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Sample records for macrophages rapid killing

  1. Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: rapid killing accompanying phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    The kinetics of bactericidal activity of activated macrophages can be precisely described by a mathematical model in which phagocytosis, killing, digestion, and release of degraded bacterial material are considered to occur continuously. To gain a better understanding of these events, I have determined the period of time between first contact of bacteria with macrophages and the onset of killing. Activated rat peritoneal macrophages were incubated for various times up to 15 min with Listeria monocytogenes previously labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine and the unassociated bacteria removed by two centrifugations through a density interface. Both cell-associated radioactivity and cell-associated viable bacteria, determined as colony forming units after sonication of the cell pellet, increased with time of incubation. However, the specific viability of these bacteria, expressed as the ratio of number of viable bacteria per unit radioactivity declined with time, as an approximate inverse exponential, after a lag period of 2.9 +/- 0.8 min. Evidence is given that other possible causes for this decline in specific viability, other than death of the bacteria, such as preferential ingestion of dead Listeria, clumping of bacteria, variations in autolytic activity, or release of Listericidins are unlikely. I conclude therefore that activated macrophages kill Listeria approximately 3 min after the cell and the bacterium first make contact.

  2. On the killing of mycobacteria by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jordao, Luisa; Bleck, Christopher K E; Mayorga, Luis; Griffiths, Gareth; Anes, Elsa

    2008-02-01

    Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacteria are internalized into macrophage phagosomes. Whereas the non-pathogenic types are invariably killed by all macrophages, the pathogens generally survive and grow. Here, we addressed the survival, production of nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and intracellular trafficking of the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, the pathogen-like, BCG and the pathogenic M. bovis in different mouse, human and bovine macrophages. The bacteriocidal effects of RNI were restricted for all bacterial species to the early stages of infection. EM analysis showed clearly that all the mycobacteria remained within phagosomes even at late times of infection. The fraction of BCG and M. bovis found in mature phagolysosomes rarely exceeded 10% of total, irrespective of whether bacteria were growing, latent or being killed, with little correlation between the extent of phagosome maturation and the degree of killing. Theoretical modelling of our data identified two different potential sets of explanations that are consistent with our results. The model we favour is one in which a small but significant fraction of BCG is killed in an early phagosome, then maturation of a small fraction of phagosomes with both live and killed bacteria, followed by extremely rapid killing and digestion of the bacteria in phago-lysosomes.

  3. Macrophage elastase kills bacteria within murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Houghton, A McGarry; Hartzell, William O; Robbins, Clinton S; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-07-30

    Macrophages are aptly positioned to function as the primary line of defence against invading pathogens in many organs, including the lung and peritoneum. Their ability to phagocytose and clear microorganisms has been well documented. Macrophages possess several substances with which they can kill bacteria, including reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and antimicrobial proteins. We proposed that macrophage-derived proteinases may contribute to the antimicrobial properties of macrophages. Macrophage elastase (also known as matrix metalloproteinase 12 or MMP12) is an enzyme predominantly expressed in mature tissue macrophages and is implicated in several disease processes, including emphysema. Physiological functions for MMP12 have not been described. Here we show that Mmp12(-/-) mice exhibit impaired bacterial clearance and increased mortality when challenged with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria at macrophage-rich portals of entry, such as the peritoneum and lung. Intracellular stores of MMP12 are mobilized to macrophage phagolysosomes after the ingestion of bacterial pathogens. Once inside phagolysosomes, MMP12 adheres to bacterial cell walls where it disrupts cellular membranes resulting in bacterial death. The antimicrobial properties of MMP12 do not reside within its catalytic domain, but rather within the carboxy-terminal domain. This domain contains a unique four amino acid sequence on an exposed beta loop of the protein that is required for the observed antimicrobial activity. The present study represents, to our knowledge, the first report of direct antimicrobial activity by a matrix metallopeptidase, and describes a new antimicrobial peptide that is sequentially and structurally unique in nature.

  4. Inability to sustain intraphagolysosomal killing of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to bacterial persistence in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jubrail, Jamil; Morris, Paul; Bewley, Martin A.; Stoneham, Simon; Johnston, Simon A.; Foster, Simon J.; Peden, Andrew A.; Read, Robert C.; Marriott, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are critical effectors of the early innate response to bacteria in tissues. Phagocytosis and killing of bacteria are interrelated functions essential for bacterial clearance but the rate‐limiting step when macrophages are challenged with large numbers of the major medical pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is unknown. We show that macrophages have a finite capacity for intracellular killing and fail to match sustained phagocytosis with sustained microbial killing when exposed to large inocula of S. aureus (Newman, SH1000 and USA300 strains). S. aureus ingestion by macrophages is associated with a rapid decline in bacterial viability immediately after phagocytosis. However, not all bacteria are killed in the phagolysosome, and we demonstrate reduced acidification of the phagolysosome, associated with failure of phagolysosomal maturation and reduced activation of cathepsin D. This results in accumulation of viable intracellular bacteria in macrophages. We show macrophages fail to engage apoptosis‐associated bacterial killing. Ultittop mately macrophages with viable bacteria undergo cell lysis, and viable bacteria are released and can be internalized by other macrophages. We show that cycles of lysis and reuptake maintain a pool of viable intracellular bacteria over time when killing is overwhelmed and demonstrate intracellular persistence in alveolar macrophages in the lungs in a murine model. PMID:26248337

  5. Inability to sustain intraphagolysosomal killing of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to bacterial persistence in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jubrail, Jamil; Morris, Paul; Bewley, Martin A; Stoneham, Simon; Johnston, Simon A; Foster, Simon J; Peden, Andrew A; Read, Robert C; Marriott, Helen M; Dockrell, David H

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical effectors of the early innate response to bacteria in tissues. Phagocytosis and killing of bacteria are interrelated functions essential for bacterial clearance but the rate-limiting step when macrophages are challenged with large numbers of the major medical pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is unknown. We show that macrophages have a finite capacity for intracellular killing and fail to match sustained phagocytosis with sustained microbial killing when exposed to large inocula of S. aureus (Newman, SH1000 and USA300 strains). S. aureus ingestion by macrophages is associated with a rapid decline in bacterial viability immediately after phagocytosis. However, not all bacteria are killed in the phagolysosome, and we demonstrate reduced acidification of the phagolysosome, associated with failure of phagolysosomal maturation and reduced activation of cathepsin D. This results in accumulation of viable intracellular bacteria in macrophages. We show macrophages fail to engage apoptosis-associated bacterial killing. Ultittop mately macrophages with viable bacteria undergo cell lysis, and viable bacteria are released and can be internalized by other macrophages. We show that cycles of lysis and reuptake maintain a pool of viable intracellular bacteria over time when killing is overwhelmed and demonstrate intracellular persistence in alveolar macrophages in the lungs in a murine model.

  6. Killing of Pseudomonas pseudomallei by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and peritoneal macrophages from chicken, sheep, swine and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Markova, N; Kussovski, V; Radoucheva, T

    1998-07-01

    Differences in the kinetics of Pseudomonas pseudomallei killing by peritoneal macrophages (PM) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) from chickens, sheep, swine and rabbits were found. P. pseudomallei was rapidly killed by porcine PM and PMNL. However the bacterial killing by ovine and lapine PM and PMNL proceeded at a slower rate. In contrast, chicken PM and PMNL ingested and killed the lowest number of P. pseudomallei bacteria. The differences in the bactericidal activity of PM and PMNL from different animal species correlated with the level of their acid phosphatase and glycolytic activity.

  7. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  8. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen. PMID:26632348

  9. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  10. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  11. Measurement of bacterial ingestion and killing by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Drevets, Douglas A; Canono, Beth P; Campbell, Priscilla A

    2015-04-01

    This unit presents assays that allow accurate measurement of phagocytosis and killing of bacteria by macrophages. The first basic protocol describes how to measure the ability of macrophages to ingest bacteria. Importantly, because macrophage phagocytosis entails separate binding and internalization steps, assays are described here that will also determine the extent to which bacteria bound to the macrophage are in fact internalized. Two effective methods to do this are described in alternate protocols. Both of these alternate protocols rely on enumeration of differentially labeled bacteria by fluorescence microscopy to distinguish intracellular from extracellular bacteria. The unit also presents two protocols to measure the ability of a macrophage to kill bacteria it has internalized. The second basic is a straightforward assay in which bacterial colonies are enumerated before and after a killing period. Bactericidal activity is evidenced by reduced CFU bacteria on agar plates. Because it is critical to remove residual extracellular organisms, the protocol presents two alternative steps to accomplish this: a washing procedure and a more stringent method in which cells are sedimented through sucrose. An alternate protocol describes a way to measure bacterial viability based on bacterial metabolism, in which the ability of bacterial dehydrogenases to mediate the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to purple formazan is monitored by measuring absorbance spectrophotometrically. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Intracellular multiplication of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in macrophages: killing and restriction of multiplication by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of coculturing yeast-form Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with murine cells was studied. Coculture of resident peritoneal or pulmonary macrophages with P. brasiliensis for 72 h dramatically enhanced fungal multiplication 19.3 +/- 2.4- and 4.7 +/- 0.8-fold, respectively, compared with cocultures with lymph node cells or complete tissue culture medium alone. Support of P. brasiliensis multiplication by resident peritoneal macrophages was macrophage dose dependent. Lysates of macrophages, supernatants from macrophage cultures, or McVeigh-Morton broth, like complete tissue culture medium, did not support multiplication of P. brasiliensis in 72-h cultures. Time course microscopic studies of cocultures in slide wells showed that macrophages ingested P. brasiliensis cells and that the ingested cells multiplied intracellularly. In sharp contrast to resident macrophages, lymphokine-activated peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages not only prevented multiplication but reduced inoculum CFU by 96 and 100%, respectively, in 72 h. Microscopic studies confirmed killing and digestion of P. brasiliensis ingested by activated macrophages in 48 h. These findings indicate that resident macrophages are permissive for intracellular multiplication of P. brasiliensis and that this could be a factor in pathogenicity. By contrast, activated macrophages are fungicidal for P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:2744848

  13. Lactoferricin Peptides Increase Macrophages' Capacity To Kill Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Moreira, Ana C.; Nazmi, Kamran; Moniz, Tânia; Vale, Nuno; Rangel, Maria; Gomes, Paula; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterial infections cause a significant burden of disease and death worldwide. Their treatment is long, toxic, costly, and increasingly prone to failure due to bacterial resistance to currently available antibiotics. New therapeutic options are thus clearly needed. Antimicrobial peptides represent an important source of new antimicrobial molecules, both for their direct activity and for their immunomodulatory potential. We have previously reported that a short version of the bovine antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin with amino acids 17 to 30 (LFcin17–30), along with its variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, killed Mycobacterium avium in broth culture. In the present work, those peptides were tested against M. avium living inside its natural host cell, the macrophage. We found that the peptides increased the antimicrobial action of the conventional antibiotic ethambutol inside macrophages. Moreover, the d-enantiomer of the lactoferricin peptide (d-LFcin17–30) was more stable and induced significant killing of intracellular mycobacteria by itself. Interestingly, d-LFcin17–30 did not localize to M. avium-harboring phagosomes but induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased the formation of lysosomes and autophagosome-like vesicles. These results lead us to conclude that d-LFcin17–30 primes macrophages for intracellular microbial digestion through phagosomal maturation and/or autophagy, culminating in mycobacterial killing. IMPORTANCE The genus Mycobacterium comprises several pathogenic species, including M. tuberculosis, M. leprae, M. avium, etc. Infections caused by these bacteria are particularly difficult to treat due to their intrinsic impermeability, low growth rate, and intracellular localization. Antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as potential treatment tools, as they have a high spectrum of activity, low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, and immunomodulatory properties. In

  14. Increased Lytic Efficiency of Bovine Macrophages Trained with Killed Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta; Garrido, Joseba M; Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Dominguez, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is evolutionarily conserved in multicellular organisms and was considered to lack memory until very recently. One of its more characteristic mechanisms is phagocytosis, the ability of cells to engulf, process and eventually destroy any injuring agent. We report the results of an ex vivo experiment in bovine macrophages in which improved clearance of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) was induced by pre-exposure to a heat killed M. bovis preparation. The effects were independent of humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses and lasted up to six months. Specifically, our results demonstrate the existence of a training effect in the lytic phase of phagocytosis that can be activated by killed mycobacteria, thus suggesting a new mechanism of vaccine protection. These findings are compatible with the recently proposed concept of trained immunity, which was developed to explain the observation that innate immune responses provide unspecific protection against pathogens including other than those that originally triggered the immune response.

  15. Increased Lytic Efficiency of Bovine Macrophages Trained with Killed Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Juste, Ramon A.; Alonso-Hearn, Marta; Garrido, Joseba M.; Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A.; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Dominguez, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is evolutionarily conserved in multicellular organisms and was considered to lack memory until very recently. One of its more characteristic mechanisms is phagocytosis, the ability of cells to engulf, process and eventually destroy any injuring agent. We report the results of an ex vivo experiment in bovine macrophages in which improved clearance of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) was induced by pre-exposure to a heat killed M. bovis preparation. The effects were independent of humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses and lasted up to six months. Specifically, our results demonstrate the existence of a training effect in the lytic phase of phagocytosis that can be activated by killed mycobacteria, thus suggesting a new mechanism of vaccine protection. These findings are compatible with the recently proposed concept of trained immunity, which was developed to explain the observation that innate immune responses provide unspecific protection against pathogens including other than those that originally triggered the immune response. PMID:27820836

  16. Killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hickman-Davis, Judy M; O'Reilly, Philip; Davis, Ian C; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Davis, Glenda; Young, K Randall; Devlin, Robert B; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-05-01

    We investigated putative mechanisms by which human surfactant protein A (SP-A) effects killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages (AMs) isolated from bronchoalveolar lavagates of patients with transplanted lungs. Coincubation of AMs with human SP-A (25 microg/ml) and Klebsiella resulted in a 68% decrease in total colony forming units by 120 min compared with AMs infected with Klebsiella in the absence of SP-A, and this SP-A-mediated effect was abolished by preincubation with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine. Incubation of transplant AMs with SP-A increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by 70% and nitrite and nitrate (NO(x)) production by 45% (from 0.24 +/- 0.02 to 1.3 +/- 0.21 nmol small middle dot 10(6) AMs(-1).h(-1)). Preincubation with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and abrogated the SP-A-mediated Klebsiella phagocytosis and killing. In contrast, incubation of AMs from normal volunteers with SP-A decreased both [Ca(2+)](i) and NO(x) production and did not result in killing of Klebsiella. Significant killing of Klebsiella was also seen in a cell-free system by sustained production of peroxynitrite (>1 microM/min) at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. These findings indicate that SP-A mediates pathogen killing by AMs from transplant lungs by stimulating phagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates.

  17. Killing of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia by pulmonary macrophages and the effect of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Arango, R; Salazar, M E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-01-01

    The ability of conidia, the infectious form of the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, to be killed in vitro by murine pulmonary macrophages was studied. Mice were immunized by intravenous injection of killed conidia, which resulted in cellular immunity demonstrated by delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and macrophage migration inhibition factor production in vitro. Resident pulmonary macrophages from non-immune mice were able to significantly kill the conidia (28%). Such macrophages treated with supernatants (cytokines) from antigen-stimulated immune mononuclears had a markedly enhanced ability to kill conidia (73%). These results show that activated pulmonary macrophages are potent killers of conidia of P. brasiliensis and that immune mononuclears play a role in activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages may be important for pulmonary defense against the initial stages of infection with this fungus.

  18. A small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor increases localization of inducible nitric oxide synthase to the macrophage phagosome and enhances bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Perry, Jeffrey W; Wobus, Christiane E; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Kapuria, Vaibhav; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2011-12-01

    Macrophages are key mediators of antimicrobial defense and innate immunity. Innate intracellular defense mechanisms can be rapidly regulated at the posttranslational level by the coordinated addition and removal of ubiquitin by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). While ubiquitin ligases have been extensively studied, the contribution of DUBs to macrophage innate immune function is incompletely defined. We therefore employed a small molecule DUB inhibitor, WP1130, to probe the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to bacterial infection. Treatment of activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) with WP1130 significantly augmented killing of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. WP1130 also induced killing of phagosome-restricted bacteria, implicating a bactericidal mechanism associated with the phagosome, such as the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). WP1130 had a minimal antimicrobial effect in macrophages lacking iNOS, indicating that iNOS is an effector mechanism for WP1130-mediated bacterial killing. Although overall iNOS levels were not notably different, we found that WP1130 significantly increased colocalization of iNOS with the Listeria-containing phagosome during infection. Taken together, our data indicate that the deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 increases bacterial killing in macrophages by enhancing iNOS localization to the phagosome and suggest a potential role for ubiquitin regulation in iNOS trafficking.

  19. Early events in macrophage killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia: new flow cytometric viability assay.

    PubMed

    Marr, K A; Koudadoust, M; Black, M; Balajee, S A

    2001-11-01

    Detailed investigations of macrophage phagocytosis and killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia have been limited by technical difficulties in quantifying fungal uptake and viability. In order to study early events in cell pathogen ingestion and killing, we developed a new flow cytometry assay that utilizes the fungus-specific viability dye FUN-1. Metabolically active A. fumigatus conidia accumulate orange fluorescence in vacuoles, while dormant or dead conidia stain green. After incubation within THP-1 cells, recovered conidia are costained with propidium iodide (PI) to discriminate between dormant and dead cells. Flow cytometric measurements of FUN-1 metabolism and PI uptake provide indicators of conidial viability, dormancy, and death. Conidial phagocytosis and killing are also assessed by measurement of green and orange FUN-1 fluorescence within the THP-1 cell population. Compared to previously described methods, this assay has less error introduced by membrane permeability changes and serial dilution of filamentous fungal forms. Results suggest that the THP-1 cells kill conidia rapidly (within 6 h) after exposure. Conidia that are preexposed to human serum are ingested and killed more quickly than are nonopsonized conidia.

  20. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-01-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  1. Extracellular stimulation by serum proteins required for maximal intracellular killing of microorganisms by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Leijh, P C; van Zwet, T L; van Furth, R

    1984-01-01

    Intracellular killing of catalase-positive Staphylococcus aureus by resident mouse peritoneal macrophages was very low in the absence of serum but maximal in the presence of fresh normal serum. A large proportion of catalase-negative Streptococcus pyogenes were killed in the absence of extracellular serum, and maximal killing was reached only when serum was present extracellularly. Further investigations revealed that stimulation of intracellular killing by extracellular serum is dependent on the interaction of immunoglobulin G and Fc receptors and of complement component C3b with C3b receptors in the macrophage membrane. PMID:6238911

  2. Identification of Legionella pneumophila genes required for growth within and killing of human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, A B; Wiater, L A; Shuman, H A

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila was mutagenized with Tn903dIIlacZ, and a collection of mutants was screened for defects in macrophage killing (Mak-). Of 4,564 independently derived mutants, 55 (1.2%) showed a reduced or complete lack in the ability to kill HL-60-derived human macrophages. Forty-nine of the Mak- mutants could be assigned to one of 16 DNA hybridization groups. Only one group (9 of the 10 members) could be complemented for macrophage killing by a DNA fragment containing icm and dot, two recently described L. pneumophila loci that are required for macrophage killing. Phenotypic analysis showed that none of the mutants were any more sensitive than the wild type to human serum, oxidants, iron chelators, or lipophilic reagents nor did they require additional nutrients for growth. The only obvious difference between the Mak-mutants and wild-type L. pneumophila was that almost all of the Mak- mutants were resistant to NaCl. The effects of LiCl paralleled the effects of NaCl but were less pronounced. Resistance to salt and the inability to kill human macrophages are linked since both phenotypes appeared when Tn903dIIlacZ mutations from two Mak- strains were transferred to wild-type backgrounds. However, salt sensitivity is not a requisite for killing macrophages since a group of Mak- mutants containing a plasmid that restored macrophage killing remained resistant to NaCl. Mak- mutants from groups I through IX associated with HL-60 cells similarly to wild-type L. pneumophila. However, like the intracellular-multiplication-defective (icm) mutant 25D, the Mak- mutants were unable to multiply within macrophages. Thus, the ability of L. pneumophila to kill macrophages seems to be determined by many genetic loci, almost all of which are associated with sensitivity to NaCl. Images PMID:8225610

  3. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  4. Antibody against Surface-Bound C5a Peptidase Is Opsonic and Initiates Macrophage Killing of Group B Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qi; Carlson, Brian; Pillai, Sub; Eby, Ron; Edwards, Lorri; Olmsted, Stephen B.; Cleary, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharides of group B streptococci (GBS) are a primary focus of vaccine development. Immunogenicity and long-lasting protection are best achieved by conjugating polysaccharides to a T-cell-dependent protein antigen. Streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPB) is a conserved surface protein that is expressed by all streptococcal serotypes tested to date, and it is a possible carrier protein that could itself induce a protective immune response. Clearance of GBS from lungs, mucosal surfaces, or blood probably depends on the opsonophagocytic response of tissue-specific macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In this study, we examined the potential of antibody directed against SCPB from a serotype II strain to enhance the capacity of mouse bone marrow macrophages (from primary cultures) and human PMNs in whole blood to kill GBS in vitro. Our experiments demonstrated that Streptococcus serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V, preopsonized with anti-SCPB antibody, were killed more rapidly by cultured macrophages and PMNs in whole blood than were nonopsonized GBS. The increased rate of killing was accompanied by an increased macrophage oxidative burst. Furthermore, opsonization was serotype transparent. Immunization with SCPB conjugated to capsular polysaccharide type III produced polysaccharide-specific antibodies. It is interesting that this antiserum promoted serotype-independent killing of streptococci. These data support the use of SCPB in a GBS polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. SCPB not only enhanced the immunogenicity of polysaccharide components of the vaccine, but it might also induce additional serotype-independent protective antibodies. PMID:11254587

  5. Macrophages sense and kill bacteria through carbon monoxide-dependent inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wegiel, Barbara; Larsen, Rasmus; Gallo, David; Chin, Beek Yoke; Harris, Clair; Mannam, Praveen; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Lee, Patty J; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Flavell, Richard; Soares, Miguel P; Otterbein, Leo E

    2014-11-01

    Microbial clearance by eukaryotes relies on complex and coordinated processes that remain poorly understood. The gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) is generated by the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1), which is highly induced in macrophages in response to bacterial infection. HO-1 deficiency results in inadequate pathogen clearance, exaggerated tissue damage, and increased mortality. Here, we determined that macrophage-generated CO promotes ATP production and release by bacteria, which then activates the Nacht, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome, intensifying bacterial killing. Bacterial killing defects in HO-1-deficient murine macrophages were restored by administration of CO. Moreover, increased CO levels enhanced the bacterial clearance capacity of human macrophages and WT murine macrophages. CO-dependent bacterial clearance required the NALP3 inflammasome, as CO did not increase bacterial killing in macrophages isolated from NALP3-deficient or caspase-1-deficient mice. IL-1β cleavage and secretion were impaired in HO-1-deficient macrophages, and CO-dependent processing of IL-1β required the presence of bacteria-derived ATP. We found that bacteria remained viable to generate and release ATP in response to CO. The ATP then bound to macrophage nucleotide P2 receptors, resulting in activation of the NALP3/IL-1β inflammasome to amplify bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that macrophage-derived CO permits efficient and coordinated regulation of the host innate response to invading microbes.

  6. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  7. Death of Monocytes through Oxidative Burst of Macrophages and Neutrophils: Killing in Trans

    PubMed Central

    Ponath, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes and their descendants, macrophages, play a key role in the defence against pathogens. They also contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Therefore, a mechanism maintaining a balance in the monocyte/macrophage population must be postulated. Our previous studies have shown that monocytes are impaired in DNA repair, rendering them vulnerable to genotoxic stress while monocyte-derived macrophages are DNA repair competent and genotoxic stress-resistant. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that monocytes can be selectively killed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by activated macrophages. We also wished to know whether monocytes and macrophages are protected against their own ROS produced following activation. To this end, we studied the effect of the ROS burst on DNA integrity, cell death and differentiation potential of monocytes. We show that monocytes, but not macrophages, stimulated for ROS production by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) undergo apoptosis, despite similar levels of initial DNA damage. Following co-cultivation with ROS producing macrophages, monocytes displayed oxidative DNA damage, accumulating DNA single-strand breaks and a high incidence of apoptosis, reducing their ability to give rise to new macrophages. Killing of monocytes by activated macrophages, termed killing in trans, was abolished by ROS scavenging and was also observed in monocytes co-cultivated with ROS producing activated granulocytes. The data revealed that monocytes, which are impaired in the repair of oxidised DNA lesions, are vulnerable to their own ROS and ROS produced by macrophages and granulocytes and support the hypothesis that this is a mechanism regulating the amount of monocytes and macrophages in a ROS-enriched inflammatory environment. PMID:28099491

  8. Macrophages sense and kill bacteria through carbon monoxide–dependent inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Barbara; Larsen, Rasmus; Gallo, David; Chin, Beek Yoke; Harris, Clair; Mannam, Praveen; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Lee, Patty J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Flavell, Richard; Soares, Miguel P.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial clearance by eukaryotes relies on complex and coordinated processes that remain poorly understood. The gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) is generated by the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1), which is highly induced in macrophages in response to bacterial infection. HO-1 deficiency results in inadequate pathogen clearance, exaggerated tissue damage, and increased mortality. Here, we determined that macrophage-generated CO promotes ATP production and release by bacteria, which then activates the Nacht, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome, intensifying bacterial killing. Bacterial killing defects in HO-1–deficient murine macrophages were restored by administration of CO. Moreover, increased CO levels enhanced the bacterial clearance capacity of human macrophages and WT murine macrophages. CO-dependent bacterial clearance required the NALP3 inflammasome, as CO did not increase bacterial killing in macrophages isolated from NALP3-deficient or caspase-1–deficient mice. IL-1β cleavage and secretion were impaired in HO-1–deficient macrophages, and CO-dependent processing of IL-1β required the presence of bacteria-derived ATP. We found that bacteria remained viable to generate and release ATP in response to CO. The ATP then bound to macrophage nucleotide P2 receptors, resulting in activation of the NALP3/IL-1β inflammasome to amplify bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that macrophage-derived CO permits efficient and coordinated regulation of the host innate response to invading microbes. PMID:25295542

  9. Macrophage Killing of Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens Is Not Inhibited by Intense Intracellular Accumulation of the Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Oritavancin

    PubMed Central

    Baquir, Beverlie; Lemaire, Sandrine; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Tulkens, Paul M.; Lin, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Intact phagocytic effector function is fundamental to host defense against microbial pathogens. Concern has been raised regarding the potential that accumulation of certain agents, including cationic amphiphilic antibiotics, within macrophages could cause a mixed-lipid storage disorder, resulting in macrophage dysfunction in recipients. The ability of 2 macrophage cell lines (HL-60; RAW 264.7) to kill archetypal Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram-negative (Acinetobacter baumannii), and fungal (Candida albicans) pathogens was tested following exposure of the macrophages to the lipoglycopeptide antibiotic oritavancin. Oritavancin did not affect killing of C. albicans but markedly enhanced killing of S. aureus by both macrophages. Oritavancin modestly reduced killing of A. baumannii by HL-60 cells but not by RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, macrophage killing of microbes remains intact despite substantial intracellular accumulation with a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic. PMID:22431853

  10. Characterization of Antibody-Dependent Killing of Trypanosomes by Macrophages.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    T. RHODESIENSE TO MACROPHAGES The role of complement in resistance to African trypanosomiasis remains controversial (Ferrante and Jenkins, 1978... trypanosomiasis . 59:283-292. 17. Silverstein, S.C. 1977. Endocytic uptake of particles by mononuclear phagocytes and the penetration of obligate

  11. Killing of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by activated murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, yet the mechanisms by which macrophages defend against Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained obscure. Results from this study show that murine macrophages, activated by interferon gamma, and lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, both growth inhibit and kill M. tuberculosis. This antimycobacterial effect, demonstrable both in murine macrophage cell lines and in peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice, is independent of the macrophage capacity to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Both the ROI-deficient murine macrophage cell line D9, and its ROI-generating, parental line J774.16, expressed comparable antimycobacterial activity upon activation. In addition, the oxygen radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, mannitol, and diazabicyclooctane had no effect on the antimycobacterial activity of macrophages. These findings, together with the results showing the relative resistance of M. tuberculosis to enzymatically generated H2O2, suggest that ROI are unlikely to be significantly involved in killing M. tuberculosis. In contrast, the antimycobacterial activity of these macrophages strongly correlates with the induction of the L-arginine- dependent generation of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). The effector molecule(s) that could participate in mediating this antimycobacterial function are toxic RNI, including NO, NO2, and HNO2, as demonstrated by the mycobacteriocidal effect of acidified NO2. The oxygen radical scavenger SOD adventitiously perturbs RNI production, and cannot be used to discriminate between cytocidal mechanisms involving ROI and RNI. Overall, our results provide support for the view that the L-arginine-dependent production of RNI is the principal effector mechanism in activated murine macrophages responsible for killing and growth inhibiting virulent M. tuberculosis. PMID:1552282

  12. Characterization of Antibody-Dependent Killing of Trypanosomes by Macrophages.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    bind Trypanosoma rhodesiense parasites in vitro. There is a high correla- tion between the ability of these products to neutralize trypanosome infection...or macrophage cell lines will bind and internalize Trypanosoma rhodesiense (Greenblatt, et al. 1983). The findings of Mac Askill, et al. (1980...AND INTERNALIZATION. Some trypanosomes, such as T. cruzi are able to actively penetrate host cells. However, the mechanism of cellular uptake of T

  13. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  14. The GAP activity of type III effector YopE triggers killing of Yersinia in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Parashar, Kaustubh; Sitaram, Ananya; Bliska, James B

    2014-08-01

    The mammalian immune system has the ability to discriminate between pathogens and innocuous microbes by detecting conserved molecular patterns. In addition to conserved microbial patterns, the mammalian immune system may recognize distinct pathogen-induced processes through a mechanism which is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that a type III secretion system (T3SS) in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis leads to decreased survival of this bacterium in primary murine macrophages by unknown mechanisms. Here, we use colony forming unit assays and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the T3SS triggers killing of Yersinia in macrophages. We present evidence that Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) delivered by the T3SS triggers intracellular killing response against Yersinia. YopE mimics eukaryotic GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and inactivates Rho GTPases in host cells. Unlike wild-type YopE, catalytically dead YopER144A is impaired in restricting Yersinia intracellular survival, highlighting that the GAP activity of YopE is detected as a danger signal. Additionally, a second translocated effector, YopT, counteracts the YopE triggered killing effect by decreasing the translocation level of YopE and possibly by competing for the same pool of Rho GTPase targets. Moreover, inactivation of Rho GTPases by Clostridium difficile Toxin B mimics the effect of YopE and promotes increased killing of Yersinia in macrophages. Using a Rac inhibitor NSC23766 and a Rho inhibitor TAT-C3, we show that macrophages restrict Yersinia intracellular survival in response to Rac1 inhibition, but not Rho inhibition. In summary, our findings reveal that primary macrophages sense manipulation of Rho GTPases by Yersinia YopE and actively counteract pathogenic infection by restricting intracellular bacterial survival. Our results uncover a new mode of innate immune recognition in response to pathogenic infection.

  15. The GAP Activity of Type III Effector YopE Triggers Killing of Yersinia in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoying; Parashar, Kaustubh; Sitaram, Ananya; Bliska, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian immune system has the ability to discriminate between pathogens and innocuous microbes by detecting conserved molecular patterns. In addition to conserved microbial patterns, the mammalian immune system may recognize distinct pathogen-induced processes through a mechanism which is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that a type III secretion system (T3SS) in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis leads to decreased survival of this bacterium in primary murine macrophages by unknown mechanisms. Here, we use colony forming unit assays and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the T3SS triggers killing of Yersinia in macrophages. We present evidence that Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) delivered by the T3SS triggers intracellular killing response against Yersinia. YopE mimics eukaryotic GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and inactivates Rho GTPases in host cells. Unlike wild-type YopE, catalytically dead YopER144A is impaired in restricting Yersinia intracellular survival, highlighting that the GAP activity of YopE is detected as a danger signal. Additionally, a second translocated effector, YopT, counteracts the YopE triggered killing effect by decreasing the translocation level of YopE and possibly by competing for the same pool of Rho GTPase targets. Moreover, inactivation of Rho GTPases by Clostridium difficile Toxin B mimics the effect of YopE and promotes increased killing of Yersinia in macrophages. Using a Rac inhibitor NSC23766 and a Rho inhibitor TAT-C3, we show that macrophages restrict Yersinia intracellular survival in response to Rac1 inhibition, but not Rho inhibition. In summary, our findings reveal that primary macrophages sense manipulation of Rho GTPases by Yersinia YopE and actively counteract pathogenic infection by restricting intracellular bacterial survival. Our results uncover a new mode of innate immune recognition in response to pathogenic infection. PMID:25165815

  16. Enhancement of macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing by bacterial outer membrane proteins (porins).

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, J B; Ribi, E; Wheat, R W

    1983-01-01

    Various microbial products are known to influence the function of mouse peritoneal macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and certain lipid A-associated proteins are known to enhance the tumoricidal effects of macrophages. The purpose of this study was to determine whether porins (outer membrane proteins) of Salmonella typhimurium G30/C21 would influence the activity of macrophages from lipid A-responsive and -unresponsive mice. Porins, extracted by a combined sodium dodecyl sulfate-EDTA method from cell walls, were free of LPS as determined by Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and appeared as a band at approximately 36,000 molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In tumor cell killing assays done under LPS-free conditions, the porins in doses of 1 to 10 ng/ml enhanced the tumoricidal effect of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN or C3H/HeJ mice. Protein-free LPS enhanced the tumoricidal activity of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice. The tumoricidal-enhancing activity of protein-free LPS was blocked by the lipid A-binding antibiotic polymyxin B sulfate, but the effects of porins were not altered by the polymyxin B sulfate. These results suggest that porins, proteins known to alter membrane function, may alter macrophage function by interaction with macrophage membranes. Images PMID:6311745

  17. P2X7 receptor-mediated killing of an intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, by human and murine macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Michael P.; Fuller, Stephen J.; McLeod, Rima; Boulter, Nicola R.; Miller, Catherine M.; Zakrzewski, Alana M.; Mui, Ernest J.; Witola, William H.; Coyne, Jessica J.; Hargrave, Aubrey C.; Jamieson, Sarra E.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Wiley, James S.; Smith, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R)4 is highly expressed on the macrophage cell surface and activation of infected cells by extracellular ATP has been shown to kill intracellular bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that decrease receptor function reduce the ability of human macrophages to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In this paper we show that macrophages from people with the 1513C (rs3751143) loss-of-function P2X7R SNP are less effective in killing intracellular Toxoplasma gondii after exposure to ATP compared with macrophages from people with the 1513A wild-type allele. Supporting a P2X7R-specific effect on T. gondii, macrophages from P2X7R knock-out mice (P2X7R−/−) are unable to kill T. gondii as effectively as macrophages from wild-type mice. We show that P2X7R-mediated T. gondii killing occurs in parallel with host cell apoptosis and is independent of NO production. PMID:20488797

  18. Bacterial killing in macrophages and amoeba: do they all use a brass dagger?

    PubMed

    German, Nadezhda; Doyscher, Dominik; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Macrophages are immune cells that are known to engulf pathogens and destroy them by employing several mechanisms, including oxidative burst, induction of Fe(II) and Mn(II) efflux, and through elevation of Cu(I) and Zn(II) concentrations in the phagosome ('brass dagger'). The importance of the latter mechanism is supported by the presence of multiple counteracting efflux systems in bacteria, responsible for the efflux of toxic metals. We hypothesize that similar bacteria-killing mechanisms are found in predatory protozoa/amoeba species. Here, we present a brief summary of soft metal-related mechanisms used by macrophages, and perhaps amoeba, to inactivate and destroy bacteria. Based on this, we think it is likely that copper resistance is also selected for by protozoan grazing in the environment.

  19. Degranulating Neutrophils Promote Leukotriene B4 Production by Infected Macrophages To Kill Leishmania amazonensis Parasites.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Natália; Afonso, Lilian; Suarez, Martha; Ampuero, Mariana; Prates, Deboraci Brito; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Barral-Netto, Manoel; DosReis, George A; Borges, Valéria Matos; Brodskyn, Cláudia

    2016-02-15

    Neutrophils mediate early responses against pathogens, and they become activated during endothelial transmigration toward the inflammatory site. In the current study, human neutrophils were activated in vitro with immobilized extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), collagen, and laminin. Neutrophil activation by FN, but not other extracellular matrix proteins, induces the release of the granules' contents, measured as matrix metalloproteinase 9 and neutrophil elastase activity in culture supernatant, as well as reactive oxygen species production. Upon contact with Leishmania amazonensis-infected macrophages, these FN-activated neutrophils reduce the parasite burden through a mechanism independent of cell contact. The release of granule proteases, such as myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, activates macrophages through TLRs, leading to the production of inflammatory mediators, TNF-α and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), which are involved in parasite killing by infected macrophages. The pharmacological inhibition of degranulation reverted this effect, abolishing LTB4 and TNF production. Together, these results suggest that FN-driven degranulation of neutrophils induces the production of LTB4 and TNF by infected macrophages, leading to the control of Leishmania infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Helicobacter pullorum induces nitric oxide release in murine macrophages that promotes phagocytosis and killing.

    PubMed

    Parente, Margarida R; Monteiro, João T; Martins, Gabriel G; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-03-01

    Helicobacter pullorum is an avian enterohepatic species that, more recently, has also been found as a naturally acquired infection in mice and rats, and isolated from patients with gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary diseases. In this work, the interaction between H. pullorum and murine macrophages was examined. Firstly, the impact of nitric oxide, which is an antimicrobial produced by mammalian macrophages, on H. pullorum 6350-92 viability and morphology was studied by colony-forming assays and light microscopy, respectively. Exposure to nitric oxide lowered H. pullorum viability, in a growth-phase-dependent manner, and decreased the mean cell size. However, the number of coccoid forms remained low, contrasting with what has been observed for other Helicobacter species. Confocal microscopy showed that H. pullorum is internalized by murine macrophages, triggering nitric oxide production that promotes phagocytosis and killing of the pathogen. Interaction between H. pullorum and macrophages stimulated secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MIP-2. These results show that H. pullorum is able to infect mammalian murine cells triggering an inflammatory response.

  1. Concanavalin A enhances phagocytosis and killing of Candida albicans by mice peritoneal neutrophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Wagner; Gaziri, Daniel Augusto; Gaziri, Luis Carlos Jabur; Felipe, Ionice

    2002-07-12

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that after administration of a single intraperitoneal dose of concanavalin A (Con-A) to mice, the proportion of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal exudate and their phagocytic and candidacidal activities should change with time. The number of neutrophils in the peritoneal exudate was greatly increased 6 h after administration of Con-A, and those cells were able to kill both intracellular and extracellular yeast and germ tube forms of Candida albicans. Addition of catalase to the culture medium reduced the killing of C. albicans, suggesting that the candidacidal activity depended on the myeloperoxidase system. The survival of mice pretreated with Con-A and submitted to an inoculum of C. albicans 6 h afterwards was twice higher than that of controls, which suggests that neutrophils were able to clear the experimental infection. One day after the treatment, the population of neutrophils in the exudate was about 45%, but after 2 days it was reduced to only 5% and the candidacidal activity was also reduced. After 4 days the exudate contained over 95% of macrophages, the candidacidal activity reached a maximum, and the phagocytosis mediated by both complement receptors and mannose receptors was increased. Uptake of FITC-mannose-BSA by macrophages was maximal on about the 4th day and was inhibited by mannan, suggesting that treatment with Con-A increased the activity of mannose receptors. These results support the hypothesis that activation of cellular immunity by Con-A occurred in two phases, one dominated by neutrophils, and the other by macrophages expressing increased activity of mannose receptors.

  2. Macrophages overexpressing tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase show altered profile of free radical production and enhanced capacity of bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Räisänen, Seija R; Alatalo, Sari L; Ylipahkala, Hannele; Halleen, Jussi M; Cassady, A Ian; Hume, David A; Väänänen, H Kalervo

    2005-05-27

    Activated macrophages and osteoclasts express high amounts of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP, acp5). TRACP has a binuclear iron center with a redox-active iron that has been shown to catalyze the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Fenton's reaction. Previous studies suggest that ROS generated by TRACP may participate in degradation of endocytosed bone matrix products in resorbing osteoclasts and degradation of foreign compounds during antigen presentation in activated macrophages. Here we have compared free radical production in macrophages of TRACP overexpressing (TRACP+) and wild-type (WT) mice. TRACP overexpression increased both ROS levels and superoxide production. Nitric oxide production was increased in activated macrophages of WT mice, but not in TRACP+ mice. Macrophages from TRACP+ mice showed increased capacity of bacterial killing. Recombinant TRACP enzyme was capable of bacterial killing in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that TRACP has an important biological function in immune defense system.

  3. The Candida albicans vacuole is required for differentiation and efficient macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G E; Kelly, M N; Sturtevant, J E

    2005-10-01

    Yeast-hypha differentiation is believed to be necessary for the normal progression of Candida albicans infections. The emergence and extension of a germ tube from a parental yeast cell are accompanied by dynamic changes in vacuole size and morphology. Although vacuolar function is required during this process, it is unclear if it is vacuolar expansion or some other vacuolar function that is important. We previously described a C. albicans vps11Delta mutant which lacked a recognizable vacuole compartment and with defects in multiple vacuolar functions. These include sensitivities to stress, reduced proteolytic activities, and severe defects in filamentation. Herein we utilize a partially functional VPS11 allele (vps11hr) to help define which vacuolar functions are required for differentiation and which influence interaction with macrophages. Mutant strains harboring this allele are not osmotically or temperature sensitive and have normal levels of secreted aspartyl protease and carboxypeptidase Y activity but have a fragmented vacuole morphology. Moreover, this mutant is defective in filamentation, suggesting that the major role the vacuole plays in yeast-hypha differentiation may relate directly to its morphology. The results of this study support the hypothesis that vacuole expansion is required during germ tube emergence. Both vps11 mutants were severely attenuated in their ability to kill a macrophage cell line. The viability of the vps11delta mutant was significantly reduced during macrophage interaction compared to that in the control strains, while the vps11hr mutant was unaffected. This implies some vacuolar functions are required for Candida survival within the macrophage, while additional vacuolar functions are required to inflict injury on the macrophage.

  4. Effects of fructooligosaccharide-inulin on Salmonella-killing and inflammatory gene expression in chicken macrophages.

    PubMed

    Babu, Uma S; Sommers, Katelyn; Harrison, Lisa M; Balan, Kannan V

    2012-09-15

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is one of the leading causes of food-borne salmonellosis, and macrophages play an essential role in eliminating this pathogen. Among the interventions to improve Salmonella clearance in chickens are the use of prebiotics and direct fed microbials (DFM) in animal feed as they have immunomodulatory effects. Therefore, we tested the influence of a prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS)-inulin on the ability of the chicken macrophage HD11 cell line to phagocytose and kill SE, and express selected inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in an in vitro model. There were significantly fewer viable intracellular SE in HD11 cells treated with FOS-inulin than the untreated cells. However, SE phagocytosis, nitric oxide expression or production were not influenced by the prebiotic treatment. Among the inflammatory markers tested, IL-1β expression was significantly lower in HD11 cells treated with FOS-inulin. These results suggest that FOS-inulin has the ability to modulate the innate immune system as shown by the enhanced killing of SE and decreased inflammasome activation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor deficiency is associated with impaired killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages and increased susceptibility to Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thierry; Delaloye, Julie; Chanson, Anne-Laure; Giddey, Marlyse; Le Roy, Didier; Calandra, Thierry

    2013-01-15

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important component of the early proinflammatory response of the innate immune system. However, the antimicrobial defense mechanisms mediated by MIF remain fairly mysterious. In the present study, we examined whether MIF controls bacterial uptake and clearance by professional phagocytes, using wild-type and MIF-deficient macrophages. MIF deficiency did not affect bacterial phagocytosis, but it strongly impaired the killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages and host defenses against gram-negative bacterial infection, as shown by increased mortality in a Klebsiella pneumonia model. Consistent with MIF's regulatory role of Toll-like 4 expression in macrophages, MIF-deficient cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or Escherichia coli exhibited reduced nuclear factor κB activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. Addition of recombinant MIF or TNF corrected the killing defect of MIF-deficient macrophages. Together, these data show that MIF is a key mediator of host responses against gram-negative bacteria, acting in part via a modulation of bacterial killing by macrophages.

  6. Antibodies Against Sporothrix schenckii Enhance TNF-α Production and Killing by Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Franco, D de Lima; Nascimento, R C; Ferreira, K S; Almeida, S R

    2012-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. The immunological mechanisms involved in the prevention and control of sporotrichosis suggest that cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against S. schenckii. Nonetheless, recent data strongly support the existence of protective Abs against this pathogenic fungus. In a previous study, we showed that passive Ab therapy led to a significant reduction in the number of colony forming unit in the organs of mice when the MAb was injected before and during S. schenckii infection. The ability of opsonization to enhance macrophage damage to S. schenckii and subsequent cytokine production was investigated in this work. Here we show that the fungicidal characteristics of macrophages are increased when the fungus is phagocytosed in the presence of inactivated serum from mice infected with S. schenckii or mAb anti-gp70. Additionally, we show an increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β. This study provides additional support for the importance of antibodies in protecting against S. schenckii and concludes that opsonization is an important process to increase TNF-α production and fungus killing by macrophages in experimental sporotrichosis.

  7. Comparison between three adjuvants for a vaccine against canine leishmaniasis: In vitro evaluation of macrophage killing ability.

    PubMed

    Trotta, T; Fasanella, A; Scaltrito, D; Gradoni, L; Mitolo, V; Brandonisio, O; Acquafredda, A; Panaro, M A

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in terms of dog macrophage killing ability in vitro, a vaccine based on Leishmania infantum promastigote soluble antigen (LSA) formulated with three different adjuvants (BCG, AdjuPrime, MPL/TDM/CWS). A significant increase of the macrophage killing ability was observed in dogs vaccinated with LSA+MPL/TDM/CWS after 1 month from vaccination. A similar increase of macrophage parasitocidal ability was present only after 5 months in dogs vaccinated with LSA+BCG or LSA+AdjuPrime. In all dogs the augmented killing percentage was still present after 12 months from vaccination. Therefore, in particular LSA+MPL/TDM/CWS vaccine seems promising for further studies in dogs.

  8. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, T.; Blumenstock, E.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1981-06-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria.

  9. Delineating the Importance of Serum Opsonins and the Bacterial Capsule in Affecting the Uptake and Killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei by Murine Neutrophils and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mulye, Minal; Bechill, Michael P.; Grose, William; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Lafontaine, Eric R.; Wooten, R. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Infection of susceptible hosts by the encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) causes melioidosis, with septic patients attaining mortality rates ≥40%. Due to its high infectivity through inhalation and limited effective therapies, Bp is considered a potential bioweapon. Thus, there is great interest in identifying immune effectors that effectively kill Bp. Our goal is to compare the relative abilities of murine macrophages and neutrophils to clear Bp, as well as determine the importance of serum opsonins and bacterial capsule. Our findings indicate that murine macrophages and neutrophils are inherently unable to clear either unopsonized Bp or the relatively-avirulent acapsular bacterium B. thailandensis (Bt). Opsonization of Bp and Bt with complement or pathogen-specific antibodies increases macrophage-uptake, but does not promote clearance, although antibody-binding enhances complement deposition. In contrast, complement opsonization of Bp and Bt causes enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils, which is linked with rapid ROS induction against bacteria exhibiting a threshold level of complement deposition. Addition of bacteria-specific antibodies enhances complement deposition, but antibody-binding alone cannot elicit neutrophil clearance. Bp capsule provides some resistance to complement deposition, but is not anti-phagocytic or protective against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-killing. Macrophages were observed to efficiently clear Bp only after pre-activation with IFNγ, which is independent of serum- and/or antibody-opsonization. These studies indicate that antibody-enhanced complement activation is sufficient for neutrophil-clearance of Bp, whereas macrophages are ineffective at clearing serum-opsonized Bp unless pre-activated with IFNγ. This suggests that effective immune therapies would need to elicit both antibodies and Th1-adaptive responses for successful prevention/eradication of melioidosis. PMID:25144195

  10. Delineating the importance of serum opsonins and the bacterial capsule in affecting the uptake and killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei by murine neutrophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mulye, Minal; Bechill, Michael P; Grose, William; Ferreira, Viviana P; Lafontaine, Eric R; Wooten, R Mark

    2014-08-01

    Infection of susceptible hosts by the encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) causes melioidosis, with septic patients attaining mortality rates ≥ 40%. Due to its high infectivity through inhalation and limited effective therapies, Bp is considered a potential bioweapon. Thus, there is great interest in identifying immune effectors that effectively kill Bp. Our goal is to compare the relative abilities of murine macrophages and neutrophils to clear Bp, as well as determine the importance of serum opsonins and bacterial capsule. Our findings indicate that murine macrophages and neutrophils are inherently unable to clear either unopsonized Bp or the relatively-avirulent acapsular bacterium B. thailandensis (Bt). Opsonization of Bp and Bt with complement or pathogen-specific antibodies increases macrophage-uptake, but does not promote clearance, although antibody-binding enhances complement deposition. In contrast, complement opsonization of Bp and Bt causes enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils, which is linked with rapid ROS induction against bacteria exhibiting a threshold level of complement deposition. Addition of bacteria-specific antibodies enhances complement deposition, but antibody-binding alone cannot elicit neutrophil clearance. Bp capsule provides some resistance to complement deposition, but is not anti-phagocytic or protective against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-killing. Macrophages were observed to efficiently clear Bp only after pre-activation with IFNγ, which is independent of serum- and/or antibody-opsonization. These studies indicate that antibody-enhanced complement activation is sufficient for neutrophil-clearance of Bp, whereas macrophages are ineffective at clearing serum-opsonized Bp unless pre-activated with IFNγ. This suggests that effective immune therapies would need to elicit both antibodies and Th1-adaptive responses for successful prevention/eradication of melioidosis.

  11. Autophagy-Related Proteins Target Ubiquitin-Free Mycobacterial Compartment to Promote Killing in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bah, Aïcha; Lacarrière, Camille; Vergne, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that plays essential functions in innate immunity, particularly, in the clearance of intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy activation and targeting of mycobacteria, in innate immune responses of macrophages, are only partially characterized. Autophagy targets pathogenic M. tuberculosis via a cytosolic DNA recognition- and an ubiquitin-dependent pathway. In this report, we show that non-pathogenic M. smegmatis induces a robust autophagic response in THP-1 macrophages with an up regulation of several autophagy-related genes. Autophagy activation relies in part on recognition of mycobacteria by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Notably, LC3 targeting of M. smegmatis does not rely on membrane damage, ubiquitination, or autophagy receptor recruitment. Lastly, M. smegmatis promotes recruitment of several autophagy proteins, which are required for mycobacterial killing. In conclusion, our study uncovered an alternative autophagic pathway triggered by mycobacteria which involves cell surface recognition but not bacterial ubiquitination. PMID:27242971

  12. In vivo killing and degradation of Mycobacterium aurum within mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, M T; Appelberg, R; Silva, M N; Macedo, P M

    1987-01-01

    We studied the in vivo killing and degradation of Mycobacterium aurum, a nonpathogenic, acid-fast bacillus, within macrophages after inoculation into the peritoneal cavity of CD-1 mice. The degradative process could be divided in five successive steps that were characterized on ultrastructural and cytochemical grounds and the relative contributions of which were determined by quantitative electron microscopy of samples taken at different times. The main ultrastructural alterations observed during the degradative process were ribosome disaggregation, coagulation of the cytoplasmic matrix, and change in the membrane profile from asymmetric to symmetric, with loss of the polysaccharide components from the outer layer, followed by membrane solubilization and intracellular clearing, followed by digestion of the innermost (peptidoglycan) layer of the cell wall, and at the end of the process, disorganization and collapse of the remaining layers of the cell wall. The correlation between viability and morphology indicated that the first ultrastructural signs of viability loss are cytoplasmic coagulation, change in the membrane geometry, and disappearance of ribosomes. The labeling of lysosomes of peritoneal macrophages with ferritin or by the cytochemical demonstration of inorganic trimetaphosphatase showed that fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes containing mycobacteria occurs in the phagocytes in the mouse peritoneal cavity and is already extensive as soon as 1 h after the inoculation of the bacilli. Images PMID:3623691

  13. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A.; Hess, Jessica A.; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Abraham, David

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system’s first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system. PMID:24642003

  14. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus in murine macrophages by chloroquine used alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin or azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Somrita; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine any alteration in the killing of Staphylococcus aureus in murine peritoneal macrophages when chloroquine (CQ) is used alone compared with when it is used in combination with ciprofloxacin (CIP) or azithromycin (AZM). The study also aimed to find out the implication of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cytokine release in the intracellular killing of S. aureus in macrophages. We present here data obtained with a model of S. aureus-infected mouse peritoneal macrophages in which the intracellular growth of the bacteria and the influence of antibiotics was monitored for 30, 60, and 90 minutes in the presence or absence of CQ along with the production of ROS and alteration in levels of antioxidant enzymes and cytokines. It was observed that S. aureus-triggered cytokine response was regulated when macrophages were co-cultured with CQ and AZM as compared with CQ stimulation only. It can be suggested that action of AZM in mediating bacterial killing is enhanced by the presence of CQ, indicating enhanced uptake of AZM during early infection that may be essential for bacteria killing by AZM. Reduction of oxidative stress burden on the S. aureus-infected macrophages may pave the way for better killing of internalized S. aureus by CQ plus ciprofloxacin (CIP) or CQ plus AZM. Based on these observations, one may speculate that in an inflammatory milieu, CQ loaded with AZM elicits a stronger proinflammatory response by increasing the intracellular uptake of AZM or CIP, thus enabling the immune system to mount a more robust and prolonged response against intracellular pathogens. PMID:25653549

  15. Burkholderia pseudomallei Evades Nramp1 (Slc11a1)- and NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Killing in Macrophages and Exhibits Nramp1-Dependent Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Muangsombut, Veerachat; Withatanung, Patoo; Srinon, Varintip; Chantratita, Narisara; Stevens, Mark P.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Korbsrisate, Sunee

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial survival in macrophages can be affected by the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1; also known as solute carrier family 11 member a1 or Slc11a1) which localizes to phagosome membranes and transports divalent cations, including iron. Little is known about the role of Nramp1 in Burkholderia infection, in particular whether this differs for pathogenic species like Burkholderia pseudomallei causing melioidosis or non-pathogenic species like Burkholderia thailandensis. Here we show that transfected macrophages stably expressing wild-type Nramp1 (Nramp1+) control the net replication of B. thailandensis, but not B. pseudomallei. Control of B. thailandensis was associated with increased cytokine responses, and could be abrogated by blocking NADPH oxidase-mediated production of reactive oxygen species but not by blocking generation of reactive nitrogen species. The inability of Nramp1+ macrophages to control B. pseudomallei was associated with rapid escape of bacteria from phagosomes, as indicated by decreased co-localization with LAMP1 compared to B. thailandensis. A B. pseudomallei bipB mutant impaired in escape from phagosomes was controlled to a greater extent than the parent strain in Nramp1+ macrophages, but was also attenuated in Nramp1− cells. Consistent with reduced escape from phagosomes, B. thailandensis formed fewer multinucleated giant cells in Nramp1+ macrophages at later time points compared to B. pseudomallei. B. pseudomallei exhibited elevated transcription of virulence-associated genes of Type VI Secretion System cluster 1 (T6SS-1), the Bsa Type III Secretion System (T3SS-3) and the bimA gene required for actin-based motility in Nramp1+ macrophages. Nramp1+ macrophages were found to contain decreased iron levels that may impact on expression of such genes. Our data show that B. pseudomallei is able to evade Nramp1- and NADPH oxidase-mediated killing in macrophages and that expression of virulence-associated genes by

  16. Candida albicans SUR7 contributes to secretion, biofilm formation, and macrophage killing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Candida albicans SUR7 has been shown to be required for plasma membrane organization and cell wall synthesis, but its role in virulence is not known. Using a bioinformatics strategy, we previously identified several novel putative secretion pathway proteins potentially involved in virulence, including the C. albicans homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae endocytosis-related protein Sur7p. We therefore generated a C. albicans sur7Δ null mutant and examined its contribution to key virulence attributes. Results Structurally, the C. albicans sur7Δ mutant was impaired in response to filamentation-inducing conditions, and formed aberrant hyphae with extensive accumulation of plasma membrane-derived structures within the cell. Absence of SUR7 resulted in a temperature-sensitive growth defect at high temperatures (42°C), which was partially rescued by addition of NaCl. We next examined the role of the SUR7 paralog C. albicans FMP45 in this temperature-sensitive phenotype. Analysis of C. albicans Fmp45p-GFP demonstrated co-localization of Fmp45p with Sur7p and increased fluorescence in the plasma membrane in the presence of high salt. We next focused on key virulence-related phenotypes. The C. albicans sur7Δ null mutant exhibited secretory defects: reduced lipase secretion, and increased levels of secreted Sap2p. The null mutant was hyper-susceptible to sub-inhibitory concentrations of caspofungin, but not amphotericin B and 5-fluorocytosine. Functionally, the sur7Δ mutant demonstrated increased adhesion to polystyrene and of note, was markedly defective in biofilm formation. In an in vitro macrophage model of virulence, the sur7Δ mutant was impaired in macrophage killing. Conclusions Plasma membrane and cell wall organization are important for cell morphology, and alterations of these structures contributed to impairment of several key virulence-associated phenotypes in the C. albicans sur7Δ mutant. PMID:20433738

  17. Nitric Oxide Not Apoptosis Mediates Differential Killing of Mycobacterium bovis in Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Solís, Hugo; Vallecillo, Antonio J.; Benítez-Guzmán, Alejandro; Adams, L. Garry; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the resistance phenotype against Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, we used a bactericidal assay that has been considered a marker of this trait. Three of 24 cows (12.5%) were phenotyped as resistant and 21 as susceptible. Resistance of bovine macrophages (MΦ) to BCG challenge was evaluated for its association with SLC11A1 GT microsatellite polymorphisms within 3′UTR region. Twenty-three cows (95.8%) had a GT13 genotype, reported as resistant, consequently the SLC11A1polymorphism was not in agreement with our bactericidal assay results. MΦ of cows with resistant or susceptible phenotype were challenged in vitro with virulent M. bovis field strain or BCG, and nitric oxide production, bacterial killing and apoptosis induction were measured in resting and LPS-primed states. M. bovis field strain induced more apoptosis than BCG, although the difference was not significant. Resistant MΦ controlled better the replication of M. bovis (P<0.01), produced more nitric oxide (P<0.05) and were slightly more prone to undergo apoptosis than susceptible cells. LPS pretreatment of MΦ enhanced all the functional parameters analyzed. Inhibition of nitric oxide production with nG-monomethyl-L-arginine monoacetate enhanced replication of M. bovis but did not modify apoptosis rates in both resistant and susceptible MΦ. We conclude that nitric oxide production not apoptosis is a major determinant of macrophage resistance to M. bovis infection in cattle and that the influence of SLC11A1 gene 3′UTR polymorphism is not associated with this event. PMID:23691050

  18. Nitric oxide not apoptosis mediates differential killing of Mycobacterium bovis in bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Solís, Hugo; Vallecillo, Antonio J; Benítez-Guzmán, Alejandro; Adams, L Garry; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2013-01-01

    To identify the resistance phenotype against Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, we used a bactericidal assay that has been considered a marker of this trait. Three of 24 cows (12.5%) were phenotyped as resistant and 21 as susceptible. Resistance of bovine macrophages (MΦ) to BCG challenge was evaluated for its association with SLC11A1 GT microsatellite polymorphisms within 3'UTR region. Twenty-three cows (95.8%) had a GT13 genotype, reported as resistant, consequently the SLC11A1 polymorphism was not in agreement with our bactericidal assay results. MΦ of cows with resistant or susceptible phenotype were challenged in vitro with virulent M. bovis field strain or BCG, and nitric oxide production, bacterial killing and apoptosis induction were measured in resting and LPS-primed states. M. bovis field strain induced more apoptosis than BCG, although the difference was not significant. Resistant MΦ controlled better the replication of M. bovis (P<0.01), produced more nitric oxide (P<0.05) and were slightly more prone to undergo apoptosis than susceptible cells. LPS pretreatment of MΦ enhanced all the functional parameters analyzed. Inhibition of nitric oxide production with n (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine monoacetate enhanced replication of M. bovis but did not modify apoptosis rates in both resistant and susceptible MΦ. We conclude that nitric oxide production not apoptosis is a major determinant of macrophage resistance to M. bovis infection in cattle and that the influence of SLC11A1 gene 3'UTR polymorphism is not associated with this event.

  19. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  20. Computer Image Analysis Method for Rapid Quantitation of Macrophage Phagocytosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    number of micro- spheres per cell. *Rapid Macrophage Phagocytosis Ouantitatlon 405 analysis system is a Kontron-Zeiss SEM-IPS ( Carl Zeiss, digitizing...re- croscope (Photomicroscope 1I, Carl Zeiss, Inc., Thorn- suiting image was scaled by making grey values from 0 wood, NY) equipped with phase...fidelity of the discrim- lease 4.4 ( Carl Zeiss, Inc., Thornwood, NY) was used to ination was evaluated by overlaying contour maps of the analyze the

  1. Short term exposure to NO sup 2 decreases intrapulmonary killing of Mycoplasma pulmonis by damaging alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.K.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Lindsey, J.R. Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of pathogen free C57BL/6N mice to 5 or 10 ppm of NO{sub 2} increased severity of murine respiratory mycoplasmosis and that this effect was associated with decreased intrapulmonary killing (IPK) of Mycoplasma pulmonis (MP). The purposes of the present studies were to titrate the NO{sub 2} effect and to determine if the changes in IPK were due to the effects of NO{sub 2} on alveolar macrophages. Exposure to less than 5 ppm NO{sub 2} had no effect on IPK of MP. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells killed MP in vitro only if they were allowed to associate with mycoplasmas in vivo. Prior exposure to NO{sub 2} abrogated killing in this in vivo-in vitro model. Exposure to NO{sub 2} did not increase the protein content of BAL within 24 hours. Greater than 95% of the BAL cells were macrophages, and greater than 98% of the cell-associated mycoplasmas were on or in alveolar macrophages. Immediately after exposure, viability of alveolar macrophages, as measured by trypan blue exclusion and fluorescein diacetate uptake, was 89 {plus minus} 4% and 88 {plus minus} 4% in the control group, respectively; 56 {plus minus} 19% and 64 {plus minus} 11% in the group receiving MP alone; 23 {plus minus} 7% and 48 {plus minus} 9% in the group receiving 10 ppm NO{sub 2}; and 16 {plus minus} 6% and 25 {plus minus} 6% in the group receiving both MP and NO{sub 2} exposures. Viability was significantly decreased following exposure to 5 or 10 ppm NO{sub 2}, but not following exposure to 2 ppm. Viability did not return to normal until 7 days after exposure to NO{sub 2}, at which time IPK also returned to normal. The cellular target of NO{sub 2} exposure in relation to IPK of MP appears to be the alveolar macrophage.

  2. Fas-Fas ligand interactions are essential for the binding to and killing of activated macrophages by gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jane E; Howell, Gareth; Pearson, Jayne; Scott, Phillip; Carding, Simon R

    2004-09-15

    Gammadelta T cells have a direct role in resolving the host immune response to infection by eliminating populations of activated macrophages. Macrophage reactivity resides within the Vgamma1/Vdelta6.3 subset of gammadelta T cells, which have the ability to kill activated macrophages following infection with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). However, it is not known how gammadelta T cell macrophage cytocidal activity is regulated, or what effector mechanisms gammadelta T cells use to kill activated macrophages. Using a macrophage-T cell coculture system in which peritoneal macrophages from naive or Lm-infected TCRdelta-/- mice were incubated with splenocytes from wild-type and Fas ligand (FasL)-deficient mice (gld), the ability of Vgamma1 T cells to bind macrophages was shown to be dependent upon Fas-FasL interactions. Combinations of anti-TCR and FasL Abs completely abolished binding to and killing of activated macrophages by Vgamma1 T cells. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that Fas and the TCR colocalized on Vgamma1 T cells at points of contact with macrophages. Collectively, these studies identify an accessory or coreceptor-like function for Fas-FasL that is essential for the interaction of Vgamma1 T cells with activated macrophages and their elimination during the resolution stage of pathogen-induced immune responses. Copyright 2004 The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Antibodies against invasive phenotype-specific antigens increase Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis translocation across a polarized epithelial cell model and enhance killing by bovine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Everman, Jamie L.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a severe chronic enteritis which affects large populations of ruminants globally. Prevention strategies to combat the spread of Johne's disease among cattle herds involve adhering to strict calving practices to ensure young susceptible animals do not come in contact with MAP-contaminated colostrum, milk, or fecal material. Unfortunately, the current vaccination options available are associated with high cost and suboptimal efficacy. To more successfully combat the spread of Johne's disease to young calves, an efficient method of protection is needed. In this study, we examined passive immunization as a mode of introducing protective antibodies against MAP to prevent the passage of the bacterium to young animals via colostrum and milk. Utilizing the infectious MAP phenotype developed after bacterial exposure to milk, we demonstrate that in vitro opsonization with serum from Johne's-positive cattle results in enhanced translocation across a bovine MDBK polarized epithelial cell monolayer. Furthermore, immune serum opsonization of MAP results in a rapid host cell-mediated killing by bovine macrophages in an oxidative-, nitrosative-, and extracellular DNA trap-independent manner. This study illustrates that antibody opsonization of MAP expressing an infectious phenotype leads to the killing of the bacterium during the initial stage of macrophage infection. PMID:26301206

  4. Antibodies against invasive phenotype-specific antigens increase Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis translocation across a polarized epithelial cell model and enhance killing by bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Everman, Jamie L; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a severe chronic enteritis which affects large populations of ruminants globally. Prevention strategies to combat the spread of Johne's disease among cattle herds involve adhering to strict calving practices to ensure young susceptible animals do not come in contact with MAP-contaminated colostrum, milk, or fecal material. Unfortunately, the current vaccination options available are associated with high cost and suboptimal efficacy. To more successfully combat the spread of Johne's disease to young calves, an efficient method of protection is needed. In this study, we examined passive immunization as a mode of introducing protective antibodies against MAP to prevent the passage of the bacterium to young animals via colostrum and milk. Utilizing the infectious MAP phenotype developed after bacterial exposure to milk, we demonstrate that in vitro opsonization with serum from Johne's-positive cattle results in enhanced translocation across a bovine MDBK polarized epithelial cell monolayer. Furthermore, immune serum opsonization of MAP results in a rapid host cell-mediated killing by bovine macrophages in an oxidative-, nitrosative-, and extracellular DNA trap-independent manner. This study illustrates that antibody opsonization of MAP expressing an infectious phenotype leads to the killing of the bacterium during the initial stage of macrophage infection.

  5. Radiometric macrophage culture assay for rapid evaluation of antileprosy activity of rifampin

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, A.; Seshadri, P.S.; Prasad, H.K.; Sathish, M.; Nath, I.

    1983-10-01

    The antileprosy effect of rifampin was evaluated by a newly developed rapid in vitro assay wherein 31 human-derived strains and 1 armadillo-derived strain of Mycobacterium leprae were maintained for 2 and 3 weeks, respectively, in murine and human macrophages in the presence of (3H)thymidine. Of these strains, 27 showed significant incorporation of the radiolabel in cultures of live bacilli as compared with control cultures of heat-killed bacilli of the same strain. Consistent and significant inhibition of (3H)thymidine uptake was observed in M. leprae resident cultures with 3 to 200 ng of rifampin per ml as compared with similar cultures without the drug. In general, an increase in percent inhibition was seen from 3 to 20 ng/ml, with marginal increases at 40, 50, and 100 ng/ml. M. leprae strains appear to be remarkably susceptible to this drug in the in vitro assay.

  6. Rapid killing of bacteria by a new type of photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; Zheng, Ke; Chen, Zhuo; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Cai, Linrong; Iqbal, Zafar; Huang, Mingdong

    2017-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) uses non-traditional mechanisms (free radicals) and is a highly advocated method with promise of inactivating drug-resistance bacteria for local infections. However, there is no related drug used in clinical practice yet. Therefore, new photosensitizers for PACT are under active development. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of photosensitizers with variable positive charges (ZnPc(TAP)4(n+), n = 0, 4, 8, 12) and their inactivation against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. The binding kinetics of ZnPc(TAP)4(n+) to bacteria were measured by flow cytometer. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation mechanism of the photosensitizers was studied. The toxicity of these compounds to human blood cells was also evaluated. These compounds showed negligible toxicity against human erythocytes but potent bactericidal effects. The compound with 8 positive charges, ZnPc(TAP)4(8+), turned out to have the strongest antibacterial effect among this series of compounds, giving IC50 value of 59 nM at a light dosage of 5 J/cm(2) toward E. coli. For a multi-resistant E. coli strain, ZnPc(TAP)4(8+) decreased the bacteria load by 1000-fold at a concentration of 1 μM. Interestingly, ZnPc(TAP)4(12+), instead of ZnPc(TAP)4(8+), exhibited the highest amount of binding to bacteria. Flow cytometry studies showed that all PSs have fast binding onto bacteria, reaching saturated binding within 5 min. Mechanistically, ZnPc(TAP)4(12+) generated ROS primarily via Type I mechanism, while ZnPc(TAP)4(4+) or ZnPc(TAP)4(8+) created ROS by both type I and type II mechanisms. ZnPc(TAP)4(n+) are highly potent, rapid-acting and non-toxic photosensitizers capable of inactivating bacteria.

  7. Hypercapnia Inhibits Autophagy and Bacterial Killing in Human Macrophages by Increasing Expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL

    PubMed Central

    Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Nair, Aisha; Beitel, Greg J.; Gates, Khalilah L.; Sporn, Peter H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnia, the elevation of CO2 in blood and tissue, commonly develops in patients with advanced lung disease and severe pulmonary infections, and is associated with high mortality. We previously reported that hypercapnia alters expression of host defense genes, inhibits phagocytosis, and increases the mortality of Pseudomonas pneumonia in mice. However, the effect of hypercapnia on autophagy, a conserved process by which cells sequester and degrade proteins and damaged organelles that also plays a key role in antimicrobial host defense and pathogen clearance, has not previously been examined. In the present study we show that hypercapnia inhibits autophagy induced by starvation, rapamycin, LPS, heat-killed and live bacteria in the human macrophage. Inhibition of autophagy by elevated CO2 was not attributable to acidosis. Hypercapnia also reduced macrophage killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, elevated CO2 induced the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, anti-apoptotic factors that negatively regulate autophagy by blocking Beclin 1, an essential component of the autophagy initiation complex. Furthermore, siRNA targeting Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the small molecule Z36, which blocks Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL binding to Beclin 1, prevented hypercapnic inhibition of autophagy and bacterial killing. These results suggest that targeting the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL-Beclin 1 interaction may hold promise for ameliorating hypercapnia-induced immunosuppression and improving resistance to infection in patients with advanced lung disease and hypercapnia. PMID:25895534

  8. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  9. Bactericidal activity of juvenile chinook salmon macrophages against Aeromonas salmonicida after exposure to live or heat-killed Renibacterium salmoninarum or to soluble proteins produced by R. salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.C.; Congleton, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from the anterior kidney of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in 96-well microtiter plates were exposed for 72 h to 0, 105, or 106 live or heat-killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells per well or to 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ??g/mL of R. salmoninarum soluble proteins. After treatment, the bactericidal activity of the macrophages against Aerornonas salmonicida was determined by a colorimetric assay based on the reduction of the tetrazolium dye MTT to formazan by viable bacteria. The MTT assay was modified to allow estimation of the percentage of bacteria killed by reference to a standard curve relating the number of bacteria added to microtiter wells to absorbance by formazan at 600 nm. The live and heat-killed R. salmoninarum treatments significantly (P < 0.001) increased killing of A. salmonicida by chinook salmon macrophages. In each of the five trials, significantly (P < 0.05) greater increases in killing occurred after exposure to 105 R. salmoninarum cells than to 106 R. salmoninarum cells per well. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with 10 ??g/mL R. salmoninarum soluble proteins significantly (P < 0.001) decreased killing of A. salmonicida, but treatment with lower doses did not. These results show that the bactericidal activity of chinook salmon macrophages is stimulated by exposure to R. salmoninarum cells at lower dose levels but inhibited by exposure to R. salmoninarum cells or soluble proteins at higher dose levels.

  10. Oxidative Stress Induced by Polymyxin E Is Involved in Rapid Killing of Paenibacillus polymyxa

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuyi; Qin, Wangrong

    2017-01-01

    Historically, the colistin has been thought to kill bacteria through membrane lysis. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that colistin induces rapid Paenibacillus polymyxa death through reactive oxygen species production. This significantly augments our understanding of the mechanism of colistin action, which is critical knowledge toward the yield development of colistin in the future. PMID:28321410

  11. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides and Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles Kill Mycobacteria without Eliciting DNA Damage and Cytotoxicity in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jena, Prajna; Mehta, Ranjit; Pati, Rashmirekha; Banerjee, Birendranath; Patil, Satish

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial strains, better therapeutic strategies are required for the successful treatment of the infection. Although antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are becoming one of the popular antibacterial agents, their antimycobacterial potential is not fully evaluated. In this study, we synthesized biogenic-silver nanoparticles using bacterial, fungal, and plant biomasses and analyzed their antibacterial activities in combination with AMPs against mycobacteria. Mycobacterium smegmatis was found to be more susceptible to AgNPs compared to M. marinum. We found that NK-2 showed enhanced killing effect with NP-1 and NP-2 biogenic nanoparticles at a 0.5-ppm concentration, whereas LLKKK-18 showed antibacterial activity only with NP-2 at 0.5-ppm dose against M. smegmatis. In case of M. marinum NK-2 did not show any additive activity with NP-1 and NP-2 and LLKKK-18 alone completely inhibited the bacterial growth. Both NP-1 and NP-2 also showed increased killing of M. smegmatis in combination with the antituberculosis drug rifampin. The sizes and shapes of the AgNPs were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. AgNPs showed no cytotoxic or DNA damage effects on macrophages at the mycobactericidal dose, whereas treatment with higher doses of AgNPs caused toxicity and micronuclei formation in cytokinesis blocked cells. Macrophages actively endocytosed fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled AgNPs resulting in nitric oxide independent intracellular killing of M. smegmatis. Apoptosis and cell cycle studies showed that treatment with higher dose of AgNPs arrested macrophages at the G1-phase. In summary, our data suggest the combined effect of biogenic-AgNPs and antimicrobial peptides as a promising antimycobacterial template. PMID:23689720

  12. Role of intracellular free calcium in killing Penicillium marneffei within human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) promote phagocyte antimicrobial responses. Here, we investigated macrophages stimulated by Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei). [Ca(2+)]c was determined in macrophages loaded with the fluorescent calcium probe Fura 2/AM as they were stimulated by P. marneffei. We found that P. marneffei induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in human macrophages. Further, increased [Ca(2+)]c with the ionophore A23187 promoted phagosomal acidification and maturation and reduced intracellular replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages, whereas decreased [Ca(2+)]c with the chelation MAPTAM decreased TNF-α production, inhibited phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular replication of P. marneffei. These data indicate that Ca(2+) signaling may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei within macrophages.

  13. The Interaction between Candida krusei and Murine Macrophages Results in Multiple Outcomes, Including Intracellular Survival and Escape from Killing ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodas, Rocío; González-Camacho, Fernando; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Candida krusei is a fungal pathogen of interest for the scientific community for its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole. Little is known about the interaction of this yeast with host immune cells. In this work, we have characterized the outcome of the interaction between C. krusei and murine macrophages. Once C. krusei was internalized, we observed different phenomena. In a macrophage-like cell line, C. krusei survived in a significant number of macrophages and induced filamentation and macrophage explosion. Phagocytosis of C. krusei led to actin polymerization around the yeast cells at the site of entry. Fluorescent specific staining with anti-Lamp1 and LysoTracker indicated that after fungal internalization, there was a phagolysosome maturation defect, a phenomenon that was more efficient when the macrophages phagocytosed killed yeast cells. Using cell line macrophages, we also observed macrophage fusion after cell division. When we used primary resident peritoneal macrophages in addition to macrophage explosion, we also observed a strong chemotaxis of uninfected macrophages to regions where C. krusei-infected macrophages were present. We also noticed yeast transfer phenomena between infected macrophages. Primary macrophages inhibited pseudohypha elongation more efficiently than the macrophage-like cell line, suggesting that C. krusei infection was better controlled by the former macrophages. Primary macrophages induced more tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than the macrophage-like cell line. Our results demonstrate that C. krusei can exploit the macrophages for replication, although other different outcomes are also possible, indicating that the interaction of this pathogen with phagocytic cells is very complex and regulated by multiple factors. PMID:21422181

  14. Killing of Leishmania parasites in activated murine macrophages is based on an L-arginine-dependent process that produces nitrogen derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Maul, J.R.; Ransijn, A.; Buchmueller-Rouiller, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    The experiments described in this report were aimed at determining whether L-arginine (L-arg)-derived nitrogen oxidation products (nitric oxide, nitrous acid, nitrites) are involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania parasites by activated murine macrophages in vitro. Peritoneal or bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with L. enriettii or L. major, then activated by exposure to recombinant murine interferon-gamma or to macrophage activating factor (MAF)-rich media in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Activation of macrophages in regular (i.e., arginine-containing) culture medium led to complete destruction of the microorganisms within 24 h (L. enriettii) or 48 h (L. major), concomitant with accumulation of nitrites (NO2-) in the culture fluids. When macrophage activation was carried out in L-arg-free medium, however, neither parasite killing nor NO2- production was obtained. A similar inhibition of macrophage leishmanicidal activity and of NO2- release was observed using media treated with arginase (which converts L-arg to urea and ornithine), or supplemented with NG-monomethyl-L-arg or guanidine (which inhibit the conversion of L-arg to nitrogen oxidation products). In all these situations, an excellent correlation between the levels of NO2- production by macrophages and intracellular killing of Leishmania was observed, whereas no strict correlation was detectable between leishmanicidal activity and superoxide production. Intracellular parasite killing by activated macrophages could be prevented by addition of iron salts to the incubation fluids. Incubation of free parasites with NaNO2 at acid pH led to immobilisation, multiplication arrest, and morphological degeneration of the microorganisms. Similarly, exposure of infected cells to NaNO2 led to killing of the intracellular parasite without affecting macrophage viability.

  15. Killing of Escherichia coli by Crohn's Disease Monocyte-derived Macrophages and Its Enhancement by Hydroxychloroquine and Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Paul K.; Chiewchengchol, Direkrit; Wright, Helen L.; Edwards, Steven W.; Alswied, Abdullah; Satsangi, Jack; Subramanian, Sreedhar; Rhodes, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with defective innate immunity, including impaired neutrophil chemotaxis, and mucosal invasion by bacteria, particularly adherent and invasive Escherichia coli that replicate inside macrophage phagolysosomes. We compared CD and healthy control (HC) macrophages for their abilities to kill E. coli and generate neutrophil chemoattractants and also assessed the effects of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and vitamin D on killing of phagocytosed E. coli. Methods: Peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages from CD and HC were compared for bacterial killing and generation of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to CD-derived E. coli. Escherichia coli replication was also assessed in the presence and absence of HCQ, alone and with antibiotics, and vitamin D. Results: Monocyte-derived macrophages from patients with CD were similar to HC in allowing replication of phagocytosed CD-derived E. coli: HM605 {CD: N = 10, mean fold replication in 3 hr = 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39–1.78); HC: N = 9, 1.50 (95% CI, 1.02–1.97); P = 0.15} and also in generation of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to E. coli (mean fold chemotaxis relative to control: CD = 2.55 [95% CI, 2.31–2.80]; HC = 2.65 [95% CI, 2.46–2.85], P = 0.42). HCQ and 1,25 OH2-vitamin D3 both caused dose-dependent inhibition of intramacrophage E. coli replication 3-hour postinfection; HCQ: 73.9% inhibition (P < 0.001) at 1 μg/mL, accompanied by raised intraphagosomal pH, and 1,25 OH2-vitamin D3: 80.7% inhibition (P < 0.05) at 80 nM. HCQ had synergistic effects with doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Conclusions: CD and HC macrophages perform similarly in allowing replication of phagocytosed E. coli and generating neutrophil chemoattractants. Replication of phagocytosed E. coli was substantially decreased by HCQ and vitamin D. These warrant further therapeutic trials in CD in combination with relevant antibiotics. PMID:25839777

  16. Killing of Escherichia coli by Crohn's Disease Monocyte-derived Macrophages and Its Enhancement by Hydroxychloroquine and Vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Paul K; Chiewchengchol, Direkrit; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Alswied, Abdullah; Satsangi, Jack; Subramanian, Sreedhar; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Campbell, Barry J

    2015-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with defective innate immunity, including impaired neutrophil chemotaxis, and mucosal invasion by bacteria, particularly adherent and invasive Escherichia coli that replicate inside macrophage phagolysosomes. We compared CD and healthy control (HC) macrophages for their abilities to kill E. coli and generate neutrophil chemoattractants and also assessed the effects of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and vitamin D on killing of phagocytosed E. coli. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages from CD and HC were compared for bacterial killing and generation of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to CD-derived E. coli. Escherichia coli replication was also assessed in the presence and absence of HCQ, alone and with antibiotics, and vitamin D. Monocyte-derived macrophages from patients with CD were similar to HC in allowing replication of phagocytosed CD-derived E. coli: HM605 {CD: N = 10, mean fold replication in 3 hr = 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.78); HC: N = 9, 1.50 (95% CI, 1.02-1.97); P = 0.15} and also in generation of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to E. coli (mean fold chemotaxis relative to control: CD = 2.55 [95% CI, 2.31-2.80]; HC = 2.65 [95% CI, 2.46-2.85], P = 0.42). HCQ and 1,25 OH2-vitamin D3 both caused dose-dependent inhibition of intramacrophage E. coli replication 3-hour postinfection; HCQ: 73.9% inhibition (P < 0.001) at 1 μg/mL, accompanied by raised intraphagosomal pH, and 1,25 OH2-vitamin D3: 80.7% inhibition (P < 0.05) at 80 nM. HCQ had synergistic effects with doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. CD and HC macrophages perform similarly in allowing replication of phagocytosed E. coli and generating neutrophil chemoattractants. Replication of phagocytosed E. coli was substantially decreased by HCQ and vitamin D. These warrant further therapeutic trials in CD in combination with relevant antibiotics.

  17. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose inhibits intracellular multiplication and promotes intracellular killing of Legionella pneumophila in A/J mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, M; Yoshida, S; Mizuguchi, Y

    1994-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila can grow intracellularly in A/J mouse macrophages. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2dG) (0.1, 1, and 10 mM) inhibited intracellular multiplication and promoted intracellular killing of L. pneumophila dose dependently when it was added to the culture medium of macrophage monolayers, whereas it did not inhibit the bacterial growth in buffered yeast extract broth, which was used for an L. pneumophila culture. The effect of 2dG was reversible because the surviving bacteria resumed intracellular multiplication after the washing away of 2dG from the culture. The effect of 2dG was also competitively inhibited by high concentrations of glucose. The inhibitory effect of 2dG was not attributed to the inhibition of bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Furthermore, sodium fluoride (0.1 and 1 mM), cycloheximide (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml), and tunicamycin (1, 2, and 5 micrograms/ml) did not promote the killing of L. pneumophila in macrophages, implying that the inhibitory effect of 2dG cannot be attributed to the inhibition of glycolysis, protein synthesis, and protein glycosylation in macrophages. We suggest that 2dG promotes intracellular killing of L. pneumophila by activating some novel killing mechanism of macrophages. PMID:8262638

  18. Trastuzumab triggers phagocytic killing of high HER2 cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by interaction with Fcγ receptors on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Brezski, Randall J; Rycyzyn, Michael; Jordan, Robert E; Strohl, William R; Zou, Quanming; Zhang, Ningyan; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-05-01

    Trastuzumab has been used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer for more than a decade, but the mechanisms of action for the therapy are still being actively investigated. Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity mediated by NK cells is well recognized as one of the key mechanisms of action for trastuzumab, but trastuzumab-mediated Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) has not been established. In this study, we demonstrate that macrophages, by way of phagocytic engulfment, can mediate ADCP and cancer cell killing in the presence of trastuzumab. Increased infiltration of macrophages in the tumor tissue was associated with enhanced efficacy of trastuzumab whereas depletion of macrophages resulted in reduced antitumor efficacy in mouse xenograft tumor models. Among the four mouse FcγRs, FcγRIV exhibits the strongest binding affinity to trastuzumab. Knockdown of FcγRIV in mouse macrophages reduced cancer cell killing and ADCP activity triggered by trastuzumab. Consistently, an upregulation of FcγRIV expression by IFN-γ triggered an increased ADCP activity by trastuzumab. In an analogous fashion, IFN-γ priming of human macrophages increased the expression of FcγRIII, the ortholog of murine FcγRIV, and increased trastuzumab-mediated cancer cell killing. Thus, in two independent systems, the results indicated that activation of macrophages in combination with trastuzumab can serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating high HER2 breast cancer by boosting ADCP killing of cancer cells.

  19. Depletion of cellular cholesterol enhances macrophage MAPK activation by chitin microparticles but not by heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Pantuso, Traci; Tsuji, Shoutaro; Yamashita, Makiko; Shinohara, Shizuka; Myrvik, Quentin N; Henriksen, Ruth Ann; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2008-08-01

    When macrophages phagocytose chitin (N-acetyl-d-glucosamine polymer) microparticles, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are immediately activated, followed by the release of Th1 cytokines, but not IL-10. To determine whether phagocytosis and macrophage activation in response to chitin microparticles are dependent on membrane cholesterol, RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with methyl-beta-cytodextrin (MBCD) and stimulated with chitin. These results were compared with the corresponding effects of bacterial components including heat-killed (HK) Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG) and an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) of bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN). The MBCD treatment did not alter chitin binding or the phagocytosis of chitin particles 20 min after stimulation. At the same time, however, chitin-induced phosphorylation of cellular MAPK was accelerated and enhanced in an MBCD dose-dependent manner. The increased phosphorylation was also observed for chitin phagosome-associated p38 and ERK1/2. In contrast, CpG-ODN and HK-BCG induced activation of MAPK in MBCD-treated cells at levels comparable to, or only slightly more than, those of control cells. We also found that MBCD treatment enhanced the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in response to chitin microparticles. In neither MBCD- nor saline-treated macrophages, did chitin particles induce detectable IL-10 mRNA synthesis. CpG-ODN induced TNF-alpha production, and COX-2 expression were less sensitive to MBCD treatment. Among the agonists studied, our results indicate that macrophage activation by chitin microparticles was most sensitive to cholesterol depletion, suggesting that membrane structures integrated by cholesterol are important for physiological regulation of chitin microparticle-induced cellular activation.

  20. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  1. Rapid Killing of Acinetobacter baumannii by Polymyxins Is Mediated by a Hydroxyl Radical Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Timothy R.; Liu, Xiang; Schroeder, Max R.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Burd, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that is a cause of clinically significant nosocomial infections. Increasingly, clinical isolates of A. baumannii are extensively resistant to numerous antibiotics, and the use of polymyxin antibiotics against these infections is often the final treatment option. Historically, the polymyxins have been thought to kill bacteria through membrane lysis. Here, we present an alternative mechanism based on data demonstrating that polymyxins induce rapid cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Supporting this notion, we found that inhibition of radical production delays the ability of polymyxins to kill A. baumannii. Notably, we demonstrate that this mechanism of killing occurs in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii and that this response is not induced in a polymyxin-resistant isolate. This study is the first to demonstrate that polymyxins induce rapid killing of A. baumannii and other Gram-negatives through hydroxyl radical production. This significantly augments our understanding of the mechanism of polymyxin action, which is critical knowledge toward the development of adjunctive therapies, particularly given the increasing necessity for treatment with these antibiotics in the clinical setting. PMID:22908157

  2. Rapid killing of Acinetobacter baumannii by polymyxins is mediated by a hydroxyl radical death pathway.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Timothy R; Liu, Xiang; Schroeder, Max R; Kraft, Colleen S; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2012-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that is a cause of clinically significant nosocomial infections. Increasingly, clinical isolates of A. baumannii are extensively resistant to numerous antibiotics, and the use of polymyxin antibiotics against these infections is often the final treatment option. Historically, the polymyxins have been thought to kill bacteria through membrane lysis. Here, we present an alternative mechanism based on data demonstrating that polymyxins induce rapid cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Supporting this notion, we found that inhibition of radical production delays the ability of polymyxins to kill A. baumannii. Notably, we demonstrate that this mechanism of killing occurs in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii and that this response is not induced in a polymyxin-resistant isolate. This study is the first to demonstrate that polymyxins induce rapid killing of A. baumannii and other Gram-negatives through hydroxyl radical production. This significantly augments our understanding of the mechanism of polymyxin action, which is critical knowledge toward the development of adjunctive therapies, particularly given the increasing necessity for treatment with these antibiotics in the clinical setting.

  3. Phagocytosis of live versus killed or fluorescently labeled bacteria by macrophages differ in both magnitude and receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Peruń, Angelika; Biedroń, Rafał; Konopiński, Maciej K; Białecka, Anna; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2017-05-01

    Scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated opsonin-independent phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages has been suggested to represent an important, early mechanism of anti-bacterial host defense. However, although the ability to bind bacteria has been demonstrated to be a shared feature of all types of SRs, in many cases the evidence is limited to the demonstration of increased binding of killed, fluorescently labeled bacteria to non-phagocytic cells transfected with these receptors. We sought to verify the ability of SRs to mediate non-opsonic phagocytosis of live Escherichia coli (Ec) and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa), model species of Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, respectively, and to assess the relative contributions of different SRs expressed on murine macrophages in this process. We found that the class A SR SR-A/CD204 was the major receptor mediating phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled Sa, whereas different SRs had highly redundant roles in the phagocytosis of live Sa. Conversely, different SRs contributed to the phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled Ec. In comparison, phagocytosis of live Ec was of much lower magnitude and was selectively mediated by SR-A. These results question the use of fluorescently labeled bacteria as valid replacements for live bacteria. The low magnitude of opsonin-independent phagocytosis of Ec and unimpaired phagocytosis of Sa in SR-A- or CD36-deficient macrophages indicate that the defect in this process might not be responsible for the reported impaired bacteria clearance in mice deficient in these receptors. We postulate that this impairment might result to a larger extent from inhibition of intracellular bacteria killing caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines, produced in excessive amounts by SR-deficient cells in response to bacterial products.

  4. Live and Heat-Killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 May Induce Modulatory Cytokines Profiles on Macrophages RAW 264.7.

    PubMed

    Jorjão, Adeline Lacerda; de Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and/or its products to induce the synthesis of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12) by mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). Three microorganism preparations were used: live L. rhamnosus (LLR) suspension, heat-killed L. rhamnosus (HKLR) suspension, and the supernatant of a heat-killed L. rhamnosus (SHKLR) suspension, which were cultured with macrophages (37°C, 5% CO2) for 2 h and 30 min. After that, cells were cultured for 16 h. The supernatants were used for the quantitation of cytokines, by ELISA. The results were compared with the synthesis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and analysed, using ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%. LLR and HKLR groups were able to significantly increase the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 (P < 0.05). SHKLR also significantly increased the production of TNF-α and IL-10 (P < 0.05) but not IL-6 (P > 0.05). All the L. rhamnosus suspensions were not able to produce detectable levels of IL-1β or significant levels of IL-4 and IL-12 (P > 0.05). In conclusion, live and heat-killed L. rhamnosus suspensions were able to induce the synthesis of different cytokines with proinflammatory (TNF-α and IL-6) or regulatory (IL-10) functions, suggesting the role of strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 in the modulation or in the stimulation of immune responses.

  5. Live and Heat-Killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 May Induce Modulatory Cytokines Profiles on Macrophages RAW 264.7

    PubMed Central

    Jorjão, Adeline Lacerda; de Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and/or its products to induce the synthesis of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12) by mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). Three microorganism preparations were used: live L. rhamnosus (LLR) suspension, heat-killed L. rhamnosus (HKLR) suspension, and the supernatant of a heat-killed L. rhamnosus (SHKLR) suspension, which were cultured with macrophages (37°C, 5% CO2) for 2 h and 30 min. After that, cells were cultured for 16 h. The supernatants were used for the quantitation of cytokines, by ELISA. The results were compared with the synthesis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and analysed, using ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%. LLR and HKLR groups were able to significantly increase the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 (P < 0.05). SHKLR also significantly increased the production of TNF-α and IL-10 (P < 0.05) but not IL-6 (P > 0.05). All the L. rhamnosus suspensions were not able to produce detectable levels of IL-1β or significant levels of IL-4 and IL-12 (P > 0.05). In conclusion, live and heat-killed L. rhamnosus suspensions were able to induce the synthesis of different cytokines with proinflammatory (TNF-α and IL-6) or regulatory (IL-10) functions, suggesting the role of strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 in the modulation or in the stimulation of immune responses. PMID:26649329

  6. Intracellular killing of bacteria: is Dictyostelium a model macrophage or an alien?

    PubMed

    Cosson, Pierre; Lima, Wanessa C

    2014-06-01

    Predation of bacteria by phagocytic cells was first developed during evolution by environmental amoebae. Many of the core mechanisms used by amoebae to sense, ingest and kill bacteria have also been conserved in specialized phagocytic cells in mammalian organisms. Here we focus on recent results revealing how Dictyostelium discoideum senses and kills non-pathogenic bacteria. In this model, genetic analysis of intracellular killing of bacteria has revealed a surprisingly complex array of specialized mechanisms. These results raise new questions on these processes, and challenge current models based largely on studies in mammalian phagocytes. In addition, recent studies suggest one additional level on complexity by revealing how Dictyostelium recognizes specifically various bacterial species and strains, and adapts its metabolism to process them. It remains to be seen to what extent mechanisms uncovered in Dictyostelium are also used in mammalian phagocytic cells.

  7. Intracellular killing of bacteria: is Dictyostelium a model macrophage or an alien?

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Pierre; Lima, Wanessa C

    2014-01-01

    Predation of bacteria by phagocytic cells was first developed during evolution by environmental amoebae. Many of the core mechanisms used by amoebae to sense, ingest and kill bacteria have also been conserved in specialized phagocytic cells in mammalian organisms. Here we focus on recent results revealing how Dictyostelium discoideum senses and kills non-pathogenic bacteria. In this model, genetic analysis of intracellular killing of bacteria has revealed a surprisingly complex array of specialized mechanisms. These results raise new questions on these processes, and challenge current models based largely on studies in mammalian phagocytes. In addition, recent studies suggest one additional level on complexity by revealing how Dictyostelium recognizes specifically various bacterial species and strains, and adapts its metabolism to process them. It remains to be seen to what extent mechanisms uncovered in Dictyostelium are also used in mammalian phagocytic cells. PMID:24628900

  8. Nerve growth factor promotes killing of Leishmania donovani by macrophages through the induction of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Rieko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Katakura, Ken; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is protozoonosis that occurs worldwide and still requires effective therapies with less toxicity. In this study, we examined the antileishmanial effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) using a murine infection model. NGF blocked the infection of macrophages by Leishmania donovani, which was completely cancelled by a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor. In vivo, not only did NGF show antileishmanial effects, but combination therapy of NGF and sodium stibogluconate synergistically exhibited the activity more potently than each monotherapy. These results indicate that NGF exerts antileishmanial effect by stimulating hydrogen peroxide production in macrophages and can be a novel therapy for leishmaniasis.

  9. Chronic Iron Overload Results in Impaired Bacterial Killing of THP-1 Derived Macrophage through the Inhibition of Lysosomal Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Jun-Kai; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ho, Li-Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for living organisms and the disturbance of iron homeostasis is associated with altered immune function. Additionally, bacterial infections can cause major complications in instances of chronic iron overload, such as patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Monocytes and macrophages play important roles in maintaining systemic iron homoeostasis and in defense against invading pathogens. However, the effect of iron overload on the function of monocytes and macrophages is unclear. We elucidated the effects of chronic iron overload on human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and THP-1 derived macrophages (TDM) by continuously exposing them to high levels of iron (100 μM) to create I-THP-1 and I-TDM, respectively. Our results show that iron overload did not affect morphology or granularity of I-THP-1, but increased the granularity of I-TDM. Bactericidal assays for non-pathogenic E. coli DH5α, JM109 and pathogenic P. aeruginosa all revealed decreased efficiency with increasing iron concentration in I-TDM. The impaired P. aeruginosa killing ability of human primary monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) was also found when cells are cultured in iron contained medium. Further studies on the bactericidal activity of I-TDM revealed lysosomal dysfunction associated with the inhibition of lysosomal acidification resulting in increasing lysosomal pH, the impairment of post-translational processing of cathepsins (especially cathepsin D), and decreased autophagic flux. These findings may explain the impaired innate immunity of thalassemic patients with chronic iron overload, suggesting the manipulation of lysosomal function as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27244448

  10. Activated Macrophages Destroy Intracellular Leishmania Major Amastigotes by an l-Arginine-Dependent Killing Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    conversion of site from one that is supportive of replication, to one that the sandfly -adapted promastigote to the amastigote form is hostile to...Inaddiion th cometiivein-room temperature for 5 min. Absorbance at 543 om was measured.activated macrophages. In addition, t e p titi e tn- No2- was qu

  11. Innate Immune Memory: Activation of Macrophage Killing Ability by Developmental Duties.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David; Tate, Ann Thomas

    2016-06-20

    Innate immune systems in many taxa exhibit hallmarks of memory in response to previous microbial exposure. A new study demonstrates that innate immune memory in Drosophila embryonic macrophages can also be induced by the successful engulfment of apoptotic cells, highlighting the importance of early exposure events for developing responsive immune systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Graphene-based photothermal agent for rapid and effective killing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Chin; Deokar, Archana R; Liao, Jhan-Hong; Shih, Po-Yuan; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2013-02-26

    Conventional antibiotic therapies are becoming less efficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Development of novel antibacterial material to effectively inhibit or kill bacteria is crucial. A graphene-based photothermal agent, magnetic reduced graphene oxide functionalized with glutaraldehyde (MRGOGA), was synthesized for efficient capture and effective killing of both gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) and gram-negative Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) bacteria upon near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. In the present work, we took advantage of the excellent photothermal properties of reduced graphene oxide upon NIR laser irradiation and glutaraldehyde as an efficient capturing agent toward both bacteria. Its magnetic characteristic allows bacteria to be readily trapped in a small volume by the external magnet. The synergetic effects increase the heating extent by MRGOGA upon NIR laser irradiation and the killing of the captured bacteria. The survival rate and membrane integrity assay demonstrate that 80 ppm MRGOGA solution provided rapid and effective killing of up to 99% of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in 10 min upon NIR laser irradiation under batch operation mode. Graphene demonstrated better photothermal antibacterial efficiency than carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, a microfluidic chip system under continuous operation mode demonstrates the reusability of MRGOGA and offers a biocompatible platform for online phothothermal sterilization.

  13. The exopolysaccharide alginate protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from IFN-gamma-mediated macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Leid, Jeff G; Willson, Carey J; Shirtliff, Mark E; Hassett, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R; Jeffers, Alyssa K

    2005-12-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilms and cause chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is well documented. Numerous studies have revealed that P. aeruginosa biofilms are highly refractory to antibiotics. However, dramatically fewer studies have addressed P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance to the host's immune system. In planktonic, unattached (nonbiofilm) P. aeruginosa, the exopolysaccharide alginate provides protection against a variety of host factors yet the role of alginate in protection of biofilm bacteria is unclear. To address this issue, we tested wild-type strains PAO1, PA14, the mucoid cystic fibrosis isolate, FRD1 (mucA22+), and the respective isogenic mutants which lacked the ability to produce alginate, for their susceptibility to human leukocytes in the presence and absence of IFN-gamma. Human leukocytes, in the presence of recombinant human IFN-gamma, killed biofilm bacteria lacking alginate after a 4-h challenge at 37 degrees C. Bacterial killing was dependent on the presence of IFN-gamma. Killing of the alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was mediated through mononuclear cell phagocytosis since treatment with cytochalasin B, which prevents actin polymerization, inhibited leukocyte-specific bacterial killing. By direct microscopic observation, phagocytosis of alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was significantly increased in the presence of IFN-gamma vs all other treatments. Addition of exogenous, purified alginate to the alginate-negative biofilms restored resistance to human leukocyte killing. Our results suggest that although alginate may not play a significant role in bacterial attachment, biofilm development, and formation, it may play an important role in protecting mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from the human immune system.

  14. Macrophages help NK cells to attack tumor cells by stimulatory NKG2D ligand but protect themselves from NK killing by inhibitory ligand Qa-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixia; Zhang, Cai; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and their crosstalk with other immune cells are important for innate immunity against tumor. To explore the role of the interaction between NK cells and macrophages in the regulation of anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we here demonstrate that poly I:C-treated macrophages increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against target tumor cells in NKG2D-dependent manner. In addition, IL-15, IL-18, and IFN-β secreted by poly I:C-treated macrophages are also involved in NKG2D expression and NK cell activation. Interestingly, the increase in expression of NKG2D ligands on macrophages induced a highly NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, but not against macrophages themselves. Notably, a high expression level of Qa-1, a NKG2A ligand, on macrophages may contribute to such protection of macrophages from NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, Qa-1 or NKG2A knockdown and Qa-1 antibody blockade caused the macrophages to be sensitive to NK cytolysis. These results suggested that macrophages may activate NK cells to attack tumor by NKG2D recognition whereas macrophages protect themselves from NK lysis via preferential expression of Qa-1.

  15. 17β-ESTRADIOL INCREASES LEISHMANIA MEXICANA KILLING IN MACROPHAGES FROM DBA/2 MICE BY ENHANCING PRODUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BUT NOT PRO-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES

    PubMed Central

    LEZAMA-DÁVILA, C.M.; ISAAC-MÁRQUEZ, A.P.; BARBI, J.; OGHUMU, S.; SATOSKAR, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that female DBA/2 mice are significantly more resistant to Leishmania mexicana compared with males. Here, we have analyzed the effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) on function and cytokine production in male and female DBA/2 macrophages in vitro. We show that E2 increases NO production and parasite killing in L. mexicana-infected male and female DBA/2 macrophages without increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data indicate that E2 may enhance leishmanicidal activity in macrophages by directly regulating production of NO. PMID:17556622

  16. Attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of Helicobacter pylori by human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, M; Paziak-Domanska, B; Wadström, T

    1995-02-01

    The different steps of phagocytosis, attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of cells of Helicobacter pylori strain 17874 (expressing sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) and cells of H. pylori strain 17875 (expressing non-sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) have been studied. More cells of sialopositive H. pylori strain 17874 have been found attached to human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBM) and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (PIM) than cells of sialonegative H. pylori strain 17875. Binding of cells of H. pylori strain 17874 has been significantly inhibited by treatment of phagocytes with neuraminidase. Inhibition of adhesion of these bacteria preincubated with foetuin to normal phagocytic cells has also been found. Well adhering cells of H. pylori strain 17874 were more resistant to killing mechanisms of human PBM and mouse PIM than cells of strain 17875. Good, probably sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin dependent, adhesion of H. pylori bacteria to phagocytes can be considered as an important virulence factor which facilitates the pathogen to avoid the defence mechanisms.

  17. Small Heat-Shock Proteins, IbpAB, Protect Non-Pathogenic Escherichia coli from Killing by Macrophage-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Goeser, Laura; Fan, Ting-Jia; Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Stasulli, Nikolas; Goldman, William E.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Hansen, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens possess virulence factors that prevent detection and killing by macrophages. However, similar virulence factors in non-pathogenic bacteria are less well-characterized and may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn’s disease. We hypothesize that the small heat shock proteins IbpAB, which have previously been shown to reduce oxidative damage to proteins in vitro and be upregulated in luminal non-pathogenic Escherichia strain NC101 during experimental colitis in vivo, protect commensal E. coli from killing by macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using real-time PCR, we measured ibpAB expression in commensal E. coli NC101 within wild-type (wt) and ROS-deficient (gp91phox-/-) macrophages and in NC101 treated with the ROS generator paraquat. We also quantified survival of NC101 and isogenic mutants in wt and gp91phox-/- macrophages using gentamicin protection assays. Similar assays were performed using a pathogenic E. coli strain O157:H7. We show that non-pathogenic E. coli NC101inside macrophages upregulate ibpAB within 2 hrs of phagocytosis in a ROS-dependent manner and that ibpAB protect E. coli from killing by macrophage-derived ROS. Moreover, we demonstrate that ROS-induced ibpAB expression is mediated by the small E. coli regulatory RNA, oxyS. IbpAB are not upregulated in pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and do not affect its survival within macrophages. Together, these findings indicate that ibpAB may be novel virulence factors for certain non-pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:25798870

  18. 17-AAG Kills Intracellular Leishmania amazonensis while Reducing Inflammatory Responses in Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Antonio Luis de Oliveira Almeida; Guedes, Carlos Eduardo Sampaio; Versoza, Carolina Leite; Lima, José Geraldo Bomfim; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Borges, Valéria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a neglected endemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Pentavalent antimonials have been the treatment of choice for the past 70 years and, due to the emergence of resistant cases, the efficacy of these drugs has come under scrutiny. Second-line drugs are less efficacious, cause a range of side effects and can be costly. The formulation of new generations of drugs, especially in developing countries, has become mandatory. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the anti-leishmanial effect of 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an HSP90 inhibitor, in vitro. This inhibitor is currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment; however, its effects against intracellular Leishmania remain untested. Macrophages infected with L. amazonensis were treated with 17-AAG (25–500 nM) and parasite load was quantified using optical microscopy. Parasite load declined in 17-AAG-treated macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular parasite death became irreversible after 4 h of treatment with 17-AAG, and occurred independent of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2−) production. Additionally, intracellular parasite viability was severely reduced after 48 h of treatment. Interestingly, treatment with 17-AAG reduced pro-inflammatory mediator production, including TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1, yet IL-12 remained unaffected. Electron microscopy revealed morphological alterations, such as double-membrane vacuoles and myelin figures at 24 and 48 h after 17-AAG treatment. Conclusions/Significance The HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, possesses high potency under low dosage and reduces both pro-inflammatory and oxidative molecule production. Therefore, further studies are warranted to investigate this inhibitor’s potential in the development of new generations of anti-leishmanials. PMID:23152914

  19. Rapid adaptation to microgravity in mammalian macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; de Zélicourt, Diane; Tauber, Svantje; Adrian, Astrid; Franz, Markus; Simmet, Dana M; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Hauschild, Swantje; Krammer, Sonja; Christen, Miriam; Bradacs, Gesine; Paulsen, Katrin; Wolf, Susanne A; Braun, Markus; Hatton, Jason; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Franke, Stefanie; Tanner, Samuel; Cristoforetti, Samantha; Sick, Beate; Hock, Bertold; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    Despite the observed severe effects of microgravity on mammalian cells, many astronauts have completed long term stays in space without suffering from severe health problems. This raises questions about the cellular capacity for adaptation to a new gravitational environment. The International Space Station (ISS) experiment TRIPLE LUX A, performed in the BIOLAB laboratory of the ISS COLUMBUS module, allowed for the first time the direct measurement of a cellular function in real time and on orbit. We measured the oxidative burst reaction in mammalian macrophages (NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages) exposed to a centrifuge regime of internal 0 g and 1 g controls and step-wise increase or decrease of the gravitational force in four independent experiments. Surprisingly, we found that these macrophages adapted to microgravity in an ultra-fast manner within seconds, after an immediate inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst reaction. For the first time, we provided direct evidence of cellular sensitivity to gravity, through real-time on orbit measurements and by using an experimental system, in which all factors except gravity were constant. The surprisingly ultra-fast adaptation to microgravity indicates that mammalian macrophages are equipped with a highly efficient adaptation potential to a low gravity environment. This opens new avenues for the exploration of adaptation of mammalian cells to gravitational changes.

  20. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J R; McLaren, D J

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell: target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-1 and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon. In this study MAF is shown to be released by a population of lymph node cells that does not adhere to nylon-wool columns, that responds well in proliferation assays to schistosome antigens and to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A, but does not respond to the B-cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide. These cells have been identified as small lymphocytes. PMID:2832308

  1. Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: correlation of /sup 3/H-DNA release from labeled bacteria and changes in numbers of viable organisms by mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.A.

    1982-12-01

    Conventional methods of assessing antibacterial activities of macrophages by viable counting are limited by the precision of the statistics and are difficult to interpret quantitatively because of unrestrained extracellular growth of bacteria. An alternative technique based on the release of radioactive DNA from labeled bacteria has been offered as overcoming these drawbacks. To assess it for use with macrophages I have made a correlation with the conventional viable counting method using a mathematical model. Opsonized Listeria monocytogenes labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were exposed to rat macrophages for periods up to 4 hr. Numbers of viable bacteria determined after sonication increased exponentially in the absence of live cells and this growth rate was progressively inhibited by increasing numbers of macrophages. After a lag period of 30-60 min soluble /sup 3/H appeared in the supernatant, the amount increasing with time and numbers of macrophages. To correlate these data I developed a mathematical model that considered that changes in numbers of viable organisms were due to the difference between rates of 1) growth of extracellular bacteria and 2) killing within the macrophage. On the basis of this model curves of best fit to the viable counts data were used to predict the release of radioactivity, assuming that death of a bacterium led to the total release of its label. These predictions and the experimental data agreed well, the lag period of 30-60 min between death of the bacterium and release of radioactivity being consistent with intracellular digestion. Release of soluble radioactivity appears to be an accurate reflection of the number of bacteria killed within the macrophage.

  2. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  3. The killing of Leishmania major by human macrophages is mediated by nitric oxide induced after ligation of the Fc epsilon RII/CD23 surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Vouldoukis, I; Riveros-Moreno, V; Dugas, B; Ouaaz, F; Bécherel, P; Debré, P; Moncada, S; Mossalayi, M D

    1995-01-01

    Serum IgE concentrations and the expression of the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RII/CD23) are increased in cutaneous leishmaniasis or after immune challenge with Leishmania antigens. In vitro, the ligation of CD23 by IgE-anti-IgE immune complexes (IgE-IC) or by anti-CD23 monoclonal antibody (mAb) induces nitric oxide (NO) synthase and the generation of various cytokines by human monocytes/macrophages. The present study shows that IgE-IC, via CD23 binding, induce intracellular killing of Leishmania major in human monocyte-derived macrophages through the induction of the L-arginine:NO pathway. This was demonstrated by increased generation of nitrite (NO2-), the stable oxidation product of NO, and by the ability of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine to block both NO generation and parasite killing. A similar NO-dependent effect was observed with interferon gamma-treated cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha is involved in this process, since both the induction of NO synthase and the killing of parasites caused by anti-CD23 mAb were inhibited by an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha mAb. Treatment of noninfected CD23+ macrophages with IgE-IC provided protection against subsequent in vitro infection of these cells by Leishmania major promastigotes. Thus, IgE-IC promote killing of L. major by inducing NO synthase in human macrophages. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7544003

  4. The Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase is required for optimal resistance to oxidative killing by murine macrophages and wild-type virulence in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gee, Jason M; Valderas, Michelle Wright; Kovach, Michael E; Grippe, Vanessa K; Robertson, Gregory T; Ng, Wai-Leung; Richardson, John M; Winkler, Malcolm E; Roop, R Martin

    2005-05-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of cell lysates from Brucella abortus 2308 and the isogenic hfq mutant Hfq3 revealed that the RNA binding protein Hfq (also known as host factor I or HF-I) is required for the optimal stationary phase production of the periplasmic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase SodC. An isogenic sodC mutant, designated MEK2, was constructed from B. abortus 2308 by gene replacement, and the sodC mutant exhibited much greater susceptibility to killing by O(2)(-) generated by pyrogallol and the xanthine oxidase reaction than the parental 2308 strain supporting a role for SodC in protecting this bacterium from O(2)(-) of exogenous origin. The B. abortus sodC mutant was also found to be much more sensitive to killing by cultured resident peritoneal macrophages from C57BL6J mice than 2308, and the attenuation displayed by MEK2 in cultured murine macrophages was enhanced when these phagocytes were treated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The attenuation displayed by the B. abortus sodC mutant in both resting and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages was alleviated, however, when these host cells were treated with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Consistent with its increased susceptibility to killing by cultured murine macrophages, the B. abortus sodC mutant also displayed significant attenuation in experimentally infected C57BL6J mice compared to the parental strain. These experimental findings indicate that SodC protects B. abortus 2308 from the respiratory burst of host macrophages. They also suggest that reduced SodC levels may contribute to the attenuation displayed by the B. abortus hfq mutant Hfq3 in the mouse model.

  5. Role of protein kinase R in the killing of Leishmania major by macrophages in response to neutrophil elastase and TLR4 via TNFα and IFNβ

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Marilia S.; Calegari-Silva, Tereza C.; de Carvalho Vivarini, Aislan; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.

    2014-01-01

    In cutaneous leishmaniasis, Leishmania amazonensis activates macrophage double-stranded, RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) to promote parasite growth. In our study, Leishmania major grew normally in RAW cells, RAW-expressing dominant-negative PKR (PKR-DN) cells, and macrophages of PKR-knockout mice, revealing that PKR is dispensable for L. major growth in macrophages. PKR activation in infected macrophages with poly I:C resulted in parasite death. Fifty percent of L. major-knockout lines for the ecotin-like serine peptidase inhibitor (ISP2; Δisp2/isp3), an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), died in RAW cells or macrophages from 129Sv mice, as a result of PKR activation. Inhibition of PKR or NE or neutralization of Toll-like receptor 4 or 2(TLR4 or TLR2) prevented the death of Δisp2/isp3. Δisp2/isp3 grew normally in RAW-PKR-DN cells or macrophages from 129Sv pkr−/−, tlr2−/−, trif−/−, and myd88−/− mice, associating NE activity, PKR, and TLR responses with parasite death. Δisp2/isp3 increased the expression of mRNA for TNF-α by 2-fold and of interferon β (IFNβ) in a PKR-dependent manner. Antibodies to TNF-α reversed the 95% killing by Δisp2/isp3, whereas they grew normally in macrophages from IFN receptor–knockout mice. We propose that ISP2 prevents the activation of PKR via an NE-TLR4-TLR2 axis to control innate responses that contribute to the killing of L. major.—Faria, M. S., Calegari-Silva, T. C., de Carvalho Vivarini, A., Mottram, J. C., Lopes, U. G., Lima, A. P. C. A. Role of protein kinase R in the killing of Leishmania major by macrophages in response to neutrophil elastase and TLR4 via TNFα and IFNβ. PMID:24732131

  6. Infection-induced respiratory burst in BALB/c macrophages kills Leishmania guyanensis amastigotes through apoptosis: possible involvement in resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Franco, Junia; Araújo-Mendes, Erica; Silva-Jardim, Izaltina; L-Santos, Jane; Faria, Daniela R; Dutra, Walderez O; Horta, Maria de Fátima

    2006-02-01

    The immune mechanisms that underlie resistance and susceptibility to leishmaniasis are not completely understood for all species of Leishmania. It is becoming clear that the immune response, the parasite elimination by the host and, as a result, the outcome of the disease depend both on the host and on the species of the infecting Leishmania. Here, we analyzed the outcome of the infection of BALB/c mice with L. guyanensis in vivo and in vitro. We showed that BALB/c mice, which are a prototype of susceptible host for most species of Leishmania, dying from these infections, develop insignificant or no cutaneous lesions and eliminate the parasite when infected with promastigotes of L. guyanensis. In vitro, we found that thioglycollate-elicited BALB/c peritoneal macrophages, which are unable to eliminate L. amazonensis without previous activation with cytokines or lipopolysaccharide, can kill L. guyanensis amastigotes. This is the first report showing that infection of peritoneal macrophages with stationary phase promastigotes efficiently triggers innate microbicidal mechanisms that are effective in eliminating the amastigotes, without exogenous activation. We demonstrated that L. guyanensis amastigotes die inside the macrophages through an apoptotic process that is independent of nitric oxide and is mediated by reactive oxygen intermediates generated in the host cell during infection. This innate killing mechanism of macrophages may account for the resistance of BALB/c mice to infection by L. guyanensis.

  7. Heat-killed BCG induces biphasic cyclooxygenase 2+ splenic macrophage formation--role of IL-10 and bone marrow precursors.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoshimi; Gabbard, Jon; Yamashita, Makiko; Tsuji, Shoutaro; Smith, Mike; Nishiyama, Akihito; Henriksen, Ruth Ann; Myrvik, Quentin N

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release by splenic F4/80(+) cyclooxygenase (COX)-2(+) macrophages (MØ) isolated from mice, treated with mycobacterial components, plays a major role in the regulation of immune responses. However, splenic MØ, isolated from untreated mice and treated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, express COX-1 and COX-2 within 1 day but release only minimal amounts of PGE(2) following elicitation with calcium ionophore A23187. For further characterization of in vivo requirements for development of PGE(2)-releasing MØ (PGE(2)-MØ), C57Bl/6 [wild-type (WT)], and interleukin (IL)-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice were treated intraperitoneally with heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (HK-BCG). One day following injection, COX-2 was induced in splenic MØ of both mouse strains. However, PGE(2) biosynthesis by these MØ was not increased. Thus, expression of COX-2 is not sufficient to induce PGE(2) production in vivo or in vitro. In sharp contrast, 14 days after HK-BCG treatment, PGE(2) release by COX-2(+) splenic MØ increased as much as sevenfold, and a greater increase was seen in IL-10(-/-) cells than in WT cells. To further determine whether the 14-day splenic PGE(2)-MØ could be derived from bone marrow precursors, we established a chimera in which bone marrow cells were transfused from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic donors to WT mice. Donors and recipients were treated with HK-BCG simultaneously, and marrow transfusion was performed on Days 1 and 2. On Day 14 after BCG treatment, a significant number of spleen cells coexpressed COX-2 and GFP, indicating that bone marrow-derived COX-2(+) MØ may be responsible for the increased PGE(2) production.

  8. MIF-driven activation of macrophages induces killing of intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi dependent on endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cutrullis, Romina A; Petray, Patricia B; Corral, Ricardo S

    2017-02-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key player in innate immunity. MIF has been considered critical for controlling acute infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Our study aimed to analyze whether MIF could favor microbicidal activity of the macrophage, a site where T. cruzi grows and the initial effector cell against this parasite. Using murine macrophages infected in vitro, we examined the effect of MIF on their parasiticidal ability and attempted to identify inflammatory agents involved in MIF-induced protection. Our findings show that MIF is readily secreted from peritoneal macrophages upon T. cruzi infection. MIF activates both primary and J774 phagocytes boosting the endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 signaling, as well as the release of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, leading to enhanced pathogen elimination. MIF can also potentiate the effect of interferon-gamma on T. cruzi killing by J774 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, rendering these cells more competent in reducing intracellular parasite burden. The present results unveil a novel innate immune pathway that contributes to host defense and broaden our understanding of the regulation of inflammatory mediators implicated in early parasite containment that is decisive for resistance to T. cruzi infection.

  9. A Rapid Increase in Macrophage-Derived Versican and Hyaluronan in Infectious Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mary Y.; Tanino, Yoshinori; Vidova, Veronika; Kinsella, Michael G.; Chan, Christina K.; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Wight, Thomas N.; Frevert, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to characterize the changes to chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and hyaluronan in lungs in the acute response to gram-negative bacterial infection, and to identify cellular components responsible for these changes. Mice were treated with intratracheal (IT) live Escherichia coli, E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or PBS. Both E. coli and LPS caused rapid selective increases in mRNA expression of versican and hyaluronan synthase (Has) isoforms 1 and 2 associated with increased immunohistochemical and histochemical staining for versican and hyaluronan in the lungs. Versican was associated with a subset of alveolar macrophages. To examine whether macrophages contribute to versican and hyaluronan accumulation, in vitro studies with primary cultures of bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages were performed. Unstimulated macrophages expressed very low levels of versican and hyaluronan synthase mRNA, with no detectible versican protein or hyaluronan product. Stimulation with LPS caused rapid increases in versican mRNA and protein, a rapid increase in Has1 mRNA, and concomitant inhibition of hyaluronidases 1 and 2, the major hyaluronan degrading enzymes. Hyaluronan could be detected following chloroquine pre-treatment, indicating rapid turnover and degradation of hyaluronan by macrophages. In addition, the effects of LPS, the M1 macrophage classical activation agonist, were compared to those of IL-4/IL-13 or IL-10, the M2a and M2c alternative activation agonists, respectively. Versican and Has1 increased only in response to M1 activation. Finally, the up-regulation of versican and Has1 in the whole lungs of wild-type mice following IT LPS was completely abrogated in TLR-4−/− mice. These findings suggest that versican and hyaluronan synthesis may play an important role in the innate immune response to gram-negative lung infection. PMID:24472738

  10. A rapid increase in macrophage-derived versican and hyaluronan in infectious lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mary Y.; Tanino, Yoshinori; Vidova, Veronika; Kinsella, Michael G.; Chan, Christina K.; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Wight, Thomas N.; Frevert, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to characterize the changes in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and hyaluronan in lungs in acute response to gram-negative bacterial infection and to identify cellular components responsible for these changes. Mice were treated with intratracheal (IT) live Escherichia coli, E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or PBS. Both E. coli and LPS caused rapid selective increases in mRNA expression of versican and hyaluronan synthase (Has) isoforms 1 and 2 associated with increased immunohistochemical and histochemical staining for versican and hyaluronan in the lungs. Versican was associated with a subset of alveolar macrophages. To examine whether macrophages contribute to versican and hyaluronan accumulation, in vitro studies with primary cultures of bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages were performed. Unstimulated macrophages expressed very low levels of versican and hyaluronan synthase mRNA, with no detectible versican protein or hyaluronan product. Stimulation with LPS caused rapid increases in versican mRNA and protein, a rapid increase in Has1 mRNA, and concomitant inhibition of hyaluronidases 1 and 2, the major hyaluronan degrading enzymes. Hyaluronan could be detected following chloroquine pre-treatment, indicating rapid turnover and degradation of hyaluronan by macrophages. In addition, the effects of LPS, the M1 macrophage classical activation agonist, were compared to those of IL-4/IL-13 or IL-10, the M2a and M2c alternative activation agonists, respectively. Versican and Has1 increased only in response to M1 activation. Finally, the up-regulation of versican and Has1 in the whole lungs of wild-type mice following IT LPS was completely abrogated in TLR-4−/− mice. These findings suggest that versican and hyaluronan synthesis may play an important role in the innate immune response to gram-negative lung infection. PMID:24727035

  11. A rapid increase in macrophage-derived versican and hyaluronan in infectious lung disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mary Y; Tanino, Yoshinori; Vidova, Veronika; Kinsella, Michael G; Chan, Christina K; Johnson, Pamela Y; Wight, Thomas N; Frevert, Charles W

    2014-02-01

    The goals of this study were to characterize the changes in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and hyaluronan in lungs in acute response to gram-negative bacterial infection and to identify cellular components responsible for these changes. Mice were treated with intratracheal (IT) live Escherichia coli, E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or PBS. Both E. coli and LPS caused rapid selective increases in mRNA expression of versican and hyaluronan synthase (Has) isoforms 1 and 2 associated with increased immunohistochemical and histochemical staining for versican and hyaluronan in the lungs. Versican was associated with a subset of alveolar macrophages. To examine whether macrophages contribute to versican and hyaluronan accumulation, in vitro studies with primary cultures of bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages were performed. Unstimulated macrophages expressed very low levels of versican and hyaluronan synthase mRNA, with no detectible versican protein or hyaluronan product. Stimulation with LPS caused rapid increases in versican mRNA and protein, a rapid increase in Has1 mRNA, and concomitant inhibition of hyaluronidases 1 and 2, the major hyaluronan degrading enzymes. Hyaluronan could be detected following chloroquine pre-treatment, indicating rapid turnover and degradation of hyaluronan by macrophages. In addition, the effects of LPS, the M1 macrophage classical activation agonist, were compared to those of IL-4/IL-13 or IL-10, the M2a and M2c alternative activation agonists, respectively. Versican and Has1 increased only in response to M1 activation. Finally, the up-regulation of versican and Has1 in the whole lungs of wild-type mice following IT LPS was completely abrogated in TLR-4(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that versican and hyaluronan synthesis may play an important role in the innate immune response to gram-negative lung infection.

  12. Reprint of: A rapid increase in macrophage-derived versican and hyaluronan in infectious lung disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mary Y; Tanino, Yoshinori; Vidova, Veronika; Kinsella, Michael G; Chan, Christina K; Johnson, Pamela Y; Wight, Thomas N; Frevert, Charles W

    2014-04-01

    The goals of this study were to characterize the changes in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and hyaluronan in lungs in acute response to gram-negative bacterial infection and to identify cellular components responsible for these changes. Mice were treated with intratracheal (IT) live Escherichia coli, E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or PBS. Both E. coli and LPS caused rapid selective increases in mRNA expression of versican and hyaluronan synthase (Has) isoforms 1 and 2 associated with increased immunohistochemical and histochemical staining for versican and hyaluronan in the lungs. Versican was associated with a subset of alveolar macrophages. To examine whether macrophages contribute to versican and hyaluronan accumulation, in vitro studies with primary cultures of bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages were performed. Unstimulated macrophages expressed very low levels of versican and hyaluronan synthase mRNA, with no detectible versican protein or hyaluronan product. Stimulation with LPS caused rapid increases in versican mRNA and protein, a rapid increase in Has1 mRNA, and concomitant inhibition of hyaluronidases 1 and 2, the major hyaluronan degrading enzymes. Hyaluronan could be detected following chloroquine pre-treatment, indicating rapid turnover and degradation of hyaluronan by macrophages. In addition, the effects of LPS, the M1 macrophage classical activation agonist, were compared to those of IL-4/IL-13 or IL-10, the M2a and M2c alternative activation agonists, respectively. Versican and Has1 increased only in response to M1 activation. Finally, the up-regulation of versican and Has1 in the whole lungs of wild-type mice following IT LPS was completely abrogated in TLR-4(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that versican and hyaluronan synthesis may play an important role in the innate immune response to gram-negative lung infection.

  13. Monosodium Urate Crystals Induce Upregulation of NK1.1-Dependent Killing by Macrophages and Support Tumor-Resident NK1.1+ Monocyte/Macrophage Populations in Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Stefanie; Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca; Harper, Jacquie L

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages display phenotypic and functional heterogeneity dependent on the changing inflammatory microenvironment. Under some conditions, macrophages can acquire effector functions commonly associated with NK cells. In the current study, we investigated how the endogenous danger signal monosodium urate (MSU) crystals can alter macrophage functions. We report that naive, primary peritoneal macrophages rapidly upregulate the expression of the NK cell-surface marker NK1.1 in response to MSU crystals but not in response to LPS or other urate crystals. NK1.1 upregulation by macrophages was associated with mechanisms including phagocytosis of crystals, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and autocrine proinflammatory cytokine signaling. Further analysis demonstrated that MSU crystal-activated macrophages exhibited NK cell-like cytotoxic activity against target cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of tumor hemopoietic cell populations showed that effective, MSU-mediated antitumor activity required coadministration with Mycobacterium smegmatis to induce IL-1β production and significant accumulation of monocytes and macrophages (but not granulocytes or dendritic cells) expressing elevated levels of NK1.1. Our findings provide evidence that MSU crystal-activated macrophages have the potential to develop tumoricidal NK cell-like functions that may be exploited to boost antitumor activity in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4+ T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as “Trojan horses” carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages. PMID:26056317

  15. Involvement of β-defensin 130 (DEFB130) in the macrophage microbicidal mechanisms for killing Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Takano, Ryo; Furukawa, Atsushi; Murakoshi, Fumi; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-02-09

    Understanding the molecular defense mechanism of macrophages and identifying their effector molecules against malarial parasites may provide important clues for the discovery of new therapies. To analyze the immunological responses of malarial parasite-induced macrophages, we used DNA microarray technology to examine the gene profile of differentiated macrophages phagocytizing Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes (iRBC). The transcriptional gene profile of macrophages in response to iRBCs represented 168 down-regulated genes, which were mainly involved in the cellular immune response, and 216 upregulated genes, which were involved in cellular proteolysis, growth, and adhesion. Importantly, the specific upregulation of β-defensin 130 (DEFB130) in these macrophages suggested a possible role for DEFB130 in malarial parasite elimination. Differentiated macrophages phagocytizing iRBCs exhibited an increase in intracellular DEFB130 levels and DEFB130 appeared to accumulate at the site of iRBC engulfment. Transfection of esiRNA-mediated knockdown of DEFB130 into macrophages resulted in a remarkable reduction in their antiplasmodial activity in vitro. Furthermore, DEFB130 synthetic peptide exhibited a modest toxic effect on P. falciparum in vitro and P. yoelii in vivo, unlike scrambled DEFB130 peptide, which showed no antiplasmodial activity. Together, these results suggest that DEFB130 might be one of the macrophage effector molecules for eliminating malarial parasites. Our data broaden our knowledge of the immunological response of macrophages to iRBCs and shed light on a new target for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Involvement of β-defensin 130 (DEFB130) in the macrophage microbicidal mechanisms for killing Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Takano, Ryo; Furukawa, Atsushi; Murakoshi, Fumi; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the molecular defense mechanism of macrophages and identifying their effector molecules against malarial parasites may provide important clues for the discovery of new therapies. To analyze the immunological responses of malarial parasite-induced macrophages, we used DNA microarray technology to examine the gene profile of differentiated macrophages phagocytizing Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes (iRBC). The transcriptional gene profile of macrophages in response to iRBCs represented 168 down-regulated genes, which were mainly involved in the cellular immune response, and 216 upregulated genes, which were involved in cellular proteolysis, growth, and adhesion. Importantly, the specific upregulation of β-defensin 130 (DEFB130) in these macrophages suggested a possible role for DEFB130 in malarial parasite elimination. Differentiated macrophages phagocytizing iRBCs exhibited an increase in intracellular DEFB130 levels and DEFB130 appeared to accumulate at the site of iRBC engulfment. Transfection of esiRNA-mediated knockdown of DEFB130 into macrophages resulted in a remarkable reduction in their antiplasmodial activity in vitro. Furthermore, DEFB130 synthetic peptide exhibited a modest toxic effect on P. falciparum in vitro and P. yoelii in vivo, unlike scrambled DEFB130 peptide, which showed no antiplasmodial activity. Together, these results suggest that DEFB130 might be one of the macrophage effector molecules for eliminating malarial parasites. Our data broaden our knowledge of the immunological response of macrophages to iRBCs and shed light on a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28181499

  17. A validated bioluminescence-based assay for the rapid determination of the initial rate of kill for discovery antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Imran; Sharma, Raman; Biagini, Giancarlo A; Horrocks, Paul

    2017-03-01

    A future treatment for uncomplicated malaria will contain at least one component that exerts a rapid rate of kill. We describe here the validation and application of a simple, robust and rapid bioluminescence-based assay for the determination of the initial rate of kill in intra-erythrocytic asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum . A modification to the concentration-response bioluminescence [here termed bioluminescence relative rate of kill (BRRoK)] assay, utilizing exposure to fold-IC 50 concentrations (0.33× to  9×), was used to monitor the immediate cytocidal effect of 372 open-source compounds for antimalarial drug discovery available through the Medicines for Malaria Venture Malaria Box. Antimalarial drugs that exert a rapid cytocidal effect produce a concentration-dependent loss of bioluminescence signal that correlates with available in vitro and in vivo estimates of parasite clearance time and parasite reduction ratio. Following the measurement of IC 50 for the Malaria Box compounds in Dd2 luc , the BRRoK assay was used to identify and rank 372 compounds for their initial cytocidal activity. Fifty-three compounds in the Malaria Box show an initial relative rate of kill greater than that of chloroquine, with 17 of these having an initial relative rate of kill greater than that of dihydroartemisinin. The BRRoK assay provides a rapid assay format for the estimation of a key pharmacodynamic property of antimalarial drug action. The simplicity and robustness of the assay suggests it would be readily scalable for high-throughput screening and a critical decision-making tool for antimalarial drug development.

  18. Evaluation of methods of rapid mass killing of segregated early weaned piglets

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Terry L.; Steele, Gregory G.; Wamnes, Steinar; Green, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The operational logistics of mass killing of healthy, surplus piglets by manual blunt force trauma, controlled blunt force trauma, intraperitoneal injection of barbiturate, and free bullet were recorded. Objective performance variables evaluated were, speed of application, human resource and input cost, animal restraint required, and failure rate. Subjective evaluation of esthetics and difficulty of application indicated manual blunt force trauma is an unacceptable technique. Under field conditions, physical methods of killing were superior to intraperitoneal injection of concentrated pentobarbital. Considering animal welfare metrics in isolation, controlled blunt force trauma was superior to all other techniques attempted. PMID:22210939

  19. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Protects Escherichia coli from Rapid Antimicrobial-Mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hongfei; Wang, Dai; Xue, Yunxin; Zhang, Zhi; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to antimicrobial lethality was examined by treating Escherichia coli with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an antioxidant solvent frequently used in antimicrobial studies. DMSO inhibited killing by ampicillin, kanamycin, and two quinolones and had little effect on MICs. DMSO-mediated protection correlated with decreased ROS accumulation and provided evidence for ROS-mediated programmed cell death. These data support the contribution of ROS to antimicrobial lethality and suggest caution when using DMSO-dissolved antimicrobials for short-time killing assays. PMID:27246776

  20. Streptococcus pyogenes M49 plasminogen/plasmin binding facilitates keratinocyte invasion via integrin-integrin-linked kinase (ILK) pathways and protects from macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Siemens, Nikolai; Patenge, Nadja; Otto, Juliane; Fiedler, Tomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2011-06-17

    The entry into epithelial cells and the prevention of primary immune responses are a prerequisite for a successful colonization and subsequent infection of the human host by Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS). Here, we demonstrate that interaction of GAS with plasminogen promotes an integrin-mediated internalization of the bacteria into keratinocytes, which is independent from the serine protease activity of potentially generated plasmin. α(1)β(1)- and α(5)β(1)-integrins were identified as the major keratinocyte receptors involved in this process. Inhibition of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) expression by siRNA silencing or blocking of PI3K and Akt with specific inhibitors, reduced the GAS M49-plasminogen/plasmin-mediated invasion of keratinocytes. In addition, blocking of actin polymerization significantly reduced GAS internalization into keratinocytes. Altogether, these results provide a first model of plasminogen-mediated GAS invasion into keratinocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that plasminogen binding protects the bacteria against macrophage killing.

  1. Rapid Temporal Dynamics of Transcription, Protein Synthesis, and Secretion during Macrophage Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Eichelbaum, Katrin; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages provide the first line of host defense with their capacity to react to an array of cytokines and bacterial components requiring tight regulation of protein expression and secretion to invoke a properly tuned innate immune response. To capture the dynamics of this system, we introduce a novel method combining pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with pulse labeling using the methionine analog azidohomoalanine that allows the enrichment of newly synthesized proteins via click-chemistry followed by their identification and quantification by mass spectrometry. We show that this permits the analysis of proteome changes on a rapid time scale, as evidenced by the detection of 4852 newly synthesized proteins after only a 20-min SILAC pulse. We have applied this methodology to study proteome response during macrophage activation in a time-course manner. We have combined this with full proteome, transcriptome, and secretome analyses, producing an integrative analysis of the first 3 h of lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation. We observed the rapid induction of multiple processes well known to TLR4 signaling, as well as anti-inflammatory proteins and proteins not previously associated with immune response. By correlating transcriptional, translational, and secretory events, we derived novel mechanistic principles of processes specifically induced by lipopolysaccharides, including ectodomain shedding and proteolytic processing of transmembrane and extracellular proteins and protein secretion independent of transcription. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the combination of pulsed azidohomoalanine and pulsed SILAC permits the detailed characterization of proteomic events on a rapid time scale. We anticipate that this approach will be very useful in probing the immediate effects of cellular stimuli and will provide mechanistic insight into cellular perturbation in multiple biological systems. The data have been deposited

  2. Rapid killing of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) on surfaces using heat: application to luggage.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The resistance of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) to chemical insecticides has motivated the development of non-chemical control methods such as heat treatment. However, because bed bugs tend to hide in cracks or crevices, their behavior incidentally generates a thermally insulated microenvironment for themselves. Bed bugs located on the outer surface of luggage are less insulated and potentially more vulnerable to brief heat treatment. Soft-sided suitcases with adult male bed bugs on the outside were exposed to an air temperature of 70-75 °C. It took 6 min to kill all of the bed bugs, even those that had concealed themselves under zipper flaps or decorative piping. During heating, only one bed bug (out of 250 in total) moved into the luggage (through a closed zipper). Over long periods of time (24 h) at room temperature, adult male bed bugs on the exterior of luggage only infrequently moved inside; only 3% (5/170) had moved inside during 24 h. Brief exterior heat treatment of luggage is a promising way to reduce the spread of bed bugs being transported on the outer surface of luggage. This treatment will not kill bed bugs inside the luggage, but could be a component of integrated management for this pest. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Macrophage and NK-mediated killing of precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells targeted with a-fucosylated anti-CD19 humanized antibodies.

    PubMed

    Matlawska-Wasowska, K; Ward, E; Stevens, S; Wang, Y; Herbst, R; Winter, S S; Wilson, B S

    2013-06-01

    This work reports the tumoricidal effects of a novel investigational humanized anti-CD19 monoclonal antibody (Medi-551). An a-fucosylated antibody with increased affinity for human FcγRIIIA, Medi-551 is shown to mediate both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Medi-551/CD19 complexes internalize slowly (>5 h) and thus remain accessible to effector cells for prolonged periods. We evaluated in vitro ADCC and ADCP activities of primary human natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages against precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient blasts. Fluorescent imaging studies document immunological synapses formed between anti-CD19-bound target leukemia cells and effector cells and capture the kinetics of both NK-mediated killing and macrophage phagocytosis. Genetic polymorphisms in FcγRIIIA-158F/V modulate in vitro activities of effector cells, with FcγRIIIA-158V homozygotes or heterozygotes showing the strongest activity. Medi-551 treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human pre-B cells led to prolonged animal survival and markedly reduced disease burden in blood, liver and bone marrow. These data show that anti-CD19 antibodies effectively recruit immune cells to pre-B ALL cells and support a move forward to early phase trials in this disease.

  4. Short communication: rapid preparation of preventive and therapeutic whole-killed retroviral vaccines using the microbicide taurine chloramine.

    PubMed

    Dudani, A K; Martyres, A; Fliss, H

    2008-04-01

    A current urgent priority is to develop microbicides and vaccines to combat retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We show that the cysteine-selective natural compound, taurine chloramine (T-NCl), can be effective in this task. A number of proteins in all retroviruses contain highly conserved cysteine-rich regions that are essential for infection and replication. Our data show that by targeting these essential cysteine residues, T-NCl (2 or 5 mM) acts as a highly effective and safe microbicide that fully blocks the infectivity of high HIV-1 titers (10(6) TCID(50) units/ml) but is not injurious to eukaryotic cells. We also demonstrate that T-NCl can be used to prepare a highly effective whole-killed vaccine against murine AIDS (MAIDS) that shows both preventive and therapeutic efficacy. The vaccine consists of a T-NCl-inactivated retrovirus suspension in host cell lysate. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease and speed of vaccine preparation and its avoidance of harsh inactivation or purification steps that can alter native viral conformation. Our approach is therefore likely to overcome a number of intractable obstacles to the preparation of an effective whole-killed HIV vaccine, such as surviving infective viral particles, rapid viral mutation rates, numerous viral strains, and harsh purification steps. Our approach may also permit the rapid preparation of autologous, or custom-made, vaccines for individual patients.

  5. The pathogen Candida albicans hijacks pyroptosis for escape from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L; Vince, James E; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-03-25

    reports of C. albicans mutants that form hyphae of wild-type morphology but are defective in killing macrophages. We show that C. albicans causes macrophage cell death by at least two mechanisms. Phase 1 killing (first 6 to 8 h) depends on the activation of the pyroptotic programmed host cell death by fungal hyphae. Phase 2 (up to 24 h) is rapid and depends on robust hyphal formation but is independent of pyroptosis. Our data provide a new model for how the interplay between fungal morphogenesis and activation of a host cell death pathway mediates macrophage killing by C. albicans hyphae.

  6. Role of trehalose-6P phosphatase (TPS2) in stress tolerance and resistance to macrophage killing in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Esparza, María; Martínez-Vicente, Encarnación; González-Párraga, Pilar; Ros, José M; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Disruption of the TPS2 gene encoding the only trehalose-6P phosphatase activity in Candida albicans caused a pleiotropic defective phenotype, maintaining the cell wall integrity and the ability to form chlamydospores. A homozygous tps2Delta/tps2Delta showed reduced growth at high temperatures and a marked sensitivity to heat shock (42 degrees C) and severe oxidative exposure (50mM H(2)O(2)). Reintroduction of the TPS2 gene reversed these alterations. A more detailed study of the antioxidant response showed that exponential tps2Delta null cells displayed an adaptive response to oxidative stress as well as cross-tolerance between temperature and oxidative stress. Differential measurement of trehalose and trehalose-6P, using reliable new HPLC methodology, revealed a significant accumulation of trehalose-6P in tps2Delta cells, which was enhanced after oxidative exposure. In contrast, the level of trehalose-6P in parental cells was virtually undetectable, and oxidative treatment only induced the synthesis of free trehalose. A transitory increase in the expression of TPS2 and TPS1 genes was promoted in wild-type cells in response to acute (50mM) but not gentle (5mM) oxidative exposure. TPS1 and TPS2 oxidative-induced transcriptions were completely absent from the tps2Delta mutant. Exponential blastoconidia from both parental and tps2Delta/tps2Delta strains were completely phagocytosed by murine and human macrophages, triggering a subsequent proinflammatory response manifested by the release of TNF-alpha. Reflecting the lower resistance to oxidative stress displayed by the tps2Delta mutant, intracellular survival in resting and IFN-gamma and LPS-stimulated macrophages was also diminished. Taken together, our results confirm the mainly protective role played by the trehalose biosynthetic pathway in the cellular response to oxidative stress and subsequently in the resistance to phagocytosis in C. albicans, a defensive mechanism in which TPS2 would be involved.

  7. Ultra-Rapid Intercritical Annealing to Improve Deep Drawability of Low-Carbon, Al-Killed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massardier, V.; Ngansop, A.; Fabregue, D.; Cazottes, S.; Merlin, J.

    2012-07-01

    Ultra-rapid annealing (URA) cycles were performed on a low-carbon, Al-killed steel coiled at a high temperature. The parameters (heating and cooling rates, and annealing temperature) of these cycles were varied to analyze their impact on the microstructure and the tensile properties of the steel. It was established that the final microstructure of the steel is governed by an interaction between the growth of the primary ferrite grains (resulting from the recrystallization) and the development of the austenite grains formed above AC1, and that the heating rate strongly influences this interaction. A microstructure favorable to deep drawability (leading to a mean plastic strain ratio of 1.8) was obtained by adjusting the parameters of the URA cycles. The current work showed that three conditions have to be fulfilled to produce this optimized microstructure: (1) Intercritical annealing should lead to the formation of about 20 pct of austenite, (2) the heating rate has to be rapid to minimize the carbon content in solution during recrystallization, and (3) the cooling rate must be relatively slow (≈50 K/s).

  8. Increased uptake by splenic red pulp macrophages contributes to rapid platelet turnover in WASP(-) mice.

    PubMed

    Prislovsky, Amanda; Strom, Ted S

    2013-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia caused by rapid platelet consumption contributes to the severe thrombocytopenia of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and to the milder thrombocytopenia seen in murine WAS. We show that rapid clearance of ¹¹¹In-labeled murine WASP(-) platelets correlates with enhanced splenic uptake. Using platelets labeled with a pH-sensitive fluorescent marker (pHrodo), we quantify normal platelet uptake by red pulp macrophages (RPMs), and demonstrate its enhancement after in vivo opsonization of platelets. The spleens of WASP(-) mice contain an increased number of RPM, and rapid clearance of WASP(-) platelets in WASP(-) mice in turn generates an increased number of pHrodo(+) splenic RPMs. To separately assess the platelet intrinsic and recipient-dependent functions involved in the clearance and splenic phagocyte uptake of WASP(-) platelets, we performed "crossed" pHrodo(+) platelet injection studies (wild type [WT] to WASP(-), WASP(-) to WT). We show that an extrinsic effect of recipient WASP deficiency on the clearance of WASP(-) platelets correlates with increased platelet uptake by RPMs. An intrinsic effect of platelet WASP deficiency on platelet clearance does not, however, correlate with increased total uptake by WT or WASP(-) RPMs. In contrast to other published findings, we find no evidence of a baseline or antibody-induced increase in phosphatidyl serine exposure on WASP(-) platelets. Our findings suggest that an increased number of RPMs in WASP(-) mice contributes significantly to the increased platelet consumption rate in WASP(-) mice. This might explain the consistent efficacy of splenectomy in murine and clinical WAS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Control of Rhagoletis indifferents using Thiamethoxam and Spinosad baits under external fly pressure and its relation to rapidity of kill and residual bait activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control of western cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis indifferens Curran) using thiamethoxam in sucrose bait and spinosad bait in cherry orchards under external fly pressure and its relation to rapidity of kill and residual bait activity were studied in Washington and Utah in 2010 and 2011. Thiamethoxam ...

  10. Rescuing of deficient killing and phagocytic activities of macrophages derived from non-obese diabetic mice by treatment with geldanamycin or heat shock: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Vega, Virginia Loreto; Charles, Wisler; Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Alexander, Laura E Crotty

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to recurrent and uncontrolled infections, with worse prognoses than in healthy individuals. Macrophages (MΦs) derived from DMT1 individuals have compromised mounting of inflammatory and immune responses. The mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain unknown. It has been shown that the presence of extra- and intracellular heat shock proteins (hsp) positively modulates immune cell function. Using naive MΦs derived from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a well-established mouse model for DMT1, we demonstrate that heat shock (HS) as well as treatment with geldanamycin (GA), significantly improves diabetic MΦ activation, resulting in increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria. Induction of HS did not affect the aberrant NOD-MΦ cytokine profile, which is characterized by elevated IL-10 levels and normal tumor necrosis factor alpha. Our observations were consistent at pre-diabetic (normal random blood glucose) and diabetic (random blood glucose greater than 250 mg/dl) stages, suggesting that HS and GA treatment may compensate for intrinsic genetic alterations present in diabetic cells regardless of the stage of the disease. The mechanisms associated to this phenomenon are unknown, but they may likely be associated with the induction of hsp expression, a common factor between HS and GA treatment. Our results may open a new field for non-classical function of hsp and indicate that hsp expression may be used as a part of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of complications associated with DMT1 as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  11. Pharmacodynamic Evidence that Ciprofloxacin Failure against Tuberculosis Is Not Due to Poor Microbial Kill but to Rapid Emergence of Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Louie, Arnold; Deziel, Mark R.; Drusano, George L.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of early bactericidal activity provide a fast and economic way to evaluate the clinical efficacy of potential agents for the treatment of tuberculosis. Based on good early bactericidal activity data, ciprofloxacin entered further studies and is now recommended as part of treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We examined the relationship between ciprofloxacin bactericidal activity and the emergence of resistance in an in vitro pharmacodynamic infection model in which we exposed Mycobacterium tuberculosis to simulated free-drug ciprofloxacin serum concentration-time profiles that mimic those encountered in humans treated with ciprofloxacin orally for 2 weeks. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures were sampled during the experiment in order to determine the effect of therapy on the total microbial population as well as the drug-resistant population. The ciprofloxacin regimen, which achieved a ratio of the area under the concentration time curve from 0 to 24 h to MIC of 80.4, resulted in a rapid microbial kill similar to that encountered in humans during studies of early bactericidal activity. However, despite this impressive bactericidal activity, resistance emerged quickly. By the end of the first week, most of the microbial population had been replaced by a ciprofloxacin-resistant population. Given the MICs encountered in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, we estimate that most clinically tolerable doses of ciprofloxacin will lead to emergence of resistance, especially when used as the only effective component of regimens given for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. One of the explanations for why early bactericidal activity fails to predict sterilization may be the emergence of a resistant subpopulation, which only becomes ≥1% at the end of the early bactericidal activity studies. PMID:16048921

  12. Rapid method for identification of macrophages in suspension by acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Ennist, D L; Jones, K H

    1983-07-01

    A supravital staining procedure for the identification of macrophages in cell suspension using a modification of a standard cytochemical assay for alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) activity is described. Macrophages are stained an intense red-brown after 5 min incubation in a buffer using ANAE as the substrate and hexazonium pararosaniline as the coupler for the azo dye. There is close agreement in the number of ANAE-positive cells found and the number of macrophages identified in smears by morphological criteria, by phagocytosis, and by the presence of Fc receptors. Therefore, this stain provides a quick, inexpensive method to estimate the number of macrophages present in suspensions of lymphocytic tissues from rats and mice.

  13. The hmp gene encoding the NO-inducible flavohaemoglobin in Escherichia coli confers a protective advantage in resisting killing within macrophages, but not in vitro: links with swarming motility.

    PubMed

    Stevanin, Tânia M; Read, Robert C; Poole, Robert K

    2007-08-15

    Escherichia coli flavohaemoglobin (Hmp) is the best-understood nitric oxide (NO) detoxifying protein and exhibits a robust dioxygenase activity, converting NO to nitrate ion with oxygen as co-substrate. Synthesis of Hmp via transcriptional regulation of hmp gene expression is an adaptive response to NO and related nitrosative stresses since Hmp levels are greatly elevated on exposure in vitro to these agents. Here we show that expression of hmp is greatly enhanced by NO but not by other haem ligands (azide, cyanide and carbon monoxide). Flavohaemoglobins of other pathogenic bacteria have been implicated in conferring resistance to NO in vitro and in macrophage-like cells but the role of the E. coli flavohaemoglobin has not been studied in macrophages. We therefore compared survival of wild-type K-12 E. coli cells and an isogenic hmp mutant after internalisation by human macrophages. Wild-type bacteria survived significantly better than the hmp mutant after incubation with macrophages, despite binding and internalisation rates being similar for both strains. Unexpectedly, however, when grown in MOPS minimal medium, in mixed cultures, more hmp mutant cells were recovered than wild-type. Significantly, an hmp mutant failed to exhibit swarming motility on soft agar and this phenotype was rescued by a plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type hmp(+) gene. Thus, although Hmp constitutes an important mechanism of protection from NO-mediated killing by human macrophages in the model E. coli strain K-12, and probably contributes to the survival of enteropathogenic E. coli during the intestinal inflammatory response, synthesis of Hmp in vitro may represent a selective disadvantage. The lack of swarming motility of the hmp mutant and its aflagellate state suggest that Hmp synthesis is a metabolic burden in the absence of NO-related stresses.

  14. Killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis by receptor-mediated drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Basu, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    p-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) conjugated to maleylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) was taken up efficiently through high-affinity MBSA-binding sites on macrophages. Binding of the radiolabeled conjugate to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages at 4 degrees C was competed for by MBSA but not by PAS. At 37 degrees C, the radiolabeled conjugate was rapidly degraded by the macrophages, leading to release of acid-soluble degradation products in the medium. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free PAS in killing the intracellular mycobacteria in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected in culture with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The killing of intracellular mycobacteria mediated by the drug conjugate was effectively prevented by simultaneous addition of excess MBSA (100 micrograms/ml) or chloroquine (3 microM) to the medium, whereas these agents did not affect the microbicidal action of free PAS. These results suggest that (i) uptake of the PAS-MBSA conjugate was mediated by cell surface receptors on macrophages which recognize MBSA and (ii) lysosomal hydrolysis of the internalized conjugate resulted in intracellular release of a pharmacologically active form of the drug, which led to selective killing of the M. tuberculosis harbored by mouse macrophages infected in culture. This receptor-mediated modality of delivering drugs to macrophages could contribute to greater therapeutic efficacy and minimization of toxic side effects in the management of tuberculosis and other intracellular mycobacterial infections.

  15. Rapid induction of REDD1 gene expression in macrophages in response to stress-related catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yoshiki; Hiraide, Sachiko; Matsumoto, Machiko; Togashi, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of stress-related catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline on macrophage expression of a new host defense factor REDD1 using murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and murine peritoneal macrophages. Short-term adrenaline exposure (15-60 min) upregulated REDD1 mRNA expression and its protein synthesis in macrophages. This adrenaline-induced REDD1 expression was completely blocked by β2-adrenoceptor selective antagonist ICI 118,551, whereas β2-adrenoceptor specific agonist salmeterol markedly enhanced REDD1 expression. Moreover, noradrenaline increased REDD1 mRNA expression at doses higher than the effective doses of adrenaline. The effect of adrenaline on REDD1 mRNA expression was mimicked by treatment with membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP. Thus, increased intracellular cAMP level resulting from β2-adrenoceptor stimulation appeared to be responsible for adrenaline-induced REDD1 mRNA expression. However, inhibiting protein kinase A (PKA) activity had no significant effect on REDD1 mRNA expression after β2-adrenoceptor stimulation. In addition, exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) agonist 8-CPT-20-O-Me-cAMP had no effect on REDD1 mRNA expression. Thus, β2-adrenoceptor-mediated increase in cAMP levels seems to induce REDD1 mRNA expression in macrophages through a PKA- and Epac-independent pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry is an Accurate and Rapid Method to Analyze Different Modes of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Richard; Daumas, Aurélie; Capo, Christian; Mege, Jean-Louis; Textoris, Julien

    2013-01-01

    MALDI-TOF is an extensively used mass spectrometry technique in chemistry and biochemistry. It has been also applied in medicine to identify molecules and biomarkers. Recently, it has been used in microbiology for the routine identification of bacteria grown from clinical samples, without preparation or fractionation steps. We and others have applied this whole-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry technique successfully to eukaryotic cells. Current applications range from cell type identification to quality control assessment of cell culture and diagnostic applications. Here, we describe its use to explore the various polarization phenotypes of macrophages in response to cytokines or heat-killed bacteria. It allowed the identification of macrophage-specific fingerprints that are representative of the diversity of proteomic responses of macrophages. This application illustrates the accuracy and simplicity of the method. The protocol we described here may be useful for studying the immune host response in pathological conditions or may be extended to wider diagnostic applications. PMID:24430799

  17. Rapid differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes epidemic clones III and IV and their intact compared with heat-killed populations using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Nyarko, Esmond B; Puzey, Kenneth A; Donnelly, Catherine W

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis (chemometrics) could be used to rapidly differentiate epidemic clones (ECs) of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as their intact compared with heat-killed populations. FT-IR spectra were collected from dried thin smears on infrared slides prepared from aliquots of 10 μL of each L. monocytogenes ECs (ECIII: J1-101 and R2-499; ECIV: J1-129 and J1-220), and also from intact and heat-killed cell populations of each EC strain using 250 scans at a resolution of 4 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared region in a reflectance mode. Chemometric analysis of spectra involved the application of the multivariate discriminant method for canonical variate analysis (CVA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). CVA of the spectra in the wavelength region 4000 to 600 cm(-1) separated the EC strains while LDA resulted in a 100% accurate classification of all spectra in the data set. Further, CVA separated intact and heat-killed cells of each EC strain and there was 100% accuracy in the classification of all spectra when LDA was applied. FT-IR spectral wavenumbers 1650 to 1390 cm(-1) were used to separate heat-killed and intact populations of L. monocytogenes. The FT-IR spectroscopy method allowed discrimination between strains that belong to the same EC. FT-IR is a highly discriminatory and reproducible method that can be used for the rapid subtyping of L. monocytogenes, as well as for the detection of live compared with dead populations of the organism. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis can be used for L. monocytogenes source tracking and for clinical case isolate comparison during epidemiological investigations since the method is capable of differentiating epidemic clones and it uses a library of well-characterized strains. The FT-IR method is potentially less expensive and more rapid compared to genetic

  18. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Connor, Gemma; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Keane, Joseph; O'Sullivan, Mary P

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such "added value" could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments.

  19. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O’Connor, Gemma; O’Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such “added value” could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments. PMID:26894562

  20. Beyond killing

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; McNally, Luke; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea; King, Kayla C.; Popat, Roman; Domingo-Sananes, Maria R.; Allen, Judith E.; Soares, Miguel P.; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic pipeline is running dry and infectious disease remains a major threat to public health. An efficient strategy to stay ahead of rapidly adapting pathogens should include approaches that replace, complement or enhance the effect of both current and novel antimicrobial compounds. In recent years, a number of innovative approaches to manage disease without the aid of traditional antibiotics and without eliminating the pathogens directly have emerged. These include disabling pathogen virulence-factors, increasing host tissue damage control or altering the microbiota to provide colonization resistance, immune resistance or disease tolerance against pathogens. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these approaches and examine their possible consequences for pathogen evolution. To guarantee a longer half-life of these alternatives to directly killing pathogens, and to gain a full understanding of their population-level consequences, we encourage future work to incorporate evolutionary perspectives into the development of these treatments. PMID:27016341

  1. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  2. Paediatric Crohn disease patients with stricturing behaviour exhibit ileal granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibody production and reduced neutrophil bacterial killing and GM-CSF bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Jurickova, I; Collins, M H; Chalk, C; Seese, A; Bezold, R; Lake, K; von Allmen, D; Frischer, J S; Falcone, R A; Trapnell, B C; Denson, L A

    2013-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies are associated with stricturing behaviour in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that CD ileal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) would produce GM-CSF autoantibodies and peripheral blood (PB) samples would contain GM-CSF neutralizing capacity (NC). Paediatric CD and control PBMC and ileal biopsies or LPMC were isolated and cultured and GM-CSF, immunoglobulin (Ig)G and GM-CSF autoantibodies production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basal and GM-CSF-primed neutrophil bacterial killing and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) tyrosine phosphorylation (pSTAT5) were measured by flow cytometry. GM-CSF autoantibodies were enriched within total IgG for LPMC isolated from CD ileal strictures and proximal margins compared to control ileum. Neutrophil bacterial killing was reduced in CD patients compared to controls. Within CD, neutrophil GM-CSF-dependent STAT5 activation and bacterial killing were reduced as GM-CSF autoantibodies increased. GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 did not vary between controls and CD patients in washed PB granulocytes in which serum was removed. However, GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 was reduced in whole PB samples from CD patients. These data were used to calculate the GM-CSF NC. CD patients with GM-CSF NC greater than 25% exhibited a fourfold higher rate of stricturing behaviour and surgery. The likelihood ratio (95% confidence interval) for stricturing behaviour for patients with elevation in both GM-CSF autoantibodies and GM-CSF NC was equal to 5 (2, 11). GM-CSF autoantibodies are produced by LPMC isolated from CD ileal resection specimens and are associated with reduced neutrophil bacterial killing. CD peripheral blood contains GM-CSF NC, which is associated with increased rates of stricturing behaviour. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Paediatric Crohn disease patients with stricturing behaviour exhibit ileal granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibody production and reduced neutrophil bacterial killing and GM-CSF bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Jurickova, I; Collins, M H; Chalk, C; Seese, A; Bezold, R; Lake, K; Allmen, D; Frischer, J S; Falcone, R A; Trapnell, B C; Denson, L A

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies are associated with stricturing behaviour in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that CD ileal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) would produce GM-CSF autoantibodies and peripheral blood (PB) samples would contain GM-CSF neutralizing capacity (NC). Paediatric CD and control PBMC and ileal biopsies or LPMC were isolated and cultured and GM-CSF, immunoglobulin (Ig)G and GM-CSF autoantibodies production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basal and GM-CSF-primed neutrophil bacterial killing and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) tyrosine phosphorylation (pSTAT5) were measured by flow cytometry. GM-CSF autoantibodies were enriched within total IgG for LPMC isolated from CD ileal strictures and proximal margins compared to control ileum. Neutrophil bacterial killing was reduced in CD patients compared to controls. Within CD, neutrophil GM-CSF-dependent STAT5 activation and bacterial killing were reduced as GM-CSF autoantibodies increased. GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 did not vary between controls and CD patients in washed PB granulocytes in which serum was removed. However, GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 was reduced in whole PB samples from CD patients. These data were used to calculate the GM-CSF NC. CD patients with GM-CSF NC greater than 25% exhibited a fourfold higher rate of stricturing behaviour and surgery. The likelihood ratio (95% confidence interval) for stricturing behaviour for patients with elevation in both GM-CSF autoantibodies and GM-CSF NC was equal to 5 (2, 11). GM-CSF autoantibodies are produced by LPMC isolated from CD ileal resection specimens and are associated with reduced neutrophil bacterial killing. CD peripheral blood contains GM-CSF NC, which is associated with increased rates of stricturing behaviour. PMID:23600834

  4. Guanylate Binding Proteins Enable Rapid Activation of Canonical and Noncanonical Inflammasomes in Chlamydia-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Finethy, Ryan; Jorgensen, Ine; Haldar, Arun K.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A.; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nagarajan, Uma M.; Miao, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) mediate cell-autonomous host resistance to bacterial pathogens and promote inflammasome activation. The prevailing model postulates that these two GBP-controlled activities are directly linked through GBP-dependent vacuolar lysis. It was proposed that the rupture of pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) by GBPs destroyed the microbial refuge and simultaneously contaminated the host cell cytosol with microbial activators of inflammasomes. Here, we demonstrate that GBP-mediated host resistance and GBP-mediated inflammatory responses can be uncoupled. We show that PVs formed by the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum, so-called inclusions, remain free of GBPs and that C. muridarum is impervious to GBP-mediated restrictions on bacterial growth. Although GBPs neither bind to C. muridarum inclusions nor restrict C. muridarum growth, we find that GBPs promote inflammasome activation in C. muridarum-infected macrophages. We demonstrate that C. muridarum infections induce GBP-dependent pyroptosis through both caspase-11-dependent noncanonical and caspase-1-dependent canonical inflammasomes. Among canonical inflammasomes, we find that C. muridarum and the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis activate not only NLRP3 but also AIM2. Our data show that GBPs support fast-kinetics processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by the NLRP3 inflammasome but are dispensable for the secretion of the same cytokines at later times postinfection. Because IFN-γ fails to induce IL-1β transcription, GBP-dependent fast-kinetics inflammasome activation can drive the preferential processing of constitutively expressed IL-18 in IFN-γ-primed macrophages in the absence of prior Toll-like receptor stimulation. Together, our results reveal that GBPs control the kinetics of inflammasome activation and thereby shape macrophage responses to Chlamydia infections. PMID:26416908

  5. Guanylate binding proteins enable rapid activation of canonical and noncanonical inflammasomes in Chlamydia-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Finethy, Ryan; Jorgensen, Ine; Haldar, Arun K; de Zoete, Marcel R; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nagarajan, Uma M; Miao, Edward A; Coers, Jörn

    2015-12-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) mediate cell-autonomous host resistance to bacterial pathogens and promote inflammasome activation. The prevailing model postulates that these two GBP-controlled activities are directly linked through GBP-dependent vacuolar lysis. It was proposed that the rupture of pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) by GBPs destroyed the microbial refuge and simultaneously contaminated the host cell cytosol with microbial activators of inflammasomes. Here, we demonstrate that GBP-mediated host resistance and GBP-mediated inflammatory responses can be uncoupled. We show that PVs formed by the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum, so-called inclusions, remain free of GBPs and that C. muridarum is impervious to GBP-mediated restrictions on bacterial growth. Although GBPs neither bind to C. muridarum inclusions nor restrict C. muridarum growth, we find that GBPs promote inflammasome activation in C. muridarum-infected macrophages. We demonstrate that C. muridarum infections induce GBP-dependent pyroptosis through both caspase-11-dependent noncanonical and caspase-1-dependent canonical inflammasomes. Among canonical inflammasomes, we find that C. muridarum and the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis activate not only NLRP3 but also AIM2. Our data show that GBPs support fast-kinetics processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by the NLRP3 inflammasome but are dispensable for the secretion of the same cytokines at later times postinfection. Because IFN-γ fails to induce IL-1β transcription, GBP-dependent fast-kinetics inflammasome activation can drive the preferential processing of constitutively expressed IL-18 in IFN-γ-primed macrophages in the absence of prior Toll-like receptor stimulation. Together, our results reveal that GBPs control the kinetics of inflammasome activation and thereby shape macrophage responses to Chlamydia infections.

  6. A Highly Conserved Toxo1 Haplotype Directs Resistance to Toxoplasmosis and Its Associated Caspase-1 Dependent Killing of Parasite and Host Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Bisanz, Cordelia; Lagrange, Dominique; Pilloux, Ludovic; Massera, Céline; Cristinelli, Sara; Jublot, Delphine; Bastien, Olivier; Loeuillet, Corinne; Aldebert, Delphine; Touquet, Bastien; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie France

    2014-01-01

    Natural immunity or resistance to pathogens most often relies on the genetic make-up of the host. In a LEW rat model of refractoriness to toxoplasmosis, we previously identified on chromosome 10 the Toxo1 locus that directs toxoplasmosis outcome and controls parasite spreading by a macrophage-dependent mechanism. Now, we narrowed down Toxo1 to a 891 kb interval containing 29 genes syntenic to human 17p13 region. Strikingly, Toxo1 is included in a haplotype block strictly conserved among all refractory rat strains. The sequencing of Toxo1 in nine rat strains (5 refractory and 4 susceptible) revealed resistant-restricted conserved polymorphisms displaying a distribution gradient that peaks at the bottom border of Toxo1, and highlighting the NOD-like receptor, Nlrp1a, as a major candidate. The Nlrp1 inflammasome is known to trigger, upon pathogen intracellular sensing, pyroptosis programmed-cell death involving caspase-1 activation and cleavage of IL-1β. Functional studies demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent refractoriness in vivo correlated with both the ability of macrophages to restrict T. gondii growth and a T. gondii-induced death of intracellular parasites and its host macrophages. The parasite-induced cell death of infected macrophages bearing the LEW-Toxo1 alleles was found to exhibit pyroptosis-like features with ROS production, the activation of caspase-1 and IL1-β secretion. The pharmacological inactivation of caspase-1 using YVAD and Z-VAD inhibitors prevented the death of both intravacuolar parasites and host non-permissive macrophages but failed to restore parasite proliferation. These findings demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent response of rat macrophages to T. gondii infection may trigger two pathways leading to the control of parasite proliferation and the death of parasites and host macrophages. The NOD-like receptor NLRP1a/Caspase-1 pathway is the best candidate to mediate the parasite-induced cell death. These data represent new insights

  7. A highly conserved Toxo1 haplotype directs resistance to toxoplasmosis and its associated caspase-1 dependent killing of parasite and host macrophage.

    PubMed

    Cavailles, Pierre; Flori, Pierre; Papapietro, Olivier; Bisanz, Cordelia; Lagrange, Dominique; Pilloux, Ludovic; Massera, Céline; Cristinelli, Sara; Jublot, Delphine; Bastien, Olivier; Loeuillet, Corinne; Aldebert, Delphine; Touquet, Bastien; Fournié, Gilbert J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Natural immunity or resistance to pathogens most often relies on the genetic make-up of the host. In a LEW rat model of refractoriness to toxoplasmosis, we previously identified on chromosome 10 the Toxo1 locus that directs toxoplasmosis outcome and controls parasite spreading by a macrophage-dependent mechanism. Now, we narrowed down Toxo1 to a 891 kb interval containing 29 genes syntenic to human 17p13 region. Strikingly, Toxo1 is included in a haplotype block strictly conserved among all refractory rat strains. The sequencing of Toxo1 in nine rat strains (5 refractory and 4 susceptible) revealed resistant-restricted conserved polymorphisms displaying a distribution gradient that peaks at the bottom border of Toxo1, and highlighting the NOD-like receptor, Nlrp1a, as a major candidate. The Nlrp1 inflammasome is known to trigger, upon pathogen intracellular sensing, pyroptosis programmed-cell death involving caspase-1 activation and cleavage of IL-1β. Functional studies demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent refractoriness in vivo correlated with both the ability of macrophages to restrict T. gondii growth and a T. gondii-induced death of intracellular parasites and its host macrophages. The parasite-induced cell death of infected macrophages bearing the LEW-Toxo1 alleles was found to exhibit pyroptosis-like features with ROS production, the activation of caspase-1 and IL1-β secretion. The pharmacological inactivation of caspase-1 using YVAD and Z-VAD inhibitors prevented the death of both intravacuolar parasites and host non-permissive macrophages but failed to restore parasite proliferation. These findings demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent response of rat macrophages to T. gondii infection may trigger two pathways leading to the control of parasite proliferation and the death of parasites and host macrophages. The NOD-like receptor NLRP1a/Caspase-1 pathway is the best candidate to mediate the parasite-induced cell death. These data represent new insights

  8. Altered Dynamics of Candida albicans Phagocytosis by Macrophages and PMNs When Both Phagocyte Subsets Are Present

    PubMed Central

    Rudkin, Fiona M.; Bain, Judith M.; Walls, Catriona; Lewis, Leanne E.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Erwig, Lars P.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT An important first line of defense against Candida albicans infections is the killing of fungal cells by professional phagocytes of the innate immune system, such as polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and macrophages. In this study, we employed live-cell video microscopy coupled with dynamic image analysis tools to provide insights into the complexity of C. albicans phagocytosis when macrophages and PMNs were incubated with C. albicans alone and when both phagocyte subsets were present. When C. albicans cells were incubated with only one phagocyte subtype, PMNs had a lower overall phagocytic capacity than macrophages, despite engulfing fungal cells at a higher rate once fungal cells were bound to the phagocyte surface. PMNs were more susceptible to C. albicans-mediated killing than macrophages, irrespective of the number of C. albicans cells ingested. In contrast, when both phagocyte subsets were studied in coculture, the two cell types phagocytosed and cleared C. albicans at equal rates and were equally susceptible to killing by the fungus. The increase in macrophage susceptibility to C. albicans-mediated killing was a consequence of macrophages taking up a higher proportion of hyphal cells under these conditions. In the presence of both PMNs and macrophages, C. albicans yeast cells were predominantly cleared by PMNs, which migrated at a greater speed toward fungal cells and engulfed bound cells more rapidly. These observations demonstrate that the phagocytosis of fungal pathogens depends on, and is modified by, the specific phagocyte subsets present at the site of infection. PMID:24169578

  9. Development of a Sandwich Hybridization Assay to Rapidly Detect and Quantify Harmful Algal Bloom (hab) Species Linked with Coastal Fish Kills and Public Health Concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, D.; Jones, W. J.; Mortensen, R.; Doll, C.; Reed, M.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular probe technologies have enabled more rapid and specific phytoplankton identification and enumeration compared to traditional technologies, such as microscopy. The method considered for this study is sandwich hybridization assay (SHA), a fast, efficient, and economic approach to detecting and quantifying plankton species. SHA employs two DNA probes, capture and signal, to detect ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. The reaction entails an anti-digoxygenin horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) conjugate to which a HRP substrate is applied. The result is a colorimetric reaction, and the resultant absorbance can be used to estimate organism abundances. This project focuses on two raphidophyte HAB species that have been responsible for declining water quality and fish kills globally, but are particularly problematic in states along the southeastern (US) coast, Fibrocapsa japonica and Chattonella subsalsa. These species produce recurrent, dense blooms annually, and are directly linked with fish kills. Work presented here also includes the domoic acid (DA) producing diatom Pseudo-nitzschia pseudodelicatissima because DA has been associated with pigmy and dwarf sperm whale strandings in the southeastern US, and blooms of this genus are frequently reported in regional waters. Here we present findings from field samplings and multiple blooms (2014-2015) of all three species that occurred in South Carolina (US) and regional waters. We also provide updates on the development, validation, and quantification of SHA applications for each of these HAB species.

  10. Mechanism of the Intracellular Killing and Modulation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in THP-1 Macrophages Activated by Gamma Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Ouadrhiri, Youssef; Scorneaux, Bernard; Sibille, Yves; Tulkens, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen, readily enters cells and multiplies in the cytosol after escaping from phagosomal vacuoles. Macrophages exposed to gamma interferon, one of the main cellular host defenses against Listeria, become nonpermissive for bacterial growth while containing Listeria in the phagosomes. Using the human myelomonocytic cell line THP-1, we show that the combination of l-monomethyl arginine and catalase restores bacterial growth without affecting the phagosomal containment of Listeria. A previous report (B. Scorneaux, Y. Ouadrhiri, G. Anzalone, and P. M. Tulkens, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 40:1225–1230, 1996) showed that intracellular Listeria was almost equally sensitive to ampicillin, azithromycin, and sparfloxacin in control cells but became insensitive to ampicillin and more sensitive to azithromycin and sparfloxacin in gamma interferon-treated cells. We show here that these modulations of antibiotic activity are largely counteracted by l-monomethyl arginine and catalase. In parallel, we show that gamma interferon enhances the cellular accumulation of azithromycin and sparfloxacin, an effect which is not reversed by addition of l-monomethyl arginine and catalase and which therefore cannot account for the increased activity of these antibiotics in gamma interferon-treated cells. We conclude that (i) the control exerted by gamma interferon on intracellular multiplication of Listeria in THP-1 macrophages is dependent on the production of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide; (ii) intracellular Listeria may become insensitive to ampicillin in macrophages exposed to gamma interferon because the increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates already controls bacterial growth; and (iii) azithromycin and still more sparfloxacin cooperate efficiently with gamma interferon, one of the main cellular host defenses in Listeria infection. PMID:10223943

  11. Killing Coyotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Presents different viewpoints concerning the federal government's Animal Damage Control (ADC) Program cited as responsible for killing millions of predators. Critics provide evidence of outdated and inhumane methods exemplified in the coyote killings. The ADC emphasizes new, nonlethal methods of controlling animals cited as "noxious."…

  12. Growth of Mycobacterium lepraemurium in nonstimulated and stimulated mouse peritoneal-derived and bone marrrow-derived macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J; Smith, C C

    1978-01-01

    Mycobacterium lepraemurium cells were found to multiply in normal mouse peritoneal-derived and bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. Whereas activated peritoneal-derived macrophages demonstrated marked bacteriostasis for M. lepraemurium, significant bactericidal activity was exhibited by activated bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, only a small proportion of the bacterial were killed by activated bone marrow-derived macrophages with subsequent and enhanced bacteria growth. It is suggested that a rapid turnover of monocytes in active lesions is required to control mycobacterial infections in vivo. These results would suggest that careful consideration be given to the choice of the host cell in studies involving obligate intracellular parasites. PMID:365762

  13. Targeted Killings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    American territory in history. Two aircraft torpedoed into the Twin Towers in New York City at speeds of over 490mph killing 2,595 people . Shortly...bomb exploded in the World Trade Center in New York City, killing a half-dozen people and wounding over a thousand. Over the next three years Al...executed his most incredible attack killing close to 3,000 people . President Bush announced to the world that, “U.S. troops will hunt down terrorists and

  14. Hyphal Growth of Phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum Causes Cell Lysis and Death of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

  15. Hyphal growth of phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum causes cell lysis and death of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host.

  16. The contribution of both oxygen and nitrogen intermediates to the intracellular killing mechanisms of C1q-opsonized Listeria monocytogenes by the macrophage-like IC-21 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Domínguez, C; Carrasco-Marín, E; López-Mato, P; Leyva-Cobián, F

    2000-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen which is internalized by host mammalian cells upon binding to their surface. Further listerial growth occurs in the cytosol after escape from the phagosomal–endosomal compartment. We have previously reported that C1q is able to potentiate L. monocytogenes phagocytosis upon bacterial opsonization by ingestion through C1q-binding structures. In this report, we analysed the post-phagocytic events upon internalization of C1q-opsonized L. monocytogenes and found an induction of macrophage (Mφ)-like IC-21 cell bactericidal mechanisms displayed by the production of oxygen and nitrogen metabolites. Both types of molecules are effective in L. monocytogenes killing. Further analysis of the cellular responses promoted by interaction of C1q with its surface binding structures, leads us to consider C1q as a collaborative molecule involved in Mφ activation. Upon interaction with surface binding structures, C1q was able to trigger and/or amplify the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates induced by stimuli such as interferon-γ and L. monocytogenes phagocytosis. PMID:11012757

  17. The contribution of both oxygen and nitrogen intermediates to the intracellular killing mechanisms of C1q-opsonized Listeria monocytogenes by the macrophage-like IC-21 cell line.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Domínguez, C; Carrasco-Marín, E; López-Mato, P; Leyva-Cobián, F

    2000-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen which is internalized by host mammalian cells upon binding to their surface. Further listerial growth occurs in the cytosol after escape from the phagosomal-endosomal compartment. We have previously reported that C1q is able to potentiate L. monocytogenes phagocytosis upon bacterial opsonization by ingestion through C1q-binding structures. In this report, we analysed the post-phagocytic events upon internalization of C1q-opsonized L. monocytogenes and found an induction of macrophage (Mphi)-like IC-21 cell bactericidal mechanisms displayed by the production of oxygen and nitrogen metabolites. Both types of molecules are effective in L. monocytogenes killing. Further analysis of the cellular responses promoted by interaction of C1q with its surface binding structures, leads us to consider C1q as a collaborative molecule involved in Mphi activation. Upon interaction with surface binding structures, C1q was able to trigger and/or amplify the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates induced by stimuli such as interferon-gamma and L. monocytogenes phagocytosis.

  18. Macrophage proliferation, provenance, and plasticity in macroparasite infection.

    PubMed

    Rückerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages have long been center stage in the host response to microbial infection, but only in the past 10-15 years has there been a growing appreciation for their role in helminth infection and the associated type 2 response. Through the actions of the IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), type 2 cytokines result in the accumulation of macrophages with a distinctive activation phenotype. Although our knowledge of IL-4Rα-induced genes is growing rapidly, the specific functions of these macrophages have yet to be established in most disease settings. Understanding the interplay between IL-4Rα-activated macrophages and the other cellular players is confounded by the enormous transcriptional heterogeneity within the macrophage population and by their highly plastic nature. Another level of complexity is added by the new knowledge that tissue macrophages can be derived either from a resident prenatal population or from blood monocyte recruitment and that IL-4 can increase macrophage numbers through proliferative expansion. Here, we review current knowledge on the contribution of macrophages to helminth killing and wound repair, with specific attention paid to distinct cellular origins and plasticity potential.

  19. The use of a model of in vivo macrophage depletion to study the role of macrophages during infection with Bacillus anthracis spores.

    PubMed

    Cote, Christopher K; Rea, Kelly M; Norris, Sarah L; van Rooijen, Nico; Welkos, Susan L

    2004-10-01

    The pathogenesis of infection by Bacillus anthracis has been the subject of many investigations, but remains incompletely understood. It has been shown that B. anthracis spores germinate in macrophages and perhaps require this intracellular niche to germinate in vivo before outgrowth of the vegetative organism. However, it has also been reported that macrophages are sporicidal in vitro. In our in vivo model, macrophages were depleted from mice by either silica treatment or treatment with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene disphosphonate (Cl(2)MDP), and the animals were infected parenterally with virulent ungerminated B. anthracis (Ames strain) spores. The mice in which macrophages had been depleted were killed more rapidly than untreated mice. In addition, augmenting peritoneal populations of macrophages with cultured RAW264.7 cells partially protected mice from disease, increasing the survival rate in a dose dependent relationship. Alveolar macrophages were depleted by intranasal instillation of liposome-encapsulated Cl(2)MDP. The animals with normal alveolar macrophage numbers had significantly greater survival rates after inhaling B. anthracis spores than the macrophage-depleted mice. These findings do not preclude the observations that macrophages provide a site permissive for spore germination, however, these data suggest that macrophages do play an important role in limiting and/or clearing a B. anthracis infection.

  20. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  1. Killing fetuses and killing newborns.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2013-05-01

    The argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns is a challenge to liberal positions on abortion because it can be considered a reductio of their defence of abortion. Here I defend the liberal stance on abortion by arguing that the argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns on ground of the social, psychological and economic burden on the parents recently put forward by Giubilini and Minerva is not valid; this is because they fail to show that newborns cannot be harmed and because there are morally relevant differences between fetuses and newborns.

  2. Human U251MG glioma cells expressing the membrane form of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) are killed by human monocytes in vitro and are rejected within immunodeficient mice via paraptosis that is associated with increased expression of three different heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Jadus, Martin R; Chen, Yijun; Boldaji, Mehrdokht Tarbiyat; Delgado, Christina; Sanchez, Ramon; Douglass, Thomas; Al-Atar, Usama; Schulz, William; Lloyd, Cheri; Wepsic, H Terry

    2003-05-01

    Human U251MG glioma cells retrovirally transduced with the human gene for the membrane form of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) were investigated. The clones, MG-2F11 and MG-2C4, that expressed the most mM-CSF, but not the viral vector or the parental U251MG cells, were killed by both murine and human monocyte/macrophages in cytotoxicity assays. MG-2F11 cells failed to form subcutaneous tumors in either nude or NIH-bg-nu-xidBR mice, while mice inoculated with the U251MG viral vector (MG-VV) cells developed tumors. Electron microscopy studies showed that 4 hours after subcutaneous injection, the mM-CSF-transduced cells began dying of a process that resembled paraptosis. The dying tumor cells were swollen and had extensive vacuolization of their mitochondria and endoplasm reticulum. This killing process was complete within 24 hours. Macrophage-like cells were immediately adjacent to the killed MG-2F11 cells. Immunohistological staining for the heat shock proteins HSP60, HSP70 and GRP94 (gp96) showed that 18 hours after inoculation into nude mice, the MG-2F11 injection site was two to four times more intensely stained than the MG-VV cells. This study shows that human gliomas transduced with mM-CSF have the potential to be used as a safe live tumor cell vaccine.

  3. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi: modification of macrophage function during infection

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with heat-killed trypanosomes elicits peritoneal macrophages which display in vitro microbicidal activity against trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. These cells also display other activated properties including rapid spreading, intense membrane activity, secretion of high levels of plasminogen activator, and ingestion mediated by the C3 receptor. An intravenous infection with BCG, followed by an intraperitoneal challenge with mycobacterial antigens brings about macrophages with similar properties. These criteria of macrophage activation were compared in normal and BCG- or T. cruzi-immune mice, with or without an intraperitoneal challenge with specific or unrelated antigens. Trypanocidal activity is displayed by both BCG- and T. cruzi-immune macrophages after intraperitoneal challenge with either antigen. Resident-immune macrophages from both T. cruzi- and BCG-infected mice show a trypanostatic, rather than trypanocidal activity. Macrophages from noninfected mice, challenged with the same antigens, show neither trypanostatic nor trypanocidal activity. Increased secretion of plasminogen activator shows a definite immunological specificity. Challenge with the specific antigen induces the appearance of macrophages secreting high levels of plasminogen activator, while unrelated antigens induce much smaller levels. Noninfected mice challenged with the same antigens do not display any enchancement in secretion. In contrast, increased spreading and phagocytosis mediated by the complement receptor are also displayed by cells from noninfected mice challenged with any of the agents tested. PMID:327012

  5. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  6. Selective killing of nonreplicating mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Ruslana; Gold, Benjamin; Venugopal, Aditya; Singh, Jasbir; Samy, Raghu; Pupek, Krzysztof; Cao, Hua; Popescu, Carmen; Gurney, Mark; Hotha, Srinivas; Cherian, Joseph; Rhee, Kyu; Ly, Lan; Converse, Paul J; Ehrt, Sabine; Vandal, Omar; Jiang, Xiuju; Schneider, Jean; Lin, Gang; Nathan, Carl

    2008-03-13

    Antibiotics are typically more effective against replicating rather than nonreplicating bacteria. However, a major need in global health is to eradicate persistent or nonreplicating subpopulations of bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Hence, identifying chemical inhibitors that selectively kill bacteria that are not replicating is of practical importance. To address this, we screened for inhibitors of dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), an enzyme required by Mtb to cause tuberculosis in guinea pigs and used by the bacterium to resist nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates, a stress encountered in the host. Chemical screening for inhibitors of Mtb DlaT identified select rhodanines as compounds that almost exclusively kill nonreplicating mycobacteria in synergy with products of host immunity, such as nitric oxide and hypoxia, and are effective on bacteria within macrophages, a cellular reservoir for latent Mtb. Compounds that kill nonreplicating pathogens in cooperation with host immunity could complement the conventional chemotherapy of infectious disease.

  7. Why is particulate matter produced by wildfires toxic to lung macrophages?

    SciTech Connect

    Franzi, Lisa M.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha M.; Last, Jerold A.

    2011-12-15

    The mechanistic basis of the high toxicity to lung macrophages of coarse PM from the California wildfires of 2008 was examined in cell culture experiments with mouse macrophages. Wildfire PM directly killed macrophages very rapidly in cell culture at relatively low doses. The wildfire coarse PM is about four times more toxic to macrophages on an equal weight basis than the same sized PM collected from normal ambient air (no wildfires) from the same region and season. There was a good correlation between the extent of cytotoxicity and the amount of oxidative stress observed at a given dose of wildfire PM in vitro. Our data implicate NF-{kappa}B signaling in the response of macrophages to wildfire PM, and suggest that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. The relative ratio of toxicity and of expression of biomarkers of oxidant stress between wildfire PM and 'normal' PM collected from ambient air is consistent with our previous results in mice in vivo, also suggesting that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. Our findings from this and earlier studies suggest that the active components of coarse PM from the wildfire are heat-labile organic compounds. While we cannot rule out a minor role for endotoxin in coarse PM preparations from the collected wildfire PM in our observed results both in vitro and in vivo, based on experiments using the inhibitor Polymyxin B most of the oxidant stress and pro-inflammatory activity observed was not due to endotoxin. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wildfire coarse PM kills macrophages at lower doses than coarse. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wildfire coarse PM activates the NF-kB pathway at lower doses than ambient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wildfire coarse PM in vitro and in vivo kill macrophages by oxidative stress.

  8. A Lys49-PLA2 myotoxin of Bothrops asper triggers a rapid death of macrophages that involves autocrine purinergic receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tonello, F; Simonato, M; Aita, A; Pizzo, P; Fernández, J; Lomonte, B; Gutiérrez, J M; Montecucco, C

    2012-01-01

    Lys49-PLA2 myotoxins, an important component of various viperid snake venoms, are a class of PLA2-homolog proteins deprived of catalytic activity. Similar to enzymatically active PLA2 (Asp49) and to other classes of myotoxins, they cause severe myonecrosis. Moreover, these toxins are used as tools to study skeletal muscle repair and regeneration, a process that can be very limited after snakebites. In this work, the cytotoxic effect of different myotoxins, Bothrops asper Lys49 and Asp49-PLA2, Notechis scutatus notexin and Naja mossambica cardiotoxin, was evaluated on macrophages, cells that have a key role in muscle regeneration. Only the Lys49-myotoxin was found to trigger a rapid asynchronous death of mouse peritoneal macrophages and macrophagic cell lines through a process that involves ATP release, ATP-induced ATP release and that is inhibited by various purinergic receptor antagonists. ATP leakage is induced also at sublytical doses of the Lys49-myotoxin, it involves Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, and is reduced by inhibitors of VSOR and the maxi-anion channel. The toxin-induced cell death is different from that caused by high concentration of ATP and appears to be linked to localized purinergic signaling. Based on present findings, a mechanism of cell death is proposed that can be extended to other cytolytic proteins and peptides. PMID:22764102

  9. In Vitro Induction of Nonspecific Resistance in Macrophages by Specifically Sensitized Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, James L.; Remington, Jack S.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine whether macrophages can be activated in vitro to resist challenge with heterologous microorganisms. Sensitized spleen cells from guinea pigs chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii were cultured with normal guinea pig peritoneal macrophages in the presence and absence of Toxoplasma antigen. Macrophage monolayers incubated with sensitized spleen cells and antigen were markedly resistant to challenge from Listeria monocytogenes. Resistance was manifested by prolonged survival of the monolayers and rapid intracellular killing of the bacteria. Macrophages incubated with sensitized spleen cells but in the absence of antigen, as well as macrophages cultured with normal spleen cells, in the presence or absence of antigen, were rapidly destroyed. Sensitized spleen cells responded to the presence of Toxoplasma antigen by increased uptake of tritium-labeled thymidine. Supernatant fluid medium obtained from cultures of macrophages, sensitized spleen cells, and antigen contained a macrophage migration inhibitory factor(s). In addition, these supernatant fluids were capable of inducing increased resistance to Listeria in normal macrophages. Images PMID:5005299

  10. M1 and M2 Macrophages: The Chicken and the Egg of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: ‘Inhibit’ type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and ‘Heal’ type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be ‘activated’ or ‘alternatively activated’ by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display ‘foreign’ antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity. PMID:25138714

  11. M1 and M2 macrophages: the chicken and the egg of immunity.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charles D; Ley, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: 'Inhibit' type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and 'Heal' type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be 'activated' or 'alternatively activated' by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display 'foreign' antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity.

  12. Effects of Activated Macrophages on Nocardia asteroides

    PubMed Central

    Filice, Gregory A.; Beaman, Blaine L.; Remington, Jack S.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism(s) of host resistance against Nocardia asteroides has not been well defined. Since disease due to N. asteroides frequently occurs in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, we studied the interaction of N. asteroides with activated and control mouse peritoneal macrophages. Activated macrophages were from mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii or injected with Corynebacterium parvum. N. asteroides in the early stationary phase (>99% in the coccobacillary form) was used for challenge of macrophage monolayers. Growth of two strains of N. asteroides was markedly inhibited in activated macrophages, whereas N. asteroides grew well in control macrophages. Quantitation of macrophage-associated N. asteroides indicated that activated macrophages killed 40 to 50% of N. asteroides within 6 h (P < 0.002). In control macrophage preparations, it appeared as if Nocardia filaments extended from within macrophages to the outside, and many of these filaments appeared to have extended to and then grown through neighboring macrophages. In activated macrophage preparations, Nocardia remained in the coccobacillary form in most macrophages. Control macrophage monolayers were almost completely overgrown with and destroyed by Nocardia 20 h after challenge, whereas activated macrophage monolayers remained intact. Nocardia that grew in control macrophages were not acid-alcohol fast or only weakly so, whereas the few Nocardia that grew in activated macrophages were strongly acid-alcohol fast. Our results indicate that activated macrophages may be important in host defense against N. asteroides. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6991421

  13. Neutrophil secretion products regulate anti-bacterial activity in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soehnlein, O; Kenne, E; Rotzius, P; Eriksson, E E; Lindbom, L

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages represent a multi-functional cell type in innate immunity that contributes to bacterial clearance by recognition, phagocytosis and killing. In acute inflammation, infiltrating neutrophils release a wide array of preformed granule proteins which interfere functionally with their environment. Here, we present a novel role for neutrophil-derived granule proteins in the anti-microbial activity of macrophages. Neutrophil secretion obtained by antibody cross-linking of the integrin subunit CD18 (X-link secretion) or by treatment with N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP secretion) induced a several-fold increase in bacterial phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages. This response was associated with a rapid activation of the monocytes and macrophages as depicted by an increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+). Interestingly, fMLP secretion had a more pronounced effect on monocytes than the X-link secretion, while the opposite was observed for macrophages. In addition, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) secretion caused a strong enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation compared to incubation with bacteria. Thus, secretion of neutrophil granule proteins activates macrophages to increase the phagocytosis of bacteria and to enhance intracellular ROS formation, indicating pronounced intracellular bacterial killing. Both mechanisms attribute novel microbicidal properties to PMN granule proteins, suggesting their potential use in anti-microbial therapy.

  14. Macrophage-mediated tumor cytotoxicity: role of macrophage surface sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D J

    1983-02-01

    Cell surface sialic acid levels were compared for monocytes and macrophages obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Equal quantities of sialic acid were found on the monocytes obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Approximately 60% more cell surface sialic acid was found on the macrophages from breast cancer patients than was found on the macrophages from normal volunteers. In order to determine whether cell surface sialic acid had any effect on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, macrophages were pretreated with neuraminidase (NANAse) prior to co-cultivation with tumor cells. The normal macrophages, after neuraminidase treatment, no longer retained their ability to kill tumor cells. However, when macrophages from breast cancer patients were treated with NANAse, no difference was observed in the ability of untreated and NANAse treated macrophages to kill tumor cells.

  15. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  16. Human neutrophils phagocytose and kill Acinetobacter baumannii and A. pittii.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Chapartegui-González, Itziar; Redondo-Salvo, Santiago; Leigh, Chike; Merino, David; Segundo, David San; Navas, Jesús; Icardo, José Manuel; Acosta, Félix; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2017-07-04

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a common cause of health care associated infections worldwide. A. pittii is an opportunistic pathogen also frequently isolated from Acinetobacter infections other than those from A. baumannii. Knowledge of Acinetobacter virulence factors and their role in pathogenesis is scarce. Also, there are no detailed published reports on the interactions between A. pittii and human phagocytic cells. Using confocal laser and scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and live-cell imaging, our study shows that immediately after bacteria-cell contact, neutrophils rapidly and continuously engulf and kill bacteria during at least 4 hours of infection in vitro. After 3 h of infection, neutrophils start to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) against Acinetobacter. DNA in NETs colocalizes well with human histone H3 and with the specific neutrophil elastase. We have observed that human neutrophils use large filopodia as cellular tentacles to sense local environment but also to detect and retain bacteria during phagocytosis. Furthermore, co-cultivation of neutrophils with human differentiated macrophages before infections shows that human neutrophils, but not macrophages, are key immune cells to control Acinetobacter. Although macrophages were largely activated by both bacterial species, they lack the phagocytic activity demonstrated by neutrophils.

  17. Altered dynamics of Candida albicans phagocytosis by macrophages and PMNs when both phagocyte subsets are present.

    PubMed

    Rudkin, Fiona M; Bain, Judith M; Walls, Catriona; Lewis, Leanne E; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars P

    2013-10-29

    An important first line of defense against Candida albicans infections is the killing of fungal cells by professional phagocytes of the innate immune system, such as polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and macrophages. In this study, we employed live-cell video microscopy coupled with dynamic image analysis tools to provide insights into the complexity of C. albicans phagocytosis when macrophages and PMNs were incubated with C. albicans alone and when both phagocyte subsets were present. When C. albicans cells were incubated with only one phagocyte subtype, PMNs had a lower overall phagocytic capacity than macrophages, despite engulfing fungal cells at a higher rate once fungal cells were bound to the phagocyte surface. PMNs were more susceptible to C. albicans-mediated killing than macrophages, irrespective of the number of C. albicans cells ingested. In contrast, when both phagocyte subsets were studied in coculture, the two cell types phagocytosed and cleared C. albicans at equal rates and were equally susceptible to killing by the fungus. The increase in macrophage susceptibility to C. albicans-mediated killing was a consequence of macrophages taking up a higher proportion of hyphal cells under these conditions. In the presence of both PMNs and macrophages, C. albicans yeast cells were predominantly cleared by PMNs, which migrated at a greater speed toward fungal cells and engulfed bound cells more rapidly. These observations demonstrate that the phagocytosis of fungal pathogens depends on, and is modified by, the specific phagocyte subsets present at the site of infection. Extensive work investigating fungal cell phagocytosis by macrophages and PMNs of the innate immune system has been carried out. These studies have been informative but have examined this phenomenon only when one phagocyte subset is present. The current study employed live-cell video microscopy to break down C. albicans phagocytosis into its component parts and examine the effect of a single

  18. The interaction of Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts with macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Michael; Proy, Vincent; Niederkorn, Jerry Y; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2003-06-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii, a free-living amoeba, causes a sight-threatening form of keratitis. Even after extensive therapies, corneal damage can be severe, often requiring corneal transplantation to restore vision. However, A. castellanii cysts are not eliminated from the conjunctiva and stroma of humans and can excyst, resulting in infection of the corneal transplant. The aim of this study was to determine whether elements of the innate immune apparatus, neutrophils and macrophages, were capable of detecting and eliminating A. castellanii cysts and to examine the mechanism by which they kill the cysts. Results show that neither innate immune cell is attracted chemotactically to intact cysts, yet both were attracted to lysed cysts. Both macrophages and neutrophils were capable of killing significant numbers of cysts, yet neutrophils were 3-fold more efficient than macrophages. Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma did not increase their cytolytic ability. Conditioned medium isolated from macrophages did not lyse the cysts; however, prevention of phagocytosis by cytochalasin D inhibited 100% of macrophage-mediated killing of the cysts. Conditioned medium from neutrophils did kill significant numbers of the cysts, and this killing was blocked by quercetin, a potent inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). These results indicate that neither macrophages nor neutrophils are chemoattracted to intact cysts, yet both are capable of killing the cysts. Macrophages killed the cysts by phagocytosis, whereas neutrophils killed cysts through the secretion of MPO.

  19. Iron Together with Lipid Downregulates Protein Levels of Ceruloplasmin in Macrophages Associated with Rapid Foam Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuangying; Zhang, Meng; Li, Kuanyu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Iron accumulation in foam cells was previously shown to be involved in atherogenesis. However, the mechanism for iron accumulation was not clarified. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is an important factor in cellular iron efflux and was found to be downregulated in atherosclerotic plaques in our previous study. The current study is to investigate the role of Cp in atherosclerosis. Methods: We used RAW264.7 cells, a well-accepted cell model of atherosclerosis, which were treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) or deferoxamine, and oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) to detect the regulation of Cp and its influence in iron efflux and lipid accumulation using biochemical and histological assays. Results: Our results showed that the Cp protein level increased after 200-µM FAC treatment in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. Ox-LDL treatment (50 µg/ml) moderately reduced both mRNA and protein levels and ferroxidase activity of Cp (p < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the expression of ferritin and ferroportin, two important iron-related proteins for iron storage and efflux, respectively, after ox-LDL treatment. However, co-treatment with ox-LDL and FAC drastically reduced the expression of Cp. Accordingly, the ferroxidase activities simultaneously decreased, whereas the protein levels of Ft and Fpn1 significantly increased, indicating further iron accumulation. Moreover, co-treatment with FAC and ox-LDL enhanced the accumulation of cholesterol compared with ox-LDL-only treatment to trigger apoptosis. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that physiological interaction of iron and lipid obstructs iron efflux and accelerates the lipid accumulation in macrophages during foam cell formation, which implicates the role of iron in the pathology of atherosclerosis. PMID:27040361

  20. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) anomalies are associated with lung disease due to rapidly growing mycobacteria and AAT inhibits Mycobacterium abscessus infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward D; Kaminska, Aleksandra M; Gill, Wendy; Chmura, Kathryn; Feldman, Nicole E; Bai, Xiyuan; Floyd, Corinne M; Fulton, Kayte E; Huitt, Gwen A; Strand, Matthew J; Iseman, Michael D; Shapiro, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are ubiquitous in the environment but cause lung disease in only a fraction of exposed individuals. This variable susceptibility to disease implies vulnerability to RGM infection due to weakness in host defense. Since most persons who contract RGM lung disease have no known host defense defect, it is likely that uncharacterized host deficiencies exist that predispose to RGM infection. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a host factor that may protect individuals from respiratory infections. Therefore, we assessed AAT protein anomalies as a risk factor for RGM lung disease. In a cohort of 100 patients with RGM lung disease, Mycobacterium (M.) abscessus was the most prevalent organism, isolated in 64 (64%) subjects. Anomalous AAT proteins were present in 27% of the cohort, which is 1.6 times the estimated prevalence of anomalous AAT proteins in the United States population (p=0.008). In in vitro studies, both AAT and a synthetic inhibitor of serine proteases suppressed M. abscessus infection of monocyte-derived macrophages by up to 65% (p<0.01). AAT may be an anti-RGM host-defense factor, and anomalous AAT phenotypes or AAT deficiency may constitute risk factors for pulmonary disease due to RGM.

  3. Effect of Corynebacterium parvum on colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation.

    PubMed

    Foster, R S; MacPherson, B R; Browdie, D A

    1977-05-01

    Because Corynebacterium parvum has tumor-inhibitory properties and stimulates granulocyte-macrophage production, it may have clinical value in combination with chemotherapy. The leukopoietic effect of killed suspensions of C. parvum was studied in mice using the technique of in vitro clonal culture of hematopoietic cells. After C. parvum injection, there was a prompt, sustained elevation of serum colony-stimulating factor followed by an increase in granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and increases in blood mononuclear and granulocyte cells. Colony-stimulating factor production is suggested as a major mechanism of stimulation of granulocyte-macrophage proliferation by C. parvum. Since rapidly proliferating hematopoietic cells may have increased sensititity to cytotoxic agents, the details of hematopoietic stimulation by C. parvum may be critical in the sequential timing of combined C. parvum and chemotherapy treatment to obtain maximal tumor inhibition and minimal hematopoietic toxicity.

  4. Macrophage triggering by aggregated immunoglobulins. II. Comparison of IgE and IgG aggregates or immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestel, J; Dessaint, J P; Joseph, M; Bazin, H; Capron, A

    1984-01-01

    Macrophages incubated with complexed or aggregated IgE released beta-glucuronidase (beta-G) within 30 min. In contrast in the presence of aggregated or complexed IgG, macrophages liberated equivalent amount of beta-G only after 6 h incubation. In addition the rapid macrophage stimulation induced by aggregated IgE was also followed by a faster 3H-glucosamine incorporation when compared to the delayed activation caused by aggregated IgG. However, macrophages stimulated either by IgG or by IgE oligomers produced the same percentage of plasminogen activator at 24 h. In contrast, while the interaction between macrophages and aggregated IgE was only followed by a peak of cyclic GMP and a beta-G release during the first 30 min of incubation, the interaction between macrophages and IgG oligomers was accompanied by a simultaneous increase of cyclic GMP and AMP nucleotides and by an absence of beta-G exocytosis. Moreover, the beta-G release induced by aggregated IgE was increased when macrophages were preincubated with aggregated IgG. This additive effect was not observed in the reverse situation. Finally macrophages activated by IgG oligomers were demonstrated to exert a cytotoxic effect on tumour cells and to kill schistosomula in the presence of a low level of complement. Taken together these results underline the peculiar ability of aggregated or complexed IgE to trigger rapidly the macrophage activation compared to aggregated IgG and can explain the important role of complexed IgE in some macrophage dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms (i.e. in parasitic diseases). PMID:6088135

  5. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs.

  6. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D.; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25319335

  7. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  8. Localized reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates inhibit escape of Listeria monocytogenes from vacuoles in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jesse T; Tsang, Albert W; Swanson, Joel A

    2003-11-15

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) evades being killed after phagocytosis by macrophages by escaping from vacuoles into cytoplasm. Activated macrophages are listericidal, in part because they can retain Lm in vacuoles. This study examined the contribution of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) to the inhibition of Lm escape from vacuoles. Lm escaped from vacuoles of nonactivated macrophages within 30 min of infection. Macrophages activated with IFN-gamma, LPS, IL-6, and a neutralizing Ab against IL-10 retained Lm within the vacuoles, and inhibitors of ROI and RNI blocked inhibition of vacuolar escape to varying degrees. Measurements of Lm escape in macrophages from gp91(phox-/-) and NO synthase 2(-/-) mice showed that vacuolar retention required ROI and was augmented by RNI. Live cell imaging with the fluorogenic probe dihydro-2',4,5,6,7,7'-hexafluorofluorescein coupled to BSA (DHFF-BSA) indicated that oxidative chemistries were generated rapidly and were localized to Lm vacuoles. Chemistries that oxidized DHFF-BSA were similar to those that retained Lm in phagosomes. Fluorescent conversion of DHFF-BSA occurred more efficiently in smaller vacuoles, indicating that higher concentrations of ROI or RNI were generated in more confining volumes. Thus, activated macrophages retained Lm within phagosomes by the localization of ROI and RNI to vacuoles, and by their combined actions in a small space

  9. Cord Blood-Derived Macrophage-Lineage Cells Rapidly Stimulate Osteoblastic Maturation in Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Glycoprotein-130 Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania J.; Hodge, Jason M.; Singh, Preetinder P.; Eeles, Damien G.; Collier, Fiona M.; Holten, Ian; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    In bone, depletion of osteoclasts reduces bone formation in vivo, as does osteal macrophage depletion. How osteoclasts and macrophages promote the action of bone forming osteoblasts is, however, unclear. Since recruitment and differentiation of multi-potential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) generates new active osteoblasts, we investigated whether human osteoclasts and macrophages (generated from cord blood-derived hematopoietic progenitors) induce osteoblastic maturation in adipose tissue-derived MSC. When treated with an osteogenic stimulus (ascorbate, dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate) these MSC form matrix-mineralising, alkaline phosphatase-expressing osteoblastic cells. Cord blood-derived progenitors were treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to form immature proliferating macrophages, or with M-CSF plus receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) to form osteoclasts; culture medium was conditioned for 3 days by these cells to study their production of osteoblastic factors. Both osteoclast- and macrophage-conditioned medium (CM) greatly enhanced MSC osteoblastic differentiation in both the presence and absence of osteogenic medium, evident by increased alkaline phosphatase levels within 4 days and increased mineralisation within 14 days. These CM effects were completely ablated by antibodies blocking gp130 or oncostatin M (OSM), and OSM was detectable in both CM. Recombinant OSM very potently stimulated osteoblastic maturation of these MSC and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) actions on MSC. To determine the influence of macrophage activation on this OSM-dependent activity, CM was collected from macrophage populations treated with M-CSF plus IL-4 (to induce alternative activation) or with GM-CSF, IFNγ and LPS to cause classical activation. CM from IL-4 treated macrophages stimulated osteoblastic maturation in MSC, while CM from classically-activated macrophages did not. Thus, macrophage-lineage cells, including

  10. Fluoroquinolone AUIC break points and the link to bacterial killing rates. Part 2: human trials.

    PubMed

    Schentag, Jerome J; Meagher, Alison K; Forrest, Alan

    2003-10-01

    To review clinical trials with fluoroquinolones and the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters predictive of clinical and microbiologic outcomes and resistance. Data on fluoroquinolones are summarized and the premise that a single AUIC target >125 may be used for all fluoroquinolones against all target organisms is examined. Primary articles were identified by a MEDLINE search (1966-February 2002) and through secondary sources. All of the articles identified from the data sources were evaluated and all information deemed relevant was included. The fluoroquinolones exhibit concentration-dependent killing. This effect clearly depends upon concentrations achieved and outcomes depend upon endpoints established by individual investigators. With AUIC values <60, the actions of fluoroquinolones are essentially bacteriostatic; any observed bacterial killing is the combined effect of low concentrations in relation to minimum inhibitory concentration and the action of host factors such as neutrophils and macrophages. AUIC values >100 but <250 yield bacterial killing at a slow rate, but usually by day 7 of treatment. AUICs >250 produce rapid killing, and bacterial eradication occurs within 24 hours. Disagreements regarding target endpoints are the expected consequences of comparing microbial and clinical outcomes across animal models, in vitro experiments (Part 1), and humans when the endpoints are clearly not equivalent. Careful attention to time-related events such as speed of bacterial killing versus global endpoints such as bacteriologic cure allows optimal break points to be defined. Evidence from human trials favors the use of AUIC values >250 for rapid bactericidal action, regardless of whether the organism is gram-negative or gram-positive.

  11. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  12. Plasma gelsolin improves lung host defense against pneumonia by enhancing macrophage NOS3 function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiping; Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Stossel, Thomas P; Kobzik, Lester

    2015-07-01

    Plasma gelsolin (pGSN) functions as part of the "extracellular actin-scavenging system," but its potential to improve host defense against infection has not been studied. In a mouse model of primary pneumococcal pneumonia, recombinant human pGSN (rhu-pGSN) caused enhanced bacterial clearance, reduced acute inflammation, and improved survival. In vitro, rhu-pGSN rapidly improved lung macrophage uptake and killing of bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Francisella tularensis). pGSN triggers activating phosphorylation (Ser(1177)) of macrophage nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS3), an enzyme with important bactericidal functions in lung macrophages. rhu-pGSN failed to enhance bacterial killing by NOS3(-/-) macrophages in vitro or bacterial clearance in NOS3(-/-) mice in vivo. Prophylaxis with immunomodulators may be especially relevant for patients at risk for secondary bacterial pneumonia, e.g., after influenza. Treatment of mice with pGSN challenged with pneumococci on postinfluenza day 7 (the peak of enhanced susceptibility to secondary infection) caused a ∼15-fold improvement in bacterial clearance, reduced acute neutrophilic inflammation, and markedly improved survival, even without antibiotic therapy. pGSN is a potential immunomodulator for improving lung host defense against primary and secondary bacterial pneumonia.

  13. Monocyte and macrophage biology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rees, Andrew J

    2010-05-01

    This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the biology of monocytes and macrophages. It focuses on four rapidly advancing areas that underpin recent conceptual advances, namely: (1) the bone marrow origins of monocytes and macrophages, (2) monocyte heterogeneity, (3) the early inflammatory consequences of tissue injury, and (4) current concepts of macrophage activation and their limitations.

  14. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  15. Killing tensors on tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    We show that Killing tensors on conformally flat n-dimensional tori whose conformal factor only depends on one variable, are polynomials in the metric and in the Killing vector fields. In other words, every first integral of the geodesic flow polynomial in the momenta on the sphere bundle of such a torus is linear in the momenta.

  16. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  17. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  18. Fluoroquinolone AUIC break points and the link to bacterial killing rates. Part 1: In vitro and animal models.

    PubMed

    Schentag, Jerome J; Meagher, Alison K; Forrest, Alan

    2003-09-01

    To review in vitro and animal model studies with fluoroquinolones and the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships that are predictive of clinical and microbiologic outcomes and resistance. Data on fluoroquinolones are summarized and examine the premise that a single area under the inhibitory concentration-time curve (AUIC) target >125 may be used for all fluoroquinolones with concentration-dependent killing actions and against all target organisms. Primary articles were identified by MEDLINE search (1966-February 2002) and through secondary sources. All of the articles identified from the data sources were evaluated, and all information deemed relevant was included. The fluoroquinolones exhibit concentration-dependent killing. This effect clearly depends on concentrations achieved, and outcomes depend on endpoints established by individual investigators. With AUIC values <60, the actions of fluoroquinolones are essentially bacteriostatic; any observed bacterial killing is the combined effect of low concentrations in relation to minimum inhibitory concentration and the action of host factors such as neutrophils and macrophages. AUIC values >100 but <250 yield bacterial killing at a slow rate, but usually by day 7 of treatment. AUICs >250 produce rapid killing, and bacterial eradication occurs within 24 hours. Disagreements regarding target endpoints are the expected consequences of comparing microbial and clinical outcomes across animal models, in vitro experiments, and humans when the endpoints are clearly not equivalent. Careful attention to time-related events, such as speed of bacterial killing, versus global endpoints, such as bacteriologic cure, allows optimal break points to be defined. Evidence from in vitro and animal models favors the use of AUIC values >250 for rapid bactericidal action, regardless of whether the organism is gram-negative or gram-positive.

  19. Mononuclear-macrophages but not neutrophils act as major infiltrating anti-leptospiral phagocytes during leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Sun, Ai-Hua; Hu, Wei-Lin; Lin, Xu’ai

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify the major infiltrating phagocytes during leptospirosis and examine the killing mechanism used by the host to eliminate Leptospira interrogans. Methods Major infiltrating phagocytes in Leptospira-infected C3H/HeJ mice were detected by immunohistochemistry. Chemokines and vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecules (VECAMs) of Leptospira-infected mice and leptospirosis patients were detected by microarray and immunohistochemistry. Leptospira-phagocytosing and -killing abilities of human or mouse macrophages and neutrophils, and the roles of intracellular ROS, NO and [Ca2+]i in Leptospira-killing process were evaluated by confocal microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. Results Peripheral blood mononuclear-macrophages rather than neutrophils were the main infiltrating phagocytes in the lungs, liver and kidneys of infected mice. Levels of macrophage- but not neutrophil-specific chemokines and VECAMs were significantly increased in the samples from infected mice and patients. All macrophages tested had a higher ability than neutrophils to phagocytose and kill leptospires. Higher ROS and NO levels and [Ca2+]i in the macrophages were involved in killing leptospires. Human macrophages displayed more phagolysosome formation and a stronger leptospire-killing ability to than mouse macrophages. Conclusions Mononuclear-macrophages but not neutrophils represent the main infiltrating and anti-leptospiral phagocytes during leptospirosis. A lower level of phagosome-lysosome fusion may be responsible for the lower Leptospira-killing ability of human macrophages. PMID:28700741

  20. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    PubMed

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species.

  1. The Pathogen Candida albicans Hijacks Pyroptosis for Escape from Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. PMID:24667705

  2. A Breakthrough: Macrophage-Directed Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charles D; Lenz, Laurel L; Harris, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Successful immunotherapy of cancer is becoming a reality aided by the realization that macrophages play an important role in the growth or regression of tumors. Specifically, M2/repair-type macrophages predominate in human cancers and produce growth-promoting molecules that actively stimulate tumor growth in much the same way they help wounds heal. However, modulating M2/repair-type macrophages to M1/kill-type can slow or stop cancer growth. The effects involve direct activity of M1 kill-type as well as the ability of M1-type macrophages to stimulate Th1-type cytotoxic T cells and other effector cells. Macrophage responses can also predict cancer susceptibility; individuals with a high M1/kill to M2/repair ratio are less prone. That macrophages/innate immunity can be modulated to play a central role in directly or indirectly combating cancer is a breakthrough that seems likely to finally make successful immunotherapy of cancer a reality.

  3. Report Bee Kills

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA uses incident report data to help inform our pesticide regulatory decisions. Information from these reports helps us identify patterns of bee kills associated with the use of specific pesticides or active ingredients. Here's how to report incidents.

  4. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik; Astudillo, Yaritzy M; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P; Strijkers, Gustav J; Stroes, Erik S G; Swirski, Filip K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E deficient mice (Apoe(-/-) ) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an eight-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  5. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  6. The Role of Macrophages in Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Elhelu, Mohamed A.

    1983-01-01

    Macrophages play a significant part in immunity and immune responses. They assume a defensive role exhibited by their ability to carry on phagocytosis of parasites and microbes. They regulate lymphocyte activation and proliferation and they are essential in the activation process of T- and B-lymphocytes by antigens and allogenic cells. Enhanced bactericidal activity of “activated macrophages” is based on immunologically linked mechanisms involving lymphocytes. Macrophages kill ingested microbes but the mechanism by which this is accomplished is not completely understood. This paper discusses the role of macrophages in relation to immunity. PMID:6343621

  7. Migration Inhibitory Factor and Macrophage Bactericidal Function

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Harvey B.; Sheagren, John N.

    1972-01-01

    A homogeneous population of immunologically active lymphocytes was obtained from peritoneal exudates of guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity to bovine gamma globulin (BGG). The lymphocytes were cultured with and without BGG for 24 hr, and cell-free supernatant fluids were then assayed simultaneously for their ability to influence two in vitro parameters of macrophage function: migration from capillary tubes and bactericidal capacity. In four consecutive experiments, supernatants from antigenically stimulated lymphocytes exhibited substantial migration-inhibitory-factor activity without enhancing the ability of macrophages to kill Listeria monocytogenes. Lymphocyte lysates were inactive in both assays. Possible mechanisms of lymphocyte-macrophage interactions are discussed. PMID:4120244

  8. Intracellular colon cancer-associated Escherichia coli promote protumoral activities of human macrophages by inducing sustained COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Raisch, Jennifer; Rolhion, Nathalie; Dubois, Anaëlle; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Bringer, Marie-Agnès

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis has been reported in patients with colorectal cancer, and there is a high prevalence of Escherichia coli belonging to B2 phylogroup and producing a genotoxin, termed colibactin. Macrophages are one of the predominant tumor-infiltrating immune cells supporting key processes in tumor progression by producing protumoral factors such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Here, we investigated whether B2 E. coli colonizing colon tumors could influence protumoral activities of macrophages. In contrast to commensal or nonpathogenic E. coli strains that were efficiently and rapidly degraded by macrophages at 24 h after infection, colon cancer-associated E. coli were able to resist killing by human THP-1 macrophages, to replicate intracellularly, and to persist inside host cells until at least 72 h after infection. Significant increases in COX-2 expression were observed in macrophages infected with colon cancer E. coli compared with macrophages infected with commensal and nonpathogenic E. coli strains or uninfected cells at 72 h after infection. Induction of COX-2 expression required live bacteria and was not due to colibactin production, as similar COX-2 levels were observed in macrophages infected with the wild-type colon cancer-associated E. coli 11G5 strain or a clbQ mutant unable to produce colibactin. Treatment of macrophages with ofloxacin, an antibiotic with intracellular tropism, efficiently decreased the number of intracellular bacteria and suppressed bacteria-induced COX-2 expression. This study provides new insights into the understanding of how tumor- infiltrating bacteria could influence cancer progression through their interaction with immune cells. Manipulation of microbes associated with tumors could have a deep influence on the secretion of protumoral molecules by infiltrating macrophages.

  9. Role of nitric oxide and superoxide in Giardia lamblia killing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P D; Assreuy, J

    1997-01-01

    Giardia lamblia trophozoites were incubated for 2 h with activated murine macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) donors or a superoxide anion generator (20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase plus 1 mM xanthine). Activated macrophages were cytotoxic to Giardia trophozoites (approximately 60% dead trophozoites). The effect was inhibited (> 90%) by an NO synthase inhibitor (200 microM) and unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD, 300 U/ml). Giardia trophozoites were killed by the NO donors, S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in a dose-dependent manner (LD50 300 and 50 microM, respectively). A dual NO-superoxide anion donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), did not have a killing effect in concentrations up to 1 mM. However, when SOD (300 U/ml) was added simultaneously with SIN-1 to Giardia, a significant trophozoite-killing effect was observed (approximately 35% dead trophozoites at 1 mM). The mixtures of SNAP or SNP with superoxide anion, which yields peroxynitrite, abolished the trophozoite killing induced by NO donors. Authentic peroxynitrite only killed trophozoites at very high concentrations (3 mM). These results indicate that NO accounts for Giardia trophozoites killing and this effect is not mediated by peroxynitrite.

  10. Passive transfer of leishmania lipopolysaccharide confers parasite survival in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Handman, E.; Schnur, L.F.; Spithill, T.W.; Mitchell, G.F.

    1986-12-01

    Infection of macrophages by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania involves specific attachment to the host membrane, followed by phagocytosis and intracellular survival and growth. Two parasite molecules have been implicated in the attachment event: Leishmania lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) and a glycoprotein (gp63). This study was designed to clarify the role of L-LPS in infection and the stage in the process of infection at which it operates. The authors have recently identified a Leishmania major strain (LRC-L119) which lacks the L-LPS molecule and is not infective for hamsters or mice. This parasite was isolated from a gerbil in Kenya and was identified phenotypically as L. major by isoenzyme and fatty acid analysis. In this study they have confirmed at the genotype level that LRC-L119 is L. major by analyzing and comparing the organization of cloned DNA sequences in the genome of different strains of L. major. Here they show that LRC-L119 promastigotes are phagocytosed rapidly by macrophages in vitro, but in contrast to virulent strains of L. major, they are then killed over a period of 18 hr. In addition, they show that transfer of purified L-LPS from a virulent clone of L. major (V121) into LRC-L119 promastigotes confers on them the ability to survive in macrophages in vitro.

  11. Spermine oxidase is a regulator of macrophage host response to Helicobacter pylori: enhancement of antimicrobial nitric oxide generation by depletion of spermine

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Frye, Jeanetta W.; Casero, Robert A.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2013-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. We have reported that in H. pylori-activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) can kill the bacterium, iNOS protein expression is dependent on uptake of its substrate L-arginine (L-Arg), the polyamine spermine can inhibit iNOS translation by inhibiting L-Arg uptake, and inhibition of polyamine synthesis enhances NO-mediated bacterial killing. Because spermine oxidase (SMO), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, is induced in macrophages by H. pylori, we determined its role in iNOS-dependent host defense. SMO shRNA knockdown in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resulted in a marked decrease in H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein, but not mRNA expression, and a 90% reduction in NO levels; NO production was also inhibited in primary murine peritoneal macrophages with SMO knockdown. There was an increase in spermine levels after H. pylori stimulation that rapidly decreased, while SMO knockdown caused a greater increase in spermine that was sustained. With SMO knockdown, L-Arg uptake and killing of H. pylori by macrophages was prevented. Overexpression of SMO by transfection of an expression plasmid prevented the H. pylori-stimulated increase in spermine levels, and led to increased L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression and NO production, and H. pylori killing. In two human monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP-1, overexpression of SMO caused a significant enhancement of NO production with H. pylori stimulation. By depleting spermine, SMO can abrogate the inhibitory effect of polyamines on innate immune responses to H. pylori by enhancing antimicrobial NO production. PMID:23820617

  12. Spermine oxidase is a regulator of macrophage host response to Helicobacter pylori: enhancement of antimicrobial nitric oxide generation by depletion of spermine.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P; Frye, Jeanetta W; Casero, Robert A; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-03-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. We have reported that in H. pylori-activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) can kill the bacterium, iNOS protein expression is dependent on uptake of its substrate L-arginine (L-Arg), the polyamine spermine can inhibit iNOS translation by inhibiting L-Arg uptake, and inhibition of polyamine synthesis enhances NO-mediated bacterial killing. Because spermine oxidase (SMO), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, is induced in macrophages by H. pylori, we determined its role in iNOS-dependent host defense. SMO shRNA knockdown in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resulted in a marked decrease in H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein, but not mRNA expression, and a 90% reduction in NO levels; NO production was also inhibited in primary murine peritoneal macrophages with SMO knockdown. There was an increase in spermine levels after H. pylori stimulation that rapidly decreased, while SMO knockdown caused a greater increase in spermine that was sustained. With SMO knockdown, L-Arg uptake and killing of H. pylori by macrophages was prevented. The overexpression of SMO by transfection of an expression plasmid prevented the H. pylori-stimulated increase in spermine levels, and led to increased L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression and NO production, and H. pylori killing. In two human monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP-1, overexpression of SMO caused a significant enhancement of NO production with H. pylori stimulation. By depleting spermine, SMO can abrogate the inhibitory effect of polyamines on innate immune responses to H. pylori by enhancing antimicrobial NO production.

  13. Local proliferation dominates lesional macrophage accumulation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Clinton S; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Weber, Georg F; Theurl, Igor; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Gorbatov, Rostic; Sukhova, Galina K; Gerhardt, Louisa M S; Smyth, David; Zavitz, Caleb C J; Shikatani, Eric A; Parsons, Michael; van Rooijen, Nico; Lin, Herbert Y; Husain, Mansoor; Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K

    2013-09-01

    During the inflammatory response that drives atherogenesis, macrophages accumulate progressively in the expanding arterial wall. The observation that circulating monocytes give rise to lesional macrophages has reinforced the concept that monocyte infiltration dictates macrophage buildup. Recent work has indicated, however, that macrophage accumulation does not depend on monocyte recruitment in some inflammatory contexts. We therefore revisited the mechanism underlying macrophage accumulation in atherosclerosis. In murine atherosclerotic lesions, we found that macrophages turn over rapidly, after 4 weeks. Replenishment of macrophages in these experimental atheromata depends predominantly on local macrophage proliferation rather than monocyte influx. The microenvironment orchestrates macrophage proliferation through the involvement of scavenger receptor A (SR-A). Our study reveals macrophage proliferation as a key event in atherosclerosis and identifies macrophage self-renewal as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease.

  14. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Macrophage Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  15. Why is Particulate Matter Produced by Wildfires Toxic To Lung Macrophages?

    PubMed Central

    Franzi, Lisa M.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha M.; Last, Jerold A.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic basis of the high toxicity to lung macrophages of coarse PM from the California wildfires of 2008 was examined in cell culture experiments with mouse macrophages. Wildfire PM directly killed macrophages very rapidly in cell culture at relatively low doses. The wildfire coarse PM are about four times more toxic to macrophages on an equal weight basis than the same sized PM collected from normal ambient air (no wildfires) from the same region and season. There was a good correlation between the extent of cytotoxicity and the amount of oxidative stress observed at a given dose of wildfire PM in vitro. Our data implicate NF-kB signaling in the response of macrophages to wildfire PM, and suggest that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. The relative ratio of toxicity and of expression of biomarkers of oxidant stress between wildfire PM and “normal” PM collected from ambient air is consistent with our previous results in mice in vivo, also suggesting that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. Our findings from this and earlier studies suggest that the active components of coarse PM from the wildfire are heat-labile organic compounds. While we can not rule out a minor role for endotoxin in coarse PM preparations from the collected wildfire PM in our observed results both in vitro and in vivo, based on experiments using the inhibitor Polymyxin B most of the oxidant stress and pro-inflammatory activity observed was not due to endotoxin. PMID:21945489

  16. Why is particulate matter produced by wildfires toxic to lung macrophages?

    PubMed

    Franzi, Lisa M; Bratt, Jennifer M; Williams, Keisha M; Last, Jerold A

    2011-12-01

    The mechanistic basis of the high toxicity to lung macrophages of coarse PM from the California wildfires of 2008 was examined in cell culture experiments with mouse macrophages. Wildfire PM directly killed macrophages very rapidly in cell culture at relatively low doses. The wildfire coarse PM is about four times more toxic to macrophages on an equal weight basis than the same sized PM collected from normal ambient air (no wildfires) from the same region and season. There was a good correlation between the extent of cytotoxicity and the amount of oxidative stress observed at a given dose of wildfire PM in vitro. Our data implicate NF-κB signaling in the response of macrophages to wildfire PM, and suggest that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. The relative ratio of toxicity and of expression of biomarkers of oxidant stress between wildfire PM and "normal" PM collected from ambient air is consistent with our previous results in mice in vivo, also suggesting that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. Our findings from this and earlier studies suggest that the active components of coarse PM from the wildfire are heat-labile organic compounds. While we cannot rule out a minor role for endotoxin in coarse PM preparations from the collected wildfire PM in our observed results both in vitro and in vivo, based on experiments using the inhibitor Polymyxin B most of the oxidant stress and pro-inflammatory activity observed was not due to endotoxin.

  17. Role of macrophages in early host resistance to respiratory Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hongyu; KuoLee, Rhonda; Harris, Greg; Van Rooijen, Nico; Patel, Girishchandra B; Chen, Wangxue

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen that causes nosocomial pneumonia and other infections. Although it is recognized as an increasing threat to immunocompromised patients, the mechanism of host defense against A. baumannii infection remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the potential role of macrophages in host defense against A. baumannii infection using in vitro macrophage culture and the mouse model of intranasal (i.n.) infection. Large numbers of A. baumannii were taken up by alveolar macrophages in vivo as early as 4 h after i.n. inoculation. By 24 h, the infection induced significant recruitment and activation (enhanced expression of CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) of macrophages into bronchoalveolar spaces. In vitro cell culture studies showed that A. baumannii were phagocytosed by J774A.1 (J774) macrophage-like cells within 10 minutes of co-incubation, and this uptake was microfilament- and microtubule-dependent. Moreover, the viability of phagocytosed bacteria dropped significantly between 24 and 48 h after co-incubation. Infection of J774 cells by A. baumannii resulted in the production of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and moderate amounts of nitric oxide (NO). Prior treatment of J774 cells with NO inhibitors significantly suppressed their bactericidal efficacy (P<0.05). Most importantly, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages significantly enhanced the susceptibility of mice to i.n. A. baumannii challenge (P<0.01). These results indicate that macrophages may play an important role in early host defense against A. baumannii infection through the efficient phagocytosis and killing of A. baumannii to limit initial pathogen replication and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines for the rapid recruitment of other innate immune cells such as neutrophils.

  18. Killing of bacteria by copper surfaces involves dissolved copper.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Cristina; Abicht, Helge K; Solioz, Marc

    2010-06-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces. However, the mechanism of this process remains unclear. Using Enterococcus hirae, the effect of inactivation of copper homeostatic genes and of medium compositions on survival and copper dissolution was tested. The results support a role for dissolved copper ions in killing.

  19. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  20. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  1. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  2. Older women and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Canetto, S S; Hollenshead, J D

    Mercy killing is usually defined as intentional killing, often by family members or friends, with the stated intent to end perceived suffering. International evidence suggests that mercy killing typically involves an older man killing his ailing wife. In this study, we examined U.S. cases of mercy killing recorded by The Hemlock Society for the period 1960-1993. We found that the typical case involved an older woman being killed by a man, often her husband, with her poor health as the justification for the killing. A firearm was often used in these incidents. These patterns of mercy killing are consistent with patterns of homicide-suicide among older adults. Future research should seek to understand why women are typically the targets, and men the agents of mercy killing.

  3. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  4. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  5. Effects of Histoplasma capsulatum on murine macrophage functions: inhibition of macrophage priming, oxidative burst, and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J E; Abegg, A L; Travis, S J; Kobayashi, G S; Little, J R

    1989-02-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells fail to trigger an oxidative burst response in normal murine macrophages. The results of this study, in which an in vitro assay of macrophage antifungal effects was used, extend these findings. During 18 h of incubation, unprimed elicited murine macrophages inhibited H. capsulatum growth only when macrophages were present in great excess. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-primed macrophages showed enhanced fungal growth inhibition but a similar requirement for an excess of phagocytes. Macrophages containing heat-killed H. capsulatum exhibited diminished antifungal effects toward viable H. capsulatum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Parallel experiments showed no comparable effect of ingested latex particles on macrophage antifungal activity. Using chemiluminescence as a measure of the oxidative burst, we found that macrophages primed in vitro with IFN-gamma alone failed to exhibit a significant response to triggering by H. capsulatum yeast cells unless a second priming agent (tumor necrosis factor alpha or bacterial lipopolysaccharide) was added to IFN-gamma. Furthermore, macrophage priming with single agents was blocked by the prior ingestion of heat-killed H. capsulatum. These studies provide evidence that ingestion of H. capsulatum yeast cells can induce a prompt and enduring deactivation of murine macrophages.

  6. Local proliferation dominates lesional macrophage accumulation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Clinton S.; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Weber, Georg F.; Theurl, Igor; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Gorbatov, Rostic; Sukhova, Galina K.; Gerhardt, Louisa M.S.; Smyth, David; Zavitz, Caleb C. J.; Shikatani, Eric A.; Parsons, Michael; van Rooijen, Nico; Lin, Herbert Y.; Husain, Mansoor; Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K.

    2013-01-01

    During the inflammatory response that drives atherogenesis, macrophages accumulate progressively in the expanding arterial wall1,2. The observation that circulating monocytes give rise to lesional macrophages3–9 has reinforced the concept that monocyte infiltration dictates macrophage build-up. Recent work indicates, however, that macrophages do not depend on monocytes in some inflammatory contexts10. We therefore revisited the mechanism of macrophage accumulation in atherosclerosis. We show that murine atherosclerotic lesions experience a surprisingly rapid, 4-week, cell turnover. Replenishment of macrophages in these experimental atheromata depends predominantly on local macrophage proliferation rather than monocyte influx. The microenvironment orchestrates macrophage proliferation via the involvement of scavenger receptor (SR)-A. Our study reveals macrophage proliferation as a key event in atherosclerosis and identifies macrophage self-renewal as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23933982

  7. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection.

  8. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  9. Antagonism of miR-328 increases the antimicrobial function of macrophages and neutrophils and rapid clearance of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) from infected lung.

    PubMed

    Tay, Hock L; Kaiko, Gerard E; Plank, Maximilian; Li, JingJing; Maltby, Steven; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Jarnicki, Andrew; Yang, Ming; Mattes, Joerg; Hansbro, Philip M; Foster, Paul S

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic bacterial infections of the lung are life threatening and underpin chronic lung diseases. Current treatments are often ineffective potentially due to increasing antibiotic resistance and impairment of innate immunity by disease processes and steroid therapy. Manipulation miRNA directly regulating anti-microbial machinery of the innate immune system may boost host defence responses. Here we demonstrate that miR-328 is a key element of the host response to pulmonary infection with non-typeable haemophilus influenzae and pharmacological inhibition in mouse and human macrophages augments phagocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and microbicidal activity. Moreover, inhibition of miR-328 in respiratory models of infection, steroid-induced immunosuppression, and smoke-induced emphysema enhances bacterial clearance. Thus, miRNA pathways can be targeted in the lung to enhance host defence against a clinically relevant microbial infection and offer a potential new anti-microbial approach for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  10. Murine Macrophages Kill the Vegetative Form of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-18

    inhibitor of the germination of B. anthracis and Bacillus cereus spores. It converts L-alanine to D-alanine, an isomer that is not recognized by...nation of Bacillus cereus spores in response to L-alanine and to inosine: the roles of gerL and gerQ operons. Microbiology 148:2089–2095. 5. Dixon, T...anthracis. J. Appl. Bacteriol. 62:269–273. 32. Todd, S. J., A. J. Moir, M. J. Johnson, and A. Moir. 2003. Genes of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis

  11. Generation and Characterization of Mouse Regulatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Hill, Marcelo; Cuturi, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, cell therapy has become a promising approach to therapeutically manipulate immune responses in autoimmunity, cancer, and transplantation. Several types of lymphoid and myeloid cells origin have been generated in vitro and tested in animal models. Their efficacy to decrease pharmacological treatment has successfully been established. Macrophages play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. They represent an interesting cell population due to their high plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we describe a protocol to differentiate murine regulatory macrophages in vitro from bone marrow precursors. We also describe several methods to assess macrophage classical functions, as their bacterial killing capacity and antigen endocytosis and degradation. Importantly, regulatory macrophages also display suppressive characteristics, which are addressed by the study of their hypostimulatory T lymphocyte capacity and polyclonal T lymphocyte activation suppression.

  12. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-01-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered. PMID:24740976

  13. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-06-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered.

  14. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  15. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants from asymptomatic dogs immunized and experimentally challenged with Leishmania chagasi can stimulate canine macrophages to reduce infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cleusa Alves Theodoro; Batista, Luís Fábio da Silva; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino; Pereira, Andréa Mendes; Santos, Patrícia Oliveira Meira; de Sá Oliveira, Geraldo Gileno; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2007-02-28

    Leishmania chagasi is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in both humans and dogs in the New World. The dog is the main domestic reservoir and its infection displays different clinical presentations, from asymptomatic to severe disease. Macrophages play an important role in the control of Leishmania infection. Although it is not an area of intense study, some data suggest a role for canine macrophages in parasite killing by a NO-dependent mechanism. It has been proposed that control of human disease could be possible with the development of an effective vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis. Development of a rapid in vitro test to predict animal responses to Leishmania infection or vaccination should be helpful. In this study, an in vitro model was established to test whether peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) supernatants from dogs immunized with promastigote lysates and infected with L. chagasi promastigotes could stimulate macrophages from healthy dogs in order to control parasite infection. PBMC from a majority of the immunized and experimentally infected dogs expressed IFN-gamma mRNA and secreted IFN-gamma when stimulated with soluble L. chagasi antigen (SLA) in vitro. Additionally, the supernatants from stimulated PBMC were able to reduce the percentage of infected donor macrophages. The results also indicate that parasite killing in this system is dependent on NO, since aminoguanidine (AMG) reversed this effect. This in vitro test appears to be useful for screening animal responses to parasite inoculation as well as studying the lymphocyte effector mechanisms involved in pathogen killing by canine macrophages.

  16. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  17. Effects of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on the development, differentiation, and maturation of marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages in the spleen of osteopetrosis (op) mutant mice lacking functional M-CSF activity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Umeda, S; Shultz, L D; Hayashi, S; Nishikawa, S

    1994-05-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques using an anti-mouse panmacrophage monoclonal antibody and anti-mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for marginal metallophilic macrophages or marginal zone macrophages were used to detect red pulp macrophages, marginal metallophilic macrophages, and marginal zone macrophages in the spleen of op/op mice. In the mutant mice, the red pulp macrophages were reduced to about 60% of those in the normal littermates and the marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages were absent. After administration of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhM-CSF), numbers of red pulp macrophages increased rapidly, reaching levels found in normal littermates 1 week later. In contrast, the marginal metallophilic macrophages as well as the marginal zone macrophages appeared slowly after rhM-CSF administration and their numbers were less than half of the baseline level of normal littermates even at 12 weeks of administration. The distribution of marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages appearing after M-CSF administration was irregular in the spleen of the op/op mice. These splenic macrophage subpopulations differed in their responses to rhM-CSF, suggesting that distinct mechanisms may be involved in their development and differentiation. The splenic red pulp macrophages present in unmanipulated op/op mice are an M-CSF-independent macrophage population. Although the marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages are thought to be M-CSF-dependent, their development and differentiation appear to be influenced by locally produced M-CSF or other cytokines.

  18. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, P. P.; Retnakumar, R. J.; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation. PMID:26876331

  19. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, P P; Retnakumar, R J; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation.

  20. Pathophysiological relevance of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liberale, Luca; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico

    2017-01-05

    Macrophages are highly heterogeneous and plastic cells. They were shown to play a critical role in all stages of atherogenesis, from the initiation to the necrotic core formation and plaque rupture. Lesional macrophages primarily derive from blood monocyte, but local macrophage proliferation as well as differentiation from smooth muscle cells have also been described. Within atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages rapidly respond to changes in the microenvironment, shifting between pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) functional phenotypes. Furthermore, different stimuli have been associated with differentiation of newly discovered M2 subtypes: IL-4/IL-13 (M2a), immune-complex (M2b), IL-10/glucocorticoids (M2c), and adenosine receptor agonist (M2d). More recently, additional intraplaque macrophage phenotypes were also recognized in response to CXCL4 (M4), oxidized phospholipids (Mox), haemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes (HA-mac/M(Hb)), and heme (Mhem). Such macrophage polarization was described as a progression among multiple phenotypes, which reflect the activity of different transcriptional factors and the cross-talk between intracellular signalling. Finally, the distribution of macrophage subsets within different plaque areas was markedly associated with cardiovascular (CV) vulnerability. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge on the role of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage phenotypic shift will be summarised and discussed. Finally, the role of intraplaque macrophages as predictors of CV events and the therapeutic potential of these cells will be discussed.

  1. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 months) and aged (14–15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  2. Aging Enhances Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Up-Regulating Classical Activation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection is central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 mo) and aged (14–15 mo) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in macrophage recruitment into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to LPS. Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in proteins linked to immune cell pathways under both basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways up-regulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins are dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice. Collectively these results indicate that macrophages isolated from

  3. Aging enhances the production of reactive oxygen species and bactericidal activity in peritoneal macrophages by upregulating classical activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C

    2011-11-15

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3-4 months) and aged (14-15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  4. Medicalized killing in Auschwitz.

    PubMed

    Lifton, R J

    1982-11-01

    Since late 1977 I have been conducting a psychological study of medical behavior in Auschwitz, and of Nazi doctors in general. I have been especially interested in the relationship of doctors, SS doctors in particular, to the killing process--in the transformation from healer to killer. I am concerned with the importance of the medicalized pattern for the overall Nazi project of mass murder and have therefore tried to examine the interaction of biomedical ideology, political ideology, and individual behavior. Finally, the work raises questions of more general significance: for doctors and medicine elsewhere; for scientists, other professionals, and institutions of all kinds; for approaches to "triage" and control over life and death; and for our understanding of human nature and human values. After describing how I did the study, I will discuss what I call the Nazi "biomedical vision" and its relationship to the killing of mental patients as well as to Auschwitz. Next I will suggest features of the Auschwitz atmosphere, particularly in regard to the psychological factors, or mechanisms, that enabled the Nazi doctors to do what they did. Finally, I will turn very briefly to the more general problems raised by the study.

  5. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  6. Posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in colonic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Filardy, A A; He, J; Bennink, J; Yewdell, J; Kelsall, B L

    2016-07-01

    Colonic macrophages (cMPs) are important for intestinal homeostasis as they kill microbes and yet produce regulatory cytokines. Activity of the NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat-containing pyrin receptor 3) inflammasome, a major sensor of stress and microorganisms that results in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death, must be tightly controlled in the intestine. We demonstrate that resident cMPs are hyporesponsive to NLRP3 inflammasome activation owing to a remarkable level of posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 and pro-interleukin-1β (proIL-1β) protein expression, which was also seen for tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6, but lost during experimental colitis. Resident cMPs rapidly degraded NLRP3 and proIL-1β proteins by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Finally, blocking IL-10R-signaling in vivo enhanced NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein but not mRNA levels in resident cMPs, implicating a role for IL-10 in environmental conditioning of cMPs. These data are the first to show dramatic posttranscriptional control of inflammatory cytokine production by a relevant tissue-derived macrophage population and proteasomal degradation of proIL-1β and NLRP3 as a mechanism to control inflammasome activation, findings which have broad implications for our understanding of intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases.

  7. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Je, Sungmo; Quan, Hailian; Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria.

  8. Rapid microassays for the measurement of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by macrophages in culture using an automatic enzyme immunoassay reader.

    PubMed

    Pick, E; Mizel, D

    1981-01-01

    Two simple semiautomated microassays for the measurement of superoxide (O-2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by cultured macrophages (MPs) are described. The measurement of O-2 is based on the reduction of ferricytochrome c as assayed by the increase in its absorbance at 550 nm. Quantitation of H2O2 is based on the horseradish peroxidase (HRPO)-dependent oxidation of phenol red which is assayed by its increased absorbance at 600 nm. MPs are cultured in monolayers in 96-well flat-bottom tissue culture plates and covered with 100 mul amounts per well of either a ferricytochrome c solution containing phenol red and HRPO. Following the addition of an agent eliciting an oxidative burst (OB) and incubation of the plates at 37 degrees C for various time intervals, the changes in the absorbance of ferricytochrome c and phenol red, respectively, are measured directly in the wells of the tissue culture plates with the cells in situ, by using an automatic 8-channel photometer which reads absorbances vertically through individual wells. This instrument, which was originally designed for reading enzyme immunoassays in microtitration plates, can be easily adapted for use in the above test, when fitted with interference filters with wave lengths of 550 nm (for the assay of O-2) and 600 nm (for the assay of H2O2). The principal advantages of this techniques are: the ability to perform the assays directly in the culture plates with cells in situ; the small amounts of cells and reagents needed; its sensitivity and reproducibility; the ease with which kinetic experiments can be done; the large number of samples which can be tested in parallel, and especially the speed and convenience offered by the automated reading and printout of absorbance values.

  9. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  10. It is all about fluidity: Fatty acids and macrophage phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Julia

    2016-08-15

    Phagocytosis is an early and fundamental step for the effective clearance of disease causing agents. The ability to engulf and kill pathogens is considered as a major effector function of macrophages. In their phagocytic role macrophages are part of the first line of innate immune defense. A number of studies investigating fatty acid effects on macrophage phagocytosis have been conducted over many years. In vitro-data consistently report that alterations in macrophage membrane fatty acid composition are linked to an altered phagocytic capacity, i.e. an increase in membrane unsaturated fatty acid content is associated with an increase in engulfment and killing rate. The mode of action of fatty acids seems to be the modulation of the physical nature of the macrophage plasma membrane. It appears that the saturated-to-unsaturated fatty acid ratio of macrophage membrane phospholipids is of importance in determining macrophage phagocytic capacity. Available in vivo-data are less clear. At present, there is a lack of systematic studies elucidating key factors such as fatty acid efficacy, effective dose or dosing intervals. Without this knowledge the targeted modulation of macrophage phagocytosis in vivo by fatty acids is still a distant possibility.

  11. How to kill creativity.

    PubMed

    Amabile, T M

    1998-01-01

    In today's knowledge economy, creativity is more important than ever. But many companies unwittingly employ managerial practices that kill it. How? By crushing their employees' intrinsic motivation--the strong internal desire to do something based on interests and passions. Managers don't kill creativity on purpose. Yet in the pursuit of productivity, efficiency, and control--all worthy business imperatives--they undermine creativity. It doesn't have to be that way, says Teresa Amabile. Business imperatives can comfortably coexist with creativity. But managers will have to change their thinking first. Specifically, managers will need to understand that creativity has three parts: expertise, the ability to think flexibly and imaginatively, and motivation. Managers can influence the first two, but doing so is costly and slow. It would be far more effective to increase employees' intrinsic motivation. To that end, managers have five levers to pull: the amount of challenge they give employees, the degree of freedom they grant around process, the way they design work groups, the level of encouragement they give, and the nature of organizational support. Take challenge as an example. Intrinsic motivation is high when employees feel challenged but not overwhelmed by their work. The task for managers, therefore, becomes matching people to the right assignments. Consider also freedom. Intrinsic motivation--and thus creativity--soars when managers let people decide how to achieve goals, not what goals to achieve. Managers can make a difference when it comes to employee creativity. The result can be truly innovative companies in which creativity doesn't just survive but actually thrives.

  12. Kill operation requires thorough analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1995-05-15

    Full control of a blowout well requires a properly designed post-capping kill operation because failures in regaining well control usually occur during the kill operation, not during capping. Capping (the installation of pressure control or diverter equipment on the wellhead) is generally very reliable in gaining control of a blowout well. The following techniques are some of the viable means of killing blowout wells once the capping assemblies are in place: direct shut in of the flow; bullheading; momentum kill; volumetric control for migration of fluids or lubrication after migration ceases; and dynamic kills (friction-based dynamic kills or mass flow rate kills) The objective of most post-capping operations is to stop the flow and put the well under hydrostatic control. The means of killing a blowout once capping assemblies are in place should be chosen with care to avoid problems such as cratering, equipment failure, and underground blowouts. The particular circumstances and well integrity will dictate which kill method will be the most viable. Each of these five methods are explained.

  13. Does smoking really kill anybody?

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1995-12-01

    Statements that so many people are killed by smoking use the term "kill" in a very unusual manner which is easily misunderstood by people not expert in epidemiology. In addition, the usual calculations leave out of account the fact that smoking interacts synergistically with other risk factors, so that it is a combination of risk factors rather than any specific one that is likely to have a causal influence on mortality. Strictly speaking it is quite inappropriate to state that smoking kills anybody, if we use the term "kill" in a meaningful fashion.

  14. 2-arachidonoylglycerol, an endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand, induces rapid actin polymerization in HL-60 cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Gokoh, Maiko; Kishimoto, Seishi; Oka, Saori; Mori, Masahiro; Waku, Keizo; Ishima, Yoshio; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2005-03-15

    Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, a major psychoactive constituent of marijuana, interacts with specific receptors, i.e. the cannabinoid receptors, thereby eliciting a variety of pharmacological responses. To date, two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: the CB1 receptor, which is abundantly expressed in the nervous system, and the CB2 receptor, which is predominantly expressed in the immune system. Previously, we investigated in detail the structure-activity relationship of various cannabinoid receptor ligands and found that 2-AG (2-arachidonoylglycerol) is the most efficacious agonist. We have proposed that 2-AG is the true natural ligand for both the CB1 and CB2 receptors. Despite the potential physiological importance of 2-AG, not much information is available concerning its biological activities towards mammalian tissues and cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of 2-AG on morphology as well as the actin filament system in differentiated HL-60 cells, which express the CB2 receptor. We found that 2-AG induces rapid morphological changes such as the extension of pseudopods. We also found that it provokes a rapid actin polymerization in these cells. Actin polymerization induced by 2-AG was abolished when cells were treated with SR144528, a CB2 receptor antagonist, and pertussis toxin, suggesting that the response was mediated by the CB2 receptor and G(i/o). A phosphoinositide 3-kinase, Rho family small G-proteins and a tyrosine kinase were also suggested to be involved. Reorganization of the actin filament system is known to be indispensable for a variety of cellular events; it is possible that 2-AG plays physiologically essential roles in various inflammatory cells and immune-competent cells by inducing a rapid actin rearrangement.

  15. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  16. Macrophages in resistance to candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Torres, A; Balish, E

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans, an increasingly common opportunistic pathogenic fungus, frequently causes disease in immunodeficient but not immunocompetent hosts. Clarifying the role of the phagocytic cells that participate in resistance to candidiasis not only is basic to understanding how the host copes with this dimorphic pathogen but also will expedite the development of innovative prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for treating the multiple clinical presentations that candidiasis encompasses. In this review, we present evidence that a diverse population of mononuclear phagocytes, in different states of activation and differentiation and from a variety of host species, can phagocytize C. albicans blastoconidia via an array of opsonic and nonopsonic mechanisms and can kill C. albicans blastoconidia and hyphae by means of oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Reactive nitrogen intermediates should now be added to the well-established candidacidal reactive oxygen intermediates of macrophages. Furthermore, what were thought to be two independent pathways, i.e., nitric oxide and superoxide anion, have now been shown to combine to form a potent macrophage candidacidal molecule, peroxynitrite. In contrast to monocytes and neutrophils, which are important in resistance to early stages of C. albicans infections, more differentiated macrophages activated by cytokines such as gamma interferon participate in the acquired resistance of hosts with C. albicans-specific, cell-mediated immunity. Evidence presented in this review demonstrates that mononuclear phagocytes, in some instances in the absence of other professional phagocytes such as neutrophils, play an import role in resistance to systemic and mucosal candidiasis. PMID:9184009

  17. Asymptotic symmetries on Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou

    2001-12-01

    We investigate asymptotic symmetries regularly defined on spherically symmetric Killing horizons in Einstein theory with or without the cosmological constant. These asymptotic symmetries are described by asymptotic Killing vectors, along which the Lie derivatives of perturbed metrics vanish on a Killing horizon. We derive the general form of the asymptotic Killing vectors and find that the group of asymptotic symmetries consists of rigid O(3) rotations of a horizon two-sphere and supertranslations along the null direction on the horizon, which depend arbitrarily on the null coordinate as well as the angular coordinates. By introducing the notion of asymptotic Killing horizons, we also show that local properties of Killing horizons are preserved not only under diffeomorphisms but also under nontrivial transformations generated by the asymptotic symmetry group. Although the asymptotic symmetry group contains the Diff(S1) subgroup, which results from supertranslations dependent only on the null coordinate, it is shown that the Poisson brackets algebra of the conserved charges conjugate to asymptotic Killing vectors does not acquire nontrivial central charges. Finally, by considering extended symmetries, we discuss the fact that unnatural reduction of the symmetry group is necessary in order to obtain the Virasoro algebra with nontrivial central charges, which is not justified when we respect the spherical symmetry of Killing horizons.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis exploits the PPM1A signaling pathway to block host macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Smith, Samuel R; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Wolschendorf, Frank; Westfall, Andrew O; Kutsch, Olaf; Sun, Jim

    2017-02-08

    The ability to suppress host macrophage apoptosis is essential for M. tuberculosis (Mtb) to replicate intracellularly while protecting it from antibiotic treatment. We recently described that Mtb infection upregulated expression of the host phosphatase PPM1A, which impairs the antibacterial response of macrophages. Here we establish PPM1A as a checkpoint target used by Mtb to suppress macrophage apoptosis. Overproduction of PPM1A suppressed apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages by a mechanism that involves inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Targeted depletion of PPM1A by shRNA or inhibition of PPM1A activity by sanguinarine restored JNK activation, resulting in increased apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages. We also demonstrate that activation of JNK by subtoxic concentrations of anisomycin induced selective apoptotic killing of Mtb-infected human macrophages, which was completely blocked in the presence of a specific JNK inhibitor. Finally, selective killing of Mtb-infected macrophages and subsequent bacterial release enabled rifampicin to effectively kill Mtb at concentrations that were insufficient to act against intracellular Mtb, providing proof of principle for the efficacy of a "release and kill" strategy. Taken together, these findings suggest that drug-induced selective apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages is achievable.

  19. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Zn, parameters which are likely interdependent. Considering the toxicity of ZnO nanorod surface towards macrophages, their role as an antibacterial surface was explored. Antibacterial coating approaches are being investigated to modify implants to reduce bacterial adhesion and viability in order to reduce implant-associated infection. To assess the efficacy of ZnO nanorod surfaces as an anti-bacterial coating, we evaluated bacterial adhesion and viability, compared to sputtered ZnO and glass substrates. Common implant-associated pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis were investigated. ZnO nanorod surface and sputtered ZnO demonstrated a significant bactericidal effect, killing respectively 2.5x and 1.7x times the number of bacteria dead on glass. A similar bactericidal effect of ZnO substrates on S. epidermidis was also evident, with sputtered ZnO and ZnO nanorod substrates killing respectively 22x and 32x times bacteria dead on glass. These data support the further investigation of ZnO nanorod coatings for bacterial adhesion resistance and bactericidal properties.

  20. Molecular basis of mycobacterial survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Flo, Trude Helen

    2017-05-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the immune system by ingesting and degrading invading pathogens, initiating an inflammatory response and instructing adaptive immune cells, and resolving inflammation to restore homeostasis. More interesting is the fact that some bacteria have evolved to use macrophages as a natural habitat and tools of spread in the host, e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and some non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Mtb is considered one of humanity's most successful pathogens and is the causal agent of tuberculosis, while NTMs cause opportunistic infections all of which are of significant public health concern. Here, we describe mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens, with an emphasis on mycobacteria, manipulate macrophage functions to circumvent killing and live inside these cells even under considerable immunological pressure. Such macrophage functions include the selective evasion or engagement of pattern recognition receptors, production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, phagosome maturation, as well as other killing mechanisms like autophagy and cell death. A clear understanding of host responses elicited by a specific pathogen and strategies employed by the microbe to evade or exploit these is of significant importance for the development of effective vaccines and targeted immunotherapy against persistent intracellular infections like tuberculosis.

  1. The role of the macrophage in wound repair. A study with hydrocortisone and antimacrophage serum.

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, S. J.; Ross, R.

    1975-01-01

    The role of the monocyte/macrophage in wound repair has been investigated by studying the healing process in wounds depleted of this cell and/or its phagocytic activity. Hydrocortisone acetate (0.6 mg/g body weight) administered as a subcutaneous depot was used to induce a prolonged monocytopenia in guinea pigs, and antimacrophage serum (AMS) was used for local elimination of tissue macrophages. In vitro, the presence of complement, macrophages are rapidly lysed and used killed by AMS. In the absence of complement, AMS is not cytotoxic but potently inhibits adherence to and phagocytosis of opsonized erythrocytes by macrophages. AMS titers were obtained by observation of adherence and phagocytosis of opsonized erythrocytes in serial dilutions of AMS. Six groups of animals were studied: a) untreated animals, b)animals receiving daily subcutaneous injections of normal rabbit serum (NRS) around each wound, c)animals receiving daily subcutaneous AMS around each wound, d)animals receiving systemic hydrocortisone, e)animals receiving systemic hydrocortisone and daily injections of NRS around each wound, and f)animals receiving systemic hydrocortisone and daily AMS around each wound. Wounds consisted of a series of six linear incisions in the dorsal skin. Subcutaneous AMS alone has no effect on the number of circulating monocytes, nor was there any observable effect on the number or the phagocytic ability of wound macrophages. Fibrosis in these wounds was unaffected. Systemic hydrocortisone induced a prolonged monocytopenia. The macrophage level in the wounds of these monocytopenic animals was reduced to approximately one-third that of controls; the phagocytic activity of the monocytes/macrophages that did appear in these wounds was, however, similar to that of controls. Some inhibition of wound debridement was observed in these wounds, but fibrosis was virtually unaffected. Collagen synthesis, as judged morphometrically, was similar to that of control wounds at all stages

  2. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  3. How electroshock weapons kill!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  4. Dexamethasone targeted directly to macrophages induces macrophage niches that promote erythroid expansion.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Mario; Varricchio, Lilian; Martelli, Fabrizio; Masiello, Francesca; Federici, Giulia; Zingariello, Maria; Girelli, Gabriella; Whitsett, Carolyn; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Zeuner, Ann; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2015-02-01

    Cultures of human CD34(pos) cells stimulated with erythroid growth factors plus dexamethasone, a model for stress erythropoiesis, generate numerous erythroid cells plus a few macrophages (approx. 3%; 3:1 positive and negative for CD169). Interactions occurring between erythroblasts and macrophages in these cultures and the biological effects associated with these interactions were documented by live phase-contrast videomicroscopy. Macrophages expressed high motility interacting with hundreds/thousands of erythroblasts per hour. CD169(pos) macrophages established multiple rapid 'loose' interactions with proerythroblasts leading to formation of transient erythroblastic island-like structures. By contrast, CD169(neg) macrophages established 'tight' interactions with mature erythroblasts and phagocytosed these cells. 'Loose' interactions of CD169(pos) macrophages were associated with proerythroblast cytokinesis (the M phase of the cell cycle) suggesting that these interactions may promote proerythroblast duplication. This hypothesis was tested by experiments that showed that as few as 103 macrophages significantly increased levels of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide incorporation frequency in S/G2/M and cytokinesis expressed by proerythroblasts over 24 h of culture. These effects were observed also when macrophages were co-cultured with dexamethasone directly conjugated to a macrophage-specific CD163 antibody. In conclusion, in addition to promoting proerythroblast proliferation directly, dexamethasone stimulates expansion of these cells indirectly by stimulating maturation and cytokinesis supporting activity of macrophages. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Peroxynitrite, a potent macrophage-derived oxidizing cytotoxin to combat invading pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Prolo, Carolina; Álvarez, María Noel; Radi, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the first cellular actors facing the invasion of microorganisms. These cells are able to internalize pathogens and destroy them by means of toxic mediators, many of which are produced enzymatically and have strong oxidizing capacity. Indeed, macrophages count on the NADPH oxidase complex activity, which is triggered during pathogen invasion and leads to the production of superoxide radical inside the phagosome. At the same time, the induction of nitric oxide synthase results in the production of nitric oxide in the cytosol which is able to readily diffuse to the phagocytic vacuole. Superoxide radical and nitric oxide react at diffusion controlled rates with each other inside the phagosome to yield peroxynitrite, a powerful oxidant capable to kill microorganisms. Peroxynitrite toxicity resides on oxidations and nitrations of biomolecules in the target cell. The central role of peroxynitrite as a key effector molecule in the control of infections has been proven in a wide number of models. However, some microorganisms and virulent strains adapt to survive inside the potentially hostile oxidizing microenvironment of the phagosome by either impeding peroxynitrite formation or rapidly detoxifying it once formed. In this context, the outcome of the infection process is a result of the interplay between the macrophage-derived oxidizing cytotoxins such as peroxynitrite and the antioxidant defense machinery of the invading pathogens. PMID:24281946

  6. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates JAK2 signaling pathway and rapidly activates p93fes, STAT1 p91, and STAT3 p92 in polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Aronica, M G; Rosso, A; Bagnara, G P; Yarden, Y; Pegoraro, L

    1996-02-16

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), supports proliferation, differentiation, and functional activation of hemopoietic cells by its interaction with a heterodimeric receptor. Although GM-CSF receptor is devoid of tyrosine kinase enzymatic activity, GM-CSF-induced peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional activation is mediated by the phosphorylation of a large number of intracellular signaling molecules. We have previously shown that JAK2 becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to GM-CSF in PMN. In the present study we demonstrate that also the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family members STAT1 p91 and STAT3 p92 and the product of the c-fps/fes protooncogene become tyrosine-phosphorylated upon GM-CSF stimulation and physically associated with both GM-CSF receptor beta common subunit and JAK2. Moreover GM-CSF was able to induce JAK2 and p93fes catalytic activity. We also demonstrate that the association of the GM-CSF receptor beta common subunit with JAK2 is ligand-dependent. Finally we demonstrate that GM-CSF induces a DNA-binding complex that contains both p91 and p92. These results identify a new signal transduction pathway activated by GM-CSF and provide a mechanism for rapid activation of gene expression in GM-CSF-stimulated PMN.

  7. How Mouse Macrophages Sense What Is Going On.

    PubMed

    Ley, Klaus; Pramod, Akula Bala; Croft, Michael; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Ting, Jenny P

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central to both innate and adaptive immunity. With few exceptions, macrophages are the first cells that sense trouble and respond to disturbances in almost all tissues and organs. They sense their environment, inhibit or kill pathogens, take up apoptotic and necrotic cells, heal tissue damage, and present antigens to T cells. Although the origins (yolk sac versus monocyte-derived) and phenotypes (functions, gene expression profiles, surface markers) of macrophages vary between tissues, they have many receptors in common that are specific to one or a few molecular species. Here, we review the expression and function of almost 200 key macrophage receptors that help the macrophages sense what is going on, including pathogen-derived molecules, the state of the surrounding tissue cells, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, antibodies and immune complexes, altered self molecules, extracellular matrix components, and cytokines, including chemokines.

  8. How Mouse Macrophages Sense What Is Going On

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus; Pramod, Akula Bala; Croft, Michael; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Ting, Jenny P.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central to both innate and adaptive immunity. With few exceptions, macrophages are the first cells that sense trouble and respond to disturbances in almost all tissues and organs. They sense their environment, inhibit or kill pathogens, take up apoptotic and necrotic cells, heal tissue damage, and present antigens to T cells. Although the origins (yolk sac versus monocyte-derived) and phenotypes (functions, gene expression profiles, surface markers) of macrophages vary between tissues, they have many receptors in common that are specific to one or a few molecular species. Here, we review the expression and function of almost 200 key macrophage receptors that help the macrophages sense what is going on, including pathogen-derived molecules, the state of the surrounding tissue cells, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, antibodies and immune complexes, altered self molecules, extracellular matrix components, and cytokines, including chemokines. PMID:27313577

  9. Cytokine-induced macrophage differentiation: a tale of 2 genes.

    PubMed

    Winston, B W; Krein, P M; Mowat, C; Huang, Y

    1999-12-01

    Macrophages are versatile cells found in every tissue in the body. They must perform a number of diverse cellular functions that allow them to kill invading micro-organisms and neoplastic cells as well as produce growth factors involved in wound healing. Macrophages that develop these diverse functions arise from a common precursor. By a process of selective adaptation, the common precursor monocyte/macrophage differentiates into a distinctive macrophage with a different and specific phenotype, characterized by the expression of a specific set of gene products. The local environment plays a critical role in shaping or directing the pattern or pathway of macrophage differentiation. The authors have focused on 2 specific macrophage differentiation pathways in a murine bone marrow-derived macrophage model. One pathway is believed to play a role in wound repair and is characterized by the induction of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I). The second pathway is involved in macrophage cytocidal activation and is characterized by the induction of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The pleotropic cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) appears to mediate macrophage differentiation along both of these pathways. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), however, appears to act as a molecular switch. In the presence of IFN-gamma, stimulation of macrophages with TNF-alpha results in macrophage differentiation along a pathway in which iNOS is expressed, whereas, in the absence of IFN-gamma, stimulation of macrophages with TNF-alpha results in differentiation along a pathway in which IGF-I is expressed. The authors focus on some of the molecular events involved in TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma signal transduction and the regulation of iNOS and IGF-I genes in macrophages.

  10. The human alveolar macrophage: isolation, cultivation in vitro, and studies of morphologic and functional characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.; Cline, Martin J.

    1971-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages were lavaged from surgically resected lungs and from lungs of normal subjects. Macrophages that had been purified by glass adherence were maintained in tissue culture for as long as 54 days. After 3-4 wk in vitro they underwent transformation into multinucleated giant cells. These aged cells had more than 30 times the phagocytic capacity that the same group of cells had had after 1 day in vitro. Phagocytosis of heat-killed Candida albicans was inhibited by iodoacetate, sodium fluoride, potassium cyanide, and low partial pressures of oxygen, suggesting that these cells require both oxidative and glycolytic energy sources for maximal particle ingestion. Alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages killed Listeria monocytogenes with similar efficiency, but neutrophils were more efficient than either of the other cell types. Bacterial killing is probably not dependent upon myeloperoxidase in the monocyte-derived macrophage or in the alveolar macrophage since histochemical stains for peroxidase do not stain either cell type. C. albicans blastospores, which are killed by neutrophils and monocytes that contain myeloperoxidase, were not killed by human alveolar macrophages during the 4 hr of observation. Large cells with supernormal phagocytic capacity were recovered from patients with postobstructive pheumonia and from one patient with recurrent bacterial pneumonia, indicating that macrophage function can be altered in certain disease states. Human alveolar macrophages are unique human phagocytes in their dependence on an oxygen tension greater than 25 mm HG for maximal phagocytosis. Carbon dioxide tensions as high as 70 mm Hg did not alter phagocytosis when the pH of the medium was held constant. These data suggest that the increased susceptibility to pneumonia of patients with chronic bronchitis or atelectasis may be in part related to suboptimal phagocytosis by macrophages in areas of the lung with depressed oxygen tension. Images

  11. A Role for Activated Macrophages in Resistance to Infection with Toxoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Jack S.; Krahenbuhl, James L.; Mendenhall, Joy W.

    1972-01-01

    Activated macrophages from mice which were chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii or Besnoitia jellisoni, or which had received Freund complete adjuvant, had an enhanced capacity to to kill intracellular Toxoplasma. Enhanced killing by activated macrophages was demonstrated by decreased incorporation of isotopically labeled uridine by intracellular Toxoplasma and by inhibition of plaque formation. The latter resulted from lack of proliferation of the intracellular Toxoplasma which is normally followed by destruction of the host cell (macrophage) and secondary invasion and destruction of fibroblast monolayers. Images PMID:4637298

  12. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  13. Persistence of avian oncoviruses in chicken macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Gazzolo, L; Moscovici, C; Moscovici, M G

    1979-01-01

    Inoculation of avian oncoviruses into 1- to 2-month old chickens led to a rapid production of antiviral humoral antibodies. Under these conditions it was found that avian leukosis viruses are sequestered in macrophages of peripheral blood, in which they can persist for a long period of time (up to about 3 years). In contrast, avian sarcoma viruses were never found in macrophages from chickens during the progression of sarcomas or after regression of the tumors. PMID:217827

  14. Platelets Mediate Host Defense against Staphylococcus aureus through Direct Bactericidal Activity and by Enhancing Macrophage Activities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ramadan A; Wuescher, Leah M; Dona, Keith R; Worth, Randall G

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are the chief effector cells in hemostasis. However, recent evidence suggests they have multiple roles in host defense against infection. Reports by us and others showed that platelets functionally contribute to protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the current study, the capacity of mouse platelets to participate in host defense against S. aureus infection was determined by assessing two possibilities. First, we determined the ability of platelets to kill S. aureus directly; and, second, we tested the possibility that platelets enhance macrophage phagocytosis and intracellular killing of S. aureus In this study we report evidence in support of both mechanisms. Platelets effectively killed two different strains of S. aureus. A clinical isolate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was killed by platelets (>40% killing in 2 h) in a thrombin-dependent manner whereas a methicillin-sensitive strain was killed to equal extent but did not require thrombin. Interestingly, thrombin-stimulated platelets also significantly enhanced peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis of both methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus by >70%, and restricted intracellular growth by >40%. Enhancement of macrophage anti-S. aureus activities is independent of contact with platelets but is mediated through releasable products, namely IL-1β. These data confirm our hypothesis that platelets participate in host defense against S. aureus both through direct killing of S. aureus and enhancing the antimicrobial function of macrophages in protection against S. aureus infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  16. Comparative Killing Rates of Fluoroquinolones and Cell Wall-Active Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Tomc, Joan C.; Gradelski, Elizabeth; Valera, Lourdes; Kolek, Benjamin; Bonner, Daniel P.

    2000-01-01

    Killing rates of fluoroquinolones, β-lactams, and vancomycin were compared against Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, pneumococci, streptococci, and Enterococcus faecalis. The times required for fluoroquinolones to decrease viability by 3 log10 were 1.5 h for Enterobacteriaceae, 4 to 6 h for staphylococci, and ≥6 h for streptococci and enterococci. Thus, the rate of killing by fluoroquinolones is organism group dependent; overall, they killed more rapidly than β-lactams and vancomycin. PMID:10770784

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis exploits the PPM1A signaling pathway to block host macrophage apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Smith, Samuel R.; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Wolschendorf, Frank; Westfall, Andrew O.; Kutsch, Olaf; Sun, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The ability to suppress host macrophage apoptosis is essential for M. tuberculosis (Mtb) to replicate intracellularly while protecting it from antibiotic treatment. We recently described that Mtb infection upregulated expression of the host phosphatase PPM1A, which impairs the antibacterial response of macrophages. Here we establish PPM1A as a checkpoint target used by Mtb to suppress macrophage apoptosis. Overproduction of PPM1A suppressed apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages by a mechanism that involves inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Targeted depletion of PPM1A by shRNA or inhibition of PPM1A activity by sanguinarine restored JNK activation, resulting in increased apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages. We also demonstrate that activation of JNK by subtoxic concentrations of anisomycin induced selective apoptotic killing of Mtb-infected human macrophages, which was completely blocked in the presence of a specific JNK inhibitor. Finally, selective killing of Mtb-infected macrophages and subsequent bacterial release enabled rifampicin to effectively kill Mtb at concentrations that were insufficient to act against intracellular Mtb, providing proof of principle for the efficacy of a “release and kill” strategy. Taken together, these findings suggest that drug-induced selective apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages is achievable. PMID:28176854

  18. Dynamics of Salmonella infection of macrophages at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Gog, Julia R; Murcia, Alicia; Osterman, Natan; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Achouri, Sarra; Wei, Bin; Mastroeni, Pietro; Wood, James L N; Maskell, Duncan J; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E

    2012-10-07

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of diseases. Salmonellae are intracellular parasites of macrophages, and the control of bacteria within these cells is critical to surviving an infection. The dynamics of the bacteria invading, surviving, proliferating in and killing macrophages are central to disease pathogenesis. Fundamentally important parameters, however, such as the cellular infection rate, have not previously been calculated. We used two independent approaches to calculate the macrophage infection rate: mathematical modelling of Salmonella infection experiments, and analysis of real-time video microscopy of infection events. Cells repeatedly encounter salmonellae, with the bacteria often remain associated with the macrophage for more than ten seconds. Once Salmonella encounters a macrophage, the probability of that bacterium infecting the cell is remarkably low: less than 5%. The macrophage population is heterogeneous in terms of its susceptibility to the first infection event. Once infected, a macrophage can undergo further infection events, but these reinfection events occur at a lower rate than that of the primary infection.

  19. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed Central

    Husak, D N

    1979-01-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible. PMID:541821

  20. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Husak, D N

    1979-12-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible.

  1. Otopathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enters and Survives Inside Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Lisi, Christopher V.; Kumari, Hansi; Grati, M’hamed; Blackwelder, Patricia; Yan, Denise; Jain, Chaitanya; Mathee, Kalai; Weckwerth, Paulo H.; Liu, Xue Z.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a broad term describing a group of infectious and inflammatory disorders of the middle ear. Despite antibiotic therapy, acute OM can progress to chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) characterized by ear drum perforation and purulent discharge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen associated with CSOM. Although, macrophages play an important role in innate immune responses but their role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa-induced CSOM is not known. The objective of this study is to examine the interaction of P. aeruginosa with primary macrophages. We observed that P. aeruginosa enters and multiplies inside human and mouse primary macrophages. This bacterial entry in macrophages requires both microtubule and actin dependent processes. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that P. aeruginosa was present in membrane bound vesicles inside macrophages. Interestingly, deletion of oprF expression in P. aeruginosa abrogates its ability to survive inside macrophages. Our results suggest that otopathogenic P. aeruginosa entry and survival inside macrophages is OprF-dependent. The survival of bacteria inside macrophages will lead to evasion of killing and this lack of pathogen clearance by phagocytes contributes to the persistence of infection in CSOM. Understanding host–pathogen interaction will provide novel avenues to design effective treatment modalities against OM. PMID:27917157

  2. Studies of macrophage function during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, E J; Krahenbuhl, J L; Remington, J S

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to investigate the quantitative and functional changes which occur in peritoneal macrophage populations obtained from mice infected orally with Trichinella spiralis larvae. C57BL/6 mice infected with T. spiralis larvae became parasitized with adult worms which were rejected from the intestine from 14 to 20 days after infection. Infected mice developed a striking increase in peritoneal exudate cells, composed largely of macrophages, which was maximal at from 16 to 18 days after infection. T. spiralis larvae and eosinophils were not seen in the peritoneal exudates. Macrophages from mice infected more than 11 days earlier inhibited DNA synthesis of syngeneic and allogeneic tumour cells, a property atributed to activated macrophages. In addition, macrophages from T. spiralis-infected mice had the functional ability to kill EL-4 tumour cells as measured by 51Cr release. Unlike activated macrophages, however, macrophages from infected mice did not develop the ability to inhibit multiplication of the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. These studies demonstrate that T. spiralis infection in mice induces changes in macrophage function that differ from changes associated with infections by intracellular pathogens. PMID:437839

  3. Legionella pneumophila Strain 130b Evades Macrophage Cell Death Independent of the Effector SidF in the Absence of Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Mary; Vogrin, Adam; Seidi, Azadeh; Abraham, Gilu; Hunot, Stéphane; Han, Qingqing; Dorn, Gerald W.; Masters, Seth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Legionella pneumophila must evade host cell death signaling to enable replication in lung macrophages and to cause disease. After bacterial growth, however, L. pneumophila is thought to induce apoptosis during egress from macrophages. The bacterial effector protein, SidF, has been shown to control host cell survival and death by inhibiting pro-apoptotic BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO signaling. Using live-cell imaging to follow the L. pneumophila-macrophage interaction, we now demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell apoptosis independent of SidF. In the absence of SidF, L. pneumophila was able to replicate, cause loss of mitochondria membrane potential, kill macrophages, and establish infections in lungs of mice. Consistent with this, deletion of BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO did not affect intracellular L. pneumophila replication, macrophage death rates, and in vivo bacterial virulence. Abrogating mitochondrial cell death by genetic deletion of the effectors of intrinsic apoptosis, BAX, and BAK, or the regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation, cyclophilin-D, did not affect bacterial growth or the initial killing of macrophages. Loss of BAX and BAK only marginally limited the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently kill all macrophages over extended periods. L. pneumophila induced killing of macrophages was delayed in the absence of capsase-11 mediated pyroptosis. Together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell death responses independently of SidF during replication and can induce pyroptosis to kill macrophages in a timely manner. PMID:28261564

  4. Shigella flexneri is trapped in polymorphonuclear leukocyte vacuoles and efficiently killed.

    PubMed Central

    Mandic-Mulec, I; Weiss, J; Zychlinsky, A

    1997-01-01

    We examined the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) against an invasive wild-type strain of Shigella flexneri (M90T) and a plasmid-cured noninvasive derivative (BS176). Both Shigella strains, as well as a rough strain of Escherichia coli, were killed with similar efficiencies by intact inflammatory PMN in room air and under N2 (i.e., killing was O2 independent). Bacterial killing by PMN extracts was substantially inhibited by antibodies to the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI). Whereas wild-type Shigella escapes from the phagosome to the cytoplasm in epithelial cells and macrophages, wild-type Shigella was trapped in the phagolysosome of PMN as visualized by electron microscopy. The efficient killing of Shigella by PMN suggests that these inflammatory cells may not only contribute initially to the severe tissue damage characteristic of shigellosis but also ultimately participate in clearance and resolution of infection. PMID:8975899

  5. RNA interference in J774 macrophages reveals a role for coronin 1 in mycobacterial trafficking but not in actin-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Rajesh; Gatfield, John; Massner, Jan; Albrecht, Imke; Zanolari, Bettina; Pieters, Jean

    2008-03-01

    Macrophages are crucial for innate immunity, apoptosis, and tissue remodeling, processes that rely on the capacity of macrophages to internalize and process cargo through phagocytosis. Coronin 1, a member of the WD repeat protein family of coronins specifically expressed in leukocytes, was originally identified as a molecule that is recruited to mycobacterial phagosomes and prevents the delivery of mycobacteria to lysosomes, allowing these to survive within phagosomes. However, a role for coronin 1 in mycobacterial pathogenesis has been disputed in favor for its role in mediating phagocytosis and cell motility. In this study, a role for coronin 1 in actin-mediated cellular processes was addressed using RNA interference in the murine macrophage cell line J774. It is shown that the absence of coronin 1 in J774 macrophages expressing small interfering RNA constructs specific for coronin 1 does not affect phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, cell locomotion, or regulation of NADPH oxidase activity. However, in coronin 1-negative J774 cells, internalized mycobacteria were rapidly transferred to lysosomes and killed. Therefore, these results show that in J774 cells coronin 1 has a specific role in modulating phagosome-lysosome transport upon mycobacterial infection and that it is dispensable for most F-actin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements.

  6. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  7. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  8. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Hickey, Michael J; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in postcapillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we showed that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor α-hemolysin produced by S. aureus lyses perivascular macrophages, which leads to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin and indicate that S. aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy.

  9. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1) The...

  10. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  11. Implication of (Mn)superoxide dismutase of Enterococcus faecalis in oxidative stress responses and survival inside macrophages.

    PubMed

    Verneuil, Nicolas; Mazé, Alain; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Laplace, Jean-Marie; Benachour, Abdellah; Auffray, Yanick; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Hartke, Axel

    2006-09-01

    The gene encoding the manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) of Enterococcus faecalis was characterized. It is transcribed monocistronically from an upstream promoter identified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR. A sodA mutant was constructed and characterized. Growth of the mutant strain was not significantly different from that of its wild-type counterpart in standing and aerated cultures. However, the mutant was more sensitive towards menadione and hydroperoxide stresses. The response to H(2)O(2) stress was analysed in more detail, and the mode of killing of this oxidant was different under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Cultures grown and challenged under anaerobic conditions were highly sensitive to treatment with 35 mM H(2)O(2). They were largely protected by the iron chelator deferoxamine, which suggested that killing was mainly due to an enhanced Fenton reaction. In contrast, neither strain was protected by the iron chelators deferoxamine and diethylenetriaminepentaacteic acid when grown and challenged under aerobic conditions, which suggested that inactivation of the cells by H(2)O(2) was due to another killing mode. The sodA mutant was more sensitive under these conditions, showing that MnSOD is also important for protecting the cells from damage under aerobic conditions. Finally, the MnSOD of Ent. faecalis may be considered to be a virulence factor, since survival of the corresponding mutant strain was highly affected inside mouse peritoneal macrophages.

  12. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  13. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  14. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  15. Impaired Mitochondrial Microbicidal Responses in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Martin A; Preston, Julie A; Mohasin, Mohammed; Marriott, Helen M; Budd, Richard C; Swales, Julie; Collini, Paul; Greaves, David R; Craig, Ruth W; Brightling, Christopher E; Donnelly, Louise E; Barnes, Peter J; Singh, Dave; Shapiro, Steven D; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2017-05-30

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by impaired clearance of pulmonary bacteria. The effect of COPD on alveolar macrophage (AM) microbicidal responses was investigated. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) were obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy donors or COPD patients and challenged with opsonized serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae. Cells were assessed for apoptosis, bactericidal activity and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production. A transgenic mouse line, in which the CD68 promoter ensures macrophage specific expression of human Mcl-1 (CD68.hMcl-1), was used to model the molecular aspects of COPD. COPD AM had elevated levels of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, with selective reduction of delayed intracellular bacterial killing. CD68.hMcl-1 AM phenocopied the microbicidal defect since transgenic mice demonstrated impaired clearance of pulmonary bacteria and increased neutrophilic inflammation. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) generated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) in response to pneumococci, which co-localized with bacteria and phagolysosomes to enhance bacterial killing. The Mcl-1 transgene increased oxygen consumption rates and mROS expression in mock-infected BMDM but reduced caspase-dependent mROS production after pneumococcal challenge. COPD AM also increased basal mROS expression, but failed to increase production after pneumococcal challenge, in keeping with reduced intracellular bacterial killing. The defect in COPD AM intracellular killing was associated with a reduced ratio of mROS /superoxide dismutase 2. Upregulation of Mcl-1 and chronic adaption to oxidative stress alters mitochondrial metabolism and microbicidal function, reducing the delayed phase of intracellular bacterial clearance in COPD.

  16. O-Glycosylation in Cell Wall Proteins in Scedosporium prolificans Is Critical for Phagocytosis and Inflammatory Cytokines Production by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xisto, Mariana I. D. S.; Bittencourt, Vera C. B.; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Haido, Rosa M. T.; Mendonça, Morena S. A.; Sassaki, Guilherme; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Romanos, Maria Teresa V.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25875427

  17. Aging of mice is associated with p16(Ink4a)- and β-galactosidase-positive macrophage accumulation that can be induced in young mice by senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brandon M.; Balan, Vitaly; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Strom, Evguenia; Krasnov, Peter; Virtuoso, Lauren P.; Rydkina, Elena; Vujcic, Slavoljub; Balan, Karina; Gitlin, Ilya; Leonova, Katerina; Polinsky, Alexander; Chernova, Olga B.; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells (SCs) have been considered a source of age-related chronic sterile systemic inflammation and a target for anti-aging therapies. To understand mechanisms controlling the amount of SCs, we analyzed the phenomenon of rapid clearance of human senescent fibroblasts implanted into SCID mice, which can be overcome when SCs were embedded into alginate beads preventing them from immunocyte attack. To identify putative SC killers, we analyzed the content of cell populations in lavage and capsules formed around the SC-containing beads. One of the major cell types attracted by secretory factors of SCs was a subpopulation of macrophages characterized by p16(Ink4a) gene expression and β-galactosidase activity at pH6.0 (β-galpH6), thus resembling SCs. Consistently, mice with p16(Ink4a) promoter-driven luciferase, developed bright luminescence of their peritoneal cavity within two weeks following implantation of SCs embedded in alginate beads. p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-expressing cells had surface biomarkers of macrophages F4/80 and were sensitive to liposomal clodronate used for the selective killing of cells capable of phagocytosis. At the same time, clodronate failed to kill bona fide SCs generated in vitro by genotoxic stress. Old mice with elevated proportion of p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-positive cells in their tissues demonstrated reduction of both following systemic clodronate treatment, indicating that a significant proportion of cells previously considered to be SCs are actually a subclass of macrophages. These observations point at a significant role of p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-positive macrophages in aging, which previously was attributed solely to SCs. They require re-interpretation of the mechanisms underlying rejuvenating effects following eradication of p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-positive cells and reconsideration of potential cellular target for anti-aging treatment. PMID:27391570

  18. Aeromonas salmonicida resistance to complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, S; Albertí, S; Tomás, J M

    1994-01-01

    The resistance of Aeromonas salmonicida to complement-mediated killing was investigated by using different strains and their isogenic mutants that had been previously characterized for their surface components. We found that the classical complement pathway is involved in serum killing of susceptible A. salmonicida strains, while the alternative complement pathway seems not to be involved. All of the A. salmonicida strains are able to activate complement, but the smooth strains (with or without the A-layer) are resistant to complement-mediated killing. The reasons for this resistance are that C3b may be bound far from the cell membrane and that it is rapidly degraded; therefore, the lytic final complex C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is not formed. Isogenic rough mutants are serum sensitive because they bind more C3b than the smooth strains, and if C3b is not completely degraded, then the lytic complex (C5b-9) is formed. Images PMID:7525485

  19. The killing efficiency of soft iron shot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, R.; Longcore, J.R.

    1969-01-01

    A cooperative research effort between the ammunition industry and the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is aimed at finding a suitable non-toxic substitute for lead shot. A contract study by an independent research organization evaluated ways of coating or detoxifying lead shot or replacing it with another metal. As a result of that study, the only promising candidate is soft iron. Previous tests of hard iron shot had suggested that its killing effectiveness was poor at longer ranges due to the lower density. In addition, its hardness caused excessive damage to shotgun barrels. A unique, automated shooting facility was constructed at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to test the killing effectiveness of soft iron shot under controlled conditions. Tethered game-farm mallards were transported across a shooting point in a manner simulating free flight. A microswitch triggered a mounted shotgun so that each shot was 'perfect.' A soft iron shot, in Number 4 size, was produced by the ammunition industry and loaded in 12-gauge shells to give optimum ballistic performance. Commercial loads of lead shot in both Number 4 and Number 6 size were used for comparison. A total of 2,010 ducks were shot at ranges of 30 to 65 yards and at broadside and head-on angles in a statistically designed procedure. The following data were recorded for each duck: time until death, broken wing or leg bones, and number of embedded shot. Those ducks not killed outright were held for 10 days. From these data, ducks were categorized as 'probably bagged,' 'probably lost cripples,' or survivors. The test revealed that the killing effectiveness of this soft iron shot was superior to its anticipated performance and close to that obtained with commercial lead loads containing an equal number of pellets. Bagging a duck, in terms of rapid death or broken wing, was primarily dependent on the probability of a shot striking that vital area, and therefore a function of range. There was no indication

  20. Anatomy of a Discovery: M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles Dudley

    2015-01-01

    M1 and M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo. The unique ability of macrophages to make these polar opposite type of responses provides primary host protection and maintains tissue homeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. In humans and other higher animals, M1 and M2-type macrophage responses also initiate and direct T cells/adaptive immunity to provide additional protection such as Th1 (cytotoxic) or Th2 (antibody-mediated) type responses. Hence, macrophages were renamed M1 and M2 to indicate the central role of macrophages/innate immunity in immune systems. These findings indicate that the long held notion that adaptive immunity controls innate immunity was backward: a sea change in understanding how immune responses occur. The clinical impact of M1/kill and M2/repair responses is immense playing pivotal roles in curing (or causing) many diseases including infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and atherosclerosis. How M1/M2 came to be is an interesting story that, like life, involved Direction, Determination, Discouragement, and Discovery. PMID:25999950

  1. Mycobacteria Clumping Increase Their Capacity to Damage Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Cecilia; Llorens-Fons, Marta; Julián, Esther; Noguera-Ortega, Estela; Tomàs-Martínez, Cristina; Pérez-Trujillo, Miriam; Byrd, Thomas F.; Alcaide, Fernando; Luquin, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps). Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of M. abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least five rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 h post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 h post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 h post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors. PMID:27757105

  2. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Macrophage mitochondrial and stress response to ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carolina; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; de Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Wang, Bo; Leon-Rivera, Rosiris; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    Human infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, a common fungal pathogen, follows deposition of yeast spores in the lung alveoli. The subsequent host-pathogen interaction can result in eradication, latency, or extrapulmonary dissemination. Successful control of C. neoformans infection is dependent on host macrophages, but macrophages display little ability to kill C. neoformans in vitro. Recently, we reported that ingestion of C. neoformans by mouse macrophages induces early cell cycle progression followed by mitotic arrest, an event that almost certainly reflects host cell damage. The goal of the present work was to understand macrophage pathways affected by C. neoformans toxicity. Infection of macrophages by C. neoformans was associated with alterations in protein translation rate and activation of several stress pathways, such as hypoxia-inducing factor-1-α, receptor-interacting protein 1, and apoptosis-inducing factor. Concomitantly we observed mitochondrial depolarization in infected macrophages, an observation that was replicated in vivo. We also observed differences in the stress pathways activated, depending on macrophage cell type, consistent with the nonspecific nature of C. neoformans virulence known to infect phylogenetically distant hosts. Our results indicate that C. neoformans infection impairs multiple host cellular functions and undermines the health of these critical phagocytic cells, which can potentially interfere with their ability to clear this fungal pathogen.

  4. Macrophage mitochondrial and stress response to ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Carolina; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; de Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Wang, Bo; Leon-Rivera, Rosiris; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Human infection with Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn), a common fungal pathogen follows deposition of yeast spores in the lung alveoli. The subsequent host-pathogen interaction can result in either eradication, latency or extra-pulmonary dissemination. Successful control of Cn infection is dependent on host macrophages but macrophages display little ability to kill Cn in vitro. Recently, we reported that ingestion of Cn by mouse macrophages induces early cell cycle progression followed by mitotic arrest, an event that almost certainly reflects host cell damage. The goal of the present work was to understand macrophage pathways affected by Cn toxicity. Infection of macrophages by Cn was associated with alterations in protein translation rate and activation of several stress pathways such as Hypoxia Inducing Factor-1α (HIF-1α), Receptor-interacting Protein 1 (RIP1) and Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF). Concomitantly we observed mitochondrial depolarization in infected macrophages, an observation that was replicated in vivo. We also observed differences in the stress pathways activated depending on macrophage cell type, consistent with the non-specific nature of Cn virulence known to infect phylogenetically distant hosts. Our results indicate that Cn infection impairs multiple host cellular functions and undermines the health of these critical phagocytic cells, which can potentially interfere with their ability to clear this fungal pathogen. PMID:25646306

  5. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Monocyte and Macrophage Dynamics during Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus; Miller, Yury I.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is associated with and in large part driven by changes in the leukocyte compartment of the vessel wall. Here, we focus on monocyte influx during atherosclerosis, the most common form of vascular inflammation. Although the arterial wall contains a large number of resident macrophages and some resident dendritic cells, atherosclerosis drives a rapid influx of inflammatory monocytes (Ly-6C+ in mice) and other monocytes (Ly-6C− in mice, also known as patrolling monocytes). Once in the vessel wall, Ly-6C+ monocytes differentiate to a phenotype consistent with inflammatory macrophages and inflammatory dendritic cells. The phenotype of these cells is modulated by lipid uptake, Toll-like receptor ligands, hematopoietic growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. In addition to newly recruited macrophages, it is likely that resident macrophages also change their phenotype. Monocyte-derived inflammatory macrophages have a short half-life. After undergoing apoptosis, they may be taken up by surrounding macrophages or, if the phagocytic capacity is overwhelmed, can undergo secondary necrosis, a key event in forming the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions. In this review, we discuss these and other processes associated with monocytic cell dynamics in the vascular wall and their role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:21677293

  7. Evidence for the opposing roles of different gamma delta T cell subsets in macrophage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Daniela; Andrew, Elizabeth M; Rhodes, Kate; Newton, Darren J; Carding, Simon R

    2006-07-01

    To ensure invading pathogens are eliminated with minimal damage to host tissues it is essential that macrophage activation be tightly regulated. Previously we demonstrated that a subset of gammadelta T cells (Vgamma1(+)) contributes to resolving pathogen-induced immune responses by killing activated macrophages. However, the exaggerated macrophage response seen in infected Vgamma1(+) T cell-deficient mice suggests that gammadelta T cells play a broader role in macrophage homeostasis and other subsets might promote macrophage activation. Using a macrophage:gammadelta T cell co-culture system we have shown that gammadelta T cells increase the activity of macrophages activated in vivo by Listeria monocytogenes infection. In a dose-dependent manner, gammadelta T cells up-regulated production of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10) and chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta) by Listeria-elicited macrophages. The ability to increase macrophage cytokine production was prominent among Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells. Reciprocally, Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells were activated by Listeria-elicited macrophages, resulting in production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. gammadelta T cell adoptive transfer experiments showed that Vgamma4(+) T cells protected TCRdelta(-/-) mice against Listeria-induced liver injury and necrosis. These findings identify distinct and non-overlapping roles for gammadelta T cell subsets in regulating macrophage function during pathogen-induced immune responses.

  8. The impact of impaired macrophage functions in cystic fibrosis disease progression.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Manuella; Le Trionnaire, Sophie; Del Porto, Paola; Martin-Chouly, Corinne

    2016-11-14

    The underlying cause of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the decline in lung function, which results in part from chronic inflammation. Inflammation and infection occur early in infancy in CF and the role of innate immune defense in CF has been highlighted in the last years. Once thought simply to be consumers of bacteria, macrophages have emerged as highly sensitive immune cells that are located at the balance point between inflammation and resolution of this inflammation in CF pathophysiology. In order to assess the potential role of macrophage in CF, we review the evidence that: (1) CF macrophage has a dysregulated inflammatory phenotype; (2) CF macrophage presents altered phagocytosis capacity and bacterial killing; and (3) lipid disorders in CF macrophage affect its function. These alterations of macrophage weaken innate defense of CF patients and may be involved in CF disease progression and lung damage.

  9. Post-transcriptional control of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in colonic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Filardy, Alessandra A.; He, Jianping; Bennink, Jack; Yewdell, Jonathan; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    Colonic macrophages (cMPs) are important for intestinal homeostasis as they kill microbes yet produce regulatory cytokines. Activity of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a major sensor of stress and microorganisms that results in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death must be tightly controlled in the intestine. We demonstrate that resident cMPs are hyporesponsive to NLRP3 inflammasome activation due to a remarkable level of post-transcriptional control of NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein expression, which was also seen for TNF-α and IL-6, but lost during experimental colitis. Resident cMPs rapidly degraded NLRP3 and proIL-1β proteins by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Finally, blocking IL-10R-signaling in vivo enhanced NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein, but not mRNA levels in resident cMPs implicating a role for IL-10 in environmental conditioning of cMPs. These data are the first to show dramatic post-transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokine production by a relevant tissue-derived macrophage population and proteasomal degradation of proIL-1β and NLRP3 as a mechanism to control inflammasome activation; findings which have broad implications for our understanding of intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26627461

  10. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  11. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  12. Anion Exchanger 2 Regulates Dectin-1-Dependent Phagocytosis and Killing of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Urso, Katia; Charles, Julia F.; Shull, Gary E.; Aliprantis, Antonios O.; Balestrieri, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (Ae2; gene symbol, Slc4a2) is a plasma membrane Cl-/HCO3- exchanger expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, kidney and bone. We have previously shown that Ae2 is required for the function of osteoclasts, bone resorbing cells of the macrophage lineage, to maintain homeostatic cytoplasmic pH and electroneutrality during acid secretion. Macrophages require endosomal acidification for pathogen killing during the process known as phagocytosis. Chloride is thought to be the principal ion responsible for maintaining electroneutrality during organelle acidification, but whether Cl-/HCO3- exchangers such as Ae2 contribute to macrophage function is not known. In this study we investigated the role of Ae2 in primary macrophages during phagocytosis. We find that Ae2 is expressed in macrophages where it regulates intracellular pH and the binding of Zymosan, a fungal cell wall derivative. Surprisingly, the transcription and surface expression of Dectin-1, the major phagocytic receptor for Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Zymosan, is reduced in the absence of Ae2. As a consequence, Zymosan-induced Tnfα expression is also impaired in Ae2-deficient macrophages. Similar to Ae2 deficiency, pharmacological alkalinization of lysosomal pH with bafilomycin A decreases both Dectin-1 mRNA and cell surface expression. Finally, Ae2-deficient macrophages demonstrate defective phagocytosis and killing of the human pathogenic fungus C. albicans. Our results strongly suggest that Ae2 is a critical factor in the innate response to C. albicans. This study represents an important contribution to a better understanding of how Dectin-1 expression and fungal clearance is regulated. PMID:27391897

  13. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  14. Immune effect of heat-killed multistrain of Lactobacillus acidophilus against Salmonella typhimurium invasion to mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, W-H; Yu, B; Lin, C-K; Hwang, W-Z; Tsen, H-Y

    2007-01-01

    This study attempted to determine whether lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could have a better probiotic function when used as a multistrain mixture, i.e. Mix-LAB, than when used as a monostrain. To this end, three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus, specifically strain LAP5, LAF1 and LAH7, were heat-killed and mixed. This heat-killed Mix-LAB was used to evaluate the effectiveness of multistrain in inhibiting Salmonella invasion into cultured cells and into organs (spleen and liver) of live mice. BALB/c mice were orally administered with heat-killed Mix-LAB or sterile normal saline (control) for seven consecutive days and then challenged with orally administered Salmonella typhimurium on day 8. Results showed that, at day 6 after the challenge, the mice which had received Mix-LAB exhibited lower rates (P < 0.05) of Salmonella invasion into liver and spleen than did the control mice. Also, before the Salmonella challenge, the serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels were not significantly different (P > 0.05) between these two groups of mice. After the challenge, however, the serum TNF-alpha level was significantly elevated (P < 0.05) in the control group, but not significantly changed in the Mix-LAB fed mice. To investigate possible factors involved in heat-killed Mix-LABs antagonistic effect on Salmonella invasion of mouse organs, heat-killed single strain and Mix-LAB were evaluated for ability to inhibit Salmonella invasion into cultured human intestinal Int-407 and Caco-2 cells. Results showed that none of the heat-killed strains were able to protect these cultured cells from Salmonella invasion, even though strains of LAP5 and Mix-LAB were adherent to them. However, study of the activation of murine macrophage Raw 264.7 cells showed that heat-killed Mix-LAB stimulated TNF-alpha production, nitric oxide release, and increased phagocytic activity in macrophages. Our findings suggest that heat-killed Mix-LAB can inhibit Salmonella invasion of mouse organs

  15. Streptolysin O and NAD-glycohydrolase prevent phagolysosome acidification and promote group A Streptococcus survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bastiat-Sempe, Benedicte; Love, John F; Lomayesva, Natalie; Wessels, Michael R

    2014-09-16

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is an ongoing threat to human health as the agent of streptococcal pharyngitis, skin and soft tissue infections, and life-threatening conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. In animal models of infection, macrophages have been shown to contribute to host defense against GAS infection. However, as GAS can resist killing by macrophages in vitro and induce macrophage cell death, it has been suggested that GAS intracellular survival in macrophages may enable persistent infection. Using isogenic mutants, we now show that the GAS pore-forming toxin streptolysin O (SLO) and its cotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase (NADase) mediate GAS intracellular survival and cytotoxicity for macrophages. Unexpectedly, the two toxins did not inhibit fusion of GAS-containing phagosomes with lysosomes but rather prevented phagolysosome acidification. SLO served two essential functions, poration of the phagolysosomal membrane and translocation of NADase into the macrophage cytosol, both of which were necessary for maximal GAS intracellular survival. Whereas NADase delivery to epithelial cells is mediated by SLO secreted from GAS bound to the cell surface, in macrophages, the source of SLO and NADase is GAS contained within phagolysosomes. We found that transfer of NADase from the phagolysosome to the macrophage cytosol occurs not by simple diffusion through SLO pores but rather by a specific translocation mechanism that requires the N-terminal translocation domain of NADase. These results illuminate the mechanisms through which SLO and NADase enable GAS to defeat macrophage-mediated killing and provide new insight into the virulence of a major human pathogen. Macrophages constitute an important element of the innate immune response to mucosal pathogens. They ingest and kill microbes by phagocytosis and secrete inflammatory cytokines to recruit and activate other effector cells. Group A Streptococcus (GAS

  16. Women who kill their mates.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Dominique; Gagné, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Spousal homicide perpetrators are much more likely to be men than women. Accordingly, little research has focused on delineating characteristics of women who have committed spousal homicide. A retrospective clinical review of coroners' files containing all cases of spousal homicide occurring in Quebec over a 20-year period was carried out. A total of 276 spousal homicides occurred between 1991 and 2010, with 42 homicides by female spouses and 234 homicides by male spouses. Differences between homicides committed by female offenders and male offenders are discussed, and findings on spousal homicide committed by women are compared with those of previous studies. Findings regarding offenses perpetrated by females in the context of mental illness, domestic violence, and homicide-suicide are explored. The finding that only 28% of the female offenders in the Quebec sample had previously been subjected to violence by their victim is in contrast to the popular belief and reports that indicate that most female-perpetrated spousal homicide occurs in self-defense or in reaction to long-term abuse. In fact, women rarely gave a warning before killing their mates. Most did not suffer from a mental illness, although one-fifth were acutely intoxicated at the time of the killing. In the vast majority of cases of women who killed their mates, there were very few indicators that might have signaled the risk and helped predict the violent lethal behavior. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  18. Fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in peroxidase-loaded resting murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Aguilar, Melby Dessiré; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Aquino-Vega, Mayda; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sandra; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2013-03-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and a halide represent an efficient microbicidal mechanism of phagocytic cells. MPO is abundant in neutrophils which also respond to infection by producing large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). MPO, ROS and halide constitute a very toxic antimicrobial system (called the Klebanoff system or KS). Resting mature macrophages do not contain granular MPO and thus are unable to kill pathogenic mycobacteria and some other microorganisms by this system. Under the hypothesis that transforming macrophages into peroxidase-positive (PO(+)) cells, these cells would be able to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in this study, mature macrophages were loaded with exogenous peroxidase and were tested for their capacity to kill the Mycobacterium in the presence or in the absence of hydrogen peroxide. It was found that PO-loaded macrophages eagerly ingest M. tuberculosis, but do not show a significant mycobactericidal activity on this microorganism despite that it is highly susceptible to the Klebanoff system in vitro. Failure of PO-loaded macrophages to kill M. tuberculosis may obey either to an inappropriate location of the exogenous PO in these cells or more likely, to the presence of efficient detoxifying mechanisms in the bacteria. On the contrary, MPO-loaded or unloaded macrophages efficiently killed Listeria monocytogenes. The lack of granular MPO in mature macrophages, and the predilection of mycobacteria to infect these cells are two situations that favor the development of tuberculosis and related diseases, such as leprosy and Buruli ulcer. Copyright © 2012 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The timing of TNF and IFN-γ signaling affects macrophage activation strategies during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Ray, J. Christian J.; Wang, Jian; Chan, John; Kirschnera, Denise E.

    2008-01-01

    During most infections, the population of immune cells known as macrophages are key to taking up and killing bacteria as an integral part of the immune response. However, during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), host macrophages serve as the preferred environment for mycobacterial growth. Further, killing of Mtb by macrophages is impaired unless they become activated. Activation is induced by stimulation from bacterial antigens and inflammatory cytokines derived from helper T cells. The key macrophage-activating cytokines in Mtb infection are tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and interferon (IFN)-γ. Due to differences in cellular sources and secretion pathways for TNF and IFN- γ, the possibility of heterogeneous cytokine distributions exists, suggesting that the timing of macrophage activation from these signals may affect activation kinetics and thus impact the outcome of Mtb infection. Here we use a mathematical model to show that negative feedback from production of nitric oxide (the key mediator of mycobacterial killing) that typically optimizes macrophage responses to activating stimuli may reduce effective killing of Mtb. Statistical sensitivity analysis predicts that if TNF and IFN-γ signals precede infection, the level of negative feedback may have a strong effect on how effectively macrophages kill Mtb. However, this effect is relaxed when IFN-γ or TNF + IFN-γ signals are received coincident with infection. Under these conditions, the model suggests that negative feedback induces fast responses and an initial overshoot of nitric oxide production for given doses of TNF and IFN-γ, favoring killing of Mtb. Together, our results suggest that direct entry of macrophages into a granuloma site (and not distal to it) from lung vascular sources represents a preferred host strategy for mycobacterial control. We examine implications of these results in establishment of latent Mtb infection. PMID:18321531

  20. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  1. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  2. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  3. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  4. Evolution of Cell-Autonomous Effector Mechanisms in Macrophages versus Non-Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Ryan G.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Specialized adaptations for killing microbes is synonymous with phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, inflammatory neutrophils and eosinophils. Recent genome sequencing of extant species, however, reveals analogous antimicrobial machineries exist in certain non-immune cells and also within species that ostensibly lack a well-defined immune system. Here we probe the evolutionary record for clues about the ancient and diverse phylogenetic origins of macrophage killing mechanisms and how some of their properties are shared with cells outside the traditional bounds of immunity in higher vertebrates such as mammals. PMID:28087931

  5. Survival and replication of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inside the mice peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mariri, Ayman

    2008-01-01

    The replication of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the resident peritoneal macrophages of four mice strains (BALB/c, CD1, C57BL, and Swiss) has been investigated. Macrophagial bactericidal killing activity was estimated via studying their ability to internalize (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during 2, 4, 24, and 48 h assays. Host genetic background has been found to show no significant effect on the ability of resident peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli O157:H7. PMID:24031167

  6. Differential induction of macrophage-derived cytokines by live and dead intracellular bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Y; Cheers, C

    1995-02-01

    Marked differences in the abilities of living and heat-killed Brucella abortus and Listeria monocytogenes organisms to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha by in vitro-cultured macrophages were observed. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 appeared to be under different control. The results are discussed in relation to the induction of gamma interferon-producing Th1 cells and acquired cellular resistance to infection by living vaccines but not killed vaccines.

  7. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  8. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  9. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  10. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  11. The equine alveolar macrophage: functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Anna E; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C; Hume, David A; Pirie, Scott R

    2013-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  12. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues.

  13. Microbicidal activity of monocyte derived macrophages in AIDS and related disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Eales, L J; Moshtael, O; Pinching, A J

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the ability of monocyte-derived macrophages from patients with AIDS and other HIV-related disorders to kill the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. We have also examined the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these patients to produce macrophage-activating and other lymphokines. The capacity to produce interleukin 2 and gamma interferon decreases from controls through asymptomatic seropositive subjects and lymphadenopathy groups A (benign) and B (prodromal) to AIDS. The decrease did not correlate precisely with the decrease in CD4+ cells in these patients. Monocyte-derived macrophages from asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects and lymphadenopathy patients showed a decreased ability to kill T. gondii after activation with recombinant gamma interferon; paradoxically, this was most striking for PGL group A. The defect was largely overcome by using Concanavalin A stimulated autologous supernatants. It was notable that macrophages from AIDS patients showed normal killing with recombinant gamma interferon, but that the supernatants from AIDS patients had reduced activity with normal macrophages. These studies confirm that functional defects of both lymphocytes and macrophages are found in HIV-infected subjects; they serve to emphasize the heterogeneity of the clinical and biological responses to this retrovirus, responses which have important implications in the pathogenesis and treatment of the immunodeficiency. PMID:3111759

  14. Macrophages and CSF-1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christina V; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-01-01

    Recent focus on the diversity of macrophage phenotype and function signifies that these trophic cells are no longer of exclusive interest to the field of immunology. As key orchestrators of organogenesis, the contribution of macrophages to fetal development is worthy of greater attention. This review summarizes the key functions of macrophages and their primary regulator, colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1, during development; highlighting trophic mechanisms beyond phagocytosis and outlining their roles in a range of developing organ systems. Advances in the understanding of macrophage polarization and functional heterogeneity are discussed from a developmental perspective. In addition, this review highlights the relevance of CSF-1 as a pleiotropic developmental growth factor and summarizes recent experimental evidence and clinical advancements in the area of CSF-1 and macrophage manipulation in reproduction and organogenic settings. Interrogation of embryonic macrophages also has implications beyond development, with recent attention focused on yolk sac macrophage ontogeny and their role in homeostasis and mediating tissue regeneration. The regulatory networks that govern development involve a complex range of growth factors, signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators arising from epithelial, mesenchymal and stromal origins. A component of the organogenic milieu common to the majority of developing organs is the tissue macrophage. These hemopoietic cells are part of the mononuclear phagocyte system regulated primarily by colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1 1, 2. There is a resurgence in the field of CSF-1 and macrophage biology; where greater understanding of the heterogeneity of these cells is revealing contributions to tissue repair and regeneration beyond the phagocytic and inflammatory functions for which they were traditionally ascribed 3–6. The accumulation of macrophages during tissue injury is no longer viewed as simply a surrogate for disease

  15. Killing(-Yano) tensors in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    We construct the Killing(-Yano) tensors for a large class of charged black holes in higher dimensions and study general properties of such tensors, in particular, their behavior under string dualities. Killing(-Yano) tensors encode the symmetries beyond isometries, which lead to insights into dynamics of particles and fields on a given geometry by providing a set of conserved quantities. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the Killing tensor, we provide a prescription for constructing several conserved quantities starting from a single object, and we demonstrate that Killing tensors in higher dimensions are always associated with ellipsoidal coordinates. We also determine the transformations of the Killing(-Yano) tensors under string dualities, and find the unique modification of the Killing-Yano equation consistent with these symmetries. These results are used to construct the explicit form of the Killing(-Yano) tensors for the Myers-Perry black hole in arbitrary number of dimensions and for its charged version.

  16. Tramadol differentially regulates M1 and M2 macrophages from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Liang; Sun, Yunyun; Li, Yuanhai

    2017-03-17

    Tramadol is an analgesic drug and relieves pain through activating μ-opioid receptors and inhibiting serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake. Emerging evidence shows that it also stimulates immune cells, including NK cells, splenocytes, and lymphocytes, and elevates IL-2 production. However, it remains unknown whether and how tramadol directly affects macrophages. To answer these questions, we collected human umbilical cord blood, isolated macrophages, and examined their responses to tramadol. Although tramadol did not alter resting macrophages and the antigen-presenting function in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages, it regulated M1 and M2 macrophages, which are, respectively, transformed by IFN-γ and IL-4. Interestingly, tramadol inhibits production and secretion of cytokines in M1 macrophages, but facilitates the production of inflammation-responding molecules, synthesized in M2 macrophages. We also found that STAT6 cascade pathway in M2 macrophages was significantly enhanced by tramadol. Therefore, this study reveals that tramadol regulates inflammation by inhibiting M1 macrophages (killing process), but promoting the function of M2 macrophages (healing process).

  17. Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 promotes bacterial phagocytosis by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wan, Min; van der Does, Anne M; Tang, Xiao; Lindbom, Lennart; Agerberth, Birgitta; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2014-06-01

    LL-37/hCAP-18 is the only human member of the cathelicidin family and plays an important role in killing various pathogens, as well as in immune modulation. In this study, we investigated the effect of LL-37 on bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages and demonstrate that LL-37 enhances phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in a dose- and time-dependent manner by dTHP-1 cells. In addition, LL-37 enhanced phagocytosis of nonopsonized Escherichia coli by human macrophages. Consistently, LL-37 elevated the expression of FcγRs on macrophages but not the complement receptors CD11b and -c. Further studies revealed that the expression of TLR4 and CD14 is also increased on LL-37-treated macrophages. Several lines of evidence indicated that the FPR2/ALX receptor mediated LL-37-induced phagocytosis. However, TLR4 signaling was also coupled to the phagocytic response, as a specific TLR4 antibody significantly suppressed phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized E. coli and nonopsonized E. coli by dTHP-1 cells. Finally, macrophages from Cnlp(-/-) mice exhibited diminished bacterial phagocytosis compared with macrophages from their WT littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel, immune-modulatory mechanism of LL-37, which may contribute to bacterial clearance.

  18. Clinical Concentrations of Thioridazine Kill Intracellular Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Bettencourt, Rosário; Almeida, Josefina; Martins, Marta; Kristiansen, Jette E.; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    The phenothiazines chlorpromazine (CPZ) and thioridazine (TZ) have equal in vitro activities against antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These compounds have not been used as anti-M. tuberculosis agents because their in vitro activities take place at concentrations which are beyond those that are clinically achievable. In addition, chronic administration of CPZ produces frequent severe side effects. Because CPZ has been shown to enhance the killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis at concentrations in the medium that are clinically relevant, we have investigated whether TZ, a phenothiazine whose negative side effects are less frequent and serious than those associated with CPZ, kills M. tuberculosis organisms that have been phagocytosed by human macrophages, which have nominal killing activities against these bacteria. Both CPZ and TZ killed intracellular antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant M. tuberculosis organisms when they were used at concentrations in the medium well below those present in the plasma of patients treated with these agents. These concentrations in vitro were not toxic to the macrophage, nor did they affect in vitro cellular immune processes. TZ thus appears to be a serious candidate for the management of a freshly diagnosed infection of pulmonary tuberculosis or as an adjunct to conventional antituberculosis therapy if the patient originates from an area known to have a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. Nevertheless, we must await the outcomes of clinical trials to determine whether TZ itself may be safely and effectively used as an antituberculosis agent. PMID:12604522

  19. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J; Schilling, Joel D

    2016-04-12

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  20. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  1. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  2. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  3. Letting die and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Narbekovas, Andrius; Meilius, Kazimieras

    2003-01-01

    We are all called to make moral decisions, not only about preserving life and health, but also about accepting our death and dying. There are situations, when it is morally right, and indeed obligatory, to allow a dying person to die in peace and dignity. But there is a world of difference between allowing a peaceful death, and deliberately setting out to bring death of the person either by acts of commission (s.c. 'active euthanasia'), or by acts of omission (s.c. 'passive euthanasia'). The word "killing" seems proper for euthanasia, because "to kill" does mean " to intentionally cause the death of someone." It can be morally acceptable to withhold or withdraw a treatment precisely because it is reasonably judged as inefficacious (futile), or excessively burdensome for the patient. One's reason for withholding such treatment must not be a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the patient's life, but a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the treatment, which is futile or burdensome.

  4. Euthanasia: killing as due care?

    PubMed

    Oduncu, Fuat S

    2003-01-01

    On 10 April 2001, the Netherlands was the first country to pass a law on the killing of patients at their request (euthanasia), which took effect on 1 April 2002. Belgium followed and passed a euthanasia law on 16 May 2002, which took effect on 23 September 2002 and is even more liberal than the Dutch one. Physicians will be exempted from criminal liability provided they satisfy the so-called 'due care criteria'. However, in medical history euthanasia has never been part of the medical duty of care. Instead, the goals of medicine have always been the relief of pain and suffering. The current article provides insights into the Dutch, Belgian and Oregon euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide practices and reflects upon some central medical and legal documents on the regulation of euthanasia and the provision of palliative care. Modern palliative care includes both the delivery of competent palliative skills and a virtuous attitude of compassionate caring about the terminally ill patient as an autonomous person. Here, the author rejects killing as due care and proposes a novel concept of 'RAHME' (Aramaic: compassion, love, mercy), which calls for a holistically oriented concept where physicians act as companions to the terminally ill and dying patients.

  5. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  6. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes.

  7. NH125 kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus persisters by lipid bilayer disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wooseong; Fricke, Nico; Conery, Annie L; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Vlahovska, Petia M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Background: NH125, a known WalK inhibitor kills MRSA persisters. However, its precise mode of action is still unknown. Methods & results: The mode of action of NH125 was investigated by comparing its spectrum of antimicrobial activity and its effects on membrane permeability and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with walrycin B, a WalR inhibitor and benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium chloride (16-BAC), a cationic surfactant. NH125 killed persister cells of a variety of Staphylococcus aureus strains. Similar to 16-BAC, NH125 killed MRSA persisters by inducing rapid membrane permeabilization and caused the rupture of GUVs, whereas walrycin B did not kill MRSA persisters or induce membrane permeabilization and did not affect GUVs. Conclusion: NH125 kills MRSA persisters by interacting with and disrupting membranes in a detergent-like manner. PMID:26910612

  8. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  9. Killing of Gyrodactylus salaris (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) mediated by host complement.

    PubMed

    Harris, P D; Soleng, A; Bakke, T A

    1998-08-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris, an important pathogen of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, has been shown to be highly sensitive to factors in host serum and mucus, being killed rapidly (50% within 1 h) by serum at a dilution of 1:200. The time needed for killing was inversely proportional to serum concentration. Similar effects were noted using host mucus, which contained approximately 1/20th of the anti-Gyrodactylus activity of serum. Serum activity was abolished completely by heating at 45 degrees C for 30 min, and by addition of EDTA, but not by EGTA + 1 mM magnesium ions. Activity was not dependent on whether the serum was from infected or naive fishes, nor was it species specific. Attempts to pre-coat parasites in salmon anti-Gyrodactylus antibodies also failed to enhance the activity of fresh serum. These observations suggest that killing is due to the complement system of the host, acting via the alternate pathway. G. salaris appears to be exceptionally sensitive to complement, being killed at concentrations which could be experienced in vivo. The role of complement in the protection of fishes against gyrodactylid infection therefore deserves further investigation.

  10. Pfiesteria shumwayae kills fish by micropredation not exotoxin secretion.

    PubMed

    Vogelbein, Wolfgang K; Lovko, Vincent J; Shields, Jeffrey D; Reece, Kimberly S; Mason, Patrice L; Haas, Leonard W; Walker, Calvin C

    2002-08-29

    Pfiesteria piscicida and P. shumwayae reportedly secrete potent exotoxins thought to cause fish lesion events, acute fish kills and human disease in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries. However, Pfiesteria toxins have never been isolated or characterized. We investigated mechanisms by which P. shumwayae kills fish using three different approaches. Here we show that larval fish bioassays conducted in tissue culture plates fitted with polycarbonate membrane inserts exhibited mortality (100%) only in treatments where fish and dinospores were in physical contact. No mortalities occurred in treatments where the membrane prevented contact between dinospores and fish. Using differential centrifugation and filtration of water from a fish-killing culture, we produced 'dinoflagellate', 'bacteria' and 'cell-free' fractions. Larval fish bioassays of these fractions resulted in mortalities (60-100% in less than 24 h) only in fractions containing live dinospores ('whole water', 'dinoflagellate'), with no mortalities in 'cell-free' or 'bacteria'-enriched fractions. Videomicrography and electron microscopy show dinospores swarming toward and attaching to skin, actively feeding, and rapidly denuding fish of epidermis. We show here that our cultures of actively fish-killing P. shumwayae do not secrete potent exotoxins; rather, fish mortality results from micropredatory feeding.

  11. Comparative in vitro killing of canine strains of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Escherichia coli by cefovecin, cefazolin, doxycycline and pradofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, Joseph M; Shebelski, Shantelle D

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial eradication is necessary for clinical cure of infections and antimicrobial agents are important adjunctive therapies for inhibiting the growth of or killing bacteria. Pre-existing skin diseases predispose animals to infection by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and, more rarely, by Gram-negative bacilli. The property of rapid killing of bacteria may influence drug selection and duration of therapy in the setting of infection. To test the killing of canine isolates of S. pseudintermedius and Escherichia coli by cefazolin, cefovecin, doxycycline and pradofloxacin at the minimum inhibitory, mutant prevention, maximum serum and maximum tissue drug concentrations. Under standard conditions, bacterial cells were exposed to clinically relevant drug concentrations in vitro and the log10 reduction (and % kill) of viable cells measured at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after drug exposure. Statistically significant differences were seen between killing efficiencies by pradofloxacin versus the other agents, whereby pradofloxacin killed cells more rapidly than the others. For example, against the S. pseudintermedius strains, significantly more cells were killed by pradofloxacin following 15 min of maximum tissue drug concentration exposure than for cefazolin (P = 0.0002), cefovecin (P = 0.0007) and doxycycline (P ≤ 0.0001). The rank order of potency based on these kill experiments was pradofloxacin > cefazolin > cefovecin > doxycycline. Rapid killing of bacteria affects the speed of clinical resolution and may influence drug selection and duration of therapy for skin infections. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  12. Gadolinium induces macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mizgerd, J P; Molina, R M; Stearns, R C; Brain, J D; Warner, A E

    1996-02-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) suppresses reticuloendothelial functions in vivo by unknown mechanisms. In vitro exposure of rat alveolar macrophages to GdCl3.6H20 caused cell death, as measured by trypan blue permeability, in both dose- and time-dependent fashions. Even a 10-min exposure to Gd caused significant cell death by 24 h. The morphology of Gd-treated cells, pyknosis and karyorrhexis prior to loss of membrane integrity, suggested apoptosis. Upon flow cytometric examination, Gd-treated propidium iodide-excluding cells demonstrated light scatter changes characteristic of apoptotic cells (decreased forward and increased right angle scatter). Gel electrophoresis of DNA from Gd-treated macrophages clearly showed the ladder pattern unique to apoptotic cells. Electron-dense structures containing Gd were observed via electron spectroscopic imaging within phagosomes and also within nuclei (associated with condensed chromatin). Gadolinium, endocytosed by macrophages and distributed to nuclei, causes apoptosis of macrophages in vitro.

  13. Physiological roles of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages are present in mammals from midgestation, contributing to physiologic homeostasis throughout life. Macrophages arise from yolk sac and foetal liver progenitors during embryonic development in the mouse and persist in different organs as heterogeneous, self-renewing tissue-resident populations. Bone marrow-derived blood monocytes are recruited after birth to replenish tissue-resident populations and to meet further demands during inflammation, infection and metabolic perturbations. Macrophages of mixed origin and different locations vary in replication and turnover, but are all active in mRNA and protein synthesis, fulfilling organ-specific and systemic trophic functions, in addition to host defence. In this review, we emphasise selected properties and non-immune functions of tissue macrophages which contribute to physiologic homeostasis.

  14. Macrophages in gene therapy: cellular delivery vehicles and in vivo targets.

    PubMed

    Burke, B; Sumner, S; Maitland, N; Lewis, C E

    2002-09-01

    The appearance and activation of macrophages are thought to be rapid events in the development of many pathological lesions, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, and arthritic joints. This has prompted recent attempts to use macrophages as novel cellular vehicles for gene therapy, in which macrophages are genetically modified ex vivo and then reintroduced into the body with the hope that a proportion will then home to the diseased site. Here, we critically review the efficacy of various gene transfer methods (viral, bacterial, protozoan, and various chemical and physical methods) in transfecting macrophages in vitro, and the results obtained when transfected macrophages are used as gene delivery vehicles. Finally, we discuss the use of various viral and nonviral methods to transfer genes to macrophages in vivo. As will be seen, definitive evidence for the use of macrophages as gene transfer vehicles has yet to be provided and awaits detailed trafficking studies in vivo. Moreover, although methods for transfecting macrophages have improved considerably in efficiency in recent years, targeting of gene transfer specifically to macrophages in vivo remains a problem. However, possible solutions to this include placing transgenes under the control of macrophage-specific promoters to limit expression to macrophages or stably transfecting CD34(+) precursors of monocytes/macrophages and then differentiating these cells into monocytes/macrophages ex vivo. The latter approach could conceivably lead to the bone marrow precursor cells of patients with inherited genetic disorders being permanently fortified or even replaced with genetically modified cells.

  15. Measuring autophagy in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Harris, James; Hanrahan, Orla; De Haro, Sergio A

    2009-11-01

    Macroautophagy is a conserved intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the degradation of cytosolic constituents. Autophagy can promote cell survival by providing essential amino acids from the breakdown of macromolecules during periods of nutrient deprivation, and can remove damaged or excess organelles, such as mitochondria and peroxisomes. More recently, autophagy has been shown to play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic bacteria in macrophages and dendritic cells. This unit presents protocols for the measurement of autophagy in macrophages.

  16. β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor protect mice against S. typhimurium challenge by activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Huang, Ke-Yan; Jiang, Yan-Long; Yang, Gui-Lian; Wang, Chun-Feng; Li, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The effects of β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor (CVP), which are extracted from a well-known immune stimulator C. versicolor, have been demonstrated extensively in vitro and in vivo. However, until now, the phagocytic activity has not been elucidated. Hence, the objective of the present study was to identify the antibacterial activity of CVP or CVP-treated macrophages by an analysis of cell cytotoxicity, phagocytic activity, intracellular bacterial survival, macrophage activation, production of nitric oxide (NO) and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in CVP-treated macrophages using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, a gentamicin protection assay, a Nitric oxide assay and an iNOS enzymatic activity assay. The results indicate that CVP-treated macrophages can phagocytize and kill bacteria, probably due to the production of NO and iNOS. More importantly, CVP-treated macrophages are effective at protecting mice against the challenge of Salmonella typhimurium. The results of this study suggest that the antibacterial effects of CVP are probably caused by the activation of innate immune cells, especially macrophages, because the activated macrophage produces NO, which kills bacteria. These phenomena indicate the possibility of CVP as a potential alternative for antibiotics against resistant bacteria.

  17. Pulmonary Macrophage Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Arumugam, Paritha; Sakagami, Takuro; Lachmann, Nico; Chalk, Claudia; Sallese, Anthony; Abe, Shuichi; Trapnell, Cole; Carey, Brenna; Moritz, Thomas; Malik, Punam; Lutzko, Carolyn; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection-risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independent of hematologic progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using GM-CSF receptor-β deficient (Csf2rb−/−) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA/CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe, well-tolerated, and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations, normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Results identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP. PMID:25274301

  18. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  19. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies.

  20. An Fc engineering approach that modulates antibody-dependent cytokine release without altering cell-killing functions.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R; Strohl, William R; Jordan, Robert E; Brezski, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often mediate target cell-killing by eliciting immune effector functions via Fc region interactions with cellular and humoral components of the immune system. Key functions include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, there has been increased appreciation that along with cell-killing functions, the induction of antibody-dependent cytokine release (ADCR) can also influence disease microenvironments and therapeutic outcomes. Historically, most Fc engineering approaches have been aimed toward modulating ADCC, ADCP, or CDC. In the present study, we describe an Fc engineering approach that, while not resulting in impaired ADCC or ADCP, profoundly affects ADCR. As such, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as effector cells against mAb-opsonized tumor cells, the described mAb variants elicit a similar profile and quantity of cytokines as IgG1. In contrast, although the variants elicit similar levels of tumor cell-killing as IgG1 with macrophage effector cells, the variants do not elicit macrophage-mediated ADCR against mAb-opsonized tumor cells. This study demonstrates that Fc engineering approaches can be employed to uncouple macrophage-mediated phagocytic and subsequent cell-killing functions from cytokine release.

  1. Vps13F links bacterial recognition and intracellular killing in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Leiba, Jade; Sabra, Ayman; Bodinier, Romain; Marchetti, Anna; Lima, Wanessa C.; Melotti, Astrid; Perrin, Jackie; Burdet, Frederic; Pagni, Marco; Soldati, Thierry; Lelong, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial sensing, ingestion, and killing by phagocytic cells are essential processes to protect the human body from infectious microorganisms. The cellular mechanisms involved in intracellular killing, their relative importance, and their specificity towards different bacteria are however poorly defined. In this study, we used Dictyostelium discoideum, a phagocytic cell model amenable to genetic analysis, to identify new gene products involved in intracellular killing. A random genetic screen led us to identify the role of Vps13F in intracellular killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Vps13F knock‐out (KO) cells exhibited a delayed intracellular killing of K. pneumoniae, although the general organization of the phagocytic and endocytic pathway appeared largely unaffected. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that vps13F KO cells may be functionally similar to previously characterized fspA KO cells, shown to be defective in folate sensing. Indeed, vps13F KO cells showed a decreased chemokinetic response to various stimulants, suggesting a direct or indirect role of Vps13F in intracellular signaling. Overstimulation with excess folate restored efficient killing in vps13F KO cells. Finally, genetic inactivation of Far1, the folate receptor, resulted in inefficient intracellular killing of K. pneumoniae. Together, these observations show that stimulation of Dictyostelium by bacterial folate is necessary for rapid intracellular killing of K. pneumoniae. PMID:28076662

  2. Timelike Killing spinors in seven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2004-12-15

    We employ the G-structure formalism to study supersymmetric solutions of minimal and SU(2) gauged supergravities in seven dimensions admitting Killing spinors with an associated timelike Killing vector. The most general such Killing spinor defines a SU(3) structure. We deduce necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a timelike Killing spinor on the bosonic fields of the theories, and find that such configurations generically preserve one out of 16 supersymmetries. Using our general supersymmetric ansatz we obtain numerous new solutions, including squashed or deformed anti-de Sitter solutions of the gauged theory, and a large class of Goedel-like solutions with closed timelike curves.

  3. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  4. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  5. Smac mimetics induce inflammation and necrotic tumour cell death by modulating macrophage activity

    PubMed Central

    Lecis, D; De Cesare, M; Perego, P; Conti, A; Corna, E; Drago, C; Seneci, P; Walczak, H; Colombo, M P; Delia, D; Sangaletti, S

    2013-01-01

    Smac mimetics (SMs) comprise a class of small molecules that target members of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of pro-survival proteins, whose expression in cancer cells hinders the action of conventional chemotherapeutics. Herein, we describe the activity of SM83, a newly synthesised dimeric SM, in two cancer ascites models: athymic nude mice injected intraperitoneally with IGROV-1 human ovarian carcinoma cells and immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine Meth A sarcoma cells. SM83 rapidly killed ascitic IGROV-1 and Meth A cells in vivo (prolonging mouse survival), but was ineffective against the same cells in vitro. IGROV-1 cells in nude mice were killed within the ascites by a non-apoptotic, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-dependent mechanism. SM83 administration triggered a rapid inflammatory event characterised by host secretion of TNF, interleukin-1β and interferon-γ. This inflammatory response was associated with the reversion of the phenotype of tumour-associated macrophages from a pro-tumoural M2- to a pro-inflammatory M1-like state. SM83 treatment was also associated with a massive recruitment of neutrophils that, however, was not essential for the antitumoural activity of this compound. In BALB/c mice bearing Meth A ascites, SM83 treatment was in some cases curative, and these mice became resistant to a second injection of cancer cells, suggesting that they had developed an adaptive immune response. Altogether, these results indicate that, in vivo, SM83 modulates the immune system within the tumour microenvironment and, through its pro-inflammatory action, leads cancer cells to die by necrosis with the release of high-mobility group box-1. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that SMs could be more therapeutically active than expected by stimulating the immune system. PMID:24232096

  6. Dynamic changes in Mcl-1 expression regulate macrophage viability or commitment to apoptosis during bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Helen M; Bingle, Colin D; Read, Robert C; Braley, Karen E; Kroemer, Guido; Hellewell, Paul G; Craig, Ruth W; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2005-02-01

    Macrophages are critical effectors of bacterial clearance and must retain viability, despite exposure to toxic bacterial products, until key antimicrobial functions are performed. Subsequently, host-mediated macrophage apoptosis aids resolution of infection. The ability of macrophages to make this transition from resistance to susceptibility to apoptosis is important for effective host innate immune responses. We investigated the role of Mcl-1, an essential regulator of macrophage lifespan, in this switch from viability to apoptosis, using the model of pneumococcal-associated macrophage apoptosis. Upon exposure to pneumococci, macrophages initially upregulate Mcl-1 protein and maintain viability for up to 14 hours. Subsequently, macrophages reduce expression of full-length Mcl-1 and upregulate a 34-kDa isoform of Mcl-1 corresponding to a novel BH3-only splice variant, Mcl-1(Exon-1). Change in expression of Mcl-1 protein is associated with mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, which is characterized by loss of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential and translocation of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor. Following pneumococcal infection, macrophages expressing full-length human Mcl-1 as a transgene exhibit a delay in apoptosis and in bacterial killing. Mcl-1 transgenic mice clear pneumococci from the lung less efficiently than nontransgenic mice. Dynamic changes in Mcl-1 expression determine macrophage viability as well as antibacterial host defense.

  7. Human splenic macrophages as a model for in vitro infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Henao, Julieta; Sánchez, Dulfary; Muñoz, Carlos H; Mejía, Natalia; Arias, Mauricio A; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2007-11-01

    Macrophages play an important role during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. In humans most of the studies on MTB-macrophage interactions have been performed using circulating monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. However, little research has been performed on this interaction using tissue macrophages. Herein, we used human splenic macrophages to characterize particular responses to MTB infection. Based on morphological, biochemical, and immunological markers, splenic adherent cells exhibit characteristics of tissue macrophages. They were able to efficiently phagocytose both live and heat-killed (h-k) MTB H37Rv. Upon infection with live, but not h-k MTB, an increase in secreted TNF-alpha was elicited. Splenic macrophages produced high basal levels of IL-10; however, infection with live or h-k MTB resulted in decrease IL-10 secretion. Both IL-12p40 and IL-12p70 basal levels were also decreased upon infection with live or h-k MTB; however, while the reduction for IL-12p40 levels was observed at earlier time points (4h) for both live and h-k MTB, infection with live MTB, but not h-k MTB, resulted in a time-dependent secretion of IL-12p40 at 24 and 48h after infection. IL-12p70 levels were completely reduced upon infection by either live or h-k MTB. These results support that human splenic macrophages may represent a potential useful model to study MTB-macrophage interactions in vitro.

  8. Macrophage activation-induced thymosin beta 4 production: a tissue repair mechanism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Macrophages play significant role in immunity which not only kill pathogens, produce cytokines but also clear dead tissues at the site of inflammation and stimulate wound healing. Much less is known how these cells contribute to tissue repair process. In course of our studies comparing the peptide...

  9. Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  10. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Michael G.; Pulsifer, Amanda R.; Price, Christopher T.; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Lawrenz, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV) and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH. PMID:26495854

  11. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  12. GP43 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis inhibits macrophage functions. An evasion mechanism of the fungus.

    PubMed

    Flavia Popi, Ana Flavia; Lopes, José Daniel; Mariano, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages constitute one of the primary cellular mechanisms that impairs parasite invasion of host tissues. The phagocytic and microbicidal properties of these cells can be modulated by specific membrane receptors involved in cell-microorganism interactions. Gp43, the main antigen secreted by Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis (Pb), the causative agent of Paracoccidioidomycosis, is a high mannose glycoprotein. The role played by gp43 in the pathogenesis of the disease is not completely known. Here, we describe the influence of this molecule on the interaction between peritoneal murine macrophages and Pb. Phagocytosis of Pb, live or heat-killed, by adherent peritoneal cells from both, B10.A (susceptible) and A/Sn (resistant) mice, was evaluated. Addition of different concentrations of gp43 to the culture medium inhibited, in a dose-dependent pattern, phagocytosis of live or heat-killed Pb by peritoneal macrophages from both B10.A and A/Sn mice. Gp43 also inhibits phagocytosis of zymosan particles but did not interfere with the uptake of opsonized sheep red blood cells. It was also shown that both gp43 and heat-killed Pb have an inhibitory effect on the release of NO by zymosan stimulated macrophages. Finally, we demonstrated that gp43 inhibits the fungicidal ability of macrophages from both lineages. Based on these data, it is suggested that gp43 can be considered one of the evasion mechanisms for the installation of primary infection in susceptible hosts.

  13. Integrating Immunometabolism and Macrophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Artyomov, Maxim; Sergushichev, Alexey; Schilling, Joel D.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that play a key role in inflammatory and tissue reparative responses. Over the past decade it has become clear that shifts in cellular metabolism are important determinants of macrophage function and phenotype. At the same time, our appreciation of macrophage diversity in vivo has also been increasing. Factors such as cell origin and tissue localization are now recognized as important variables that influence macrophage biology. Whether different macrophage populations also have unique metabolic phenotypes has not been extensively explored. In this article, we will discuss the importance of understanding how macrophage origin can modulate metabolic programming and influence inflammatory responses. PMID:27771140

  14. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  15. Enhancement of the immune response against Salmonella infection of mice by heat-killed multispecies combinations of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yuan; Tsen, Hau-Yang; Lin, Chun-Li; Lin, Chien-Ku; Chuang, Li-Tsen; Chen, Chin-Shuh; Chiang, Yu-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Heat-killed lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has advantages over live LAB in that it has a long shelf-life and is therefore easy to store and transport. From four LAB strains selected by immunomodulatory activity and adherent properties, we prepared the heat-killed multispecies combination of LAB (MLAB) and the cell walls from MLAB under two conditions (100 °C for 30 min and 121 °C for 15 min). Different effects on the adherent properties of these four LAB strains were observed, depending on the heating conditions. With mouse macrophage cells, the two heat-killed MLABs (HMLABs) showed significantly higher induction activities on the production of interleukin 12 (IL-12) than their individual strains did. Heat-killed MLABs and cell-wall preparations were able to reduce the Salmonella invasion of Caco-2 and mouse macrophage cells. Feeding mice with HMLAB could inhibit the Salmonella invasion of mice significantly. For these mice, the expression level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, in mouse serum was reduced while that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, i.e. IL-10, was enhanced. The HMLABs developed in this study showed higher protective effect against Salmonella invasion either of Caco-2 cells or of mice, relative to the heat-killed lactobacilli, which consisted of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains selected at random. In conclusion, the HMLABs were potentially useful for the protection of mice against Salmonella infection and the induced inflammation.

  16. Macrophage Apoptosis Triggered by IpaD from Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Arizmendi, Olivia; Picking, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis, a potentially severe bacillary dysentery, is an infectious gastrointestinal disease caused by Shigella spp. Shigella invades the human colonic epithelium and avoids clearance by promoting apoptosis of resident immune cells in the gut. This process is dependent on the Shigella type III secretion system (T3SS), which injects effector proteins into target cells to alter their normal cellular functions. Invasion plasmid antigen D (IpaD) is a structural component that forms a complex at the tip of the T3SS apparatus needle. Recently, IpaD has also been shown to indirectly induce apoptosis in B lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the cytotoxicity profile during macrophage infection by Shigella and discovered that the pathogen induces macrophage cell death independent of caspase-1. Our results demonstrate that IpaD triggers apoptosis in macrophages through activation of host caspases accompanied by mitochondrial disruption. Additionally, we found that the IpaD N-terminal domain is necessary for macrophage killing and SipD, a structural homologue from Salmonella, was found to promote similar cytotoxicity. Together, these findings indicate that IpaD is a contributing factor to macrophage cell death during Shigella infection. PMID:27068089

  17. Serum factors responsible for killing of Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Reed, W. P.; Albright, Elizabeth L.

    1974-01-01

    Eight strains of Shigella were tested for susceptibility to killing by seven normal human sera. Although there was a wide range of susceptibility between strains of bacteria, there was surprisingly little difference in the killing activity of individual sera and no relationship between antibody titres and killing capacity. Bacteriolysis required small amounts of antibody, but as little as 0.02 mg of a 19S fraction from normal serum restored full killing capacity to 1 ml of antibody depleted serum. Neither 11S IgA nor Cohn fraction II restored the bacteriolytic ability. Both the early reacting complement sequence and the alternate C3 activating pathway appeared to participate in killing as indicated by the roles of C2 and C3PA. Killing occurred, but with reduced efficiency, when either of the two substances was missing. However, serum lacking both C2 and C3PA could no longer kill Shigella. Killing also required the presence of C3, and presumably some of the later components of complement are subsequently involved. PMID:4846468

  18. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  19. Puzzling cases about killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Favor, C D

    1996-01-01

    Discussions of euthanasia often appeal to the distinction between killing people and letting them die. Favor asks whether this distinction is morally important--in particular, whether killing is worse than merely letting someone die, even when the motivations and consequences are the same. She explores our moral intuitions via a discussion of various subtly different hypothetical examples.

  20. Killing and letting die: a defensible distinction.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, W

    1996-04-01

    The distinction between killing and letting die is investigated and clarified. It is then argued that in most cases, though not in all, it is worse to kill than to let die. In euthanasia the significance of the distinction is diminished, but still important.

  1. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  2. Killing, letting die, and simple conflicts.

    PubMed

    Malm, H M

    1989-01-01

    Proponents of the moral equivalence of killing and letting die argue that in cases of simple conflict, where one agent must either perform a positive act and kill one person, or not perform that act and allow another person to die, the agent's alternatives are clearly morally equivalent. Malm rejects this view in a three part essay. He argues that in cases of simple conflict, the acts of killing and letting die are morally different, and that killing is not in itself worse than letting die. Malm considers and rejects the suggestion that the agent should decide randomly between the two alternatives. He concludes that while simple conflict cases require us to recognize a morally significant difference between killing and letting die, they do not require us to recognize a morally significant difference between acting and refraining.

  3. Antibacterial surface design - Contact kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajbir; Liu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Designing antibacterial surfaces has become extremely important to minimize Healthcare Associated Infections which are a major cause of mortality worldwide. A previous biocide-releasing approach is based on leaching of encapsulated biocides such as silver and triclosan which exerts negative impacts on the environment and potentially contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. This drawback of leachable compounds led to the shift of interest towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach: contact-killing surfaces. Biocides that can be bound onto surfaces to give the substrates contact-active antibacterial activity include quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), quaternary phosphoniums (QPs), carbon nanotubes, antibacterial peptides, and N-chloramines. Among the above, QACs and N-chloramines are the most researched contact-active biocides. We review the engineering of contact-active surfaces using QACs or N-chloramines, the modes of actions as well as the test methods. The charge-density threshold of cationic surfaces for desired antibacterial efficacy and attempts to combine various biocides for the generation of new contact-active surfaces are discussed in detail. Surface positive charge density is identified as a key parameter to define antibacterial efficacy. We expect that this research field will continue to attract more research interest in view of the potential impact of self-disinfective surfaces on healthcare-associated infections, food safety and corrosion/fouling resistance required on industrial surfaces such as oil pipes and ship hulls.

  4. Choke and kill control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, R.E.

    1988-08-02

    A control system is described for a choke and kill safety valve for use in a well conduit, in which the valve indicates a housing having a bore therethrough, a sleeve telescopically movable in the housing about the bore, a valve closure member positioned in the housing and connected to the sleeve and movable between open and closed positions in the bore, a flow tube longitudinally movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means between the sleeve and the flow tube for biasing the flow tube in a direction for causing the valve closure member to move the closed position, releasable latch means between the sleeve and the flow tube initially holding the flow tube in position holding the valve closure member in the open position, a biased piston and cylinder assembly initially engaging the releasable latch and holding the latch engaged, the assembly being exposed on one side to pressure in the housing, and the housing and the sleeve including openings which when aligned by movement of the sleeve by well pressure allows fluid to be inserted into the bore from the outside of the housing.

  5. The interaction of gamma delta T cells with activated macrophages is a property of the V gamma 1 subset.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jane E; Pearson, Jayne; Scott, Phillip; Carding, Simon R

    2003-12-15

    Immunoregulation is an emerging paradigm of gammadelta T cell function. The mechanisms by which gammadelta T cells mediate this function, however, are not clear. Studies have identified a direct role for gammadelta T cells in resolving the host immune response to infection, by eliminating populations of activated macrophages. The aim of this study was to identify macrophage-reactive gammadelta T cells and establish the requirements/outcomes of macrophage-gammadelta T cell interactions during the immune response to the intracellular bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Using a macrophage-T cell coculture system in which peritoneal macrophages from naive or Lm-infected TCRdelta(-/-) mice were incubated with splenocytes from naive and Lm-infected alphabeta/gammadelta T cell-deficient and wild-type mice, the ability to bind macrophages was shown to be restricted to gammadelta T cells and the GV5S1 (Vgamma1) subset of gammadelta T cells. Macrophage adherence resulted in a 4- to 10-fold enrichment of Vgamma1(+) T cells. Enrichment of Vgamma1 T cells was dependent upon the activation status of macrophages, but independent of the activation status of gammadelta T cells. Vgamma1 T cells were cytotoxic for activated macrophages with both the binding to and killing of macrophages being TCR dependent because anti-TCRgammadelta Abs inhibited both Vgamma1 binding and killing activities. These studies establish the identity of macrophage cytotoxic gammadelta T cells, the conditions under which this interaction occurs, and the outcome of this interaction. These findings are concordant with the involvement of Vgamma1 T cells in macrophage homeostasis during the resolution of pathogen-mediated immune responses.

  6. Macrophage Responses to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Claire; Murdoch, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The presence of multiple areas of hypoxia (low oxygen tension) is a hallmark feature of human and experimental tumors. Monocytes are continually recruited into tumors, differentiate into tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and then accumulate in these hypoxic areas. A number of recent studies have shown that macrophages respond to the levels of hypoxia found in tumors by up-regulating such transcription factors as hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2, which in turn activate a broad array of mitogenic, proinvasive, proangiogenic, and prometastatic genes. This could explain why high numbers of TAMs correlate with poor prognosis in various forms of cancer. In this review, we assess the evidence for hypoxia activating a distinct, protumor phenotype in macrophages and the possible effect of this on the growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion of tumors. We also discuss current attempts to selectively target TAMs for destruction or to use them to deliver gene therapy specifically to hypoxic tumor sites. PMID:16127144

  7. Macrophages and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Miguel P.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions whilst preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function. PMID:26982356

  8. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  9. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Taylor, Philip R

    2005-12-01

    Heterogeneity of the macrophage lineage has long been recognized and, in part, is a result of the specialization of tissue macrophages in particular microenvironments. Circulating monocytes give rise to mature macrophages and are also heterogeneous themselves, although the physiological relevance of this is not completely understood. However, as we discuss here, recent studies have shown that monocyte heterogeneity is conserved in humans and mice, allowing dissection of its functional relevance: the different monocyte subsets seem to reflect developmental stages with distinct physiological roles, such as recruitment to inflammatory lesions or entry to normal tissues. These advances in our understanding have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies that are targeted to modify particular subpopulations of monocytes.

  10. Yersinia pestis Intracellular Parasitism of Macrophages from Hosts Exhibiting High and Low Severity of Plague

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Yersinia pestis causes severe disease in natural rodent hosts, but mild to inapparent disease in certain rodent predators such as dogs. Y. pestis initiates infection in susceptible hosts by parasitizing and multiplying intracellularly in local macrophages prior to systemic dissemination. Thus, we hypothesize that Y. pestis disease severity may depend on the degree to which intracellular Y. pestis overcomes the initial host macrophage imposed stress. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, the progression of in vitro infection by Y. pestis KIM62053.1+ of mouse splenic and RAW264.7 tissue culture macrophages and dog peripheral blood-derived and DH82 tissue culture macrophages was studied using microscopy and various parameters of infection. The study showed that during the early stage of infection, intracellular Y. pestis assumed filamentous cellular morphology with multiple copies of the genome per bacterium in both mouse and dog macrophages. Later, in mouse macrophages, the infection elicited spacious vacuolar extension of Yersinia containing vacuoles (YCV), and the filamentous Y. pestis reverted to coccobacillary morphology with genomic equivalents approximately equaling colony forming units. In contrast, Y. pestis infected dog macrophages did not show noticeable extension of YCV, and intracellular Y. pestis retained the filamentous cellular morphology for the entire experiment in DH82 cells or were killed by blood-derived macrophages. In addition, during the later stage of infection, Y. pestis infected mouse macrophages exhibited cell lysis whereas dog macrophages did not. Conclusion/Significance Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Y. pestis in mouse macrophages can overcome the initial intracellular stress necessary for subsequent systemic infection. However, in dogs, failure of Y. pestis to overcome macrophage imposed stress may result in mild or in apparent disease in dogs. PMID:22848745

  11. Macrophage colony stimulating factor: not just for macrophages anymore! A gateway into complex biologies.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Thomas G; Driggers, Lara; Zhang, Jian Gang; Hoa, Neil; Delgado, Christina; Williams, Christopher C; Dan, Qinhong; Sanchez, Ramon; Jeffes, Edward W B; Wepsic, H Terry; Myers, Michael P; Koths, Kirston; Jadus, Martin R

    2008-10-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called colony stimulating factor-1) has traditionally been viewed as a growth/differentiation factor for monocytes, macrophages, and some female-specific tumors. As a result of alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational processing, several forms of M-CSF protein are produced: a secreted glycoprotein, a longer secreted form containing proteoglycan, and a short membrane-bound isoform. These different forms of M-CSF all initiate cell signaling in cells bearing the M-CSF receptor, called c-fms. Here we review the biology of M-CSF, which has important roles in bone physiology, the intestinal tract, cancer metastases to the bone, macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing and tumor immunity. Although this review concentrates mostly on the membrane form of human M-CSF (mM-CSF), the biology of the soluble forms and the M-CSF receptor will also be discussed for comparative purposes. The mechanisms of the biological effects of the membrane-bound M-CSF reveal that this cytokine is unexpectedly involved in many complex molecular events. Recent experiments suggest that a tumor vaccine based on membrane-bound M-CSF-transduced tumor cells, combined with anti-angiogenic therapy, should be evaluated further for use in clinical trials.

  12. Berberine augments ATP-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages by enhancing AMPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Hui; Liang, Yi-Dan; Wei, Hong-Xia; Hu, Bo; Pan, Hao; Zha, Qing-Bing; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The isoquinoline alkaloid berberine possesses many pharmacological activities including antibacterial infection. Although the direct bactericidal effect of berberine has been documented, its influence on the antibacterial functions of macrophages is largely unknown. As inflammasome activation in macrophages is important for the defense against bacterial infection, we aimed to investigate the influence of berberine on inflammasome activation in murine macrophages. Our results showed that berberine significantly increased ATP-induced inflammasome activation as reflected by enhanced pyroptosis as well as increased release of caspase-1p10 and mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in macrophages. Such effects of berberine could be suppressed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor compound C or by knockdown of AMPKα expression, indicating the involvement of AMPK signaling in this process. In line with increased IL-1β release, the ability of macrophages to kill engulfed bacteria was also intensified by berberine. This was corroborated by the in vivo finding that the peritoneal live bacterial load was decreased by berberine treatment. Moreover, berberine administration significantly improved survival of bacterial infected mice, concomitant with increased IL-1β levels and elevated neutrophil recruitment in the peritoneal cavity. Collectively, these data suggested that berberine could enhance bacterial killing by augmenting inflammasome activation in macrophages through AMPK signaling. PMID:27980220

  13. The efficacy of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide-specific antibodies to serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae requires macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Kevin; Manix, Catherine; Tian, Haijun; van Rooijen, Nico; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2010-11-03

    The efficacy of antibody immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae stems from the ability of opsonic, serotype (ST)-specific antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS) to facilitate killing of the homologous ST by host phagocytes. However, PPS-specific antibodies have been identified that are protective in mice, but do not promote opsonic killing in vitro, raising the question of how they mediate protection in vivo. To probe this question, we investigated the dependence of antibody efficacy against lethal systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 (ST3) on macrophages and neutrophils for the following PPS3-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in survival experiments in mice using a non-opsonic human IgM (A7), a non-opsonic mouse IgG1 (1E2) and an opsonic mouse IgG1 (5F6). The survival of A7- and PPS3-specific and isotype control MAb-treated neutrophil-depleted and neutrophil-sufficient and macrophage-depleted and macrophage-sufficient mice were determined after i.p. challenge with ST3 strains 6303 and WU2. Neutrophils were dispensable for A7 and the mouse MAbs to mediate protection in this model, but macrophages were required for the efficacy of A7 and optimal mouse MAb-mediated protection. For A7-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had higher blood CFU, cytokines and peripheral neutrophil levels than macrophage-sufficient mice, and macrophage-sufficient mice had lower tissue bacterial burdens than control MAb-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that macrophages contribute to opsonic and non-opsonic PPS3-specific MAb-mediated protection against ST3 infection by enhancing bacterial clearance and suggest that neutrophils do not compensate for the absence of macrophages in the model used in this study.

  14. Sialoadhesin Promotes Rapid Proinflammatory and Type I IFN Responses to a Sialylated Pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Klaas, Mariliis; Oetke, Cornelia; Lewis, Leanne E.; Erwig, Lars P.; Heikema, Astrid P.; Easton, Alistair; Willison, Hugh J.

    2012-01-01

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a macrophage (Mϕ)-restricted receptor that recognizes sialylated ligands on host cells and pathogens. Although Sn is thought to be important in cellular interactions of Mϕs with cells of the immune system, the functional consequences of pathogen engagement by Sn are unclear. As a model system, we have investigated the role of Sn in Mϕ interactions with heat-killed Campylobacter jejuni expressing a GD1a-like, sialylated glycan. Compared to Sn-expressing bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type mice, BMDM from mice either deficient in Sn or expressing a non-glycan–binding form of Sn showed greatly reduced phagocytosis of sialylated C. jejuni. This was accompanied by a strong reduction in MyD88-dependent secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-10. In vivo studies demonstrated that functional Sn was required for rapid TNF-α and IFN-β responses to i.v.-injected sialylated C. jejuni. Bacteria were captured within minutes after i.v. injection and were associated with Mϕs in both liver and spleen. In the spleen, IFN-β–reactive cells were localized to Sn+ Mϕs and other cells in the red pulp and marginal zone. Together, these studies demonstrate that Sn plays a key role in capturing sialylated pathogens and promoting rapid proinflammatory cytokine and type I IFN responses. PMID:22851711

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  16. Role of Cathepsins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Survival in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pires, David; Marques, Joana; Pombo, João Palma; Carmo, Nuno; Bettencourt, Paulo; Neyrolles, Olivier; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Anes, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Cathepsins are proteolytic enzymes that function in the endocytic pathway, especially in lysosomes, where they contribute directly to pathogen killing or indirectly, by their involvement in the antigen presentation pathways. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that survives inside the macrophage phagosomes by inhibiting their maturation to phagolysosomes and thus avoiding a low pH and protease-rich environment. We previously showed that mycobacterial inhibition of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB results in impaired delivery of lysosomal enzymes to phagosomes and reduced pathogen killing. Here, we elucidate how MTB also controls cathepsins and their inhibitors, cystatins, at the level of gene expression and proteolytic activity. MTB induced a general down-regulation of cathepsin expression in infected cells, and inhibited IFNγ-mediated increase of cathepsin mRNA. We further show that a decrease in cathepsins B, S and L favours bacterial survival within human primary macrophages. A siRNA knockdown screen of a large set of cathepsins revealed that almost half of these enzymes have a role in pathogen killing, while only cathepsin F coincided with MTB resilience. Overall, we show that cathepsins are important for the control of MTB infection, and as a response, it manipulates their expression and activity to favour its intracellular survival. PMID:27572605

  17. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  18. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of human pancreatic islet cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter D; Estella, Eugene; Dudek, Nadine L; Jhala, Gaurang; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H; Mannering, Stuart I

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are believed to play an essential role in beta-cell destruction leading to development of type 1 diabetes and allogeneic islet graft failure. We aimed to identify the mechanisms used by CTL to kill human beta cells. CTL clones that recognize epitopes from influenza virus and Epstein-Barr virus restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A0201 and -B0801, respectively, were used to investigate the susceptibility of human beta cells to CTL. In a short-term (5-hour) assay, CTL killed human islet cells of the appropriate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I type that had been pulsed with viral peptides. Killing was increased by pretreating islets with interferon gamma that increases MHC class I on target cells. Killing was abolished by incubation of CTL with the perforin inhibitor concanamycin A. The Fas pathway did not contribute to killing because blocking with neutralizing anti-Fas ligand antibody did not significantly reduce beta-cell killing. In conclusion, we report a novel way of investigating the interaction between CTL and human islets. Human islets were rapidly killed in vitro by MHC class I-restricted CTL predominantly by the granule exocytosis pathway.

  19. Early stages of in vitro killing curve of LY146032 and vancomycin for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Flandrois, J P; Fardel, G; Carret, G

    1988-01-01

    The early stages of the time-killing curves of vancomycin and LY146032 have been studied, by use of short sampling intervals, for three strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Both vancomycin and LY146032 killed S. aureus, but the time-killing curves differed: the effect of vancomycin was slow, limited, and not related to the concentration of the drug, whereas that of LY146032 was rapid, extensive, and related to concentration. When strains ATCC 25923 and CIP 6525 were exposed to LY146032, the population decreased exponentially with time. The killing rate was constant and linked to the concentration by a Michaelis-Menten relationship. The maximum killing rate and the affinity constant of LY146032, estimated from the data transformed by the Lineweaver-Burk method, differed for the two strains. The concentration of the antibiotic at which killing theoretically begins (estimated by linear regression using the logarithm of the concentration) is of the same magnitude as the MIC of LY146032, which indicates the pure bactericidal mode of action of the drug. S. aureus ATCC 12600 was more resistant to the bactericidal effect of the two drugs, and its killing curve did not conform to the model described here. PMID:2837137

  20. Light controllable surface coating for effective photothermal killing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Han; Kang, Eun Bi; Jeong, Chan Jin; Sharker, Shazid Md; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2015-07-22

    Although the electronic properties of conducting films have been widely explored in optoelectronic fields, the optical absorption abilities of surface-coated films for photothermal conversion have been relatively less explored in the production of antibacterial coatings. Here, we present catechol-conjugated poly(vinylpyrrolidone) sulfobetaine (PVPS) and polyaniline (PANI) tightly linked by ionic interaction (PVPS:PANI) as a novel photothermal antibacterial agent for surface coating, which can absorb broadband near-infrared (NIR) light. Taking advantage of the NIR light absorption, this coating film can release eminent photothermal heat for the rapid killing of surface bacteria. The NIR light triggers a sharp rise in photothermal heat, providing the rapid and effective killing of 99.9% of the Gram-positive and -negative bacteria tested within 3 min of NIR light exposure when used at the concentration of 1 mg/mL. Although considerable progress has been made in the design of antibacterial coatings, the user control of NIR-irradiated rapid photothermal destruction of surface bacteria holds increasing attention beyond the traditional boundaries of typical antibacterial surfaces.

  1. Candida albicans Induces Selective Development of Macrophages and Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells by a TLR2 Dependent Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Alberto; Megías, Javier; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M. Luisa

    2011-01-01

    As TLRs are expressed by haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), these receptors may play a role in haematopoiesis in response to pathogens during infection. We have previously demonstrated that in in vitro defined conditions inactivated yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans induce HSPCs proliferation and differentiation towards the myeloid lineage by a TLR2/MyD88 dependent pathway. In this work, we showed that C. albicans invasive infection with a low virulence strain results in a rapid expansion of HSPCs (identified as LKS cells: Lin− c-Kit+ Sca-1+ IL-7Rα−), that reach the maximum at day 3 post-infection. This in vivo expansion of LKS cells in TLR2−/− mice was delayed until day 7 post- infection. Candidiasis was, as expected, accompanied by an increase in granulopoiesis and decreased lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow. These changes were more pronounced in TLR2−/− mice correlating with their higher fungal burden. Accordingly, emigration of Ly6Chigh monocytes and neutrophils to spleen was increased in TLR2−/− mice, although the increase in macrophages and inflammatory macrophages was completely dependent on TLR2. Similarly, we detected for the first time, in the spleen of C. albicans infected control mice, a newly generated population of dendritic cells that have the phenotype of monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDCs) that were not generated in TLR2−/− infected mice. In addition, C. albicans signalling through TLR2/MyD88 and Dectin-1 promotes in vitro the differentiation of Lin− cells towards moDCs that secrete TNF-α and are able to kill the microorganism. Therefore, our results indicate that during infection C. albicans can directly stimulate progenitor cells through TLR2 and Dectin-1 to generate newly formed inflammatory macrophages and moDCs that may fulfill an essential role in defense mechanisms against the pathogen. PMID:21935459

  2. Household Air Pollution Causes Dose-Dependent Inflammation and Altered Phagocytosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Duncan G.; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N.; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K. A.; Wootton, Daniel G.; Glennie, Sarah J.; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke–exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions. PMID:25254931

  3. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis.

  5. The role of TREM-2 in internalization and intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pan; Lu, Qiang; Cui, Guimei; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Changjiang; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-02-15

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) is a cell surface receptor primarily expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. TREM-2 functions as a phagocytic receptor for bacteria as well as an inhibitor of Toll like receptors (TLR) induced inflammatory cytokines. However, the role of TREM-2 in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. To investigate whether TREM-2 is involved in Brucella intracellular survival, we chose bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs), in which TREM-2 is stably expressed, as cell model. Colony formation Units (CFUs) assay suggests that TREM-2 is involved in the internalization of Brucella abortus (B. abortus) by macrophages, while silencing of TREM-2 decreases intracellular survival of B. abortus. To further study the underlying mechanisms of TREM-2-mediated bacterial intracellular survival, we examined the activation of B. abortus-infected macrophages through determining the kinetics of activation of the three MAPKs, including ERK, JNK and p38, and measuring TNFα production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Brucella (BrLPS) or B. abortus stimulation. Our data show that TREM-2 deficiency promotes activation of Brucella-infected macrophages. Moreover, our data also demonstrate that macrophage activation promotes killing of Brucella by enhancing nitric oxygen (NO), but not reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, macrophage apoptosis or cellular death. Taken together, these findings provide a novel interpretation of Brucella intracellular growth through inhibition of NO production produced by TREM-2-mediated activated macrophages.

  6. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H. Steven

    2017-01-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhea a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal, and nasalpharyngal mucosa during infection. While it is well-established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria were able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis, N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting PMNs to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis. PMID:26426083

  8. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F; Cliff, Jacqueline M; Clark, Taane G; Hibberd, Martin L

    2017-02-08

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions.

  9. From coprophagy to predation: a dung beetle that kills millipedes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Trond H; Lopera, Alejandro; Forsyth, Adrian; Génier, François

    2009-04-23

    The dung beetle subfamily Scarabaeinae is a cosmopolitan group of insects that feed primarily on dung. We describe the first case of an obligate predatory dung beetle and contrast its behaviour and morphology with those of its coprophagous sympatric congeners. Deltochilum valgum Burmeister killed and consumed millipedes in lowland rainforest in Peru. Ancestral ball-rolling behaviour shared by other canthonine species is abandoned, and the head, hind tibiae and pygidium of D. valgum are modified for novel functions during millipede predation. Millipedes were killed by disarticulation, often through decapitation, using the clypeus as a lever. Beetles killed millipedes much larger than themselves. In pitfall traps, D. valgum was attracted exclusively to millipedes, and preferred injured over uninjured millipedes. Morphological similarities placing D. valgum in the same subgenus with non-predatory dung-feeding species suggest a major and potentially rapid behavioural shift from coprophagy to predation. Ecological transitions enabling the exploitation of dramatically atypical niches, which may be more likely to occur when competition is intense, may help explain the evolution of novel ecological guilds and the diversification of exceptionally species-rich groups such as insects.

  10. From coprophagy to predation: a dung beetle that kills millipedes

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Trond H.; Lopera, Alejandro; Forsyth, Adrian; Génier, François

    2009-01-01

    The dung beetle subfamily Scarabaeinae is a cosmopolitan group of insects that feed primarily on dung. We describe the first case of an obligate predatory dung beetle and contrast its behaviour and morphology with those of its coprophagous sympatric congeners. Deltochilum valgum Burmeister killed and consumed millipedes in lowland rainforest in Peru. Ancestral ball-rolling behaviour shared by other canthonine species is abandoned, and the head, hind tibiae and pygidium of D. valgum are modified for novel functions during millipede predation. Millipedes were killed by disarticulation, often through decapitation, using the clypeus as a lever. Beetles killed millipedes much larger than themselves. In pitfall traps, D. valgum was attracted exclusively to millipedes, and preferred injured over uninjured millipedes. Morphological similarities placing D. valgum in the same subgenus with non-predatory dung-feeding species suggest a major and potentially rapid behavioural shift from coprophagy to predation. Ecological transitions enabling the exploitation of dramatically atypical niches, which may be more likely to occur when competition is intense, may help explain the evolution of novel ecological guilds and the diversification of exceptionally species-rich groups such as insects. PMID:19158030

  11. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Binnebose, Andrea M.; Haughney, Shannon L.; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H.

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  12. Rapid discrimination of silica and heavy metal oxide-coated dust by induction of changes in [Ca2+]i, pHi, and plasma membrane potential in alveolar macrophages using flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schluter, Thomas; Dorger, Martina; Berg, Ingeborg; Gercken, Gunther; Tarnok, Attila

    1999-06-01

    Inhalable particulate dusts are involved in the genesis of several lung diseases. Besides the well-known toxic dusts, i.e. asbestos and quartz, heavy metal-containing pollutants are considered as possible harmful substances. In the present study we compared the effect of silica chemically coated with certain metal oxides on several cell physiological parameters of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM). The cytosolic free calcium concentration [(Ca2+)i], the intracellular pH (pHi), and the plasma membrane potential (MP) of BAM were measured by flow cytometry whereas the dust- induced secretion of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured enzymatically. Compared to control incubations with pure silica the dust-induced secretion of ROS by BAM was not affected when the particles were coated with Cr2O3, NiO, and Fe3O4, whereas VO2-coated dust induced a marked increase in ROS release. This effect was not correlated to changes in (Ca2+)i, pHi, or MP. On the other hand Cr2O3-coated silica caused alterations in all of the three latter parameters. The same pattern of changes has been reported previously for quartz dusts (Tarnok et al., Anal. Cell Pathol., 15:61-72, 1997). We conclude that cell physiological measurements by flow cytometry could extend the pallet of tools to evaluate possible toxic effects of environmental dust samples.

  13. Macrophage recognition of ICAM-3 on apoptotic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, O D; Devitt, A; Bell, E D; Simmons, D L; Gregory, C D

    1999-06-01

    Cells undergoing apoptosis are cleared rapidly by phagocytes, thus preventing tissue damage caused by loss of plasma membrane integrity. In this study, we show that the surface of leukocytes is altered during apoptosis such that the first Ig-like domain of ICAM-3 (CD50) can participate in the recognition and phagocytosis of the apoptotic cells by macrophages. Macrophage recognition of apoptotic cell-associated ICAM-3 was demonstrated both on leukocytes and, following transfection of exogenous ICAM-3, on nonleukocytes. The change in ICAM-3 was a consistent consequence of apoptosis triggered by various stimuli, suggesting that it occurs as part of a final common pathway of apoptosis. Alteration of ICAM-3 on apoptotic cells permitting recognition by macrophages resulted in a switch in ICAM-3-binding preference from the prototypic ICAM-3 counterreceptor, LFA-1, to an alternative macrophage receptor. Using mAbs to block macrophage/apoptotic cell interactions, we were unable to obtain evidence that either the alternative ICAM-3 counterreceptor alpha d beta 2 or the apoptotic cell receptor alpha v beta 3 was involved in the recognition of ICAM-3. By contrast, mAb blockade of macrophage CD14 inhibited ICAM-3-dependent recognition of apoptotic cells. These results show that ICAM-3 can function as a phagocytic marker of apoptotic leukocytes on which it acquires altered macrophage receptor-binding activity.

  14. 5-Aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin-IX accumulation and associated phototoxicity in macrophages and oral cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sulbha; Jajoo, Anjana; Dube, Alok

    2007-09-25

    Studies were carried out on 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin (PpIX) synthesis in mice peritoneal macrophages and two human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines NT8e and 4451. Cells were treated with 200 microg/ml ALA for 15 h and PpIX accumulation was monitored by spectrofluorometry and phototoxicity to red light (630+/-20 nm) was measured by MTT assay. PpIX accumulation was higher in macrophages as compared to OSCC cells under both normal serum concentration (10%) and conditions of serum depletion. The results on phototoxicity measurements correlated well with the levels of PpIX accumulation in both macrophages and cancer cells. While red light caused 20% phototoxicity in macrophages, no phototoxicity was seen in 4451 cells at 10% serum. Decrease in serum concentration to 5% and 1% led to higher phototoxicity corresponding to 40% and 70% in macrophages and 10% and 15% in 4451 cells. Similar results were obtained in NT8e cell line. Propidium iodide staining followed by fluorescence microscopic observations on photodynamically treated co-culture of murine or human macrophages and cancer cells showed selective damage to macrophages. These results suggest that in OSCC, macrophages would contribute more to tumor PpIX level than tumor cells themselves and PDT may lead to selective killing of macrophages at the site of treatment. Since macrophages are responsible for production and secretion of various tumor growth mediators, the effect of selective macrophage killing on the outcome of PDT would be significant.

  15. Oxidative stress, polarization of macrophages and tumour angiogenesis: Efficacy of caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Oršolić, Nada; Kunštić, Martina; Kukolj, Marina; Gračan, Romana; Nemrava, Johann

    2016-08-25

    Macrophage polarization is a process when macrophage expresses different functional programs in response to microenvironmental signals and two extreme forms exist; M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 macrophages are highly microbicidal and anticancer with enhanced ability to kill and phagocytose pathogens, upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive molecular species, and present antigens; M2 macrophages and the related tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) regulate tissue remodelling and promote tissue repair and angiogenesis and can amplification of metabolic pathways that can suppress adaptive immune responses. It is demonstrated that ROS production, critical for the activation and functions of M1 macrophages, is necessary for the differentiation of M2 macrophages and TAMs, and that antioxidant therapy blocks TAMs differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer. In order to study how caffeic acid (CA), a natural antioxidant, affects macrophage function, polarization, angiogenesis and tumour growth we injected mice with Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells and treated them for 10 days with CA in a dose of 40 and/or 80 mg kg(-1.) Macrophage polarization was further characterized by quantifying secreted pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and arginase 1 activity. CA may increase the cytotoxic actions of M1 macrophages and inhibit tumour growth; inhibitory activity on TAMs may be mediated through its antioxidative activity. Taken together, we conclude that the antitumour activity of CA was the result of the synergistic activities of different mechanisms by which CA acts on proliferation, angiogenesis, immunomodulation and survival. The continuous administration of CA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models. Targeting TAMs by antioxidants can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment.

  16. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sharon M.; Duncan, Sheelagh; Hewitson, James P.; Barr, Tom A.; Jackson-Jones, Lucy H.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2) similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell. PMID:28334040

  17. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  18. Acts and omissions, killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Gillon, R

    1986-01-11

    Gillon asks what, if any, moral importance resides in the distinction between killing and letting die in the context of medical care. He considers and rejects the acts and omissions doctrine, which claims that actions (killing) resulting in some undesirable end are in general morally worse than failures to act (allowing to die) that have the same result. He also refutes the argument that the moral distinction between killing and letting die is one of harming versus benefitting, and that a physician has a responsibility not to harm (kill) a patient but no duty to help (keep alive). Gillon concludes by discussing the moral claims upon which the Roman Catholic rejection of the acts and omissions doctrine is based, which are the subjects of his next British Medical Journal article on medical ethics.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  20. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  1. Macrophage polarization in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaojiang; Chen, Shi-You

    Macrophage accumulation associates closely with the degree of renal structural injury and renal dysfunction in human kidney diseases. Depletion of macrophages reduces while adoptive transfer of macrophages worsens inflammation in animal models of the renal injury. However, emerging evidence support that macrophage polarization plays a critical role in the progression of a number of kidney diseases including obstructive nephropathy, ischemia-reperfusion injury, glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, and other kidney diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the macrophage infiltration and polarization in these inflammatory and fibrotic kidney diseases, discussing the results mostly from studies in animal models. In view of the critical role of macrophage in the progression of these diseases, manipulating macrophage phenotype may be a potential effective strategy to treat various kidney diseases.

  2. Pulmonary Responses to Stachybotrys chartarum and Its Toxins: Mouse Strain Affects Clearance and Macrophage Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Jamie H. Rosenblum; Molina, Ramon M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Amuzie, Chidozie J.; Pestka, James J.; Coull, Brent A.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated differences in the pulmonary and systemic clearance of Stachybotrys chartarum spores in two strains of mice, BALB/c and C57BL/6J. To evaluate clearance, mice were intratracheally instilled with a suspension of radiolabeled S. chartarum spores or with unlabeled spores. The lungs of C57BL/6J mice showed more rapid spore clearance than the lungs of BALB/c mice, which correlated with increased levels of spore-associated radioactivity in the GI tracts of C57BL/6J as compared with BALB/c mice. To identify mechanisms responsible for mouse strain differences in spore clearance and previously described lung inflammatory responses, we exposed alveolar macrophages (AMs) lavaged from BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice to S. chartarum spores, S. chartarum spore toxin (SST), and satratoxin G (SG) in vitro. The S. chartarum spores were found to be highly toxic with most cells from either mouse strain being killed within 24 h when exposed to a spore:cell ratio of 1:75. The spores were more lethal to AMs from C57BL/6J than those from BALB/c mice. In mice, the SST elicited many of the same inflammatory responses as the spores in vivo, including AM recruitment, pulmonary hemorrhage, and cytokine production. Our data suggest that differences in pulmonary spore clearance may contribute to the differences in pulmonary responses to S. chartarum between BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice. Enhanced AM survival and subsequent macrophage-mediated inflammation may also contribute to the higher susceptibility of BALB/c mice to S. chartarum pulmonary effects. Analogous genetic differences among humans may contribute to reported variable sensitivity to S. chartarum. PMID:20385656

  3. Pulmonary responses to Stachybotrys chartarum and its toxins: mouse strain affects clearance and macrophage cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Jamie H Rosenblum; Molina, Ramon M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Amuzie, Chidozie J; Pestka, James J; Coull, Brent A; Brain, Joseph D

    2010-07-01

    We investigated differences in the pulmonary and systemic clearance of Stachybotrys chartarum spores in two strains of mice, BALB/c and C57BL/6J. To evaluate clearance, mice were intratracheally instilled with a suspension of radiolabeled S. chartarum spores or with unlabeled spores. The lungs of C57BL/6J mice showed more rapid spore clearance than the lungs of BALB/c mice, which correlated with increased levels of spore-associated radioactivity in the GI tracts of C57BL/6J as compared with BALB/c mice. To identify mechanisms responsible for mouse strain differences in spore clearance and previously described lung inflammatory responses, we exposed alveolar macrophages (AMs) lavaged from BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice to S. chartarum spores, S. chartarum spore toxin (SST), and satratoxin G (SG) in vitro. The S. chartarum spores were found to be highly toxic with most cells from either mouse strain being killed within 24 h when exposed to a spore:cell ratio of 1:75. The spores were more lethal to AMs from C57BL/6J than those from BALB/c mice. In mice, the SST elicited many of the same inflammatory responses as the spores in vivo, including AM recruitment, pulmonary hemorrhage, and cytokine production. Our data suggest that differences in pulmonary spore clearance may contribute to the differences in pulmonary responses to S. chartarum between BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice. Enhanced AM survival and subsequent macrophage-mediated inflammation may also contribute to the higher susceptibility of BALB/c mice to S. chartarum pulmonary effects. Analogous genetic differences among humans may contribute to reported variable sensitivity to S. chartarum.

  4. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  5. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  6. Is killing no worse than letting die?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, W

    1995-01-01

    Those who wish to refute the view that it is worse to kill than to let die sometimes produce examples of cases in which an agent lets someone die but would be generally agreed to be no less reprehensible than if he had killed. It is argued that the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were designed to undermine.

  7. Killing and letting die: hidden value assumptions.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G

    1983-01-01

    In this paper I argue for several related theses: first, that the distinction between killing and letting die, as it is drawn by ordinary persons in ordinary contexts, is more complex than is generally understood; second, that the key feature of this complexity lies in the presence of a hidden normative component in what appears to be a straightforwardly descriptive distinction; and, third, that this complexity renders the killing/letting die distinction an inadequate and hazardous guide for moral reasoning.

  8. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E.; Scordo, Julia M.; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Moliva, Juan I.; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage. PMID:25748325

  9. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E; Scordo, Julia M; Sasindran, Smitha J; Moliva, Juan I; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2015-09-15

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage.

  10. Lie algebra of conformal Killing-Yano forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Ümit

    2016-06-01

    We provide a generalization of the Lie algebra of conformal Killing vector fields to conformal Killing-Yano forms. A new Lie bracket for conformal Killing-Yano forms that corresponds to slightly modified Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket of differential forms is proposed. We show that conformal Killing-Yano forms satisfy a graded Lie algebra in constant curvature manifolds. It is also proven that normal conformal Killing-Yano forms in Einstein manifolds also satisfy a graded Lie algebra. The constructed graded Lie algebras reduce to the graded Lie algebra of Killing-Yano forms and the Lie algebras of conformal Killing and Killing vector fields in special cases.

  11. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  12. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  13. [Study of the in vivo penetration of cotrimoxazole in alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Lopez, I; Dubar, V; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-04-01

    Kinetic of cotrimoxazole was studied in serum, alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid from guinea pigs receiving sulfamethoxazole (SMX, 100 mg/kg) and trimethoprim (TMP, 20 mg/kg). Guinea pigs were killed by cervical dislocation 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after intraperitoneal injection. Lung lavage was performed to obtain alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid. TMP and SMX levels were assayed using high-performance-liquid chromatography. Highest SMX levels were obtained in serum at 30 min, in BAL fluid at 1 h and in alveolar macrophages at 3 h. Mean SMX/TMP ratios (30 min, 1 h, 3 h) was 26.5 +/- 0.8 in serum, 3.76 +/- 1.8 in BAL fluid and 1.15 +/- 0.02 in alveolar macrophages.

  14. Mertk on tumor macrophages is a therapeutic target to prevent tumor recurrence following radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Marka R.; Baird, Jason; Friedman, David; Savage, Talicia; Uhde, Lauren; Alice, Alejandro; Cottam, Benjamin; Young, Kristina; Newell, Pippa; Nguyen, Cynthia; Bambina, Shelly; Kramer, Gwen; Akporiaye, Emmanuel; Malecka, Anna; Jackson, Andrew; Gough, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy provides a means to kill large numbers of cancer cells in a controlled location resulting in the release of tumor-specific antigens and endogenous adjuvants. However, by activating pathways involved in apoptotic cell recognition and phagocytosis, irradiated cancer cells engender suppressive phenotypes in macrophages. We demonstrate that the macrophage-specific phagocytic receptor, Mertk is upregulated in macrophages in the tumor following radiation therapy. Ligation of Mertk on macrophages results in anti-inflammatory cytokine responses via NF-kB p50 upregulation, which in turn limits tumor control following radiation therapy. We demonstrate that in immunogenic tumors, loss of Mertk is sufficient to permit tumor cure following radiation therapy. However, in poorly immunogenic tumors, TGFb inhibition is also required to result in tumor cure following radiation therapy. These data demonstrate that Mertk is a highly specific target whose absence permits tumor control in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:27602953

  15. The contributions of lung macrophage and monocyte heterogeneity to influenza pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Mubing; Hibbs, Margaret L; Chen, Weisan

    2017-03-01

    The lung myeloid cell microenvironment comprises airway, alveolar and interstitial macrophages, peripheral blood recruited lung monocytes as well as residential and migratory dendritic cell subsets. Findings from fate mapping, parabiosis, transcriptome and epigenome profiling studies now indicate that tissue macrophage and monocyte subsets possess specialized functions which differentially impact homoeostatic tolerance, pathogen detection and pathogen killing. In the lungs, residential alveolar macrophages are catabolic and immunosuppressive in contrast to the classically pro-inflammatory repertoire of lung monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells recruited during acute inflammation. Here, we review the identity and functions of all lung macrophage and monocyte subsets during homoeostasis and acute lung inflammation, with a special focus on their contributions to influenza virus detection, clearance and the development of influenza-induced lung pathologies. Subsequent implications for the development of new therapeutic targets against influenza-induced lung pathologies will also be discussed.

  16. Antimicrobial Mechanisms of Macrophages and the Immune Evasion Strategies of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Flannagan, Ronald S.; Heit, Bryan; Heinrichs, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitually professional phagocytes, including macrophages, eradicate microbial invaders from the human body without overt signs of infection. Despite this, there exist select bacteria that are professional pathogens, causing significant morbidity and mortality across the globe and Staphylococcus aureus is no exception. S. aureus is a highly successful pathogen that can infect virtually every tissue that comprises the human body causing a broad spectrum of diseases. The profound pathogenic capacity of S. aureus can be attributed, in part, to its ability to elaborate a profusion of bacterial effectors that circumvent host immunity. Macrophages are important professional phagocytes that contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune response, however from in vitro and in vivo studies, it is evident that they fail to eradicate S. aureus. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms employed by macrophages to combat bacteria and describes the immune evasion strategies and some representative effectors that enable S. aureus to evade macrophage-mediated killing. PMID:26633519

  17. Fosfomycin enhances phagocyte-mediated killing of Staphylococcus aureus by extracellular traps and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fengge; Tang, Xudong; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of bacterial infections is the achievement of a synergy between the host’s immune defences and antibiotics. Here, we examined whether fosfomycin (FOM) could improve the bactericidal effect of phagocytes, and investigated the potential mechanisms. FOM enhanced the phagocytosis and extra- or intracellular killing of S. aureus by phagocytes. And FOM enhanced the extracellular killing of S. aureus in macrophage (MФ) and in neutrophils mediated by extracellular traps (ETs). ET production was related to NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, FOM increased the intracellular killing of S. aureus in phagocytes, which was mediated by ROS through the oxidative burst process. Our results also showed that FOM alone induced S. aureus producing hydroxyl radicals in order to kill the bacterial cells in vitro. In a mouse peritonitis model, FOM treatment increased the bactericidal extra- and intracellular activity in vivo, and FOM strengthened ROS and ET production from peritoneal lavage fluid ex vivo. An IVIS imaging system assay further verified the observed in vivo bactericidal effect of the FOM treatment. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the host’s immune defences and antibiotic interactions in microbial infections. PMID:26778774

  18. Effects of Macrophage Depletion on Sleep in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ames, Conner; Boland, Erin; Szentirmai, Éva

    2016-01-01

    The reciprocal interaction between the immune system and sleep regulation has been widely acknowledged but the cellular mechanisms that underpin this interaction are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in sleep loss- and cold exposure-induced sleep and body temperature responses. Macrophage apoptosis was induced in mice by systemic injection of clodronate-containing liposomes (CCL). We report that CCL treatment induced an immediate and transient increase in non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and fever accompanied by decrease in rapid-eye movement sleep, motor activity and NREMS delta power. Chronically macrophage-depleted mice had attenuated NREMS rebound after sleep deprivation compared to normal mice. Cold-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREMS, rapid-eye movement sleep and body temperature were significantly enhanced in macrophage-depleted mice indicating increased cold sensitivity. These findings provide further evidence for the reciprocal interaction among the immune system, sleep and metabolism, and identify macrophages as one of the key cellular elements in this interplay.

  19. Effects of Macrophage Depletion on Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Conner; Boland, Erin; Szentirmai, Éva

    2016-01-01

    The reciprocal interaction between the immune system and sleep regulation has been widely acknowledged but the cellular mechanisms that underpin this interaction are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in sleep loss- and cold exposure-induced sleep and body temperature responses. Macrophage apoptosis was induced in mice by systemic injection of clodronate-containing liposomes (CCL). We report that CCL treatment induced an immediate and transient increase in non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and fever accompanied by decrease in rapid-eye movement sleep, motor activity and NREMS delta power. Chronically macrophage-depleted mice had attenuated NREMS rebound after sleep deprivation compared to normal mice. Cold-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREMS, rapid-eye movement sleep and body temperature were significantly enhanced in macrophage-depleted mice indicating increased cold sensitivity. These findings provide further evidence for the reciprocal interaction among the immune system, sleep and metabolism, and identify macrophages as one of the key cellular elements in this interplay. PMID:27442442

  20. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  1. A Macrophage Subversion Factor Is Shared by Intracellular and Extracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Laubier, Aurélie; Bleves, Sophie; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed strategies to adapt to host environment and resist host immune response. Several intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, share the horizontally-acquired MgtC virulence factor that is important for multiplication inside macrophages. MgtC is also found in pathogenic Pseudomonas species. Here we investigate for the first time the role of MgtC in the virulence of an extracellular pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A P. aeruginosa mgtC mutant is attenuated in the systemic infection model of zebrafish embryos, and strikingly, the attenuated phenotype is dependent on the presence of macrophages. In ex vivo experiments, the P. aeruginosa mgtC mutant is more sensitive to macrophage killing than the wild-type strain. However, wild-type and mutant strains behave similarly toward macrophage killing when macrophages are treated with an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton ATPase. Importantly, P. aeruginosa mgtC gene expression is strongly induced within macrophages and phagosome acidification contributes to an optimal expression of the gene. Thus, our results support the implication of a macrophage intracellular stage during P. aeruginosa acute infection and suggest that Pseudomonas MgtC requires phagosome acidification to play its intracellular role. Moreover, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa MgtC is required for optimal growth in Mg2+ deprived medium, a property shared by MgtC factors from intracellular pathogens and, under Mg2+ limitation, P. aeruginosa MgtC prevents biofilm formation. We propose that MgtC shares a similar function in intracellular and extracellular pathogens, which contributes to macrophage resistance and fine-tune adaptation to host immune response in relation to the different bacterial lifestyles. In addition, the phenotypes observed with the mgtC mutant in infection models can be mimicked in wild-type P. aeruginosa strain by producing a MgtC antagonistic peptide, thus

  2. A Macrophage Subversion Factor Is Shared by Intracellular and Extracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Belon, Claudine; Soscia, Chantal; Bernut, Audrey; Laubier, Aurélie; Bleves, Sophie; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed strategies to adapt to host environment and resist host immune response. Several intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, share the horizontally-acquired MgtC virulence factor that is important for multiplication inside macrophages. MgtC is also found in pathogenic Pseudomonas species. Here we investigate for the first time the role of MgtC in the virulence of an extracellular pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A P. aeruginosa mgtC mutant is attenuated in the systemic infection model of zebrafish embryos, and strikingly, the attenuated phenotype is dependent on the presence of macrophages. In ex vivo experiments, the P. aeruginosa mgtC mutant is more sensitive to macrophage killing than the wild-type strain. However, wild-type and mutant strains behave similarly toward macrophage killing when macrophages are treated with an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton ATPase. Importantly, P. aeruginosa mgtC gene expression is strongly induced within macrophages and phagosome acidification contributes to an optimal expression of the gene. Thus, our results support the implication of a macrophage intracellular stage during P. aeruginosa acute infection and suggest that Pseudomonas MgtC requires phagosome acidification to play its intracellular role. Moreover, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa MgtC is required for optimal growth in Mg2+ deprived medium, a property shared by MgtC factors from intracellular pathogens and, under Mg2+ limitation, P. aeruginosa MgtC prevents biofilm formation. We propose that MgtC shares a similar function in intracellular and extracellular pathogens, which contributes to macrophage resistance and fine-tune adaptation to host immune response in relation to the different bacterial lifestyles. In addition, the phenotypes observed with the mgtC mutant in infection models can be mimicked in wild-type P. aeruginosa strain by producing a MgtC antagonistic peptide, thus

  3. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  4. Replication of Yersinia pestis in interferon gamma-activated macrophages requires ripA, a gene encoded in the pigmentation locus.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Céline; Grabenstein, Jens P; Perry, Robert D; Bliska, James B

    2005-09-06

    Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that can replicate in macrophages. Little is known about the mechanism by which Y. pestis replicates in macrophages, and macrophage defense mechanisms important for limiting intracellular survival of Y. pestis have not been characterized. In this work, we investigated the ability of Y. pestis to replicate in primary murine macrophages that were activated with IFN-gamma. Y. pestis was able to replicate in macrophages that were activated with IFN-gamma after infection (postactivated). A region of chromosomal DNA known as the pigmentation (pgm) locus was required for replication in postactivated macrophages, and this replication was associated with reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels but not with reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression. Y. pestis delta pgm replicated in iNOS-/- macrophages that were postactivated with IFN-gamma, suggesting that killing of delta pgm Y. pestis is NO-dependent. A specific genetic locus within pgm, which shares similarity to a pathogenicity island in Salmonella, was shown to be required for replication of Y. pestis and restriction of NO levels in postactivated macrophages. These data demonstrate that intracellular Y. pestis can evade killing by macrophages that are exposed to IFN-gamma and identify a potential virulence gene encoded in the pgm locus that is required for this activity.

  5. Effects of Corynebacterium parvum treatment and Toxoplasma gondii infection on macrophage-mediated cytostasis of tumour target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, J L; Lambert, L H; Remington, J S

    1976-01-01

    Injection of mice with Corynebacterium parvum or living or killed Toxoplasma gondii was studied to determine the efficacy of these treatments in activating peritoneal macrophages to inhibit the uptake of [3H]TdR (cytostasis) by tumour target cells in vitro. In the presence of activated macrophages from mice treated i.p. with a wide dose range of either C. parvum or living Toxoplasma, cytostasis was usually greater than 99%. This population of activated macrophages was transient in C. parvum-treated mice, but persists, probably for life, in Toxoplasma-infected mice. Whereas the i.p. route of administration of C. parvum was more efficient in activating macrophages than the i.v. route, the s.c. route appeared to be relatively ineffective. Treatment with killed Toxoplasma by any route was also relatively ineffective in activating macrophages. In contrast Toxoplasma infection resulted in highly activated peritoneal macrophages, regardless of the route of administration. Depending upon the route of initial treatment, the route of readministration of C. parvum had either no appreciable effect or resulted in a marked alteration in the cytostatic capacity of peritoneal macrophages. PMID:992714

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage: maintaining a balance.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Jean

    2008-06-12

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a highly efficient pathogen, killing millions of infected people annually. The capacity of M. tuberculosis to survive and cause disease is strongly correlated to their ability to escape immune defense mechanisms. In particular, M. tuberculosis has the remarkable capacity to survive within the hostile environment of the macrophage. Understanding M. tuberculosis virulence strategies will not only define novel targets for drug development but will also help to uncover previously unknown signaling pathways related to the host's response to M. tuberculosis infection.

  7. Macrophage polarization following chitosan implantation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Fonseca, Ana C; Costa, Madalena; Amaral, Isabel F; Barbosa, Mário A; Águas, Artur P; Barbosa, Judite N

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages are a key cell in the host response to implants and can be polarized into different phenotypes capable of inducing both detrimental and beneficial outcomes in tissue repair and remodeling, being important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macrophage response to 3D porous chitosan (Ch) scaffolds with different degrees of acetylation (DA, 5% and 15%). The M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages was investigated in vivo using a rodent air-pouch model. Our results show that the DA affects the macrophage response. Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced the adhesion of lower numbers of inflammatory cells, being the M2 the predominant phenotypic profile among the adherent macrophages. In the inflammatory exudates F4/80(+)/CD206(+) cells (M2 macrophages) appeared in higher numbers then F4/80(+)/CCR7(+) cells (M1 macrophages), in addition, lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines were found. Ch scaffolds with DA 15% showed opposite results, since M1 were the predominant macrophages both adherent to the scaffold and in the exudates, together with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced a benign M2 anti-inflammatory macrophage response, whereas Ch scaffolds with DA 15% caused a macrophage M1 pro-inflammatory response.

  8. Epigenomics of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, David; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages play essential roles in tissue homeostasis, pathogen elimination, and tissue repair. A defining characteristic of these cells is their ability to efficiently adapt to a variety of abruptly changing and complex environments. This ability is intrinsically linked to a capacity to quickly alter their transcriptome, and this is tightly associated with the epigenomic organization of these cells and, in particular, their enhancer repertoire. Indeed, enhancers are genomic sites that serve as platforms for the integration of signaling pathways with the mechanisms that regulate mRNA transcription. Notably, transcription is pervasive at active enhancers and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are tightly coupled to regulated transcription of protein-coding genes. Furthermore, given that each cell type possesses a defining enhancer repertoire, studies on enhancers provide a powerful method to study how specialization of functions among the diverse macrophage subtypes may arise. Here, we review recent studies providing insights into the distinct mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of enhancers and their role in the regulation of transcription in macrophages.

  9. Effects of Newcastle disease virus infection on the binding, phagocytic, and bactericidal activities of respiratory macrophages of the turkey.

    PubMed

    Ficken, M D; Edwards, J F; Lay, J C

    1987-01-01

    Effects of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection on the binding, phagocytic, and bactericidal activities of turkey respiratory macrophages were studied. Respiratory macrophages of the turkey demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G and complement receptors but lacked IgM receptors. Respiratory macrophages from NDV-infected turkeys showed little or no depression of binding of sheep erythrocyte-IgG complexes and sheep erythrocyte-IgM-complement complexes to their appropriate membrane receptors. In contrast, respiratory macrophages from NDV-infected turkeys showed significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) depression of phagocytosis of similar complexes. Bacterial killing by respiratory macrophages from NDV-infected turkeys was significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) inhibited.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated macrophage activation: the role of calcium in the generation of tumoricidal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Drysdale, B.E.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    As the authors reported, calcium ionophore, A23187, activates macrophages (M theta) for tumor cell killing and the activated M theta produce a soluble cytotoxic factor (M theta-CF) that is similar if not identical to tumor necrosis factor. Based on these observations they have investigated whether calcium is involved in the activation mediated by another potent M theta activator, LPS. The authors have shown that A23187 caused uptake of extracellular /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ but LPS did not. They have examined the effect of depleting extracellular calcium by using medium containing no added calcium containing 1.0 mM EGTA. In no case did depletion result in decreased M theta-CF production by the M theta activated with LPS. Measurements using the fluorescent, intracellular calcium indicator, Quin 2 have also been performed. While ionomycin, caused a rapid change in the Quin-2 signal, LPS at a concentration even in excess of that required to activate the M theta caused no change in the signal. When high doses of Quin 2 or another intracellular chelator, 8-(diethylaminol-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, were used to treat M theta, M theta-CF production decreased and cytotoxic activity was impaired. These data indicate that one or more of the processes involved in M theta-CF production does require calcium, but that activation mediated by LPS occurs without the influx of extracellular calcium or redistribution of intracellular calcium.

  11. Functional Activity of Monocytes and Macrophages in HTLV-1 Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Camila F.; Souza, Anselmo S.; Diniz, Angela G.; Carvalho, Natália B.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2014-01-01

    The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC), 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS) not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the increasing

  12. Immunohistological studies on macrophages in lymph nodes of onchocerciasis patients after treatment with ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Knab, J; Darge, K; Büttner, D W

    1997-12-01

    The role of macrophages in the killing and elimination of microfilariae (mf) was studied immunohistologically in 14 lymph nodes from 10 patients with generalized onchocerciasis 20-68 h after treatment with a single oral dose of 150 microg/kg ivermectin. Mf with signs of damage at light microscopical level were surrounded by a cellular infiltrate comprising macrophages, eosinophils and neutrophils, whereas light microscopically intact mf mostly showed no cellular reaction. Resident mature macrophages expressing the CD 68 epitope usually neither migrated nor attached to damaged mf, especially on the first and second day after ivermectin treatment. However, many young invading macrophages labelled for the L1 protein (antibodies 27 E 10, MAC 387, S 36.48 and 8.5C2) were found within the cellular infiltrate around damaged mf and in adherence to the mf in all lymph nodes after ivermectin treatment. Free L1 protein was observed on the cuticle of the mf. The attacking macrophages contained increased amounts of the enzymes lysozyme, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin and alpha-1-antitrypsin compared to resident macrophages. Free enzymes were found on the cuticle of the mf and around them, indicating a role of these enzymes in the inflammatory reaction to the parasites. The attacking macrophages were strongly labelled for human HLA-DR and they showed further an increased expression of the complement receptors CR1 (CD 35) for C3b and CR3 (CD 11b) for C3 bi in comparison to resident macrophages and thus were considered as activated macrophages. Rarely fragments of mf were seen within multinuclear macrophages. We conclude that young activated macrophages play a major role in the elimination of mf transported to the regional lymph nodes after ivermectin treatment. The immunohistological findings are in accordance with the assumption that these activated macrophages together with granulocytes contribute to the killing of the damaged mf. They also help to limit the damage of the host tissue

  13. Studies on the influence of ozone on complement-mediated killing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Doroszkiewicz, W; Sikorska, I; Jankowski, S

    1994-10-01

    The role of ozone in the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter anitratus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to serum was investigated. It was found that ozone-treated cells were more susceptible to complement-mediated killing serum. These results suggest that ozone damage or change of cell membrane leads to a more rapid penetration of the membrane attack complex of complement.

  14. Candida albicans Chitin Increases Arginase-1 Activity in Human Macrophages, with an Impact on Macrophage Antimicrobial Functions

    PubMed Central

    MacCallum, Donna M.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause a variety of diseases, ranging from superficial mucosal infections to life-threatening systemic infections. Phagocytic cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophages, are important first-line responders to an infection and generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as part of their protective antimicrobial response. During an infection, host cells generate nitric oxide through the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to kill the invading pathogen. Inside the phagocyte, iNOS competes with the enzyme arginase-1 for a common substrate, the amino acid l-arginine. Several pathogenic species, including bacteria and parasitic protozoans, actively modulate the production of nitric oxide by inducing their own arginases or the host’s arginase activity to prevent the conversion of l-arginine to nitric oxide. We report here that C. albicans blocks nitric oxide production in human-monocyte-derived macrophages by induction of host arginase activity. We further determined that purified chitin (a fungal cell wall polysaccharide) and increased chitin exposure at the fungal cell wall surface induces this host arginase activity. Blocking the C. albicans-induced arginase activity with the arginase-specific substrate inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA) or the chitinase inhibitor bisdionin F restored nitric oxide production and increased the efficiency of fungal killing. Moreover, we determined that C. albicans influences macrophage polarization from a classically activated phenotype toward an alternatively activated phenotype, thereby reducing antimicrobial functions and mediating fungal survival. Therefore, C. albicans modulates l-arginine metabolism in macrophages during an infection, potentiating its own survival. PMID:28119468

  15. Evolutionary Aspects of Macrophages Polarization.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Rhoo, Kun Hyoe; Robert, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages constitute a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that are essential for maintaining homeostasis and as a first line of innate responders controlling and organizing host defenses against pathogens. Monocyte-macrophage lineage cells are among the most functionally diverse and plastic cells of the immune system. They undergo specific activation into functionally distinct phenotypes in response to immune signals and microbial products. In mammals, macrophage functional heterogeneity is defined by two activation states, M1 and M2, which represent two polar ends of a continuum exhibiting pro-inflammatory and tissue repair activities, respectively. While the ancient evolutionary origin of macrophages as phagocytic defenders is well established, the evolutionary roots of the specialized division of macrophages into subsets with polarized activation phenotypes is less well defined. Accordingly, this chapter focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the evolution of macrophage polarization and functional heterogeneity with a focus on ectothermic vertebrates.

  16. Upregulation of phagocytosis and candidicidal activity of macrophages exposed to the immunostimulant acemannan.

    PubMed

    Stuart, R W; Lefkowitz, D L; Lincoln, J A; Howard, K; Gelderman, M P; Lefkowitz, S S

    1997-02-01

    Previous studies by these investigators have shown that mannosylated bovine serum albumin (m-BSA) enhances the respiratory burst (RB), phagocytosis, and killing of Candida albicans by resident murine peritoneal macrophages (MO). Upregulation of the above MO functions was associated with binding of m-BSA to the MO-mannose receptor. The present study was done to determine if the immunostimulant, acemannan prepared from aloe vera, could stimulate MO in a similar manner. Resident peritoneal MO collected from C57BL/6 mice were exposed to acemannan for 10 min. The RB was measured using chemiluminescence and demonstrated approximately a two-fold increase above the media controls. In studies involving phagocytosis, MO were exposed to acemannan, washed and exposed to Candida at a ratio of 1:5. The percent phagocytosis and Candida killing were determined using fluorescence microscopy. There was a marked increase in phagocytosis in the treated cultures (45%) compared to controls (25%). Macrophages exposed to acemannan for 10 min resulted in ca 38% killing of Candida albicans compared with 0-5% killing in controls. If MO were incubated with acemannan for 60 min, 98% of the yeast were killed compared to 0-5% in the controls. The results of the present study indicate that short term exposure of MO to acemannan upregulates the RB, phagocytosis and candidicidal activity. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential use of this immunostimulant as an anti-fungal agent.

  17. Imaging and measuring the biophysical properties of Fc gamma receptors on single macrophages using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Nanoscale cellular ultra-structures of macrophages were observed. •The binding affinities of FcγRs were measured directly on macrophages. •The nanoscale distributions of FcγRs were mapped on macrophages. -- Abstract: Fc gamma receptors (FcγR), widely expressed on effector cells (e.g., NK cells, macrophages), play an important role in clinical cancer immunotherapy. The binding of FcγRs to the Fc portions of antibodies that are attached to the target cells can activate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) killing mechanism which leads to the lysis of target cells. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the cellular ultra-structures and measure the biophysical properties (affinity and distribution) of FcγRs on single macrophages in aqueous environments. AFM imaging was used to obtain the topographies of macrophages, revealing the nanoscale cellular fine structures. For molecular interaction recognition, antibody molecules were attached onto AFM tips via a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) crosslinker. With AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the binding affinities of FcγRs were quantitatively measured on single macrophages. Adhesion force mapping method was used to localize the FcγRs, revealing the nanoscale distribution of FcγRs on local areas of macrophages. The experimental results can improve our understanding of FcγRs on macrophages; the established approach will facilitate further research on physiological activities involved in antibody-based immunotherapy.

  18. Glycoconjugates as Mediators of Nitric Oxide Production upon Exposure to Bacterial Spores by Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Soderberg, Lee; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Phagocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in large quantities to combat bacteria. The spore-producing Gram-positive organisms of Bacillus cereus family are causative agents from mild to a life threatening infection in humans and domestic animals. Our group have shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) activate macrophages and enhance killing of Bacillus spores. In this investigation, we will explore the effect of different GCs structures on NO production. The objective of this study is to study effects of GCs 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 on NO release upon exposure to B. cereus and Bacillus anthracis spores by macrophages. Our results demonstrated that GCs activated macrophages and increased NO production using studied GCs ligands compared to macrophage only (p<0.001). GC2 and GC8 were able to further increase NO production in macrophages compared to the B. anthracis spores treated macrophages (p<0.001). Our finding suggests that GCs could be used as potential mediators of NO production in macrophages to fight B. anthracis and other pathogens.

  19. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Polarisation and Soluble Mediator Gene Expression during Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages function as sentinel cells, which constantly monitor the host environment for infection or injury. Macrophages have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of activated phenotypes, which can often be cate