) from Postnatal Days 1 to 14, and six study groups were obtained: LPS+RA+NS, LPS+RA+MSC (3×105 cells), LPS+RA+MSC (1×106 cells), LPS+O2+NS, LPS+O2+MSC (3×105 cells), and LPS+O2+MSC (1×106 cells). The lungs were excised for cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression, and histological analyses on Postnatal Day 14. Results: Body weight was significantly lower in rats reared in hyperoxia than in those reared in RA. The LPS+O2+NS group exhibited a significantly higher mean linear intercept (MLI) and collagen density and a significantly lower vascular density than the LPS+RA+NS group did. Administering MSC to hyperoxia-exposed rats improved MLI and vascular density and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels and collagen density to normoxic levels. This improvement in lung development and fibrosis was accompanied by an increase and decrease in lung VEGF and CTGF expression, respectively. Conclusion: Human MSCs attenuated perinatal inflammation- and hyperoxia-induced defective alveolarization and angiogenesis and reduced lung fibrosis, likely through increased VEGF and decreased CTGF expression. PMID:27158330

  6. Classical cardiovascular disease risk factors associate with vascular function and morphology in rheumatoid arthritis: a six-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). An early manifestation of CVD is endothelial dysfunction which can lead to functional and morphological vascular abnormalities. Classical CVD risk factors and inflammation are both implicated in causing endothelial dysfunction in RA. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of baseline inflammation, cumulative inflammation, and classical CVD risk factors on the vasculature following a six-year follow-up period. Methods A total of 201 RA patients (155 females, median age (25th to 75th percentile): 61 years (53 to 67)) were examined at baseline (2006) for presence of classical CVD risk factors and determination of inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). At follow-up (2012) patients underwent assessments of microvascular and macrovascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, along with assessment of carotid atherosclerosis. The CRP and ESR were recorded from the baseline study visit to the follow-up visit for each patient to calculate cumulative inflammatory burden. Results Classical CVD risk factors, but not RA disease-related inflammation, predicted microvascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, macrovascular endothelium-independent function and carotid atherosclerosis. These findings were similar in a sub-group of patients free from CVD, and not receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors or biologics. Cumulative inflammation was not associated with microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function, but a weak association was apparent between area under the curve for CRP and carotid atherosclerosis. Conclusions Classical CVD risk factors may be better long-term predictors of vascular function and morphology than systemic disease-related inflammation in patients with RA. Further studies are needed to

  7. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  8. Pulsed dye laser application in ablation of vascular ectasias of the larynx: a preliminary animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Peak; Wang, Zhi; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; McMillan, Kathleen; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1995-05-01

    Vascular ectasias (dilatation) and vascular lesions of the larynx are difficult to treat with exciting modalities. Varix (enlarged vessel) of the vocal folds, vocal fold hemorrhage, vascular polyp, hemangioma, intubation or contact granuloma are common problems which disturb voice. Current applications of CO2 laser and cautery often damage the delicate vocal fold cover. The 585 nm dermatologic pulsed dye laser may be an ideal substitute. Two adult canines were examined under anesthesia via microlaryngoscopy technique. Pulsed dye laser (SPTL-1a, Candela Laser Corp., Wayland, MA) energy was delivered via the micromanipulator with the 3.1-mm spot size in single pulses of 6, 8, and 10 Joules/cm2 and applied to the vessels of the vocal folds, epiglottis, and arytenoid cartilage. Endoscopic examination was carried out immediately after the treatment and at 4 weeks postoperatively. The animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks, larynges excised, and whole organ laryngeal section were prepared for histology. Pulsed dye laser thrombosed vessels of the vocal fold using 6 or 8 Joules/cm2. Vascular break and leakage occurred at 10 Joules/cm2. Follow up examination showed excellent vessel obliteration or thrombosis without scarring or injury to the overlying tissues. Histologic examination shows vascular thrombosis without inflammation and fibrosis in the vocal fold cover. Pulsed dye laser may have promise in treatment of vascular lesions of the larynx and upper airway.

  9. Impact of Cocoa Consumption on Inflammation Processes—A Critical Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ellinger, Sabine; Stehle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cocoa flavanols have strong anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. If these also occur in vivo, cocoa consumption may contribute to the prevention or treatment of diseases mediated by chronic inflammation. This critical review judged the evidence for such effects occurring after cocoa consumption. Methods: A literature search in Medline was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of cocoa consumption on inflammatory biomarkers. Results: Thirty-three RCTs were included, along with 9 bolus and 24 regular consumption studies. Acute cocoa consumption decreased adhesion molecules and 4-series leukotrienes in serum, nuclear factor κB activation in leukocytes, and the expression of CD62P and CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils. In healthy subjects and in patients with cardiovascular diseases, most regular consumption trials did not find any changes except for a decreased number of endothelial microparticles, but several cellular and humoral inflammation markers decreased in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glucose. Conclusions: Little evidence exists that consumption of cocoa-rich food may reduce inflammation, probably by lowering the activation of monocytes and neutrophils. The efficacy seems to depend on the extent of the basal inflammatory burden. Further well-designed RCTs with inflammation as the primary outcome are needed, focusing on specific markers of leukocyte activation and considering endothelial microparticles as marker of vascular inflammation. PMID:27240397

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in the joint: contributions to pain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David A; Mapp, Paul I; Kelly, Sara

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis is the commonest cause of disabling chronic pain, and both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain major burdens on both individuals and society. Peripheral release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) contributes to the vasodilation of acute neurogenic inflammation. Contributions of CGRP to the pain and inflammation of chronic arthritis, however, are only recently being elucidated. Animal models of arthritis are revealing the molecular and pathophysiological events that accompany and lead to progression of both arthritis and pain. Peripheral actions of CGRP in the joint might contribute to both inflammation and joint afferent sensitization. CGRP and its specific receptors are expressed in joint afferents and up-regulated following arthritis induction. Peripheral CGRP release results in activation of synovial vascular cells, through which acute vasodilatation is followed by endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis, key features of chronic inflammation. Local administration of CGRP to the knee also increases mechanosensitivity of joint afferents, mimicking peripheral sensitization seen in arthritic joints. Increased mechanosensitivity in OA knees and pain behaviour can be reduced by peripherally acting CGRP receptor antagonists. Effects of CGRP pathway blockade on arthritic joint afferents, but not in normal joints, suggest contributions to sensitization rather than normal joint nociception. CGRP therefore might make key contributions to the transition from normal to persistent synovitis, and the progression from nociception to sensitization. Targeting CGRP or its receptors within joint tissues to prevent these undesirable transitions during early arthritis, or suppress them in established disease, might prevent persistent inflammation and relieve arthritis pain.

  11. The antidiabetic agent glibenclamide protects airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Zhang, Shufang; Cai, Zhijian; Hu, Xinlei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Wang, Yong; Li, Na; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-04-01

    Glibenclamide has a newly discovered role in inflammation regulation besides its antidiabetic effect. As an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, glibenclamide antagonizes the relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle. This indicates that glibenclamide might attenuate airway inflammation while aggravate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthmatics. Clinically, many diabetics with asthma are prescribed with glibenclamide to control blood glucose. However, whether glibenclamide could exert any effects on asthmatic inflammation remains unknown. Using an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse model of asthma, we evaluated the effects of glibenclamide on the AHR and inflammation. Interestingly, glibenclamide reduced all the cardinal features of asthma in OVA-challenged mice, including AHR, airway inflammation, and T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines. Glibenclamide also downregulated OVA-induced expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (p-STAT6) in the lung. In addition, increased sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) expression in the lung was observed after the OVA challenge. These findings suggest that the classic sulfonylurea glibenclamide plays an important protective role in the development of asthma, which not only provides the evidence for the safety of prescribed glibenclamide in diabetics combined with asthma but also indicates a possible new therapeutic for asthma via targeting glibenclamide-related pathways.

  12. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  13. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  14. MK2 inhibitor reduces alkali burn-induced inflammation in rat cornea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanfeng; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhang, Xiaobo; Yang, Shu; Peng, Gao; Wu, Ting; Zhou, Yueping; Huang, Caihong; Reinach, Peter S.; Li, Wei; Liu, Zuguo

    2016-01-01

    MK2 activation by p38 MAPK selectively induces inflammation in various diseases. We determined if a MK2 inhibitor (MK2i), improves cornea wound healing by inhibiting inflammation caused by burning rat corneas with alkali. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that MK2i inhibited alkali burn-induced MK2 activation as well as rises in inflammation based on: a) blunting rises in inflammatory index, inflammatory cell infiltration, ED1+ macrophage and PMN+ neutrophil infiltration; b) suppressing IL-6 and IL-1β gene expression along with those of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1); c) reducing angiogenic gene expression levels and neovascularization (NV) whereas anti-angiogenic PEDF levels increased. In addition, this study found that MK2i did not affect human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) proliferation and migration and had no detectable side effects on ocular surface integrity. Taken together, MK2i selectively inhibited alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation by blocking MK2 activation, these effects have clinical relevance in the treatment of inflammation related ocular surface diseases. PMID:27329698

  15. Inflammation in end-stage renal failure: could it be treated?

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter

    2002-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by an exceptional mortality rate, much of which is the result of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although traditional risk factors are common in ESRD patients, they may not be sufficient alone to account for the high prevalence of CVD in this condition. Recent evidence demonstrates that chronic inflammation, a non-traditional risk factor which is observed commonly in ESRD patients, may cause malnutrition and progressive atherosclerotic CVD by several pathogenetic mechanisms. The causes of inflammation in ESRD are multifactorial and, while it may reflect underlying CVD, an acute-phase reaction may also be a direct cause of vascular injury by several pathogenetic mechanisms. Available data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines play a central role in the genesis of both malnutrition and CVD in ESRD. Thus, it could be speculated that suppression of the vicious cycle of malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis (MIA) would improve survival in dialysis patients. Recent evidence has demonstrated strong associations between inflammation and both increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in ESRD patients. As there is as yet no recognized, or even proposed, treatment for ESRD patients with chronic inflammation, it would be of obvious interest to study the long-term effect of various anti-inflammatory treatment strategies on the nutritional and cardiovascular status as well as the outcome in these patients.

  16. The role of inflammation in coronary artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Chen-Gang; Yu, Bing; Liu, Ya-Xin; Yu, Meng-Yue

    2007-12-01

    Vascular calcification is an age-dependent, common finding in human coronary arteries and begins as early as the second decade of life, just after fatty streak formation. Previous studies have showed that the severity of coronary calcification is closely related to atherosclerotic plaque burden and cardiac event rate. In the past few decades, coronary calcification has been considered passive and degenerative. With recent clinical and basic research, however, there is increasing recognition that coronary calcification is an active, regulated process. Current diagnostic methods for coronary artery calcification (CAC) are usually traditional coronary angiography, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) while treatment for patients with calcified coronary arteries is troublesome. Several lines of evidence suggest that inflammation plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis as well as its clinical manifestations. Recent study showed that inflammatory process might be also involved in coronary calcification. Accordingly, measurements of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) may in part reflect indices of atherosclerosis, such as coronary calcification, and are likely to provide distinct information regarding cardiovascular risk. In this article, we review the current evidence of relationship between coronary calcification and inflammation for purpose of drawing the more attention on the inflammatory mechanism of coronary calcification, which may change our research as well as therapeutic strategies for coronary calcification in the future. PMID:17964226

  17. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: development, functions, and role in atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specialized subset of DCs that links innate and adaptive immunity. They sense viral and bacterial pathogens and release high levels of Type I interferons (IFN-I) in response to infection. pDCs were shown to contribute to inflammatory responses in the steady state and in pathology. In atherosclerosis, pDCs are involved in priming vascular inflammation and atherogenesis through production of IFN-I and chemokines that attract inflammatory cells to inflamed sites. pDCs also contribute to the proinflammatory activation of effector T cells, cytotoxic T cells, and conventional DCs. However, tolerogenic populations of pDCs are found that suppress atherosclerosis-associated inflammation through down-regulation of function and proliferation of proinflammatory T cell subsets and induction of regulatory T cells with potent immunomodulatory properties. Notably, atheroprotective tolerogenic DCs could be induced by certain self-antigens or bacterial antigens that suggests for great therapeutic potential of these DCs for development of DC-based anti-atherogenic vaccines. PMID:25120492

  18. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  19. Treatment with olopatadine and naphazoline hydrochloride reduces allergic conjunctivitis in mice through alterations in inflammation, NGF and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Quan, Lin; He, Hua

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate whether olopatadine and naphazoline hydrochloride reduce allergic conjunctivitis in mice through alterations in inflammation, NGF and VEGF. An allergic conjunctivitis mouse model was established using histamine or an antigen (ovalbumin), following which mice were treated with 1% olopatadine solution and/or 0.2 mg/ml of naphazoline hydrochloride. Histamine or antigen‑induced conjunctival vascular hyperpermeability was examined and the levels of inflammatory factors, cytokines, IgE, GMCSF and NGF were a